Magnum Car Batteries Data Sheet
MM Series
Inverters
Owner’s Manual
Disclaimer of Liability
The use of this manual and the conditions or methods of installation,
operation, use, and maintenance of the MM Series Inverter are beyond
the control of Magnum Energy, Inc. Therefore, this company assumes
no responsibility and expressly disclaims any liability for loss, damage,
or expense whether direct, indirect, consequential, or incidental
that may arise out of or in anyway connected with such installation,
operation, use, or maintenance.
Due to continuous improvements and product updates, the images
shown in this manual may not exactly match the unit purchased.
Restrictions on Use
The MM Series Inverter shall not be used in connection with life
support systems, life saving or other medical equipment or devices.
Use of this particular equipment is at your own risk.
Record the unit’s model and serial number in case you need to provide this
information in the future. It is much easier to record this information now,
instead of trying to gather it after the unit has been installed.
Model:
Serial Number:
MM612
L1
MM1212
M1
Conventions Used in this Manual
Safety symbols
To reduce the risk of electrical shock, fire, or other safety hazard, the
following safety symbols have been placed throughout this manual to
indicate dangerous and important safety instructions.
WARNING: This symbol indicates that failure to take a
specified action could result in physical harm to the user.
CAUTION: This symbol indicates that failure to take a
specified action could result in damage to the equipment.
Info: This symbol indicates information that emphasizes or
supplements important points of the main text.
Terminology
AC source or External AC power - refers to Alternating Current (AC)
provided by the utility electric power grid or from a generator. In some
applications this is referred to as shore power.
AE application - typically refers to using the inverter in an system that
uses Alternative Energy (e.g., solar, wind, or hydro). This term is also
used to refer to inverters used in a home, office, or a cabin installation.
Mobile application - refers to inverters used in a Recreation Vehicle
(RV), boat, or a truck installation.
IMPORTANT PRODUCT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
This manual contains important safety instructions that must be followed during the installation and operation of this product. Read all
instructions and safety information contained in this manual before
installing or using this product.
• All electrical work must be performed in accordance with local, state,
and federal electrical codes.
• This product is designed for indoor/compartment installation. It must
not be exposed to rain, snow, moisture, or liquids of any type.
• Use insulated tools to reduce the chance of electrical shock or
accidental short circuits.
• Remove all jewelry such as rings, watches, bracelets, etc., when
installing or performing maintenance on the inverter.
• Always disconnect the batteries or energy source prior to installing
or performing maintenance on the inverter. Live power may be present at more than one point since an inverter utilizes both batteries
and AC. Turning off the inverter may not reduce this risk. As long as
AC power is connected, it will pass thru the inverter regardless of the
ON/OFF power switch setting.
• Always verify proper wiring prior to starting the inverter.
• Do not operate the inverter if it has been damaged.
• Do not dismantle the inverter; there are no user-serviceable parts
contained in this product. Attempting to service the unit yourself
could cause electrical shock. Internal capacitors remain charged after
all power is disconnected.
• No AC or DC disconnects are provided as an integral part of this
inverter. Both AC and DC disconnects must be provided as part of
the system installation.
• No overcurrent protection for the battery supply is provided as an
integral part of this inverter. Overcurrent protection of the battery
cables must be provided as part of the system installation.
• No overcurrent protection for the AC output wiring is provided as an
integral part of this inverter. Overcurrent protection of the AC output
wiring must be provided as part of the system installation.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
IMPORTANT
BATTERY SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
• Wear eye protection such as safety glasses when working with
batteries.
• Remove all jewelry such as rings, watches, bracelets, etc., when
installing or performing maintenance on the inverter.
• Never work alone. Always have someone near you when working
around batteries.
• Use proper lifting techniques when working with batteries.
• Never use old or untested batteries. Check each battery’s label for
age, type, and date code to ensure all batteries are identical.
• Batteries are sensitive to changes in temperature. Always install
batteries in a stable environment.
• Install batteries in a well ventilated area. Batteries can produce
explosive gasses. For compartment or enclosure installations, always
vent batteries to the outside.
• Provide at least one inch of air space between batteries to provide
optimum cooling.
• Never smoke when in the vicinity of batteries.
• To prevent a spark at the battery and reduce the chance of explosion, always connect the cables to the batteries first. Then connect
the cables to the inverter.
• Use insulated tools at all times.
• Always verify proper polarity and voltage before connecting the
batteries to the inverter.
• To reduce the chance of fire or explosion, do not short-circuit the
batteries.
• In the event of accidental exposure to battery acid, wash thoroughly
with soap and water. In the event of exposure to the eyes, flood
them for at least 15 minutes with running water and seek immediate
medical attention.
• Recycle old batteries.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
1.0 Introduction
1.0 Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of an MM Series inverter from Magnum Energy, Inc. This product is designed to be powerful, yet simple
to use, and provide you with years of trouble-free use.
Please read this chapter to familiarize yourself with the features and
benefits of your particular MM Series model.
Figure 1, MM Series Inverter
MM Series Models
MM612 - a 600 watt inverter with 7 amp AC transfer relay. The AC
input and output are provided with pigtail wires to allow hardwiring
to an AC distribution panel. Features neutral-to-ground switching for
mobile applications.
MM1212 - a 1200 watt inverter/charger with 12 amp AC transfer
relay and 70 amp, 4-stage PFC charger. The AC input and output
are provided with pigtail wires to allow hardwiring to a main AC
distribution panel and an inverter sub-panel. Features neutral-toground switching for mobile applications. Includes a 15’ battery
temperature sensor.
1.0 Introduction
How an Inverter/Charger Works
An inverter takes direct current (DC) from your batteries and turns it
into alternating current (AC), like you use at home. With MM Series
models that have the battery charger feature, it also takes alternating
current (when connected to a generator or to shore power) and transforms it into direct current to recharge your batteries.
There are three modes of operation associated with this inverter:
Inverter Mode: DC from the batteries is transformed into AC for
powering your boat or RV accessories.
Transfer Mode: AC is taken directly from shore power (or other AC
sources) and passes through the inverter directly to your RV or boat
accessories.
Charger Mode (not available on all models): The incoming AC from
shore power (or other AC sources) is converted to DC to recharge the
batteries connected to the inverter.
What Appliances will run from a Modified Sine Inverter
Today’s inverters come in two basic output waveforms: modified sine
(which is actually a modified square wave) and pure sine wave. Modified sine wave inverters approximate a pure sine waveform.
The output of a modified sine wave inverter will run most electronic
and household items including but not limited to TV, VCR, satellite dish
receiver, computers, and printers. Some devices such as rechargeable
power supplies for phones, drills, and other like devices may not run
or be damaged by modified sine wave inverters.
Appliances and Run Time
The MM Series inverter can power a wide range of household appliances
including small motors, clocks, and other electrical devices. As with any
appliance using batteries for power, there is a certain length of time that
it can run – this is called “run time”. Actual run time depends on several
variables including the size and the type of appliance, the type of batteries installed in your application, as well as the battery’s capacity and
age. Other factors such as the battery’s state of charge and temperature can also affect the length of time your appliances can run.
Appliances such as TVs, VCRs, stereos, computers, and lights can all
be successfully powered by your inverter. Depending on your inverter
capacity, larger electrical appliances such as coffee pots and hair dryers can be used for short durations. However, loads that are used for
longer periods such as stoves or water heaters can quickly drain your
batteries and are not recommended for inverter applications.
All electrical appliances are rated by the amount of power they consume. The rating is printed on the product’s nameplate label, usually
located on its chassis near the AC power cord. Even though it is difficult to calculate exactly how long an inverter will run a particular appliance, the best advice is trial and error. Your MM Series inverter has
a built-in safeguard that automatically protects your batteries from
being over-discharged.
1.0 Introduction
Standard Features and Benefits
The MM Series inverter converts 12 Volts Direct Current (VDC) power
from your battery to 120 Volts Alternating Current (VAC) power. On
models with the multi-stage battery charger feature, the incoming AC
power is optimized using Power Factor Correction (PFC) technology to
keep the inverter’s battery bank fully charged. This inverter is designed to allow easy installation and use and with its die-cast aluminum baseplate, which ensures maximum durability and cooler more
efficient operation.
The inverter is equipped with the following features:
• 600 or 1200 watts continuous (depending on model) at 25° Celsius.
• Numerous protection features to provide a safe and peace-of-mind
operation.
• AC transfer switch circuitry; allowing incoming AC power to continue
to pass-thru to power loads even if the inverter is off.
• Dead battery charging (battery charger models) for charging
batteries that are extremely low.
• Automatic 4-stage battery charger with power factor correction and
temperature compensation – for optimum battery charging (models
with battery charger and using the temperature sensor).
