Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver

Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver
Open Processor with
Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver
Owner’s Manual
125-2154
Rev. 4, 2/98
Rev. 4, Feb. 1998
NOTICE
The information contained within this document is subject to change without notice and should not be
construed as a commitment by Landis & Staefa, Inc. Landis & Staefa, Inc. assumes no responsibility for
any errors that may appear in this document.
All software described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied only in
accordance with the terms of such license.
WARNING
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions manual, may cause interference to radio communications. It has been
tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC
rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference when operated
in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause
interference in which case users at their own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be
required to correct the interference.
SERVICE STATEMENT
Control devices are combined to make a system. Each control device is mechanical in nature and all
mechanical components must be regularly serviced to optimize their operation. All Landis & Staefa, Inc.
branch offices and authorized distributors offer Technical Support Programs that will ensure your
continuous, trouble-free system performance.
For Further Information Contact Your Nearest Landis & Staefa, Inc. Representative.
Copyright 1997, 1998 by Landis & Staefa, Inc.
TO THE READER
A Reader Comment form is located at the end of this manual. Please use this form for reporting errors or
discrepancies.
Printed in U.S.A.
2
Table of Contents
Introduction 1 .................................................................................................................................... 1-1
About this Manual ......................................................................................................................... 1-1
Prerequisites........................................................................................................................... 1-2
Compatibility ........................................................................................................................... 1-3
Principles of .................................................................................................................................. 1-3
Open Processor Operation ........................................................................................................... 1-3
Gathering and Processing Field Inputs .................................................................................. 1-3
Executing Control Programs .................................................................................................. 1-3
Processing Operator Commands........................................................................................... 1-4
Peer-to-Peer Networking........................................................................................................ 1-5
Single Open Processor Remote Sites.................................................................................... 1-5
Hardware 2 ......................................................................................................................................... 2-1
Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 2-1
Modular Building Controller/Remote Building Controller Enclosure.............................................. 2-2
Open Processor ..................................................................................................................... 2-3
Open Processor LEDs............................................................................................................ 2-4
Other Open Processors.......................................................................................................... 2-4
Power Module, Controller Module .......................................................................................... 2-5
Expansion Module Kit............................................................................................................. 2-5
Point Termination Modules..................................................................................................... 2-5
Operator Interfaces ....................................................................................................................... 2-5
Operator Terminals ................................................................................................................ 2-5
Video Display and Printers ..................................................................................................... 2-6
Modems ........................................................................................................................................ 2-6
Landis & Staefa Components ....................................................................................................... 2-7
Open Processor ..................................................................................................................... 2-7
MBC/RBC Enclosure .............................................................................................................. 2-8
Trunk Interface II for KE and KF2 Interface Modules............................................................. 2-8
Trunk/RS-422 Interface Converter Module ............................................................................ 2-9
Allen-Bradley Components ........................................................................................................... 2-9
Data Highway Plus ................................................................................................................. 2-9
Data Highway Plus Interface Module ..................................................................................... 2-9
PLC 5 Series PLC ................................................................................................................ 2-14
Software 3 .......................................................................................................................................... 3-1
Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 3-1
Open Processor Software............................................................................................................. 3-1
Allen-Bradley Driver................................................................................................................ 3-1
Operator Interface .................................................................................................................. 3-1
PPCL ...................................................................................................................................... 3-1
i
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner's Manual
Point Database 4................................................................................................................................ 4-1
Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 4-1
Logical Points................................................................................................................................ 4-1
Physical Points ....................................................................................................................... 4-2
Virtual Points .......................................................................................................................... 4-2
Allen-Bradley Point Definition Information..................................................................................... 4-2
Point Name............................................................................................................................. 4-2
Point Types............................................................................................................................. 4-3
Point Descriptor ...................................................................................................................... 4-4
Alarm Information ................................................................................................................... 4-5
Point Address ......................................................................................................................... 4-5
FLN and Device Numbers ...................................................................................................... 4-5
Allen-Bradley Addressing ....................................................................................................... 4-6
Totalize Information................................................................................................................ 4-6
Engineering Units ................................................................................................................... 4-6
Slope and Intercept Constants ............................................................................................... 4-6
Sensor Types ......................................................................................................................... 4-7
COV Limit ............................................................................................................................... 4-7
Initial Value ............................................................................................................................. 4-7
English, SI Units ..................................................................................................................... 4-7
Normally Closed ..................................................................................................................... 4-7
Invert Value ............................................................................................................................ 4-7
Point Termination Module Points .................................................................................................. 4-7
Required Points ............................................................................................................................ 4-8
Diagnostic Points.................................................................................................................... 4-8
Applications 5 .................................................................................................................................... 5-1
Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 5-1
Open Processor Applications........................................................................................................ 5-1
PLC-5 Memory Addressing Overview........................................................................................... 5-4
Understanding Allen-Bradley PLC Addressing ............................................................................. 5-5
Files ........................................................................................................................................ 5-5
Register .................................................................................................................................. 5-5
Register Addressing ............................................................................................................... 5-6
Data Types ............................................................................................................................. 5-6
Addressing Nomenclature ...................................................................................................... 5-7
Examples................................................................................................................................ 5-7
Point Database Guidelines ........................................................................................................... 5-7
Point Addresses ..................................................................................................................... 5-8
Metadrops ..................................................................................................................................... 5-8
Metadrop Example ............................................................................................................... 5-11
Design Considerations ......................................................................................................... 5-12
Configuring the Open Processor................................................................................................. 5-15
Point Characterization .......................................................................................................... 5-16
Mapping the Metadrop.......................................................................................................... 5-16
Troubleshooting 6 ......................................................................................................................... 6-1
Overview................................................................................................................................. 6-1
Basic service information ....................................................................................................... 6-1
Ordering replacement parts.................................................................................................... 6-2
Open Processor Troubleshooting........................................................................................... 6-2
Open Processor Operation..................................................................................................... 6-2
Trunk Interface ....................................................................................................................... 6-3
ii
Table of Contents
Point Operation....................................................................................................................... 6-4
Communications with Allen-Bradley System .......................................................................... 6-6
Battery Replacement Procedure ............................................................................................ 6-7
Required tools ........................................................................................................................ 6-7
Instructions ............................................................................................................................. 6-7
Glossary ................................................................................................................................Glossary-1
Index ............................................................................................................................................Index-1
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Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner's Manual
Notes
iv
Introduction
About this Manual
1
This manual is written for the owner and user of the Landis & Staefa Open
Processor with Allen-Bradley driver, referred to as Open Processor for the
remainder of this manual. It is designed to help you become familiar with the
Open Processor and its applications. It contains the following information:
Section 1, Introduction, describes each section in this manual and
presents an overview of Open Processor operation.
Section 2, Hardware, describes the hardware components of the Open
Processor, Allen-Bradley devices and their functions.
Section 3, Software, describes the software used with the Open
Processor.
Section 4, Point Database, defines the Open Processor’s point database.
Section 5, Applications, describes the applications available with the
Open Processor. Point maps for each supported Allen-Bradley device,
complete with slopes and intercepts, are included.
Section 6, Troubleshooting, describes basic corrective measures you can
take if you encounter a problem when using the Open Processor. This
section is not meant to be a full diagnostic guide, but is designed to help
you address basic troubleshooting issues. If you encounter a problem not
covered in this section or require further assistance, then consult your
local Landis & Staefa representative.
A Glossary describes the terms and acronyms used in this manual.
An Index is provided to assist you in finding information presented in this
manual.
1-1
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Figure 1-1. The Open Processor.
Prerequisites
In addition to reading this owner's manual, you should also become familiar
with the following Landis & Staefa technical documents. Each document has
been written to help you get the most out of your Open Processor.
Powers Process Control Language (PPCL) User's Manual, product
number 125-1896. This manual describes Powers Process Control
Language (PPCL), the language used to write the control programs for
the Open Processor.
System 600 Field Panel User's Manual, product number 125-1895. This
manual describes the operator interface program you use to
communicate with the Open Processor and other System 600 field
panels.
Field Panel User's Quick Reference Guide, product number 125-1897.
This guide is a pocket version of the System 600 Field Panel User's
Manual written for experienced users of the operator interface. It contains
a listing of the operator interface prompt strings and the keystrokes an
operator needs to access the functions.
These manuals, along with information about other Landis & Staefa products,
technical training classes, and services, can be obtained from your local
Landis & Staefa representative.
For more information about the Allen-Bradley system, contact your local
Allen-Bradley representative.
NOTE: This manual contains information specific to Open Processor
applications. For information regarding operation sequences for Allen-Bradley
devices, refer to the appropriate Allen-Bradley documentation.
1-2
Introduction
Compatibility
If you have other System 600 products in your facility, you will find that the
Open Processor is fully compatible with and will communicate with the
following products:
Insight for Personal Computers
Insight for Minicomputers
Stand-alone Control Unit (SCU), Revision 6.1 or greater*
Remote Control Unit Protocol 2 (RCU P2)*
FLN Controller*
* To view all the features of the Open Processor from this field panel's
operator interface, the field panel must have Revision 12 or greater firmware.
For more information about these or other System 600 products, contact your
local Landis & Staefa representative.
NOTE: FLN is the acronym for Four-Level Network which replaces the
previously-used LAN (Local Area Network).
Principles of
Open Processor
Operation
Through the Floor Level Network, the Open Processor establishes
communication with and gathers information about the Allen-Bradley
equipment it monitors and controls. Updated information received from the
Allen-Bradley network is stored into a standard System 600 point type. The
Open Processor also executes control programs, handles operator
commands and requests, and makes control management decisions.
Gathering and
Processing Field Inputs
The Open Processor samples the Allen-Bradley network inputs, or points, for
information and stores numerical representations of these values. Next, any
points which require additional handling are checked, such as making a log
entry in a point trend file or notifying an operator of an alarm condition. The
Open Processor then takes the required action; that is, it adds current
information to the history file or sends an alarm message to the proper
location.
Executing Control
Programs
The Open Processor continuously executes a user-defined set of instructions
called the control program. This program uses the most recent point values
and the most recent clock time. The control program performs the following
functions:
Evaluates control strategies
Uses an internal calendar and time clock for time-based functions
Updates point values and commands field points according to the
program results
Sends alarms, messages, or reports to proper terminal locations as
needed
1-3
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Processing Operator
Commands
An operator issues commands or requests to the Open Processor using an
operator terminal and the operator interface program that resides in the Open
Processor. The functions that an operator may perform depend upon the
operator’s assigned access level. The operator access levels and the
functions they support are listed in Table 1-1.
Table 1-1. Environmental Units.
Function
Level
0
Level
1
Level
2
Command points.
Enable and disable points.
Perform basic PPCL functions.
Display and list points.
Edit the point database.
Perform advanced point commands.
Create schedules.
Perform advanced PPCL functions.
Perform networking functions.
= function supported at this level.
Valid operator commands to change point values or to command field points
are handled similarly to field input or control program commands. For
example, if an operator issues an ON command to a fan starter, then the
Open Processor issues the ON command to the field point and updates the
value in its memory. In this case the operator overrides the control program.
The fan point would remain ON until the operator commands the fan OFF or
until the operator releases the point back to automatic control.
NOTE: Points which are contained in the Open Processor point maps may
be commanded at both the Allen-Bradley device controller and the Open
Processor.
1-4
Introduction
Peer-to-Peer
Networking
Up to 64 Open Processors and field panels can be connected and can
communicate by means of a Protocol 2 (P2) peer-to-peer network.
Information can be shared and accessed across the network from any Open
Processor or field panel by means of a communication link. This link is known
as the Building Level Network (BLN) trunk system. The BLN trunk system
can be a physical wire, dedicated telephone lines, or dial-up telephone lines.
The trunk system provides connections within buildings or between buildings
for multiple field panels and operator workstations.
NOTE: BLN is the acronym for Building-Level Network which replaces the
previously-used PMD (Powers Multi-Drop).
More than one operator can access the network at one time. For example, as
one operator accesses the system another operator can access the system
at another terminal or from a remote site by means of a modem. Alarms are
reported to the alarm printer even as an operator accesses information.
When an operator issues a command over the network, the Open Processor
or field panel at which the operator issued the command validates the
command, determines the command’s destination, and passes the command
to the destination over the network. This process is illustrated in Figure 1-2. A
command, issued by the operator at the Open Processor located in the lower
level of the building, is sent by means of the communication trunk to the
Open Processor located on the penthouse for the purpose of controlling the
main air handling unit of the building.
For more information about networking, contact your local Landis & Staefa
representative.
Single Open Processor
Remote Sites
The Open Processor can be a stand-alone unit. A single Open Processor is
generally used in remote sites where only the equipment for that site needs to
be controlled. Communications with the remote site is achieved using
modems.
