1747-6.1, Data Table Access Module User Manual

1747-6.1, Data Table Access Module User Manual
Allen-Bradley
Data Table
Access Module
(Cat. No. 1747-DTAM-E)
User
Manual
Important User Information
Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this
publication, those responsible for the application and use of this
control equipment must satisfy themselves that all necessary
steps have been taken to assure that each application and use
meets all performance and safety requirements, including any
applicable laws, regulations, codes and standards.
The illustrations, charts, sample programs and layout examples
shown in this guide are intended solely for purposes of example.
Since there are many variables and requirements associated with
any particular installation, Allen-Bradley does not assume
responsibility or liability (to include intellectual property
liability) for actual use based upon the examples shown in this
publication.
Allen-Bradley publication SGI-1.1, Safety Guidelines for the
Application, Installation and Maintenance of Solid-State Control
(available from your local Allen-Bradley office), describes some
important differences between solid-state equipment and
electromechanical devices that should be taken into consideration
when applying products such as those described in this
publication.
Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in
whole or part, without written permission of Allen-Bradley
Company, Inc., is prohibited.
Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety
considerations:
!
ATTENTION: Identifies information about
practices or circumstances that can lead to personal
injury or death, property damage or economic loss.
Attention statements help you to:
• identify a hazard
• avoid a hazard
• recognize the consequences
Important: Identifies information that is critical for successful
application and understanding of the product.
PLC, PLC2, PLC3, and PLC5 are registered trademarks of Rockwell Automation.
SLC, SLC500, PanelView, RediPANEL, and Dataliner are trademarks of Rockwell
Automation.
IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines, Inc.
Summary of Changes
The information below summarizes the changes to this manual since
the last printing.
To help you find new information and updated information in this
release of the manual, we have included change bars as shown to the
right of this paragraph.
New Information
The table below lists sections that document new features and provide
additional information about existing features, and it shows where to
find this new information.
For New Information On
Because users may employ different programming
devices, specific references to Advanced Programming
Software have been removed from this manual.
Notice of Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D
Hazardous Location Certification
See Chapter
Preface – Related
Documentation Table and/or
Your Software User Manual
Chapter 8 – Message
Capability
Chapter 1 – Data Table
Access Module Overview
Appendix A – Specifications
An updated diagram showing the connection of a DTAM
module to a DH485 network using a link coupler and an
Advanced Interface Converter (1747-NET-AIC).
Chapter 2 – Installation and
Power Up
An updated listing of MSG Instruction Error Codes
Chapter 9 –Troubleshooting
Publication 1747-6.1
S-2
Summary of Changes
Publication 1747-6.1
Table of Contents
iii
Table of Contents
Preface
Who Should Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Techniques Used in this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allen-Bradley Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical Product Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Your Questions or Comments on this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Table Access Module
Overview
Chapter 1
Installation and Power Up
Chapter 2
Module Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
European Union Directive Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EMC Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Your Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Configuration and Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-Up Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Setup Procedure
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-4
2-6
2-8
Chapter 3
Keyboard Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Factory Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering the Setup Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Node Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Auto Attach Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backlighting the LCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Monitor Override Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accepting Module Setup Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Module Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attaching to a Processor
P-1
P-1
P-2
P-3
P-3
P-4
P-4
P-4
P-4
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-4
3-5
3-5
3-6
3-6
3-7
3-7
Chapter 4
Manual Attach Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auto Attach Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ready Attached Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Mode Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backspace Function During Attach Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attaching to a Password Protected Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-4
Publication 1747-6.1
iv
Table of Contents
Monitoring and Modifying
Data
Chapter 5
Quick Recall Functions
Chapter 6
Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Modify Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Monitor Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Monitor Override Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Logical Data File Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Backspace Function During Data File Address Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Quick Access Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Entering Data File Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Entering Input and Output Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Entering Bit Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Entering Timer and Counter Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Entering Control Register Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Entering Integer Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
How to Change Displayed Data File Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
How to Display Higher and Lower Word Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
How to Display Different Word Addresses Within Elements. . . . . . . .5-10
How to Display Different Control Bits Within Elements . . . . . . . . . . . .5-11
How to Display Different Bit File Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
How to Change Data File Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
How to Change Word Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
How to Change the Sign of a Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Backspace Function During Data File Value Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
How to Change Bit Status at the Word Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-15
Cursor Right Function During Binary Data Entry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
How to Change Bit Status at the Bit Level. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
Quick Recall Function Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Defining Quick Recall Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Using Quick Recall Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Clearing Quick Recall Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Processor Control
Functions
Message Capability
Chapter 7
Changing the Processor to Run Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Changing the Processor to Program Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Viewing Processor Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Clearing Processor Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
Transferring Memory from EEPROM to RAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Transferring Memory from RAM to EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Chapter 8
Message Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Programming the MSG Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
5/02 Control Block Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
5/03 Control Block Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
8-Word Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Publication 1747-6.1
Table of Contents
v
16-Word Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
12-Word Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
13-Word Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
18-Word Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
1-Word Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Application Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
Application Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
Troubleshooting
Chapter 9
Troubleshooting Module Problems Using the Communications LED . . . . 9-1
Troubleshooting Module Problems Using the LCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Troubleshooting Communication Problems Using the LCD . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Troubleshooting Function Problems Using the LCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Troubleshooting MSG Instruction Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Troubleshooting Processor Faults Using the LCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Specifications
Appendix A
Operating Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Temperature and Humidity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
General Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
SLC 500 Data Files and
Logical Addressing
Appendix B
Module Display Character
Set
Appendix C
Mounting Template
Appendix D
Data Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data File Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Files 0 and 1 - Outputs and Inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data File 3 - Bit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data File 4 - Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data File 5 - Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data File 6 - Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data File 7- Integer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
B-1
B-2
B-2
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-8
B-9
Display Character Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Using the Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Publication 1747-6.1
vi
Table of Contents
Publication 1747-6.1
Preface
Read this preface to familiarize yourself with the rest of the manual.
This preface covers the following topics:
• who should use this manual
• the purpose of this manual
• common techniques used in this manual
• Allen-Bradley support
Who Should Use this
Manual
Use this manual if you are responsible for designing, installing,
programming, or troubleshooting control systems that use AllenBradley small logic controllers.
You should have a basic understanding of SLC 500 products. If you
do not, contact your local Allen-Bradley representative for
information on available training courses before using this product.
Purpose of this Manual
This manual is a learning and reference guide for the Data Table
Access Module. It describes the procedures you use to access data
file information, change operating modes, monitor and clear
processor faults, and transfer memory with any SLC 500 family
processor.
Publication 1747-6.1
P-2
Preface
Contents of this Manual
Chapter
Title
Preface
1
Data Table Access
Module Overview
Explains features and capabilities.
2
Installation and Powerup
3
Module Setup Procedure
4
Attaching to a Processor
5
Monitoring and
Modifying Data
6
Quick Recall Functions
7
Processor Control
Functions
8
Message Capability
9
Troubleshooting
Appendix A
Specifications
Appendix C
SLC 500 Data Files and
Logical Addressing
Module Display
Character Set
Appendix D
Mounting Template
Appendix B
Quick Reference Chart
Publication 1747-6.1
Contents
Describes the purpose, background, and scope of
this manual. Also specifies the audience for whom
this manual is intended.
Describes module installation, connections, and
power up.
Gives descriptions and examples of module setup.
Provides instructions on how to initiate
communications with a processor.
Describes Monitor and Modify modes, addressing
methods, and methods used to modify and monitor
data.
Describes how to define, utilize, and clear user
macros.
Contains instructions on how to change processor
modes, view and clear processor faults, and
transfer RAM to and from EEPROM memory.
Describes module use as an operator interface
using the message capabilities of the SLC 5/02 and
5/03 processors.
Provides instructions on solving common operating
problems.
Provides physical, electrical, environmental, and
functional specifications for this module.
Gives overview of SLC 500 Family processor data
files and logical addressing.
Provides conversion table showing ASCII
characters in binary and hexadecimal format.
Contains tear-out dimensional template for cutout
and drilling dimensions.
A tear-out pocket guide for DTAM procedures.
Preface
P-3
Related Documentation
The following documents contain additional information concerning
Allen-Bradley SLC and PLC products. To obtain a copy, contact
your local Allen-Bradley office or distributor.
For
Read this Document
Document
Number
An overview of the SLC 500 family of products
SLC 500 System Overview
1747-2.30 1
A description on how to install and use your Modular SLC 500
programmable controller
Installation & Operation Manual for Modular
Hardware Style Programmable Controllers
1747-6.2 1
A description on how to install and use your Fixed SLC 500
programmable controller
Installation & Operation Manual for Fixed
Hardware Style Programmable Controllers
1747-6.21 1
A procedural manual for technical personnel who use APS to
develop control applications
Rockwell Software Advanced Programming
Software (APS) User Manual
9399-APSUM
A reference manual that contains status file data, instruction
set, and troubleshooting information
SLC 500™ and MicroLogix™ 1000 Instruction
Set Reference Manual
1747-6.151
An introduction to APS for first-time users, containing basic
concepts but focusing on simple tasks and exercises, and
allowing the reader to begin programming in the shortest time
possible
Rockwell Software Getting Started Guide for
APS
9399-APSQS
A procedural and reference manual for technical personnel who
use the APS import/export utility to convert APS files to ASCII
and conversely ASCII to APS files
Rockwell Software APS Import/Export User
Manual
9399-APSIE
A programming reference guide to A.I. Series Software ladder
logic for PLC-500
PLC-500 A.I. Series Ladder Logistics Processor
Reference
9399-S5PR
A reference manual for technical personnel who use A.I. Series
Programming Software
A.I. Series MicroLogix 1000 and PLC-500
Software Reference
9399-S5SR
A procedural and reference manual for technical personnel who
use an HHT to develop control applications
Hand-Held Terminal User Manual
1747-NP002
An introduction to HHT for first-time users, focusing on simple
tasks and exercises, and allowing the reader to begin
programming in the shortest time possible
Getting Started Guide for HHT
1747-NM009
A complete listing of current Automation Group documentation,
including ordering instructions. Also indicates whether the
documents are available on CD-ROM or in multiple languages.
Automation Group Publication Index
SD499
A glossary of industrial automation terms and abbreviations
Allen-Bradley Industrial Automation Glossary
ICCG-7.1
1. Also available from the Automation Bookstore at http://www.theautomationbookstore.com.
Common Techniques
Used in this Manual
The following conventions are used throughout this manual:
• Bulleted lists such as this one provide information, not
procedural steps.
• Numbered lists provide sequential steps or hierarchical
information.
• Italic type is used for emphasis.
• Text in indicates words or phrases you should type.
Publication 1747-6.1
P-4
Preface
• Key names match the names shown and appear in bold, capital
letters within brackets (for example, ).
• The Data Table Access Module displays data and messages like
this:
RDY>
5/02
1
RHALT
01234567
• The error symbol displays on the LCD when you attempt an
illegal entry.
!
• The Data Table Access Module is called the module or DTAM.
Allen-Bradley Support
Allen-Bradley offers support services worldwide, with over 75 Sales/
Support Offices, 512 authorized Distributors and 260 authorized
Systems Integrators located throughout the United States alone, plus
Allen-Bradley representatives in every major country in the world.
Local Product Support
Contact your local Allen-Bradley representative for:
• sales and order support
• product technical training
• warranty support
• support service agreements
Technical Product Assistance
If you need to contact Allen-Bradley for technical assistance, please
review the information in chapter 9, Troubleshooting. Then call your
local Allen-Bradley representative.
Your Questions or Comments on this Manual
If you have any suggestions for how this manual could be made more
useful to you, please send us your ideas on the enclosed reply card.
If you find a problem with this manual, please notify us of it on the
enclosed Publication Problem Report.
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
1
Data Table Access Module
Overview
This chapter describes features and capabilities of the Data Table
Access Module.
Module Overview
The Data Table Access Module (Catalog Number 1747-DTAM-E) is
a plant floor device that allows you to access data file information,
change operating modes, monitor and clear processor faults, and
transfer memory with any SLC 500 family processor.
Important: The DTAM module does not support the floating point,
string, and ASCII data values that can be used with
SLC 5/03 ™ OS301 and later processors.
• Data can be monitored or modified in any SLC 500 family
processor.
• Ten Quick Recall Functions are provided to assign frequently
monitored and/or modified data file addresses to a simplified
function key sequence.
• Processor operating modes can be changed between Run mode
and Halt mode. (For SLC 5/03 processors, the keyswitch must be
in the REM position before the mode can be changed.)
• Processor faults can be viewed and cleared.
• Memory can be transferred between CPU RAM and CPU
EEPROM.
• Two operational modes are provided: Monitor and Modify.
These modes are enabled or disabled by a factory-installed
jumper or by a user-supplied security key switch.
• The Monitor Override feature allows you to modify data at
specified addresses while in the Monitor mode.
• The Auto Attach function initiates processor communications.
• Prompts can be displayed in six, user-selectable languages:
English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Japanese.
• Shorthand addressing provides easier access to default data files.
• The module can be used as a point-to-point interface to a SLC
family processor or as a network device on a DH485 Network.
• The module can be used as an operator interface to display
messages from SLC processors, such as the SLC 5/02 processor,
on a DH485 Network.
• The module is UL-Listed, CSA-Certified and meets NEMA
Type 12 and 13 enclosure applications.
Publication 1747-6.1
1-2
Data Table Access Module Overview
• Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D, Hazardous Location
Certification
• A bi-color LED indicates operational mode and the status of
certain fault and communication conditions.
• The keyboard is a 19-key, sealed membrane keypad with tactile
feedback.
• The data display is a 16-character x 2-line, dot-matrix, backlit
LCD with contrast control.
• A single cable is provided for power and communications.
• Module configuration parameters are stored in nonvolatile
memory.
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
2
Installation and Power Up
Read this chapter before installing the Data Table Access Module. It
describes the procedures for:
• mounting the module
• connecting the module to your system
• module configuration and adjustments
• powering up the module
European Union
Directive Compliance
If this product has the CE mark, it is approved for installation within
the European Union and EEA regions. It has been designed and
tested to meet the following directives.
EMC Directive
This product is tested to meet Council Directive 89/336/EEC
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and the following standards,
in whole or in part, documented in a technical construction file:
• EN50081-2
EMC – Generic Emission Standard, Part 2 – Industrial
Environment
• EN50082-2
EMC – Generic Immunity Standard, Part 2 – Industrial
Environment
This product is intended for use in an industrial environment.
Mounting the Module
The module is designed for mounting in a cutout on the door of an
enclosure. The cutout and drilling dimensions for the module are
shown on the following page.We have also included a full-size tearout mounting template (appendix D) for your convenience.
When locating the cutout on the enclosure door:
• Provide 139.7 mm (5.5 in) clearance behind the enclosure door
and 50.8 mm (2.0 in) electrical clearance above and below the
module housing.
!
ATTENTION: To keep the module temperature
within the specified range, enclosure temperature must
be between 0 to 55° (32 to 131° F).
Publication 1747-6.1
2-2
Installation and Power Up
• Before drilling in the enclosure door, all power to the enclosure
must be disconnected. Make sure the drill bit does not contact
equipment and cause damage.
!