• Modern and aesthetically pleasing design with large AC wiring
compartment (provides easy access to AC wiring for simple and
quick connections) and 360° DC connection terminals with colorcoded insulating covers.
• True RMS output voltage regulation to ensure the inverter will deliver
the correct amount of power – within the DC input voltage range and
the continuous output power level.
• Quick connection accessory and remote ports – easily accepts
several optional remote controls and the Battery Temp. Sensor.
1
2
3
5
4
6
8
7
Figure 2, Top Side Features
1.0 Introduction
1. Inverter Status Indicator - this green light emitting diode (LED)
illuminates to provide information on the inverter’s operation.
2. Power switch - momentary push button switch that turns the
inverter On or Off.
3. Negative DC terminal (black) - the inverter’s connection to the
negative terminal on the 12 VDC battery bank.
4. Positive DC terminal (red) - the inverter’s connection to the
positive terminal on the 12 VDC battery bank.
5. Input circuit breaker - this circuit breaker protects the unit’s
internal wiring and pass-thru relay.
6. Output circuit breaker - this circuit breaker provides another
layer of overload protection. This is not a branch-circuit rated breaker.
Separate AC output breakers are required on the output.
7. Mounting flanges (x4) - used to secure the inverter to shelf/wall.
8. AC Wiring Compartment - provides access for all AC input and
output connections on the inverter.
Front Side
Back Side
9
10
11
13
14
12
Figure 3, Front and Back Side Features
9. Warning and information label - provides pertinent information
for safely using the inverter.
10. REMOTE port connection - a RJ11 connector that allows an
optional remote control to be connected.
11. ACCESSORY PORT connection - a RJ11 connector (only
available for models with the battery charger) to allow the Battery
Temperature Sensor (BTS) or MM accessories (e.g., MM-DCLD) to be
connected. The BTS provides information that enables the multi-stage
PFC battery charger to “fine tune” the battery charge voltages.
12. Intake vent - ventilation openings to pull in air to help keep the
inverter cool for peak performance.
13. Exhaust vent - ventilation openings that allow heated air to be
removed by the internal cooling fan.
14. Model/Serial Number label - includes model/serial number and
provides specifications and information on the inverter and charger.
See the Specifications on page 28 for more information and the different models available.
1.0 Introduction
15
16
17
Figure 4, Left Side Features
15. AC output connection - AC knockout (output) for hardwiring.
16. AC input connection - AC knockout (input) for hardwiring.
17. DC Ground terminal - this connection is used to tie the exposed
chassis of the inverter to the DC grounding system. This terminal accepts CU/AL conductors from #14 AWG to #6 AWG.
Battery Temperature Sensor (Battery Charger Models Only)
A plug-in external Battery Temperature Sensor (BTS) is provided
for units with the battery charger feature. When installed, the BTS
automatically adjusts the battery chargers BULK, ABSORB, and
FLOAT voltage set-points based on temperature for better charging
performance and longer battery life. If the temperature sensor is NOT
installed and the batteries are subjected to large temperature changes,
the battery life may be shortened.
~2"
~1"
FRONT VIEW
~¾”
Cable
SIDE VIEW
0.375" diameter
~½”
Figure 5, Battery Temperature Sensor
2.0 Installation
2.0 Installation
Pre-Installation
Before installing the inverter, read the entire Installation section. The
more thorough you plan in the beginning, the better your inverter
needs will be met.
WARNING: Installations should be performed by qualified
personnel, such as a licensed or certified electrician. It
is the installer’s responsibility to determine which safety
codes apply and to ensure that all applicable installation
requirements are followed. Applicable installation codes
vary depending on the specific location and application of
the installation.
Info: Review the “Important Product Safety Information”
on page ii and the “Important Battery Safety Instructions”
on page iii before any installation.
The basic system diagram shown in Figure 6 should be reviewed to
assist you in planning and designing your installation.
Unpacking and Inspection
Carefully remove the MM Series inverter from its shipping container
and inspect all contents. Verify the following items are included:
−
−
−
−
−
−
The MM Inverter
Red and black DC terminal covers
AC access cover with two screws
Two 1/2” hex-head kep nuts (installed on the DC terminals)
Battery Temperature Sensor (battery charger models only)
MM Series Owner’s Manual
If items appear to be missing or damaged, contact your authorized
Magnum Energy dealer or Magnum Energy.
If at all possible, keep your shipping box. It will help protect your inverter from damage if it ever needs to be returned for service.
Save your proof-of-purchase as a record of your ownership; it will also
be needed if the unit should require in-warranty service.
Record the unit’s model and serial number in the front of this manual
in case you need to provide this information in the future. It is much
easier to record this information now, instead of trying to gather it
after the unit has been installed.
2.0 Installation
MM Series Inverter
AC IN
DC
Ground
DC
disconnect
and
overcurrent
device
AC
OUT
AC
Main Panel
Battery
Bank
AC
Sub-Panel
TV
AC
Outlet
Tools
VCR
Figure 6, Basic Installation Diagram
AC Loads
2.0 Installation
Locating and Mounting the Inverter
WARNINGS:
• Do not mount the inverter near any flammable or combustible fluid or components.
• Provide adequate clearance/ventilation to the inverter.
• Mount only on a “non-combustible” surface.
• Maximum ambient temperature around the inverter must
not exceed 77° F (25° C) to meet power specifications.
The inverter should only be installed in a location that meets the
following requirements:
Clean and Dry - The inverter should not be installed in an area that
allows dust, fumes, insects, or rodents to enter or block the inverter’s
ventilation openings. This area also must be free from any risk of
condensation, water, or any other liquid that can enter or fall on the
inverter. The inverter uses stainless steel fasteners, plated copper
busbars, and a power-coated aluminum base. Also, the internal circuit
boards are conformal coated. The above measures are undertaken
to help fight the harmful effects of corrosive environments. However,
the life of the inverter is uncertain if used in any of these types of
environments, and inverter failure under these conditions is not
covered under warranty.
Cool - The inverter should be protected from direct exposure to the
sun or any equipment that produces extreme heat. The ambient air
temperature should be between 32° F (0° C) and 104° F (40° C);
realize that the inverter’s output specifications are rated at 77° F (25°
C), so the cooler the better within this range.
Ventilated - In order for the inverter to provide full output power and
avoid over-temperature fault conditions; do not cover or block the
inverters ventilation openings, or install this inverter in an area with
limited airflow. Allow as much clearance around the inverter’s intake
and exhaust ventilation openings as possible, see Items 12 and 13 in
Figure 3. At the minimum, allow an airspace clearance of 6” (15 cm) at
the front and back, and 3” (7.5 cm) everywhere else to provide adequate ventilation.
If installed in an enclosure, a fresh air intake opening must be provided directly to the front side (intake vent) and an exhaust opening
on the back side (exhaust vent) of the inverter. This will allow cool air
from the outside to flow into the inverter, and heated air to exit away
from the inverter and the enclosure. When mounted in an enclosed
compartment, airflow must be at least 59 cfm in order to maintain no
more than a 68° F (20° C) rise in compartment temperature. Minimum
clearances can be reduced if airflow is increased, but in no case should
clearance around the inverter be less than 2” (5 cm) on all sides.
Safe - Keep any flammable/combustible material (e.g., paper, cloth,
plastic, etc.) that may be ignited by heat, sparks, or flames at a
minimum distance of 2 feet (60 cm) away from the inverter.
2.0 Installation
Do not install this inverter in any area that contains extremely
flammable liquids like gasoline or propane, or in locations that require
ignition-protected devices.
Close to the battery bank - As with any inverter, it should be located
as close to the batteries as possible. Long DC wires tend to lose
efficiency and reduce the overall performance of an inverter. However,
the unit should not be installed in the same compartment as the
batteries or mounted where it will be exposed to gases produced by
the batteries. These gases are corrosive and will damage the inverter;
also, if these gases are not ventilated and if allowed to collect, they
could ignite and cause an explosion.
Accessible - Do not block access to the inverter’s remote control
and accessory ports. Also allow enough room to access the AC and
DC wiring connections, as they will need to be checked and tightened
periodically. See Figure 8 for the MM Series’ inverter dimensions.
Mounting Orientation - To meet regulatory requirements, the MM
Series inverter can only be mounted on a horizontal surface (shelf or
table) or a vertical surface (wall or bulkhead) either right-side up or
upside-down, as shown in Figure 7. The inverter must be mounted on a
“non-combustible” surface, and this surface and the mounting hardware
must be capable of supporting at least twice the weight of the inverter.
After determining your mounting position, use the base of the inverter’s
chassis as a template to mark your mounting screw locations. Remove
the inverter and drill pilot holes into the mounting surface.