The remote site Open Processor can initiate a telephone call to a device such
®
as a minicomputer or personal computer running Insight software, or a
dumb terminal. Once the remote site connects to the device, an alarm or
other user-defined event is issued. When the remote site no longer requires
the connection to the device, the remote site disconnects. The remote site
can also receive telephone calls from a device running Insight software to
allow for centralized access of a local network's database.
For more information about remote site Open Processors, contact your local
Landis & Staefa representative.
1-5
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Figure 1-2. Commanding Over a Network.
1-6
Hardware
Overview
2
The Open Processor allows the System 600 to communicate with the AllenBradley Programmable Logical Controller (PLC). Since the processes and
equipment involved differ greatly from that typically installed by Landis &
Staefa, learning about the equipment and terminology of the industry is
important. With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 integration, this is especially important,
since expensive processes or equipment are involved.
Read this entire article before installing the Open Processor and related
components. For information on additional Allen-Bradley training, contact
National Operations in Buffalo Grove.
NOTE: It is very important to work closely with the customer and the
Allen-Bradley technical representatives to determine the exact database
addressing and point types for mapping into the Open Processor.
The Open Processor is used as “master” only. This means that the Open
Processor has the ability to read and write data from and to a PLC-5, but the
PLC-5 cannot issue read or write commands to System 600 points.
Typical applications include a customer who has a number of PLCs or points
®
which he desires to monitor with Insight for alarming and trending purposes.
Manual commanding is also possible through Insight.
NOTE: Do not do looped control where the System 600 automatically
commands PLC-5 I/O points using Powers Process Control Language
(PPCL). PPCL should be used to pass values to holding registers only. It is
then the responsibility of the Allen-Bradley PLC representative to determine
how to use those values. Ideally, the Open Processor commanding feature is
used to change temperature set points or to request PLC-5 actions.
Some applications require the PLCs to receive S600 point values. For
example, a drug manufacturing process needs the temperature and humidity
for each cell (monitored by S600), and will shut down if these values get out
of spec. This is an acceptable application if it involves a small number of
points. Since the Open Processor acts as the master, this requires the Open
Processor to periodically (timing depends on customers specifications) write
(command) the PLC registers using PPCL routines.
Automatically commanding point values in PLC-5 controllers which require
sequential or time critical information is not recommended. Ideally, the Open
Processor commanding feature is used to set temperatures and set points or
to request PLC actions.
2-1
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Modular Building
Controller/Remote
Building
Controller
Enclosure
The Open Processor may reside in any Modular Building Controller (MBC) or
Remote Building Controller (RBC) enclosure with an open slot on the
communications bus (C-Bus). In addition, the Open Processor:
Supports Expansion Module Kits
Does not require a Power Module in the enclosure unless the Open
Processor controls Point Termination Modules (PTMs)
May reside in an enclosure that contains a Power Module and one or
more Controller Modules and/or other Open Processors. Other Open
Processors are those capable of supporting one of a variety of
communication drivers
Figure 2-1 shows an MBC/RBC enclosure with various modules and PTMs.
NOTE: An MBC enclosure is FCC-approved for a maximum of four
Controller and/or Open Processors.
NOTE: In the following sections, BLN is an acronym for Building-Level
Network which replaces the previously-used PMD (Powers Multi-Drop).
NOTE: In the following sections, FLN is an acronym for Floor-Level Network
which replaces the previously-used LAN (Local Area Network).
Figure 2-1. MBC/RBC Enclosure with Door Removed.
2-2
Hardware
Open Processor
The Open Processor looks and functions like a standard MBC Controller
Module. Therefore, if you are familiar with controller modules, no additional
training is required.
The Open Processor is a high performance, independent controller that is
customized to meet your exact building control needs. It controls mechanical
equipment and performs specialized applications using Direct Digital Control
(DDC). The Open Processor can communicate with System 600 field panels
and Insight workstations. It can be implemented as a central monitoring unit
or remote site controller.
Data about Allen-Bradley controllers for controlling, displaying, logging,
alarming, trending, etc., on the System 600 is made available by the Open
Processor, shown in Figure 2-2, Figure 2-3, and Figure 2-4. Points in the
Open Processor’s database hold information about Allen-Bradley controllers.
The Open Processor cannot communicate with any other FLN devices; for
example, Terminal Equipment Controllers. The Open Processor connects to
the Allen-Bradley system using only the FLN1 port. The Open Processor uses
the address space of FLN1, FLN2, and FLN3.
Figure 2-2. Open Processor (Front View).
Figure 2-3. Open Processor
(Left Side View).
Figure 2-4. Open Processor
(Right Side View).
2-3
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Open Processor LEDs
Eight LEDs are located on the front of the Open Processor, but only six are
active. Each LED is labeled according to its function. Refer to Table 2-1 and
Figure 2-5 for more information.
Table 2-1. Open Processor LEDs.
Color
Label
Description
Green
FLN TX
Open Processor is transmitting information over
the FLN 1 trunk.
Green
FLN1 RX
Open Processor is receiving information over the
FLN 1 trunk.
Green
BLN TX
Open Processor is transmitting information over
the BLN trunk.
Green
BLN RX
Open Processor is receiving information over the
BLN trunk.
Green
STATUS
Open Processor is powered up and operating
properly when this LED is flashing.
Red
BATT
LOW
The Open Processor backup battery is low.
Replace the battery.
Figure 2-5. LEDs For An Open Processor.
Other Open Processors
2-4
Other Open Processors are those capable of supporting one of a variety of
communication drivers. Other Open Processors also gather information
about other building systems that they monitor and sometimes control. The
information from the other building systems is then stored into standard
System 600 point types.
Hardware
For more information about other Open Processors and associated drivers
contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
Power Module,
Controller Module
The Open Processor does not require a Power Module or a Controller
Module when it is in an MBC/RBC enclosure. These two modules, however,
can share an MBC/RBC enclosure with Open Processors.
NOTE: If an Open Processor controls PTMs, then a Power Module is
required.
For more information about Power Modules and Controller Modules, refer to
the Landis & Staefa Modular Building Controller and Remote Building
Controller Owner’s Manual, product number 125-1992.
Expansion Module Kit
Expansion Module Kits contain communication devices that join the Module
Bus (M-Bus) of two sets of MBC/RBC enclosures when the first enclosure
reaches its maximum point capacity.
The Expansion Module Kit contains two different types of modules: the
Primary Module (PM) and the Expansion Module (EM). The Primary Module
is installed in the primary panel (an MBC/RBC with the Open Processor or
Controller Module). The primary panel is responsible for controlling PTMs
installed within that enclosure, as well as any enclosures with Expansion
Module Kits joined to the primary panel.
The Expansion Module is installed in the expansion panel (an MBC/RBC
without an Open Processor or Controller Module). The purpose of the
expansion panel is to provide the extra PTM slots for use by the primary
panel.
For more information about Expansion Module Kits, refer to the Landis &
Staefa Modular Building Controller and Remote Building Controller Owner’s
Manual.
Point Termination
Modules
Point Termination Modules (PTMs) are signal converters that have one, two,
or four points. PTMs are the interface between the field equipment and an
Open Processor or a Controller Module. Field equipment includes devices
that provide information to, or are controlled or monitored by an Open
Processor or a Controller Module. All field input and output points are either
digital points or analog points and include 4mA–20mA sensors, 0Vdc–10Vdc
outputs to control actuators, and pulsed accumulators.
For more information about PTMs, refer to the Landis & Staefa Modular
Building Controller and Remote Building Controller Owner’s Manual.
Operator
Interfaces
Operator interfaces are devices that allow you to communicate with the Open
Processor. These devices include operator terminals (PCs and laptops),
video display terminals, and printers.
Operator Terminals
Operator terminals allow you to communicate interactively with the Open
Processor. A keyboard is used for input, and a video screen or printer is used
2-5
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
to display (echo) your inputs and the system responses. Operator terminals
allow you to do the following:
Video Display and
Printers
Modems
directly control or request information about Open Processor points
check the operation of Allen-Bradley building controls
change or override control programs in the Open Processor
request and receive a variety of Allen-Bradley system and point status
reports
change the definition of points in the system
define the destinations of alarm messages and reports
control operator access to the system (set up operator access levels and
passwords)
create backup copies of user-defined control programs (using a PC or
laptop)
transmit messages between operator terminals
Video display terminals and printers are one-way devices that transmit
information from the Open Processor to the operator by means of a video
screen or on paper. These two devices allow you to do the following:
receive reports
receive alarms
receive alarm messages
Modems can transmit data from an Open Processor to an operator interface
over telephone lines. Therefore, remote communication between the Open
Processor and an operator interface is possible using two modems—one at
each end of the communication link. For example, an alarm printer can be set
up in a building manager's office to receive alarms from an Open Processor
that is in a remote location.
Modems may be used along with leased telephone lines to link remote Open
Processors in a networked system and to link remote Open Processors with
a centrally located mass storage device such as a personal computer running
®
®
Insight for Personal Computers or a minicomputer running Insight for
Minicomputers.
A modem approved by Landis & Staefa for your application can be installed
within the MBC/RBC enclosure. A cable connects the modem's RS-232 port
to the MMI/MODEM port on the Open Processor. Refer to Figure 2-6. If you
need more room for the modem, then you may remove the literature pocket
by lifting up on the center of the pocket until the ends slide out from
underneath the two tabs on both sides.
NOTE: The communication speed (baud rate) of the modem and the
MMI/MODEM port must match.
For more information about modems approved for use with your Open
Processor, contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
2-6
Hardware
Figure 2-6. Typical Modem Installation.
Landis & Staefa
Components
This section gives a brief overview of the Landis & Staefa System 600
components used in conjunction with Allen-Bradley components (described
later) to form the Open Processor system.
Open Processor
The Open Processor, gathers data from the Data Highway Plus system and
makes it available for controlling, displaying, logging, alarming, trending, etc.,
on the System 600. Points in the Open Processor’s database hold
information from the Data Highway Plus devices. This is very similar to how
an MBC module polls (unbundles) Terminal Equipment Controller (TEC)
devices for specific point values to be held in the local database for use in
MBC applications such as PPCL or trending.
The Open Processor uses standard MBC controller hardware, with two
significant modifications. Standard Controller Modules include software that
scans the FLN (Four-Level Network) trunks for data about Landis & Staefa
FLN devices and makes this data available to other System 600 components.
In the Open Processor, this software has been replaced by software that
communicates with the Allen-Bradley system for data and translates the data
into System 600 point information. In addition, the Open Processor connects
to the Allen-Bradley Interface Device using only the FLN 1 port. The Open
Processor uses the address space of FLN 2 and FLN 3, but devices such as
TECs cannot be connected to these ports because the ports are not enabled
for communications.
2-7
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
To size the database for the Allen-Bradley Open Processor, refer to the
System 600 Configuration and Sizing Guidelines Manual (125-1830), Field
Panels section, for help in determining memory availability. Table 2-2 lists
firmware revisions and their associated memory availability.
Table 2-2. Hardware Revision Memory Availability.
MBC/RBC Enclosure
Hardware Revision
Memory Available
3.2
275K
3.3
275K
3.4
275K
The Open Processor may reside in any MBC or RBC enclosure that has an
open slot on the Communications Bus (C-Bus). The Open Processor
supports Point Termination Modules (PTM), which require a Power Module
for proper PTM operation. The Open Processor may reside in an enclosure
that contains a Power Module and one or more Controller Modules and/or
other Open Processors. The Open Processor does not require a power
module if PTMs are not installed.
NOTE: MBC and RBC enclosures are FCC-approved for a maximum of four
Controller and/or Open Processors.
Trunk Interface II for KE
and KF2 Interface
Modules
The Trunk Interface II is used to convert RS-232 signals received from the
low-speed port of the Allen-Bradley 1785-KE and 1770 KF2 Interface
Modules into RS-485 signals for the Open Processor to use, and vice versa.
NOTE: The Trunk Interface II generally is not installed in the PLC-5
enclosure.
The following guidelines should be followed when locating the TI II:
The Trunk Interface II needs a 115VAC power source with a typical
115VAC electrical socket to power the external transformer.
If the Open Processor is less than 50 cable feet (15.24 m) from the KE
Interface Module (see the Allen-Bradley Components Section below),
place the Trunk Interface II in the MBC/RBC enclosure. This is the
recommended placement.
If the Open Processor is more than 50 cable feet (15.24 m) from the KE
Interface Module, place the Trunk Interface II in the Allen-Bradley
cabinet. The TI II requires a standard 120VAC socket as a power source.
Shielded cable is recommended.
NOTE: Use the MBC Installation Procedure, Revision 3 (P/N 538-663) as a
standard installation guide. It should be understood that in noisy
environments the RS-232 systems are susceptible to data corruption.
2-8
Hardware
Trunk/RS-422 Interface
Converter Module
The Trunk/RS-422 Interface Converter Module is a converter box that will
convert an RS-422 signal (KF2 mode) into an RS-485 signal for use with the
Open Processor. This module can have a cable run of 1000 feet on both the
RS-422 and RS-485 sides. It is a special component available via the
specials department in Buffalo Grove, IL.
