Manual - BikeInn
www.dahon.com
OWNER'S
MANUAL
Parts Guide
01. Wheel
02. Rear Derailleur
03. Chain
04. Crank Set
05. Pedal
06. Seat Post
07. Saddle
08. Bolts for Bottle Cage
09. Frame
10. Head Set
11. Handlepost
12. Handlebars
13. Brake Lever
14. Fork
15. Brakes
NOTE: This manual is meant to act as a guide only. Dahon recommends that
your bicycle is regularly serviced by a qualified bicycle mechanic.
02
Contents
Section 1. First ......................................................................................... 04
A. Bike Fit ............................................................................................. 04
B. Safety ............................................................................................... 04
C. Manual ............................................................................................. 04
Section 2. Safety ...................................................................................... 05
A. The Basics ........................................................................................ 05
B. Riding Safety ..................................................................................... 05
C. Wet Weather Riding ........................................................................... 05
D. Night Riding ....................................................................................... 06
Section 3. Fit .............................................................................................. 07
A. Saddle Position ................................................................................. 07
B. Handlebar Height and Angle ............................................................... 07
Section 4. Tech .......................................................................................... 08
A. Wheels ............................................................................................. 08
1. Installing A Quick Release Front Wheel ............................................ 08
2. Installing A Quick Release Rear Wheel ............................................. 08
B. Brakes: Rim Brakes & Disc Brakes ...................................................... 09
1. Brake Controls and Features ........................................................... 09
2. How Brakes Work .......................................................................... 09
C. Shifting Gears ................................................................................... 10
1. How a Derailleur Drive Train Works ................................................. 10
2. Shifting Gears ............................................................................... 10
3. Shifting the Rear Derailleur ............................................................. 10
4. Shifting the Front Derailleur ............................................................. 10
5. What Gear Should I Be In ............................................................... 11
D. How an Internal Gear Hub Drive Train Works ........................................ 11
1. Shifting Internal Hub Gears ............................................................. 11
2. What Gear Should I Be In ............................................................... 11
E. Chains .............................................................................................. 12
F. Pedals .............................................................................................. 12
G. Transporting Your Bike ....................................................................... 13
Section 5. Service ...................................................................................... 13
Service Intervals .................................................................................... 14
1. Break-in Period .............................................................................. 14
2. After Every Long Hard Ride ............................................................. 14
3. After Every Long Hard Ride or After 10 to 20 Hours of Riding ................ 14
Section 6. Warranty .................................................... .............................. 16
Section 7. Torque Values .......................................................................... 17
03
First
• All folding bicycles and Pack Away Quickly
(P.A.Q) mini-bikes are designed for paved
roads only.
• Only large-wheeled P.A.Q folders are
suitable for flat dirt tracks.
• For large-wheeled P.A.Q folders, do not
attempt to perform jumps, stunts or any other
tricks that are outside the parameters of
transport means.
• The misuse of your bicycle could severely
affect the performance of the components
and could cause potential injury.
Bike Fit
• To prevent an accident, take care to
correctly measure the size of the bike
in proportion to the size of your body.
Failure to evaluate such measurements
may cause you to lose control of the bike
and result in injury.
• For questions about sizing, please contact
your local representative for help, or
follow the instructions demonstrated in
Section 3.A
• When adjusting your saddle height,
please see the ‘Minimum Insertion’ guide
as illustrated in Section 3.A.
• Check to make sure the saddle and
seatpost have been securely clamped. A
correctly tightened saddle will not allow
any saddle movement in any direction.
See Section 3.A.
• Adjust the stem and handlebars to
proportion fit you body type. For assistance,
please see Section 3.B.
• Adjust brakes to personal preference.
Brakes should be easy to reach, comfortable
to grasp and powerful enough to quickly bring
your bike to a complete stop.
• Prior to your first test ride, familiarize yourself
with all functions, features and operations of
your new bicycle. Should you have any questions
concerning the performance of your bike, please
see you local dealer for additional information.
Safety
• Helmet – Always wear a helmet that has been properly
fitted to the size of your head when operating any type
of mobility product.
• Traffic and Road Rules - Be aware of your surroundings
and other cyclists. Be courteous to other riders and be
sure to comply with all traffic laws, rules, and regulations.
• Excessive Weight - Unless otherwise stated, a rider’s
weight and luggage should not exceed 105kg (230lbs).
• Wheel Quick Releases - Please see the illustrations in
Section 4.A.1 and 4.A.2 that demonstrate the correct
procedures in operating your wheel quick releases.
Improper use of wheel quick releases can cause unstable
or loose wheels that could disengage from the bicycle,
causing serious injury or death.