If this unit is used in a mobile application, you may want to place
flexible washers or bushings between the mounting surface and the
inverter’s mounting flanges to reduce vibration.
After the inverter has been properly mounted, proceed to the DC Wiring section.
Shelf Mounted
(right-side up)
Wall Mounted (right-side up)
Wall Mounted (up-side down)
Shelf Mounted
(up-side down)
Figure 7, Approved Mounting Orientations
2.0 Installation
Mounting holes x 4
[¼” (0.25") diameter ]
~ 4 11/16 "
(4.66")
10.0"
~ 16 5/8"
(16.59")
~6
3/4
" (6.71")
~ 7 ½" (7.51")
~ 8 7/16 " (8.41")
Figure 8, MM Series Inverter Dimensions
Wiring Guidelines
• Before connecting any wires, determine all wire routes to and from
the inverter throughout the RV or vehicle/boat.
• Conductors passing through walls, bulkheads, or other structural
members must be protected to minimize insulation damage such as
chafing, which can be caused by vibration or constant rubbing.
• Always check for existing electrical, plumbing, or other areas of
potential damage prior to making cuts in structural surfaces, bulkheads, or walls.
• Make sure all wires have a smooth bend radius and do not become
kinked.
• Both AC and DC overcurrent protection must be provided as part
of the installation.
2.0 Installation
• Do not attempt to use a vehicle metal frame in place of the DC
negative connection or DC ground. The inverter requires a reliable
negative and ground return path directly to the battery.
• DC wires and cables should be tied together with wire ties or
electrical tape approximately every 6 inches. This helps improve the
surge capability and reduces the effects of inductance, which improves the inverter waveform and reduces the wear of the inverter’s
filter capacitors.
• Use only copper wires with a minimum temperature rating of 75° C.
• To ensure the maximum performance from the inverter, all
connections from the battery bank to the inverter should be minimized; the exceptions are the DC overcurrent disconnect in the
positive line and a shunt in the negative line. Any other additional
connection will contribute to additional voltage drops, and these
extra connections points may loosen during use.
• All wiring to the battery terminals should be checked periodically
(once a month) for proper tightness. The torque requirement for the
DC terminals is between 10 to 12 foot-pounds. If you don’t have a
torque wrench, ensure all DC terminals are tight and cannot move.
CAUTION: Be aware that overtightening and misthreading
the nuts on the DC terminals can cause the bolts to strip
and snap/break off.
DC Wiring
This section describes the inverter’s required DC wire sizes and the
recommended disconnect/overcurrent protection, and how to make
the DC connections to the inverter and the battery bank.
DC Wire Sizing and Overcurrent Protection
It is important to use the correct DC wire to achieve maximum efficiency from the system and reduce fire hazards associated with
overheating. See Table 1 to select the minimum DC wire size needed
based on your inverter model. If the distance from the inverter to the
battery bank is greater than 3 feet, use Table 2 to help determine
the minimum recommended cable sizes for longer distances. Always
keep your wire runs as short as practical to help prevent low voltage
shutdowns, and keep the DC breaker from nuisance tripping (or open
fuses) because of increased current draw. Undersized cables can also
lower the inverter’s peak output voltage as well as reduce its ability to
surge heavy loads.
2.0 Installation
Info: The DC wires must be color coded with colored tape
or heat shrink tubing; RED for positive (+), BLACK for
negative (-), and GREEN for DC ground.
The DC wires must have soldered and crimped lugs, crimped copper
compression lugs, or aluminum mechanical lugs. Soldered connections
alone are not acceptable for this application.
Table 1, Recommended DC Wire/Overcurrent Device
Inverter Model
MM612
MM1212
Full Load DC
Input Current
60 amps
125 amps
Maximum DC
Input Current
125 amps
175 amps
Minimum
Wire Size
# 4 AWG
# 1 AWG
Maximum DC
Overcurrent Device*
125 amps
200 amps
DC Ground
Wire Size
# 6 AWG
# 6 AWG
*Based on NEC, NFPA 70, Table 310-17, for 75° C single-insulated
cables in free air
If the inverter is expected to operate at a distance greater than three
feet from the battery bank, the DC wire will need to be increased to
overcome the increase in resistance – which affects the performance
of the inverter. Continue to use the overcurrent device and DC ground
wire previously determined from Table 1 and then, refer to Table 2 to
determine the minimum DC wire size you need for various distances
based on your inverter model.
Table 2, DC Wire Size For Increased Distance
Minimum recommended DC wire size (one way)
3 ft or less
3 to 5 ft
5 to 10 ft
10 to 15 ft
MM612
#4 AWG
#2 AWG
#1/0 AWG
#2/0 AWG
MM1212
# 1 AWG
#1/0 AWG
#2/0 AWG
not
recommended
2.0 Installation
DC Overcurrent Protection
For safety and to comply with electrical code regulations, you must
install a DC overcurrent protection device in the positive DC cable
line to protect your DC cables. This DC overcurrent device must be
DC rated and can be a fuse or circuit-breaker. It must be correctly
sized according to the size of DC cables being used, which means it
is required to open before the cable reaches its maximum current
carrying capability, thereby preventing a fire. See Table 1 to select
the DC overcurrent device needed based on the minimum wire size
according to your inverter model.
Electrical systems in mobile installations typically do not require
using a DC disconnect, although an overcurrent protection device is
still required. Because the DC disconnect is not required, a fuse is
usually used as the overcurrent device in these installations. These
installations also do not normally use conduit, so the fuse must be
installed in the ungrounded conductor (usually the positive DC cable
line) within 18 inches of the battery – to protect the DC wiring system.
If using a fuse, we recommend using a class-T type or equivalent. This
fuse type is rated for DC operation, can handle the high short-circuit
currents, and allows for momentary current surges from the inverter
without opening.
DC Grounding
The inverter/charger should always be connected to a permanent,
grounded wiring system. The idea is to connect the metallic chassis
of the various enclosures together to have them at the same voltage
potential, which reduces the possibility for electric shock. For the
majority of installations, the inverter chassis and the negative battery
conductor are connected to the system’s ground bond via a safetygrounding conductor (bare wire or green insulated wire) at only one
point in the system. Per the NEC, the size for the grounding conductor
is usually based on the size of the overcurrent device used in the DC
system. Refer to Table 1 to select the appropriate DC ground wire
based on the overcurrent device used for your inverter model.
If using this inverter in a vehicle, DO NOT connect the battery negative
(-) cable to the vehicle’s safety ground. Connect it only to the inverter’s negative battery terminal. If there are any non-factory installed
DC appliances on board the vehicle, DO NOT ground them at the safety
ground. Ground them only at the negative bus of the DC load center
(as applicable).
2.0 Installation
DC Cable Connections
When connecting the DC cable to the battery or inverter DC terminals,
the hardware should be installed in the correct order to prevent high
resistance connections which will heat up and could cause the connections to melt. Follow Figures 9 and 10 to stack the hardware correctly.
Tighten the terminal connections from 10 to 12 foot-pounds.
CAUTION: Do not put anything between the DC cable ring
lug and the battery terminal post or inverter’s DC terminal.
If antioxidant grease or spray is used, apply it after all the
connections have been made and are properly tightened.
CAUTION: Overtightening or misthreading nuts on the DC
terminals will cause the bolts to strip and snap/break-off.
Temperature sensor
(for charger models)
nut
DC cable
with ring lug
lock washer
BATTERY
battery terminal
flat washer
battery
post
bolt
Verify that the
DC cable lugs are flush
with the battery terminals.
Torque the battery terminals
from 10 to 12 foot-pounds.
Figure 9, DC Cable to Battery Terminals
CAUTION: The inverter is NOT reverse polarity protected
(negative and positive connected backwards). You must
verify the correct voltage polarity BEFORE connecting the
DC wires or damage may occur.
Crimped and sealed copper ring terminal lugs with a 5/16” hole should
be used to connect the DC wires to the inverter’s DC terminals.
DC cable
with ring lug
DC
terminal cover
(snaps on)
Inverter’s
DC terminal
½” Kep nut
(nut with star-washer)
Figure 10, DC Cable to Inverter’s DC Terminals
2.0 Installation
Battery Bank Wiring
WARNING: Lethal currents will be present if the positive
and negative cables attached to the battery bank touch
each other. During the installation and wiring process,
ensure the cable ends are insulated or covered to prevent
touching/shorting the cables.
Info: DO NOT connect the DC wires from the battery bank to
the inverter until: 1) all DC/AC wiring complete, 2) the correct DC and AC overcurrent protection have been installed,
and 3) the correct DC voltage and polarity have been verified.
Info: For optimum performance, a minimum battery bank
of 200 AHr is recommended.