NOTE: The Trunk/RS-422 Interface Converter Module (P/N 538-715) cannot
be ordered through the factory. It can only be ordered through the Landis &
Staefa Specials Department; do not try to order this product otherwise or the
part number will appear to be invalid.
Allen-Bradley
Components
The Open Processor allows the System 600 to communicate with the AllenBradley PLCs. Since the processes and equipment involved differ greatly
from the Landis & Staefa core HVAC business, learning about the equipment
and terminology of the industry is important for accurate point mapping,
communication, and control.
Data Highway Plus
The DH+ is the name of the network that the Allen-Bradley PLC-5s use for
communication. The DH+ operates at 57.6k baud. Since the speed of the
DH+ is much faster than the System 600 P2, the System 600 cannot be
placed directly onto the DH+. Therefore, an Interface Module is required
which becomes a node on the DH+. The Interface Module output is daisy
chained to DH+ devices using the standard 3-wire terminal block supplied
with the module.
Data Highway Plus
Interface Module
The DH+ Interface Module allows communication between the Open
Processor and the DH+ Devices (PLC-5s). It provides communications with
the Open Processor along with PLC-5 devices. The Open Processor
supports two different Allen-Bradley Interface Modules; the 1785-KE and the
1770 KF2.
NOTE: The Allen-Bradley Interface Module is not supplied with the Open
Processor and should be acquired locally by the customer or Field Office.
The Interface Module should be installed by a trained, qualified technician
certified by Allen-Bradley. Contact your Allen-Bradley representative for
details.
1785-KE Series B — This module mounts in an open slot in an existing PLC5 equipment rack. Power for this module is supplied through the PLC rack
backplane. Communications with the Open Processor are through the Trunk
Interface II Module. Due to the potentially noisy environments found in an
industrial installation, the RS-232 cable from the Trunk Interface II to the
1785-KE module should be kept as short as possible.
1770 KF2 Interface Module — This desktop unit is to be utilized when there
are no mounting provisions within the PLC-5 rack and cable lengths of 50 feet
or less between the TI II and the KF2 are obtainable. This unit requires a
standard 120VAC outlet and will require usage with a TI II or a Landis &
Staefa 422/485 converter (PN 538-715).
Wiring diagrams and dip switch settings for each of the 1785-KE and the
1770 KF2, along with associated TI II and Trunk/RS-422 Interface Converter
Module, are illustrated in the figures on the following pages.
2-9
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
GW0299R1
11
12
20
13
21
14
22
15
23
24
DB-15 MALE
CONNECTOR
TO KE
25
DB-25 MALE
CONNECTOR
TO TI-II
Figure 2-7. Connecting the Open Processor to the
Allen-Bradley 1785-KE System.
2-10
GW0298R1
Hardware
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
20
20
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
24
25
25
DB-25 FEMALE
CONNECTOR
TO KF2
DB-25 MALE
CONNECTOR
TO TI-II
Figure 2-8. Connecting the Open Processor to the
Allen-Bradley KF-2 System
with Trunk Interface II.
2-11
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
1
2
3
TX
+
4
5
6
7
8
TX
-
14
15
16
17
RX
+
18
GW0297R1
20
RX
-
25
DB-25 FEMALE
CONNECTOR
TO KF2
6-POSITION SCREW
CONNECTOR ON
CONVERTER
Figure 2-9. Connecting the Open Processor to the
Allen-Bradley KF-2 System
with RS-485 to RS-422 Converter.
2-12
Hardware
1
2
3
4
DB-15 FEMALE
CONNECTOR
TO 1770 KF2
5
6
BLUE (2)
7
SHIELD (SH)
8
CLEAR (1)
9
14
15
Figure 2-10. 1770 KF2 Wiring to Data Highway Plus.
KF2 DIP SWITCH SETTINGS WHEN USED WITH
485/422 CONVERTER
XX XXX XXX
SW
8
SW
1
SW 2, 3, 4
(xxx is octal address)
SW
5
SW
6
SW
7
KE DIP SWITCH SETTINGS WHEN USED WITH
TI-II TRUNK INTERFACE
XX XXX XXX
SW
1
SW 2
(xxx is octal address)
SW
3
SW
4
KF2 DIP SWITCH SETTINGS WHEN USED WITH
TI-II TRUNK INTERFACE
XX XXX XXX
SW
8
SW
1
SW 2, 3, 4
(xxx is octal address)
SW
5
SW
6
SW
7
Figure 2-11. Dip Switch Settings For KF-2 and KE Modules.
2-13
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
PLC 5 Series PLC
This describes an entire product family of programmable controllers
manufactured by Allen-Bradley. The model numbers will be shown as PLC5/XX, of which many will be compatible with the Open Processor. The Open
Processor uses logical ASCII/binary addressing. Verify support of this
protocol if you are working with existing PLCs. The ASCII/binary addressing
commands used are illustrated in Table 2-3 below.
Table 2-3. Command Set Table.
Command Sets
Command
Function
AB (Word) Range Read
15
01
AB (Word) Range Write
15
00
AB Read_Modify_Write
15
38
AB SLC Read
15
A2 (162 decimal)
AB SLC Write
15
AA, AB (170, 171 decimal)
NOTE: the Allen-Bradley series 2 and 3 PLCs are not supported by the Open
Processor.
In order to make the Open Processor addressing sections more meaningful,
an overview of PLC data organization and System 600 differences follows:
In the PLC5 world, there are three basic data types:
Integer
IEEE floating point
Bit-packed binary
There are also various internal control and timer structures which are
combinations of the given types, but direct access to these structures is not
supported by the Open Processor.
PLC memory space can be viewed as an array of generic 16 bit words (called
registers), which the programmer can use to create data files (blocks) of
various types and sizes. For instance, if a programmer needed a block of ten
floating point variables for a control algorithm, and the last allocated file was
30, the programmer could create a floating point file number 31, data size 10.
From then on, registers in this data block could be addressed as F31:0
through F31:9. Similarly, registers within an integer data block could be
addressed as N32:0 through N32:9.
Bit packed binary data are handled somewhat differently. Integer elements
can be used to store binary information by appending a bit address on the
integer file address. For example, when using ladder logic, N32:0/0 accesses
the first bit of integer 32:0. Discrete I/O is also handled as bit-packed binary,
with input file type I and output file type O. Finally, there is a bit file type B
which is bit addressable, so B4:000 accesses the first 16 bits of binary file 4.
Additionally, B4:001 access the second set of 16 bits in binary file 4. Any of
2-14
Hardware
these bitwise data elements can be moved from file to file and type to type
with simple ladder logic statements.
When integrating with single or multiple PLC-5s, you should expect to be
given a list showing the PLC node number, starting address, range, and
register type for each group of holding registers to be read by the Open
Processor.
For example, the customer has three PLCs, each with ten analog inputs he
wishes to have displayed on Insight graphics, trended, etc. He would map the
ten analog inputs into a floating point data block consisting of ten registers
(e.g. addressed as FXX:0 through FXX:9) within each PLC or he could map
all 30 inputs into a single data block within a single PLC. These are what we
referred to earlier as holding registers.
The Open Processor will then map these data blocks into FLN devices as
described in the Point Database section. System 600 points are then
characterized (defined) for the appropriate addresses within these FLN
devices similar to unbundling TEC points. Once the point is defined within the
MBC Open Processor Module, you are free to use it any way you would use
any other MBC point.
Many applications will require some but not all of the points within a data
block to be read by the Open Processor. The Open Processor will be
configured to read the entire block of data, but only those points desired to be
mapped into the Open Processor database need to be defined (unbundled).
When calculating the total number of points in the Open Processor only the
number of defined points (including virtual and diagnostic) is counted, not the
total number of registers in all data blocks.
2-15
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Notes
2-16
Software
3
Overview
This section describes the software that is available with the Open Processor.
Open Processor
Software
The Landis & Staefa Allen-Bradley driver comes installed in the Open
Processor, and runs automatically when the Open Processor is powered up.
When properly configured, the Open Processor establishes communications
with the remainder of the System 600 and the Allen-Bradley networks, and
begins relaying data.
The Open Processor contains the following software:
An Allen-Bradley driver
An operator interface
The Powers Process Control Language (PPCL)
Allen-Bradley Driver
The Allen-Bradley driver directs the Allen-Bradley system to perform work.
Operator Interface
An operator issues commands or requests to the Open Processor using an
operator terminal and the operator interface. The operator interface is the
software that allows the operator to communicate interactively with the Open
Processor.
The operator interface is described in detail in the Landis & Staefa System
600 Field Panel User's Manual, product number 125-1896. This manual is
designed to help you become familiar with and be able to use the operator
interface. It describes the functions necessary for everyday operation of your
system, plus the higher level functions for commanding, displaying, editing,
scheduling, networking, alarm management, and others.
For experienced users of the operator interface, the Landis & Staefa Field
Panel User's Manual Quick Reference Guide, product number 125-1897,
contains a listing of the operator interface prompt strings and the keystrokes
necessary to access the functions.
PPCL
The programming language used with the Open Processor is called Powers
Process Control Language (PPCL), product number 125-1896. PPCL is a
powerful programming language developed specifically for controlling
Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) equipment.
3-1
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
The control configuration and control requirements of your system are
customized into each application by using PPCL. The applications that you
can incorporate into the operation of your system include the following:
Alarm Management
Auto-Dial/Dial-Up
Daylight Savings Time
Duty Cycling
Enthalpy and Dry Bulb Economizer Control
Field Panel/Equipment Controller Coordinator
Loop Tuning (available as an option)
Peak Demand Limiting (PDL)
Start/Stop Time Optimization (SSTO)
Time-Of-Day (TOD) Scheduling
Trend Data Collection
The Powers Process Control Language (PPCL) User's Manual contains
information on designing, coding, and implementing PPCL programs. It lists
and defines all PPCL control commands, control applications, syntax and
functionality.
3-2
Point Database
Overview
4
This section presents a description of the Open Processor point database
including point definition information, dynamic point information, point
database structure, point addresses and slopes and intercepts.
Most tasks which the Open Processor performs involve either collecting data
from Allen-Bradley devices or commanding them. Other tasks require
communication and calculations within the control programs using stored
information. Operators also need a practical method of commanding and
examining points. With the Open Processor, operators use the commands
and menu-driven prompts of the operator interface. The information that the
Open Processor needs on all points from Allen-Bradley devices is called the
point database.
The point database is created by supplying the Open Processor with logical
points and information about the Allen-Bradley points. There are two basic
classifications of point information that make up the point database:
Information used to define Allen-Bradley points and information that is
updated or set during operation of the Allen-Bradley system.
The following paragraphs describe each of these classifications. For
information on how to add points to or modify the point database, refer to the
Landis & Staefa Field Panel User's Manual, product number 125-1895.
In order to monitor and/or control Allen-Bradley devices, points must be
added to the Open Processor database. For details about characterizing
these points for the Open Processor’s point database, refer to the point
addressing information below. Information for specific devices is listed in
Section 5, Applications.
Logical Points
Logical points are used by the operator and the control programs to reference
physical or virtual points for commanding or monitoring Allen-Bradley devices
and Landis & Staefa devices connected to Point Termination Modules
(PTMs). Logical points handle alarming, totalization, conversion of field inputs
and outputs to engineering units, and so on.
4-1
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Physical Points
Physical points are determined by the hardware that is connected to the
Open Processor. They each have a unique eight-character point address that
precisely defines the location of the hardware termination in the system by its
network, field panel number, field device, and point termination number.
Refer to Table 4-2 for more information. The four types of physical points are
as follows:
Analog Input (AI) points which receive/monitor variable input signals
Analog Output (AO) points which generate variable output signals
Digital Input (DI) points which receive/monitor two-state (ON/OFF) input
signals. Pulse counting points are digital inputs which count pulses from
an input signal.
Digital Output (DO) points which generate two-state (ON/OFF) output
signals
Virtual Points
Virtual points are memory-resident points that do not have any physical
terminations. Their point addresses specify "imaginary" terminations. Virtual
points can be defined as digital or analog, and are used by operators or the
control programs to hold or store information such as setpoints. Users assign
unique English names to virtual points.
Allen-Bradley
Point Definition
Information
The information used to define a point in the point database is called point
definition information. This information describes the characteristics of a point
and changes only if you edit the database. The following information
describes the various types of information you may be required to supply
about a point when you define it in the point database.
For information on how to enter point definition information into the point
database, refer to the Landis & Staefa Field Panel User's Manual.
Point Name
The point name is used by the System 600 and the operator to display and to
command all logical point types. Naming conventions allow you to use one to
six alphanumeric characters (A–Z and 0–9) to reference a logical AllenBradley point. The name may not contain spaces between the characters. It
may not duplicate any name in the list of reserved logical point names (which
are names used for special purposes in Landis & Staefa control programs).
