Installation Manual

Installation Manual
Sur-Gard MLR2000
Virtual Network Receiver
Installation
Manual
WARNING: This manual contains information on limitations regarding
product use and function and information on the limitations as to
liability of the manufacturer. The entire manual should be carefully read.
version 1.7
FCC Compliance Statement
CAUTION: Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Digital Security Controls could
void your authority to use this equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged
to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
Re-orient the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for help.
The user may find the following booklet prepared by the FCC useful: “How to Identify and Resolve
Radio/Television Interference Problems”. This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington D.C. 20402, Stock # 004-000-00345-4.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC Rules. On the side of this equipment is a label that
contains, among other information, the FCC registration number and ringer equivalence number
(REN) for this equipment. If requested, this number must be provided to the Telephone Company.
FCC Registration Number: 1VDCAN-25404-AL-N
REN: 0.2B
USOC Jack: RJ11C
Telephone Connection Requirements
A plug and jack used to connect this equipment to the premises wiring and telephone network must
comply with the applicable FCC Part 68 rules and requirements adopted by the ACTA. A compliant
telephone cord and modular plug is provided with this product. It is designed to be connected to a
compatible modular jack that is also compliant. See installation instructions for details.
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) The REN is used to determine the number of devices that may
be connected to a telephone line. Excessive RENs on a telephone line may result in the devices not
ringing in response to an incoming call. In most but not all areas, the sum of RENs should not exceed
five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices that may be connected to a line, as determined by
the total RENs, contact the local Telephone Company. For products approved after July 23, 2001, the
REN for this product is part of the product identifier that has the format
US: AAAEQ##TXXXX. The digits represented by ## are the REN without a decimal point (e.g., 03
is a REN of 0.3). For earlier products, the REN is separately shown on the label.
Incidence of Harm If this equipment Sur-Gard MLR2000 causes harm to the telephone network, the
telephone company will notify you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be
required. But if advance notice is not practical, the Telephone Company will notify the customer as
soon as possible. Also, you will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC if you
believe it is necessary.
Changes in Telephone Company Equipment or Facilities The Telephone Company may make
changes in its facilities, equipment, operations or procedures that could affect the operation of the
equipment. If this happens the Telephone Company will provide advance notice in order for you to
make necessary modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
Equipment Maintenance Facility If trouble is experienced with this equipment Sur-Gard
MLR2000, for repair or warranty information, please contact the facility indicated below. If the
equipment is causing harm to the telephone network, the Telephone Company may request that you
disconnect the equipment until the problem is solved. This equipment is of a type that is not intended
to be repaired by the end user.
DSC
c/o APL Logistics
757 Douglas Hill Rd, Lithia Springs, GA 30122
Additional Information Connection to party line service is subject to state tariffs. Contact the state
public utility commission, public service commission or corporation commission for information.
If your home has specially wired alarm equipment connected to the telephone line, ensure the installation of this equipment Sur-Gard MLR2000 does not disable your alarm equipment. If you have questions about what will disable alarm equipment, consult your telephone company or a qualified
installer.
Customer Premises Equipment and Wiring
Network
Service
Provider's
Facilities
Computer
RJ-31X
Jack
Alarm Dialing
Equipment
Unused
RJ-11 Jack
Telephone
Line
Telephon
Network
Demarcation
Point
Fax Machine
Telephone
Answering
System
Unused
RJ-11 Jack
Telephone
Industry Canada Statement
IC: 160A-MLR2000
NOTICE: This equipment meets the applicable Industry Canada Terminal Equipment
Technical Specifications. This is confirmed by the registration number. The abbreviation,
IC, before the registration number signifies that registration was performed based on a
Declaration of Conformity indicating that Industry Canada technical specifications were
met. It does not imply that Industry Canada approved the equipment.
NOTICE: The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) for this terminal is 01. The REN
assigned to each terminal equipment provides an indication of the maximum number of
terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface. The termination on an interface may consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the
sum of the Ringer Equivalence Numbers of all the devices does not exceed five.
Classification
The equipment MLR2000 is a CLASS 1, RACK-MOUNTED, (FIXED –
STATIONARY) EQUIPMENT, PLUGGABLE TYPE A USING A DETACHABLE POWER SUPPLY CORD, designed to be INSTALLED, OPERATED and MAINTAINED by SERVICE PERSONNEL ONLY. [persons
having appropriate technical training and experience necessary to
be aware of hazards to which they are exposed in performing a task
and of measures to minimise the danger to themselves or other
persons].
The equipment MLR2000 is designed to be installed in RESTRICTED
ACCESS LOCATIONS within an environment that provides the Pollution Degree max 2 and OVERVOLTAGES CATEGORY II - NONHAZARDOUS LOCATIONS, INDOOR ONLY.
Table of Contents
Section 1 - Introduction ............................................. 1
1.1 CPM2000 ................................................................ 1
1.2 DRL2000 ................................................................. 1
1.3 Power and Supervision............................................. 1
1.4 CPM2000 Outputs/ Inputs ....................................... 1
1.5 System Overview...................................................... 2
1.6 Virtual Receiver Architecture .................................... 2
1.7 Number of Line Cards Supported ............................. 2
1.8 Redundancy............................................................. 2
1.9 Approvals ................................................................ 2
1.10 Virtual Connectivity ................................................. 2
1.11 Internal 10B2 Ethernet............................................. 2
Section 2 - Quick Start ............................................... 3
2.1 Receiver Setup and Operation .................................. 3
2.2 Bench Testing .......................................................... 9
Section 3 - Installation............................................. 10
3.1 Dimensions ............................................................ 10
3.2 Definity DNIS ......................................................... 10
3.3 Mounting the Receiver........................................... 10
3.4 Printer Connections ............................................... 10
3.5 Computer Connections.......................................... 10
3.6 Telephone Line Connections .................................. 10
3.7 Grounding ............................................................. 10
3.8 Power Supply......................................................... 10
3.9 Battery Charging Current....................................... 10
3.10 Removing and Installing System Components ........ 10
3.11 To Install a Line Card Module ................................. 10
Section 4 - DRL2000 Digital Receiver Line Card .... 11
4.1 General Information............................................... 11
4.2 DRL2000 Features.................................................. 11
4.3 Installation ............................................................. 11
4.4 DRL2000 Controls.................................................. 11
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12
7.13
7.14
7.15
Ademco Contact ID................................................24
Ademco Express .....................................................26
Ademco Super Fast (High Speed Format) ................26
FBI Super Fast Format .............................................26
ITI Format...............................................................26
ITI Sensor Library ....................................................26
Modem II, Modem IIE, Modem IIIa² and
BFSK Formats .........................................................27
SIA FSK ..................................................................27
Silent Knight FSK1, FSK2 ........................................27
Silent Knight FSK2 Protocol ....................................27
Sescoa Super Speed ...............................................28
DRL2000 Predefined Library Decoding and Event
Codes Table27
Section 8 - CPM2000 Central Processing Module... 30
8.1 General Information ...............................................30
8.2 Features .................................................................30
8.3 CPM2000 Controls.................................................30
Section 9 - CPM2000 Wiring Diagram ..................... 31
9.1 Loss of Socket/Automation.....................................31
9.2 CPM Redundancy...................................................31
9.3 CPM Restoral .........................................................31
Section 10 - MLR2000 Computer Interface ............. 32
10.1 Virtual connectivity .................................................32
10.2 Automation Mode..................................................32
10.3 TCP/IP Ports ............................................................32
10.4 Client Side Connects ..............................................32
10.5 Stream Packet Structure .........................................32
10.6 Status Addressing...................................................32
10.7 Overview of Communication ..................................32
10.8 Console spcifies which SG Automation to
Supervise................................................................33
Section 5 - DRL2000 Operating Mode ..................... 12
5.1 DRL2000 Standby Mode ........................................ 12
5.2 DRL2000 Cold Start-up .......................................... 12
5.3 Communications in Progress .................................. 12
Section 11 - PSU2000 Power supply Module .......... 36
Section 6 - Advanced Programming ...................... 13
6.1 Profile Introduction ................................................ 13
6.2 A.H.S. (Automatic Handshake Selection) ................ 14
6.3 Dynamic Options: [30] - [FF]............................... 17
Section 13 - Detailed Description of Computers ... 38
13.1 COM Responses .....................................................38
13.2 Automation Absent...............................................38
Appendix A - DRL2000 Communication Formats ...........39
Appendix B - Decimal - HEX - Binary Conversion Chart.40
Appendix C - ASCII Character Chart ..............................41
Appendix D - Printer Words: Options [60-6F]................42
Appendix E - Panels Compatibility List ..........................44
Section 7 - DRL2000 Communication Formats ....... 24
7.1 Common Formats .................................................. 24
7.2 Sur-Gard DTMF Formats......................................... 24
7.3 Acron Format......................................................... 24
Section 12 - Automation Protocols ......................... 37
12.1 Data Byte protocol..................................................37
12.2 Acknowledgment of the Signal ..............................37
WARNING
Please Read Carefully
N o te t o In s t al le r s
This warning contains vital information. As the only individual in contact with system users, it is your
responsibility to bring each item in this warning to the attention of the users of this system.
S y st e m Fa i lu r e s
This system has been carefully designed to be as effective as possible. There are circumstances, however,
involving fire, burglary, or other types of emergencies where it may not provide protection. Any alarm
system of any type may be compromised deliberately or may fail to operate as expected for a variety of
reasons. Some but not all of these reasons may be:
■ Inadequate Installation
A security system must be installed properly in order to provide adequate protection. Every installation
should be evaluated by a security professional to ensure that all access points and areas are covered. Locks
and latches on windows and doors must be secure and operate as intended. Windows, doors, walls, ceilings and other building materials must be of sufficient strength and construction to provide the level of
protection expected. A reevaluation must be done during and after any construction activity. An evaluation by the fire and/or police department is highly recommended if this service is available.
■ Criminal Knowledge
This system contains security features which were known to be effective at the time of manufacture. It is
possible for persons with criminal intent to develop techniques which reduce the effectiveness of these
features. It is important that a security system be reviewed periodically to ensure that its features remain
effective and that it be updated or replaced if it is found that it does not provide the protection expected.
■ Access by Intruders
Intruders may enter through an unprotected access point, circumvent a sensing device, evade detection by
moving through an area of insufficient coverage, disconnect a warning device, or interfere with or prevent
the proper operation of the system.
■ Power Failure
Control units, intrusion detectors, smoke detectors and many other security devices require an adequate
power supply for proper operation. If a device operates from batteries, it is possible for the batteries to
fail. Even if the batteries have not failed, they must be charged, in good condition and installed correctly.
If a device operates only by AC power, any interruption, however brief, will render that device inoperative
while it does not have power. Power interruptions of any length are often accompanied by voltage fluctuations which may damage electronic equipment such as a security system. After a power interruption has
occurred, immediately conduct a complete system test to ensure that the system operates as intended.
■ Failure of Replaceable Batteries
This system’s wireless transmitters have been designed to provide several years of battery life under normal conditions. The expected battery life is a function of the device environment, usage and type. Ambient conditions such as high humidity, high or low temperatures, or large temperature fluctuations may
reduce the expected battery life. While each transmitting device has a low battery monitor which identifies when the batteries need to be replaced, this monitor may fail to operate as expected. Regular testing
and maintenance will keep the system in good operating condition.
■ Compromise of Radio Frequency (Wireless) Devices
Signals may not reach the receiver under all circumstances which could include metal objects placed on or
near the radio path or deliberate jamming or other inadvertent radio signal interference.
■ System Users
A user may not be able to operate a panic or emergency switch possibly due to permanent or temporary
physical disability, inability to reach the device in time, or unfamiliarity with the correct operation. It is
important that all system users be trained in the correct operation of the alarm system and that they know
how to respond when the system indicates an alarm.
■ Smoke Detectors
Smoke detectors that are a part of this system may not properly alert occupants of a fire for a number of
reasons, some of which follow. The smoke detectors may have been improperly installed or positioned.
Smoke may not be able to reach the smoke detectors, such as when the fire is in a chimney, walls or roofs,
or on the other side of closed doors. Smoke detectors may not detect smoke from fires on another level of
the residence or building.
Every fire is different in the amount of smoke produced and the rate of burning. Smoke detectors cannot
sense all types of fires equally well. Smoke detectors may not provide timely warning of fires caused by
carelessness or safety hazards such as smoking in bed, violent explosions, escaping gas, improper storage
of flammable materials, overloaded electrical circuits, children playing with matches or arson.
Even if the smoke detector operates as intended, there may be circumstances when there is insufficient
warning to allow all occupants to escape in time to avoid injury or death.
■ Motion Detectors
Motion detectors can only detect motion within the designated areas as shown in their respective installation instructions. They cannot discriminate between intruders and intended occupants. Motion detectors
do not provide volumetric area protection. They have multiple beams of detection and motion can only be
detected in unobstructed areas covered by these beams. They cannot detect motion which occurs behind
walls, ceilings, floor, closed doors, glass partitions, glass doors or windows. Any type of tampering
whether intentional or unintentional such as masking, painting, or spraying of any material on the lenses,
mirrors, windows or any other part of the detection system will impair its proper operation.
Passive infrared motion detectors operate by sensing changes in temperature. However their effectiveness
can be reduced when the ambient temperature rises near or above body temperature or if there are intentional or unintentional sources of heat in or near the detection area. Some of these heat sources could be
heaters, radiators, stoves, barbeques, fireplaces, sunlight, steam vents, lighting and so on.
■ Warning Devices
Warning devices such as sirens, bells, horns, or strobes may not warn people or waken someone sleeping
if there is an intervening wall or door. If warning devices are located on a different level of the residence
or premise, then it is less likely that the occupants will be alerted or awakened. Audible warning devices
may be interfered with by other noise sources such as stereos, radios, televisions, air conditioners or other
appliances, or passing traffic. Audible warning devices, however loud, may not be heard by a hearingimpaired person.
■ Telephone Lines
If telephone lines are used to transmit alarms, they may be out of service or busy for certain periods of
time. Also an intruder may cut the telephone line or defeat its operation by more sophisticated means
which may be difficult to detect.
■ Insufficient Time
There may be circumstances when the system will operate as intended, yet the occupants will not be protected from the emergency due to their inability to respond to the warnings in a timely manner. If the system is monitored, the response may not occur in time to protect the occupants or their belongings.
■ Component Failure
Although every effort has been made to make this system as reliable as possible, the system may fail to
function as intended due to the failure of a component.
■ Inadequate Testing
Most problems that would prevent an alarm system from operating as intended can be found by regular
testing and maintenance. The complete system should be tested weekly and immediately after a break-in,
an attempted break-in, a fire, a storm, an earthquake, an accident, or any kind of construction activity
inside or outside the premises. The testing should include all sensing devices, keypads, consoles, alarm
indicating devices and any other operational devices that are part of the system.
■ Security and Insurance
Regardless of its capabilities, an alarm system is not a substitute for property or life insurance. An alarm
system also is not a substitute for property owners, renters, or other occupants to act prudently to prevent
or minimize the harmful effects of an emergency situation.