Depending upon the type of batteries you use in the installation (6
or 12 VDC), the batteries must be wired in series, parallel, or seriesparallel to provide 12 VDC (see Appendix B - Battery Information, for
guidance on wiring batteries together). The interconnecting DC wires
must be sized and rated exactly the same as those that are used between the battery bank and the inverter.
Place the batteries as close as practical to the inverter, preferably in
an insulated and ventilated enclosure. Allow adequate space above the
batteries to access the terminals and vent caps (as applicable). Also,
allow at least 1” of space between the batteries to provide good air
flow. DO NOT mount the batteries directly under the inverter.
Info: To ensure the best performance from your inverter
system do not use old or untested batteries. Batteries
should be of the same size, type, rating, and age.
CAUTION: Install batteries in a well ventilated area. Batteries can produce explosive gasses. For compartment or
enclosure installations, always vent batteries to the outside.
Inverter to Battery Bank Wiring
WARNING: Ensure all sources of DC power (i.e., batteries, solar, wind, or hydro) and AC power (utility/shore
power or AC generator) are de-energized (i.e., breakers
opened, fuses removed) before proceeding.
CAUTION: The inverter is NOT reverse polarity protected.
If this happens, the inverter will be damaged and will not
be covered under warranty. Before connecting the DC
wires from the batteries to the inverter, verify the correct
battery voltage and polarity using a voltmeter. If the positive terminal of the battery is connected to the negative
terminal of the inverter and vice versa, severe damage will
result. If necessary, color code the cables with colored tape
or heat shrink tubing; RED for positive (+), and BLACK for
negative (-) to avoid polarity confusion.
2.0 Installation
Info: The DC overcurrent device (i.e., fuse or circuit breaker)
must be placed in the positive (RED) DC cable line between
the inverter’s positive DC terminal and the battery’s positive
terminal (RED); as close to the battery as possible.
DC Ground Wire
Route an appropriately sized DC grounding wire (GREEN or bare wire)
from the inverter’s DC Ground Terminal (see Figure 4, Item 17) to a
dedicated system ground. Recommended tightening torque is 45 in. lbs.
DC Negative Wire
Route an appropriately sized DC negative wire (BLACK) from the
negative terminal of the first battery string to the inverter’s negative
terminal (see Figure 16 for reference).
Battery Temperature Sensor (Battery charger models only)
Connect the RJ11 connector end of the BTS to the ACCESSORY PORT
(see Figure 3, Item 11) on the inverter. Connect the other end of the BTS
to the negative terminal of the first battery string (in same place as the
negative DC wire above); refer to Figure 9 for the correct hardware
placement.
DC Positive Wire
Mount the DC fuse block and disconnect (or circuit breaker assembly)
as near as practical to the batteries, and then remove the fuse (or
open the circuit breaker).
WARNING: DO NOT close the DC fuse/DC disconnect (or
close the DC circuit breaker) to enable battery power to
the inverter at this time. This will occur in the Functional
Test after the installation is complete.
Route and connect an appropriately sized DC positive wire (RED) from
the DC fuse block (or circuit breaker assembly) to the inverter’s positive
DC terminal.
Connect a short wire (same rating as the DC wires) to one end of the
fuse block and the other end of the short wire to the positive terminal of
the last battery string (see Figure 16). This is essential to ensure even
charging and discharging across the entire battery bank.
Ensure the DC wire connections (on the batteries, inverter, and fuse
lugs/DC circuit breaker) are flush on the surface of the DC terminals
and the hardware (lock washer and nut) used to hold these connections
are stacked correctly (see Figures 9 and 10).
Verify all DC connections are torqued from 10 to 12 foot-pounds.
Once the DC connections are completely wired and tested, coat the
terminals with an approved anti-oxidizing spray.
Press on the red and black terminal covers to the inverter’s DC connectors to secure them in place.
If batteries are in an enclosure, perform a final check of the hold down
brackets and all connections. Close and secure the battery enclosure.
2.0 Installation
AC Wiring
This section describes the required AC wire size and the overcurrent
protection needed. It also provides information on how to make the AC
connections.
Neutral to Safety Ground Bonding
Electrical safety standards for wiring mobile (RV, boat, or truck)
installations require the AC source (inverter, shore power, or a generator)
to have the neutral conductor tied to ground. These standards also
require that the AC neutral be connected to safety ground in only one
place at any time (often called a “bond”). If more than one bond is
established, currents can circulate between neutral and ground and cause
ground-loop currents. These “ground-loops” can trip GFCIs and cause an
electric shock hazard.
In mobile installations there may be multiple AC sources, which means
there is the potential of having multiple neutral to ground connections.
Therefore, you must ensure that the inverter does not also connect
neutral-to-ground while the other AC source is powering the inverter
loads. While inverting, the MM inverters use an internal relay that
automatically connects the AC neutral output terminal to the vehicle/
boat’s ground. However, when an external AC source is connected,
another neutral-to-ground connection is introduced in the system. When
the MM Series is connected to this external AC source, the internal relay
automatically opens the neutral-to-ground connection. This design keeps
two neutral-to-ground connections from occurring at the same time.
AC Wiring Connections
For all hardwired inverter models, the AC input and output wiring is performed in the AC wiring compartment. This compartment is located on
the top panel (see Figure 2, Item 8). If installed, remove the two Phillips
screws on the cover to access the AC wiring compartment and locate the
inverter’s AC wiring. There is a label located in the AC access compartment with information on which wires are used for the AC input and output. You can also refer to Table 3 to match the inverter’s AC wires to the
appropriate AC wire connection.
Table 3, Wire Color to AC Wire Connection
AC IN
AC OUT
AC Ground
Wire color (label)
Wire connection
Black (HOT IN)
Hot In
White (NEUT IN)
Neutral In
Red (HOT OUT)
Hot Out
White with black
stripe (NEUT OUT)
Neutral Out
Green (GROUND)
AC IN and AC OUT Ground
2.0 Installation
The AC wires inside the AC compartment are #16 AWG with a temperature rating of 105° C, all AC connections should be made using an
approved connector for your application (e.g., split bolt, twist-on wire
connectors, etc.). Ensure the wire connectors used are rated for the
size and number of wires you are connecting.
After connecting the wires together, gently pull on the wires to ensure
they are securely held together. In a proper connection, no bare wire
should be exposed.
Info: Per UL certification, non-metallic sheathed cable (i.e.,
Romex™) or a SO flexible cord with listed strain reliefs
are allowed to be used to connect to the inverter; conduit
connections are not allowed.
After all AC wiring in the inverter is complete — prior to reattaching
the AC access cover — review all wiring to ensure all connections are
correct and secure.
AC Wire Size and Overcurrent Protection
The AC input and output wiring must be sized per the NEC and local electrical safety code requirements to ensure the wire’s ability to
safely handle the inverter’s maximum load current. After determining
the proper AC wire sizes, the inverter’s AC input (unless you are using
a flexible cord) and output wires are required to be protected against
overcurrent and have a means to disconnect the AC circuits.
Overcurrent protection must be provided by fuses or circuit-breakers,
and must be properly sized and rated for the wire they are protecting
and the appliances being powered.
An external disconnect device is required for both the AC input and AC
output wiring. Most inverter’s that are “hardwired” use a service/distribution panel wired to the inverter’s input (main panel), and a dedicated panel between the inverter’s output wiring and the AC loads (subpanel). These systems use the circuit breakers provided in the panels
as the overcurrent protection and the AC disconnect. If fuses are used,
then separate AC disconnect switches will be needed.
Based on information from the NEC, Table 4 provides the minimum AC
wire size and the suggested breaker size based on the inverter model.
However, larger wire size may be required because of voltage drop.
The AC wire sizes provided in this table assume using only copper wire
and a temperature rating of 75° C or higher. A minimum of #14 AWG
is required for all AC wiring.
Table 4, Minimum Wire Size to Circuit-breaker Size
Inverter
Model
AC Input
AC Output
Input
Breaker
Minimum
Wire Size
Suggested
Breaker Size
Output
Breaker
Minimum
Wire Size
Suggested
Breaker Size
MM612
7 amps
#14 AWG
MM1212
20 amps
#12 AWG
10 amps
8 amps
#14 AWG
10 amps
20 amps
12 amps
#14 AWG
15 amps
2.0 Installation
AC Input Wiring
Your inverter has an AC transfer feature that passes the AC input
power to the inverter’s output. Connection to the AC input is made by
hardwiring from a distribution panel as described below:
1. Run an appropriately sized 2-conductor plus ground cable (from
the AC distribution panel) through a strain relief on the AC IN opening. Refer to Table 4 for minimum wire size and overcurrent protection
required for the AC input wiring.
2. Remove about two inches of the insulating jacket from the AC cable,
and then separate the three wires and strip about 3/4” of insulation
from each wire.