The list of reserved logical point names appears in the Powers Process
Control Language (PPCL) User's Manual, product number 125-1896.
Each logical point must have a unique name within the Open Processor and
across the System 600 network. That is, two logical points on the same
network may not have the same name, even if they reside in different field
panels.
4-2
Point Database
Examples of both correct and incorrect logical point names are as follows:
Correct
Incorrect
FAN01
FAN 01
(Spaces are not allowed between characters.)
FLOPCT
FLOW%
(% is not an alphanumeric character.)
SMKALM
SMOKE
(SMOKE is a reserved logical point name.)
NOTE: It is not necessary for the Allen-Bradley system and System 600 to
refer to a single point by the same name. However, for ease of use and
maintenance, and if the Allen-Bradley system supports the System 600
naming convention, Landis & Staefa recommends that you do so.
Point Types
Normally, the Open Processor supports only five types of logical points for
Allen-Bradley devices. If, however, the Open Processor is controlling Point
Termination Modules (PTMs) or there are other Controller Modules in the
enclosure, then numerous other point types are supported. Refer to the
Landis & Staefa Modular Building Controller and Remote Building Controller
Owner’s Manual, product number 125-1992.
Each point type requires you to supply a specific set of information about it in
the point database. Table 4-1 provides a summary of the information required
for each point type. Using other points may result in unreliable point data.
Logical Analog Input (LAI). An LAI point provides one analog input point.
You can use this point type to process input signals from sensors such as
temperature sensors, flow sensors, pressure sensors, and so on.
Logical Analog Output (LAO). An LAO point provides one commandable
analog output point. You can use this point type to process output signals to
devices such as valve actuators, damper motors, and so on.
Open Processor LAOs are unique because they also have the same
characteristics as LAIs. With one LAO, you can command and monitor a
point, and the point can be used to prove status. You do not have to unbundle
two points to perform the same function.
Logical Digital Input (LDI). An LDI point type monitors one latched digital
input. You can use this point to monitor the status of smoke detectors, low
temperature detectors, flow switches, damper end switches, limit switches,
and so on.
Logical Digital Output (LDO). An LDO point provides one commandable
latched or pulsed digital output for two-state (ON/OFF) control. You can use
this point type to provide output signals to switches for occupancy indication,
and so on. LDO points can also be used to store ON/OFF values.
Open Processor LDOs are unique because they also have the same
characteristics as LDIs. With one LDO, you can command and monitor a
point, and the point can be used to prove status. You do not have to unbundle
two points to perform the same function.
4-3
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Logical Controller (LCTLR). An LCTLR point type allows you to monitor
bundled points such as Allen-Bradley controllers.
Table 4-1. Summary of Point Information Categories by Point Type.
Category
LAI
LAO
LDI
LDO
LCTLR
Point name
Point type
Descriptor
Alarm information
Totalize
--
Engineering units
--
--
--
Point address
Slope
--
--
--
Intercept
--
--
--
Sensor type
--
--
--
--
COV limit
--
--
--
Initial value
--
--
--
--
Normally closed
--
--
--
--
Invert value
--
--
--
--
= required
Point Descriptor
4-4
-- = not required
The point descriptor for a logical point is a string of 0–12 alphanumeric
characters or blank spaces. Point descriptors help you to identify points when
they are displayed at an operator's terminal or in reports. Point descriptors
are not used by the system or the operator to request displays or to
command points. Therefore, point descriptors need not be unique and may
even be left blank. Examples of point descriptors are as follows:
Point Name
Point Descriptor
FAN01
SUPPLY FAN 1
FLOPCT
FLOW PERCENT
Point Database
Alarm Information
The alarm option of a point applies to all logical point types. You can specify
whether or not you want the point to be alarmable. When you specify that a
point is alarmable, then the system may request additional information such
as the values of the high alarm limit and the low alarm limit to define the
conditions under which the point is placed into or taken out of alarm. These
conditions vary with point type and the individual point requirements. The
Open Processor also allows you to define alarm messages, determine
printing locations, and design specific alarm applications. A summary of point
information appears in Table 4-1. For more information about alarms, refer to
the Landis & Staefa Field Panel User's Manual.
Point Address
The point address applies to all logical point types. The point address is a
unique eight-digit number that defines the exact location of the point. As a
rule, no two point addresses are the same.
The Open Processor uses the Landis & Staefa addressing scheme of
TCCLDDPP, with the parts as follows:
NOTE: FLN, which appears in following sections, is an acronym for FourLevel Network and replaces the previously-used LAN (Local Area Network)
terminology.
Table 4-2. Landis & Staefa Open Processor Point Addressing Scheme.
Abbr.
Meaning
Range
Description
T
Trunk
0–7
Individual BLN network number is always zero unless the point
is on a minicomputer.
CC
Cabinet
00–99
The cabinet number assigned to the Open Processor (unique
P2 node address).
NOTE: It is possible to have more than one node in an
enclosure.
L
FLN*
0–3
DD
Device
00–31
and
0A–0Z
PP
Point
00–99
0 —virtual points and/or point modules
1,2—PLC-5 data blocks (devices)
3 — all but devices 30 and 31 used for PLC-5 data blocks
(devices)
00–31 PLC-5 devices (FLN 1 and FLN 2)
01–29 PLC-5 devices (FLN 3)
30 Metadrop (FLN 3)
31 Diagnostic device (FLN 3)
0A–0Z — virtual point devices
These are the individual points defined (characterized) as
needed within each PLC-5 data block (device).
NOTE: Although the Term “LAN” has been changed to “FLN, the “L” in the
naming convention remains the same.
For information on addressing PTM points, refer to the Landis & Staefa Field
Panel User's Manual.
FLN and Device
Numbers
Allen-Bradley hardware is connected to a controller which uses one device in
the Open Processor’s address space.
4-5
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Physically, all information about the Allen-Bradley system is transmitted
through the Open Processor’s FLN 1 port, but the address spaces of FLN 2
and FLN 3 hold information that is sent and received through the FLN 1 port.
It is suggested, as an addressing method, that for controllers with addresses
01–31, you use FLN 1 and make the device number equal to the controller
address. For example, if the controller’s address is 16, then use FLN 1,
device 16. For controller 32, use FLN 2, device 0; for controller 33, use FLN
2, device 1, and so on.
Allen-Bradley
Addressing
In the Allen-Bradley network, Device addresses are determined and set by
the local Allen-Bradley representative. Request a copy of the device
addressing scheme from that representative.
Totalize Information
All logical point types, except LCTLR points, may be totalized. Totalizing a
point allows the system to keep track of information about the point such as
run time for fans and pumps, total volume from a flow rate sensor, degree
days, and so on. Point information may be totalized in hours or in minutes.
Engineering Units
Engineering units are units of measurement associated with the value of
logical analog (LAO and LAI) points. Engineering units are expressed in
English units. When adding a logical controller (LCTLR) point to the
database, you must select point information to be displayed in English units
because the International System of Units (Systeme International d'unites,
abbreviated "SI") is not supported.
Table 4-3 shows commonly used engineering units in English units.
Table 4-3. Examples of Commonly Used Engineering Units.
Measurement
Slope and Intercept
Constants
4-6
English Unit (abbreviation)
Temperature
Degrees Fahrenheit (DEG F)
Flow velocity
Feet per minute (FPM)
Air volume flow rate
Cubic feet per minute (CFM)
Volume flow rate
Gallons per minute (GPM)
Operating pressure
Pounds per square inch (PSI)
Static pressure
Inches of Column Water (IWC)
Slope and intercept constants are numeric factors that are used to convert
the digital units that the Open Processor uses into the appropriate
engineering units that are meaningful to the user. Slope and intercept
constants are necessary for analog points and are determined by the type of
field input and output that is represented by the physical or virtual point.
When adding an analog point to the database, the operator interface program
at your terminal prompts you for the slope and the intercept constants for the
point.
Point Database
Slope and intercept constants for physical points. Physical points, field
inputs and outputs are represented in engineering units such as pressure,
amperage, voltage, temperature, and others.
Slope and intercept constants for virtual points. Slope and intercept
constants for virtual LAI and LAO points are calculated based on the
resolution and range of values required for the point. These constants
determine a straight line which maps the point value to a digital value range
of 0–32,767. The slope is the required resolution for reporting point
information over a network. A slope of 1.0 and an intercept of 0.0 is used
frequently (based on a resolution of 1.0 and a range of 0–32,767). For more
information, refer to the Landis & Staefa Modular Building Controller and
Remote Building Controller Owner’s Manual.
Sensor Types
Sensor type applies to all physical LAI points. These points must be defined
in the point database as receiving input that is either current (4–20 mA),
voltage (0–10 Vdc), thermistor or L-type.
COV Limit
The Change-Of-Value (COV) limit applies to LAI and LAO points. This
specifies the amount of change a point can experience before the system
reports the change.
Initial Value
Initial value applies only to LAO points. The initial value of a point is the value
of the point when it is first entered into the point database until it is
commanded or it receives a COV. The initial value is a numeric value that
can be negative, positive, a decimal, or an integer.
English, SI Units
You must select English units. SI Units are not supported by the AllenBradley Gateway.
Normally Closed
Normally closed applies only to LDI points. This information allows you to
specify if the contacts that are associated with the point are open or closed in
the de-energized state. An input of Y (Yes) indicates that the contacts are
closed in the de-energized state. An input of N (No) indicates that the
contacts are open in the de-energized state.
Invert Value
Invert value applies only to LDO points. Invert value allows you to reverse the
energize and de-energize commands when the command is applied to the
output point.
Point Termination
Module Points
Point Termination Modules (PTMs) are the interfaces between the field
equipment and the Open Processor. Field equipment includes devices that
provide information to, or are controlled or monitored by the Open Processor.
PTMs can also be controlled by Controller Modules.
PTMs gather information from sensors. Sensors are input points because
they provide information, or input to the Open Processor. Sensors may
indicate the position of dampers, valves and other equipment. Sensors may
also measure input such as temperature, relative humidity, flow and pressure.
4-7
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
PTMs control equipment such as motors, pumps, fans, valves, dampers,
lights, compressors, and so on. These devices are output points because
they are controlled with electrical or pneumatic command signals, or output
from the Open Processor.
There are 14 types of PTMs. Each has one, two, or four points depending on
its type. You can add PTMs to your MBC/RBC enclosure if your system
expands. For more information about PTMs, refer to the Landis & Staefa
Modular Building Controller and Remote Building Controller Owner’s Manual.
Required Points
The following point is common to all Allen-Bradley applications and is
required to startup the Allen-Bradley Gateway:
FLN3 Device 31, Point 60, KE/KF2 Interface Node Address
Diagnostic Points
For troubleshooting in the field, diagnostic points are available on FLN 3,
device 31. During startup and subsequent operation, these points can be
used to determine whether the Open Processor is operational and, if not, the
source of the problem.
Table 4-4 on the following pages provides information regarding the
diagnostic points.
4-8
Point Database
Table 4-4. Diagnostic Device Points.
PT
PT TYPE
UNBUNDLED
DEFAULT
DATA VALUE RANGE
DESCRIPTION
60
LA0
0
0 - 255 DECIMAL
AB KE/KF2 INTERFACE NODE ADDRESS
61
LA0
3
1 - 65535
FAILED MESSAGE RETRY MAXIMUM
62
LA0
16
1 - 65535
KE/KF2 NOT READY TO SEND DATA RETRY
MAXIMUM
63
LA0
10
1 - 65535 (64 PER SEC)
KE/KF2 TIMER TO ACKNOWLEDGE REQUEST
TRANSMISSION
64
LA0
32
1 - 65535 (64 PER SEC)
KE/KF2 TIMER TO RESPOND TO AN INQUIRY
MESSAGE
65
LA0
10
1 - 65535 (64 PER SEC)
OPEN PROCESSOR TIMER TO WAIT AFTER
SENDING ACKNOWLEDGMENT
66
LA0
32
1 - 65535 (64 PER SEC)
OPEN PROCESSOR TIMER TO SEND KE/KF2
RESET COMMAND WHEN NO DATABASE
67
LA0
16
0 - 65535 (SINGLE PT
CMDS)
OPEN PROCESSOR NUMBER OF CONSECUTIVE
SINGLE POINT WRITE COMMANDS
68
LA0
0 - DECIMAL
0 - DECIMAL
AB NODE ID IN METADROP DESCRIPTOR AND
KE/KF2 DIAGNOSTIC IS OCTAL
>0 - OCTAL
69
LA0
0 DON’T
REQUE FAIL PT
0 - NO REQUEUE FAILED
COMMANDS
OPEN PROCESSOR INTERNAL COMMAND QUEUE
TO ALLEN-BRADLEY SYSTEM STATUS
1 - REQUEUE, ENABLE
UPDATES
2 - NO REQUEUE,
ENABLE UPDATES
3 - REQUEUE, DISABLE
UPDATES
70
LAI
0 - NO POLLS
DONE
0 - 65535 COMPLETED
POLLS
OPEN PROCESSOR COMPLETED AND
ACKNOWLEDGED METADROP GROUP POLLS
71
LAI
0 - NO WRITES
DONE
0 - 65535 COMPLETED
WRITES
OPEN PROCESSOR COMPLETED AND
ACKNOWLEDGED POINTS COMMANDED
72
LAI
0 - METADROP
ID
0 - 94 METADROP
INTERNAL ID
OPEN PROCESSOR CURRENT METADROP ID
READY TO POLL TOALLEN-BRADLEY
73
LAI
0 - METADROP
ID
0 - 94 METADROP
INTERNAL ID
OPEN PROCESSOR CURRENT METADROP ID
READY TO COMMAND ALLEN-BRADLEY
74
LAI
XX - YY
XX - YY INTERNAL
STATE
OPEN PROCESSOR INTERNAL STATE MACHINE
DIAGNOSTIC VALUE
continued on the next page . . .