Limited Warranty
Digital Security Controls warrants the original purchaser that for a period of twelve months from the date
of purchase, the product shall be free of defects in materials and workmanship under normal use. During
the warranty period, Digital Security Controls shall, at its option, repair or replace any defective product
upon return of the product to its factory, at no charge for labour and materials. Any replacement and/or
repaired parts are warranted for the remainder of the original warranty or ninety (90) days, whichever is
longer. The original purchaser must promptly notify Digital Security Controls in writing that there is
defect in material or workmanship, such written notice to be received in all events prior to expiration of
the warranty period. There is absolutely no warranty on software and all software products are sold
as a user license under the terms of the software license agreement included with the product. The
Customer assumes all responsibility for the proper selection, installation, operation and maintenance of any products purchased from DSC. Custom products are only warranted to the extent that
they do not function upon delivery. In such cases, DSC can replace or credit at its option.
In t e rn a t io n al War ra n t y
The warranty for international customers is the same as for any customer within Canada and the United
States, with the exception that Digital Security Controls shall not be responsible for any customs fees,
taxes, or VAT that may be due.
Wa rr an t y Pr oc e d ur e
To obtain service under this warranty, please return the item(s) in question to the point of purchase. All
authorized distributors and dealers have a warranty program. Anyone returning goods to Digital Security
Controls must first obtain an authorization number. Digital Security Controls will not accept any shipment
whatsoever for which prior authorization has not been obtained.
C on d it io n s t o Vo id Wa rr an t y
This warranty applies only to defects in parts and workmanship relating to normal use. It does not cover:
• damage incurred in shipping or handling;
• damage caused by disaster such as fire, flood, wind, earthquake or lightning;
• damage due to causes beyond the control of Digital Security Controls such as excessive voltage,
mechanical shock or water damage;
• damage caused by unauthorized attachment, alterations, modifications or foreign objects;
• damage caused by peripherals (unless such peripherals were supplied by Digital Security Controls);
• defects caused by failure to provide a suitable installation environment for the products;
• damage caused by use of the products for purposes other than those for which it was designed;
• damage from improper maintenance;
• damage arising out of any other abuse, mishandling or improper application of the products.
It e m s N ot C ove re d by Wa rr an t y
In addition to the items which void the Warranty, the following items shall not be covered by Warranty: (i)
freight cost to the repair centre; (ii) products which are not identified with DSC's product label and lot
number or serial number; (iii) products disassembled or repaired in such a manner as to adversely affect
performance or prevent adequate inspection or testing to verify any warranty claim. Access cards or tags
returned for replacement under warranty will be credited or replaced at DSC's option. Products not covered by this warranty, or otherwise out of warranty due to age, misuse, or damage shall be evaluated, and
a repair estimate shall be provided. No repair work will be performed until a valid purchase order is
received from the Customer and a Return Merchandise Authorisation number (RMA) is issued by DSC's
Customer Service.
Digital Security Controls’s liability for failure to repair the product under this warranty after a reasonable
number of attempts will be limited to a replacement of the product, as the exclusive remedy for breach of
warranty. Under no circumstances shall Digital Security Controls be liable for any special, incidental, or
consequential damages based upon breach of warranty, breach of contract, negligence, strict liability, or
any other legal theory. Such damages include, but are not limited to, loss of profits, loss of the product or
any associated equipment, cost of capital, cost of substitute or replacement equipment, facilities or services, down time, purchaser’s time, the claims of third parties, including customers, and injury to property. The laws of some jurisdictions limit or do not allow the disclaimer of consequential damages.
If the laws of such a jurisdiction apply to any claim by or against DSC, the limitations and disclaimers contained here shall be to the greatest extent permitted by law. Some states do not allow
the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so that the above may not
apply to you.
D i sc l ai m e r o f War r an t ie s
This warranty contains the entire warranty and shall be in lieu of any and all other warranties,
whether expressed or implied (including all implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose) And of all other obligations or liabilities on the part of Digital Security Controls Digital Security Controls neither assumes responsibility for, nor authorizes any other person purporting to
act on its behalf to modify or to change this warranty, nor to assume for it any other warranty or liability concerning this product.
This disclaimer of warranties and limited warranty are governed by the laws of the province of Ontario,
Canada.
WARNING: Digital Security Controls recommends that the entire system be completely tested on a
regular basis. However, despite frequent testing, and due to, but not limited to, criminal tampering
or electrical disruption, it is possible for this product to fail to perform as expected.
In s t al le r ’s Loc kou t
Any products returned to DSC which have the Installer’s Lockout option enabled and exhibit no other
problems will be subject to a service charge.
Ou t of Wa rr an t y R e pa ir s
Digital Security Controls will at its option repair or replace out-of-warranty products which are returned
to its factory according to the following conditions. Anyone returning goods to Digital Security Controls
must first obtain an authorization number. Digital Security Controls will not accept any shipment whatsoever for which prior authorization has not been obtained.
Products which Digital Security Controls determines to be repairable will be repaired and returned. A set
fee which Digital Security Controls has predetermined and which may be revised from time to time, will
be charged for each unit repaired.
Products which Digital Security Controls determines not to be repairable will be replaced by the nearest
equivalent product available at that time. The current market price of the replacement product will be
charged for each replacement unit.
Section 1 - Introduction
The MLR2000 is a Multi-Line, Multi-Format Digital Receiver for
commercial fire and burglary. The basic unit consists of 60 individual line-cards (DRL2000) connected to a dual redundant central resource, router and protocol converter (CPM2000). The
MLR2000 includes many features, especially high bandwidth
internal buses and high bandwidth external connections to
allow traditional network philosophies to be observed for the
first time on a central station receiver. The MLR2000 can
decode a variety of popular and widely used communication
formats. Refer to Appendix A, DRL2000 Communication Formats for a list of the available communication protocols.
The MLR2000's real-time clock and calendar 'stamps' all information received with the time and date, and all information
may be printed or forwarded to a computer. To ensure security,
adjustment of the clock, calendar and other programming is
protected by password codes.
1.3.3 Compatibility
Central station automation software packages such as:
• MAS • DICE • SIMS II • GENESYS • S.I.S. • IBS
• MicroKey
support the MLR2000 Sur-Gard interface.
Refer to automation software specifications for compatibility.
NOTES: Automation connections are considered
supplementary per UL864 Listing. Compatibility
with the automation software in a system used at a
central station is intended to be handled under a
separate UL1981 software and/or site certification
evaluation.
1.1
1.5
1.4
CPM2000
The CPM2000 Central Processing Module oversees operation of the receivers. Along with its built-in keypad and
LCD message screen, the CPM2000 features TCP/IP, two
parallel printers, one serial printer and two serial computer
interface capability.
1.2
System Overview
• Patented Caller Identification (Call Display) capability
• Patent Pending DNIS Identification
• nonvolatile RAM on each DRL2000 line card module for
programming and event buffer.
• Fast Ethernet communication between line-cards and
CPM
• Flash download for software upgrades
• Up to 64 different options set (profiles per line)
• Patented virtual configurations
• 3/1, 4/2 formats with or without parity, 4/1 without parity at 10, 14, 20, or 40 baud
• 4/1, 4/2, 4/3, and 4/3 DTMF formats
• Optional* formats: 3-2, 4/1, 4/2 extended
• ACRON DTMF format
• Contact ID (DTMF) format
• Adcor 20 baud
• Super fast or high speed DTMF format, with or without
parity
• DTMF 4/1 express format (optional)
• DTMF 4/2 express format
• FBI super fast format with or without parity
• Radionics Modem II, Modem IIE, Modem IIIa2 and BFSK
formats
• SIA format: 110 and 300 baud, tone and data acknowledgement
• SK FSK0, FSK1, FSK2
• Any handshake frequencies by increment of 100 Hz
from 100 Hz to 2300 HZ, Dual Tone, SIA FSK, Modem II
and ITI selected by configuration commands
• Up to 8 different handshakes per profile.
• Large, easy to read 2-line, 16-characters-per-line, LCD
(Liquid Crystal Display) screen
• All modules function individually to help ensure uninterrupted operation during hardware or software upgrades
• Inputs on CPM2000 for UPS supervisory
• 255 lines maximum per receiver
• 512-event memory buffer on each individual line card
• Real-time clock
• CPM2000 features 32-bit micro-controller
• Two parallel printer port; three serial RS232 ports and
one 10 BaseT connection.
• Programmable serial ports configuration
• Programmable System Functions: Computer and printer
• Fast transmission of multiple alarms to the computer
and printer to ensure operator's quick response
DRL2000
Each DRL2000 module can monitor two telephone lines.
The line card module is equipped with a 256-event nonvolatile memory buffer to record events and corresponding telephone numbers. Caller Source capability is built-in
and telephone numbers can be printed out, sent to automation and stored in memory. Events and information
stored in memory can be printed at any time. Each line
card also features flash EPROM uploads through the
Debug port for software upgrades or options programming.
1.3
CPM2000 Outputs/ Inputs
• The CPM2000 features four switched-negative
(PGMOUT1 is activated when automation fails) outputs,
two relay outputs and four inputs.
Power and Supervision
1.3.1 Power
The MLR2000 power supplies inputs are 120 Vac at 10A,
60 Hz. Each AC power supply supplies a nominal 28 Vdc
+/-5% power. The receiver is equipped with 24V
rechargeable stand-by battery connections at 160 Ahr.
and an automatic battery charger. Provision is made for an
internal battery pack for temporary use. User supplied
batteries may be used externally but must be fused and
connected to 10-32 lugs supplied via a stud termination.
Full power operation is .5 Amps per line and 1 Amp per
CPM at 28 Vdc nominal. All elements have extensive
power down capabilities and are implemented in CMOS
logic.
1.3.2 Supervision
The stand-by battery voltage and connections are supervised. The Line Cards are also continuously supervised to
ensure uninterrupted communication with the CPM2000.
Any trouble conditions are reported on the LCD screens
and sent to the printer and the computer.
The DRL2000 Line Card Module also verifies communications with the CPM2000. In the event of a malfunction,
the operator will be advised with a visual indication and
the Line Cards will continue to function. Each line card will
continue to receive information.
The printer is supervised for off-line, paper out and other
trouble conditions. The communication link to the computer through the RS232 ports is monitored by the supervisory 'heartbeat' test transmissions.
*All formats noted as optional are selected using configuration commands.
1
• Continuous verification of the computer-receiver links
with the 'heartbeat' function
• Switched-negative outputs on CPM2000 (special applications)
• AC-lost detection and stand-by battery supervision
• Low battery detection and automatic low battery disconnect to prevent deep-discharge damage to battery
• Operator Acknowledge
• Telephone Line Supervision
1.6
printer and three serial ports. The serial ports are intended
primarily for debug applications but may be used for fallback automation outputs (optional). The primary automation connection is via 10BT Ethernet connection. Again if
redundant CPM's are used the external network components must be duplicated to allow for full redundancy.
1.9.3 Automation Mode
In automation mode it is expected that the primary connection is via TCP/IP networking on the 10BT Ethernet
connection. A menu on the CPM2000 will prompt the
user for the IP address setup and port setup. Once the
configuration management port is set up, all other
options and setups may be done via a Telnet session or
the Sur-Gard Console.
1.9.4 UL Manual Mode
For UL manual mode, each event will activate the internal
buzzer to be acknowledged manually. Each event will be
sent automatically to all connected printers.
NOTE: For central station applications the signaling
performance of each dact shall be manually tracked.
Failure to receive a signal from a dact over a 24-hour
period shall be handled as a trouble signal.
Virtual Receiver Architecture
The most novel feature of the DRL2000 is the ability to
use Telco information delivered as a DNIS (dialed number
identification service) to allow the Sur-Gard expert format
identification system to option on the fly each received call
to eliminate dedicated line pool hardware. Instead the
DNIS allows call up options which set up virtual line pools
to identify security formats and extend account numbers.
Standard dialed number identification is supported up to
10 digits.
Each dialed number should be assigned to a virtual
receiver. Each dialed number would have formerly been a
line pool on conventional line-cards.
1.7
1.10 Virtual Connectivity
Number of Line Cards Supported
Each receiver has one IP address and a number of associated ports. Internal socket programming uses specific
ports for expected tasks. The MLR2000 is the listener.
1.10.1 Configuration Management - Sur-Gard Configuration Port 1024
A tool is provided for NT 4 + or Windows 9x/2000/XP
environments which provides graphical style menu for
configuration management. Additional features are storage of virtual receiver setups, formats conversion table
and configuration wizards.
1.10.2 Status Addressing
Line card status will be reported via physical addressing.
This will be assigned by shelf and slot number. All device
status information is in Sur-Gard format. The reporting of
status on this port, automation output and printer will
relate to physical addressing.
1.10.3 Automation input/output (Port 1025, 1026)
Traditional automation communication will be provided
via a minimum of two ports. The primary port is Sur-Gard
standard output and provides Sur-Gard standard automation output.
Optional secondary automation communication will be
provided to map to proprietary types. It is expected that
named virtual receiver types will be mapped to this output. In addition two way automation commands may be
supported on this port.
The system will support a maximum of 255 line-cards concurrently connected. Optional hubs will be required for
backplane connectivity in installations beyond 5 shelves.
1.8
Redundancy
The MLR2000 has a main power supply module for side A
and for side B, and an optional stand-by power supply per
rack. Additional 10B2 Ethernet is available as a backup B
side. This and the ability to mount an optional second
CPM2000 controller will allow for seamless system redundancy in maximum configuration. In practical terms this
means that any line card may fail and not affect system
performance ; and with redundant CPM's the B unit will
take up where the A unit failed with a loss of no more
than 30 seconds. External networking components would
necessarily be duplicated to take full advantage of this
configuration.
1.9
Approvals
1.9.1 Industry Approvals
The MLR2000 in redundant configuration is listed under
the following UL standards:
• UL 864 Control Units for Fire-Protective Signaling Systems
• UL 1610 Central Station Burglar Alarm Units
This equipment should be installed in accordance
with the requirements of NFPA72, NFPA70 and
UL827.
1.9.2 System Connectivity
The system may have two identical CPMs both connected
to internal resources. Internal connections are A and B
side 28 V power and A and B side 10B2 Ethernet. Additional internal connections are power monitoring services
on the primary rack. External connections are two parallel
1.11 Internal 10B2 Ethernet
Internal Ethernet is not standard TCP/IP instead it has allocated proprietary type per Internet standards. Full physical
10B2 requirements are met allowing approved segment
interconnects to be used including hubs, optical transceivers and wan interconnects (wan interconnects preclude
trap and capture commands).
2
Section 2 - Quick Start
2.1 Receiver Setup and Operation
• Take a 50-ohm coaxial cable and connect one end to
the BNC connector (ETHERNET B) of the CPM2000. The
other end of the coaxial cable should be connected to
the BNC connector (ENET B IN) of the backplane.
• Make sure that there are 50 ohm BNC terminators on
the other end of the T Connectors of the CPM2000
labelled ETHERNET A AND B.
• Make sure that there are 50 ohm BNC terminators connected on the BNC terminals marked ENET A OUT and
ENET B OUT of the backplane. (This should be already
done.)
2.1.1 Unpacking
Carefully unpack the receiver and inspect for shipping
damage. If there is any apparent damage, notify the carrier immediately.
2.1.2 Ethernet Connections
NOTES: Be sure to be properly grounded.
• Take a 50 ohm coaxial cable and connect one end to the
BNC connector (ETHERNET A) of the CPM2000. The
other end of the coaxial cable should be connected to
the BNC connector (ENET A IN) of the backplane.