• Maintenance for Rims - To prolong the lifetime of your
rims, it is important to ensure they are kept clean and
undamaged along the braking surface. It is advised to
periodically inspect your rims for excessive wear. If you
have any questions concerning the safety of your rims,
please have them inspected by your local bicycle dealer.
• Saddle and Handlebars - Check that the saddle and
handlebar stems are parallel to the bike’s centerline.
Correct saddle and handlebar stems should be clamped
tight to prevent them from moving out of alignment.
• Handlebar Ends (if applicable) - If your bike is equipped
with handlebar ends, it is recommended to check that the
grips are secure and in good condition. A properly fitted
handlebar end should not exhibit excessive movement.
If you need additional assistance in replacing or managing
your handlebar ends, please contact your local bicycle
representative.
NOTE:
Installation of TT bars, criterion, aero bars, bar ends
or a triathlon style clip-on can potentially affect your
reaction times when braking and steering.
Manual
As a user of the Dahon service guide, it is paramount
to maintain that its contents are offered only as a guide.
Any information presented is not to be misconstrued as
actual or implied references to the maintenance and
care of Dahon products.
CAUTION:
Dahon is not liable for accidents, injuries or product
malfunctions that result from unauthorized changes/
modification or tampering with any part of original
specifications.
04
Safety
The Basics
WARNING:
• Acknowledge and stop at ALL stop signs
and traffic lights.
It is your responsibility to comply with
all traffic related laws and to use proper
equipment. This includes appropriate
cycling attire and bike maintenance.
• When coming to a complete stop, look
both ways at street intersections before
continuing onward.
• Use official hand signals for turning and
stopping.
Observe all local bicycle traffic laws and regulations.
Observe regulations about bicycle lighting, licensing,
riding on pavements/sidewalks, bike path and trail
use, helmet laws, child laws relating to cycling, and
special bicycle traffic laws. It is your responsibility to
know and obey your local laws.
• Do not ride with headphones.
• Do not carry a passenger.
• Never hold onto another vehicle.
• Do not weave through traffic or make
unexpected moves or turns.
• Before you ride your bike, always check to make
sure everything is working and correctly aligned.
• Be familiar with the controls of your bicycle:
brakes (Section 4.B);
pedals (Section G);
and shifting (Section 4.C).
• Keep all body parts or any obtrusive objects away
from the sharp chainrings when pedalling. Failure to
wear proper attire could lead to injuries.
• Rules that govern the right-of-way for
motorists apply to cyclists. A bicyclist
should always be prepared to yield.
Riding Safety
Wet Weather Riding
• Do not ride while under the influence of
alcohol or drugs.
• Avoid riding in bad weather when visibility
is obscured: dawn, dusk, or in the dark. Such
conditions increase the risk of accident.
• While riding, remember you are sharing the road
or path with others - i.e. motorists, pedestrians and
other cyclists.
WARNING:
• Always be a defensive rider. Always assume that
others do not see you and expect the unexpected.
Wet weather impairs traction, braking
and visibility for bicyclists and other
motor vehicles sharing the road. During
wet conditions, the risk of an accident
is dramatically increased.
• Always be aware of your surrounds. Be alert and
responsive to:
»» motor vehicles of all types and in all directions
»» unexpected movement of obstacles
»» nearby pedestrians
»» children or animals in the area
»» imperfections of bike paths or paved roads
including potholes, uneven surfaces, loose
gravel, construction and debris
»» warning, hazard and yield signs
Under wet conditions, the power and traction
of your brakes (Note: Weather conditions
affect other vehicles sharing the road) are
dramatically reduced. Under such conditions,
it is harder to control your speed and easier
to lose control. To make sure that you can
slow down and stop safely in wet conditions,
ride slowly and apply your brakes earlier.
( Section 4.B)
• Ride in designated bike lanes when available and
always ride in the direction of traffic.
05
Night Riding
Cyclists should exercise extra caution when
riding at night. Bicyclists are very difficult for
motorists and pedestriansto see in the dark
and in many cases, night riding can be more
dangerous than day riding.
It is suggested that children should never ride
at dawn, dusk or at night.
Individuals of an appropriate age who are
aware of the increased risks should take
extra care when riding at dawn, dusk or at
night. Please note that it is important to
choose suitable apparel and specialized
equipment when riding in unfavourable
conditions to reduce the risk of injury.
See your local dealer for more information
about safely equipment for riding at night.
• Purchase and install a battery or self powergenerating head and tail light. Seek advice for
local requirements regarding visibility for head
and tail lights.
• It is important you take steps to enhance your
visibility by wearing light-colored, reflective
clothing and accessories. There are plenty of
proper reflective gear options that can be worn:
vests, armbands, leg bands, stripes on your
helmet, and blinkers attached to your body
and or bicycle.
• Make sure your clothing or miscellaneous
items do not obstruct the visibility of your
reflectors and lights.
