Esse Ironheart Cookstove Owner`s Manual

Esse Ironheart Cookstove Owner`s Manual
Installation and Operating
Instructions for the
ESSE Cookstove
Save these Instructions
Ouzledale Foundry Co. Limited, Long Ing,
Barnoldswick, Lancashire BB18 6BN England
Table of Contents
SAFETY NOTES..............................................................................................................................1
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Your Stove........................................................................................................................................2
Lighting and Controlling the Fire........................................................................................................2
Correct Running Temperatures..........................................................................................................5
Extended burning..............................................................................................................................5
Fuel..................................................................................................................................................6
Operating the Oven and Hob.............................................................................................................6
Cleaning the Stove............................................................................................................................7
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
Chimney and Flue Information..........................................................................................................8
Flue Draught Guide.........................................................................................................................13
Positioning and Flue Connection.....................................................................................................14
Parts Diagram.................................................................................................................................15
Safety Notes
Properly installed, operated and maintained, this appliance will not emit fumes into the dwelling.
However occasional fumes from de–ashing and re–fuelling may occur.Persistent fume emission is
potentially dangerous and must not be tolerated. If fume emission does persist, open doors and
windows to ventilate the room. Let the fire burn out or eject and safely dispose of fuel from the
appliance. Once the fire is cold, check the flue and chimney for blockages and clean if required.
For Canada: The authority having jurisdiction (such as municipal building department, fire
department, fire prevention bureau, etc.) should be consulted before installation to
determine the need to obtain a permit
•
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RELIGHT THE FIRE UNTIL THE CAUSE OF THE FUME EMISSION HAS
BEEN IDENTIFIED AND CORRECTED. SEEK EXPERT ADVICE IF NECESSARY.
•
DO NOT FIT AN EXTRACTOR FAN IN THE SAME ROOM AS THE APPLIANCE.
•
AN ADEQUATE AIR SUPPLY FOR COMBUSTION AND VENTILATION IS ESSENTIAL. AIR
OPENINGS PROVIDED FOR THIS PURPOSE MUST NOT BE RESTRICTED.
•
IT IS IMPORTANT THAT FLUE WAYS ARE CLEANED FREQUENTLY AND THE CHIMNEY SWEPT
REGULARLY. ALSO THE STOVE MUST BE MAINTAINED IN GOOD MECHANICAL ORDER.
•
IF THE CHIMNEY WAS PREVIOUSLY USED FOR AN OPEN FIRE, IT IS POSSIBLE THAT THE
HIGHER FLUE GAS TEMPERATURES GENERATED BY THE STOVE MAY LOOSEN DEPOSITS
THAT WERE FIRMLY ADHERING TO THE INNER SURFACE OF THE CHIMNEY AND CAUSE
BLOCKAGE OF THE FLUEPIPE. WE RECOMMEND THAT IN SUCH A SITUATION A SECOND
SWEEPING OF THE CHIMNEY SHOULD BE CARRIED OUT WITHIN ONE MONTH OF
REGULAR USE OF THE STOVE AFTER INSTALLATION.
•
THE FIREGUARD SUPPLIED SHOULD BE USED WHEN THE COOKSTOVE IS IN OPERATION.
THE FIRE GUARD SHOULD BE HUNG FROM THE HAND RAIL AND POSITIONED IN FRONT OF
THE FIRE DOOR.
•
AVOID THE USE OF AEROSOL SPRAYS IN THE VICINITY OF THE STOVE WHEN IT IS IN
OPERATION.
•
THE FRONT OF THE STOVE BECOMES VERY HOT WHEN IN USE. DO NOT PLACE TOWELS ON
THE HAND RAIL WHEN THE STOVE IS ALIGHT.
•
DO NOT INSTALL IN A MOBILE HOME
•
DO NOT CONNECT TO OR USE IN CONJUNCTION WITH ANY AIR DISTRIBUTION DUCTWORK
UNLESS SPECIFICALLY APPROVED FOR SUCH INSTALLATIONS.