3. Using approved AC wire connectors, connect the incoming Hot In,
Neutral In, and Ground wires to the MM Series’ AC wires colored black
(HOT IN), white (NEU IN), and green (AC GROUND) respectively.
4. After making the AC input connections, secure the AC input cable
by tightening the strain relief.
The AC input wiring in the inverter is complete. Review all AC wiring to
ensure all connections are correct and secure.
Neutral
In (white)
AC
Ground
In/Out
(green)
Neutral Out
(white w/black
stripe)
Hot
In
Hot
Out
(red)
(black)
Strain
reliefs
AC IN
AC OUT
Figure 11, AC Wiring Connections
2.0 Installation
AC Output Wiring
CAUTION: The inverter’s AC output must never be connected to an AC power source. This will cause severe damage to the inverter and is not covered under warranty.
When hardwiring the output of the inverter, a cable must be routed
from the inverter’s output to an AC distribution panel (sub-panel) that
provides overcurrent protection to the loads powered by the inverter.
Connect the AC output to this distribution panel as described below:
1. Remove the 1/2” knockout on the AC Output Connection
(see Figure 4, Item 15) – use a utility knife to cut thru the round slot.
2. Discard this knockout and install a 1/2” strain relief in the AC OUT
opening. You may need to file the opening edge to fit properly.
3. Run a 2-conductor plus ground cable through the strain relief on the
AC OUT opening. Refer to Table 4 for minimum wire size and overcurrent protection required for the AC output wiring.
4. Remove about two inches of the insulating jacket from the AC cable,
and then separate the three wires and strip about 3/4” of insulation
from each wire.
5. Using approved AC wire connectors, connect the outgoing Hot Out,
Neutral Out, and AC Ground wires to the MM Series’ AC wires colored
red (HOT OUT), white with black stripe (NEU OUT), and green (AC
GROUND) respectively. Gently pull on the wires to ensure they are
securely held together, and check to see that no bare wire is exposed.
6. After making the AC output connections, secure the AC output cable
by tightening the strain relief.
7. Connect the outgoing AC wires to an AC load panel equipped with
overcurrent protection (e.g., circuit breakers).
The AC output wiring in the inverter should be complete. Before reattaching the AC access cover, review all AC wiring to ensure all connections are correct and secure.
Ground-Fault Circuit Interruption (GFCI) Breakers
If installing this inverter in the wiring system of a mobile application
(RV/marine/truck), a GFCI may be installed to protect some branch
circuits powered by this inverter. In compliance with UL standards,
Magnum Energy has tested the following GFCIs and find that they
function properly when connected to the inverter’s AC output.
Shock SentryTM #XGF15V-SP
Leviton Smart Lock #8899-A
Hubbel #GF520EMBKA
WARNING: Risk of electric shock. Use only the GFCIs
[receptacles or circuit breaker(s)] specified in this manual.
Other types may fail to operate properly when connected
to this inverter.
2.0 Installation
Functional Test
After all electrical connections to the inverter, batteries, AC source,
and loads (using a sub-panel) have been completed, follow these steps
to test the installation and the inverter’s operation.
1. Check the battery voltage and polarity before connecting the batteries to the inverter. Use a multimeter to verify 10 to 15 VDC at the
batteries’ positive and negative terminals.
2. Apply battery power to the inverter by switching the DC disconnect
On (or close the DC circuit-breaker). The inverter will remain OFF, but
the green status indicator on the front of the inverter will quickly blink
once to indicate that DC power has been connected and is ready to be
turned on.
3. Prior to turning on the inverter, make sure all connected loads (e.g.,
appliances) are switched OFF or disconnected from the AC outlets.
4. a. If a remote switch is connected, press the ON/OFF switch to turn
the inverter on.
b. If there is not a remote switch connected, lightly press and
release the inverter’s ON/OFF power switch — located on the top of
the inverter — to turn the inverter on.
Verify the inverter’s status indicator is blinking – indicating the inverter
is providing AC power.
5. Check the output voltage of the inverter by connecting a true RMS
multimeter to the outlets powered by the inverter. Verify the voltage is
120 VAC +/- 5 VAC. If not using a true RMS meter, the output AC voltage could indicate from 90 to 130 VAC.
6. Turn on or connect a load to the outlets and verify it comes on.
Continue to keep the load connected and turned on.
7. Press the remote ON/OFF switch to turn the inverter off. If the
remote is not used, press and release the inverter’s ON/OFF power
switch to turn the inverter off. The inverter’s status indicator and the
connected load should go off.
8. Apply AC power to the inverter’s AC input. After the AC input power
is qualified (approximately 15 seconds), the incoming AC power will
transfer through the inverter to the inverter’s AC output and power
the connected load. Verify the inverter’s status indicator and the connected load comes on.
9. Even though the connected load is on, the inverter is currently disabled/off. Press the remote’s ON/OFF switch (or press and release the
ON/OFF power switch on the inverter) to enable/turn-on the inverter.
10. Disconnect the incoming AC power to the inverter. Verify the connected load remains on, but now is powered by the inverter.
If the inverter passes all the steps, the inverter is ready for use.
If the it fails any of the steps, refer to the Troubleshooting section.
3.0 Operation
3.0 Operation
Operating Modes
The MM Series inverter has two normal modes of operation; Invert
Mode, which powers your loads using the batteries, and Transfer Mode,
which powers your loads from the incoming AC power (i.e., shore power or a generator). This inverter also has extensive protection circuitry
and will go into the Protection Mode under certain fault conditions.
Invert Mode
In Invert Mode, the inverter supplies AC power to your appliances
by inverting the DC power from the battery. The amount of time the
inverter can provide power is directly related to the capacity of the
battery (or battery bank).
Transfer Mode
The inverter will automatically go into Transfer Mode whenever an external AC source is connected and allowed to pass through to power
your AC loads. While in Transfer Mode, the AC input is continually
monitored to ensure it remains between 80 VAC (determined by the
‘Adj VAC dropout’ setting) and 140 VAC. The status LED indicator will
be on (Transfer Mode), or blink off every four seconds (battery charging) to indicate that the inverter is passing the input AC power to the
output and monitoring the AC input. Whenever AC power is disconnected or falls below the 80 VAC threshold, the inverter automatically
transfers back to the Invert Mode with minimum interruption to your
appliances – as long as the inverter is enabled (turned on).
Info: You must use the ME-RC remote to adjust the VAC
dropout setting – which in turn determines the VAC dropout
threshold.
Transfer time - When the AC power falls below the VAC dropout
threshold voltage (80 VAC, default setting), the relay transfers from
Transfer Mode to Invert Mode in about 16 milliseconds. While the MM
Series is not designed as a computer UPS system, this transfer time
is usually fast enough to hold them up. However, the VAC dropout
setting has an effect on the ability of the loads to transfer without
resetting. The lower this setting, the longer the effective transfer will
be and therefore, the higher the probability for the output loads to
reset. This occurs because the incoming AC voltage is allowed to fall
to a level that is so low, that when the transfer does occur (in addition to the relay transfer time), the voltage from the inverter’s output
has already fallen to a low enough level to reset the loads.
The disadvantage of a higher VAC dropout setting is that smaller generators (or large generators with an unstable output) may nuisance
transfer. This commonly happens when powering loads that are larger
than the generator can handle – causing the generator’s output to
constantly fall below the inverter’s VAC dropout threshold.
When switching from Invert Mode to Transfer Mode, the inverter waits
approximately 15 seconds to ensure the grid is stable (or the generator is up to speed) and then makes the transfer in approximately 8
milliseconds.
3.0 Operation
Protection Mode
The inverter is protected against five fault conditions, and in normal
usage it will be rare to see any. If there is a situation the inverter can’t
handle, then it will shut down and attempt to protect itself, the battery
bank, and your appliances. If there is a condition that causes one of
the following five faults to be enabled, refer to the Troubleshooting
section to diagnose and clear the fault.
• Low Battery - Whenever the battery voltage falls to a low level (10
VDC, default setting) for more than one minute, the inverter will
shut down to protect the batteries from being over-discharged.
• High Battery - In the event the battery voltage exceeds a high
voltage level (15.5 VDC), the inverter will automatically shut down
— along with all connected loads — to protect the loads from unregulated AC output voltage.
• Overload - While inverting, the AC and DC sides are monitoring the
current levels. In the event of a short-circuit or overload condition,
the inverter will shut down.
• Over-temperature - If internal power components begin to exceed
their safe operating temperature level, the inverter will shut down to
protect itself from damage.
• Internal Fault - The inverter continually monitors several internal
components and the processor communications. If a condition occurs that does not allow proper internal operation, the inverter will
shut down to protect itself and the connected loads.