ATTENTION: The module has ventilation holes on
the top and bottom of the back cover. If you make
additional holes in the enclosure, cover the module
ventilation holes to protect against metal shavings
entering the module housing.
• Do not remove top label until after installation.
• A strain relief tab on the back of the module helps reduce stress
on the interconnect cable when the door is opened. Once the
module is installed, insert the cable under the tab and bend the
tab downward to secure the cable.
• The module has a .8 Nm (7.0 in-lb) mounting torque.
• Insure that the module is grounded. If the DTAM is mounted to a
non-conductive surface, attach a #8 AWG wire from the DTAM
grounding screw to the SLC chassis.
Prepare a cutout for your enclosure door using the measurements
shown below. See the template in Appendix D.
104.8 mm
(4.125 in.)
95.76 mm
(3.77 in.)
Scrape paint
to ensure
good
ground.
3.86 mm dia.
(0.152 in.)
4 holes
Publication 1747-6.1
128.5 mm
(5.06 in.)
114.3 mm
(4.5 in.)
Scrape paint
to ensure
good
ground.
Installation and Power Up
2-3
COMM
Module/Status
Indicator
LCD
Display
Keypad
Cable Socket
Grounding
Screw
Grounding
Foil
Access Port
Access Hole
Strain Relief
Tab
Mounting
Screws (4)
Publication 1747-6.1
2-4
Installation and Power Up
Connecting Your
Equipment
Connect the module to your system as shown below:
Point-to-Point Connection to a SLC 500 Family Processor
DTAM
Processor
CH
Communications
Port
Interconnect Cable
1.8 m (6 ft.) 1747-C10
Connection to a DH485 Network
Interconnect Cable
1.8 m (6 ft.) 1747-C10
CH
DTAM
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
Peripheral
Communication
Cable
J2
1747-C11
To Processor
Earth Ground
Publication 1747-6.1
To optional 24V dc
Power Supply
Installation and Power Up
2-5
You can connect the DTAM module to an SLC 5/04 or later processor
using either of the following methods.
Connection to a DH485 Network Using an Interface Module
SLC 5/04 Processor
(1747-L542)
Interconnect Cable
1.8 m (6 ft.) 1747-C10
Interface Module
(1747-KE)
DTAM
9-pin to 9-pin
Connector
(1747-CP3)
CH
Connection to a DH485 Network Using Link Couplers
Interconnect Cable
1.8 m (6 ft.) 1747-C10
DTAM
CH
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
Advanced Interface Coupler
1761-NET-AIC
Communications
Cable
Belden 9842
1747-CP3
To SLC 5/04 Processor
Earth Ground
To 24V dc
Power Supply
!
To 24V dc
Power Supply
ATTENTION: The DTAM module end of the
interconnect cable has pins that carry 24V dc.
Disconnect the cable at the processor or link coupler to
guard against connector short circuits and possible
damage to the processor.
Publication 1747-6.1
2-6
Installation and Power Up
Module Configuration
and Adjustments
The module’s access port and access hole allow you to adjust the
LCD contrast and select the operational mode. Refer to chapter 5 to
determine which mode to select, then return to this section to make
the physical setting.
The module is shipped from the factory with the jumper installed
between terminals 1 and 2 to configure the module for the Modify
operational mode.
Header
3
Jumper
Jumper
2
1
LCD Contrast
Adjust Pot
Plug
Access Port View
Access Hole View
To configure the module for the Monitor mode, either connect the
jumper between terminals 1 and 3 (leaving the jumper installed in the
module) or completely remove the jumper. You may either leave the
header in place and make the connection via the access port and
access hole, or temporarily remove the header from the module by
pulling it off of the plug. If you choose the latter method, return the
header to the plug once the connection is made.
Header
3
Jumper
Jumper
2
1
LCD Contrast
Adjust Pot
Access Port View
Publication 1747-6.1
Plug
Access Hole View
Installation and Power Up
2-7
The jumper may be removed and an externally mounted user-supplied
key switch connected.
Modify
Mode
Monitor
Mode
Terminal 3 is
unused.
1.83 m (6 ft.)
Maximum distance
LCD Contrast
Adjust Pot
!
Access Port View
ATTENTION: To avoid damaging the module, when
you wire an external keyswitch for mode control, use
an isolated switching device. Do not apply power to
the terminals.
ATTENTION: To avoid damaging the module, when
you change the mode select jumper, disconnect power
from the module. Move the top lead of the jumper
between terminals 2 and 3. Always leave the lead
attached to the bottom terminal (terminal 1) connected.
Important: After you have set up the module for your application,
to prevent unauthorized access to data files, connect the
jumper for the Monitor mode or wire the key switch as
shown .
Publication 1747-6.1
2-8
Installation and Power Up
Power-Up Sequence
When the module is plugged into a processor or link coupler for the
first time, the following sequence occurs:
1. The Communications LED illuminates solid red.
2. The module performs diagnostic self tests.
3. When the tests are complete, the Communications LED turns
off, and the LCD displays:
Enter Network
Working . . .
If the module fails any of the self diagnostic tests, refer to chapter 9,
Troubleshooting, for a list of error and fault codes.
4. The Communications LED flashes green, and the LCD displays:
RDY>
5. After a successful power-up, the display shows the ready
prompt. You can now perform any of the following functions:
• Change the Module Setup. Refer to chapter 3, Module Setup
Procedure.
• Initiate communications with a SLC 500 family processor.
Refer to chapter 4, Attaching to a Processor.
• Clear an existing Quick Recall Function. Refer to chapter 6,
Quick Recall Functions.
• Observe and respond to a displayed message. Refer to chapter
8, Message Capability.
Publication 1747-6.1
3
Chapter
Module Setup Procedure
This chapter describes the setup procedures for configuring the
operation of the module for specific applications. The topics covered
are:
• language for the module display
• module node address
• module baud rate
• Auto Attach function
• LCD backlighting
• Monitor Override function
• module reset function
Keyboard Description
The keyboard is shown below. Details about individual key functions
are described at the point of use in this manual.
I
O
7
T
B
8
C
4
N
M
ESC
.
I
3
2
+/-
INC
F(
DEC
)
:
0
Key
0-9
ACC
PREV
POS
6
R
5
1
PRE
NEXT
LEN
9
SHIFT
ENTER
Explanation
Numeric Keys
I
Input Image Data File
O
Output Image Data File
B
Bit Data File
T
Timer Data File
C
Counter Data File
R
Control Data File
N
Integer Data File
M
Reserved for Future Use
Publication 1747-6.1
3-2
Module Setup Procedure
Key
:
Data File Addressing Element Delimiter
.
Data File Addressing Word Delimiter
/
Data File Addressing Bit Delimiter
PRE
Timer/Counter Preset Word
ACC
Timer/Counter Accumulator Word
LEN
Control Register File Length Word
POS
Control Register Pointer Position Word
+/-
Factory Default
Settings
Explanation
Positive/Negative Signed Integer
NEXT
Increment to Next Logical Address
PREV
Decrement to Previous Logical Address
INC
Increment Data Value or Control Bit
DEC
Decrement Data Value or Control Bit
F( )
Function Key
ESC
Escape Key
SHIFT
Shift to Upper Case
ENTER
Enter Desired Parameter
The module is shipped from the factory with the following default
settings:
Feature
Publication 1747-6.1
Default Setting
Language
English
DTAM Node Address
0
Baud Rate
19200
Auto Attach
Off
LCD Backlighting
On
Monitor Override
Off
Module Setup Procedure
Entering the Setup
Mode
3-3
To change the Setup configuration, the module must be in the Modify
mode. This is indicated by the flashing green Communications LED.
To review the Setup configuration, the module must be in the Modify
mode. Press the key repeatedly until the procedure is
complete.
After the module is powered up and the self diagnostics are
completed, the LCD displays the Ready Unattached screen:
RDY>
To enter the Setup mode:
Press simultaneously, and hold until the display shows:
Modify Setup
Confirm?
This display prompts you to confirm:
• If you want to initiate the setup procedure:
Press • If you want to return to the previous display:
Press When the setup mode has been initiated, the Communications LED
turns off.
Important: Once you initiated the setup procedure, only the ,
and keys are functional.
If the unit disconnects, a power failure occurs, or the
module is switched from Modify to Monitor mode
while in the setup procedure, no new parameters are
saved.
Publication 1747-6.1
3-4
Module Setup Procedure
Selecting the
Language
You can configure the module to display all prompts and data in one
of six languages. The available languages are: English, Spanish,
Japanese, Italian, German and French. The default language
displayed is English:
Select Language
ENGLISH
• To change the language displayed:
Press or • To accept the displayed language:
Press Once you have selected a language, the module immediately begins to
display in that language.
Selecting the Node
Address
The node address is the communications identifier on the DH485
network for this module. Valid node addresses range from 0 through
31. The default node address displayed is 0.
Important: Care must be taken when selecting a node address. Do
not duplicate the address of a processor or another
device on the DH485 network.
Select DTAM Addr
0
• To change the node address:
Press [] or [
].
• To accept the displayed address:
Press Publication 1747-6.1
Module Setup Procedure
Setting the Baud Rate
3-5
This is the communications rate for the module. Available baud rates
are: 1200, 2400, 9600 and 19200 baud. The default baud rate
displayed is 19200.
Important: All devices on the DH485 network, including the
module, must be set to the same baud rate.
Select Baud Rate
19200
• To scroll through the available baud rates:
Press [] or [
].
• To accept the displayed baud rate:
Press [
].
Setting the Auto
Attach Function
This selection determines how the module attaches to a processor.
The default selection is Off.
When the function is set to Off, you are required to manually attach to
a processor each time the module is powered up.
When the function is set to On, the module attempts to attach to the
address of the last processor it was logically attached to or to the
default node address of one.
Set Auto Attach
OFF
• To toggle between On and Off:
Press [] or [
].
• To accept the setting:
Press [
].
Publication 1747-6.1
3-6
Module Setup Procedure
Backlighting the LCD
This selection controls the illumination for the LCD. The default
selection is On:
Set Backlighting
ON
• To toggle between On and Off:
Press [] or [
].
• To accept the setting:
Press [
].
Setting the Monitor
Override Function
The Monitor Override feature allows you to write to selected data file
addresses while in the Monitor mode. Refer to chapter 5, Monitoring
and Modifying Data and chapter 6, Quick Recall Functions. The
default selection is Off:
Monitor Override
OFF
• To toggle between On and Off:
Press [] or [
].
• To accept the setting:
Press [
].
Publication 1747-6.1
Module Setup Procedure
Accepting Module
Setup Parameters
3-7
If you accept the new configuration, the parameters are written to the
module’s nonvolatile memory. If you reject the new parameters, the
previous setup configuration remains unchanged.
Accept Setup
Confirm?
• To accept the configuration:
Press [
].
• To reject the configuration:
Press [
].
The module then performs a reset and self test. Upon completion, the
LCD displays one of the two Ready screens. Refer to chapter 4,
Attaching to a Processor, for a description of these displays.
Using the Module
Reset
The module reset key sequence is available at any time and during
any function sequence. Use it when a nonrecoverable fault condition
error code is displayed or when the module appears to be
nonfunctional. Refer to chapter 9, Troubleshooting, for fault
conditions and error codes.
To reset the module:
Press [] [] [
] simultaneously and hold until this message
displays:
DTAM Reset
In Progress
This reset message continues to display during the reset procedure
and the diagnostic test which follows. Upon completion, one of the
Ready screens displays.
Publication 1747-6.1
3-8
Module Setup Procedure
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
4
Attaching to a Processor
Read this chapter before initiating communications between the
module and a SLC 500 family processor. It describes:
• Manual Attach procedure
• Auto Attach procedure
• Ready Attached screen
• Backspace Function during attach procedure
• attaching to a password-protected processor
Manual Attach
Procedure
After the module is powered up and the setup parameters are
configured, you are ready to attach to the desired processor to initiate
communications.
You may perform the attach procedure with the module in either
Monitor or Modify mode. Refer to chapter 5, Monitoring and
Modifying Data, for descriptions of these modes.
If the module is configured with the Auto Attach feature set to Off:
1. At power up, the display shows the Ready Unattached screen:
RDY>
2. To attach to a processor node address:
Press [] [].
3. Notice the symbol to the right of RDY has changed to indicate a
shifted key function:
RDY^
4. To Continue:
Press [].
5. The module displays the attach to CPU screen. Asterisks display
in the lower right-hand corner if the module was not previously
attached to a processor or if the last processor it was attached to
is no longer active. If a number is displayed in the lower righthand corner, it is the node address of the processor to which the
module was previously attached.
Attach to CPU?
**
Publication 1747-6.1
4-2
Attaching to a Processor
6. To change the node address:
• Scroll through the list of active node addresses attached to the
network. Press [] or [
].
• Use the numeric keys to enter a value from 0 through 31.
7. Once the appropriate node address is displayed:
Press [
].
8. The module displays the Ready Attached screen:
RDY>
5/02
4
RRUN
4444
If the processor you are attaching to is password-protected, refer to
the section on attaching to a password-protected processor on
page 4-4.
Auto Attach Procedure
If the module is configured with the Auto Attach feature set to On:
1. At power up, the module displays:
Attach to CPU?
WORKING . . . .
2. When the module completes the attach procedure, the display
shows the Ready Attached screen:
RDY>
5/02
4
RRUN
4444
If the module has not been previously attached to a processor or if the
last processor it was attached to is no longer active, the display shows:
Attach to CPU?
**
1. To change the node address:
• Press [] or [ ] to scroll through the list of active node
addresses attached to the network.
• Use the numeric keys to enter a value from 0 through 31.
2. Once the appropriate node address is displayed:
Press [
].
If the processor you are attaching to is password-protected, refer to
the section on attaching to a password-protected processor on
page 4-4.
Publication 1747-6.1
Attaching to a Processor
Ready Attached
Screen
4-3
The Ready Attached screen displays the ready prompt, processor
node address, and processor operating mode on the top line, and the
processor type and program name on the bottom line:
RDY>
5/02
4
RRUN
4444
Operating Mode Text
The text displayed in the Ready Attached screen depends on the
processor mode and type, as summarized in the table below.
Processor Mode
Backspace Function
During Attach
Procedure
Operating Mode Text
SLC 500, SLC 5/01™
and
SLC 5/02™ Processors
and
SLC 5/03 and SLC 5/04
processors with
Keyswitch in REM
SLC 5/03 or later
processors with Keyswitch
Not in REM
Run
RRUN
RUN
Program
RHALT
HALT
Test
RTEST
HALT
Fault
FAULT
FAULT
If you incorrectly entered the node address during the Attach
procedure (and have not pressed [
] yet), you can use the
Backspace Function to delete characters from right to left, and then
re-type the value. Backspacing to the beginning of the string (leftmost
character) will in most cases return the default value. The exception is
during password entry.
There are two ways to implement the Backspace Function:
• Single Backspace - Press and release the [] key, then press
and release the [
] key.
• Multiple Backspace - Press and hold the [] key while
repeatedly pressing the [
] key.
The example below shows a default node address of 15.
Attach to CPU?