• Make sure that your bicycle is equipped with
reflectors for riding at dawn, dusk or at night.
WARNING:
Reflectors should not be worn as a
substitute for required lighting. Cyclists
are near to invisible for other cyclists
and motorists if the necessary lights
and reflective gear are not used.
If you ride at night, take all required
precautions to make yourself visible
through the use of lights and reflectors.
Lack of adequate lighting measures
may result in serious injury or death.
As a moving cyclist, reflectors are
designed to reflect off of car and street
lights to help you become more visible
and recognizable when riding.
While riding at dawn, at dusk or at night:
• Ride slowly.
• Avoid dark areas and areas of heavy or
fast-moving traffic.
• Avoid road hazards.
When riding in heavy traffic:
• Be responsive and attentive. Ride your bicycle
in clear, visible areas for motorists.
• Be alert.
• Ride defensively and expect the unexpected.
CAUTION:
Reflectors and their mounting brackets
should be checked regularly to ensure
they are clean, straight and securely
mounted. Consult with your dealer about
replacing any damaged reflectors that are
loose or bent. Check to be sure you comply
with all local laws about night riding.
Please see the following recommendations:
• Ask your dealer about traffic safety classes
or books on bicycle traffic safety.
06
Fit
Saddle Position
Correct saddle adjustment and placement
is a significant factor in getting the best
performance, as well as comfort from your
bicycle. If you do not feel comfortable in
your saddle position, see your local dealer.
Saddles can be adjusted
in 3 directions:
• Up and down adjustment.
Check for correct saddle height:
»» Sit on the saddle.
»» Place your heel on the pedal.
»» While on the pedal, rotate the crank until
heel of the foot is in the downward position,
and the crank arm is parallel to the
seat tube.
If your leg is not completely straight, your
saddle height may need to be adjusted. If
your hips are uneven when your foot extends
to reach the pedal, the saddle is too high.
If the saddle is too low, your leg will bend at
the knee when your heel is on the pedal.
Once the height of the saddle is correct, make
sure that the seat post does not project from
the frame beyond the minimum or maximum
extension marks.
WARNING:
If your seatpost projects from the frame
beyond the minimum or maximum
extension marks, it is possible that your
seatpost may break, causing you to lose
control or fall.
• Front and back adjustment - The saddle
can be adjusted to go forward or backward
to help you get the optimal position on the
bike. Ask your dealer to set the saddle for
the best possible outcome while riding.
• Saddle angle adjustment – Most people
prefer a horizontal saddle, but some riders
like the saddle nose angled up or down.
Your dealer can adjust the saddle angle to
your preferred riding position.
NOTE:
Making small changes within the saddle position
will make a big difference in the performance and
comfort level of your ride. To find your best saddle
position, change the positioning by making several
small adjustments.
NOTE:
Periodically consult your local dealer if your bicycle
has a suspension seatpost.
WARNING:
Prior to riding and after any saddle adjustment,
be sure that the saddle adjusting mechanism is
properly tightened. A loose saddle clamp or seatpost
binder can cause damage to the structure. A correctly
tightened saddle will not allow movement in any
direction. Periodically check to make sure that the
saddle adjusting mechanism is properly tightened.
Failure to inspect may cause loss of control and injury.
Handlebar Height and Angle
WARNING:
The stem’s minimum insertion mark should not be
visible above the headset. If the stem is extended
beyond its minimum or maximum marks it could
cause damage or break the fork's steering tube,
which could cause you to lose control and fall.
NOTE:
Any local dealer can change the angle
of the handlebar or bar-end extended.
WARNING:
If a bolt for a stem binder is insufficiently tightened,
it may compromise steering and cause you to lose
control and fall. To avoid this, check for tightness
by placing the front wheel of the bicycle between
your legs and attempting to twist the handlebar/stem
assembly.
The bolts are not properly tightened if you are able to:
1. Twist the stem (in relation to the front wheel),
2. Turn the handlebars (in relation to the stem), or
3. Turn the bar-end extensions (in relation to the
handlebar)
07
Tech
Wheels
Installing a Quick Release Front Wheel
CAUTION:
• If the lever cannot be pushed to a parallel
position with the fork blade, return the lever
to the OPEN position. Then try to turn the
tension-adjusting nut counter-clockwise by
one-quarter turn.
If your bike is equipped with disk brakes,
be careful not to damage the disk, caliper
or brake pads when re-inserting the disk
into the caliper. Unless the disk is correctly
inserted in the calliper, do not activate a disk
brake’s control lever. See also Figure 4.B.
• To restore correct brake pad-to-rim clearance,
re-engage the brake quick-release mechanism.
Check by spinning the wheel of your bicycle to
see if it is centered in the frame and clears the
brake pads. Lastly, squeeze the brake levers to
make sure they are working properly.