Charge Mode (not available on all models)
Some MM Series models are equipped with a multi-stage battery
charger feature. This includes an automatic 4-stage charging process:
Bulk, Absorb, Float and Full Charge; and a manual charge stage:
Equalization (the ME-RC50 is required to enable Equalization charge).
The automatic 4-stage charge process provides complete recharging
and monitoring of the batteries without damage due to overcharging.
Bulk
Charging
Absorb
Charging
Bulk volts
DC
Voltage
Float
Charging
Full
Charge
Float
volts
Bulk and Float voltage settings are
determined by the ‘Battery Type’ selection
Increased
Voltage
Constant
Voltage
Reduced
Voltage
Monitored
Voltage
Time
DC
Current
‘Adj
Charge
Rate’
Setting
Constant
Current
Goes to Full
Charge after 4
hours in Float
Charge
Absorb Time
(d etermin ed b y
th e ‘Ad j Batt
Amp H rs’ settin g)
Reduced
Current
Monitored
Current
No Current
Figure 12, Automatic 4-Stage Charging Graph
3.0 Operation
When an AC source (shore power or generator) is connected to an
inverter that has a battery charger, the inverter will monitor the AC
input for acceptable voltage. Once the inverter has accepted the AC
input, the AC transfer relay will close and Charge Mode will begin. Once
in Charge Mode, the DC voltage will be monitored to determine how
to charge. If the DC voltage is ≤12.9 VDC, the charger will go to bulk
charging. If the DC voltage is >12.9 VDC, the charger will skip the initial
Bulk/Absorb Charging stages and go directly to float charging.
While charging, the unit may go into Charger Back-off protection
which automatically reduces the charge current to the batteries. This
is caused by: 1. The internal temperature is too hot – the charger
automatically reduces the charge rate to maintain temperature; or,
2. The AC input voltage falls below 85 VAC – the charger reduces the
charge current to zero to help stabilize the incoming AC voltage.
The Charge Mode provides up to four separate charging stages: Bulk
Charging, Absorb Charging, Float Charging and Full Charge.
Bulk Charging; This is the initial stage of charging. While bulk charging, the charger supplies the battery with constant current. The charger
will remain in bulk charge until 14.6 VDC* is achieved (determined by
the Battery Type selection**).
Absorb Charging; This is the second charging stage and begins after
the bulk voltage has been reached. Absorb charging provides the batteries with a constant voltage and reduces the DC charging current in
order to maintain the bulk voltage setting. The absorb charging time is
120 minutes (determined by the Battery AmpHrs selection**).
Float Charging; The third charging stage occurs at the end of the absorb charging time. While float charging (also known as a maintenance
charge), the batteries are kept fully charged and ready if needed by
the inverter. In this stage, the charge voltage is reduced to 13.4 VDC*
(determined by the Battery Type selection**) which can maintain the
batteries indefinitely.
Full Charge (Battery Saver™ mode); The fourth stage occurs after
four hours in the Float Charging stage. The Full Charge stage maintains
the batteries without overcharging, preventing excessive loss of water in
flooded batteries or drying out of GEL/AGM batteries. In this stage, the
charger is turned off and begins monitoring the battery voltage; if the
battery voltage drops to 12.9 VDC, the charger will automatically initiate another four hours in float charge.
* These voltage settings are based on the Battery Temperature Sensor
(BTS) being disconnected, or at a temperature of 77° F (25° C). If the BTS
is installed, these voltage settings will increase if the temperature around the
BTS is below 77° F (25° C), and decrease if the temperature around the BTS
is higher than 77° F (25° C).
** The MM Series uses changeable settings (see Table 5, Inverter Default Settings) that are adequate for most installations. However, if you determine that
some of your operating parameters need to be changed, the ME-RC50 remote
control can be purchased to allow changes to those settings.
3.0 Operation
Start-up
ON/OFF Switch - Turning the inverter ON and OFF is controlled by a
momentary switch on the front of the inverter (see Figure 2, Item 2).
When the inverter is connected to the batteries, or when its automatic
protection circuit has turned the inverter off, the ON/OFF switch will
need to be pressed to start the unit. Once the inverter has been
turned on, pressing the ON/OFF switch alternately turns the unit on
and off.
Info: The ON/OFF control switch is a small momentary
switch which functions by lightly pressing and releasing.
Status Indicator - The status indicator is a green LED that provides
information on the operational mode of the inverter. Watch the status
indicator (see Figure 2, Item 1) for at least 10 seconds to verify or
determine the operational condition from the information below.
Normal Operation
• Off - The inverter is off. There is no AC power from inverter,
shore, or generator at the inverter’s output terminals.
• On (solid) - The inverter is in Transfer Mode. The external AC
power (utility power or generator) connected to the inverter’s
input is passing to the inverter’s output to power the AC loads.
• Blinks on once every second - The inverter is on and using energy
from the battery. The inverter is either providing full power to the
loads connected to the inverter, or it’s in Search Mode and ready
to supply AC power to the loads connected to the inverter.
Protection Mode
There are five fault conditions that will cause the inverter to shut
down; Low Battery, High Battery, Over-temperature, AC Overload,
and Internal faults. If your inverter has shut down, monitor the status indicator and count the number of blinks that occur every four
seconds to determine the particular reason for the shutdown. Once
you have determined the reason for the shutdown, refer to the
Troubleshooting section to help diagnose/clear the fault condition.
• Blinks on 1 time every four seconds - Low Battery fault.
• Blinks on 2 times every four seconds - High Battery fault.
• Blinks on 3 times every four seconds - Over-temperature fault.
• Blinks on 4 times every four seconds - AC Overload fault.
• Blinks on 5 times every four seconds - Internal fault.
Charge Mode
Some units are equipped with the internal battery charger – with
this option the green LED status indicator provides additional information:
• Blinks off every four seconds - The unit is charging the batteries
connected to the inverter.
3.0 Operation
Factory Default Settings
Your MM Series inverter uses default settings that are adequate for
most installations. However, if you determine that some of your operating parameters need to be changed, the optional ME-RC50 remote
allows you to control the operation and to customize the programming
parameters of the inverter and/or charger.
Table 5, Inverter Default Settings
Function
Default Settings
Search Watts
NA (MM612),
5W (MM1212)
LowBatCutOut
Battery AmpHrs
10.0 VDC
400 AmpHrs
(Absorb Time = 120 minutes)
Flooded - Liquid Lead Acid
Battery Type
(Bulk = 14.6 VDC,
Float = 13.4 VDC)
Charge Rate
100%
VAC dropout
80VAC
To help you determine if you need the ME-RC50 remote*, information
on the settings that can be changed is provided below. The settings
once programmed are saved in non-volatile memory and will be preserved until changed – even if DC power to the inverter is lost (the
ME-RC50 must always be connected).
Search Watts: This setting allows you to enable the power-saving
Search Mode circuitry and to adjust the power level at which the
inverter will “wake up” and start inverting. This function is not
available on the MM612 model and is adjusted to 5W (“wakes up” and
inverts if loads exceed 5 watts) on the MM1212.
LBCO: This setting determines when the inverter will turn off based
on low battery voltage (inverter turns off automatically after battery
voltage has been below this setting for more than one minute). This
protects the batteries from over-discharge and the AC loads from
unregulated power (brown-outs).
Battery AmpHrs: This setting allows the user to input the battery
bank size in amp hours, which provides information to the charger on
how long to charge the batteries in the Absorb Charging stage.
Battery Type: Sets the type of batteries being used in the system
which provides information to the charger to determine what voltage
level to charge the batteries.
Charge Rate: This setting uses a percentage of the charger’s max.
output to determine the output charge rate. This setting can be used
to limit the amount of current that the charger can use (leaving more
current available to power loads); or, to ensure small battery banks
are not overheated because of a charge rate that is too high.
VAC Dropout: Sets the min. AC voltage that can be present on the
AC input before the unit transfers from Transfer Mode to Invert Mode.
This protects the AC loads from utility outages and brown-outs.
4.0 Troubleshooting
4.0 Troubleshooting
The MM Series inverter is a fairly simple device to troubleshoot. There
are only two active circuits (AC and DC) as well as a charging circuit
in some of the models. The following chart is designed to help you
quickly pinpoint the most common inverter and charger faults.
Table 6, Troubleshooting Guide
Symptom
Possible cause
Recommended Solution
Low Battery Voltage
(the status indicator
blinks on 1 time every
4 secs)
The battery voltage level has dropped
below the Low Battery Cut Out (LBCO)
set-point for more than one minute
(10.0VDC = LBCO default setting).
Battery voltage is too low. Check
fuses/circuit-breakers and cable
connections. Check battery voltage at the
inverter's terminals. Your batteries may
need to be charged, this fault condition will
automatically clear when the battery
voltage exceeds 12.5VDC.