15
If you press 3 then 0, the node address changes to 30, as shown below.
Attach to CPU?
30
Publication 1747-6.1
4-4
Attaching to a Processor
If you press and release the [] key, then press and release the
[
] key, the display appears as:
Attach to CPU?
3
To restore the default value of 15, press and release the [] key,
then press and release the [ ] key.
Attaching to a
Password Protected
Processor
In either of the previous procedures, if the processor you are attaching
to is password-protected. The module displays:
Enter Password?
1. Use the numeric keys to enter the password.
2. As the password keys are pressed, the module displays asterisks
in the lower right hand corner.
Important: During password entry, if you backspace to the
beginning of the password (using [ ]),
your password entry is invalid. the following message is
displayed:
RDY>
Function Failed
3. When the password is complete:
Press [
].
4. When the password is accepted, the Ready Attached screen
displays:
RDY>
5/02
4
RRUN
4444
If any variations of the above procedures occur, refer to chapter 9,
Troubleshooting.
5. After successfully attaching to a processor, you can now:
• Change the module setup. Refer to chapter 3, Module Setup
Procedure.
• Clear an existing Quick Recall Function. Refer to chapter 6,
Quick Recall Functions.
• Observe and respond to a displayed message. Refer to chapter 8,
Message Capability.
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
5
Monitoring and Modifying Data
This chapter describes:
• operating modes
• logical data file addressing
• Backspace Function during data file address entry
• quick access addressing
• entering data file addresses
• changing displayed data file addresses
• changing data file values
Operating Modes
The module has two operational modes, Modify and Monitor. A
Monitor Override feature is also provided.
Modify Mode
The module is shipped from the factory configured for the Modify
mode. This mode allows access to all features available in the module.
Refer to chapter 2, Installation and Power Up, for details on the
Modify mode configuration.
Monitor Mode
When the module is configured for the Monitor mode, you are
allowed to display values contained in data file words. Alteration of
data within the processor data files is prohibited. This mode of
operation is provided to prevent unauthorized access to certain
processor functions. Refer to chapter 2, Installation and Power Up,
for details on configuring the unit for the Monitor mode.
Monitor Override Feature
When configured for the Monitor mode, a Monitor Override feature
is provided to allow data modification of up to ten user-defined data
file addresses using the Quick Recall Functions. Refer to chapter 3
for details on how to use the module setup procedure to configure this
feature. Refer to chapter 6 for a description of the Quick Recall
Functions.
Publication 1747-6.1
5-2
Monitoring and Modifying Data
See the chart below for the functions you may perform in each mode:
Operation
Monitor Mode
Modify Mode
Module Setup
No
Yes
Monitor Data File Address
Yes
Yes
Modify Data File Address
No 1
Yes2
Change Processor Mode
No
Yes
Transfer EEPROM Memory to RAM
No
Yes
Transfer RAM Memory to EEPROM
No
Yes
Define a Quick Recall Function
No
Yes
Recall a Quick Recall Function
Yes
Yes
Clear a Quick Recall Function
No
Yes
Attach to a Processor
Yes
Yes
View a Processor Fault
Yes
Yes
Clear a Processor Fault
No
Yes
Receive a Message
Yes
Yes
Respond to a Message
Yes
Yes
1. Up to 10 user-defined addresses may be modified using the Monitor Override feature.
2. Input and Output Image Table words are always view only. In 5/02 and 5/03 processors, data files
may have additional file protection preventing the DTAM from changing data.
The communications LED on the module changes according to the
operational mode selected, as shown below:
LED
DTAM Operating Mode
Flashing Green
Modify Mode
Flashing Green
Data being entered using the Monitor Override feature
Solid Green
Monitor Mode
For additional information regarding the LED functions, refer to
chapter 9, Troubleshooting.
Publication 1747-6.1
Monitoring and Modifying Data
Logical Data File
Addressing
5-3
SLC 500 family logical addressing can be used with the module to
access all data files except the status file (S2). You may access any
valid address in the attached processor.
1. For example, to access T10:100.ACC you would use the
following key sequence:
Press As the address is being entered, the address will be displayed in
the lower left-hand corner of the LCD.
2. When the [
] key is pressed, the display shows the logical
address on the top line and its associated value in the lower righthand corner:
T10:100.ACC
999
Important: Once you press [] [], [] or [], it is not
necessary to press the [] key for [#
],
[], [$
] or [#%].
1. To logically address to the bit level for B3:2/9, use the following
key sequence:
Press !
"
2. The LCD displays the logical address on the top line and the on/
off status of that bit on the bottom line:
B3:2/9
.......0............
For more information on logical addressing, see appendix B.
Publication 1747-6.1
5-4
Monitoring and Modifying Data
Backspace Function
During Data File
Address Entry
If you made an error while entering a data file address (and have not
pressed [
] yet), you can use the Backspace Function to delete
characters and re-type the address.
The following strings are deleted in one keystroke:
• .ACC
• .LEN
• .POS
• .PRE
When you enter data table addresses, text entry is from left to right.
In the example below, T255:7.PRE has just been entered. The cursor
is to the right of PRE.
RDY>
4
T255:7.PRE
RRUN
If you press and release the [] key, and then press and release
the [
] key, the display appears as:
RDY>
T255:7
4
RRUN
Backspacing over the first character that you entered returns the
information previously displayed on line two.
Publication 1747-6.1
Monitoring and Modifying Data
Quick Access
Addressing
5-5
The module provides you with a shorthand method of data file
addressing for default files 3 through 7. Type the file identifier: &
& & or & then [
]. The module displays the first address
within that file.
1. For example, to display the first address in the Integer file:
Press The module displays:
N7:0
123
2. You can now use the [
'] and [#
(] keys to step through all
the addresses contained in that file. This is explained later in this
chapter.
You may also access a specific element within a data file.
1. To display the Input Image Table word for slot 2:
Press 2. The module displays the logical address on the top and the on/off
status of each of the bits associated with that word on the bottom
line:
I1:2.0
0000111100110101
Important: Input and Output Image Table words can only be
monitored. The Input Image data file represents
external input conditions and cannot be modified by the
module. The Output Image data file is controlled by the
user program and cannot be modified by the module.
Publication 1747-6.1
5-6
Monitoring and Modifying Data
You may use shorthand addressing to display an address at the bit
level.
1. To display the on/off status of the bit B3:1/14:
Press ! The display shows the logical address on the top line and the on/
off status of that bit on the bottom line:
B3:1/14
.1.................
2. You can now use the [] and [
] keys to step through
each bit in that word. This is explained later in this chapter.
The following chart shows you how shorthand addressing
corresponds to the logical addresses in processor memory:
Keyboard Entry
Data File Address
O0 to O31
O0:0.0 to O0:31.0
I0 to I31
I1:0.0 to I1:31.0
B0 to B255
B3:0 to B3:255
T0 to T255
T4:0 to T4:255
T0.PRE to T255.PRE
T4:0.PRE to T4:255.PRE
T0.ACC to T255.ACC
T4:0.ACC to T4:255.ACC
C0 to C255
C5:0 to C5:255
C0.PRE to C255.PRE
C5:0.PRE to C5:255.PRE
C0.ACC to C255.ACC
C5:0.ACC to C5:255.ACC
R0 to R255
R6:0 to R6:255
R0.POS to R255.POS
R6:0.POS to R6:255.POS
R0.LEN to R255.LEN
R6:0.LEN to R6:255.LEN
N0 to N255
N7:0 to N7:255
Data File addresses may be entered from any Attached display except
the Data Entry display, described later in this chapter.
Publication 1747-6.1
Monitoring and Modifying Data
Entering Data File
Addresses
5-7
The following flowchart shows you the variations available for
entering data file addresses:
Entering Input and Output Addresses
2
Q
(17(5
Q
,
Q
Entering Bit Addresses
%
(17(5
Q
Q
Q
Q
Entering Timer and Counter Addresses
7
(17(5
Q
&
Q
35(
$&&
Q
Q
Publication 1747-6.1
5-8
Monitoring and Modifying Data
Entering Control Register Addresses
5
(17(5
Q
Q
/(1
326
Q
Entering Integer Addresses
1
(17(5
Q
Publication 1747-6.1
Q
Monitoring and Modifying Data
How to Change
Displayed Data File
Addresses
5-9
Once you have the desired data file address displayed on the module,
you may display different addresses within that file by using the
[1(;7], [35(9], [,1&] and ['(&] keys. You may also monitor or
modify data contained at that address. This will be described later in
this chapter.
How to Display Higher and Lower Word Addresses
When a single element word address is displayed, such as Integer or
Bit file words, you may use the [1(;7] and [35(9] keys to view a
different address.
• To display the next higher address, press the [1(;7] key. If the
address displayed is at the word level:
N11:25
468
Press [1(;7].
The display shows the next address along with its associated
value:
N11:26
0
• To display the next lower address, press the [35(9] key. If the
address displayed is at the bit level:
B3:2/5
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . .
Press [PREV].
The display shows the previous word address with its associated
value or bit pattern:
B3:1/5
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0. . . .
When the address displayed is at the bit level, only the on/off state of
that bit is displayed.
The [1(;7] and [35(9] keys work the same with multiple word
element addresses, such as Timer, Counter, and Control file
addresses. The keys permit you to display the next or previous words
within the displayed element before displaying a different element.
Publication 1747-6.1
5-10
Monitoring and Modifying Data
How to Display Different Word Addresses Within
Elements
When a Timer, Counter and Control address is displayed, the [1(;7]
and [35(9] keys work as follows:
1. To view the three words of counter C5:3, display the address as
described in the previous section. The display shows the most
significant bit of the control word:
C5:3.0/15
CU = 0
Press [1(;7].
2. The display shows the Preset word and the value stored there:
C5:3.PRE
500
Press [1(;7].
3. The display shows the Accumulator word and its associated
value:
C5:3.ACC
0
Press [1(;7].
4. The display shows the Control word of the next highest Counter
in the file:
C5:4.0/15
CU =0
The [35(9] key works in the same fashion.
The [1(;7] and [35(9] keys can be used to display all valid addresses
contained within a data file. The keys do not allow you to cross file
boundaries. If the [ 1(;7] key is pressed when the highest address
within a file is displayed, the display rolls over to the lowest address
in that file. If the [35(9] key is pressed with the first address of a file
displayed, the display shows the highest address in that file.
Publication 1747-6.1
Monitoring and Modifying Data
5-11
How to Display Different Control Bits Within Elements
With a data file address displayed, you may use the [] and [
]
keys to display different bits within a Timer, Counter, or Control
word, or change bit addresses within a Bit element.
When a Timer, Counter, and Control address is displayed, the []
and [
] keys work as follows:
1. To view the Control bits in T4:3, display the address as
previously described. The display shows the highest numbered
Control bit, with the address on the top left and the bit function
and on/off state in the lower right-hand corner:
T4:3.0/15
EN =0
Press 2. The LCD displays the original bit and the next lower numbered
bit. The bit address in the upper left-hand corner corresponds to
the function and state in the lower right-hand corner:
T4:3.0/14
EN =0
TT = 0
Press [
].
3. The display shows the next lowest bit in the Control word:
T4:3.0/13
EN =0 TT = 0 DN = 1
The [
] key works in the same fashion.
A maximum of three Control bits may be displayed at one time. Only
the Control bit displayed in the lower right-hand corner can be
manipulated. Use the [] and [
] keys to access any other bits.
Another function of the [ ] and [
] keys is to change the Bit
address displayed on the LCD.
When a Bit file address is displayed at the bit level, the [ ] and
[
] keys work as follows:
Publication 1747-6.1
5-12
Monitoring and Modifying Data
How to Display Different Bit File Addresses
To increment the Bit address from B10:7/13:
B10:7/13
..1.................
Press The next highest bit address in that word displays along with its
associated on/off state:
The [
] key decrements addresses in the same fashion.
If the highest bit address in the element is displayed and the [] key
is pressed, the display rolls over to display the lowest bit address in
that element. The [ ] key works in the same fashion.
How to Change Data
File Values
Once you have the desired data file address displayed on the module,
you may change the value stored there, change the sign of an Integer
value, or change the on/off status of individual bits.
How to Change Word Values
You can change the value of a displayed word by using the [] and
[
] keys or by entering new values, using the numeric keys.
You may use the [] and [
] keys to change values stored at data
file word addresses.
1. To increment the value stored at T4:3.PRE:
T4:3.PRE
25
Press [].
2. The LCD displays the new value in the lower right-hand corner
and the previous value in the lower left-hand corner:
T4:3.PRE
25
26
3. You may continue pressing the [] or [ ] keys until the
appropriate value is displayed, then:
Press [].
Publication 1747-6.1
Monitoring and Modifying Data
5-13
4. The address displays with the new value in the lower right-hand
corner:
T4:3.PRE
26
When pressing these keys, the longer you hold the key, the faster the
values change.
When you use the [ ] and [
] keys, the module display
automatically rolls over or under the value when the numeric high or
low limit of the data file is reached. The following table lists the
values for the different files:
Data File
Roll Over/Under Range
Roll over at 32767 to 0
Timer PRE and ACC
Roll under at 0 to 32767
Counter PRE and ACC
Roll over at 32767 to –32768
Roll under at –32768 to 32767
Roll over at 32767 to 0
Roll under at 0 to 32767
Control LEN and POS
Roll over at 32767 to –32768
Integer
Roll under at –32768 to 32767
You may also use the numeric keys to enter or change a value at a
displayed address.
• To enter the value 567 into T4:5.PRE:
T4:5 PRE
0
Press The address and the new value displays:
T4:5 PRE
567
Important: Once data entry has been initiated, you may not attempt
to display different addresses. You must either finish
the data entry and press [] or press [].
Once data entry has been initiated, if you press the
or switch the module from Modify to
Monitor mode, the new value is lost.
[] key
Publication 1747-6.1
5-14
Monitoring and Modifying Data
How to Change the Sign of a Value
The [] key may be used to change the sign of signed integers
contained in the Counter or Integer data files.
• For example, to change the sign of the signed integer value 56
stored at word N20:7:
N20:7
56
Press The module displays:
N20:7
-56
Important: To enter a negative number into an address, you must
enter at least one numeric value before pressing the [
] key.
Backspace Function During Data File Value Entry
If you make an error while entering a data file value (and have not
pressed [] yet), you can use the Backspace Function to delete
characters and re-type the value. In the example below, integer value
56 has just been entered.
The cursor is positioned to the right of the 6.
N20:7
789
56
If you press and release the [] key, then press and release the
[] key, the display appears as:
N20:7
789
5
Backspacing over the first character abandons the integer entry. The
module then returns to monitoring the data file address and the
original data value.
Publication 1747-6.1
Monitoring and Modifying Data
5-15
How to Change Bit Status at the Word Level
You may change the on/off status in Bit file words with the 16-bit
word displayed.
1. To change the bit pattern in B3:10, display the word address:
B3:10
0000000000000000
Press 2. The display changes to reflect the state of the least significant
bit:
B3:10
0000000000000001
3. A blinking cursor appears over the next bit to the left. Each time
you press a or the cursor moves one bit to the left.