• Move the quick-release lever away from the
wheel to the OPEN position.
• With the steering fork facing forward, insert
the wheel between the fork blades, so the axle
seat is firmly on top of the slots that are at the
tips of the fork blades - the fork dropouts. The
quick-release lever should be on the left side
of the bicycle.
Installing a Quick Release Rear Wheel
• With your right hand holding the quick-release
lever in the OPEN position, tighten the tensionadjusting nut with your left hand until it is tight
against the fork dropout.
• Check to make sure the rear derailleur is
still in its outermost, high-gear position.
• Pull back the derailleur body with your right
hand.
• Simultaneously, push the wheel firmly to the
top of the slots in the fork dropouts and center
the wheel rim in the fork. Move the quick-release
lever upwards and swing it into the CLOSED
position. The lever should be parallel to the fork
blade and curved back toward the wheel. With
just the right amount of force, the lever should
make a clear, embossed mark on the surface
of the fork.
• Move the quick-release lever to the OPEN
position, the lever should now be on the
side of the wheel opposite the derailleur and
free-wheel sprockets.
• Place the chain on top of the smallest freewheel sprocket. Then, insert the wheel up and
then back into the frame dropouts. Pull it all the
way into the dropouts section.
WARNING:
• Tighten the quick-release adjusting nut until
it is firmly against the frame dropout. Swing the
lever toward the front of the bike. To be sure,
the lever should be parallel to the frame’s chain
stay (seat stay) and curved toward the wheel.
When applying the correct amount of clamping
force, you should be able to wrap your fingers
around the frame tube for leverage. A sign you
have done this correctly is when you have a clear,
embossed mark in the surface of your frame.
A secure clamping process of the front and
rear wheels should take considerable force.
When securing the tension of the rear wheels,
you should be able to fully close the quick
release by wrapping your fingers around
the fork blade for leverage. The lever should
leave a clear, embossed mark in the surface
of your fork if it is done correctly. Open the
lever, turn the tension-adjusting nut Clockwise
a quarter turn, then try again to achieve the
proper safety measures.
08
Brakes – Rim Brakes
& Disc Brakes
How Brakes Work
Riding with improperly adjusted brakes or
worn brake pads is hazardous. This can
result in a serious injury or death. Applying
the brakes too hard or abruptly can lock up
a wheel, which could cause you to lose
control and fall. Sudden or excessive
application of the front brake may throw the
rider over the handlebars, which could also
result in injury or death.
The function of a rim-actuated brake on a
bicycle is to cause friction between the brake
surface (usually the brake pads) and the
wheel rim. Keep your wheel rims and brake
pads clean and free of dirt, lubricants, waxes
or polishes for maximum friction. An important
bicycle brake is the disc brake. To install a
disc brake, you must use special disc brake
mounts on the frame and fork, as well as
special hubs. These brakes are small and rely
heavily on brake pads that squeeze from both
sides of a small disc rotor that is mounted on
each wheel. Disc brakes are quite resistant to
weather and provide great stopping ability on
steep hills or on wet terrain.
A number of bicycle brakes, such as disc
brakes and linear-pull brakes are extremely
powerful. Please take extra care when using
them. Disc brakes can overheat with extended
use; be careful not to touch a disc brake until
it has completely cooled down. See the
manufacturer’s instructions for operation and
care for your brakes or call your dealer.
Brake Controls and Features
It is very important to learn and remember
which brake lever controls which brake.
Your bike comes pre-set and adjusted; the
right brake lever controls the rear brake
and the left lever controls the front brake.
Check to make sure your hands can reach
and squeeze the brake levers.
Brakes are designed to stop or control the
speed of your bike. The maximum braking
force on each wheel will occur right before
the wheel “locks up” (stops rotating) and
starts to skid. Once a tire skids, you will lose
your ability to slow down as well as control
of direction.
NOTE:
Do not allow oil or lubrication to touch
your brake pads or rims’ braking surfaces.
When replacing worn brake shoes, please
use factory authorized brake replacements.
NOTE:
In the UK and Japan, brakes are aligned
differently. The right lever controls the
front brake while the left lever controls
the rear brake. All brakes should be
adjusted according to local regulations.
09
Shifting Gears
Shifting the Rear Derailleur
Your multi-speed bicycle will have a
derailleur drive train, an internal gear
hub drive train, or in some cases a
combination of the two drive trains.
The right shifter controls the rear derailleur.
The main function of the rear derailleur is to
move the drive chain from one gear sprocket
to the other. Smaller sprockets on the rear
wheel gear cluster produce higher gear ratios.