Figure 1, 60 Line Cards Configuration
3
Figure 2, 72 Line Cards Configuration (Expansion cabinet)
4
2.1.3 Power Cable Connections
• Take the power cable for the CPM2000 and connect the
labelled wire to the designated terminal on the backplane. Take the other end of the power cable and connect it to the power connector on the CPM2000.
• Take the power cables (10 gage) and connect one end
to the power terminals of the backplane marked PWRGND (black cable) and +28 VDC A (red cable). Take the
other end of the power cables and connect to a 28 VDC
power supply (make sure power is OFF).
Figure 3, 60 Line Cards Configuration
Fan Tray
Ethernet Repeater A
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
PW R J AM ACT
PORT 1
PORT 2
PORT 3
PORT 4
PORT A
Ethernet Repeater B
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC CO L P AR PA R
PW R J AM ACT
POR T 1
NOTE: Battery wiring
should be run in conduit
and batteries should be
housed in a separate UL
Listed enclosure.
Recommended batteries:
2x12V / 140-190Ah
4 hours backup batteries
used in conjunction with
power generator.
Model:INTERSTATE SG8D.
POWER A BATTERY
+
-
+
PORT 2
PORT 3
PORT 4
PORT A
POWER B
-
Non Power
+
-
+
-
Limited Circuit
WARNING: To reduce the
risk of electric shock, this
product is provided with a
grounding type power
supply cord. Connect
product to a grounded
receptacle.
120V/60Hz/10A
5
NOTE: AC supply cords
shall be run in conduit
or be provided with
equivalent mechanical
protection.
Figure 4, 72 Line Cards Configuration (Expansion Cabinet)
Fan Tray
Ethernet Repeater A
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
PW R J AM ACT
PORT 1
PORT 2
PORT 3
PORT 4
PORT A
Ethernet Repeater B
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MA N
REC COL PA R P AR
MA N
REC COL PA R P AR
PORT 2
PORT 3
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
MAN
REC COL PA R P AR
PW R J AM AC T
PORT 1
NOTE: Battery wiring
should be run in conduit
and batteries should be
housed in a separate UL
Listed enclosure.
Recommended batteries:
2x12V / 140-190Ah
4 hours backup batteries
used in conjunction with
power generator.
Model:INTERSTATE SG8D.
POWER A BATTERY
+
-
+
PORT 4
PORT A
POWER B
-
Non Power
+
-
+
-
Limited Circuit
WARNING: To reduce the
risk of electric shock, this
product is provided with a
grounding type power
supply cord. Connect
product to a grounded
receptacle.
120V/60Hz/10A
6
NOTE: AC supply
cords shall be run in
conduit or be
provided with
equivalent
mechanical
protection.
2.1.4 Signaling/Supervisory Connections
Figure 5, 60 Line Cards Configuration
7
Figure 6, 72 Line Cards Configuration (Expansion Cabinet)
8
2.2
Bench Testing
2.2.3 Debug Output
The debug output is another means of accessing the linecard's programmed options and diagnostics features. A
debug cable is required to connect by serial communication from the line card to a standard PC running Windows
9x/2000/XP.
2.2.4 Debug Cable Connectivity
• Connect the RJ45 end of the debug cable to the debug
jack on the front of the line card or to the debug jack of
the paddle board on the back of the sub-rack.
• Connect the female DB-9 connector to the serial port of
a computer (COM1 port - usually DB-9 male, COM2
port - DB-25 female).
2.2.5 Debug Software Setup
• Using WIN95, point and click on the 'START' button.
Access 'Programs' -> 'Accessories' -> 'HyperTerminal'.
Once in the HyperTerminal window, point and click on
'Hypertrm.exe' icon.
• A connection description window should appear. A
prompt should appear on the 'Name' category. Type a
name. Point and click on the 'OK' button.
• A phone number window should appear. Choose the
direct to COM port required for connection and point
and click on 'OK'.
• COMX properties windows should appear. The configuration should be:
• Bits per second: 19200
• Data bits: 8
• Parity: None
• Stop bits: 1
• Flow control: None
• Point and click on the 'OK' button after setting the configuration.
• The HyperTerminal window should appear. Press any
button. The debug menu will be displayed.
2.2.6 Button Commands
A:This button will display the address of the line card. The
address includes the shelf and slot number of the line
card making each line card unique.
D:This button will initiate the download of a file to the
line card.
O:This button will enable the user to dump the current
programmed options of the line card or set an option
to a particular value.
P:Sets the message priority to be displayed. This is useful
for debugging purposes only.
2.2.7 Downloading steps
1. Press the 'D' button to initiate downloading of the
binary file. The Hyper Terminal will display:
Ready to download.
CCCC
2. Point and click at 'Transfer' on the Hyper Terminal
menu and access the 'Send File' category. The 'Send
File' window should appear.
3. Change the protocol to 'X-modem' and place the correct path and file name of the binary file to be downloaded.
4. Point and click on the [Send] button and the downloading status window should appear.
The line card will restart automatically after a successful
download.
2.2.8 Printer output
It is suggested that the receiver be tested before actual
installation; becoming familiar with the connections and
setup of the unit on the work bench will make final installation more straightforward.
The following items are required:
• 28 VDC Power supply
• One telephone line
• One or more dialer or digital dialer control panels
2.2.1 Power Up
When the 28 VDC power is applied, the CPM2000 unit
will beep for approximately 1-2 minutes during system initialization. The buzzer will deactivate as soon as the
CPM2000 software initializes and is running. The LCD display on the CPM2000 should display 'Primary'. If the Line
Cards do not have telephone lines connected, the
DRL2000 modules will activate 'Line Fault' lights. The telephone line should be connected to the POTS jack at the
back of the DRL SUBRACK. As soon as the line card
detects a phone line, a line restore message will be sent to
the printer and computer output. If the phone line is
removed, a line fault message will be sent to the printer
and computer output.
If there is no computer or printer connected, a trouble
message will be displayed on the CPM2000 LCD and the
'ACK' light will flash. Press the [ACK] button to silence the
CPM2000 buzzer.
The watchdog LED on the line card should flicker as soon
as it is initialized. The Trouble LED will activate if the line
card is not receiving a poll from the CPM2000. As soon as
the line card responds to the polling, the Trouble LED
should deactivate.
2.2.2 Operation with Default Programming
Without any changes to the factory default programming,
the receiver operates as follows:
• Answers incoming calls on the first ring
• Sends 2300 Hz as the first handshake
• Sends 1400 Hz as the second handshake
• Sends dual tone as the third handshake
• Sends SIA FSK tone as the fourth handshake
• Sends ITI , Modem IIE/ IIIa2 tone as fifth handshake
• Sends Modem II tone as sixth handshake
• Receives all communication formats, except for: 3/2, 4/1
express, 4/2 extended and 4/2 checksum.
• The above formats can be manually selected.
• Signals can be displayed on the debug output computer
as they are received. The signals are then sent to the
parallel printer and computer connected to serial port
COM1 or to the 10BT connector. The default event
codes described in the 'DRL2000 Library Decoding and
Event Codes Table' will be used with the Sur-Gard automation communication protocol to send signals to the
computer, if connected.
• If a computer is not connected, press the [ACK] button
on the CPM2000 module to silence the buzzer.
Printer Examples:
Date
Ex. JUN 01 2000
Ex. JUN 01 2000
Ex. JUN 01 2000
Time
SS/00 Receiver Type Receiver #
- 08:00:22 - 01/02
-SG
- 01
- 08:00:22 - 01/02
-SG
- 01
- 08:00:22 - 01/02
-SG
- 01
9
Line #
- 061
- 061
- 061
Account #
- 965
- 965
- 965
Alarm Code
Message
- E9
RESTORE
- F9
TROUBLE
-2
PANIC ALARM
Section 3 - Installation
3.1 Dimensions
3.6
The MLR2000 is implemented into a 42U * 600 mm *
800 mm cabinet. The cabinet has 7 subracks, each on is
19 inches * 6U high. Housed in the top subrack, the
CPM2000 comes complete with its own 19 inch * 6U
tray. Bellow the CPM2000 tray, the MLRX-2000 expansion
cage provides for up to 12 DRL2000 line cards. Each
DRL2000 line card is 6U * 6HP * 220 mm. Each paddle
board is 3U * 6 HP * 220 mm. The PSU-2000 comes complete in its own 19 inch * 6U high cage.
The main MLR2000 cabinet will hold 2×CPM2000,
5×MRLX-2000, 60×DRL2000, 2×PSU-2000.
The expansion MLR2000 cabinet will hold 6×MRLX-2000,
72×DRL2000, 2×PSU-2000.
3.1.1 Spacing
All units of a receiver must be within 50 ft. (cable length)
of the CPM to provide system timing integrity.
3.2
Each paddle module has the connections shown here. Connect each
line module output (POTS) to the
telephone line (analog) with 6-pin
modular cables.
NOTE: Use minimum AWG 26
wires for telephone cables.
*NOTE: Connection of an Ademco radio
receiver model 7810RT or 7830R can be
done on the serial port of the paddle
module. The device should be mounted
in the same room as the MLR2000
receiver (within 20 ft.). The connection
shall be run in conduit or equivalent i.e.
providing mechanical protection.
3.7
Definity DNIS
3.8
Mounting the Receiver
CAUTION: Connecting a positive (+) terminal
to a negative (-) terminal may cause a fire and
possibly serious personal harm.
Printer Connections
The following UL Listed printers can be used with the
MLR2000: Sur-Gard CPU-1150 (Panasonic KX-P1150)
DMP SCS-PTR (Okidata Microline 182/184)
Connect the parallel printers to the MLR2000 printer output ports using parallel printer cables.
NOTE: A minimum of two printers are required for
UL Listed applications.
Do not use a printer cable which has only 1 common
ground wire.
3.5
Power Supply
Ensure that all electrical connections are made correctly.
After verifying all connections, connect the RED and
BLACK leads to a 24 (2 × 12V batteries in series) VDC
sealed rechargeable battery. Be sure to observe polarity
when connecting the battery. When the battery is connected, test the system under battery power only.
Install the MLR2000 in a closed 19" rack or cabinet with a
locking rear access door. Cover all unused spaces with
blank metal plates. The LCD screen on the receiver is
designed to be viewed below eye level. A Stand-up Unit
(61.25" tall up to 60 telephone lines, part #90000016)
can be supplied for a complete installation.
NOTE: If 60 telephone lines are not used, cover each
unused location with a blank plate.
3.4
Grounding
For maximum resistance to static and electrical noise, the
19" rack frame must be connected to earth ground
through the AC utility box.
The AT&T Definity G3 DTMF vdn codes have been tested
and are supported by the MLR2000.
3.3
Telephone Line
Connections
3.9
Battery Charging Current
The maximum battery charging current is factory set at 5A.
3.10 Removing and Installing System
Components
To remove the Power Supply Modules
The Power Supply charges the battery and provides low
battery voltage disconnect; removing the power supply
module will disconnect the battery and shut down the
entire system. Please make sure there is a second power
supply module installed.
To Remove the CPM2000 Module
Disconnect all cables and slowly pull the module out of
the metal cabinet.
To Remove a Line Card Module
Slowly pull the module out of the sub rack.
Computer Connections
Connect the computer to the MLR2000 RS232 port using
a serial cable to COM1.
3.11 To Install a Line Card Module
Slowly insert the module in the sub rack.
Installation Checklist (Complete Operation)
❑ 19" Rack Mount Cabinet connected to earth ground
❑ SG-PSU2000 Power Supply installed
❑ 6-pin modular cable(s) connected to DRL2000 and telephone line
❑ Parallel Printer Cable connected to MLR2000 Parallel
Printer Port
❑ Parallel Printer power connected
❑ Computer connected to MLR2000 COM1 port using
serial cable
❑ Computer connected to MLR2000 10BT port using
10BT cable
NOTE: Pins 1, 4 and 6 on the receiver side are connected together. Pin 7 and 8 are also shorted
together. Pin 9 is not connected.
10
Section 4 - DRL2000 Digital Receiver Line Card
The DRL2000 acts as an interface between the digital
4.4 DRL2000 Controls
alarm transmitter and the CPM2000. Different communication formats can be used to transmit the information.
The main functions of the line-cards are to continuously
monitor the telephone line, receive calls from digital dialers or control panels, and to report alarms to the
CPM2000. In addition, if a Line Card is unable to communicate with the CPM2000, then each Line Card is capable
of functioning independently. Each Line Card can record
256 different alarm messages and 256 Caller-ID telephone
numbers.
4.1
Each DRL2000 Module has one telephone line.
Momentarily depressing and releasing a button will register as a single input or keystroke.
ON LINE: The 'on-line' light will be
ON when the Line Card is on-line in
communication. The 'on-line' light will
be OFF when the Line Card is in Standby Mode. When the line card is on-line
but not in communication, the on-line
LED will FLASH to indicate that the
buffer is full, or that there is a checksum error after download.
LINE FAULT: The 'Line Fault' light will
come ON if the telephone line is disconnected. The 'Line Fault' light will
turn OFF automatically when the telephone line is restored.
TROUBLE: The 'Trouble' light will
come ON when the Line Card is shut
down by an operator's command or
when communication with the
CPM2000 is interrupted. The 'Trouble'
light will be shut OFF when the trouble
condition is corrected.
WATCHDOG: The 'Watchdog' light
will FLASH to indicate that Line Card
operation is being monitored
[ACK] Button: Not used.
[CANCEL] Button: Not used.
HANDSET: Not used.
DEBUG: Connection to a PC for troubleshooting.
[F1] + [F2] Buttons: Press and hold
both buttons simultaneously on power
up for 10 seconds will reset the line
card to factory default.
General Information
The receiver is capable of processing signals from digital
communicators in variety of formats. The type of signal
(alarm, trouble, restore, cancel and so on) can be printed.
4.2
DRL2000 Features
• Operator selection of communication formats and
handshake priority
• 64 profiles per line card, up to 255 line pools.
• On-Board Ethernet interface.
• Flash Download for software upgrades.
• Records up to 256 messages.
• Records up to 256 Caller-ID phone numbers. This feature helps locate and identify the source of the device in
communication and assists in troubleshooting
• Multiple alarms are forwarded to the computer and
printer through the CPM2000 with minimum delay
• The DRL2000 monitors the telephone line connection,
and line faults will result in reports to the computer and
the printer
• DRL2000 automatically goes into stand-alone mode in
case of CPM2000 failure
• 'Watchdog' timer continually monitors receiver operation
• 'Cold boot' option allows receiver's configuration to be
reset to factory default programming
• DSP processing to reduce data receiving errors, and to
help for weak and noisy signals
• Gain boost available to amplify weak signals
• Serial link for troubleshooting
4.3
Installation
It is recommended that a DRL2000 Cold Start-up be performed when the unit is updated with a new program
version. Refer to Operating Mode Section (DRL2000 Cold
Start-up for information).
After the cold start-up, check the configuration information listed in the Quick Reference Guide to make any
required changes for your particular application.
11
Section 5 - DRL2000 Operating Mode
5.1 DRL2000 Standby Mode
5.2
After start-up the Line Card enters the Stand-by Mode
and monitors the telephone line and the CPM2000.