When you have displayed the desired bit pattern:
Press [].
Cursor Right Function During Binary Data Entry
During binary data entry, you can move the cursor one position to the
right each time you use the Cursor Right Function.
There are two ways to implement the Cursor Right Function:
• Single Cursor Right - press and release the [] key, then
press and release the [] key
• Multiple Cursor Right - press and hold the [] key, then
repeatedly press the [] key
In the example below, the cursor is to the left of the 1. The cursor was
placed there by entering 0,0,0,0,0,1.
B3:10
0000000000100000
To change the value to 0000000000101000, you can use the following
key sequence:
1. Press and hold the key.
2. Press .
3. Release the key.
4. Press .
Publication 1747-6.1
5-16
Monitoring and Modifying Data
The display appears as shown below:
B3:10
0000000000101000
How to Change Bit Status at the Bit Level
You may also change the on/off status of a bit, with a Bit file word
displayed at the bit level.
For example, to change the status of bit B3:2/3 to Off:
1. Display the address to the bit level:
B3:2/3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 . .
Press [0].
2. The Off state of the bit displays, and a blinking cursor appears
over the bit:
B3:2/3
.................0..
3. To change the state of the bit in memory:
Press 4. The zero remains on the display and the cursor disappears.
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
6
Quick Recall Functions
This chapter describes how to:
• define Quick Recall Functions
• use Quick Recall Functions
• clear Quick Recall Functions
Quick Recall Function
Overview
The module has the capability to let you define and use up to 10 data
file address Quick Recall Functions. These functions are stored in the
module’s nonvolatile memory. They allow you to assign frequently
accessed data file addresses to a simplified keystroke procedure. You
may later recall these addresses by pressing two keys instead of using
the addressing procedure described in the previous chapter.
Quick Recall Functions also provide the ability to write data to
selected data file addresses when the module is configured for the
Monitor mode. This Monitor Override feature is enabled in the
Module Setup Procedure described in chapter 3.
Defining Quick Recall
Functions
The available Quick Recall Functions are numbered F(0) through
F(9). For example, to assign address T4:1.ACC to Quick Recall
Function F(1):
1. Configure the module for the Modify mode.
2. Make sure the module is attached to a processor.
3. Enter the data file address:
Press 4. The address and its current value are displayed:
T4:1.ACC
9999
5. To define Quick Recall Function F(1):
Press 6. The Quick Recall Function for that address is now stored in the
module nonvolatile memory. The display shows the following
for three seconds:
T4:1.ACC
Macro 1 Defined
Publication 1747-6.1
6-2
Quick Recall Functions
7. The display then returns to the previous address display:
T4:1.ACC
9999
8. You may now perform any of the module functions.
Important: If the unit is connected to a DH485 Network, the
module is able to communicate with multiple
processors on the network. Any data file address
assigned to a Quick Recall Function and stored in the
module’s nonvolatile memory is accessible in any
processor data file on the network to which the module
is attached.
Using Quick Recall
Functions
After defining the Quick Recall Function, you are able to recall that
data file address at any time. The module may be configured for the
Modify or Monitor modes.
In the Monitor mode, if the unit has been configured with the
Monitor Override feature set to On, you can modify data at that data
file address by recalling the Quick Recall Function.
Important: Data can be modified in the Monitor mode with the
Monitor Override set to On only at the address
displayed by a Quick Recall Function. Addresses
displayed using the or
keys can be monitored but not modified in this
mode.
1. Make sure the module is attached to a processor.
2. To recall Quick Recall Function F(1), from any screen:
Press 3. The module displays the data file address assigned to that Quick
Recall Function:
T4:1.ACC
9999
4. You are now able to view or alter the data at this data file address
using the procedures described in the previous chapter.
Publication 1747-6.1
Quick Recall Functions
Clearing Quick Recall
Functions
6-3
To erase Quick Recall Function F(1), make sure that no data file
address is displayed (otherwise you will re-define the Recall Function
or Macro):
1. Configure the module for the Modify mode.
2. With either Ready screen displayed:
Press .
3. The LCD displays the following for three seconds:
RDY>
4
RRUN
Macro 1 Cleared
4. The display returns to the previous screen.
5. You may now perform any of the module functions.
Publication 1747-6.1
6-4
Quick Recall Functions
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
7
Processor Control Functions
This chapter describes the procedures to:
• change processor modes
• view and clear processor faults
• transfer user programs between RAM and EEPROM memory
Changing the
Processor to Run
Mode
The module must be configured for the Modify mode to change the
processor to Run mode. If the module is attached to a 5/03 processor,
the keyswitch must also be in the REM position to change the
processor mode.
When the module is attached to a processor, the module displays the
Ready Attached screen with the processor operating mode displayed
in the upper right-hand corner:
RDY>
4
5/02 1111
RHALT
1. To place the attached processor into the Run mode from any
screen where data is not being entered:
Press 2. The module displays:
Enter RUN,
Confirm?
3. To confirm:
Press 4. The processor enters the Run mode and the module displays:
Publication 1747-6.1
7-2
Processor Control Functions
Changing the
Processor to Program
Mode
The module must be configured for the Modify mode to change the
processor to Program mode. If the module is attached to a 5/03
processor, the keyswitch must also be in the REM position to change
the processor mode.
1. To place the attached processor into the Program mode:
Press [ 2. The display shows:
Halt CPU
Confirm?
3. To confirm:
Press 4. The processor enters the Program mode and the module
displays:
RDY>
4
5/02 1111
RHALT
If the key is pressed at either Confirm screen, the display
returns to the previous Ready Attached screen, and the processor
mode is not changed.
If any problem occurs during the mode change procedures, the
module displays the appropriate error message. Refer to chapter 9,
Troubleshooting.
Viewing Processor
Faults
When the module is configured for the Modify or Monitor mode, you
are allowed to view attached processor faults.
1. To view a fault code while attached to a processor, from any
screen:
Press 2. The module displays the appropriate error code, in hexadecimal
format, and a description for three seconds:
CPU Fault: 0022H
WATCHDOG TIMEOUT
3. The display returns to the Ready Attached screen with the word
! flashing in the upper right hand corner:
RDY>
4
5/02 1111
FAULT
If you are entering a data file address or data when a processor fault
occurs, the fault screen is held until completion of the entry.
Publication 1747-6.1
Processor Control Functions
Clearing Processor
Faults
7-3
The module must be configured for the Modify mode to clear
recoverable faults in the attached processor.
1. You may first choose to view a fault condition as described in the
previous section.
2. To clear a fault, initiate the Clear Fault procedure from any
screen:
Press !
ATTENTION: If the DTAM is attached to a 5/03 and
the processor keyswitch is in the RUN position when
you start to clear the fault, the processor enters the
RUN mode once the fault is cleared.
3. If the DTAM is not attached to a 5/03 with the keyswitch in
RUN, the fault clears, and the processor is placed in the Program
mode.
4. The Ready Attached screen displays:
RDY>
4
5/02 1111
RHALT
5. You may now return the processor to the Run mode or initiate
other module functions.
Important: Before trying to place the processor in the Run mode,
you must ensure that the cause of the fault has been
corrected. If it is not rectified, the processor returns to
the faulted condition as soon as you attempt to place it
in Run mode.
For additional information on faults and fault codes refer to chapter 9,
Troubleshooting.
Publication 1747-6.1
7-4
Processor Control Functions
Transferring Memory
from EEPROM to RAM
You may transfer a program between processor EEPROM and RAM
memory.
To transfer EEPROM to RAM, from any display:
1. Configure the module for the Modify mode.
2. Make sure the processor is in the Program mode.
3. To initiate the memory transfer:
Press 4. The module displays:
PROM -> CPU RAM,
Confirm?
5. To confirm:
Press To abort the memory transfer:
Press The display returns to the previous Ready
Attached screen.
6. When the transfer is initiated, the module displays:
PROM -> CPU RAM,
Working . . . .
7. If the memory transfer is successful, the module displays:
PROM -> CPU RAM,
Transfer Success
If the program contained in the EEPROM is password-protected,
you are required to re-enter the password at this point.
8. When the transfer is complete (or the password is entered, if
required), the module displays the Ready Attached screen:
RDY>
4
5/02 1111
RHALT
If an error occurs during the transfer, an error message displays on the
bottom line of the display. Refer to chapter 9, Troubleshooting.
Publication 1747-6.1
Processor Control Functions
Transferring Memory
from RAM to EEPROM
7-5
To transfer a program from processor RAM to EEPROM memory,
from any display:
1. Configure the module for the Modify mode.
2. Make sure the processor is in the Program mode.
3. To initiate the memory transfer:
Press 4. The module displays:
CPU RAM -> PROM,
Confirm?
5. To confirm:
Press If the key is pressed at the Confirm screen, the display
returns to the previous Ready Attached screen, and the memory
transfer is aborted.
6. When the transfer is initiated, the module displays:
CPU RAM -> PROM,
Working . . . .
7. If the memory transfer is successful, the module displays:
CPU RAM -> PROM,
Transfer Success
8. When the transfer is complete, the module returns to the Ready
Attached screen.
If an error occurs during the transfer, an error message displays on the
bottom line of the display. Refer to chapter 9, Troubleshooting.
Publication 1747-6.1
7-6
Processor Control Functions
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
8
Message Capability
This chapter provides:
• an overview of the message types
• programming parameters for the MSG instruction
• control block configuration for the 5/02 and 5/03 MSG
instructions
• operational descriptions of the message types
• sample SLC 5/02 user programs
Message Overview
The module supports six types of messages. The table below
describes the functions of each:
Message Type
Functions
8-Word
16 characters
Displayed on one line
Display-only
16-Word
32 characters
Displayed on two lines
Display-only
12-Word
16 characters
Operator reply
Initial value of zero
13-Word
16 characters
Operator reply
User-defined initial value
18-Word
16 characters
Operator reply
User-defined initial value
User-defined acknowledge bit addresses
1-Word
Clear message
Other module message capabilities are:
• display Write messages from any DH485 network device with
message capability
• display messages in the Monitor or Modify modes
• enter data in the Monitor or Modify modes
• message overwrite protection
Important: SLC 500 Fixed and SLC 5/01 Modular Controllers do
not support message capability.
Publication 1747-6.1
8-2
Message Capability
Programming the MSG
Instruction
The DTAM message is configured in the 5/02 or 5/03 processor user
program by selecting a message (MSG) instruction and entering the
following parameters:
Message Type:
Write
Target Device:
485CIF
Network Type (5/03 only):
Control Block Address:
Local or Remote
Starting address of an unused block of 7 words
(5/02) or 14 words (5/03) in any bit or integer file
(to store message status)
Source File Address:
Starting address of an unused block or x words in
any bit or integer file (to store message text), where
x = message length or the DTAM message type
Target Node Address:
DTAM node address (as defined in the module setup procedure), 0 through 31 inclusive
Offset:
Message Length:
Message overwrite capability: 0 for cannot overwrite
or 100 for can overwrite
Number of words in selected DTAM message type
(1, 8, 12, 13, 16, or 18)
Processor communication port:
Channel (5/03 only):
1 for DH485 channel
or 0 for RS232 channel
5/02 Control Block
Configuration
Most of the MSG instruction parameters are stored in its associated
control block. The “delivery” status and any error code of the
message are also stored there. The information below describes the
message instruction control block layout necessary to display
messages on the DTAM:
Bit/
Word
15
14
13
12
0
EN
ST
DN
ER
11
10
9
8
EW
NR
TO
7
6
Error Code
1
DTAM Node Address
2
Message Length in Words (Read Only)
3
Offset Word (0 or 100)
4
Not Used
5
Not Used
6
Not Used
Publication 1747-6.1
5
4
3
2
1
0
Message Capability
Word 0
8-3
Control bits:
EN
Enable bit
ST
Start bit
DN
Done bit
ER
Error Bit, used with the Error code. Refer to
chapter 9, Troubleshooting
EW
Enabled and waiting bit
NR
No response bit
TO
Time out bit
Word 1
DTAM node address, 0-31 inclusive.
Word 2
Message length: 1, 8, 12, 13, 16 or 18 words (Read only).
Word 3
The value in the offset word determines whether or not a
displayed message is overwritten by a new message. If
the value entered in this word is:
0
This message cannot overwrite the previously
displayed message.
100
This message can overwrite the displayed
message.
After the MSG instruction is entered in the ladder program, the local
source file block (or message text) is entered through the Data
Monitor Function. The format of the local source file block depends
on the type of message length chosen.
The next sections describe the different messages and the format of
each local source file block. Refer to the SLC 500™ and
MicroLogix™ 1000 Instruction Set Reference Manual (Catalog
number 1747-6.15) for more information on the MSG instruction.
Publication 1747-6.1
8-4
Message Capability
5/03 Control Block
Configuration
Most of the MSG instruction parameters are stored in its associated
control block. The “delivery” status and any error code of the
message are also stored there. The information below describes the
message instruction control block layout necessary to display
messages on the DTAM:
Bit/
Word
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
0
EN
ST
DN
ER
CO
EW
NR
TO
7
6
Error Code
1
DTAM Node Address
2
Message Length in Words (Read Only)
3
Offset Word (0 or 100)
4
Not Used
5
Not Used
6
Not Used
7
Reserved (Internal Messaging Bits)
8
Message Timer Preset
9
Message Timer Scaled Zero
10
Message Timer Accumulator
11
Reserved (Internal Use Only)
12
Reserved (Internal Use Only)
13
Reserved (Internal Use Only)
Publication 1747-6.1
5
4
3
2
1
0
Message Capability
Word 0
8-5
Control bits:
EN
Enable bit
ST
Start bit
DN
Done bit
ER
Error Bit, used with the Error code. Refer to
chapter 9, Troubleshooting
CO
Continuous operation bit
EW
Enabled and waiting bit
NR
No response bit
TO
Time out bit
Word 1
DTAM node address, 0-31 inclusive.
Word 2
Message length: 1, 8, 12, 13, 16 or 18 words (Read only).
Word 3
The value in the offset word determines whether or not a
displayed message is overwritten by a new message. If
the value entered in this word is:
Word 7
0
This message cannot overwrite the previously
displayed message.
100
This message can overwrite the displayed
message.
Control bits:
WQ
Word 8
Waiting for queue space bit
Message time-out, how long the processor will wait for a
reply from the DTAM, 0-255 seconds.
After the MSG instruction is entered in the ladder program, the local
source file block (or message text) is entered through the Data
Monitor Function. The format of the local source file block depends
on the type of message length chosen.
The next sections describe the different messages and the format of
each local source file block. Refer to the SLC 500™ and
MicroLogix™ 1000 Instruction Set Reference Manual (Catalog
number 1747-6.15) for more information on the MSG instruction.
Publication 1747-6.1
8-6
Message Capability
8-Word Message
This is a 16-character, one-line message. It is a display-only message
requiring no operator response. If data is not being entered, the
message is displayed as soon as it is received by the module. The
message appears on the top line of the display:
8 Word Message
• The message remains on the display until it is overwritten by
another message or any module key is pressed.