•
DO NOT USE CHEMICALS OR FLUIDS TO START THE FIRE.
•
DO NOT BURN GARBAGE OR FLAMMABLE FLUIDS SUCH AS GASOLINE, NAPHTHA OR ENGINE
OIL.
•
HOT WHILE IN OPERATION. KEEP CHILDREN, CLOTHING AND FURNITURE AWAY. CONTACT
MAY CAUSE SKIN BURNS.
1
Operating Instructions
Your Stove
Figure 1 shows the stove and its controls. The large glass door on the left is the loading door
through which the fire is lighted and refuelled. The small door at the bottom on the left is the ash
door. The large door to the right of the stove is the oven and the small door at the bottom right is
the oven flue access door.
Included inside your stove is a multi purpose–operating tool - for lifting the ash pan, adjusting the
primary and secondary air supply and opening the doors. A fire guard is also supplied which should
be hung from the rail in front of the fire door when the stove is in operation.
The stove is suitable for burning wood only.
Lighting and Controlling the Fire
Warning: The front of the stove becomes very hot when in use. Do not place towels on the
hand rail when the stove is alight and keep children and pets away from the stove. Always
use the fire guard supplied.
Before lighting ensure that all the internal components are correctly in position. See Figure 3.
Open the ash door on the bottom left of the stove by inserting the operating tool into the handle slot
and turning it in an anti–clockwise direction.
Figure 1 shows the primary air control lever on the left. Push the lever left to open and right to
close. To light the stove the air control should be fully open.
Open the loading door by lifting the handle either manually or using the operating tool. Caution:
when the stove is running the handle will become hot and the operating tool alone should then be
used. Figure 1 shows the secondary air control to the left and the direct flue damper to the right.
As with the primary air control, the lever should be pushed left to open and right to close. The flue
damper is open when the knob is pulled out and closed when it is pushed in. To light the stove the
secondary air control should be fully open and the damper knob pulled out. This will allow fumes to
escape directly up the flue whilst the stove warms up.
Open the air wash control and the primary air control fully. Place some tightly rolled paper on top of
some crumpled paper on the base towards the back of the stove. On top of this, place some small
pieces of wood. Light the crumpled paper and close the door.
Never use gasoline, gasoline-type lantern fuel, kerosene, charcoal lighter fluid, or similar liquids to
start or ‘freshen up’ a fire in this heater. Keep all such liquids well away from the heater while it is in
use.
Once the fire becomes established add some larger pieces of wood. As the stove comes up to
temperature close the primary air inlet. The burning rate of the stove can now be regulated by the
rate at which fuel is added and by adjusting the air wash control.
2
3
USE THIS TO ADJUST THE
DAMPER CONTROL AND
AIRWASH CONTROLS
USE THIS TO OPEN THE
DOORS
USE THIS TO MOVE THE
ASHPAN
FIG. 2 OPERATING TOOL
FIG. 1 THE STOVE
PRIMARY AIR CONTROL
(LEFT TO OPEN)
DAMPER CONTROL
(PULL OUT TO OPEN)
SECONDARY AIR CONTROL
(LEFT TO OPEN)
HOB
HOB LIDS
ASH DOOR
LOADING DOOR
900mm
35.4”
FLUE ACCESS
OVEN DOOR
FIT THE FIRESCREEN AS
SHOWN WHEN THE STOVE
IS IN USE
600mm
23.6”
(Top casting)
85mm
Flue centre
900mm
35.4”
271mm
10.7”
(feet)
For Canada: Clearances may only be reduced by means approved by the regulatory authority.
If the chimney connector goes horizontally through a wall, the floor protection must
extend under the connector and 2”(50mm) beyond each side.