Depending on the system's status, the following conditions will be indicated:
• Line Fault light
• Trouble light: of Line Card communication problem with
CPM2000
5.1.1 Line Fault
The DRL2000 verifies the telephone line voltage. The 'Line
Fault' light will come ON when the voltage drops below
12V.
If the Line Check option is enabled, the following information will be transmitted to the printer and computer:
• Printer:
Jul 17 1998-08: 08: 28-SS/OO-SG-RR-LLL-0000PHONE LINE TROUBLE
• Computer:0RRLLL[#0000¦NLTSSOO][DC4]
A hexadecimal number from 00 to 0B representing the
slot number of the Line Card will be sent for each 'O'
shown above.
A hexadecimal number from 01 to FE representing the
shelf number of the Line Card will be sent for each 'S'
shown above.
If the Line Check option is disabled, the DRL2000 will not
send the report to the printer or computer. Refer to
'DRL2000 Programmable Features' for information on
enabling the Line Check option.
When the line condition returns to normal, the 'Line Fault'
light will be shut OFF.
If the Line Check option is enabled and the telephone line
returns to normal, the following information will be transmitted to the printer and computer:
• Printer:
Jul 17 1998 - 08: 08: 35-SS/OO-SG-RR-LLL-0000PHONE LINE RESTORE
• Computer:0RRLLL[#0000¦NLRSSOO][DC4]
5.1.2 CPM2000 Error
If the DRL2000 cannot detect CPM2000 polling, the trouble light will come on.
If alarm messages cannot be sent to the CPM2000
because of the error, the DRL2000 will start buffering
incoming calls.
Up to 256 alarm messages for the printer and computer
will be retained in the DRL2000 event buffer. When the
event buffer is full, the line card will stop answering the
calls.
When the CPM2000 Error condition is corrected, the
alarm messages in the event buffer will be transmitted to
the CPM2000 with the corresponding time/ date the
alarm have been received.
DRL2000 Cold Start-up
To perform a Cold Start-up, press the [F1] and [F2] buttons
simultaneously for 10 seconds while powering up.
5.3
Communications in Progress
5.3.1 Data Reception
During data reception, the on-line LED will turn on. The
DRL2000 decodes all information received and stores the
information in its Event Buffer. When a valid signal is
received, the DRL2000 sends a kiss-off signal and transmits the decoded alarm signal to the computer and then
to the printer through the CPM2000.
The DRL2000 will send each message it receives to the
printer for review by the system operator. Two messages
may be sent to the printer to indicate reception problems:
the 'Fault Data' and 'Fault Call'.
5.3.2 Fault Data Message
When this problem is encountered, the following information is transmitted to the printer and the computer:
• Printer:
Jun 25 1998-11:18:07-SS/OO-SG-12-234-0000INVALID REPORT
• Computer: 012234[#0000¦NYNSSOO][DC4]
This output for account code '0000' indicates that data
has been received, but is not valid (for example, there are
unmatched rounds or wrong parity).
5.3.3 Fault Call
When this problem is encountered, the following information is transmitted to the printer and the computer:
• Printer:
Jun 25 1998-11:18:07-SS/OO-SG-12-234-0000COMMUNICATION FAIL
• Computer: 0RRLLL[#0000¦NYCSSOO] [DC4]
This output indicates that a call was received, but no data
was detected. The call may have been a wrong number,
or the calling control panel was unable to connect with
the receiver's handshakes.
5.3.4 Caller ID
When Caller-ID is enabled:
• Printer:
19-Nov-1998 10:40:54 - Nov 19 1998-11:32:25- F3/
00-SG -19-069-123F—
• Computer: 419069 123F0000000000
5.3.5 Calling Name
When Calling name is enabled:
• Computer: u19069 123FSUR-GARD SECURT
• Printer:
19-Nov-1998 10:40:56 - Nov 19 1998-11:32:25-F3/00SG -19-069-123F—SUR-GARD SECURT
12
Section 6 - Advanced Programming
6.1 Profiles Introduction
By receiving the DNIS or Caller ID, the appropriate profile
can be selected through a look-up table "stored" on the
line card.
The DRL2000 'virtual receiver' will load unique 'profiles' in
order to effectively communicate with control panels. A
profile is a set of pre-programmed line card options
unique for a particular DNIS number. The 'DNIS' will point
to a particular profile, which will then be loaded into the
line card before the first handshake is sent. It is essential
that the correct option be programmed for a profile in
order to correctly communicate with the control panel.
Each 'virtual receiver' can have a maximum of 64 profiles.
To change the options for a particular profile, the
MLR2000 Console software is provided. This software will
allow the user/operator to edit the profiles.
NOTE: DNIS (Dialled Number Identification Service).
This number represents the dialled number, or the
number being called. ANI: (Automatic Number Identification). This number represents the source of a
call and allows the system to determine the handshake protocol. Caller ID: This number identifies the
source of a call. For the purpose of this document,
Caller ID and ANI will be referred to as Caller ID, but
both can not be used at the same time. Contact your
provider to determine which service is available.
DNIS or Caller ID can be used for profile selection.
Line Cards Identification Number Handling:
Profile
0
(Default)
Receive DNIS
or Caller ID
Send string to
Lookup Table
No
~
00
2F
Static Options - identical for all profiles
30
Dynamic 30
Options
unique
for each
profile
Dynamic 30
Options
Dynamic 30
Options
~
AF
AF
AF
AF
DNIS Received
Profile
63
Dynamic
Options
Profile# to be used
00001
01
00002
03
00003
24
...
...
99999
45
The second type is used if ANI-Caller ID and/or DNIS are
received, and can consist of up to 5,000 entries, with
Caller ID or DNIS of up to 10 digits.
YES
Point to Profile #
Profile
2
Profile 0 is the default. When no Caller ID or unknown
DNIS is received, or when the received number does not
point to a profile, the default will be used.
Profiles are used to reduce on-line time, and for specific
customers or panel/format types, one can have a profile
with certain handshakes sent first. Also, some formats
require certain options, and this can be pre-defined as
well.
Profiles allow for a more customized system. Rather than
having a line card (or a receiver itself) devoted to certain
customers, the MLR2000 can "handle" any format at any
time through the use of profiles. Each line card holds its
own look-up table that can be shared through line pools,
or shared within the entire receiver.
Two types of tables are available, but only one type can be
chosen. The first type, which consists of 10 000 entries, is
used strictly with DNIS of up to 5-digits.
Table type 1:
DNIS receivedProfile # to be used
Call Processing Flowchart
Corresponding
Profile?
Profile
1
Use Profile 0
Use Options
from Profile
Done
Each profile is made up of Static Options and Dynamic
Options. The static options are the same for all profiles,
but the dynamic options can be programmed specifically
per hunt groups, panel type, etc.
13
Table type 2:
Caller ID
Number
05 603000
05 603001
05 603002
05 603003
DNIS Number
12345
12346
1234
Convert Data
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Convert Data
54321
54322
54333
Option [03]: Internal messages RS-232 - Default [01]
When this option is programmed as ‘00’, the DRL2000 will
output its internal messages in the following format:
SRRLLL[#AAAA|Nxxyy]
If it is programmed as ’01’ internal messages will be
output as
0RRLLL[#AAAA|Nxxyy]
Where S, 0 (zero) = Protocol number
RR = Receiver number
LLL = Line number
AAAA = Account code, always 0000
Nxxyy = SIA event
Profile
0
1
2
3
Profile
0
1
2
Option [04]: 2-Way Audio Activation Time Default [00]
Option [04] determines how long, in 10-second increments, the 2-way audio function will be active once it is
initiated. At the end of this time, the line card will hang up
the line. Program a value from "01" to "FF" for 10 seconds to 2550 seconds. Three (3) minutes is the recommended length of time for the 2-way audio activation
time. To disable the 2-way audio feature, program Option
[04] as "00".
NOTE: Enabling 2-way audio will affect NFPA 72 system loading requirements. Refer to Par. 4-5.3.2.2.2 of
NFPA 72 for details.
If the alarm panel sends a listen-in code activation
request and audio is enabled for this format (Option
[7F]), the receiver will remain in two-way voice for a
period of 60 seconds even if the activation time is not
programmed.
Each portion may contain 0-10000 entries with the total of all
the entries not exceeding 10000.
The receiver will first check through the Caller ID section if a
Caller ID number is received. If only a DNIS number is received,
or Caller ID is received but the Caller ID was not found, it will
check in the DNIS section.
On a standard receiver, the Automation output would look similar to the following:
1RRLLLssssssAAAAsYsZZ[DC4]
On the MLR2000, it will replace the RRLLL, which is normally
the receiver number and the line card number, by the DNIS
received or the convert data found in the table.
This makes possible the duplication of accounts, as long as they
are dialling different numbers.
The output will become:
Option [05]: Pre-H.S. Duration - Default [0A]
When the line card seizes the line, it will wait the time programmed at Option [05]; then send the first handshake.
The value programmed (hex) at this location will be multiplied by 100 ms. [e.g., 100 ms., 200 ms.] The default is 0A,
for 1000ms (100ms x default value).
The minimum time is 1 second. If the option is programmed with any value lower than 0A, the line card will
use a 1 second delay.
1DDDDDssssssAAAAsYsZZ[DC4]
Where DDDDD is the DNIS number. See Option 20 for more
information on how to enable the combined table.
6.2
Static Options: [00] - [2F]
Option [00]: Reserved
Option [01]: Line Card Number - Default [01]
The line card Number provides a virtual identification code
for each DRL2000 module. Hexadecimal numbers '01' to
'FE' can be programmed in Option [01] to identify line
cards.
Options [06] to [09]: Reserved
Options [0A] to [0C]: Reserved
Option [0D]: Ring Select - Default [00]
Enables or disables the double ring detection. If programmed as 00, the line card will detect single ring. If programmed as 01, the line card will detect the double ring.
Option [02]: Line Card Number Length - Default [0A]
This option is used to determine how many digits from the
line card number will be sent to the output. You also have
the option of displaying the number in hex or decimal.
Program Option 02 with one of the following:
01 Send only one hex digit to the printer or computer
output (if you have a 2-digit line card number only the
last digit will be sent to the output)
02 Send 2 hex digit line card number to the output
03 Send 3 hex digit line card number to the output (leading Zeros will be inserted prior to the line card number)
0A Send 3-digit line card number as entered (no conversion).
0D Send 3-digit line card number in decimal (conversion
from decimal to hex decimal
NOTE: When using the DRL2000, the line card Number Length option should always correspond to the
number of DNIS digits being received. For example, if
5-digits are being received then the line card Number
Length Option should be programmed to 3, so that
the 5 digits of DNIS will become 1ddddd and overwrite 1RRLLL.
Options [0E-10]: Reserved
Option [11]: Hook-flash Enable/Disable - Default [00]
Enables or disables ability to hookflash the phone line and
determines its duration in increments of 10 ms.
If programmed as 00, the option is disabled. If set to anything else, you multiply the decimal equivalent of the hex
value by 10 ms and that is the duration. For example, if
hookflash time of 500 ms is wanted, program Option 2A
to 32 hex.
500 ms / 10
50 Dec
= 50
= 32 hex
Option [12]: Caller Source ID Option - Default [00]
Option [12] allows the line card to receive Caller Identification data or DNIS that is transmitted after the first ring on
the telephone line. The appropriate service must be available and requested from the Telephone Company for this
feature to be operational.
14
00
01
02
03
0X
2X
4X
Disabled
Standard Bellcore Caller-ID
Reserved for future use
Reserved for future use
Receive X (4 to 10) digits DTMF DNIS
Receive DNIS and ANI in <DNIS>C<ANI>C
Receive ANI and DNIS in <ANI>C<DNIS>C
The default value is 00 for 2-digit zone and 2-digit user
number.
NOTE: Option [17] Only affects DMP Serial 1 format
not DMP Serial 3.
Option [18]: Sur-Gard DTMF 4/3 Format Output Default [00]
Each nibbles of this option controls how the 4/3 format
computer output string is formatted. The first nibble
allows for the user and group codes for openings and closings to be combined. When programmed as “1x”, group
arming/disarming signals will be combined with the user
code into one signal which will be sent to the computer.
Example, the following information may be sent to the
computer: (The printer output does not change)
Printer:
1234-B01 CloseGrp
1234-416 Close
1234-C02 OpenGrp
1234-532 Open
Computer:
1234 C1 16 (instead of 1234 C 01 and 1234 C 16)
1234 O2 32 (instead of 1234 O 02 and 1234 O 32)
If a user code is not received after the group opening/closing, the message “1234 C1 FF” will be sent; “FF” indicates
that a user code was not received.
The second nibble of this option controls the user/zone
number conversion. The Sur-Gard 4/3 DTMF format is
made up of a 4-digit account code, a 1-digit event code,
and a 2-digit hexadecimal zone code or user number.
However, some central station software packages use a
common event code and require decimal user codes. This
option allows the user codes to be converted from hexadecimal to decimal to meet the needs of the central station
software. Program with one of the following:
General messages other than Caller ID or DNIS:
•Private Call: An anonymous indication is received instead
of the originating telephone number.
•No Call No.: An out-of-area or unavailable indication is
received instead of the originating telephone number.
•Unknown Call: The originating telephone number has
not been received or was not transmitted.
Option [13]: Caller Source to SG Computer Default [00]
Option [13] allows the transmission of the Caller Identification or ANI, to the computer output. Program Option [13]
as one of the following:
Protocol
00
01
4RRLL
02
URRLLL
04
4RRLLL
Do not send to the computer
Send to the computer
(North American Caller ID)
Send to the computer
(International Caller ID)
Send ANI information to the
computer
NOTE: Option [12] must be programmed as "01" to
use Caller ID or "4x" to use ANI. Where "x" represents the number of DNIS digits (including the terminator digit).
Option [14]: Caller Source to printer - Default [00]
Option [14] allows the transmission of the Caller Identification or ANI, to the printer output. Program Option [14] as
one of the following
00
01
04
X0
X1
Do not send to the printer
Send to the printer; each alarm will print an
extra line, showing the Caller ID
Send to the printer; each alarm will print an
extra line, showing the ANI number.
Send the last two digits as user codes without
conversion
Convert the last 2-digit user codes to decimal
as shown here:
User Code Receive
00 to 99
B0 to B9
C0 to C9
D0 to D9
E0 to E9
F0 to F9
NOTE: Option [12] must be programmed as "01" for
Caller ID or "4x" ANI, where "x" represents the number of DNIS digits (including the terminator digit).
Options [15]: Reserved
Option [16]: Format disabling Option - Default [00]
This option is bit oriented and will disable the decoding
of the following DTMF formats. For multiple formats all
corresponding bit must be disabled.
Example: to disable 13, 22 and 23 digits DTMF formats,
set option to 4A.
Bit 01: 15 digits DTMF formats
Bit 02: 13 digits DTMF formats
Bit 03: 8 digits DTMF formats
Bit 04: 22 digits DTMF formats
Bit 05: 11 digits DTMF formats
Bit 06: 12 digits DTMF formats
Bit 07: 23 digits DTMF formats
X2
X3
User Code after
Conversion
00 to 99
100 to 109
110 to 119
120 to 129
130 to 139
140 to 149
Example, if 1234 4B1 is received, 1234 C 101
will be sent to the computer.