• When the message is cleared, the screen returns to the previous
display.
The message text is stored in processor memory at the local source
file address that is designated in the message instruction. The table
below describes the message instruction local source file block
layout:
Word
Block Description
Word Description
2
16-Character
2 ASCII
3
Message Text
Characters per
4
Block
Word
0
1
5
6
7
For example: If the Local Source File Address is N7:10, the message is stored in words N7:10
through N7:17.
To enter the message text into processor memory, refer to your
software user manual.
Publication 1747-6.1
Message Capability
16-Word Message
8-7
This is a 32-character, two-line message. It is a display-only message
requiring no operator response. It is functionally identical to the
8-word message except in length. The message appears on both lines
of the display:
16 Word Message
Shown in 2 Lines
• The message remains on the display until it is overwritten by
another message or any module key is pressed.
• When the message is cleared, the screen returns to the previous
display.
The message text is stored in processor memory at the local source
file address that is designated in the message instruction. The table
below describes the message instruction local source file block
layout:
Word
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Block Description
Word Description
32-Character
Message Text
Block
2 ASCII
Characters per
Word
For example: If the Local Source File Address is N7:10, the message is stored in words N7:10
through N7:25.
To enter the message text into processor memory, refer to your
software user manual.
Publication 1747-6.1
8-8
Message Capability
12-Word Message
This is a display and return message. When the message is displayed,
you are prompted to enter data from the module keypad. This value is
then written to a user-designated data file address word.
The message text is displayed on the top line, and an initial value of
zero is displayed in the lower right-hand corner of the display:
• A signed integer value may be entered using the numeric keys
followed by the key. When the key is
pressed, the value is stored at the data entry destination address,
and the screen returns to the previous display.
• The message cannot be overwritten while data is being entered.
• Pressing the key without entering data writes a zero to
the data entry destination address and clears the message from
the display.
• Pressing the key clears the message from the display and
does not alter the value previously stored at the data entry
destination address.
The message text is stored in processor memory at the local file
address that is designated in the message instruction. The data entry
destination address block is automatically assigned to the four data
file words immediately following the message text as described in the
table below.
Important: The programming device does not allocate the memory
location described in the data entry destination address
block. See your software user manual for information
on using memory mapping to verify that the memory
location exists or to create the data location if it does
not exist. Otherwise the DTAM displays ""#$%"
&''%() when it attempts to enter a value into a nonallocated data entry destination.
Word
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Publication 1747-6.1
Block Description
Word Description
16-Character
Message
Text
Block
2 ASCII
Characters per
Word
Data Entry
Destination
Address Block
File Type Identifier
File Number
Element Number
Subelement Number
Message Capability
13-Word Message
8-9
This is a display and return message. When the message is displayed,
you are required to enter data from the module keypad. It is
functionally similar to the 12-word message except a user-defined
initial value is displayed in the lower right-hand corner of the display:
13 Word Message
123
• A signed integer value may be entered using the numeric keys
followed by the key. When the key is
pressed, the value is stored at the data entry destination address,
and the screen returns to the previous display.
• The message cannot be overwritten while data is being entered.
• Pressing the key without entering data writes the
initial value to the data entry destination address and clears the
message from the display.
• Pressing the key clears the message from the display and
does not alter the value previously stored at the data entry
destination address.
The message text is stored at the local file address, followed by the
data entry destination address block. The initial value word is
automatically assigned to the next data file address following the data
entry destination address block.
Important: The programming device does not allocate the memory
location described in the data entry destination address
block. See your software user manual for information
on using memory mapping to verify that the memory
location exists or to create the data location if it does
not exist. Otherwise the DTAM displays ""#$%"
&''%() when it attempts to enter the value into a nonallocated data entry destination.
Word
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Block Description
Word Description
16-Character
Message
Text
Block
2 ASCII
Characters per
Word
Data Entry
Destination
Address Block
Initial Value Word
File Type Identifier
File Number
Element Number
Subelement Number
Signed Integer Value
To enter the message text into processor memory, refer to your
software user manual.
Publication 1747-6.1
8-10
Message Capability
18-Word Message
This is a display and return message. When the message is displayed,
you are required to enter data from the module keypad. It is
functionally similar to the 13-word message except a user-defined
acknowledge bit address block is included to indicate whether or not a
message has been responded to.
The message display format is identical to the 13-word message:
• A signed integer value may be entered using the numeric keys
followed by the key. When the key is
pressed, the value is stored at the data entry destination address,
the user-defined message acknowledge bit is set, and the screen
returns to the previous display.
• The message cannot be overwritten while data is being entered.
• Pressing the key without entering data writes the
initial value to the data entry destination address, sets the
acknowledge bit, and clears the message from the display.
• Pressing the key does not alter the value stored at the
data entry destination address, sets the user defined no
acknowledge bit, and clears the message from the display.
The table on page 8-11 describes the local source file block layout for
the 18-word message. The acknowledge bit address block is
automatically assigned to the five data file address words immediately
following the initial value word.
Important: The programming device does not allocate the memory
location described in the data entry destination address
block OR the acknowledge bit address block. See your
software user manual for information on using the
memory mapping. Otherwise the DTAM displays
""#$%" &''%() when it attempts to enter the value
into a non-allocated data entry destination or tries to set
the non-allocated acknowledge bit.
Publication 1747-6.1
Message Capability
Word
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Block Description
Word Description
16-Character
Message
Text
Block
2 ASCII
Characters per
Word
Data Entry
Destination
Address Block
Initial Value Word
Acknowledge Bit
Address Block
8-11
File Type Identifier
File Number
Element Number
Subelement Number
Signed Integer Value
File Type Identifier
File Number
Element Number
Subelement Number
Bit Number (0 - 15)
To enter the message text into processor memory, refer to your
software user manual.
1-Word Message
This is a clear message. It is enabled by the user program to clear a
displayed message. This message acts the same as pressing the
module key.
The message instruction must be configured as follows:
Read/Write:
Write
Target Device:
485 CIF
Control Block:
Any Bit or Integer File
Local Source File Address:
Any Bit or Integer File
Target Node:
Module Node Address
Target Offset:
100
Message Length in Elements: 1
Publication 1747-6.1
8-12
Message Capability
Application Example 1
Application example 1 uses two 18-word message instructions to
enter variable data for high and low limits of a machine process. It
also uses an 8-word message instruction to prompt you if data is not
entered. The 5/02 ladder logic program is shown below. The data
monitor displays for the message instructions and the user-defined
data files are shown on the following page. The procedure to display
the message is shown on page 8-16.
Example 1
I:1.0
Message trigger 0
input
0
B3
Acknowledge Bit 1
from message in
rung 0
No-acknowledge
2
bits from
messages in
rungs 0 and 1
17
B3
18
B3
20
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/Write
WRITE
Target Device
485 CIF
Control Block
N7:0
Control Block Length
7
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/Write
WRITE
Target Device
485 CIF
Control Block
N7:30
Control Block Length
7
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/Write
WRITE
Target Device
485 CIF
Control Block
N7:60
Control Block Length
7
CLR
CLEAR
Dest
3
4
Operation Notes
Rung 0
Input instruction I:1.0/0 initiates the first message instruction.
This message prompts you to enter a value for the low range
of the machine process. The initial value indicates that a
minimum value of one should be entered. The Data Entry
Destination Address is N10:1. The Acknowledge Bit Address
is B3:1.0/1 or B3/17.
Rung 1
This input instruction B3/17, is the user-designated
acknowledge bit from the first message instruction. It is used
to initiate the second message which prompts you to enter a
value for the high range of the machine process. The initial
value indicates a maximum of 250 should be entered. The
Data Entry Destination Address is N10:2. The Acknowledge
Bit Address is B3:1.0/3 or B3/19.
Publication 1747-6.1
(EN)
(DN)
18-word Write
Message instruction
for low level data
(ER)
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
(EN)
(DN)
18-word Write
Message
instructions for high
level data
8-word Write
Message instruction
for no data entry
(ER)
B3:1
0000000000000
000
Reset Message
acknowledge bits
END
Rung 2
Input instructions B3/18 and B3/20 are the user-designated
no-acknowledge bits from the previous message
instructions. If the module [ESC] key is pressed before
entering either or both values, the message will prompt you
that no value has been entered.
Rung 3
This Clear instruction is enabled every scan to reset the
user-defined acknowledge and no-acknowledge bits to zero.
Rung 4
This is the end of the user program.
Message Capability
8-13
The following example is the data monitor display for the 18-word
message instruction in Rung 0:
Read/Write:
Target Device:
Control Block:
Local Source File Address:
Target Node:
Target Offset:
Message Length in elements:
WRITE
485 CIF
N7:0
N7:10
2
100
18
ignore if timed out:
to be retried:
awaiting execution:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
error:
message done:
message transmitting:
TO
NR
EW
ER
DN
ST
Below is the data monitor display for the message control block and
the local source file, followed by an explanation of the data file.
Address
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
N7:0
0
2
18
100
0
0
0
0
0
0
N7:10
EN
TE
R
LO
W
RA
NG
E
7
10
N7:20
1
0
1
3
3
1
0
1
0
0
For ease of viewing, N7:10 through N7:17 are displayed in the ASCII radix. The rest of the file is
displayed in Decimal.
7-word message control block: N7:0 through N7:6
N7:0 = 0
message status
N7:1 = 2
DTAM node address
N7:2 = 18
N7:3 = 100
message length
offset (overwrite capability)
N7:4 through N7:6 = unused
Publication 1747-6.1
8-14
Message Capability
18-word local source file: N7:10 through N7:27
N7:10 through N7:17
8-word message text
N7:18 through N7:21
data entry destination address
In this example the data entry destination address is N10:1. Memory
locations N7:18 through N7:21 are assigned as follows:
File Number
File Type
Element
N10:1
N7:18=7
N7:20=1
N7:19=10
Important: N10:1 must be allocated. See your software user
manual. Otherwise the DTAM displays ""#$%"
&''%().
N7:22 = 1
initial value word
N7:23 through N7:27
acknowledge bit address
In this example the acknowledge bit address is B3:1.0/1. Memory
locations N7:23 through N7:27 are assigned as follows:
File Type
File
Element
Number
Subelement
Bit
B3:1.0/1
N7:27=1
N7:23=3
N7:26=0
N7:24=3
N7:25=1
The following example is for the 18-word message in rung 1:
Read/Write:
Target Device:
Control Block:
Local Source File Address:
Target Node:
Target Offset:
Message Length in elements:
WRITE
485 CIF
N7:30
N7:40
2
100
18
ignore if timed out:
to be retried:
awaiting execution:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
error:
message done:
message transmitting:
TO
NR
EW
ER
DN
ST
Below is the data monitor display for the message control block and
the local source file, followed by an explanation of the data file.
Address
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
N7:30
0
2
18
100
0
0
0
0
0
0
N7:40
EN
TE
R
HI
GH
R
AN
GE
7
10
N7:50
2
0
250
3
3
1
0
3
0
0
For ease of viewing, N7:40 through N7:47 are displayed in the ASCII radix. The rest of the file is
displayed in Decimal.
Publication 1747-6.1
Message Capability
8-15
7-word message control block: N7:30 through N7:36
N7:30 = 0
message status
N7:31 = 2
DTAM node address
N7:32 = 18
N7:33 = 100
message length
offset (overwrite capability)
N7:34 through N7:36 = unused
18-word local source file: N7:40 through N7:57
N7:40 through N7:47
8-word message text
N7:48 through N7:51
data entry destination address
In this example the data entry destination address is N10:2. Memory
locations N7:48 through N7:51 are assigned as follows:
File Type
File Number
Element
N10:2
N7:48=7
N7:50=2
N7:49=10
Important: N10:2 must be allocated. See your software user
manual. Otherwise the DTAM displays ""#$%"
&''%().
N7:52 = 250
initial value word
N7:53 through N7:57
acknowledge bit address
In this example the acknowledge bit address is B3:1.0/3. Memory
locations N7:53 through N7:57 are assigned as follows:
File
Element
Number
Subelement
File Type
Bit
B3:1.0/3
N7:57=3
N7:53=3
N7:56=0
N7:54=3
N7:55=1
The following example is for the 8-word message in rung 2:
Read/Write:
Target Device:
Control Block:
Local Source File Address:
Target Node:
Target Offset:
Message Length in elements:
WRITE
485 CIF
N7:60
N7:70
2
100
8
ignore if timed out:
to be retried:
awaiting execution:
error:
message done:
message transmitting:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TO
NR
EW
ER
DN
ST
Publication 1747-6.1
8-16
Message Capability
Below is the data monitor display for the message control block and
the local source file, followed by an explanation of the data file .
Address
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
N7:60
0
2
8
100
0
0
0
0
0
0
N7:70
NO
V
AL
UE
NT
ER
ED
0
0
E
For ease of viewing, N7:60 through N7:67 are displayed in the ASCII radix. The rest of the file is
displayed in Decimal.
7-word control block: N7:60 through N7:66
N7:60 = 0
N7:61 = 2
N7:62 = 8
N7:63 = 100
N7:64 through N7:66 = unused
message status
DTAM node address
message length
offset (overwrite capability)
8-word local source file: N7:70 through N7:77
N7:70 through N7:77
8-word message text
The ladder logic and data monitor examples on the previous pages
must be programmed in SLC 5/02 processor memory for the
following module message display:
1. When the input in rung 0 becomes true, the module displays this
message and the suggested low value to be entered:
ENTER LOW RANGE
1
2. To enter a value:
• Accept the displayed value:
Press • Use the numeric keys to change the value:
Press 3. The value is written to the data entry destination address, and the
module displays the next message in the sequence, with the
suggested high value:
ENTER HIGH RANGE
250
• Accept the displayed value:
Press • Use the numeric keys to change the value:
Press Publication 1747-6.1
Message Capability
8-17
4. The value is written to the data entry destination address, and the
module display returns to the screen displayed before the first
message was received.
If you press the key before the key while
either of these messages is displayed, the value in the data entry
destination address remains unchanged, and the module displays:
NO VALUE ENTERED
5. Press any key to clear this message. The display returns to the
previous screen.
Publication 1747-6.1
8-18
Message Capability
Application Example 2
Application example 2 uses a 12-word message instruction to enter a
value to a data file word. It also uses a timer and a clear message
instruction to clear the message from the display if data is not entered.
The 5/02 ladder logic program is shown on the next page. The data
monitor displays for the message instructions and the user defined
data files are shown on the following page. The procedure to display
the message is shown on page 8-20.
Example 2
I:1.0
0
0
Message
trigger input
N7:0
1
13
Done Bit from
message in
rung 0
T4:1
2
DN
Timer Done Bit
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/Write
WRITE
Target Device
485 CIF
Control Block
N7:0
Control Block Length
7
TON
TIMER ON DELAY
Timer
Time Base
Preset
Accum
CLR
CLEAR
Dest
DN
4
Operation Notes
Rung 0
Input instruction I:1.0/0 initiates the message instruction.
This message prompts you to enter a new value. The 12word message instruction always displays an initial value
of 0. The Data Entry Destination Address is N10:20.