High Battery Voltage
(the status indicator
blinks on 2 times every
4 secs)
The battery voltage is above 15.5 VDC.
The inverter automatically resets and
resumes operation when the battery
voltage drops below 15.5 VDC.
This condition usually occurs only when an
additional charging source (alternator,
solar panels or other external charging
sources) is used to charge the battery
bank. Reduce or turn off any other charger
to the inverter batteries to allow the
voltage level to drop.
Over-temperature
condition
(the status indicator
blinks on 3 times every
4 secs)
The internal temperature of the
Reduce the number of electrical loads that
inverter has risen above acceptable
you are operating, this will avoid a repeat
limits; caused by loads too great for
Overtemp shutdown if the cause was too
the inverter to operate continuously, or many loads for the ambient conditions.
by lack of ventilation to the inverter.
Check ventilation around the inverter,
When the unit has cooled, it will
ensure cool air is available to pass-thru the
automatically reset and resume
inverter.
operation.
AC Overload
(the status indicator
blinks on 4 times every
4 secs)
The inverter has turned off because the Reduce the AC loads connected to the
connected loads are larger than the
inverter or remove all AC output wiring and
inverters output capacity or the output restart the inverter.
wires are shorted.
This fault occurs when an internal fault To clear this fault, an inverter reset is
Internal fault
is detected.
required. Remove DC power to the inverter
(the status indicator
or press and hold down the power switch
blinks on 5 times every
4 secs)
on the inverter for 15 seconds (until the
green Status LED comes on). If this fault
does not clear, the unit will need to be
serviced.
Inverter's status light
is off.
Inverter is switched OFF or there is no Switch the inverter ON. Connect a battery
DC voltage (battery) connected to
with correct voltage to the inverter.
inverter.
AC input won't connect The incoming AC voltage will not be
Check the incoming AC voltage to the input
(AC IN on remote
accepted if it is below the VAC Dropout of the inverter, ensure it is present and
blinks)
setting (80VAC = VAC Dropout default above the VAC dropout level.
setting).
Appliances turn off and Loose AC output connections.
on; or there is low AC Loose / corroded battery cables.
output power.
Low batteries.
Tighten AC output connections.
Clean and tighten all cables.
Recharge or replace batteries.
Inverter AC output
Wrong type of voltmeter used (will
voltage is too low or
display 90 VAC to 130 VAC depending
too high when using an on the battery voltage).
AC voltmeter.
Most meters are made to read Average AC
voltage. The AC output of the MM is a
"modified" waveform which requires using
a “true” RMS voltmeter to correctly read
the output voltage.
While charging, the DC
charge voltage is
higher or lower than
expected.
This is normal.
If the Battery Temperature Sensor is
installed, it will increase or decrease
the DC voltage level depending on
temperature around the battery
sensor.
5.0 Specifications
5.0 Specifications
Table 7, MM Series Specifications
MODEL
MM612
MM1212
Inverter Specifications
Input DC voltage range
9 to 15.5 Vdc
Output voltage AC
120 VRMS +/- 5%
Output frequency
60 Hz +/- .004%
1msec peak surge current
27A
42A
100msec peak surge current
11A
23 A
5 sec surge power
1100W
2100W
10 sec surge power
1050W
1900W
30 sec surge power
1000W
1750W
5 min surge power
950W
1450W
30 min surge power
675W
1375W
600 VA
1200 VA
Continuous output power
Input DC current (at 12.6Vdc)
60A
125A
Inverter efficiency (maximum)
95%
Transfer time
16 msecs
AC transfer capability
7A
Search mode
3W
5W
10W
18W
No load (120 VAC output - typical)
Output AC waveform type
12A
Modified Sine Wave
Charger Specifications
NA
Standard
Continuous charger current (at 12.6Vdc)
NA
70 ADC
Charger efficiency (maximum)
NA
88%
Power factor (10% to 100% charge)
NA
> 0.95
Input current for rated charger output
NA
9 AAC
Temperature compensation
NA
Yes, with BTS
General Features and Capabilities
Protection circuitry
Corrosion protection
Output circuit breaker
Input circuit breaker
Internal cooling
Optional remotes available
UL listing
Low/High Battery, Over-temp & Overload
PCB’s conformal coated, powder coated chassis
7A switchable
12A switchable
8A
20A
Yes, 0 to 59 cfm variable speed
MM-R or ME-RC50
MM-RC or ME-RC50
ETL to UL/cUL458, CSA C22.2 #107.1-01
Environmental Specifications
Operating temperature
Non-operating temperature
Operating humidity
-20° C to +60° C (-4° F to 140° F)
-40° C to +70° C (-40° F to 158° F)
0 to 95% RH non-condensing
Physical Specifications
Dimensions (L x W x H)
Mounting
Weight
16.6”x 8.4”x 4.7” (42cm x 21cm x 12cm)
Shelf or wall (top or bottom up)
16 lbs. (7.3 kg)
Specifications @ 25° C - Subject to change without notice
22 lbs. (10 kg)
Appendix A - Remote Control and Monitoring
Appendix A - Remote Control and Monitoring
There are several remotes that let you monitor and switch the inverter
on/off from a convenient location. Using the supplied cable with RJ11
connectors, they connect easily to the REMOTE port located on the
front side of the MM Series (see Figure 3, Item 10).
Depending on your inverter model, you can select one of the following
remotes:
MM-R - Provides three LED indicators for inverter status and includes
a remote ON/OFF switch; comes with 25’ cable. This remote is for the
MM Series inverter without the battery charger feature – the MM612
model (requires serial number L1-201 or higher).
MM-RC - Provides six LED indicators for inverter and charger status,
includes a remote ON/OFF switch; comes with 25’ cable. This remote
is for the MM Series inverter with the battery charger feature – the
MM1212 model.
ME-RC50 - Full feature remote with backlit LCD display and LED indicators for inverter and charger status. Provides full menu access for
easy selection and adjustment; comes with 50’ cable. The ME-RC50 is
used for many inverter models and has additional features that are not
functional with the MM Series inverter. However, it can be used with all
MM Series inverter models (MM612 requires serial number L1-201 or
higher).
Using the MM-R and MM-RC Remotes
The MM remotes perform the same function as the ON/OFF switch
on the front of the MM Series inverter, and provides the status of the
different operational modes of the inverter. The appropriate remote
to use depends on whether your inverter includes the battery charger
feature. For MM Series inverters that do not have the battery charger,
the MM-R is the recommended remote; for MM Series inverters that
do have the battery charger, the MM-RC is the recommended remote.
MM-RC
MM-R
INV E RT
INV E RT
B ULK
A B S ORB
A C IN
A C IN
ON/ OFF
FA ULT
3 LED’S for
inverter operation
ON/OFF
FA ULT
FLOA T
3 additional LED’S
for charger operation
Figure 13, MM Remotes
Appendix A - Remote Control and Monitoring
ON/OFF Switch
The ON/OFF Switch is a momentary push-button switch that duplicates
the ON/OFF switch on the inverter. This switch also allows additional
changes to be made while in the Invert or Charge Mode.
When the inverter is first connected to the batteries, the inverter and
remote go through an internal 10 seconds start-up test. After this test
is completed, the ON/OFF switch can be pressed to turn on the inverter.
Once the inverter has been turned on, momentarily pressing the ON/OFF
switch alternately turns the inverter On/Standby and Off.
On models with the Search Mode function, the ON/OFF switch can be used
to enable or disable the Search Mode. While in the Invert Mode, pressing
and holding this switch for three seconds causes the Search Mode to
alternate between Disabled (inverter always on – indicated by the INVERT
LED indicator always on) and 5W (inverter is looking for at least a 5 watt
load to turn on and start inverting – indicated by the INVERT LED indicator
blinking once a second).
On models with the battery charger feature, this switch can also be
used to put the charger in standby (disables the charger) so that all the
incoming power can be used exclusively for the AC loads. To put the
charger in standby, press and hold the ON/OFF switch for three seconds
(you must be in the Charge Mode). When this happens, the charging
indicators (BULK, ABSORB and FLOAT) will go off. To activate the charger,
press and hold the ON/OFF switch for three seconds again. When the
charger is again activated, one of the charging indicators will come on to
show the current charge stage.
WARNING: When any external AC power is passing
through the inverter and present on the output, pressing
the ON/OFF switch will not remove this AC power on the
inverter’s output.
Monitoring the LED Indicators
MM-R and MM-RC Remotes
The three LED indicators on the left side of both the MM-R and MM-RC
remotes (see Figure 13) will show you the operating status of the MM
Series inverter. Monitor the indicators to determine the mode of operation:
INVERT (green) • On (solid)
- and the AC IN LED indicator is Off. The inverter is On. It is using
energy from the battery to supply AC power to the loads connected to
the inverter.