Send the last 3 digits as the zone codes with
the 5th digit still used as the event code
Example, if 1234 161 is received, 1234 A 161
will be sent to the computer.
When individual event codes are used, if
1234 401 is received, 1234 C 01 will be transmitted to the computer. When common
event codes are used, if 1234 401 is received,
1234 Z 401 will be transmitted to the computer, where Z is the common event code.
Send the last 3 digits as the zone codes and
convert the user codes only to decimal
NOTE: When the first nibble of the option is set to 1
the 3-digit user codes will be combined with the
group number as follows:
Option [17]: DMP User Length - Default [00]
Option 17 is for the variable length zone and user numbers. The first digit in the option represents the user number and the second digit represents the zone number. For
example, if Option 17 is set for 24 than the receiver will
output a 2-digit user number and a 4-digit zone number.
Code received
1234B01
12344B1
15
Code sent to computer
No transmission
1234 C1 101
Option [19]: Fault Call Counter - Default [00]
Option 19 is used for limiting the number of Fault Call
messages that are sent to the printer and computer.
The default setting will send a Fault Call alarm for every 10
Fault Calls. To have every Fault Call sent to the computer
and printer set Option 19 to 01.
Option [21]: Reserved
Option [1A]: DNIS Input Sensitivity - Default [00]
Option [27]: Caller Source Process - Default [05]
This option determines how many digits of Caller ID or
DNIS the receiver will process.
0x - x is number of digits of DNIS or Caller ID to be processed (range from 1 to A hex)
Options [22] - [24]: Internal Use Only
Option [25]: Reserved
Option [26]: Internal Use Only
NOTE: Do not change this option unless instructed to
do so by DSC Technical Support.
Option [1B]: Reserved
Options [28] - [29]: Reserved
Option [1C]: Busy Out - Default [00]
This option allows the line card to seize the phone line in
case of checksum error after download or when its internal
buffer is full after loss of communication with the CPM.
Program Option [1C] with one of the following:
Option [2A]: Hook-flash Delay - Default [00]
Time delay before hang-up option. Option value x 100ms
to a maximum of 9.5 seconds.
When programmed with values starting with A the second
digit will be multiplied by 10 seconds. The second digit
must be converted to decimal first.
Example a value of [AF] would result is 150 seconds delay.
00
01
04
05
The line is seized if any of the conditions mentioned above occurs.
The line is NOT seized if any of the conditions
mentioned above occurs.
The line will be seized immediately
if the automation computer is absent.
The line will be seized if there is a loss of
automation software or no communication to
the CPM2000 ONLY if the internal computer
buffer is full. If there is a loss of printer(s), any
new alarms will not be buffered in the internal printer buffer. (note: the line card has two
independent printer and computer buffers).
Options [2B] - [2C]: Reserved
Option [2D]: A.H.S. - Default [00]
A.H.S., Automatic Handshake Selection is the process of
the line card to send a handshake to be used with the ANI.
Also included in A.H.S. is the ability for the CPM2000 to
“remember” which handshakes are used for which ANI.
The A.H.S. have the ability to be used in conjunction with
the DNIS to select a predefined profile based on the DNIS
table that is stored in the line card. The handshake is
retrieved from the A.H.S. table, and the remainder of the
options to be taken from the DNIS profile.
Also, if the panel does not respond to the handshake given
by the line card, it will proceed with it’s handshake
sequence from this profile as opposed to the default profile.
00 A.H.S. Disable
01 A.H.S. enable, 10 digits
02 A.H.S. enable international
Call Blocking When A.H.S. is active
At any time the operator may want to use a call blocking
type feature for particular customers (i.e. inactive
accounts). The operator will be able to manually update
the A.H.S. database with the MLR2000 AHS software. If
the operator wishes to call block a particular customer
(Caller ID), they would do this by entering for that entry
the handshake value of 99. When this is sent to the line
card, the line card will release the line as soon as it sees the
Caller ID.
Computer Message:
0RRLLL[#0000|ACPM 2000 BLOCKED CALL]
Printer Message:
RRLLL–0000--CPM2000 BLOCKED CALL
NOTE: If the option is programmed to 01, the line
card will NOT buffer any new alarms once the internal buffer is full. Setting Option [1C] to 01 is NOT RECOMMENDED.
Options [1D] - [1E]: Reserved
Option [1F]: Debug Output - Default [00]
Set to 01 to enable. The debug mode should only be used
when required and disabled after use.
Option [20]: C.L.A.S.S. Field Data - Default [04]
00
01
02
03
04
05
Send “0”s in C.L.A.S.S. field of E.-bus.
Send receiver line card number from options
in C.L.A.S.S. field of E.-bus.
Send DNIS in C.L.A.S.S. field of E.-bus.
Send Caller ID in C.L.A.S.S. field of E.-bus.
Send whatever Option [12] Caller Source is
set to in the C.L.A.S.S. field of E.-bus
When the receiver is programmed to receive
DNIS, send the Convert Data from the DNIS /
Caller-ID Conversion table in the C.L.A.S.S.
field of EBUS for alarms. If the convert data is
0, the received DNIS will be inserted. If the linecard is not programmed to receive DNIS (for
example, Caller-ID), then the table lookup
functionalities remain the same. If the entry is
found use the Profile from the table to perform the profile switching.
Option [2E]: Reserved
Option [2F]: Online Time Out - Default [00]
The Online Time Out option hangs up after a predetermined time delay. Time Out range can be programmed
from 01 to 255 seconds (Hex 01 - FF) or until the call is
completed by the panel (Hex 00). When time out occurs,
the DRL3 hangs up and generates a signal to the printer
and to the automation ( SIA identifier YB).
For Example:
Printer Message: "DRL Online Time-Out"
Automation: NYS0102 (shelf 01, slot 02)
NOTE: When the CLASS Field option is set to 00-04
then the receiver assumes a DNIS table has been
uploaded to the linecard. When the option is set to
05 the receiver assumes a Combined Table has been
uploaded to the linecard. All other conditions (NOT
RECOMMENDED) will cause failure in the Table
Lookup and/or Profile Selection steps of the linecard
and the linecard will default to profile 0.
16
6.3
Dynamic Options: [30] - [FF]
Options [50] - [5F]: 4/3 Digit 0-F
The DRL2000 will use the fifth digit of data received in 4/3
formats to determine the message and event code. The
event code will then be transmitted to the central station
computer. Refer to the DRL2000 Decoding Library for the
complete set of messages and event codes used by the
DRL2000. In Sections [50] through [5F], program ASCII
codes according to the Decoding Library. Do NOT use
values other than 20-7F (ASCII).
NOTE: The old value programmed in each Option will
not be changed until a command with valid data is
received.
Defaults:
Options [30] - [3F]: 3/1 - 4/1 Digit 0-F
The DRL2000 uses a unique Sur-Gard communication format to transmit data through the CPM2000 to the central
station computer. Event codes corresponding to alarm
codes in 10 to 40 Baud formats and DTMF 4/1 to 4/3 formats are used in this unique format to enable the computer software to determine alarm types.
The DRL2000 will use the last digit of data received in 3/1
and 4/1 formats to determine the computer event code.
The event code will then be transmitted to the central station computer. Refer to the DRL2000 Decoding Library for
the complete set of event codes used by the DRL2000. In
Sections [30] through [3F], program ASCII codes according
to the Decoding Library.
Do NOT use values other than 20-7F (ASCII).
Option
Value
Code
50
51
52
55
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
52
41
43
4F
42
54
5C
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
R
A
C
O
B
T
/
Defaults:
Option
Value
Code
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
52
41
4F
43
5C
52
54
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
R
A
O
C
/
R
T
Options [60] - [6F]: Printer Words.
The English Printer Library is provided and can be selected
by programming the event codes to the corresponding
word.
For example, if the words 'exit alarm' are required when
the alarm code 1 is received in 3/1 (or 4/1 formats), Option
[61] must be programmed as '90'.
Refer to Appendix A for a list of available words.
Defaults:
Options [40] - [4F]: 3/2 - 4/2 Digit 0-F
The DRL2000 will use the first digit following the account
code in 4/2, 3/1 extended or 3/2 formats to determine the
computer event code. The event code will then be transmitted to the central station computer. Refer to the
DRL2000 Decoding Library for the complete set of event
codes used by the DRL2000.
In Sections [40] through [4F], program ASCII codes according to the Decoding Library. Do NOT use values other than
20-7F (ASCII).
Defaults:
Option
Value
Code
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
41
52
41
4F
43
5C
52
54
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
R
A
O
C
/
R
T
Option
Value
60
61
62
66
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
F2
OA
14
1E
63
62
E5
00
E4
61
F2
C6
C7
E6
50
A6
Word
PERIODIC TEST REPORT
FIRE ALARM
PANIC ALARM
BURGLARY
CLOSING
OPENING
SERVICE
MEDICAL*
MESSAGE
RESTORE
PERIODIC TEST REPORT
GROUP CLOSING
GROUP OPENING
ZONE BYPASS
SYSTEM TROUBLE
CANCEL
*Use only with Model MLR2000 CE.
MLR2000 CE is not UL Listed.
17
Option [70]: Automation Common Event Code Default [00]
Some central station software packages are unable to process an alarm using the event codes listed in the DRL2000
Decoding Library. Where a central station monitors thousands of accounts belonging to different companies, the
same reporting codes may have different meanings for different companies. Because of this, the individual event
codes in Options [30] through [5F] cannot accurately represent the alarm condition. To overcome this, Option [70]
may be programmed as indicated below:
Program Operation:
00 - Use individual event codes to computer.
20, 30-39 & 41-5A - Use common event codes (space, 0-9,
A-Z). When using common event codes, DSC recommends
that either hexadecimal code '5A' (ASCII 'Z') or hexadecimal code '41' (ASCII 'A') be used. The 'Space' character
(Hex 20) can be used as the common event code with certain automation software packages to avoid account code
database changes when switching over from other brand
receivers to the Sur-Gard receiver.
Example:
12341 becomes '1234 A 1' becomes [#1234|NBA1]
Value
Codes
SIA
41
A
BA
42
B
BA
43
C
CL
46
F
FA
48
H
HA
4F
O
OP
4D
M
MA
50
P
PA
52
R
BR
54
T
TA
5C
\
OC
62
b
BR
66
f
FH
68
h
HH
6D
m
MH
70
p
PH
74
t
TH
7C
|
UB
Values programmed in Options[30]-[5F],[70] other than in
this table will default to UAxx for Undecoded Alarm.
Bit3 - Convert BFSK format to SIA.
The BFSK outputs will be converted to a SIA format. The
automation Output will use the Protocol ID of 'R'.
When this option is enabled it has precidence over the
BFSK RS232 Option[A4]. The Accounts 3/x to 4/x
Option[76] may be used to insert a leading 0 to the
account code.
Example:[#123|NFA1]
Option [71]: Library Select - Default [04]
Determines how to use Printer Words Options.
00 No printer words.
01 Printer words options used for 1-digit reporting code formats only; other will use pre-defined library.
02 Printer words options used for 2-digit reporting code
formats only; other will use pre-defined library.
03 Printer words options used for 3-digit reporting code
formats only; other will use pre-defined library.
04 Printer words options used for 1-digit and 2-digit
reporting code formats only; other will use pre-defined
library.
05 Printer words options used for 1-digit, 2-digit and 3digit reporting code formats.
NOTE: Option [71] is ignored when using SIA, ITI,
Contact-ID, ACRON, MODEM II, MODEM IIE, MODEM
IIIa², FBI SuperFast, BFSK, ADEMCO Super Fast and SK
FSK1, 2 formats.
Option [73]: DSP Input & Output - Default [43]
The upper nibble will set the input sensitivity of the DSP
where as the lower nibble of the option will set the output
level. NOTE: This option should be left as default and
should be changed only on the recommendation of a DSC
technician.
Option [74]: Equivalent Line Number - Default [00]
The equivalent line number is used with the receiver number for sending signals to the central station software. This
option may be used if there is no DNIS number being
received by the line card.
Option [72]: SIA Option - Default [00]
This option is a bit selectable Option meaning some or all
of these choices may be enabled. For example, to enable
"Force SIA Zone Number", and "Convert Pulse formats to
SIA", set Option[72]=05. To enable only "Convert Pulse to
SIA" and "Convert BFSK to SIA" set Option[72]=0C.
Bit0 - Force SIA Zone Number.
The receiver will decode SIA Alarms sent without Zone
numbers and add '00' as the zone number to the automation output:
Example: [#1234|NriBA] becomes [#1234|NriBA00]
Bit1 - Convert SIA Account A's.
Any Account Digits received as 'A' will be converted to '0'.
Example: [#A123|NriBA01] becomes [#0123|NriBA01]
Bit2 - Convert Pulse formats to SIA.
All Pulse Format Printer and Computer outputs will be converted to a SIA format, in a two step conversion process.
The automation Output will use the Protocol ID of 'R'.
First the type of alarm is determined by Options[30]-[5F],
[70].
Secondly the type of alarm is mapped to a SIA output as
per the following table.
Option [75]: Receiver Number - Default [01]
The receiver number is used for sending signals to the central station software. Refer to the manuals for any central
station automation software being used to determine if
there are any special requirements for this number. Also,
check the numbers used for any other receivers in the station to ensure that numbers are not duplicated.
Option [76]: Accounts 3/x to 4/x - Default [00]
When programmed as 00, if the alarm is reported in 3/1, 3/
1 extended, BFSK, 3/2 or 3/8 ACRON formats, a leading
space will be communicated in front of the 3-digit account
codes.
Ex: 1RRLLLsssssssAAAsXsssY[DC4]
01 - If the alarm is reported in 3/1, 3/1 extended, 3/2 or 3/
8 ACRON formats, a leading '0' (zero) will be communicated in front of the 3-digit account codes.
Ex: 1RRLLLssssss0AAAsXsssY[DC4]
02 - Alarms communicated to the computer. If the alarm is
reported in 3/1, 3/1 extended, 3/2 or 3/8
ACRON formats, a leading '0' (zero) will be communicated
in front of the 3-digit Account. And a '0' (zero) will be
communicated in front of the 1-digit alarm code for the
above formats as well as 4/1 formats.
Ex: 1RRLLLssssss0AAAsXss0Y[DC4]
18
04 - If the panel is reported in SIA a leading '0' (zero) will
be communicated in front of the 3-digit account.
EX: S1011[#0AAA|Nri0/FH00]
05 - If the alarm is reported in 3/1, 3/1 etended, 3/2 BFSK,
SIA, 3.8 ACRON formats then a leading '0' (zero) will be
communicated in front of the 3-dgit account.
06 - If the alarm is reported in 3/1, 3/1 extended, 3/2 BFSK,
SIA, 3.8 ACRON formats then a leading '0' (zero) will be
communicated in front of the 3-dgit account and a '0'
(zero) will be communicated in front of the 1-digit alarm
code.
Option [79]: Max Inter-burst - Default [00]
Certain old dialers may have difficulties in communicating
with the DRL2000 line cards. The DRL2000 provides the
possible solution by programming this option. This option
should be left as default and should be changed only on
the recommendation of a DSC technician. When programmed as 00, the inter-burst has a time of 100 ms, all
other values are in 10 ms increments.