Rung 1
Input instruction N7:0/13 is the done bit from the message
instruction in rung 0. The done bit becomes true as soon
as the message is transmitted successfully. The timer will
increment whether data is entered or not.
(DN)
(DN)
(EN)
(DN)
(ER)
N7:0
0000000000000
000
5-second on-delay
timer to clear the
display if data not
entered
One-word Write
Message
instruction to clear
display
Reset Message
control bits
END
Rung 2
After five seconds, the timer done bit initiates the
message clear instruction to clear the module display if
data has not already been entered. If data has been
entered, or the [ESC] key has been pressed, the display
is already clear.
Rung 3
This clear instruction is enabled by the timer done bit. It is
used to reset the message instruction control bits.
Rung 4
This is the endo fo the suer program.
Publication 1747-6.1
12-word Write
Message instruction
for data entry
(ER)
(EN)
T4:1
1.0
5
0
MSG
READ/WRITE MESSAGE
Read/Write
WRITE
Target Device
485 CIF
Control Block
N7:10
Control Block Length
7
T4:1
3
(EN)
Message Capability
8-19
The following example is the data monitor display for the 12-word
message instruction in Rung 0:
Read/Write:
Target Device:
Control Block:
Local Source File Address:
Target Node:
Target Offset:
Message Length in elements:
WRITE
485 CIF
N7:0
N10:0
2
100
12
ignore if timed out:
to be retried:
awaiting execution:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
error:
message done:
message transmitting:
TO
NR
EW
ER
DN
ST
Below is the data monitor display for the message control block,
followed by an explanation of the data file.
Address
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
N7:0
0
2
12
100
0
0
0
0
0
0
7-word message control block: N7:0 through N7:6
N7:0 = 0
message status
N7:1 = 2
DTAM node address
N7:2 = 12
N7:3 = 100
message length
offset (overwrite capability)
N7:4 through N7:6 = unused
Below is the data monitor display for the message local source file,
followed by an explanation of the data file.
Address
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
N10:0
En
te
r
Ne
w
Va
lu
e?
7
10
N10:10
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
For ease of viewing, N10:0 through N10:7 are displayed in the ASCII radix. The rest of the file is
displayed in Decimal.
12-word local source file: N10:0 through N10:11
N10:0 through N10:7
N10:8 through N10:11
8-word message text
data entry destination address
In this example the data entry destination address is N10:20. Memory
locations N10:8 through N10:11 are assigned as follows:
File Type
File Number
Element
N10:20
N10:8=7
N10:9=10
N10:10=20
Publication 1747-6.1
8-20
Message Capability
The following example is for the 1-word message in rung 2:
Read/Write:
Target Device:
Control Block:
Local Source File Address:
Target Node:
Target Offset:
Message Length in elements:
WRITE
485 CIF
N7:10
N7:20
2
100
1
ignore if timed out:
to be retried:
awaiting execution:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
error:
message done:
message transmitting:
TO
NR
EW
ER
DN
ST
Below is the data monitor display for the message control block and
the local source file, followed by an explanation of the data file.
Address
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
N7:10
0
2
1
100
0
0
0
0
0
0
N7:20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7-word control block: N7:10 through N7:16
N7:10 = 0
message status
N7:11 = 2
DTAM node address
N7:12 = 1
message length
N7:13 = 100
offset (overwrite capability)
N7:14 through N7:16 = unused
1-word local source file: N7:20
The ladder logic and data monitor examples on the previous pages
must be programmed in SLC 5/02 processor memory for the
following module message display:
1. When the input in rung 0 becomes true, the module displays this
message:
ENTER NEW VALUE?
0
2. To enter a value use the numeric keys. Then:
Press 3. The value writes to the data entry destination address, and the
module display returns to the previous screen.
If no value is entered, the value in the data entry destination
address remains unchanged, and the display returns to the previous screen after five seconds.
Pressing the key while the message is displayed does not
alter the value stored at the data entry address, and the display
returns to the previous screen.
Publication 1747-6.1
Chapter
9
Troubleshooting
This chapter describes the most common troubleshooting procedures.
It describes:
• troubleshooting module problems using the Communications
LED
• troubleshooting module problems using the module display
• troubleshooting communications problems using the module
display
• troubleshooting function problems using the module display
• troubleshooting MSG instruction error codes
• troubleshooting processor faults using the module display
Troubleshooting
Module Problems
Using the
Communications LED
Refer to the following log to determine the status of the LED
indicators:
Indicates the LED is OFF.
Indicates the LED is ILLUMINATED RED.
Indicates the LED is FLASHING RED.
Indicates the LED is ILLUMINATED GREEN.
Indicates the LED is FLASHING GREEN.
Publication 1747-6.1
9-2
Troubleshooting
TROUBLESHOOTING CONSIDERATIONS
COMMUNICATIONS
INDICATOR
DESCRIPTION
PROBABLE CAUSES
RECOMMENDED ACTION
Bad cable connection
1. Verify proper connections
on the module.
2. Verify proper connections
to processor or link coupler.
3. Replace 1747-C10 Cable.
Power supply overloaded
Evaluate chassis backplane
loading for proper sizing of
power supply.
No power to link coupler if on
DH485 network
If no processor is connected to
link coupler, provide 190mA or
24 VDC to screw terminals on
link coupler.
Defective chassis power
supply
1. Check for proper power
supply connections.
2. Check for proper power
suplly voltage.
3. Replace power supply.
4. Disconnect module. Call
your Allen-Bradley service
representative.
During power up
Normal
None.
During self diagnostics
Normal
None.
Hardware malfunction
Defective power supply
1. Check for proper power
supply voltage.
2. Replace power supply.
3. Disconnect module. Call
your Allen-Bradley service
representative.
Software malfunction
Diagnostic failure
FLASHING RED
Illegal network connection
Improper module setup
configuration
Refer to module display.
ILLUMINATED GREEN
Communicating on network
Module configured for Monitor
mode
None.
FLASHING GREEN
Communicating on network
Module configured for Modify
mode
None.
Data being entered in Monitor
Override mode
None.
OFF
ILLUMINATED RED
Publication 1747-6.1
Module does not power up
1. Consult error code on
module display.
2. Reset module.
3. Cycle power to module.
Troubleshooting
9-3
Troubleshooting
Module Problems
Using the LCD
TROUBLESHOOTING CONSIDERATIONS
MODULE DISPLAY
COMM LED
PROBABLE CAUSES
RECOMMENDED ACTION
ERROR 100
LED illuminated red
ROM memory failed checksum
test
Reset module.
ERROR 200
LED illuminated red
RAM failed Read/Write test
Reset module.
ERROR 300
LED illuminated red
Keypad malfunction
Reset module.
LED illuminated red
Configuration memory failed
checksum test
1. Cycle module power.
2. Reconfigure module. Refer
to chapter 3, Module Setup
Procedure.
ERROR 400
Backlighting off
LED illuminated red
Backlighting flashes on and off
LED illuminated red
Insufficient power supply
voltage
Insufficient or unregulated
power supply voltage
Check power supply.
Check power supply.
LCD background is solid black
Any
Enclosure is too hot
1. Adjust display contrast,
turn pot clockwise.
2. Operate within temperature
specifications.
LCD characters are out of line
Any
Enclosure is too hot or module
is exposed to sudden
temperature change.
Allow temperature to stabilize.
LCD is difficult to read
Any
Backlighting was Turned Off
Reconfigure module. Refer to
chapter 3, Module Setup
Procedure.
LCD characters unintelligible
Any
Water contamination in
module
Improper initialization
Module Cconfigured for a
foreign language
LCD appears faded or no
display at all
Any
Enclosure too cold
Module subjected to excessive
heat or humidity
Correct condition.
Reset module.
Reconfigure module. Refer to
chapter 3, Module Setup
Procedure.
Adjust display contrast, turn
pot counter clockwise.
Disconnect module. Contact
your local Allen-Bradley
representative.
Publication 1747-6.1
9-4
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Communication
Problems Using the
LCD
TROUBLESHOOTING CONSIDERATIONS
GENERAL ERROR SCREEN
ATTEMPTED FUNCTION
PROBABLE CAUSES
Attach to node
Illegal node address entered
Node address must be within
the range of 0 through 31.
Change processor to Run
mode
Module not attached to node
Attach to proper node address.
Module not in Modify mode
Display fault
Clear fault
Module not attached to node
Module not attached to node
Module not in modify node
Change processor to Program
mode
EEPROM to RAM memory
transfer
Attach to proper node address.
Module not in Modify mode
Change module to Modify
mode.
Module not attached to node
Attach to proper node address.
Processor in Run orTest mode
RAM to EEPROM memory
transfer
Change module to Modify
mode.
Attach to proper node address.
Attach to proper node address.
Change module to Modify
mode.
Module not attached to node
Module not in Modify mode
Module not attached to node
Module not in Modify node
Processor in Run, Test or Fault
mode
Processor contains no user
program
Publication 1747-6.1
RECOMMENDED ACTION
Change module to Modify
mode.
Change processor to Program
mode.
Attach to proper node address.
Change module to Modify
mode.
Change processor to Program
mode or clear fault.
Download a user program to
processor from a programming
device or HHT.
Troubleshooting
9-5
TROUBLESHOOTING CONSIDERATIONS
GENERAL ERROR SCREEN
ATTEMPTED FUNCTION
Use a Quick Recall Function
PROBABLE CAUSES
Quick recall function not
defined
Quick recall function defined
but that address is not defined
in this processor
Enter Setup Procedure
Module not in Modify mode
Enter Password
Data Address Entry
Incorrect password entered
Incorrect format for address
Address not defined in this
processor
Data entry
Module in the Monitor mode
Value out of range for file type
Address is read only (input or
output file)
No response to a function key
Address entry in progress
Data entry in progress
Responding to a message
The Data file that the DTAM is
trying to write to does not exist
Attach to a 5/03 processor
The firmware in the DTAM is
less than revision 3.0 and does
not support 5/03
communications
Incompat Program
Attach to a processor
The user program in the 5/03
processor is not supported by
DTAM
Illegal Network
LED flashing red
Illegal Command
Duplicate Node
LED flashing red
LED flashing red
No Response
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
No other nodes are active on
the network
One or more nodes on the
network have an incorrect
baud rate
Network is shorted or
improperly wired
Module has same node
address as a 5/01 or fixed
controller (point-to-point
connection)
The maximum node address
of the previous node is lower
than the module address
Module has same node
address as a 5/02 or 5/03
(point-to-point connection)
Module has same node
address as another node
(DH485 network connect ion)
The node that the module is
attached to has too many other
nodes trying to communicate
with it
RECOMMENDED ACTION
Assign an address to that
function.
Attach to proper node address.
Change module to Modify
mode.
Enter correct password.
Reenter address correctly.
Allocate address in memory.
Change module to Modify
mode.
Enter value within range.
Abort entry.
Complete address entry or
press the >(6&@key.
Complete data entry or press
the>(6&@key.
See your software user
manual for information on how
to create the data entry
destination or acknowledge bit
locations.
Verify the firmware revision
number on the DTAM
nameplate, and contact your
local Allen-Bradley sales office
for an upgrade.
Abort.
Contact your local AllenBradley sales office.
Attach the required processor
to the network.
Correct the baud rates.
Check network cable
connections.
Reconfigure the module node
address, refer to chapter 3,
Module Setup Procedure.
Change the maximum node
address of the previous node.
Change the module node
address.
Change the module node
address.
Decrease the network traffic to
the desired node address.
Publication 1747-6.1
9-6
Troubleshooting
TROUBLESHOOTING CONSIDERATIONS
GENERAL ERROR SCREEN
XX is inactive 1
XX is not a CPU a
XX not supported a
COMM LED
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
1. Where XX is the Node Address Value.
Publication 1747-6.1
PROBABLE CAUSES
The processor at that node
address is not powered up
The processor at that node
address is disconnected from
the network
A fault has caused that
processor node addressto
change to a default of one
The processor is set at the
wrong baud rate
The node addressyou are
attempting to attach to is a
programming device or
another DTAM
A programming device has
been connected to the network
with the same node address
as a processor
The node addressyou are
attempting to attach to is a nonsupported device
RECOMMENDED ACTION
Power up the processor.
Activate that processor on the
network.
Change the processor node
address.
Change the processor baud
rate.
Abort.
Change the node address of
the programming device.
Abort.
Contact your local AllenBradley sales office.
Troubleshooting
9-7
Troubleshooting
Function Problems
Using the LCD
TROUBLESHOOTING CONSIDERATIONS
GENERAL ERROR SCREEN
COMM LED
PROBABLE CAUSES
RECOMMENDED ACTION
Start a new attach procedure
with the correct password.
Wait until the communications
are complete or cancel the
communications from one of
the other devices.
Function Failed
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
An incorrect password has
been entered three times
XX owned by: XX 1
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
The node you wish to attachto
is communicating with another
node
Program Changed
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
User program in the processor
you are attached to has been
changed by a programming
device
Initiate a new attach sequence
or press >(6&@if auto attach
is set on.
Default
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
Processor contains no user
program
Download a user program to
the processor from a
programming device or HHT.
No Memory Module
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
Trying to do a memorytransfer
function with no EEPROM
installed in the processor
Install an EEPROM Module in
the processor.
Access Denied
LED illuminated green or
flashing green
Processor is owned by another
node or HHT
The data entry destination
address word in a 13- or 18word message format is invalid
or not allocated in the
processor
The acknowledge/noacknowledge bit address in an
18-word message format is
invalid or not allocated in the
processor
The user program in a SLC
5/02 processor is compiled
with all data files protected
The keyswitch for a SLC 5/03
processor is not in the correct
position
Wait until communications are
complete or cancel the
ownership of the other device.
Allocate the required address
in the processor data file, then
save and download the
program.
Check the data entry
destination address.
Allocate the required address
in the processor data file, then
save and download the
program.
Check the acknowledge/noacknowledge bits.
Remove the file protection in
the processor, then save and
download the program.
Set the keyswitch to REM
position.
1. Where XX is the Node Address Value.
Publication 1747-6.1
9-8
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting MSG
Instruction Error
Codes
When an error condition occurs with a Message Instruction (MSG),
the error code and its description are indicated in the Data Monitor
display.
INSTRUCTION ERRORS
Error
Code
Publication 1747-6.1
Fault Description
02H
Target node is busy. The MSG instruction will automatically reload. If other
messages are waiting, the message is placed at the bottom of the stack.
03H
Target node cannot respond because message is too large.
04H
Target node cannot respond because it does not understand the command
parameters OR the control block may have been inadvertently modified.
05H
Local processor is offline (possible duplicate node situation).
06H
Target node cannot respond because requested function is not available.
07H
Target node does not respond.
08H
Target node cannot respond.
09H
Local modem connection has been lost.
10H
Target node cannot respond because of incorrect command parameters or
unsupported command.
11H
Local file has constant file protection.
12H
Local channel configuration protocol error exists.
13H
Local MSG configuration error in the Remote MSG parameters.
14H
Local communication driver is incompatible with the MSG instruction.