When pedalling in higher gears, it requires
greater amount of effort, but will take you a
further distance with each turn of the pedal
crank. The larger sprockets produce lower
gear ratios, which use less pedalling effort,
but propel you a shorter distance with each
spin. Two set screws or limit screws on the
rear derailleur body are designed to restrict
the travel of the rear derailleur. By tightening
the high-rear derailleur adjustment gear
screws, it will keep the chain from shifting off
the small (high) gear. This is located on the
rear axel. Also, by tightening the low-rear
derailleur adjustment gear screws, you will
notice that the chain will stop from shifting
off the large (low) gear into the rear wheel.
When moving the chain from a smaller
sprocket (in the gear cluster) to a larger
sprocket, it will result in a downshift. Moving
the chain from the smaller sprocket on the
chainrings to a larger sprocket will result in
an “upshift”. In order for the derailleur to
move the chain from one sprocket to another,
the rider must be pedalling forward.
How a Derailleur Drive Train Works
If your bicycle has a derailleur drive train,
gear-changing mechanisms include:
»» a rear cassette or free-wheel
sprocket cluster
»» A rear derailleur
»» in most cases, a front derailleur
»» 1 or 2 shifters
»» 1-3 front sprocket chainrings
»» a drive chain
Shifting Gears
There are several different types and
styles of shifting controls available:
levers, twist grips, triggers, combination
shift brake controls and push buttons.
Ask your dealer to explain the type of
shifting controls that are on your bike
and how they work.
A downshift is a shift to a “lower” or “slower”
gear, which is easier to pedal. An upshift is
a shift to a“higher” or “faster” pedal gear.
To select a gear that will make pedalling
easier on a hill, you can change the downshift
gear in one of two ways: shift the chain down
(the gear “steps” to a smaller gear at the front)
or shift the chain up (the gear “steps” to a
larger gear in the rear). A downshift moves
the chain up to a larger gear. Remember
that shifting the chain towards the centerline
of the bike is for accelerating and climbing,
which is called a downshift. Moving the chain
away from the centerline of the bike is for
speed, and is called an upshift.
Shifting the Front Derailleur
The front derailleur, which is controlled by
the left shifter, switches the chain between
the larger and smaller chainrings. Shifting
the chain onto a smaller chainring makes
pedalling easier (a downshift), while shifting
to a larger chainring makes pedalling harder
(an upshift). Two adjustment screws are
located on the front derailleur. The first one
is to limit the travel of the front derailleur for
the chain to be shifted upwards towards the
larger, higher pedal gears. This will not allow
the chain to “overshift.” The second screw
limits the travel of the front derailleur
towards the smaller or easier-to-pedal chain
wheel. By limiting travel, it prevents the
chain from“undershifting” by keeping the
chain from falling off the chain wheel and
onto the frame.
Whether upshifting or downshifting, the bicycle
derailleur system design requires that the drive
chain be in a forward-moving motion and is
under some tension.
NOTE:
A derailleur will only shift if you are
pedalling forward.
10
WARNING:
Never shift the derailleur onto the largest
or the smallest sprocket if the derailleur
is not shifting smoothly. If a derailleur is
out of alignment or not working properly,
check to see if the chain is jammed. Failing
to ensure the safety of your bicycle may
cause you to lose control and fall.
Which Gear Should I Be In?
The combination of the largest rear-gear
and the smallest front-gear are used for
steep hills. The smallest rear and largest
front gear combination is also used for
maximum speed. It is not necessary to
shift gears in sequence. Instead, find the
“starting gear” that is right for you - a gear
which is high enough for strong acceleration
and low enough so you can set off without
wobbling. As an experiment with upshifting
and downshifting, test each of the different
gear combinations.
First, build your confidence by practicing
gear shifts where there are no hazards or
other traffic. Learn to anticipate the need
to shift, and shift to a lower gear before the
hill gets too steep. If you have difficulties
with shifting, there might be an error with
the mechanical adjustment -- see your
dealer for help.
How an Internal Gear Hub
Drive Train Works
If your bicycle has an internal gear hub
drive train, the gear changing mechanism
will consist of:
»» a 3, 5, 7, 8 or possibly 12-speed
internal gear hub
»» 1 or 2 shifters
»» 1 or 2 control cables
»» 1 front sprocket chainring, and
»» a drive chain
Shifting Internal Gear Hub Gears
Shifting with an internal gear hub drive train is a
matter of simply moving the shifter to the indicated
position for the desired gear. After you have moved
the shifter to the gear position of your choice, ease
the pressure on the pedals to allow the hub to
complete the shift.
Which Gear Should I Be In?
Lower gears (1) are for steep hills whereas larger
gears (3, 5, 7 or 12, depending on the number of
speeds on your hub) are for riding at high-speeds.
11
Chains
Pedals
Today, single-speed and three-speed
bicycles as well as many other IGH
(Internal Geared Hubs) systems use
a “1/2 x 1/8” chain with a master link.