WARNING: DO NOT STORE WOOD WITHIN THE CLEARANCE AREA
4
Notes on Woodburning
Wood burns most efficiently when the air for combustion is supplied from above the fire bed rather than
below. The air supplied above the fire bed provides the oxygen necessary for the volatile gases
(smoke), given off by the wood as it heats, to combust. This ensures that the gases are burnt and used
to heat the stove instead of being wasted up the chimney or condensing and forming tarry deposits
inside the stove, in the flue or on the stove glass. Running the stove with the primary air control open
and the air wash control closed will provide oxygen for the wood to burn on the fire bed but will not
provide air for the volatile gases above the fire bed to combust resulting in a smoky inefficient fire.
With the above in mind it is plain to see that the stove should ideally be run with the primary air inlet
closed and the air wash control open whenever possible. Another advantage of running the stove with
the air wash open is that the air being drawn into the stove travels across the glass forming an air
barrier between the glass and the fire bed helping to prevent smoke particles sticking to the glass.
If the fire dies down too low, opening the primary air control for a short period will revive it.
Correct running temperatures for wood burning
To get the best results from your stove it is recommended that a wood stove thermometer (available
from your stove dealer) be fitted to the flue pipe above the stove, at eye level if possible. The figures
below show the recommended temperature of the flue gases:
115 °C – 245°C (240°F - 475°F)
The flue gases should be in this temperature band for the safest, most efficient and most economical
operation of your stove.
Below 115°C (240°F)
This is below the condensation point of wood gases and may cause the build up of tar in the chimney,
dirty the sto5ve glass and result in the inefficient burning of fuel.
Above 245 °C (475°F)
Too hot. Heat will be wasted up the chimney. Excess heat may damage the stove or ignite an existing
accumulation of tar resulting in a chimney fire.
Don not overfire the cookstove. If the stove or chimney connector glows, you are overfiring.
Extended Wood Burning
Loading a large amount of wood into the stove all at once will reduce the temperature inside the stove.
If the temperature is too low, the gases given off from the wood will be too low to combust resulting in a
lot of smoke covering the inside of the stove, including the glass, with soot. To combat this problem it is
a good idea to increase the temperature of the stove before loading by further opening the air inlets.
Load the wood and leave the air controls open until the moisture is driven out of the wood and the stove
is back up to an efficient operating temperature. The air inlets can then be reduced to hold the
temperature of the stove. Loading the stove little and often will help keep the stove temperature steady.
Note: The above text should be used as a guide only. The ideal operation of your stove depends on a
number of factors, which vary with each installation, and so gaining experience operating your stove is
the only way to learn its best operation.
Creosote - Formation and Need for Removal
When wood is burned slowly, it produces tar and other organic vapours, which combine with expelled
moisture to form creosote. The creosote vapours condense in the relatively cool chimney flue of a slow
burning fire. As a result, creosote residue accumulates on the flue lining. When ignited this creosote
makes an extremely hot fire.
The chimney and chimney connector should be inspected at least once every two months during the
heating season to determine if creosote build up has occured. If creosote has accumulated, it should be
removed to reduce the risk of a chimney fire.
5
Types of wood for fuel
For best results use well seasoned hardwood. Allow wood to dry out under cover in well–ventilated
conditions for at least twelve months. Wood is ready for burning when radial cracks appear in the
end of the logs. Burning wood that is not seasoned will result in tar being deposited in the stove, on
the glass and in the flueways. This build up of tar is a hazard and if it ignites may cause a chimney
fire. Resinous softwood burns well and gives a high output for short periods but is not as efficient
and does not last as long as hardwood.
WARNING: DO NOT STORE WOOD WITHIN THE CLEARANCE AREA OF THE STOVE
Ash Removal
Wood burns best on its own ash and a manageable layer of ash on the grate is of benefit to the
efficient running of your stove. To empty the ashes from the ashpan below the grate, open the door
on the bottom left of the stove using the operating tool by inserting the tool into the slot and turning
anti–clockwise. Insert the tool into the slot on the ash pan and pull forwards to remove.
Ashes should be placed in a metal container with a tight lid. The closed container of ashes should
be placed on a noncombustible floor on the ground, well away from all combustible materials,
pending final disposal. If the ashes are disposed of by burial in soil or otherwise locally dispersed,
they should be retained in the closed container until all cinders have thoroughly cooled.