00
100 ms (default)
01
10 ms
02
20 ms... and so on
Option [77]: Digit Replace - Default [00]
Option 77 works in conjunction with Option A2. Option
77 is programmed with an ASCII value that will replace an
account code digit or insert a value into an account code.
Option A2 is used to replace a digit or insert a digit. To
replace a digit use 0x where x is the digit to be replaced. To
shift a digit use Option A2 and set to 8x where x is the
location in the account code.
Example 1:
Option 77 is set for 41 and Option A2 is set for 01:
Standard 4/2-format output:
1RRLLLssssssAAAAsXssYZ
Account code is 9876
1RRLLLssssss9876sXssYZ
The receiver will do the following. First it will replace the
first digit (Option A2=01) of the account code (in this
example "1") and replace it with the ASCII value of 41,
which is an "A".
New Output:
1RRLLLssssssA876sXssYZ
Example 2:
To insert a digit use 8x were x is the spot were the digit is
to be inserted.
Option 77 is set to 2D and Option A2 is set for 82:
Account code is 9876
1RRLLLssssss9876sXssYZ
The receiver will do the following, it will insert the ASCII
value of Option 77, in this case the ASCII value of 2D (2D is
a " - ") into position two (Option A2=82), and the account
code will shift to the left. So it will convert account code
9876 as indicated below:
1RRLLLsssss9-876sXssYZ
Option [7A]: 4 and 5 Digit Account Codes to Activate
2-Way Audio - Default [00]
Option [7A] determines which account codes will be able
to activate the 2-way audio feature. Program the first digits
of the desired account codes in Option [7A].
For example:
To allow all account codes between 1000 and 2FFF to activate the 2-way audio function, program Option [7A] as
'12'.
To allow all account codes between 3000 and 6FFF to activate the 2-way audio function, program Option [7A] as
'36'.
To disable the 2-way audio function, program Option [7A]
as '00'.
NOTE: Option [7A] may be used with any formats
supported by the MLR2000.
Option [7B]: 3 Digit Account Codes to Activate 2Way Audio - Default [00]
Option [7B] determines which 3-digit account codes will be
able to activate the 2-way audio feature. Program the first
digits of the desired account codes in Option [7B].
For example:
To allow all 3-digits account codes between 200 and 3FF to
activate the 2-way audio function, program Option [7B] as
'23'.
To allow all 3-digit account codes between 300 and 6FF to
activate the 2-way audio function, program Option [7B] as
'36'.
Program Option [04] as '00' to disable this function.
NOTE: Option [7B] may be used with any 3-digit
account code formats supported by the MLR2000.
Option [7C]: Alarm Codes to Activate 2-Way Audio Default [00]
Option [7C] determines the range of alarm codes, which
will activate the 2-way audio function. Program the first
digits of the desired alarm codes in Option [7C].
For example:
The DRL2000 will initiate audio by the account range,
Options [7A] and [7B] or by Option [7C] ALARM CODE or
by both.
If all alarm codes beginning with 6, 7 and 8 are to activate
2-way audio, program Option [7C] as '68'. Option [7C]
may be used with 10 to 40 Baud formats, DTMF 4/1, 4/2,
and 4/3 formats.
Program Option [7C] as '00' to disable this function.
Example:
4/2 format with account code 1234, alarm code 2 on zone
3. (1234-23)
* This will not affect SIA.
Option [78]: Max Inter-digit - Default [00]
Certain old dialers may have difficulties in communicating
with the DRL2000 line cards. The DRL2000 provides a possible solution by programming this option. This option
should be left as a default and should be changed only on
the recommendation of a DSC technician. When programmed as 00, the inter-digit time is determined by the
Baud rate of the format being used; all other values are in
100 ms. intervals. 0 determined by Baud rate (default).
00
auto
01
100 ms
02
200 ms
.....
.....
0A
1000 ms
19
Option - [7A] [7C] Switch Reason (or [7B]) to Audio
00 1-2
Yes Alarm code 2 falls within the code
range 1-2.
1-1 00
Yes Account code 1234 falls within the
range 1-1.
2-3 00
No
Account code 1234 is outside the
range 2-3.
00 3-4
No
Alarm code 2 is outside the range 34.
1-2 3-4
No
If both are programmed, both must
be good and alarm code 2 is outside
the range 3-4.
3-5 1-3
No
Both must be good and account code
1234 is outside the range 3-5.
1-4 1-5
Yes Alarm code 2 falls within the code
range 1-5, account code 1234 falls
within the range 1-4.
Options [81] through [88]: Handshake Selection Default:
23
18
14
10
Option [7E] Audio RS-232 - Default [00]
This is the code sent to the automation software that indicates that two-way audio has been initiated. If this option
is set to '00' there will be no audio-initiated message sent
to the automation output. If set to 01, the automation
message for audio will be generated with protocol ID 'S'. If
set to 02, the automation message will be generated with
protocol ID '0'.
[85]
0E
[82]
14
[86]
0B
[83]
2D
[87]
00
[84]
0C
[88]
00
2300 Hz
1800 Hz
1400 Hz
1000 Hz
Option [89] to [90]: Handshake and Kiss-off
Duration - Default [00]
Some control panels may require a different handshake
duration. Each unit has increments of 100 ms, from 100
ms to a maximum of 8.1 seconds. Program Options 88 to
90 for the desired duration.
No Automation Output
Send SRRLLL[#AAAA|NLFssoo][DC4]
Send 0RRLLL[#AAAA|NLFssoo][DC4]
00
01
02
03
04
0A
0C
Option [7F]: Audio Format Enable - Default [00]
This option gives you the ability to enable and disable
audio for selected formats. A '1' in the formats bit position
will enable the format for audio. A '0' in the formats bit
position will disable audio for the format.
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
23
The DRL2000 is a multi-format receiver capable of sending
several handshakes to a dialer. Often it is important which
handshake is sent first. Program Options [81] through [88]
according to your applications. Handshake Options:
00
No handshake
2D
Double dual-tone handshake
0C
SIA FSK handshake
0B
Modem II handshake
0E
Modem IIE and ITI handshake
1D
Single dual-tone handshake
0F
DMP handshake
0D
Westec handshake*
EC
SURTEC
* Special software is required.
All other frequencies can be programmed using the first
two digits to represent the 3rd and 4th decimal places.
Example:
Option [7D]: Audio Zone Code - Default [00]
Audio zone code is the range of zone codes that will activate audio. The first digit is the lowest code. The second
digit indicates the highest zone that will activate audio.
Option [7D] may be used with 10 to 40 Baud formats,
DTMF 4/1, 4/2, and 4/3 formats.
NOTE: Option [7D] Only works for DMP Serial 1 not
for DMP Serial 3.
00
01
02
[81]
3 Digit pulse format
4 and 5 Digit pulse format
DTMF format
Contact ID
SIA format
Modem II format
ITI Format
Westec format
1 second
100 ms
200 ms
300 ms
400 ms
1 second.
1.2 second.... and so on
DSC does not recommend programmed durations longer
than 1.5 seconds, as it may not be tolerated by the alarm
panel. For special applications, it may be necessary, but any
durations higher than 8.1 seconds will not be accurate and
may not match the duration programmed.
NOTE: These options will only affect steady tones
handshakes.
Option [89]: Handshake #1 duration
Option [8A]: Handshake #2 duration
Option [8B]: Handshake #3 duration
Option [8C]: Handshake #4 duration
Option [8D]: Handshake #5 duration
Option [8E]: Handshake #6 duration
Option [8F]: Handshake #7 duration
Option [90]: Handshake #8 duration
For example: if the user wants audio to work only for 3digit pulse and SIA formats, Option 7F would have to be
programmed as 11 hex which enables bit 0 and bit 4.
Option 80: Kiss-Off to Hang-up Time - Default [1F]
This option determines the delay between Kiss-off and the
release of the line. The hex value programmed at this location will be converted to decimal and then multiplied by
100 milliseconds to generate the delay.
For example:
Option 80 = 0A hex = 10 decimal * 100 ms = 1000 ms = 1 second delay
Option 80 = 28 hex = 40 decimal * 100 ms = 4000 ms = 4 second delay
20
Option [91]: Inter-Handshake Duration - Default [00]
The DRL2000 line card will usually wait for signals from the
control panels for 4 seconds before sending the next handshake, if there are no signals received. In certain applications, control panels cannot wait long enough to get its
own handshake especially if the handshake is programmed
as the fifth or later handshake. Program Option [91] with
one of the following:
00
01
02
03
Value
5 Digit Setting
6 Digit Setting
00
01
02
select 4/1 format
select 3/2 format*
select 3/1 checksum
format
select 3/1 checksum
format special**
select 4/1 format
select 3/2 format*
select 3/1 checksum
format
select 3/1 checksum
format special**
select 4/2 format
select 4/2 format
select 4/2 format
03
10
11
12
4-second interval
1-second interval
2-second interval
3-second interval
13
select 4/2 format
select 5/1 format***
select 5/1 format***
select 5/1 format***
select 5/1 format***
*NOTE 1: The printer messages for the 3/2 format are
the same as those used for the 4/2 format.
**NOTE 2: Select 3/1 with checksum only for Radionics
Fast (40 baud rate) sent on the 2300Hz handshake, and
4/1 on all other baud rate regardless of the handshake.
***NOTE 3: The printer messages for the 5/1 format
are the same as those used for the 4/1 format.
Option [92]: Reserved
Option [93]: Min Audio Tone - Default [00]
This option is used for Two-way audio tone detection from
specific audio panels. This option should be left as default
unless otherwise instructed by DSC Technical Support.
Option [94]: Account Digit Stripping - Default [00]
When Option 94 is set to 01, the leading digit of a fourdigit account code will be stripped if it is an F.
Example:
Standard 4/2 format Output:
1RRLLLssssssAAAAsXssYZ
Example 1:
Option 94 set to 00
Panel account code is F245
104091ssssssF245sXssYZ
IF Option 94 is set to 01 the ‘F’ will be replaced by a space.
This setting will also enable the receiver to decode special
pulse extended-extended formats.
104091sssssss245sXssYZ
If Option 94 is set to 02 than the leading digit of a fourdigit panel account code will be stripped if it is a zero. This
option will work with the following formats:
Standard Pulse and DTMF(3/x, 4/x & Extended)
FBI
Ademco Super Fast (4/8/1, 4/8)
Contact ID
ITI
SIA
Modem II
SKFSK
Example 1:
Option 94 set to 02
Panel account code is 0345
1RRLLLssssss0345sXssYZ
New Output:
1RRLLLsssssss345sXssYZ
Option [96]: 4/1 Extended - Default [00]
Program the 4/1 Extended Option as '01' to enable combining 2 round pairs of 4/1 extended format into 4/2 output for reporting to the automation and the printer. For
example, with Option [96] enabled, the security control
panel may transmit the following information:
1234 3
1234 3
3333 1
3333 1
The DRL2000 will interpret this information as: 1234 31.
The default of '00', means 4/1 Extended is disabled.
Option [97]: 4/2 Extended - Default [00]
Program Option [97] as '01' to combine 2 round pairs of 4/
2 extended format into 4/3 output for reporting to the
computer and the printer. Program one of the following:
00 4/2: Extended format data is not combined.
01: The panel will send:
123405
123405
050516
050516
The DRL2000 will interpret this information as 1234 516,
or the panel will send:
123403
123403
333301
333301
The DRL2000 will interpret this information as 1234 301.
Note that a longer on-line time is required for this format
than for a standard 4/2 format. The default setting for
Option [97] is '00'; when programmed as '00', the option
is disabled.
Option [95]: 5-Digit Pulse - Default [00]
The DRL2000 cannot distinguish between 4/1, 3/2 and 3/1
with checksum because all of them contain a total of 5
digits. Therefore, this option must be programmed to
inform the DRL2000 which of the 3 formats may be used.
The DRL2000 cannot distinguish between 4/2 and 5/1 they
both contain a total of 6 digits, therefore the DRL2000
must be programmed to indicate what format.
Option [98]: 3/1 Extend - Default [01]
Program Option [98] as '01' to combine 2 round pairs of 3/
1 extended or 3/1 partial extended format into 3/2 output
for reporting to the computer and the printer. For example,
with Option [98] enabled, the security control panel may
transmit the following information:
1233
1233
3331
3331
The DRL2000 will interpret this information as: 123 31; the
default setting for Option [98] is '01'; when programmed
as '00', the option is disabled.
21
Option [99]: Ademco Express - Default [01]
The Ademco 4/1 Express format may cause conflicts with
the Sur-Gard DTMF 4/3 with checksum format or FBI Super
fast without checksum. Therefore, this option must be programmed to inform the DRL2000 which of the 3 formats
may be used.
00 Sur-Gard DTMF 4/3 with checksum
01 Ademco 4/1 Express
02 FBI without checksum
Option [9E]: Reserved
Option [9F]: Ademco High Speed RS-232 - Default
[01]
When this option is programmed as '00', the DRL2000 will
convert the High Speed format signal into 4/2 format (E.g.
1RRLLLssssssAAAAsXssYY[DC4]). If it is programmed as
'01' the Ademco High Speed will be sent to the computer
as indicated below:
8RRLLLAAAAsCCCCsCCCCsC[DC4]
Where 8 = protocol number
RR = receiver number
LLL = line number
AAAA = account code
CCCC = channel 1-4
s = space
CCCC = channel 5-8
s = space
C = Channel 9
[DC4] terminator
Option [9A]: Reserved
Option [9B]: Echo Canceller - Default [00]
00 Disabled
01 Enabled: Disable echo canceller
Option [9C]: Acron RS-232 - Default [01]
When this option is programmed as '00', the DRL2000 will
convert the Acron Super Fast format signal into 3/2 or 4/2
format (Ex: AAAAsXssYY[DC4] ). If it is programmed as
'01' the Acron Super Fast will be sent to the computer as
indicated below:
Option [A0]: 11 / 12-Digit DTMF (Acron or
Scantronics) - Default [00]
When this option is programmed as '00', if 11 or 12-digit
DTMF is received, it will be decoded as ACRON Format.
When this option is programmed as '01', if 11 or 12-digit
DTMF is received, it will be decoded as SCANTRONICS Format.
9RRLLLssssAAAACCCCCCCCC[DC4]
Where 9 = protocol number
RR = receiver number
LLL = line number
ssss = spaces
AAAA = account code
CCCC = channel 1-4
CCCC = channel 5-8
[DC4] = terminator
00
00
01
01
Option [9D]: MODEM II RS-232 - Default [01]
The DRL2000 is able to decode the Modem II formats. The
handshake 0B needs to be programmed as one of the
handshakes of the DRL2000 for the Modem II and handshake 0E for Modem IIE or Modem IIIa 2. Option [9D]
determines the protocol sent to the computer. Note that
this option will also affect the BFSK format only if programmed as 00 or 01.
Option 9D Programming
Option 9D has changed from a value programmed
option to a bit programmed option.
Bit 0: Controls if the Modem II output protocol is 01
or 06.
Bit 1: Controls if the Modem II output is Modem II or
converted to SIA without text.
Bit 2: Controls if the Modem II to SIA conversion
includes the ASCII text.
Bit 3: Enables the full account code to be sent to the
printer and automation if receiving more then 4 digits. Refer to example for more details. This affects the
standard Modem output protocols as well as the SIA
conversion.