4-9
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Table 4-4. Diagnostic Device Points.
PT
75
PT TYPE
UNBUNDLED
DEFAULT
DATA VALUE RANGE
LAO OR
LDO
0 - DON’T
CLEAR CMD
QUEUE
0 - DON’T CLEAR
LAO OR
LDO
0 - DON’T
RESTORE
FAILED
0 - DON’T UNFAIL
79
80
LA0
0 - ASCII
PROTOCOL
0 - ASCII
1 - BINARY
2 - SLC
81
82
LA0
LA0
0 - CRC
0 - CRC
1 - BCC
LAO
10
LAO
0-Allen-Bradley
76
>0 - CLEAR
>0 - RESTORE
DESCRIPTION
OPEN PROCESSOR DIAGNOSTIC TO PURGE
COMMANDS IN COMMAND QUEUE
OPEN PROCESSOR TO UNFAIL ALL DATABASE
POINTS
77
78
83
1
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
LAO
0
LA0
97
LA0
98
LAI OR
LDI
LAI
0 - DON’T
CLEAR
COUNTERS
0 - CLIP MAX
INTEGER
0 - NOT FULL
99
1 - GOOD
RESPONSE
1 Used for Baseline 400 only.
4-10
0 - AB KE/KF2
1 - AB DIRECT
OPEN PROCESSOR INTERNAL DIAGNOSTIC TO
CHANGE COMMAND CODES TO ALLEN-BRADLEY
RESERVED FOR KE DIAGNOSTICS
PROTOCOL CHECK CRC OR BCC
INNER CHARACTER DELAY POINT
RESERVED
RESERVED
CHECK MESSAGE RESPONSE DESTINATION
OPEN PROCESSOR SOURCE ID
0 - DON’T CLEAR
>0 - CLEAR
CLEAR THE TOTAL READ AND WRITE
DIAGNOSTIC COUNTERS
0 - CLIP MAX
>0 - DON’T CLIP
0 - NOT FULL
>0 - FULL
0 - GOOD MSG
>0 - ERROR CODE
CLIP VALUES AT 2.1474 BILLION AND FAIL THE
CURRENT POINT
COMMAND QUEUE INTERNAL STATUS- 1000
COMMANDS WAITING
INTERNAL VALIDATE CODE FOR ALLEN-BRADLEY
RESPONSE PACKET ROUTINE
Applications
5
Overview
This section contains features, applications and point addressing information,
complete with information describing metadrop points, for the Allen-Bradley
devices supported by the Landis & Staefa Open Processor with the AllenBradley (A-B) Driver installed.
Open Processor
Applications
Open Processor applications are an important part of the energy
management capabilities of your system. Open Processor applications are
created using PPCL statements and, in some cases, additional hardware to
perform specific operations or functions. The control configuration and control
requirements of your system are customized into each application by using
Powers Process Control Language (PPCL). The applications that you can
incorporate into the operation of your system depend upon the Allen-Bradley
hardware the Open Processor is controlling. For a list of features, refer to the
specific Allen-Bradley controller that manipulates the Allen-Bradley hardware.
Allen-Bradley hardware occupies one device on an FLN in the Open
Processor address space. Although there is no requirement that the device
address be related to the Allen-Bradley device address, Landis & Staefa
recommends doing so. Refer to Figure 5.1 for a typical Open Processor
system installation structure.
NOTE: FLN, as it appears in this section, is an acronym for Four-Level
Network which replaces the previously-used LAN (Local Area Network)
acronym.
5-1
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Figure 5-1. Open Processor System Overview.
5-2
Applications
CAUTION:
Incorrect point commanding and operation may damage
the devices that are controlled by this Open Processor.
Points that may be commanded for specific devices must
not be set to values other than those recommended by
Allen-Bradley. Refer to Allen-Bradley documentation for
specifics on Allen-Bradley device operations.
CAUTION:
There may be more than one source of control for points
in the Allen-Bradley system. Be sure not to command
points that are being commanded by other Allen-Bradley
devices.
Also, be sure that the real-times for the Allen-Bradley
network, and the Landis & Staefa network are
synchronized.
CAUTION:
If you try to input an LAO point value below the minimum
limit, the system makes the value match the minimum
limit. If you try to input an LAO point value above the
maximum limit, the system makes the value match the
maximum limit.
If you need further information, consult with your local
Allen-Bradley representative
5-3
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
PLC-5 Memory
Addressing
Overview
In order to make the Open Processor addressing sections more meaningful,
an overview of PLC-5 data organization and System 600 differences follows.
Figure 2 shows the PLC-5 data organization. Refer to Section 4, Point
Database, for a description of PLC-5 Data Types.
Each PLC-5 has a unique address (node). The PLC-5 memory space can be
viewed as a block of files (data files). Each file contains a group of registers.
A register is a section of memory specifically allocated for storing values for
use by the PLC-5. Memory is configured by an Allen-Bradley technician.
DATA HIGHWAY PLUS (DH+)
PLC-5
NODE #1
PLC-5
NODE #2
PLC-5
NODE #32
NODE #1
FILE (01)
FILE (02)
FILE (03)
FILE (04)
FILE (01)
REGISTER (01)
REGISTER (02)
FILE (XX)
REGISTER (03)
REGISTER (04)
REGISTER (05)
REGISTER (06)
REGISTER (07)
GW0160R1
REGISTER (XX)
(MOST
SIGNIFICANT
BIT VALUE)
(LEAST
SIGNIFICANT
BIT VALUE)
Figure 5-2. Allen-Bradley Addressing – Top Level Down.
5-4
Applications
Understanding
Allen-Bradley PLC
Addressing
The purpose of this section is to help the Landis & Staefa customer
understand how Allen-Bradley addresses the PLC-5 series of controllers.
This discussion refers to, and expands on, Figure 5-2 from the previous
page.
Files
FILE (01)
FILE (02)
GW0156R1
FILE (03)
FILE (04)
FILE (XX)
Within each controller (PLC-5), there are
data files. A file is a block of data that
groups points of various types together.
There are several different file types in the
PLC-5. The Landis & Staefa Open
Processor supports the following types:
Integer (N)
Floating (F)
Binary (B)
Figure 5-3. Files.
Register
REGISTER (01)
REGISTER (02)
REGISTER (03)
A register is a group of bits. A bit is a
value that can be read by the
computer that represents a real world
point value.
REGISTER (04)
GW0157R1
REGISTER (05)
REGISTER (06)
REGISTER (07)
REGISTER (XX)
Registers are addressed in the
following format:
[node #] [data type] [file #]:[register #]
where:
node #
= DH+ node
data type = N (integer)
F (floating)
B (binary)
file #
= file being
addressed
register # = the register to be
used
Figure 5-4. Registers.
5-5
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Register Addressing
GW0158R1
BITS (VALUES OF 0 OR 1 ONLY)
(most significant
(least significant
bit)
bit)
Figure 5-5. Register Addressing.
Registers are made up of combinations of binary values of either one or zero.
How the register’s value is interpreted depends on the file type within which
the register resides.
Data Types
The Open Processor supports three (3) basic PLC-5 data types; Integer (N),
Floating Point (F), and Bit-packed Binary (B).
Integer – (a 16 bit register value) An “N” data type can represent either a
single analog value or a series of 15 digital values. In order for the Open
Processor to know the difference in PLC-5 data types, a “P” type is used in
the Open Processor Metadrop Point Descriptor instead of an “N”. An analog
value is obtained by reading (interpreting) the entire register as an analog
value. Metadrop points are discussed later in this document.
NOTE: The “N” type can also interpret up to 16 digital values by looking at
each bit individually as being “ON” or “OFF” (bit value of 0 or 1). When
referencing individual bits in an “N” type register from the Open Processor, a
“P” type is used in the metapoint device descriptor instead of “N”. When
writing to the “N” type register, all values must be written to, regardless of
their value or usage. This is called the “P” type and is a subset of the “N”
type.
Floating point – The floating point is used when high precision is required for
analog values. This is known as “F” type (IEEE Standard).
Bit-packed binary – This is known as “B” type where each bit can be toggled
independently (on/off, start/stop), and it is not necessary to use all of the bits
within the register. There can be empty/blank bits in the binary type register. It
is recommended that, for improved efficiency, bits adjacent to each other be
used.
5-6
Applications
Addressing
Nomenclature
The addressing nomenclature for Allen-Bradley PLC-5s will be as follows:
XXD7:0
REGISTER NUMBER
FILE NUMBER
GW0159R1
DATA TYPE
Examples
WHERE D = N (INTEGER)
F (FLOATING)
B (BINARY)
NODE NUMBER
Floating Point— A PLC-5 programmer needs a block of ten floating point (F)
variables for a control algorithm and the last allocated file was 30. The
programmer creates a floating point file 31 containing ten floating point
elements. The elements within the data block are now addressed as:
F31:0 through F31:9.
Integer— Similarly, a PLC-5 programmer needs a block of ten integer (N)
variables for a control algorithm and the last allocated file was 31. The
programmer creates an integer file 32 containing ten floating point elements.
The elements within the data block are now addressed as:
N32:0 through N32:9.
Binary— The programmer needs a block of 16 binary values. The last file
created was 32. The programmer creates a bit backed binary file 33
containing 16 floating point elements. The bits within this block are now
addressed as:
B33:0 through B33:15
Note: Anytime binary files are created, they are always in groups of 16.
Although there are B registers that act as individual bits, there are times when
individual bits of an analog register need to be examined. The Open
Processor supports this function.
Point Database
Guidelines
This section gives some general guidelines for adding points to the Open
Processor’s database. These points monitor and command registers in the
Allen-Bradley System. The Open Processor supports only Allen-Bradley
registers of type Integer, Float, and Binary. The only System 600 point types
supported by the Open Processor are LDO, LDI, LAO, and LAI.
5-7
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Table 5-1 shows which point types should be used for Allen-Bradley register
types.
Table 5-1. System 600 Points to Allen-Bradley Registers.
Point Addresses
System 600 Point
Type
Allen-Bradley Register
Type
Example
LDO
Binary
B8:0
LDI
Binary
B8:1
LAO
Integer or Float
N7:10
F8:5
LAI
Integer or Float
N7:10
F8:5
The Open Processor uses the standard Landis & Staefa addressing scheme
of TCCLDDPP. Refer to Table 5-2.
Table 5-2. Open Processor Point Addressing.
Abbr.
Meaning
Range
Description
T
Trunk
0–7
Individual BLN network number is always zero unless the point
is on a minicomputer.
CC
Cabinet
00–99
The cabinet number assigned to the Open Processor (unique
P2 node address).
NOTE: It is possible to have more than one node in an
enclosure.
L
FLN*
0–3
DD
Device
00–31
and
0A–0Z
PP
Point
00–99
0 —virtual points and/or point modules
1,2—PLC-5 data blocks (devices)
3 — all but devices 30 and 31 used for PLC-5 data blocks
(devices)
00–31 PLC-5 devices (FLN 1 and FLN 2)
01–29 PLC-5 devices (FLN 3)
30 Metadrop (FLN 3)
31 Diagnostic device (FLN 3)
0A–0Z — virtual point devices
These are the individual points defined (characterized) as
needed within each PLC-5 data block (device).
NOTE: Although the term “LAN” has been changed to “FLN”, the “L” in the
naming convention remains the same.
Metadrops
5-8
A Metadrop is actually one device of the FLN address space (FLN 3, Device
30). This device is dedicated by the Open Processor to map the Allen-Bradley
system (AB PLC-5) memory addresses to the FLN address space. Points
from the Allen-Bradley system that are accessed by the System 600 via an
Open Processor must appear as native System 600 points. This “mapping” is
done through a pre-defined structure (See Table 5-5). This structure is stored
in FLN 3, Device 30 points 0-93 by the user.