Operating the Oven and Hobs
The temperature of the hob is graduated from left to right. The left side is hotter and so is used for
boiling, and the right side for simmering. The oven door and the fire door are opened by lifting the
handle either manually or using the operating tool. Both handles will become hot during operation
when a cloth or the operating tool provided is recommended.
The oven and hobs are heated directly by the fire. In order to heat up the oven and hobs the fire
should be lit as described. Once the fire is established the flue damper should be pushed in. This
will allow the hot fumes from the fire to circulate around the inner cavity between the stove and the
oven thus heating up both the hobs and the oven.
The hob lids can be left in the down position when the hob is not being used in order to keep the
hotplate warm. In the up position the they will allow more heat to come into the room.
To reduce the heat going to the oven when the stove is up and running, the flue damper knob can
be pulled out. This will allow the hot fumes to escape directly up the chimney via the boiling side of
the hotplate thus reducing the heat to the oven but maintaining a hot hotplate.
To maintain a good cooking temperature in the oven only requires a small amount of fuel. To
reduce the effective size of the firebox, the fuel bar can be moved towards the back, and thus used
to hold a smaller amount of fuel at the rear of the firebox, see Figure 5. This also has the
advantage of reducing the heat radiated through the window making life easier for the cook.
The temperature gauge on the oven door provides an indication of the oven temperature. It should
be noted however that since the gauge is attached to the door it will drop if the door is left open for
any prolonged period, in which case, the oven may be hotter than is indicated on the dial. Once the
door is closed again the gauge will come back to temperature.
6
Cleaning the Stove
The stove should only be cleaned when it is cold. The exterior can be dusted with a firm brush. Do not
use a cloth, as this will drag on the paint finish leaving lint on the surface.
As the stove top is used for cooking, normal wear and tear will occur. Spills should be wiped up
immediately with a damp cloth, but oven cleaners should not be used on the hob surface.
The exterior of the stove is painted with high temperature stove paint and from time to time it may
become necessary to renovate the exterior by repainting. The surface must be prepared by rubbing
down with a wire brush. The stove paint will not key to the surface if there are fat deposits or food
particles on the area to be resprayed. High temperature stove paints are available in aerosol form from
your stove dealer. Do not use this paint until the stove is completely cold and always follow the
instructions on the container before starting to paint. The usual precautions should be taken such as
covering adjoining surfaces and protecting the bolster lids.
The bolster lids are made from stainless steel. These have been treated with oil at the factory to prevent
fingerprints and marks forming. The lids can be wiped clean with a damp cloth and proprietary stainless
steel cleaners may be used. It is recommended that after such cleaning, the lids be again treated with
oil by wiping over with a lint free cloth. This will prevent fingerprints and smears. Baby oil or similar is
recommended for this purpose.
The loading door glass should stay relatively clean if the correct type of fuel is used as described above,
but from time to time this can be cleaned when cold with a proprietary glass cleaner and a dry cloth, or
depending on soot build up, a nylon pan scourer. Vinegar and newspaper may also successfully be
used.
FIG. 5
ALTERNATIVE FUELBAR POSITIONS
Fuel
placed
at the
back
Fuel bar
fits into
any of
the slots
7
Installation Instructions
Important Installation Notes:
a) When this stove is not properly installed, a house fire may result. To reduce the risk of fire,
follow the installation instructions. Contact local building or fire officials about restrictions and
installation inspection requirements in your area.
b) For the US this room heater must be connected to:
1) A chimney complying with the requirements for Type HT chimneys in the Standard for
Chimneys, Factory-Built, Residential Type and Building Heating Appliance, UL 103, or
2) A code-approved masonary chimney with a flue liner.
c) Please read this entire manual before you install and use your new stove. Failure to follow
instructions may result in property damage, bodily injury or even death.
Chimney and Flue
The successful operation of the stove relies on the adequate performance of the chimney to which it
is connected. The chimney must:
·
Be suitable for solid fuel.