- and the AC IN LED indicator is On (solid). The inverter is in Standby.
The external AC power (utility/shore power or generator) connected
to the inverter’s input is passing through the inverter to power the AC
loads. The inverter will automatically turn on to power the AC loads if
the external AC power is lost or disconnected.
• Blinks On (once every second) - The inverter is in Search Mode. The AC
load is below 5 watts (Search Watts default setting).
Appendix A - Remote Control and Monitoring
• Off - The inverter is disabled. The inverter is not on or will not come on if
AC power is lost or disconnected.
AC IN (green) • On (solid) - the external AC power (utility/shore power or generator)
is connected to the inverter’s input, and passing through the inverter to
power the AC loads connected to the inverter’s output.
• Blinking On (once every second) - the external AC power is detected on
the inverter’s input, but not actively being used. Either: 1. The AC input
is being qualified (takes approximately 15 seconds); or, 2. The input AC
voltage is low. Ensure the incoming AC voltage is above 90 volts (VAC
dropout setting with the MM remote connected).
• Off - No external AC power is detected on the inverter’s input.
FAULT (red) - Under normal operating conditions, the FAULT indicator will
be off. If there is a fault condition, this indicator will blink differently
for each specific fault to help troubleshoot the inverter. Monitor this
indicator for at least 10 seconds, and count the number of blinks
that occur every four seconds to determine the particular reason for
the shutdown. Once you have determined and cleared the fault the
inverter can be turned on. To help clear the fault condition, refer to the
Troubleshooting section.
• Blinks On 1 time every 4 seconds - Low Battery Voltage; the battery
voltage level has dropped below 10.0 VDC (LBCO default setting**).
Your batteries need to be charged, this fault condition will automatically
clear when the battery voltage exceeds 12.5 VDC.
• Blinks On 2 times every 4 seconds - High Battery Voltage; the battery
voltage is above 15.5 VDC. Reduce or turn off the external charging
source to bring the battery voltage down.
• Blinks On 3 times every 4 seconds - Over-temperature condition; The
internal temperature of the inverter has risen above acceptable limits;
caused by loads too great for the inverter to operate continuously, or
by lack of ventilation to the inverter. When the unit has cooled, it will
automatically reset and resume operation.
• Blinks On 4 times every 4 seconds - AC Overload; the inverter has
turned off because the connected loads are larger than the inverter’s
output capacity, or there is a short on the output wiring. The inverter
can be restarted after the AC loads are reduced or the wiring short has
been removed. To restart the inverter, momentarily press the ON/OFF
button on the inverter or remote.
• Blinks On 5 times every 4 seconds - Internal Fault; the inverter has
turned off because it has detected an internal problem. To clear this
fault, the inverter will need to be reset by: 1. Press and hold the ON/
OFF switch on the inverter for 15 seconds (the status LED must begin
to rapidly flash); or, 2. Disconnect all DC power to the inverter for at
least 15 seconds, and then reconnect. After resetting the inverter,
momentarily press the inverter’s ON/OFF switch and verify the fault has
cleared. If the internal fault remains, the inverter requires service at an
authorized repair facility.
Appendix A - Remote Control and Monitoring
MM-RC Remote Only
The MM-RC provides three additional charging LED indicators. Monitor
these indicators for at least 10 seconds to determine the charger status.
BULK (yellow) • On (solid) - Bulk Charging; the charger is delivering maximum
current to the batteries. The charger will remain in bulk charge until
14.6 VDC* is achieved (determined by the Battery Type selection**).
• Blinks On (1 time every 4 seconds) - Charger Back-off; the charger
current is reduced. This occurs if: 1. The internal temperature is very
hot (the charger reduces the charge rate to maintain temperature);
or, 2. The AC input voltage has fallen below 85 VAC (the charger
reduces the charge rate to help stabilize the incoming AC voltage).
• Off - charger is not in Bulk Charge mode.
ABSORB (yellow) • On (solid) - Absorb Charging; the charger is in constant voltage stage
and begins after the bulk voltage has been reached. The DC charging
current will taper down in order to maintain the bulk voltage setting. The
absorb charging time is 120 minutes (per Battery AmpHrs selection**).
• Blinks On (1 time every 4 seconds) - Charger Back-off; the charger
current is reduced. This occurs if: 1. The internal temperature is very
hot (the charger reduces the charge rate to maintain temperature);
or, 2. The AC input voltage has fallen below 85 VAC (the charger
reduces the charge rate to help stabilize the incoming AC voltage).
• Off - charger is not in Absorption Charge mode.
FLOAT (green) • On (solid) - Float Charging; at the end of the absorb charging time,
the charger reduces the charge voltage to maintain the batteries at
13.4* VDC (determined by the Battery Type selection**).
• Blinks On (1 time every 4 seconds) - Charger Back-off; the charger
current is reduced. This occurs if: 1. The internal temperature is very
hot (the charger reduces the charge rate to maintain temperature);
or, 2. The AC input voltage has fallen below 85 VAC (the charger
reduces the charge rate to help stabilize the incoming AC voltage).
• Blinks On (2 times every 4 seconds) - Full Charge; this mode
monitors the battery voltage to determine when to continue
charging. After four hours in the Float Charge mode, the charger
turns off and goes to Full Charge mode. If the battery voltage drops
to 12.9 VDC, the charger will automatically initiate another float
charge.
• Off - charger is not in Float Charge mode.
* These voltage settings are based on the BTS being disconnected; if
connected, these voltage settings will increase or decrease depending
on temperature around the BTS – this ensures correct charging.
** These settings are preset in the inverter (see Table 5, Inverter Default Settings), but can be changed using the ME-RC50 remote.
Appendix B - Battery Information
Appendix B - Battery Information
Battery Bank Sizing
The size of the battery bank determines how long the inverter can power
the AC loads without recharging. The larger the battery bank, the longer
the run time. Size your battery bank to the system’s AC load requirements
and the length of time required to run the load from the batteries. In
general, the battery bank should not be discharged more than 50%.
Battery Types
Batteries are available in different sizes, amp-hour ratings, voltage,
and chemistries; they also come in liquid or gel, vented or nonvented, etc. They are also available for starting applications (such
as an automobile starting battery) and deep discharge applications.
Only the deep cycle types are recommended for inverter applications.
Choose the batteries best suited for the inverter installation and cost.
Use only the same battery type for all batteries in the bank. For best
performance, all batteries should be from the same lot and date. This
information is usually printed on a label located on the battery.
Battery Configuration
The battery bank must be wired to match the inverter’s DC input voltage specifications (12 VDC). In addition, the batteries can be wired to
provide additional run time. The various wiring configurations are:
Series Wiring
Wiring batteries in a series increases the total battery bank output
voltage. A series connection combines each battery in a string until the
voltage matches the inverter’s DC requirement. Even though there
are multiple batteries, the capacity remains the same. In the example
below (Figure 14), two 6 VDC/200 AHr batteries are combined into a
single string – resulting in a 12 VDC/200 AHr bank.
overcurrent protection
6 volts
(200 AHrs )
6 volts
(200 AHrs )
To
12 VDC
Inverter
12 volt battery bank (total capacity = 200 AHrs)
Figure 14, Series Battery Wiring
Appendix B - Battery Information
Parallel Wiring
Wiring the batteries in parallel increases the total run time the batteries can operate the AC loads. A parallel connection combines overall
battery capacity by the number of batteries in the string. Even though
there are multiple batteries, the voltage remains the same. In the example below (Figure 15), four 12 VDC/100 AHr batteries are combined
into a single 12 VDC/400 AHr battery bank.
12 volts
(100 AHrs )
overcurrent
protection
12 volts
(100 AHrs )
To
12 VDC
Inverter
12 volts
(100 AHrs )
12 volts
(100 AHrs )
12 volt battery bank (total capacity = 400 AHrs)
Figure 15, Parallel Battery Wiring
Series-Parallel Wiring
A series-parallel configuration increases both voltage (to match the
inverter’s DC requirements) and capacity (to increase run time for
operating the loads) using smaller, lower-voltage batteries. In the example below (Figure 16), four 6 VDC/200 AHr batteries are combined
into two strings resulting in a 12 VDC/400 AHr battery bank.
String 1
6 volts
(200 AHrs )
6 volts
(200 AHrs )
overcurrent
protection
String 2
6 volts
(200 AHrs )
6 volts
(200 AHrs )
To
12 VDC
Inverter
12 volt battery bank (total capacity = 400 AHrs)
Figure 16, Series-Parallel Battery Wiring
MAGNUM BATTERY
CAR BATTERIES
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