Applications
Mapping must define the following:
1. Which points or block of points are read or commanded in the AllenBradley system memory space through the Open Processor?
2. Where to store a copy of the contents of those points in the System 600
addressing space (FLN device)?
When the Metadrop points (FLN 3, Device 30, Points 0-93) are characterized,
the Descriptor field is used to specify the Allen-Bradley system’s memory
addresses which are going to be referenced (See NOTE: When integrating
with single or multiple PLC-5s the Allen-Bradley field representative should
provide a list showing the PLC-5 node number, starting address, range, and
register type for each group of registers to be read by the Open Processor.
Table 5-4).
In order to specify the location in the System 600 addressing space in which
to store the contents of the Allen-Bradley system points, the following
addressing scheme applies.
Each Metadrop device point (points 0-93) has a one-to-one correspondence
to one location in the System 600 addressing space as follows:
Metadrop points 0 - 31 correspond consecutively to FLN 1 Device 0
through 31.
Metadrop points 32-63 correspond consecutively to FLN 2 Device 0
through 31.
Metadrop points 64-93 correspond consecutively to FLN 3 Device 0
through 29.
Figure 5-6 illustrates this concept.
NOTE: FLN 3 Device 30 is reserved for the Open Processor Metadrop.
FLN 3 Device 31 is reserved for Open Processor Control &
Diagnostics.
This means that once a Metadrop point is characterized, the values of the
read or commanded points defined by this Metadrop point can only be stored
in the FLN device that corresponds to that Metadrop point.
NOTE: When integrating with single or multiple PLC-5s the Allen-Bradley
field representative should provide a list showing the PLC-5 node number,
starting address, range, and register type for each group of registers to be
read by the Open Processor.
Table 5-4 describes the contents of all fields when characterizing a Metadrop
point.
Once a Metadrop point is characterized to reference a number of points on
the Allen-Bradley PLC-5 and the correspondence to the System 600
5-9
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
addressing space is established, then some or all of those points in the
corresponding FLN device must also be characterized.
For example, a Metadrop point META00 is characterized to have a Descriptor
of [5 N7 0] (Refer to NOTE: When integrating with single or multiple PLC-5s
the Allen-Bradley field representative should provide a list showing the PLC-5
node number, starting address, range, and register type for each group of
registers to be read by the Open Processor.
Table 5-4), with an Initial Value of ten (this is the size of the register block in
the AB PLC-5). This references ten consecutive Integer Registers in the
Allen-Bradley PLC-5 with a node number of five. Once this Metadrop device
point is characterized, the next step is to characterize some or all of these ten
points as LAOs or LAIs as needed.
Metadrop
Allen-Bradley PLC-5
Data Blocks
FLN 3,
DEVICE 30
Data Block 0 - 31
FLN 1
Points 0 - 31
Data Block 0 - 31
Points 32 - 63
FLN 2
Points 64 - 93
Data Block 0 - 29
FLN 3
Figure 5-6. Concept of Metadrops.
The fundamental purpose of the metadrop in register mapped systems is to
segment the foreign system into a series of ‘virtual devices’. In this case, the
‘virtual device’ will be a data block of PLC-5 registers. The metadrop points
are System 600 LAOs which will contain a descriptor string specifying the
PLC node number, the PLC data file type and number, and the base PLC
address to poll (the starting address). It also contains the number of System
600 points allocated to store the PLC polled data.
5-10
Applications
NOTE: Not all points need to be “defined” or characterized within the Open
Processor. For example, a metadrop may be used to poll for a data block of
30 integer (N type) registers. However, only three of those points are
characterized. In this example only three points have been used.
Metadrop Example
A customer has a PLC-5 defined as Node 2 and needs to transfer the
following registers to the Open Processor:
40 analog values stored on F type registers in the PLC, starting with
register address F8:10
32 binary values, starting with register address B32:0 (data block
measured in 16 bit words)
96 digital values, starting with Allen-Bradley register address N99:0 (data
block measured in 16-bit words). Using Allen-Bradley N-type registers to
represent digital information requires a P-type substitution in the
Metadrop definition.
ten analog values starting with register address N7:00
Table 5-3 shows how the metadrop point would be defined to tell the Open
Processor how to map the System 600 FLN devices into corresponding PLC5 data blocks. NOTE: When integrating with single or multiple PLC-5s the
Allen-Bradley field representative should provide a list showing the PLC-5
node number, starting address, range, and register type for each group of
registers to be read by the Open Processor.
Table 5-4 explains how the metadrop is characterized for use with the
System 600.
Table 5-3. Example of Metadrop Naming.
Metadrop
Point
FLN 3,
Device 30,
Point 0
FLN 3,
Device 30,
Point 1
FLN 3,
Device 30,
Point 2
FLN 3,
Device 30,
Point 3
Point
Type
LAO
Point
Descriptor
2 F8 10
Initial
Value
40.0
LAO
2 B 32
32.0
LAO
2 N99 0
96.0
LAO
2 N7 0
10.0
Location in the
System 600
FLN 1,
Points for
Device 0,
A-B data
Points 0–39 block 1
FLN 1,
Points for
Device 1,
A-B data
Points 0–31 block 2
FLN 1,
Points for
Device 2,
A-B data
Points 0–99 block 3
FLN 1,
Points for
Device 3,
A-B data
Points 0–9
block 4
5-11
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Design Considerations
5-12
The following design considerations should be used when preparing to use
the Open Processor. These are recommendations for optimizing the Open
Processor’s performance on the DH+ network.
DATA BLOCK SIZING — The Open Processor works more efficiently
when the information from the PLC-5 is retrieved in large blocks of data.
It is much more efficient to request a small number of larger blocks of
data rather than a large number of small blocks of data due to the
overhead experienced during the communication process.
CHARACTERIZING — Planning of the Open Processor database in
many cases will use one metadrop definition to poll one larger area of the
PLC-5 memory. The PLC-5 memory may contain two smaller groups of
needed data points as long as the total number of points is not greater
than the maximum number allowed per metadrop. If there are points in
the PLC-5 which are not used, do not characterize (unbundle) them. All
points requested by the Open Processor for a metadrop definition need
not be characterized. Any data which is sent by the PLC-5 which is not
characterized in the Open Processor will be discarded.
BLOCK SIZING — The metadrops are used to map the blocks of data
from the PLC-5 into the Open Processor address space. The limitation of
96 analog or digital values and 40 floating point numbers (i.e. analog
points) defines the maximum number of block sizes available when
defining the metadrop information. The maximum value of analog data is
+/- 2.1474 E+06.
DATA TYPE MIXING— Each metadrop defined may only consist of an
FLN device address space containing LDI/LDO or LAI/LAO type points.
DATA TYPES — The types of Allen-Bradley data supported are Integer,
Binary, and Float. The Open Processor does support the ability to specify
whether any Integer analog data is to be signed or unsigned numbers.
BINARY POINT ADDRESSING — The metadrop definition for PLC-5
Binary points address specification is always defined in groups of sixteen.
To be consistent with Allen-Bradley documentation the address B1 and
B2 contain sixteen digital values each. The Open Processor metadrop
descriptor field will read and translate the appropriate number of digital
points. The Allen-Bradley address syntax for Binary points in the
descriptor field will agree with the Allen-Bradley documentation.
OVERLAPPING MEMORY REGIONS — Metadrops defined in the Open
Processor may contain overlapping PLC-5 memory regions. Very few
cases will require this design and in most cases this should be avoided
due to possible complex timing.
PLC-5 POLLING — The Open Processor will not start polling the PLC-5
until a valid database has been downloaded to the Open Processor by
any suitably recognized database loading tool. Until a valid database has
been loaded the Open Processor will transmit communication reset
messages to the PLC-5 host.
PLC-5 COMMUNICATION FAILURE — Metadrop status communication
will not indicate FAIL when there is a communication failure to the PLC-5.
Only the FLN device points associated with the metadrop will indicate
FAIL. The metadrop status is reserved to indicate the syntactic
Applications
correctness of the descriptor field for the Open Processor to PLC-5
mapping.
LAO/LDO COMMANDING — The initial value of an LAO is sent to the
PLC-5 shortly after a database download to the Open Processor has
been completed. There are several diagnostic points which can be used
to avoid this situation so that the value of the LAO point contained within
the associated metadrop will reflect the PLC-5 value and not change the
PLC-5 until the LAO is subsequently commanded. LDO values do not
have an initial value, so the Open Processor will not command the value
to the PLC-5 when a database is loaded to the Open Processor.
SLOW/FAST MODES — The Open Processor can run in two modes of
operation. These modes are SLOW and FAST polling. The default mode
is to poll the PLC-5 once every few seconds. When the diagnostic point
RSPINT is characterized as an LAI the Open Processor will change the
internal timers to run as fast as possible. Some other Open Processors
use the RSPINT point as an LAO which will override the internal timers to
the specified value. The Open Processor should only use the RSPINT
point as an LAI.
OCTAL NOTATION — All information provided in the metadrop
descriptor field and the Allen-Bradley KE address diagnostic are by
default decimal in value. Since Allen-Bradley documentation usually
specifies node addresses in octal notation there is a diagnostic to allow
the node field of the metadrop descriptor and the KE address diagnostic
to be entered in octal notation.
L2SL VIRTUAL POINT — Care must be taken when using PPCL to
automatically command Allen-Bradley points. Because there are timing
delays during communications the best method for commanding Open
Processor points is to construct an L2SL virtual point using the data from
one metadrop as the LDI and the data from another metadrop as the
LDO. When commanding an LAO, a sample statement should be used to
control how fast the Open Processor value should be changed.
COMMAND QUEUING — The Open Processor command queue for
commanding output points only uses the most recent data values in the
MBC database to command the PLC-5 points. If PPCL is changing Open
Processor data faster than the Open Processor can communicate to the
PLC-5, the Open Processor will queue up the request from the PPCL.
Only the point identification is queued and not the value. In most cases
when this happens the Open Processor will command the PLC-5 points
to the most recent value several times. To avoid conflicts use the sample
statement in PPCL or construct an L2SL.
COMMANDING SEQUENTIAL DATA — The Open Processor always
will command LAO or LDO points to the PLC-5 one at a time. Since the
MBC has many processes running at one time (i.e. PPCL, TOD, MMI),
and experiences delays due to remoteness of locations over the P2
network, the Open Processor is not guaranteed that the COV data for
commanding a point to the PLC-5 is in the original sequential order. The
only way to command sequential data is to use a virtual L2SL point.
ADDRESS SIZE LIMITATION — The Open Processor has a maximum
value of 254 for the address of the PLC-5 as well as the file identification.
5-13
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
The communications device addresses (for example, the 1785-KE and
the 1770 KF2) also should be kept less than or equal to 254. This is due
to incompatibility throughout the PLC-5 product line. The protocol has
been changed over the years and in order to be compatible with older
devices the Open Processor imposes this limitation.
Care must be taken when designing the PPCL statements for commandable
Open Processors. It is not recommended that PPCL statements be written
which allow points residing in the Allen-Bradley PLC to be commanded
constantly. The suggested alternative is to use the SAMPLE command to
slow down the rate of commandability of points. This prevents the point
values from saturating the internal serial communication holding buffers. The
Open Processor will always use the current value in the database when
commanding the Allen-Bradley point type regardless of how many request
entries are internally queued to the PLC. Statements such as:
100 ABPOINT = ABPOINT + 1
200 if (ABPT.EQ.ON) THEN OFF(ABPT) ELSE ON(ABPT)
should be rewritten as:
100 SAMPLE(TIME) ABPOINT = ABPOINT + 1
200 SAMPLE (TIME 1, TIME 2) if (ABPT.EQ.ON) THEN OFF(ABPT) ELSE
ON(ABPT)
where (TIME) is the number of seconds to wait. Serial communication is slow
when compared to the number of lines of PPCL which can be evaluated per
second. Therefore, the database value for ABPOINT will have changed much
faster than the rate at which the Open Processor could send the command
response for that line of PPCL. The SAMPLE statement controls the rate at
which PPCL evaluates lines of data.
5-14
Applications
Configuring the
Open Processor
Many applications will require some, but not all, of the points within a data
block to be read by the Open Processor. The Open Processor may be
configured to read the entire block of data, but only those points that are used
in the System 600 application need to be defined (unbundled) for mapping
into the Open Processor’s database. See NOTE: When integrating with
single or multiple PLC-5s the Allen-Bradley field representative should
provide a list showing the PLC-5 node number, starting address, range, and
register type for each group of registers to be read by the Open Processor.
Table 5-4 for characterization (unbundling) information.
NOTE: When integrating with single or multiple PLC-5s the Allen-Bradley
field representative should provide a list showing the PLC-5 node number,
starting address, range, and register type for each group of registers to be
read by the Open Processor.
Table 5-4. Example of Metadrop Characterization Information.
Point Name
Point name (for example: META00, META01...)