·
Have an internal cross section of no less than 320 cm.sq (8” Dia.). (If a flue liner is used it
should be 6” diameter and suitable for solid fuel).
·
Be a minimum 15’ (4.6m) high from hearth level to pot.
·
Be terminated at least 40” (1m) above roof level so that the chimney does not terminate in a
pressure zone. See Figure 6.
·
Be free from cracks, severe bends, voids, and obstructions.
·
New chimneys must be built in accordance with local building regulations.
·
If the stove is installed as a freestanding appliance, it should not support any part of the
chimney.
·
Voids in the chimney should be avoided, as these will prevent a steady flue draught. The
stove flue pipe should pass beyond the narrowing of the chimney.
·
A flue/chimney access point may also be required so that the state of the chimney can be
checked and any fallen soot removed.
·
External flues must be insulated to prevent heat loss.
·
Where passage through a wall, or partition of combustible consruction is desired, the installation
shall conform to CAN/CSA-B365, Installation Code fo Solid-Fuel-Burning Appliances and
Equipment (Canada).
·
DO NOT CONNECT THIS UNIT TO A CHIMNEY FLUE SERVING ANOTHER APPLIANCE.
·
DO NOT CONNECT TO ANY AIR DISTRIBUTION DUCT OR SYSTEM.
8
Chimney Connection
The chimney connector is a single walled pipe used to connect the stove to the chimney. The
chimney connector MUST be 6" in diameter, with a minimum thickness of 24 gauge black steel or 26
gauge blued steel.
Aluminium and galvanized steel pipe is not acceptable for use with the woodstove. These materials
cannot withstand the extreme temperatures of a wood fire and can give off toxic fumes when heated.
Do not use the connector pipe as a chimney.
Each chimney connector or stove pipe section must be installed to the stove flue collar and to each
other with the male (crimped) end toward the stove.
This prevents any amount of condensed or liquid creosote from running down the outside of the pipe
or the stove top. All joints, including the flue collar connection must be secured with three sheet
metal screws to ensure that the sections do not separate.
No part of the chimney connector may pass through an attic or roof space, closet or other concealed
space, or through a floor ceiling. All sections of the chimney connectors must be accessible for
cleaning. Where passage through a wall or partition of combustible construction is desired, the
installation must conform with NFPA 211 or CAN/CSA-B365.
9
Chimney
DO NOT CONNECT THIS UNIT TO A CHIMNEY FLUE SERVING ANOTHER APPLIANCE. DO
NOT CONNECT TO ANY AIR DISTRIBUTION DUCT OR SYSTEM.
This room heater must be connected to a factory built UL 103 HT chimney (ULC S629, in Canada) or
a code-approved masonry chimney with a flue liner.
Masonry Chimney
Ensure that a masonry chimney meets the minimum standards of the National Fire Protection
Association (NFPA) by having it inspected by a professional. Make sure there are no cracks, loose
mortar or other signs of deterioration and blockage. Have the chimney cleaned before the stove is
installed and operated. When connecting the stove through a combustible wall to a masonry
chimney, special methods are needed.
Factory Built Chimney
When a metal prefabricated chimney is used, the manufacturer’s installation instructions must be
followed. You must also purchase (from the same manufacturer) and install the ceiling support
package or wall pass-through and “T” section package, firestops (where needed), insulation shield,
roof flashing, chimney cap, etc. Maintain proper clearance to the structure as recommended by the
manufacturer. The chimney must be the required height above the roof or other obstructions for
safety and proper draft operation.
10
Combustible Wall Chimney Connector Pass-Throughs
Method A. 12" (304.8 mm) Clearance to Combustible Wall
Member: Using a minimum thickness 3.5" (89 mm) brick
and a 5/8" (15.9 mm) minimum wall thickness clay liner,
construct a wall pass-through. The clay liner must conform
to ASTM C315 (Standard Specification for Clay Fire Linings)
or its equivalent. Keep a minimum of 12" (304.8 mm) of brick
masonry between the clay liner and wall combustibles. The
clay liner shall run from the brick masonry outer surface to
the inner surface of the chimney flue liner but not past the
inner surface. Firmly grout or cement the clay liner in place
to the chimney flue liner.