NOTE: If disabled, only the first 4 digits will be
decoded even if more are received.
For previous versions that were programmed
Prior to 1.70
Equivalent programming on 1.70
00
00
01
01
02
02
03
06
NOTE: Ensure that the automation software supports
settings 02 and 04 if the SIA protocol is desired.
Incoming Format
11-digit DTMF
12-digit DTMF
11-digit DTMF
12-digit DTMF
Decoded Format
Acron 3-8
Acron 4-8
Scantronics 2-8-1
Scantronics 3-8-1
Option [A1]: FBI RS-232 - Default [01]
To enable the computer for FBI Super Fast protocol, program Option [A1] as '01'. When enabled, the computer
output will be as indicated below:
JRRLLLssssssAAAATZZEss[DC4]
Where:
J = FBI protocol identifier
RR = receiver number
LLL = line number
s = spaces
AAAA = account code
T = zone type
ZZ = zone number, in hex.
E = event code
if E = 0 and T = 0 : listen in.
Option [A2]: Digit Replace - Default [00]
Option 77 works in conjunction with Option A2. Option
77 is programmed with an ASCII value that will replace an
account code digit or insert a value into an account code.
Option A2 is used to replace a digit or insert a digit. To
replace a digit use 0x where x is the digit to be replaced.
To shift a digit use Option A2 and set to 8x where x is the
location in the account code.
Option [A3]: D6500 RS-232 - Default [00]
This option is used to strip hex digits on the automation
output. The DRL2000 will emulate the Radionics 6500 RS232 protocol on pulse formats, Ademco Express and
Varitech only. When Option A3 is set to 01 the hex digit
will be stripped for 1-digit reporting codes including
Varitech 4/1.
22
Example 1: Code 1
Computer output: 1RRLLLsssssss022sAsss1
Example 2: Code B
Computer output: 1RRLLLsssssss022sOssss
If Option A3 set to 02: the hex digit will be stripped for 2digit reporting codes including Varitech 4/2.
Example 1: Code 21
Computer output: 1RRLLLsssssss022sAss21
Example 2: Code B1
Computer output: 1RRLLLsssssss022sOsss1
If Option A3 set to 03: the hex digit will be stripped for 1
and 2-digit reporting codes including Varitech.
If Option A3 set to 04: the hex digit will be stripped for
BFSK.
NOTE: This option will only work if Option A4 is set
to 01.
Example 1: Code 21
Computer output: 6RRLLLsssssss022sAss21
Example 2: Code B1
Computer output: 604091sssssss022sOsss1
If Option A3 is set to 05: the hex digit will be stripped for
1-digit reporting and BFSK.
If Option A3 Is set to 06: the hex digit will be stripped for
2-digit reporting and BFSK.
If Option A3 set to 07: the hex digit will be stripped for 1digit, 2-digit and BFSK.
NOTE: Option [70] must be left as an individual event
code when enabling this option.
Option [A7]: Silent Knight FSK2 RS-232 - Default [00]
The DRL2000 provides two possible outputs to the computer for Silent Knight FSK2 format. The operation of this
option is explained below:
[A7] = 00
SKFSK disabled
[A7] = 01
SKFSK enabled for:
SKFSK1
ERRLssssssAAAAYYssss[DC4]
SKFSK2 Protocol #2
CRRLssssAAAAAAYYZZss[DC4]
[A7] = 02
SKFSK enabled for:
SKFSK1
ERRLssssssAAAAYYssss[DC4]
SKFSK2 Protocol #2
FRRLssssAAAAAAYYZZss[DC4]
Options [A8] - [AF]: Dial-out Number For 2-way
Audio Transfer - Default [00]
These 8 options are used to provide the dial-out number if
the user wishes to transfer the call to another extension.
Up to 16 digits may be programmed including any 'Feature
Command' digits. The values in these options will be sent
as DTMF tones on the phone line after the following
sequence takes place:
1
2
Option [A4]: BFSK RS-232 - Default [00]
When programming Option [A4] as '00', the BFSK format
will be reported as Radionics 6500 BFSK mode to the computer; the protocol identifier will be a 6.
Example 1: Code 21
Computer Output: 604091
022sAsss1
Example 2: Code B1
Computer Output: 604091
022sOsss1
When Option A4 set to 01, the BFSK will be reported as a
standard 3/1 extended format, the protocol identifier will
also be changed from 6 to 1.
Example 1: Code 21
Computer Output: 104091
022sAss21
Example 2: Code B1
Computer Output: 104091
022sOssB1
3
The DRL2000 has recognized the current call as a
2-way audio account and alarm code.
The calling control panel has finished sending its
alarms and switched into 2-way audio mode.
The DRL2000 will perform a Hook-flash with the
time value as programmed in Option 11 and then
start to dial the digits programmed in Options
A8-AF.
Options A8-AF must be programmed in the following
manner: Digits 1-9 are programmed as the numbers 1-9.
The digit ‘A’ must be programmed if a zero is needed anywhere in the dial string as the digit zero is used to indicate
to the line card that there are no more digits to dial. If a '*'
is needed, (e.g., *70, the transfer command in some PBX/
PABX switches) program a 'B'. Similarly, if a '#' is needed,
program a 'C'.
To get the line card to wait for 3 seconds in a dial string,
program a 'D'. For example: to have the line card transfer
a 2-way audio call to Ext. 51386, with a 3 second pause
between the transfer command and dialing, Options A8AF would be programmed as the following:
Option [A5]: Sescoa Super Speed - Default [01]
If set to 00 Sescoa Super Speed will be disabled and 4/
2 with checksum will be enabled.
If set to 01, Sescoa Super Speed will be enabled and 4/
2 with checksum will be disabled.
If set to 03 Sescoa Super Speed will be disabled and
only 4/2 with checksum will be enabled. 4/2 double
round will be disabled.
A8 = B7
A9 = AD
AA = 51
AB = 38
Options [B0] - [FF]: Reserved
Option [A6]: ITI Adjust - Default [00]
When set to 01, the ITI account codes will be converted to
four digits by stripping the last digit off. For example, a
panel account of 23459 will become account 2345. If the
leading digit of the panel account is a 0 than it will be
stripped and replaced with a space. For example, if 02349
is sent then the receiver will output 234 for the panel
account.
23
AC = 60
AD = 00
AE = 00
AF = 00
Section 7 - DRL2000 Communication Formats
7.1 Common Formats
The following formats are commonly used:
• 3/1, 4/1, 4/2 formats; 10, 14, 20 Baud
• 3/1 extended format; 10, 14, 20, 40 Baud.
• 3/1, 4/2 formats with or without checksum; 40 Baud
• 3-2 format; 10, 14, 20 Baud (option)
• 4/1 Extended format; 10, 14, 20 Baud (option)
• 4/2 Extended format; 10, 14, 20, 40 Baud (option)
Example:
• 3/1 FORMAT
Computer: 1011ssssss123sAsss1[14]
Printer: Jun 26 1998-13:42:32-01/02-SG - 01-123123• 1-FIRE ALARM
• 3/1 EXTENDED FORMAT
Computer: 1011ssssss123sAss32[14]
Printer: Jun26 1998-13:49:38-01/02-SG - 01-123123• 32-BURGLARY
• 4/2 FORMAT
Computer: 1011ssssss1234sAss22[14]
Printer: Jun 26 1998-15:02:23-01/02-SG - 01-1231234• 22-PANIC ALARM
7.2
7.3
E= Event code.
ZZ = Zone number or user number.
Computer: 1011ssssss2255sAs266[14][6]
Printer: Jun 25 1998-13:20:42-01/02-SG - 01-1232255266-PANIC ALARM
Acron Format
The Acron format is a DTMF format. It can transmit 3 or 4
account digits and 8 digits of channel status at a time.
Shown below are several examples of Acron transmissions.
• Handshake / Kiss-off: 2300 Hz
• 1234: Account Code
Example:
• AAAAZZZZZZZZorAAAZZZZZZZZ
• 9RRLLLssssAAAACCCCCCCC[DC4]
• With option disabled
4/8
Computer: 101123ssssss1234sCssA1[14][6]
Printer: Jun 25 1998-13:25:12-01/02-SG - 01-1231234-A1-CLOSEsUSERs01
• With option enabled
4/8
Computer:901123ssss1234AAAAA78A[14][6]
Sur-Gard DTMF Formats
7.4
Sur-Gard DTMF 4/3 and 4/3 with checksum formats provide fast, reliable and easy-to-understand and decode
data transmission. On-line time will be greatly reduced
when using 4/3 and 4/3 with checksum formats. The 4/1
and 4/2 DTMF formats can also be decoded by the
DRL2000.
The 4/3 with checksum format is recommended for use
with Sur-Gard and DSC security control panels.
Example:
• Sur-Gard 4/3 format
Each round pair represents a single event:
AAAAEZZ
AAAA = 4-digit account code.
Ademco Contact ID
This DTMF format requires a dual tone handshake and
1400 Hz kiss-off, or 1400 Hz handshake and 1400 Hz
kiss-off.
NOTE: If the dialer responds to a 2300 Hz handshake by
sending the Contact ID Format data, the DRL2000 will
accept and decode the format. The DRL2000 will send a
1400 Hz kiss-off tone regardless of the handshake.
EVENT CODE CLASSIFICATIONS
CONTACT ID
The Event codes have been grouped according to the
type of event (see Event Code Library below).
Contact ID Event Code Library
Medical Alarms - 100
100
101
102
Medical
Pendant transmitter
Fail to report in
Fire Alarms - 110
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
Fire alarm
Smoke
Combustion
Water Flow
Heat
Pull Station
Duct
Flame
Near alarm
120
Panic alar
121
122
123
Duress
Silent
Audible
Burglar Alarms - 130
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
Burglary
Perimeter
Interior
24 Hour
Entry/Exit
Day/Night
Outdoor
Tamper
Near alarm
Silent Burg
140
General alarm
Panic Alarms - 120
141
142
143
144
145
146
Polling loop open
Polling loop short
Expansion module failure
Sensor tamper
Expansion module tamper
Silent Alarm
24 Hour Non-Burglary - 150 and 160
General Alarms
24
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
24 Hour non-burg
Gas detected
Refrigeration
Loss of heat
Water leakage
Foil break
Day trouble
Low bottled gas level
High temp
159
161
Low temp
Loss of air flow
Fire supervisory - 200 and 210
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
Fire supervisory
Low water pressure
Low CO2
Gate valve sensor
Low water level
Pump activated
Pump failure
System Troubles - 300 and 310
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
System trouble
AC loss
Low system battery
RAM checksum bad
ROM checksum bad
System reset
Panel program changed
Self-test failure
System shutdown
Battery test failure
Ground fault
Sounder/Relay Troubles - 320
320
321
322
323
324
325
Sounder/relay
Bell 1
Bell 2
Alarm relay
Trouble relay
Reversing
System Peripheral Troubles - 330 and 340
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
341
System Peripheral
Polling loop open
Polling loop short
Exp. module failure
Repeater failure
Local printer paper out
Local printer failure
Exp Mod DC Loss
Exp ModLow Batt
Exp Mod Reset
Exp Mod Tamper
Communication Troubles - 350 and 360
350
351
352
353
354
Communication
Telco 1 fault
Telco 2 fault
Long range radio
Fail to communicate
355
356
357
Loss of radio supervision
Loss of central polling
Radio Xmtr VSWR
Protection Loop Troubles - 370
370
371
372
373
374
Protection loop
Protection loop open
Protection loop short
Fire trouble
Exit Alarm
Sensor Troubles- 380
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
Sensor trouble
Loss of super. - RF
Loss of super. - RPM
Sensor tamper
RF xmtr. low battery
Smoke Hi-Sens.
Smoke Low Sens.
Intrusion Hi-Sens.
Intrusion Low Sens.
Detector Self Test Fail
Open/close - 400
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
Open/Close
O/C by user
Group O/C
Automatic O/C
Late to O/C
Deferred O/C
Cancel
Remote arm/disarm
Quick Arm
Keyswitch O/C
411
412
413
414
415
Callback request made
Succes - download access
Unsuccessful access
System shutdown
Dialer shutdown
Remote Access - 410
Access Control - 420
421
422
Access denied
Access report by user
Special O/C - 440-450
441
450
451
452
453
455
Armed Stay
O/C by Exception
Early O/C
Late O/C
Fail to O/C
Auto Arm Fail
456
457
458
459
O/C Partial Arm
exit Error
User on Premises
Recent Close
System Disables - 500 and 510
Sounder/Relay disables - 520
520
521
522
523
524
525
Sounder/Relay disabl
Bell 1 disable
Bell 2 disable
Alarm relay disable
Trouble relay disable
Reversing relay disable
System peripheral Disables - 530 and 540
Communication Disables - 550 and 560
551
552
Dialer disabled
Radio xmitter disabled
Bypasses - 570
570
571
572
573
574
575
Zone bypass
Fire bypass
24 Hour zone bypass
Burg. bypass
Group bypass
Swinger Bypass
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
611
612
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
Manual trigger test
Periodic test report
Periodic RF Xmission
Fire test
Status report to follow
Listen-in to follow
Walk Test Mode
OFF normal condition
Video transmitter active
Fire test: point tested
Fire test: point not tested
Event log reset
Event log 50% full
Event log 90% full
Event log overflow
Time/Date Reset
Time/Date inaccurate
Program mode Entry
Program mode Exit
1 & 1/3 day no read log
Sched change
Exception Schedule change
Access Sched change
Test/Misc. - 600
Example:
• COMPUTER: 501123s181234E12200003[14][6]
• PRINTER: Jun 26 1998-16:07:35-01/02-SG - 01-123-1234-122-E122-00sSILENT PANIC 003
25
7.5
Ademco Express
FBI Event
7.6
Ademco Super Fast (High Speed
Format)
The High Speed format consists of 4 digit account numbers, 8 channel status digits, and 1 auxiliary channel.
NOTE: When option [9F] is programmed as ‘00’, the
DRL2000 will convert the signal into 4/2 format.
When option [9F] is programmed as ‘01’, the
DRL2000 will send the information as it received to
the printer and to the computer using High Speed
RS-232 communication protocol.
8RRLLLAAAAsCCCCsC[DC4]
AAAAZZZZ ZZZZ S
AAAA = Three digit or four digit account number.
ZZZZ ZZZZ = Zone status.
S = Status channel indicates the meaning of the message.