• Toe clips and straps are a way to keep your
feet correctly positioned and engaged with the
pedals. Toe clips are positioned on the ball of
the foot over the pedal spindle, which gives you
maximum pedalling power. When tightened,
the toe strap keeps the foot engaged throughout
the rotation cycle of the pedal. Specific cycling
shoes are designed to work effectively with toe
clips and straps. Prior to riding in traffic, it is
important to be accustomed to the use of toe
clips.
To reinstall the “1/2 x 1/8” chain, turn
the bicycle upside down. After reinstalling
the chain, pull the rear wheel axle in the
reverse direction. With the rotation of the
chain, any tight or loose spots are due
to inconsistent chain wheel roundness.
Always keep the chain tight.
Derailleur equipped bicycles use a
narrower “1/2 x 3/32” chain that does
not have a master link. With a “1/2 x 3/32”
chain, it is necessary to use a special
tool to push a link pin out of the chain
to separate and remove it. There are
several methods of measuring the chain
to determine if it is too worn. If chain is
too worn, bike shops sell excellent chain
wear indicators. The rear wheel undergoes
more chain rotation than the front, therefore
note that restoring any worn chain may
mean replacing the rear wheel cassette or
freewheel.
• Clipless pedals (sometimes called “step-in-pedals”)
are another way to keep the foot securely fastened
in the correct position. A plate, called a “cleat”, is
located on the sole of the shoe, which clicks into a
mating spring-loaded fixture on the pedal. The only
way to engage or disengage is with a very specific
motion that must be practiced.
12
Transporting Your Bike
All 16 and 20-inch wheeled folding bicycles
can be transported by the methods in Sections
A, B, C, and D. Bikes with 24 and 26-inch
wheels, as well as road bikes with 700c
wheels, have limited carrying abilities and
will not fit in overhead compartments or
specific places. Using the methods described
in Sections C and D are no problem. Our
suggestion when commuting (medium distance
travel) is to carry a nylon bag. For long
distance travellers, the 24 to 26-inch wheeled
bikes and the 700c road bicycles should be
packed in a sturdy travel case.
B
A
C
Carrying
Bag
For short and medium distances, carrying
a 16 to 20-inch wheeled folded bicycle is
trouble-free. When using Jetstream full
suspension bicycles, make sure you have
the black nylon bag to bind the wheels
together (sold separately).
You can easily grab the bicycle and carry
the bag by the saddle’s edge. When crossing
a threshold, boarding a bus, train or plane or
even simply stowing the bike in an overhead
compartment, feel confident in knowing that
your bike is ready!
For a clean, efficient method of packing and
carrying many Dahon bicycles, place the
folded, collapsed or packed-away bicycle in
a carry bag. There are spacious internal
pockets for parts that must be removed, such
as pedals, or tools you might need later.
Having a nice, neat package is easy when
the sides of the bag are pulled up tight and
the handle/shoulder strap is fastened. The
entire process will only take a few seconds.
It is perfect to carry your bike on any public
conveyance or in a car (the carry bag is not
approved for airline check in).
Rolling
An easy or more efficient method to
transport your 16 to 20-inch wheeled
bicycles is to roll them on their wheels.
Remember that the Jetstream fork and
frame must be bound together, thus
making the wheels roll. By folding the
bike towards you, tilt or angle the bike
seat post approximately 305mm (12 inches),
then push the bicycle forward. This method
is perfect for travel: from parking lots to
smooth granite or tile floors.
D
Travel Case
A semi-hard travel case is a perfect long
distance transportation solution for most
folding bicycles.They have been proven
to work well on any public transportation
system. Many travel cases are able to
withstand the most difficult safety challenges
in travelling-airport check-in. You can find
travel cases large enough for most 16, 20,
and 24-inch wheeled bicycles. However,
when transporting bikes that have 26-inch
wheels, the wheels must be removed.
13
Service
Break-in Period
WARNING:
With increasing technological advances
and innovations, bicycles and their
components are more complex than
ever. This manual is to provide all the
information required to properly repair
and or maintain your bicycle. In order to
help minimize the chances of an accident
and possible injury, it is critical that you
have any repairs or maintenance performed
by your dealer. Routine maintenance
requirements will be determined by your
riding style and geographic location.
Consult your dealer for help in determining
your maintenance requirements.
Your bike will last longer and work better if you
break it in. Control cables and wheel spokes
may stretch or “seat” when a new bike is first
used, and may require readjustment by your
dealer. The ‘Mechanical Safety Check’ can help
you identify components that will need
readjustment. If everything seems fine to you,
it is still always best to take your bike back to the
dealer for a check-up. Typically, dealers suggest
you bring the bike in for a 30-day check-up.