Method B. 9" (228.6 mm) Clearance to Combustible Wall
Member: Using a 6" (152.4 mm) inside diameter, listed,
factory-built Solid-Pak chimney section with insulation of 1"
(25.4 mm) or more, build a wall pass-through with a minimum
9" (228.6 mm) air space between the outer wall of the chimney
length and wall combustibles. Use sheet metal supports
fastened securely to wall surfaces on all sides, to maintain
the 9" (228.6 mm) air space. When fastening supports to
chimney length, do not penetrate the chimney liner (the inside
wall of the Solid-Pak chimney). The inner end of the SolidPak chimney section shall be flush with the inside of the
masonry chimney flue, and sealed with a non-water soluble
refractory cement. Use this cement to also seal to the brick
masonry penetration.
Method C. 6" (152.4 mm) Clearance to Combustible Wall
Member: Starting with a minimum 24 gage (.024" [.61 mm])
6" (152.4 mm) metal chimney connector, and a minimum 24
gage ventilated wall thimble which has two air channels of
1" (25.4 mm) each, construct a wall pass-through. There
shall be a minimum 6" (152.4) mm separation area containing
fiberglass insulation, from the outer surface of the wall thimble
to wall combustibles. Support the wall thimble, and cover
its opening with a 24-gage minimum sheet metal support.
Maintain the 6" (152.4 mm) space. There should also be a
support sized to fit and hold the metal chimney connector.
See that the supports are fastened securely to wall surfaces
on all sides. Make sure fasteners used to secure the metal
chimney connector do not penetrate chimney flue liner.
Method D. 2" (50.8 mm) Clearance to Combustible Wall
Member: Start with a solid-pak listed factory built chimney
section at least 12" (304 mm) long, with insulation of 1" (25.4
mm) or more, and an inside diameter of 8" (2 inches [51
mm] larger than the 6" [152.4 mm] chimney connector). Use
this as a pass-through for a minimum 24-gage single wall
steel chimney connector. Keep solid-pak section concentric
with and spaced 1" (25.4 mm) off the chimney connector by
way of sheet metal support plates at both ends of chimney
section. Cover opening with and support chimney section
on both sides with 24 gage minimum sheet metal supports.
See that the supports are fastened securely to wall surfaces
on all sides. Make sure fasteners used to secure chimney
flue liner.
NOTES:
1. Connectors to a masonry chimney, excepting method B, shall extend in one continuous section through the wall pass-through
system and the chimney wall, to but not past the inner flue liner face.
2. A chimney connector shall not pass through an attic or roof space, closet or similar concealed space, or a floor, or ceiling.
11
Pressure and Suction zones
created by wind
Effect of adjacent buildings, hills or tall
trees on the exit of flue gases
Figure 6. Chimney and flue performance.
Chimney Height
A masonry chimney or a listed factory-build chimney must be the required height above the roof and any other
nearby obstructions. The chimney must be at least 3’ (90 cm) higher than the highest point where it passes
through the roof and at least 2’ (60 cm) higher than the highest part of the roof or structure that is within 10’
(305 cm) of the chimney, measured horizontally.
12
Flue Draught
The chimney can be checked, before the stove is installed, with a smoke match. If the chimney doesn’t pull the smoke
it may suggest the chimney needs attention (see the Flue Diagnosis Table below). Note: This test is only a guide as
an apparently poor flue may improve once the stove is installed, lit and the flue is warmed. If, once the stove is
installed, there is any doubt that the chimney is providing an adequate draught, a flue draught reading can be taken
with the stove lit. Two flue draught readings should be taken, one with the stove at minimum firing rate and one at
maximum firing rate.
Measurement
The flue draught test hole must be drilled in the flue pipe as close to the stove as possible and before any flue draught
stabiliser.