Point Type
LAO
Descriptor
Used to indicate the first AB register in the data block:
NODE_FILE_REGISTER where:
NODE =
AB Node Number of the PLC-5
FILE =
File type and number. Allowed File Types are:
N
for Unsigned Integer Registers
G
for Signed Integer Registers
P
for accessing individual bits in an N (Integer)
type Register
F
for Floating point Analog Registers
B
for Binary type Registers
REGISTER AB Register number in the specified file space
Alarmable
No
Totalize
No
Engineering
Units
(optional)
Point Address
TCC330PP (see Table 5-2 for details)
Slope
1.0
Intercept
0.0
Initial Value
Number of System 600 points allocated by the Metadrop point to
store values read or commanded from/to the AB PLC-5 (Maximum
of 100 for N (integer) or 96 (binary) type, 40 for F (float) type).
COV
1
NOTE: Points defined by the Metadrop device can be characterized as LAO
or LAI for N or F types, and as LDO or LDI for B or P type.
5-15
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Point Characterization
Each point that the Open Processor is to poll must be inserted as a single
point on the System 600. This is done through use of a metadrop point. A
metadrop point uses the same point addressing scheme as a regular System
600 point. Each metadrop has a descriptor attached to it.
Mapping the Metadrop
After the Allen-Bradley representative has provided a printout of the AllenBradley addresses to be mapped into the Open Processor, and the ‘data
block’ concept is thoroughly understood, it is time to actually map the AllenBradley point to the Open Processor database. When mapping an AllenBradley address into a metadrop point, the address follows the same
convention as all System 600 points: TCCLDDPP (refer to Table 5-2).
Example: The Allen-Bradley representative provides a printout of the
following addresses to be mapped into the Open Processor database:
02N7:0
02F10:15
02F11:21
02B8
02G7
The Open Processor resides in cabinet number 12.
For a block of data containing 16 analog values to be mapped to 16 analog
points in the System 600 and having the Allen-Bradley starting address of
2N7:0, the data block and descriptor for use in the System 600 would be:
System 600 Point
Address
01233000 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Metadrop Point
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
=
meta00
LAO
2 N7 0
16
FLN 3, Device 30, Point 00
NOTE: Spaces in the Descriptor numbering are critical. Example: 2_N7_0,
where the _ represents a space.
To characterize the first point in this block:
System 600 Point
Address
01210000 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
5-16
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
Point0
LAI
Optional
0.00 (varies)
Applications
For a block of data containing a maximum of 40 analog values to be mapped
to 40 analog points in the System 600 and having the Allen-Bradley starting
address of 2F10:15 the data block and descriptor for use in the System 600
would be:
System 600 Point
Address
01233001 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Metadrop Point
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
=
meta01
LAO
2 F10 15
40
FLN 3, Device 30, Point 01
To characterize the first point in this block:
System 600 Point
Address
01210100 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Type
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
Point 0
LAI
st
1 Register of 2 F10 15
I
For a block of data containing 5 analog values to be mapped to 5 analog
points in the System 600 and having the Allen-Bradley starting address of
2F11:21 the data block and descriptor for use in the System 600 would be:
System 600 Point
Address
01233002 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Metadrop Point
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
=
meta02
LAO
2 F11 21
5
FLN 3, Device 30, Point 02
To characterize the first point in this block:
System 600 Point
Address
01210200 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Type
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
Point 0
LAI
st
1 Register of 2 F11 21
I
5-17
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
For a block of data containing 16 binary values, only one of the values (Bit 0)
is to be mapped into the System 600 and having the Allen-Bradley address of
2B8:0. Even though a single bit is desired, the entire register must be
mapped. The data block and descriptor for use in the System 600 would be:
System 600 Point
Address
01233003 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Metadrop Point
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
=
meta03
LAO
2 B8
1
FLN 3, Device 30, Point 03
To characterize the first point in this block:
System 600 Point
Address
1210300 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Type
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
Point 0
LDI
Bit 0 of 2 B8
I
For a block of data containing 16 binary values, only one of the values is to
be mapped into the System 600, having the Allen-Bradley address of 2B8:6.
The data block and descriptor for use in the System 600 would be:
System 600 Point
Address
01233004 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Metadrop Point
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
=
Meta04
LAO
2 B8
7
FLN 3, Device 30, Point 04
To characterize the first point (Bit 6) in 2 B8, which is the seventh point in this
block:
System 600 Point
Address
01210407 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Type
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
Point 1
LDI
Bit 6 of 2 B8
I
NOTE: Bits in binary registers are addressed as follows: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6…
Bit 6 is the in the seventh location of the series. Therefore, the initial value
field for the Metadrop in this example is 7. To be safe, always use multiples of
16 for the initial binary register values.
5-18
Applications
As described earlier, Allen-Bradley integer registers (N-type) may be used to
describe digital values. To read a block of data containing 16 digital values
stored in 2N7 characterize the Metadrop as follows:
System 600 Point
Address
01233005 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Metadrop Point
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
=
meta05
LAO
2 P7
16
FLN 3, Device 30, Point 05
NOTE: Descriptor 2P7 is used because P is used as a reference to AllenBradley N-type integer register when they are used to represent digital
information.
To characterize the first point in this block:
System 600 Point
Address
01210500 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Type
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
Point 0
LDI
BIT 0 of 2N7
I
For a block of data containing 16 analog values to be mapped to 16 analog
points in the System 600 and having the Allen-Bradley starting address of
2G7:0, the data block and descriptor for use in the System 600 would be:
System 600 Point
Address
01233000 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Metadrop Point
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
=
meta00
LAO
2 G7 0
16
FLN 3, Device 30, Point 00
To characterize the first point in this block:
System 600 Point
Address
01210000 Point Name
Point Type
Descriptor
Initial Value
Descriptor
=
=
=
=
Point0
LAI
Optional
0.00 (varies)
5-19
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Table 5-5 addresses the Metadrop Referencing System for FLN3, Device 30.
Table 5-5. Metadrop Reference.
Metadrop Point
FLN 3, Device
30
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
5-20
Corresponding FLN Address
FLN
DEVICE
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
POINTS
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
Continued on next page...
Applications
Table 5-5. Metadrop Reference.
Metadrop Point
FLN 3, Device
30
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
metadrop
diagnostic
Corresponding FLN Address
FLN
DEVICE
POINTS
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
00-99
5-21
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Notes
5-22
Troubleshooting
Overview
6
This section describes corrective measures you can take if you encounter a
problem with the Open Processor. If you encounter a symptom or a problem
not covered in this manual, contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
WARNING:
The Point Termination Module (PTM) manual override switch is not
intended to be used as a safety device when performing
maintenance. If you use the PTM manual override switch as a
safety device, it may result in serious injury to personnel and may
damage property in the area. Continue to follow safety procedures
when performing maintenance.
Basic service
information
To determine that the Open Processor is powered up and communicating
properly, verify that the STATUS LED on the Open Processor is flashing ON
and OFF once per second. (Upon power-up, it may take five to six seconds
for the STATUS LED to begin flashing.)
NOTE: When troubleshooting, record what the problem is and what actions
were performed immediately before the problem occurred. Being able to
describe the problem in detail is important, should you need assistance from
your local Landis & Staefa representative.
When removing power to an Open Processor to perform maintenance or
service, make sure that the person in charge of the facility is aware of this
and that appropriate steps are taken to keep the building in control.
To view the status of the Open Processor and to call up reports for
troubleshooting, you can use an operator's terminal and the operator
interface or an Insight workstation. For more information refer to the following
manual(s):
Landis & Staefa Field Panel User's Manual, product number 125-1895.
The System Management volume of the Insight for Personal Computers
User's Set, product number 125-1854.
The Advanced Operations volume of the Insight for Minicomputers User's
Set, product number 125-1910.
Landis & Staefa recommends that you make routine backups of the Open
Processor database. Backups are also recommended whenever changes are
made to the database or new equipment is added.
6-1
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner's Manual
CAUTION:
Landis & Staefa recommends that you wear an anti-static wrist
strap when you install or service an Open Processor. Failure to do
so may allow an electrostatic discharge to pass from your body to
the equipment, causing irreparable damage to the Open Processor.
Ordering replacement
parts
If an Open Processor, Controller Module, Power Module, or PTM is not
operating correctly, it should be replaced. Contact your local Landis & Staefa
representative for ordering and replacement information.
Open Processor
Troubleshooting
Find the symptom (in boldface type) that best describes the problem. Perform
the corrective action that follows. If the problem persists or other symptoms
are present, contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
NOTE: Landis & Staefa recommends that you backup your Open Processor
database before continuing.
Open Processor
Operation
Which of the following best describes the problem?
A. No LEDs on the Open Processor are illuminated.
1. Check that there is power to the MBC/RBC enclosure.
2. Check that power to the field panel is turned ON.
3. Turn OFF power to the field panel. Turn ON power to the field panel.
4. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
B. The STATUS LED is illuminated (steadily) on the Open Processor.
WARNING:
To avoid injuring either personnel or equipment, be sure that all
equipment is in manual mode.
1. Turn OFF power to the field panel. Turn ON power to the field panel.
2. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
C. The BATT LOW LED is illuminated (steadily). Battery low warning
displayed at operator’s terminal (optional).
1. Check that the mylar insert has been removed from the battery
holder.
2. Check that the battery is properly installed (+ to + and to ) and that
it is seated properly in its holder.
3. Refer to the Battery Replacement Procedure later in this chapter.
4. Turn OFF power, remove and reinstall the Open Processor. Turn ON
power.
5. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
6-2
Troubleshooting
D. The MMI prompt line does not appear.
1. Verify baud rates of operator terminal. Change them to match the
MMI port.
2. Check the memory board.
3. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
E. The FLN TX and FLN 1 RX LEDs on the front of the Open Processor
do not flash.
1. Verify that there is at least one point in the Open Processor.
2. Disconnect the FLN 1 Trunk cable that connects the Open Processor
to the Trunk Interface II to see if the problem disappears. If the LEDs
start flashing, the wiring may be bad. Check the wiring polarity
between the Trunk Interface II and the Open Processor: + to +,
to , shield connected at the Open Processor, but disconnected at
the Trunk Interface II.
3. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
Trunk Interface
Which of the following best describes the problem?
A. The FLN TX LED on the Open Processor and the RX LED on the
Trunk Interface II do not flash.
1. Verify that the AC power to Trunk Interface II is properly connected.
2. Verify that the FLN connector screws face down at the Open
Processor and up at the Trunk Interface II.
3. Verify that the FLN connections properly terminate at FLN 1 on the
Open Processor: + to +, -to , and shield to shield.
4. Verify that the FLN connections properly terminate at the Trunk
Interface II: + to +, to , and shield disconnected.
5. Verify that the Open Processor’s FLN 1 baud rate is correct.
6. Check the FLN Trunk for shorts or opens.
7. Verify that the Open Processor addresses are correct and that all
Allen-Bradley equipment controller points have addresses on FLNs
1–3.
8. Replace the Trunk Interface II.
9. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
B. RX LED on Trunk Interface II does not flash when connected to the
Allen-Bradley system.
1. Check wiring polarity between the Allen-Bradley system and the
Trunk Interface II: pin 2 to TX terminal, pin 3 to RX terminal, pin 7 to
GND terminal.
2. Disconnect the Trunk Interface II from the Allen-Bradley system. If
the problem ceases, call your Allen-Bradley representative.
6-3
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner's Manual
3. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
C. The Trunk Interface II TX LED does not flash.
1. Check wiring polarity between the Allen-Bradley system and the
Trunk Interface II: pin 2 to TX terminal, pin 3 to RX terminal, pin 7 to
GND terminal.
2. Replace the Trunk Interface II.
3. Contact an Allen-Bradley representative to make sure the AllenBradley system has been installed and certified, and that it operates
according to their procedures.
4. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
D. The Power LED on the front of the Trunk Interface II is not lit.
1. Verify that the proper power supply is being used.
2. Verify that the Trunk Interface II power supply is plugged into a live
electrical outlet.
3. Verify that the power supply is securely plugged into the socket on
the back of the Trunk Interface II.
4. Replace the Trunk Interface II.
5. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
E. The Power LED on the Trunk Interface II is lit, but the DTR LED is
not lit.
1. Verify that the cable between the Allen-Bradley system and the Trunk
Interface II is (a) properly connected, and (b) has the correct pin
assignments.
2. Replace the Trunk Interface II.
3. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
Point Operation
Which of the following best describes the problem?
A. All the Point Termination Module (PTM) points in an enclosure read
failed (*F*).
1. Check that the power to the field panel is turned ON.
2. Check that all electrical connections are secure.
3. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
B. All points addressed in the Open Processor appear as failed (*F*).
1. Verify that the points have the correct addresses and that there are
no duplicate addresses.
2. Check that points are defined with the proper type, slope, intercept,
etc. Refer to Section 5, Applications, for more information.