A way to judge when it is time for the first check-up
is to bring the bike in after three to five hours of
hard off-road use, or about 10 to 15 hours of on
and off-road use. If you think something is wrong
with the bike, take it to your dealer before riding
it again.
WARNING:
After Every Long or Hard Ride
Bicycle maintenance and repair tasks
require special knowledge and tools.
Until you have learned to properly
complete any adjustments or services
on your bicycle from a dealer, do not
ride your bicycle. Improper adjustment
or service may result in damage to the
bicycle or in an accident that can cause
serious injury or death.
If the bike has been exposed to water, dirt
or endured tough terrain, make sure you
clean and lightly oil the chain with a dry
Teflon lubrication (synthetic based chain lube).
Then, wipe off any excess oil. Long lasting
lubrication varies with climate: hot or cold,
wet or dry. For general cycle lubrication,
Dahon suggests using lightweight mineral
based oil that is available in most bike shops
or hardware stores. If you have any questions,
please talk to your dealer as incorrect
lubricants can damage the painted surfaces.
Service Intervals
After Every Long or Hard Ride or
After Every 10 to 20 Hours of Riding
Various service and maintenance should
be performed by the owner, which do not
require any special tools or knowledge
beyond what is presented in this manual.
Throughout the manual you will find the
following examples in the types of services
you should perform yourself. All other
services, maintenance and repairs should
be executed in a properly equipped facility
by a qualified bicycle mechanic, using the
correct tools and procedures specified by
the manufacturer.
Whilst squeezing the front brake, rock the bike
back and forth. If you hear unusual or clonking
noises with each forward or backward movement
of the bike, you probably have a loose headset.
To check the tightness of your headset, lift the
front wheel off the ground and swing it from side
to side. If you feel any binding or roughness in
steering, you may have a tight headset. Another
test is to hold one pedal and shake it back and
forth from the centerline of the bike and then do
the same with the opposite pedal. Any looseness
should be referred to your dealer.
14
Look at the brake pads. If they are
starting to look worn or are not properly
hitting the wheel rim squarely, please
consult your local dealer to have them
adjusted or replaced. Check the control
cables and cable housings. If there are
any signs of rust or fraying, have your
dealer replace them. Also check for
consistency between dealer to adjoining
pair of spokes on either side of each
wheel by running your thumb and index
finger over each spoke. Do they all feel
the same? If any spokes feel too loose,
have your dealer check the wheel.
Also check to make sure that all parts
and accessories are still securely fastened.
When it is time for replacement parts, be
sure to use factory authorized replacement
parts from your local authorized Dahon
dealer. Check the frame, specifically in
the area surrounding all of the tube joints;
handlebars, stem, and seatpost for parts,
be deep scratches, cracks or discoloration.
These examples are signs of stress-caused
fatigue and are an indication that it needs
to be replaced.
WARNING:
Like many mechanical devices,
a bicycle and its components
are subject to wear and tear. Different
materials and mechanisms can wear or
fatigue from stress at different rates
because they have different life cycles.
If a component’s life cycle is exceeded,
the component can suddenly fail, causing
serious injury or death to the rider.
Scratches, cracks, fraying and discoloration
are signs of stress-caused fatigue and indicate
that a part is at the end of its useful life, and
needs to be replaced. While individual
components may be covered by a warranty for
a specified period of time by the manufacturer,
there is no guarantee that the product will last
the entire term of the warranty. Product life will
rely heavily on the riding conditions and treatment
of the product. The bicycle’s warranty does not
entail that the bicycle will not get broken or last
forever--it means the bicycle is covered by
specified subject matters under the warranty.
15
Warranty
Dahon Two-Year Limited
Warranty
Dahon warrants its bicycle frames and rigid
forks are free from possible defects. Dahon
warrants all original parts on the bicycle,
excluding suspension forks and rear shocks,
for a period of 2 years from the date of
purchase. Suspension forks and rear shocks
are covered by the warranty of the original
manufacturers. This warranty is limited to the
repair and replacement of a defective frame,
fork, or defective part and this shall be the
sole redress of the warranty. The warranty
only applies to the original owner and it is
not transferable. The warranty only covers
bicycles and components purchased through
an authorized Dahon dealer. It is only valid
within the country the bicycle was purchased.
The warranty does not cover:
• normal wear and tear
• improper assembly
• follow-up maintenance
• installation of parts/accessories
(not originally intended or compatible
with the bicycles sold)
• damage/failure due to accident
• misuse
• neglect
• modification of the frame, fork or components
Exclusions
• For all city, road or trekking bikes-Damage
resulting from commercial use, accident, misuse,
abuse, neglect and or other non-standard use of
the product.