15H
Local channel configuration parameter error exists.
16H
Target or Local Bridge address is higher than the maximum node address.
17H
Local service is not supported.
18H
Broadcast (Node Address 155) is not supported.
19H
Improperly formatted Logical ASCII Address string. String not properly
terminated with a NULL character or the string length does not match the
value in the length parameter.
20H
PCCC Description: Host has a problem and will not communicate.
30H
PCCC Description: Remote station host is not there, disconnected, or shut
down.
37H
Message timed out in local processor.
38H
Message disabled pending link response.
40H
PCCC Description: Host could not complete function due to hardware fault.
50H
Target node is out of memory.
60H
Target node cannot respond because file is protected.
70H
PCCC Description: Processor is in Program mode.
80H
PCCC Description: Compatibility mode file missing or communication zone
problem.
90H
PCCC Description: Remote station cannot buffer command.
B0H
PCCC Description: Remote station problem due to download.
C0H
PCCC Description: Cannot execute command due to active IPBs.
D0H
No IP address configured for the network, -orBad command – unsolicited message error, -orBad address – unsolicited message error, -orNo privilege – unsolicited message error.
Troubleshooting
D1H
9-9
Maximum connections used – no connections available.
D2H
Invalid internet address or host name.
D3H
No such host / Cannot communicate with the name server.
D4H
Connection not completed before user-spcified timeout.
D5H
Connection timed out by the network.
D7H
Connection refused by destination host.
D8H
Connection was broken.
D9H
Reply not received before user-specified timeout.
DAH
No network buffer space available.
E1H
PCCC Description: Illegal Address Format, a field has an illegal value.
E2H
PCCC Description: Illegal Address Format, not enough fields specified.
E3H
PCCC Description: Illegal Address Format, too many fields specified.
E4H
PCCC Description:Illegal Address Format, symbol not found.
E5H
PCCC Description: Illegal Address Format, symbol is 0 or greater than the
maximum number of characters supported by this device.
E6H
PCCC Description: Illegal Address, address does not exist, or does not
point to something usable by this command.
E7H
Target node cannot respond because length requested is too large.
E8H
PCCC Description: Cannot complete request, situation changed (file size,
for example) during multi-packet operation.
E9H
PCCC Description: Data or file is too large.
EAH
PCCC Description: Request is too large; transaction size plus word
address is too large.
EBH
Target node cannot respond because target node denies access.
ECH
Target node cannot respond because requested function is currently
unavailable.
EDH
PCCC Description: Resource is already available; condition already exists.
EEH
PCCC Description: Command cannot be executed.
EFH
PCCC Description: Overflow; histogram overflow.
F0H
PCCC Description: No access.
F1H
Local processor detects illegal target file type.
F2H
PCCC Description: Invalid parameter; invalid data in search or command
block.
F3H
PCCC Description: Address reference exists to deleted area.
F4H
PCCC Description: Command execution failure for unknown reason;
PLC-3 histogram overflow.
F5H
PCCC Description: Data conversion error.
F6H
PCCC Description: The scanner is not able to communicate with a 1771
rack adapter. This could be due to the scanner not scanning, the selected
adapter not responding, or an invalid request of a "DCM BT (block
transfer)".
F7H
PCCC Description: The adapter is not able to communicate with a module.
F8H
PCCC Description: The 1771 module response was not valid – size,
checksum, etc.
F9H
PCCC Description: Duplicate label.
FAH
Target node cannot respond because another node is file owner (has sole
file access).
FBH
Target node cannot respond because another node is program owner (has
sole access to all files).
Publication 1747-6.1
9-10
Troubleshooting
Publication 1747-6.1
FCH
PCCC Description: Disk file is write-protected or otherwise inaccessible
(off-line only).
FDH
PCCC Description: Disk file is being used by another application; update
not performed (off-line only).
FFH
Local communication channel is shut down.
0AH
Buffer unavailable to receive SRD reply.
0BH
Target node does not accept this type of MSG instruction.
0CH
Received a master link reset (one possible source is from the DF1 master).
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Processor Faults
Using the LCD
9-11
If you are attached to a processor when a fault occurs, the module
displays a fault code, in hexadecimal format, and a description of the
fault. You may also attach to a faulted processor to view the source of
a fault. The tables below describe the possible fault conditions in SLC
500 family processors.
The characters xx in the following codes represent the slot number, in
hex. The characters xx become 1F if the exact slot can not be
determined.
Slot Numbers in Hexadecimal
Slot
XX
Slot
XX
Slot
XX
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
PROCESSOR ERRORS
Error
Code
Module Display
Fault Description
0000
NO FAULT
You have attempted to view a fault in a nonfaulted processor.
0001
CORRUPT NVRAM
NVRAM error.
0002
HARDWARE TIMEOUT
Unexpected hardware watchdog timeout.
0003
AUTOLOAD FAILED
Memory module memory error. This error can
also occur when going to the REM Run mode.
0007 1
TRANSFER FAILED
Failure during memory module transfer of
autoload.
0008 1
CPU SOFTWARE ERR
Internal software error.
0009 1
CPU HARDWARE ERR
Internal hardware error.
0010
WRONG PROC. REV.
The processor does not meet the proper revision
level.
0011
FILE 2 MISSING
The executable program file number 2 is absent.
0012
PROG MEM. ERROR
The ladder program has a memory error.
0013
MEM MOD MISSING
The required memory module is absent or either
S:1/10 or S:1/11 is not set as required by the
program.
0014
INT. FILE ERROR
Internal file error.
0015
CFG. FILE ERROR
Configuration file error.
1. Error codes for 5/03 processor only
Publication 1747-6.1
9-12
Troubleshooting
PROCESSOR ERRORS
Error
Code
Module Display
0016
START AFTER P.F.
Startup protection after power loss. Error
condition exists at powerup when bit S:1/9 is
set and powerdown occurred while running.
0017 1
PRC/MMOD MISMATCH
NVRAM/memory module mismatch.
001F 1
BAD ONLINE EDIT
A program integrity problem occurred during
an online editing session.
0020
MINOR ERR AT END
A minor error bit is set at the end of the scan.
0021
REM. POWER FAIL
A remote power failure of an expansion I/O
rack has occurred.
0022
WATCHDOG TIMEOUT
The user watchdog scan time has been
exceeded.
0023
INVALID STI FILE
Invalid or non-existent STI interrupt file.
0024
INVALID STI TIME
Invalid STI interrupt interval (greater than 2550
ms or negative).
0025
TOO MANY JSRs
Excessive stack depth/JSR calls for the STI
routine.
0026
TOO MANY JSRs
Excessive stack depth/JSR calls for an I/O
interrupt routine.
0027
TOO MANY JSRs
Excessive stack depth/JSR calls for the user
fault routine.
0028
INVALID FLT FILE
Invalid or non–existent “startup protection” fault
routine file value.
0029
INDEX TOO LARGE
Indexed address reference is outside of entire
data file space (range of B3:0 through the last
file).
002A
INDEX TOO LARGE
Indexed address reference is beyond specific
referenced data file.
002B 1
BAD INDRCT FILE
Invalid indirect address file number.
002C 1
BAD INDRCT ELEM
Invalid indirect address element.
BAD INDRCT SUBEL
Invalid indirect address subelement.
002E 1
INVALID DII SLOT
Invalid DII input slot.
002F 1
INVALID DII FILE
Invalid or non-existent DII interrupt file.
0030
SUB NEST TOO DEEP
An attempt was made to jump to one too many
nested subroutine files. This code can also
mean that a program has potential recursive
routines.
0031
UNSUPPORTED INST
An unsupported instruction reference was
detected. Contact Allen-Bradley.
002D
1
1. Error codes for 5/03 processor only
Publication 1747-6.1
Fault Description
Troubleshooting
9-13
PROCESSOR ERRORS
Error
Code
Module Display
Fault Description
0032
BAD SQC/SQO INST
A sequencer instruction length/position
parameter points past the end of a data file.
0033
BAD BSL/BSR INST
The length parameter of an LFU, LFL, FFU,
FFL, BSL or BSR points past the end of data
file.
0034
BAD TIMER DATA
A negative value for a timer accumulator or
preset value was detected.
0035
BAD INST IN INTR
TND, SVC or REF instruction is called within
an interrupting or user fault routine.
0036
BAD PID PARAM
An invalid value is being used for a PID
instruction parameter.
0038
RET IN FILE 2
A RET instruction was detected in a nonsubroutine file.
xx39 1
BAD STxx:LEN
Invalid string length in string file.
xx50
SLOT xx DATA ERR
A rack data error is detected at the slot
specified.
xx51
SLOT xx MOD ERROR
An I/O module runtime error at the slot
specified.
xx52
SLOT xx MOD RMV
A module required for the user program is
detected as missing or removed at the slot
specified.
xx53
MOD IN SLOT xx
At going-to-run, a user program declares a slot
as unused, and that slot is detected as having
an I/O module inserted.
xx54
SLOT xx MISMATCH
A module required for the user program is
detected as being the wrong type.
xx55
SLOT xx MOD ERR
A module required for the user program is
detected as having the wrong I/O count or
wrong I/O driver.
0056
SLOT 00 BAD CFG
The rack configuration specified in the user
program is incorrect.
xx57
SLOT xx COMM ERR
An intelligent I/O module has not responded to
a Lock Shared Memory command within the
required limit.
xx58
SLOT xx SI/O ERR
A specialty I/O module generated a generic
fault.
xx59
SLOTxx SI/O ERR
An intelligent I/O module has not responded to
a command as being completed within the
required time limit.
xx5A
SLOT xx SI/O ERR
Hardware interrupt problem at the specified
slot.
1. Error codes for 5/03 processor only
Publication 1747-6.1
9-14
Troubleshooting
PROCESSOR ERRORS
Error
Code
Publication 1747-6.1
Module Display
Fault Description
xx5B
SLOT xx BAD CFG
G file configuration error – User program G file
size exceeds the capacity of the module.
xx5C
SLOT xx BAD CFG
M0-M1 file configuration error – User program
M0-M1 file size exceeds the capacity of the
module.
xx5D
SLOT xx SI/O ERR
Interrupt service requested is not supported by
the processor.
xx5E
SLOT xx SI/O ERR
Processor I/O driver (software) error.
xx60 thru
xx6F
SLOT xx SI/O ERR
Identifies an I/O card specific recoverable
major error. Refer to the user information
supplied with the card for further details.
xx70 thru
xx7F
SLOT xx SI/O ERR
Identifies an I/O card specific non-recoverable
major error. Refer to the user information
supplied with the card for further details.
xx80 thru
xx8F
SLOT xx SI/O ERR
Identifies an I/O card specific non-recoverable
major error. Refer to the user information
supplied with the card for further details.
xx90
SLOT xx MOD ERROR
Interrupt problem at the specified disabled slot.
xx91
SLOT xx MOD ERROR
The specified disabled slot has faulted.
xx92
SLOT xx INT ERROR
Invalid or non-existent module interrupt.
xx93
SLOT xx MOD ERROR
Unsupported I/O module specific major error.
xx94
MOD IN SLOT xx
In the processor run or test mode, a module
has been detected as being inserted under
power. Code xx94 also can mean that an I/O
module reset itself.
Appendix
A
Specifications
This appendix contains the module’s specifications for:
• operating power
• temperature and humidity
• general characteristics
Operating Power
Input Line Voltage
18 to 30 V dc
Input Current
104 mA (max) at 24 VDC
Input Volts (ripple)
1V p-p
Input Current Inrush
350 mA pk (max)
Operating Temperature
0 to 55°C (+32 to +131°F)
Storage Temperature
-20 to +65°C (-4 to +149°F)
Temperature and
Humidity
5 to 95% (without condensation)
Humidity Rating
IMPORTANT: Due to the physical properties of
Liquid Crystal Displays, it is important that the
following temperature/humidity ratings be considered
maximums to prevent premature degradation of
display quality:
Temperature Humidity
35°C (95°F) 95% RH
45°C (113°F) 85% RH
55°C (131°F) 75% RH
Publication 1747-6.1
A-2
Specifications
General
Characteristics
Physical Dimensions
• Front Panel: 152.4 mm H x 139.7 mm W
(6.0 in H x 5.5 in W)
• Back Case: 127.0 mm H x 101.6 mm W x 63.5 mm D
(5.0 in H x 4.0 in W x 2.5 in D)
Mounting Torques
.8 Nm (7.0 in-lb)
Operating Modes
The module can operate in one of two modes, Monitor or
Modify. There is a three position terminal block provided for
mode change. Access to the terminal is provided through the
back case.
Display
The display is liquid crystal, using supertwist nematic fluid.
The display format is 16 characters by 2 lines. A trim pot is
provided for contrast adjustment. LCD backlighting is
provided for viewing in low light conditions.
Keypad
The keypad is of sealed membrane construction. The keys
have an embossed rim and tactile feedback.
Status Indicator
A bi-color LED is provided on the front of the module to
provide communications and fault status.
Interconnect Cable
The standard 1747-C10 cable is used as the interconnector
between the module and a SLC 500 family processor or a DH485 link coupler.
0.38 mm (0.015 in) peak to peak displacement
Vibration
2.5 g peak (max) acceleration
1 hr/axis
Noise Immunity
Meets NEMA standard ICS 2-230
UL listed.
CSA certified.
Certification
Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D
Meets NEMA 12 and 13 enclosure applications
CE compliant for all applicable directives
Publication 1747-6.1
Appendix
B
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical
Addressing
This appendix provides you with an overview of SLC 500 family data
files and logical addressing. It describes:
• data files
• data file types
• data file addressing
Data Files
Data files contain the status information associated with external I/O
and all other instructions you use in your program. In addition, these
files store information concerning processor operation.
Data File Types
For the purposes of addressing, each file type is identified by a letter
(identifier) and a file number.
File numbers 0 through 7 are the default files, created for you. If you
need additional storage, you can create files by specifying the
appropriate identifier and a file number from 10 to 255. This applies
to Bit, Timer, Counter, Control, and Integer files only. Refer to the
tables on the following page.
Data Files
0
Output Image
File Type
1
Input Image
2
Status
3
Bit
4
Timer
Output
Input
Status a
Bit
Timer
Counter
Control
Integer
5
Counter
6
Control
7
Integer
8
Reserved
9
Reserved
10-255
Bit, Timer, Counter,
Control, or Integer,
assigned as needed
a
Identifier File Number
O
I
S
B
T
C
R
N
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Not accessible from the DTAM
User-Defined Files
File Type
Bit
Timer
Counter
Control
Integer
Identifier File Number
B
T
C
R
N
10-255
Publication 1747-6.1
B-2
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
Address Structure
Data files contain elements. Some data files have 1-word elements,
some have 3-word elements. You will be addressing elements, words,
and bits.
Addresses are made up of alpha-numeric characters separated by
delimiters. Delimiters include the colon, slash, and period.
Typical element, word, and bit addresses are shown below.