Minimum
The stove should be lit and allowed to warm the flue thoroughly. The air controls can then be set so that the stove
burns on a low setting. Allow the burning rate to become steady. The flue draught reading should now be taken with
the primary air intake closed and the airwash control fully open.
Maximum
The primary air intake can now be opened to allow the stove to burn at maximum rate. Give the stove some time for
the burning rate to become steady and then close the primary air intake, make sure the airwash control is fully open
and take a flue draught reading immediately.
Ideally, the flue draught readings should range between 1 mm wg (0.04 in wg) and 2.5 mm wg (0.1 in wg). Any
readings significantly outside this range may indicate the need for remedial action.
Low flue draught—symptoms: difficult to light and smoke coming into the room.
Cause
Remedy
Cold chimney
Line the chimney
Chimney too short
Extend the chimney
Down draught
Relocate/extend the chimney terminal. Fit an anti down draught cowl
Chimney diameter too large
Line chimney
Chimney obstruction
Clear/sweep chimney
Restricted air supply
Check for competing draughts (other chimneys, extractor hoods/fans), Fit
an air vent if the room is sealed.
High flue draught—symptoms: fire difficult to control, fuel will not last, stove too hot, stove damage,
Cause
Remedy
External wind conditions
combined with chimney terminal
Fit s tabilizer cowl. Fit flue draught stabilizer.
13
Flue Stabilizer
A flue stabilizer can be fitted to reduce the draught through the stove if the flue draught is too high. The flue
stabilizer should; be fitted in the same room as the stove, be the same size as the flue pipe and be fitted no
closer than 28” (700mm) to the flue outlet of the appliance
Positioning
The overall dimensions of the stove are shown in Figure 1. The figure below shows the requied clearances
around the stove.
If the chimney connector goes horizontally through a wall, the floor protection must extend under
the connector and 2”(50mm) beyond each side.
For Canada: Clearances may only be reduced by means approved by the regulatory authority.
WARNING: DO NOT STORE WOOD WITHIN THE CLEARANCE AREA
Flue connection
DO NOT CONNECT THIS UNIT TO A CHIMNEY FLUE SERVING ANOTHER APPLIANCE
The flue pipe used to connect the stove to the chimney is 6” (150mm) in diameter. The flue connection is on the
top of the stove, in the centre at the back.
Important notes:
1. The installation must allow for adequate chimney sweeping.
2. Avoid using bends greater than 45° to the vertical. All pipe flue sections should be as close to vertical
as possible.
3. All joints in the flue system must be effectively sealed.
4. All flue sockets must face upwards.
On completing the installation, check that all the internal components of the stove are positioned correctly.
Check:
– Grate, baffle, ashpan, insulation bricks, fuel bar. See Figure 3 .
14
15
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
UPPER DOOR HANDLES
LOWER DOOR HANDLES
FIRE GUARD
CAST FIRE DOOR
ASH DOOR
MAGNET CATCH
TEMERATURE CLOCK
CERAMIC GLASS WINDOW
FLUE ACCESS DOOR
OVEN DOOR LINER
FUEL GUARD
STAINLESS BAFFLE
FLUE ACCESS PLATE
ASHPAN
GRATE
OVEN TRAY
LOWER SLIDER
CAST SHELF SUPPORTS
DOOR HINGE ASSEMBLY
WIRE SHELF
VERMICULITE BAFFLE
UPPER SLIDER
FLUE HEAT SHIELD
HAND RAIL
FLUE RESTRICTOR GUIDE
SIDE PANEL
HAND RAIL BRACKET
HOTPLATE
CAST TOP
FLUE RESTRICTOR
04/04
Esse North America
Tel: (250) 743 2221
Fax: (250) 743 1229
Esse Firemaster UK
Ouzledale Foundry Co Ltd, Long Ing, Barnoldswick, Lancashire, BB18 6BN
Tel: 01282 813235 Fax: 01282 816876 www.ouzledale.co.uk
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