Making a Warranty Claim
To make a warranty claim, you must present
both the original receipt of sale and the limited
warranty statement (proof of warranty coverage)
at the place of purchase. If this is not an option,
contact your local retailer. Should you need
further assistance, please visit our website,
www.dahonbikes.com where you will find
contact information for your specific region
and one of our associates will be happy to
assist you.
NOTE:
A warranty registration card must be
completed and received by Dahon before
a warranty claim can be processed. Take
your bicycle to your local dealer who will
then contact a Dahon representative to
determine the necessary coverage by the
warranty. This warranty does not affect the
statutory rights of the consumer. If issued,
local laws will take precedent.
Warranty Upgrade
The warranty on the frame, handlepost and
rigid fork may be upgraded if the original owner
fills out the online registration form. To activate
your Dahon warranty, Register Your Dahon at
www.dahonbikes.com
Your registration confirmation email,
along with original proof of purchase, serves as
proof of ownership for future warranty issues.
Exclusions from the standard warranty also apply
to the extended warranty.
16
Torque Values
Handlebar, Headset, Saddle, and Seat Post
Component
in•lbs
Newton Meters (Nm)
kgf•cm
Dahon large hex key
headset screw (10mm)
52~87
6.8~11.3
60~100
Dahon handlepost
clamp screw (6mm)
87
11.3
100
Stem steer tube binder bolts;
threadless headset
115~145
13~16.4
132~167
Dahon threadless innite
adjustable stem h/bar clamp
44~53
5~6
51~61
Dahon threadless innite
adjustable stem rear stem clamp
62~71
7~8
71~82
Stem handlebar clamp
1 or 2 binder bolts
175~260
19.8~29.4
201~299
Stem handlebar clamp
4 binder bolts
120~145
13.6~16.4
138~167
MTB bar ends, alloy
144
16.3
164
MTB bar ends, magnesium
70
7.9
81
Seat rail binder
156.3~182.3
18.0~21.0
180~210
Kore I-beam rail clamp
85
9.6
98
Stem screw
156.3~199.7
18~23
180~230
Stem inside screw
78.1~112.8
9~13
90~130
17
Brake-Rim and Disc and Brake Lever
Component
in•lbs
Newton Meters (Nm)
kgf•cm
Brake lever - MTB type
53~60
6~6.8
61~69
Brake lever - drop bar type
(including STI & ERO types)
55~80
6.2~9
63~92
Disc rotor to hub (M5 bolts)
18~35
2~4
21~40
Disc rotor to hub
(M965 rotor lockring)
350
39.5
402.5~
Disc rotor to hub (Avid)
55
6.2
63
Caliper mount
55~70
6.2~7.9
63~81
Crankset, Bottom Bracket and Pedal Area
Component
in•lbs
Newton Meters (Nm)
kgf•cm
Pedal into crank
307
34.7
353
Crank bolt - including spline
and square type spindles
300~395
33.9~44.6
345~454
Crank bolt - one key release
44~60
5~6.8
51~69
Crank bolt - one key release
(Truvativ)
107~125
12.1~14.1
123~144
Bottom bracket adjustable type
610~700
68.9~79.1
702~805
Bottom bracket cartridge type
435~610
49.1~68.9
500~702
18
Front and Rear Hubs; QR and Nutted Axles
Component
in•lbs
Newton Meters (Nm)
kgf•cm
Freehub body
305~434
34.5~49
35~499
Cassette sprocket lockring;
disc brake lockring
260~434
29.4~49
299~499
Front axle nuts
180
20.3
207
Rear axle nuts to frame
(non-quick release type wheels)
260~390
29.4~44.1
299~449
Handlebar, Headset, Saddle, and Seat Post
Component
in•lbs
Newton Meters (Nm)
kgf•cm
BAB lower frame coupling
35
4
40
BAB upper seat binder bolt
35~55
4~6.2
40~63
BB mid seat mast binder bolt
35~55
4~6.2
40~63
Kickstand mounting bolt
60
6.8
69
H2O cage mounting screw
25~35
2.8~4
29~40
Frame front or rear rack
braze-on bolt torque
25~35
2.8~4
29~40
Fender to frame mounting
bolt torque
50~60
5.6~6.8
58~69
Formulas for converting to other torque designations:
in•lb = ft•lb x 12
in•lb = Nm x 8.851
in•lb = kgf•cm / 1.15
19
OWNER'S MANUAL
Headquarters
Dahon North America INC.
833 Meridian Street
Duarte CA 91010
+1 800 442 3511
www.dahon.com
Dahon Technologies, Ltd.
Dahon Bldg, Furong 6th
Rd., Shajing
Shenzhen, 518125, P.R.C
+86 755 27249136
Dahon Europe
No.1 P.O. Box 17,
Goliamokonarsko Shosse Str.
Tsaratsovo Village, 4027, Bulgaria
+359 32335 598
2012 Dahon North America
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