File
Type
File
Number
Element
N7:15
Element
Delimiter
An element address
File
Type
File
Number
File
Number
Element
Word
Element
File
Type
Bit
T4:7.ACC
Element
Delimiter
Word Delimiter
A word address
B3:64/15
Element
Delimiter
Bit
Delimiter
A bit address
The address format varies, depending on the file type. This is
explained in the following sections. We begin with file 0 and 1,
outputs and inputs, and follow with files 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7.
Data Files 0 and 1 - Outputs and Inputs
Bits in file 0 are used to represent external outputs. Bits in file 1 are
used to represent external inputs. In most cases, a single 16-bit word
in these files will correspond to a slot location in your controller, with
bit numbers corresponding to input or output terminal numbers.
The tables on the following pages describe the I/O addressing
methods for both fixed and modular controllers.
Publication 1747-6.1
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
B-3
I/O addresses are assigned to fixed I/O controllers as shown below.
Format
Explanation
O
Output
I
Input
:
Element delimiter
e
Slot number
(decimal)
.
Word delimiter.
Required only if a word number is
necessary as noted below.
s
Word number
Required if the number of inputs or
outputs exceeds 16 for the slot. Range:
0-255 (range accomodates multi-word
specialty I/O modules).
/
Bit delimiter
b
Terminal
number
O:0/4
Controller Output (slot 4)
O:2/7
Output 7, slot 2 of an expansion rack
fixed I/O controller: 0
O:e.s/b
I:e.s/b
Examples:
I:1/4
I:0/15
I:0.1/17
left slot of expansion rack: 1
right slot of expansion rack: 2
Inputs: 0 to 15 (or 0 to 23, slot 0)
Outputs: 0 to 15
Input 4, slot 1 of an expansion rack
Controller input 15 (slot 0)
Controller input 23 (bit 07, word 1 of slot 0)
Alternate way of addressing I/O terminals 16 and higher: As indicated above, address
I:0.1/7 applies to input terminal 23 of slot 0. You can also address this terminal as I:0/23
Word
Addresses
O:1
Output word 0, slot 1
I:0
Input word 0, slot 0
I:0.1
Input word 1, slot 0
Publication 1747-6.1
B-4
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
I/O addresses are assigned to modular controllers as shown in the
table below:
Format
Explanation
O
Output
I
Input
:
Element delimiter
e
Slot number
(decimal)
Slot 0, adjacent to the power supply in
the first rack, applies to the processor
module (CPU). Succeeding slots are I/O
slots, numbered from 1 to a maximum of
30.
.
Word delimiter.
Required only if a word number is
necessary as noted below.
s
Word number
Required if the number of inputs or
outputs exceeds 16 for the slot. Range:
0-255 (range accomodates multi-word
specialty I/O modules).
/
Bit delimiter
b
Terminal
number
O:e.s/b
I:e.s/b
Inputs: 0 to 15
Outputs: 0 to 15
Examples:
Word
Addresses
Publication 1747-6.1
O:3/15
O:5/0
O:10/11
I:7/8
I:2.1/3
Output 15, slot 3
Output 0, slot 5
Output 11, slot 10
Input 8, slot 7
Input 3, slot 2, word 1
O:5
O:5.1
I:8
Output word 0, slot 5
Input word 1, slot 5
Input word 0, slot 8
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
B-5
Data File 3 - Bit
File 3 is the bit file, used principally for relay logic instructions, shift
registers, and sequencers. The maximum size of the file is 256
1-word elements, or a total of 4096 bits. You can address bits by
specifying the element number (0-255) and the bit number within the
element (0-15). You can also address bits simply by numbering them
in sequence, from 0 to 4095.
You can also address elements of this file.
Bit 14, element 3.
Address B3:3/14
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Element
0
1
Can also be
expressed as bit 62.
Address B3/62
2
3
252
253
254
Bit 0, element 252.
Address B3:252/0
Can also be
expressed as bit
4032.
Address B3/4032
255
Format
Explanation
B
Bit type file
f
File number.
:
Element delimiter
e
Element
number
/
Bit delimiter.
b
Bit number
B
f
/
Same as above.
b
Bit number
B3:3/14
Bit 14, element 03
Number 3 is the default file. A file
number between 10-255 can be used if
additional storage is required.
Bf:e/b
Bf/b
Examples
Ranges from 0 to 255. These are 1-word
elements. 16-bits per element.
Bit location within the element. Ranges
from 1 to 15.
B3:252/0
Bit 0, element 252
B3:9
Bit 0-15, element 9
B3/62
Bit 62
This is the numerical position of the bit
within the file. Ranges from 0 to 4095.
B3/4032
Bit 4032
Publication 1747-6.1
B-6
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
Data File 4 - Timers
Timers are 3-word elements. Word 0 is the control word, word 1
stores the preset value, and word 2 stores the accumulator value. This
is illustrated below.
Timer Element
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Word
EN TT DN
nternal se
Preset alue PRE
Accumulated alue ACC
Addressable Bits
0
1
2
Addressable Words
r
d
r
o
d r r o ddr
Assign timer addresses as follows:
Format
Tf:e
Examples:
Explanation
T
Timer
f
File number.
:
Element delimiter
e
Element
number
T4:0
Number 4 is the default file. A file
number between 10-255 can be used if
additional storage is required.
Ranges from 0 to 255. These are 3-word
elements. See the figure above.
Element 0, timer file 4.
Address bits and words by using the format TF:e.s/b where Tf:e is explained above, and
. is the word delimiter
s indicates subelement
/ is the bit delimiter
b indicates bit
Publication 1747-6.1
T4:0/15
T4:0/14
T4:0/13
Enable bit
Timer timing bit
Done bit
T4:0.1
T4:0.2
Preset value of the timer
Accumulated value of the timer
T4:0.1/0
T4:0.2/0
Bit 0 of the preset value
Bit 0 of the accumulated value
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
B-7
Data File 5 - Counters
Counters are 3-word elements. Word 0 is the control word, word 1
stores the preset value, and word 2 stores the accumulator value. This
is illustrated below.
Counter Element
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Word
CU CD DN O UN UA
nternal Use
Preset alue PRE
Accumulated alue ACC
Addressable Bits
Addressable Words
o
o do
o
ro
dro
d or
r
d
0
1
2
dr
r o ddr
o
Assign counter addresses as follows:
Format
Cf:e
Examples:
Explanation
C
Counter
f
File number.
:
Element delimiter
e
Element
number
C5:0
Number 5 is the default file. A file
number between 10-255 can be used if
additional storage is required.
Ranges from 0 to 255. These are 3-word
elements. See the figure above.
Element 0, counter file 5.
Address bits and words by using the format CF:e.s/b where Cf:e is explained above, and
. is the word delimiter
s indicates subelement
/ is the bit delimiter
b indicates bit
C5:0/15
C5:0/14
C5:0/13
C5:0/12
C5:0/11
C5:0/10
Count Up Enable
Count Down Enable
Done bit
Overflow bit
Underflow bit
Update accumulator bit (HSC only)
C5:0.1
C5:0.2
Preset value of the counter
Accumulated value of the counter
C5:0.1/0
C5:0.2/0
Bit 0 of the preset value
Bit 0 of the accumulated value
Publication 1747-6.1
B-8
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
Data File 6 - Control
These are 3-word elements, used with Bit Shift and Sequencer
instructions. Word 0 is the status word, word 1 indicates the length of
stored data, and word 2 indicates position. This is illustrated below.
Control Element
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Word
EN
DN
ER UL IN FD
Internal Use
Length of Bit array or File
Bit Pointer or Position
Addressable Bits
Addressable Words
o
rror
od o
oo
0
1
2
dr
r o ddr
od
Assign control addresses as follows:
Format
Rf:e
Examples:
Explanation
R
Control
f
File number.
:
Element delimiter
e
Element
number
R6:2
Number 6 is the default file. A file
number between 10-255 can be used if
additional storage is required.
Ranges from 0 to 255. These are 3-word
elements. See the figure above.
Element 2, control file 6.
Address bits and words by using the format RF:e.s/b where Rf:e is explained above, and
. is the word delimiter
s indicates subelement
/ is the bit delimiter
b indicates bit
R6:2/15
R6:2/13
R6:2/11
R6:2/10
R6:2/9
R6:2/8
Enable bit
Done bit
Error bit
Unload bit
Inhibit bit
Found bit
R6:2.1
R6:2.2
Length value
Position value
R6:2.1/0
R6:2.2/0
Publication 1747-6.1
Bit 0 of the length value
Bit 0 of the position value
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
B-9
Data File 7- Integer
These are 1-word elements, addressable at the element and bit level.
The Data Table Access Module cannot access Integer words to the bit
level.
Integer File
15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Element
0
1
2
253
254
255
Assign integer addresses as follows:
Format
Nf:e
Examples:
Explanation
N
Integer
f
File number.
:
Element delimiter
e
Element
number
/
Bit delimiter
b
Bit number
N7:2
N7:2/8
N10:36
Number 7 is the default file. A file
number between 10-255 can be used if
additional storage is required.
Ranges from 0 to 255. These are 1-word
elements. 16 bits per element.
Bit location within the element. Ranges
from 0 to 15.
Element 2, integer file 7.
Bit 8 in element 2, integer file 7.
Element 36, integer file 10 (file designated as an integer file
by the user)
Publication 1747-6.1
B-10
SLC 500 Data Files and Logical Addressing
Publication 1747-6.1
Appendix
C
Module Display Character Set
Display Character
Table
This appendix provides a table to describe the module display
characters and their binary equivalents. 00 through 1F Hex are
reserved for system use.
Example: 41H = 01000001B = A
Hex 2x 3x 4x 5x 6x 7x
Ax Bx Cx Dx Ex Fx
Low High Order
4 bit
Binary 0010 0011 0100 0101 0110 0111 1010 1011 1100 1101 1110 1111
Order 4 bit
Hex
Binary
y0
0000
y1
0001
y2
0010
y3
0011
y4
0100
y5
0101
y6
0110
y7
0111
y8
1000
y9
1001
yA
1010
yB
1011
yC
1100
yD
1101
yE
1110
yF
1111
Publication 1747-6.1
C-2
Module Display Character Set
Publication 1747-6.1
Appendix
D
Mounting Template
We have provided the following full-size template for your
convenience in mounting the Data Table Access Module.
Using the Template
Before you use this template, read the installation recommendations
on page 2-1.
104.8 mm
(4.125 in.)
95.76 mm
(3.77 in.)
Scrape paint
to ensure
good ground.
Scrape paint
to ensure
good ground.
114.3 mm
(4.5 in.)
128.5 mm
(5.06 in.)
3.86 mm dia.
(0.152 in.)
4 holes
Publication 1747-6.1
D-2
Mounting Template
Publication 1747-6.1
Index
Symbols
.ACC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
.LEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
.POS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
.PRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Numerics
12-word message
application example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
1747 AIC+. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
1747-AIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
1747-C10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
1747-C-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
18-word message
application example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
1-word message
application example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
8-word message
application example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
A
access denied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
access hole
making adjustments through. . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
access port
making adjustments through. . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
addressing
changing the node address . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
data file address structure. . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
adjustments
monitor mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
ASCII characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-1
B
Backspace Function
during data file value entry . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
bit addresses
address format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
to an SLC 5/04 processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
contrast, LCD
adjust pot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
adjusting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
control addresses
address format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8
entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
counter addresses
address format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-7
entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
current
input. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
input inrush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
cursor movement
to the left . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
to the right . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Cursor Right Function
during binary data entry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
implementing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Multiple Cursor Right . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Single Cursor Right . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
D
data file values
changing bit status at bit level . . . . . . . . . 5-16
changing bit status at word level . . . . . . . 5-15
changing the sign of a value . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
data files
address structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
variations of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
DEC key, explanation of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
deleting strings
.ACC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
.LEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
.POS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
.PRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
DH-485 network, connecting to. . . . . . . . . . 2-4, 2-5
dimensions, physical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
displaying data file addresses
different bit file addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
different control bits within elements. . . . 5-11
different word addresses within elements 5-10
duplicate node error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
bit status
changing at bit level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
changing at word level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
E
equipment connection
C
cables
communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
interconnect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
character display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C-1
clear message
application example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
communications LED
state changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
configuration and adjustments
monitor mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
connecting the equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4, 2-5
to a DH-485 network . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4, 2-5
to a SLC 500 family processor . . . . . . . . . 2-4
I-1
. . . . . . . . . . 2-4, 2-5
errors
correcting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
function failed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
illegal command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
illegal network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
incompat program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
no memory module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
no response. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
program changed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
F
function failed error .
.............
9-7
Publication 1747-6.1
I-2
Index
G
grounding the module
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
H
HALT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Halt mode
Ready Attached screen display . . . . . . . . 4-3
humidity rating. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
I
illegal command error
Monitor Override
functions performed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
LED state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
moving the cursor
to the left . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
to the right . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
N
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
NEXT key, explanation of .
..........
3-2
illegal network error. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
no memory module error. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
INC key, explanation of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
no response error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
incompat program error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
node address
changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
input and output addresses
address format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
integer addresses
addresses format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-9
entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
interconnect cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
J
jumper
alternative to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
configuring the module with . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
K
keys, explanation of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
keyswitch
for 5/03 operating modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
mounting user-supplied. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
L
LCD
contrast adjust pot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
contrast adjustment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
LED
state changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
link coupler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
logical data file addressing
compared to quick access addressing . . . 5-6
M
manuals, related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-3
memory transfer
troubleshooting using the LCD . . . . . . . . . 9-7
modify mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
configuration and adjustments . . . . . . . . . 2-6
functions performed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
LED state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
module configuration and adjustments
monitor mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Publication 1747-6.1
monitor mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
configuration and adjustments . . . . . . . . . 2-6
functions performed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
LED state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
noise immunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
O
operating modes
displayed on Ready Attached screen . . 4-3
monitor mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Monitor Override feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
operating power
input current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
input current inrush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
input line voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
input volts (ripple) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
output and input addresses
address format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
P
PREV key, explanation of .
..........
3-2
PROG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
program changed error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Program mode
Ready Attached screen display. . . . . . . . . 4-3
publications, related . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-3
Q
questions or comments on manual. . . . . . . . . . . P-4
quick access addressing
compared to logical addressing . . . . . . . . 5-6
Index
I-3
R
ready screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Ready Attached screen
during Manual Attach procedure . . . 4-2
text, operating mode . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Ready Unattached screen. . . . . . . . . .3-3, 4-1
during Manual Attach procedure . . . 4-1
REM position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
RHALT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
RRUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
RTEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
RUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Run mode
Ready Attached screen display
. . . . . 4-3
S
setup mode
changing the setup configuration . . . . . . . 3-3
strain relief tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
T
technical product assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-4
temperature
operating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
TEST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
timer addresses
address format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6
entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
torque . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2, A-2
U
user-supplied keyswitch
connecting . . . .
...........
2-7
V
volts
input (ripple) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
input line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Publication 1747-6.1
I-4
Index
Publication 1747-6.1
Publication 1747-6.1 — August 1998
Supercedes Publication Number 1747-6.1— November 1996
40072-041-01(B)
Copyright 1998 — Rockwell International Corporation. Printed in USA
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