3. Verify all physical connections.
6-4
Troubleshooting
4. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
C. Some or all points addressed in the Open Processor display
incorrect values.
1. Verify that the points have the correct addresses and that there are
no duplicate addresses.
2. Check that the points are defined with the proper type, slope,
intercept, etc. Refer to Section 5, Applications, for more information.
3. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
4. Contact an Allen-Bradley representative to ensure that the AllenBradley system has been installed and certified, and that it is
operating according to their procedures.
D. A group of points associated with a specific controller appears as
failed (*F*).
1. Verify that the points have the correct address and that there are no
duplicate addresses.
2. Check that the points are defined with the proper type, slope,
intercept, etc. Refer to Section 5, Applications, for more information.
3. Check that the communication status points appear as normal (-N-).
4. Check for correct equipment controller password.
5. Contact an Allen-Bradley representative to ensure that the AllenBradley system has been installed and certified, and that it is
operating according to their procedures.
6. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
E. All points addressed in the Open Processor appear as failed (*F*).
1. Verify that the points have the correct addresses and that there are
no duplicate addresses.
2. Check that points are defined with the proper type, slope, intercept,
etc. Refer to Section 5, Applications, for more information.
3. Verify all physical connections.
4. Verify baud rates of FLN port.
5. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
6-5
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner's Manual
Communications
with Allen-Bradley
System
Which of the following best describes the problem?
A. No communications with the Allen-Bradley system.
1. Check the FLN trunk connectors for proper orientation. The screws
for the connectors should face down at the Open Processor.
2. Check the FLN trunk connectors for proper termination at the AllenBradley system: + to +, to , and shield disconnected.
3. Verify that the communication switches are set for RS-485
communications.
a. For OPMs, the Port A switch must be set toward the center of the
controller board.
b. For LLLBs, switch S9 must be set toward the three-pin
connectors on the controller board.
4. Verify that the Open Processor addresses are correct and that the
Allen-Bradley Equipment Controller points have addresses on FLNs
1–3.
5. Check that points are defined with the proper type, slope, intercept,
etc. Refer to Chapter 5 for more information.
6. Check the Allen-Bradley Open Processor Communications Status
point (FLN 3, Drop 31, Point 55) to be sure the value is not zero.
Write down the value if is not zero.
7. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
B. Limited or no communication with one or more Allen-Bradley
controllers.
1. Check that the points have the correct address and that there are no
duplicate addresses.
2. Verify that the Allen-Bradley Open Processor Communications Status
point (FLN 3, Drop 31, Point 55) is correctly addressed and enabled.
3. Contact your local Landis & Staefa representative.
6-6
Troubleshooting
Battery
Replacement
Procedure
Replacement battery kits with 10 non-rechargeable lithium batteries and pull
tabs are available only from your local Landis & Staefa representative.
Order using product number 545-710.
CAUTION:
Use only replacement batteries from Landis & Staefa. Failure to do
so may result in equipment damage or data loss.
Leave the AC power to the Open Processor ON during battery
replacement. You will lose data if power is turned OFF and the
battery is low or is removed.
Required tools
None.
Instructions
Follow these procedures to replace the battery backup of the Open
Processor:
1. With the AC power to the Open Processor turned ON, lift up the front
cover of the Open Processor to expose the battery. Refer to
Figure 6-1.
2. Remove the old battery from holder by pulling on the tab.
3. Properly discard the old battery and tab.
4. Insert the new battery through the loop of the new pull tab.
5. Insert the battery and pull tab combination back into the battery
holder with the plus (+) and minus () ends aligned as shown in
Figure 6-1.
6. Close the cover of the Open Processor.
Battery replacement is complete.
Figure 6-1. Battery Replacement.
6-7
Open Processor with Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner's Manual
Notes
6-8
Glossary
Overview
This section contains a glossary of terms and acronyms that are used in this
manual. For definitions of point database descriptors, refer to Chapter 4,
Point Database, in this manual. For definitions of commonly used terms as
well as acronyms and abbreviations associated with the System 600, refer to
the System 600 Glossary of Terms, Acronyms and Abbreviations,
(125-1834). This book is available from your local Landis & Staefa
representative.
A–D
address key
PTM component that provides the PTM address for the Gateway or Controller
Module and the point database.
alarm priority
The ranking of a point alarm.
analog input-electric
An analog input point that receives either a current, voltage, or resistance
input signal.
analog outputpneumatic
An analog output point that outputs a pneumatic signal.
C-Bus
The low voltage power pathway between the Gateway, Controller and Power
Modules.
command priority
The ranking of a point command.
Controller Module
Optional. It is the modular component that can contain the "brains" of the
MBC/RBC enclosure. This unit holds the processor, memory chips,
analog-to-digital converter, supporting circuitry, and operator terminal ports.
current value
The last commanded or sensed value of a logical point.
digitized value
The integer value used by the Gateway or Controller Module to determine the
logical value, state, and the condition of logical points.
dynamic point
information
Information stored in the point database that may change during system
operation and that is not part of the data entered when defining points.
Glossary-1
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
E–M
enclosure
Metal case that houses the Gateway Module and other MBC/RBC
components.
English units
The foot-pound-second system of units for weights and measurements.
Enhanced Alarming
An application that allows multiple alarm limits, specific alarm reporting
locations, and variable alarm limit setpoints.
®
Insight
A graphical software package that allows an operator to monitor and control
building environments from a personal computer.
Level 1 controller
Level 1 controllers, which communicate with the gateway via RS-485 signals,
provide the link between the gateway and Level 2 controllers.
Level 2 controller
Level 2 controllers are connected to devices such as chillers, self-contained
air conditioning units, rooftop units, unit ventilators, water source heat pumps
and loop water controllers. They process input and output information about
the devices and may contain an LCD display.
Level 3 controller
Level 3 controllers are directed by Level 2 controllers and include logic control
processors for centrifugal chillers.
literature pocket
Metal slip case in the MBC/RBC enclosure for storing layout sheets,
documentation, and so on.
MBC
Modular Building Controller.
M-Bus
Module Bus. The low voltage and communication pathway between the
Gateway or Controller Module and the Point Termination Modules provided
by means of the M-Bus rails.
M-Bus rail
The low voltage and communication hardware pathway between the Gateway
or Controller Module and the Point Termination Modules.
Metadrop
One device on the FLN device address space (FLN3, Device 30)
Modular Building
Controller
A System 600 field panel with replaceable modules.
mounting rail
The hardware on which Gateway, Controller and Power Modules are
installed.
Glossary-2
Glossary
O–Z
OPM
Open Protocol Master. Level 1 Allen-Bradley controller.
Open Processor
The Open Processor is responsible for communicating with Allen-Bradley
system components, and is similar to a Controller Module. It is the modular
component that contains the "brains" of the MBC/RBC enclosure. This unit
holds the processor, memory chips, analog-to-digital converter, supporting
circuitry, and operator terminal ports.
point condition
State of a point such as normal, alarm, alarm-by-command, failed or operator
disabled.
point module
The component of a PTM which provides the signal conversion between the
MBC/RBC enclosure and the field input or output point.
Point Termination
Module
The interface between the Gateway or Controller Module and the field device.
PTM
Point Termination Module.
RBC
Remote Building Controller.
RMC
Remote Monitoring and Control. Level 1 Allen-Bradley controller.
RMS
Remote Monitoring and Sequencing. Level 1 Allen-Bradley controller.
RTU
Rooftop Unit. Level 2 Allen-Bradley controller.
SCAC
Self-Contained Air Conditioner.
service box
MBC/RBC enclosure component that receives the line power for the field
panels.
termination block
The component of the PTM at which the field devices are terminated.
text-based terminal
An operator terminal which displays and accepts text only.
totalized value
The sum of information (in hours or minutes) about logical points such as run
time, total volume, degree days, and so on.
unbundle
Term used to describe the action of entering a point that resides in an
equipment controller's database into the field panel's database so that it can
be monitored at and/or controlled from the field panel.
WSHP
Water Source Heat Pump. Level 2 Allen-Bradley controller.
Glossary-3
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
Notes
Glossary-4
Index
A
G
Address format............................................ 4-5
address, point.............................................. 4-5
alarm information ........................................ 4-5
Alarm Management..................................... 3-2
applications ................................................. 5-1
Auto-Dial ..................................................... 3-2
gateway
troubleshooting ....................................... 6-2
Gateway Module
troubleshooting ....................................... 6-2
gathering and processing field inputs ......... 1-3
I
B
battery backup............................................. 2-4
battery replacement .................................... 6-7
product number ....................................... 6-7
initial value .................................................. 4-7
intercept ... (See slope and intercept constants)
invert value.................................................. 4-7
L
C
LAI point........................................4-3, 4-6, 4-7
LAN trunk number....................................... 4-5
LAO point ......................................4-3, 4-6, 4-7
LCTLR point................................................ 4-4
LDI point...................................................... 4-3
LDO point.................................................... 4-3
literature pocket .......................................... 2-6
logical points ............................................... 4-1
slopes and intercepts .............................. 4-6
types of ................................................... 4-2
Loop Tuning................................................ 3-2
Cabinet number........................................... 4-5
C-Bus .......................................................... 2-2
commanding over a network................1-4–1-5
compatibility ................................................ 1-3
control program
execution of............................................. 1-3
control strategy............................................ 1-3
Controller module........................................ 2-5
in cabinet with Open Processor .............. 2-2
COV limit ..................................................... 4-7
D
M
MBC ............... See Modular Building Controller
M-Bus ................................... See Modular Bus
McQuay communications ........................... 6-6
troubleshooting ....................................... 6-6
Metadrop..................................................... 5-8
MMI/modem port......................................... 2-6
communication speed of......................... 2-6
modem........................................................ 2-6
Modular Building Controller......................... 2-2
compatibility ............................................ 1-3
Module Bus ................................................. 2-5
Database
point address........................................... 4-5
Daylight Savings Time ................................ 3-2
Dial-Up ........................................................ 3-2
display printer .............................................. 2-5
Drop number ............................................... 4-5
Duty Cycling ................................................ 3-2
E
engineering units......................................... 4-6
English units................................................ 4-7
Enthalpy and Dry Bulb Economizer Control 3-2
Equipment Controller Coordinator............... 3-2
Expansion Module Kits................................ 2-5
N
network .........................................1-5, 1-4–1-5
normally closed ........................................... 4-7
F
field equipment............................................ 2-5
field input/output points ............................... 2-5
Field Panel Coordinator .............................. 3-2
O
Open Processor
applications ............................................. 5-1
Index-1
Open Processor With Allen-Bradley PLC-5 Driver Owner’s Manual
battery backup......................................... 2-4
description........................................2-3, 2-7
firmware .................................................. 1-3
memory ................................................... 1-4
multiple modules in one enclosure.......... 2-2
Open Processor
LEDs ....................................................... 2-4
operator access levels ................................ 1-4
operator commands .................................... 1-4
operator interface .................................2-5, 3-1
operator terminals ....................................... 2-5
T
telephone lines............................................ 1-5
Time-Of-Day (TOD) Scheduling ................. 3-2
totalize information...................................... 4-6
Trend Data Collection ................................. 3-2
trending ....................................................... 1-3
troubleshooting ........................................... 6-2
battery replacement ................................ 6-7
Gateway Module ..................................... 6-2
McQuay communications ....................... 6-6
Point Termination Modules ..................... 6-4
points ...................................................... 6-4
Trunk number ............................................. 4-5
P
P2................................................................ 1-5
parts, ordering replacement ........................ 6-2
Peak Demand Limiting (PDL) ..................... 3-2
peer-to-peer networking .............................. 1-5
physical points............................................. 4-2
slope and intercept constants ................. 4-7
PMD trunk ................................................... 1-5
point ............................................................ 1-3
point address............................................... 4-5
point database............................................. 4-1
point definition information .......................... 4-2
point descriptor............................................ 4-4
point name .................................................. 4-2
Point operation
troubleshooting........................................ 6-4
Point Termination Modules ..................2-2, 2-5
troubleshooting........................................ 6-4
point types ............................................4-3–4-4
Power Module ......................................2-2, 2-5
Powers Process Control Language............. 3-1
PPCL. See Powers Process Control Language
printer
alarm ....................................................... 1-5
PTM................ See Point Termination Modules
R
RBC................ See Remote Building Controller
Remote Building Controller ......................... 2-2
compatibility............................................. 1-3
operation of ............................................. 1-3
replacement parts, ordering ........................ 6-2
S
sensor types................................................ 4-7
SI units .................................................4-6, 4-7
slope and intercept constants ..................... 4-6
Start/Stop Time Optimization ...................... 3-2
status lights
Open Processor ...................................... 2-4
Index-2
U
units, engineering........................................ 4-6
V
video display terminals................................ 2-6
virtual points................................................ 4-2
slope and intercept constants ................. 4-7
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