AAAAZZZZZZZZS or AAAZZZZZZZZS
Example:
• With option 9F disabled
Computer: 101001ssssss1234sAss02[14][6]
Printer: Jun 25 1998-14:17:50-F3/00-SG-01-1231234-02-ALARM ZONE02
• With option 9F enabled
Computer: 801001 1234s5155s5555s7[14][6]
Printer: Jun 25 1998-14:21:50-01/02-SG - 01-1231234- 515555557
7.7
7.8
7.9
Code
Converted Event Code
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
A
A
A
A
A
B
A
A
ITI Format
ITI Sensor Library
Sensor #Printed Out AsSpecifics
00
01-32
00-16
02-07
01
02-76
01-18
01-76
77
Buddy AlarmSX-V Only
ALARMCaretaker Plus
AlarmRF Commander/ Commander III
AlarmSX-IVB
Bad Sensor #SX-V Only
AlmSX-V
AlarmCommander 2000
AlarmUltraGard 5000
AlarmTmprCaretaker Plus, SX-IVB, SX-V, UltraGard
5000 Only
78
TroubleCaretaker Plus, UltraGard 5000 Only
79
No Activ AlmCaretaker Plus, UltraGard 5000 Only
80
AlarmALL Supported ITI Panels
81
AlarmALL Supported ITI Panels
82
AlarmALL Supported ITI Panels
83
PhoneTstALL Supported ITI Panels
84
OpenUsr xxALL Supported ITI Panels
85
CloseUsr xxALL Supported ITI Panels
86
SilentDuressALL Supported ITI Panels
87
Force Arm, ALL Supported ITI Panels
Auto ForceArm
88
TroubleCaretaker Plus, UltraGard 5000 Only
89
RF TouchpadCaretaker Plus, UltraGard 5000 Only
90
AC FailALL Supported ITI Panels
91
Low BatteryALL Supported ITI Panels
92
AlmTamprLoopALL Supported ITI Panels
93
AutoPhoneTstALL Supported ITI Panels
94
Recevier FailureALL Supported ITI Panels
95
CPU Back InALL Supported ITI Panels
98
Event Dump ReportCommander 2000 Only.
NOTE: The UltraGard 5000 and the Security Pro5000
are the same panel with different marketing names.
Therefore all references above to the UltraGard
5000 include the Security Pro5000.
FBI Super Fast Format
FBI Event
Converted Event Code
The ITI format covers ITI panels listed in Appendix E. In
order to receive the ITI format, the handshake #10 must
be programmed.
This DTMF format consists of 4-digit account codes, 2digit zone codes, 1-digit zone type codes, and 1-digit
event codes. The zone codes will be converted into 3-digit
decimal codes by the DRL2000.
The following are the zone type codes used by this format:
Fire
Panic
Burglary
MedicaL
Auxiliary
Bypass
Inactive
Eight
Code
Nine
9
A
Zero
0
A
Opening
B
O
Closing
C
C
Abort
D
T
Restore
E
R
Trouble
F
T
NOTE: Note that option [A1] can give a unique FBI
RS232 output when enable.
Example:
• FBI RS232 Option On
Computer:JO112323452032 [14]
Printer: 20-Jul-1998 13:12:29 - Jul 20 199813:14:51 -01/-2-SG - 01-123-2345-003-PANIC
• FBI RS232 Option Off
Computer:101123 2345 O 001 [14]
Printer:20-Jul-1998 13:52:35 - Jul 20 199813:54:57-01/02-SG - 01-123-2345-001-OPENING
This format consists of 4-digit account codes and 1- or 2digit alarm codes. The DRL2000 will decode the signal as
regular 4/1 or 4/2 format. Option [99] must be programmed as ‘01’ to decode the 4/1 Express format
instead of the Sur-Gard 4/3 with checksum format.
Example:
• Option 99 set to 00
Raw data: 23451726
Computer Output: 101123 2345 A 172
Printer Output: Jul 20 1998-15:54:31-01/02-SG 01-123-2345-172-FIRE ALARM
• Option 99 set to 01
Raw data: 23451726
Computer Output: 101123 2345 A 2
Printer Output: Jul 20 1998-15:48:57-01/02-SG 01-123-2345-2-PANIC ALARM
26
7.10 Modem II, Modem IIE, Modem IIIa²
and BFSK Formats
7.12 Silent Knight FSK1, FSK2
7.12.1 Silent Knight FSK1 Protocol
ERRLLLssssAAAAAAXXssss[DC4]
Where:
E
FSK protocol identifier
RR
Receiver number
LLL
Line number
s
Spaces
AAAAAA Account number (if the account is 4 or 5 digits, the leading “A”s will be replaced by
spaces)
XX
Alarm code
Possible alarm codes are as follows:
00
Alarm Panic
01-08
Alarm 01-08
09
Holdup
10-19
Alarm 10-19
30
Test code
31
Trouble line 1
32
Trouble line 2
33
Expand trouble
34
Forced access
35
Restore line 1
36
Restore line 2
37
Expand restore
38
Cancel code
39
Data lost
40
Closing
41-49
Closing 1-9
50-59
Bypass 10-19
60
Trouble AC
61-68
Trouble 1-8
69
Trouble bat
70
Restore AC
71-78
Restore 1-8
79
Restore bat
80
Access
81-89
Access 1-9
90
Opening
91-99
Opening 1-9
[DC4]
Represents the terminator
Example
• Printer:L1-1234-03-LIBRARY WORD
HH:MM:SS-DD/MM
• Computer: E01001
123403 [14]
BFSK, Modem II, Modem IIIa2 or Modem IIE formats (refer
to appendix D) can be decoded by the DRL2000.
7.10.1 Modem II
Example:
• Modem II RS-232 Option ON
Computer Output: 601001 7112 T 9[14]
Printer Output: 23-Jun-1998 09:49:02 - Jun 23
1998 -09:53:00-01/02-SG - 01-123-7112BATTERY MISSING
• Modem II RS 232 option OFF
Computer Output: 101001 7112 R F01[14]
Printer Output: 23-Jun-1998 11:07:47 - Jun 23
1998-11:11:45-01/02-SG - 01-123-7112PROG ACCESS OK
7.10.2 BFSK
Example:
• BFSK option ON
Computer Output: 601001 112F 1[14]
Printer Output: 22-Jun-1998-11:17:26 - Jun 22
1998-11:21:32-01/02-SG-01-123-112-FIRE
ALARM
• BFSK option OFF
Computer Output: 101001 112F 1[14]
Printer Output: 22-Jun-1998 13:05:17 - Jun 22
1998-13:09:23-01/02-SG-01-123-112-FIRE
ALARM
7.11 SIA FSK
The SIA digital format is a modem format communicating
at 110 or 300 Baud and using the SIA protocol to transfer
information to the computer.
The standard DRL2000 can receive Bell 103 modem frequencies.
NOTE: The DRL2000 can accept SIA formats with
and without separators. The DRL2000 version 1.4
software implements Levels 1, 2 and 3 of the SIA
1993IIb Digital Communication Standard, but it
does not support “Receiver Call out and Access Passcode Block,” “Reverse Channel Block,” and “VChannel Communications".
The DRL2000 supports an account code with a maximum
of 16 digits, (including any displayable ASCII characters
except the pipe symbol: “|”). It also supports an alarm
code with a maximum of 4 digits. Usually, the central station automation refers to the SIA Event Block Data Code
Definitions for information on interpreting the alarm
codes.
Acknowledgments for the SIA format are tonal by default.
The transmitter may, however, request data acknowledgment by transmission of the optional configuration block.
When the DRL2000 receives the configuration block from
a transmitter requiring data acknowledgment, it will send
the tonal acknowledgment to this block. It will then send
the data acknowledgment to the following data blocks if
the data received is valid.
Example:
• Printer: Jul 20 1998-17:30:16-01/02-SG-01-1231234 - NM008
• Computer: S011[#1234:NBA08]
7.13 Silent Knight FSK2 Protocol
The DRL2000 will provide two possible outputs to the
computer, according to the value set under option A7.
When the option is programmed as “02”, the computer
output will be as follows:
FRRLLLssssAAAAAAYYZZss[DC4]
Where:
F
FSK2 protocol 1 identifier
RR
Receiver number
LLL
Line number
s
Spaces
27
AAAAAA Account number (if the account is 4 or 5 digits, the leading “A”s will be replaced by
spaces)
YY
Event code
ZZ
Zone/user number
[DC4]
Represents the terminator
Possible events are as follows:
YT00
Battery Trouble
YR00
Battery Restore
AT00
System Trouble AC
DOZZ
Access left open ID ZZ
DFZZ
Access forced ID ZZ
DSZZ
Access Station ID ZZ
AJ00
System Restore AC
LT0Z
Trouble phone line #0Z
Restore phone line 0Z
Expand trouble device ID z
Expand restore device ID z
ETZZ
Expand trouble station ID ZZ (ZZ=17-31)
ERZZ
Expand restore station ID ZZ (ZZ=17-31)
RP00
Automatic test
RXZZ
Manual test zone ZZ
CA
Automatic closing
OA
Automatic opening
CLZZ
Normal closing ID ZZ
OPZZ
Normal opening ID ZZ
CFZZ
Forced closing ID ZZ
ORZZ
Forced opening ID ZZ
Supervised closing ID ZZ
OTZZ
Supervised opening ZZ
CG0a
Closing area 0a
OG0a
Opening area 0a
DRZZ
Access granted ID ZZ
When the option is programmed as “01”, the computer output will be as follows:
CRRLLLssssAAAAAAXYZZss[DC4]
Where:
C
FSK2 protocol 2 identifier
RR
Receiver number
LLL
Line number
s
Spaces
AAAAAA Account number (if the account is 4 or 5 digits, the leading “A”s will be replaced by
spaces)
X
Event code
Y
Condition code
ZZ
Zone/user number
[DC4]
Represents the terminator
Possible events are as follows:
B600
Battery Trouble
BE00
Battery Restore
C600
System Trouble AC
CE00
System Restore AC
D60z
Trouble phone line #0z
DE0z
Restore phone line 0z
E60z
EE0z
E6zz
EEzz
E100
E2zz
F000
F400
F1zz
F5zz
F2zz
F6zz
F3zz
F7zz
FD0a
FF0a
F8zz
F9zz
FAzz
FBzz
FC00
FE00
Expand trouble device ID z
Expand restore device ID z
Expand trouble station ID zz (zz=17-31)
Expand restore station ID zz (zz=17-31)
Automatic test
Manual test zone ZZ
Automatic closing
Automatic opening
: Normal closing ID ZZ
: Normal opening ID ZZ
: Forced closing ID ZZ
: Forced opening ID ZZ
: Supervised closing ID ZZ
: Supervised opening ZZ
: Closing area 0a
: Opening area 0a
: Access
: Access left open ID zz
: Access forced ID ZZ
: Access station ID ZZ
: Duress
: Data lost
7.14 Sescoa Super Speed
Sescoa Super Speed is a 40 Baud communication format.
Account codes are programmed as 4-digit decimal codes
ranging from 0001 to 3374. The account code is followed
by a 1-digit event code, a 2-digit alarm code, and 1-digit
checksum.
Option [A5] must be programmed as “01” in order to use
Sescoa Super Speed decoding instead of 4/2 with checksum decoding.
Example:
• Printer: L01-1234—LOW BATT HH:MM:SS-DD/MM
• Computer: 701007ssssss1234sF
7.15 DRL2000 Predefined Library Decoding
and Event Codes Table
7.15.1 3/1 - 4/1 Alarm Library
For Alarm
Message
Restore
Open
Close
Cancel
Restore
Trouble
28
Corresponding
Code
0 (A)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
B
C
D
E
F
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
R
O
C
/
R
T
Event
Code (Options 30-3F)
PER TEST REPORT
FIRE ALARM
PANIC ALARM
BURGLARY
GENERAL ALARM
GENERAL ALARM
GENERAL ALARM
MEDICAL
SYSTEM TROUBLE
RESTORE
OPENING
CLOSING
CANCEL
RESTORE
SYSTEM TROUBLE
7.15.2 3/1-4/1
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Restr
Open
Close
Cancl
Restr
Trble
Extended, 3/2 & 4/2 Alarm Library
0x (Ax) A
PER TEST REPORT
1x
A
FIRE ALARM
2x
A
PANIC ALARM
3x
A
BURGLARY
4x
A
GENERAL ALARM
5x
A
GENERAL ALARM
6x
A
GENERAL ALARM
7x
A
MEDICAL
8x
A
SYSTEM TROUBLE
9x
R
RESOTRE
Bx
O
OPENING
Cx
C
CLOSING
Dx
/
CANCEL
Ex
R
RESTORE
Fx
T
SYSTEM TROUBLE
7.15.3 4/2 Extended &
Alarm
0xx(Axx)
Alarm
1xx
Alarm
2xx
Alarm
3xx
Close
4xx
Open
5xx
Alarm
6xx
Alarm
7xx
Alarm
8xx
Restr
9xx
CloseGrp Bxx
OpenGrp Cxx
Bypas
Dxx
Unbyp
Exx
Cancl
Fxx
7.15.4 Event Codes Summary
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D or /
H
O
R
T
Z
20 Hex
4/3 Alarm Library
T
0
PER TEST REPORT
A
1
FIRE ALARM
A
2
PANIC ALARM
A
3
BURGLARY
C
4
CLOSING
O
5
OPENING
T
6
SERVICE
A
7
MEDICAL
A
8
MESSAGE
R
9
RESTORE
C
C
OPENING
O
O
CLOSING
B
B
CANCEL
H
H
RESTORE
/
/
SYSTEM TROUBLE
Ensure that the central station automation software is able to
accept these codes if they are to be used.
29
Event
Automatic Test
Fire Alarm
Panic Alarm
Burglary Alarm
Closing by User Number
Opening by User Number
Service
Medical Emergency
Message
Restore
Alarm
Bypass
Closing
Cancel
Unbypass
Opening
Restore
Trouble
Common Event Code
Common Event code
“Space”
Section 8 - CPM2000 Central Processing Module
The CPM2000 is the central processing module that monitors
the DRL2000 Line Cards and forwards the information from the
Line Cards to the computer and printer. The CPM2000 is capable of monitoring a maximum of 255 DRL2000 modules.
8.1
• Ethernet A and B to DRL2000 line-cards
• TCP/IP output to automation software and MLR2000
console software.
• Two RS232 ports for automation software
• 11 input/ outputs for BUZZER, ACT, etc.
• 2 relay outputs
• Available COM1 and COM2 baud rates: 110, 150, 300,
600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 or 38400
• COM1 or COM2 Data bits: 7, 8 or 9
• COM1 or COM2 Parity: Even, odd or none
• COM 1 or COM2 Stop Bits: fixed at 1
• System menu for easy initial programming.
• Software Version 1.0 supports line-cards and CPM2000
programming through TCP/ IP from a computer
General Information
The CPM2000 64-bit micro-controller and real-time language program running at 133 MHz allow the system to
quickly and efficiently execute several tasks at the same
time. The use of a unique menu display system enhances
the system's ease of use for the operator and makes the
system configuration and programming simple and efficient. Several diagnostics modes are available to assist the
operator in troubleshooting and maintenance, the
MLR2000 Console software through Windows 9x/2000/
XP computer is also available to setup the CPM and Line
cards
8.2
8.3
Features
• Multi-tasking allows the receiver to perform functions
that might otherwise be delayed by a slow computer
acknowledgement response
• Fast internal communication results in practically no
delay in transfer of information between the Line Card
and the CPM2000. The CPM2000 is capable of polling
more than 200 Line Cards in less than 2 seconds.
• LCD contrast easily adjusted
• Hot switching to secondary CPM2000
• 3½ floppy drive for data input/ output and software
upgrades.
8.3.1
8.3.2
8.3.3
8.3.4
Figure 7, CPM2000 Front View
30
CPM2000 Controls
• [ACK] Button: Used to manually acknowledge an
alarm event when a computer is not connected to
the receiver. Press the [ACK] button to turn the
'ACK' light OFF and silence the buzzer.
“ACK” light
Flashes when a message is received from the line card and
the computer is disconnected.
[Enter] button
Not used.
[Backspace] button
Not used.
[Escape] button
Not used.
Section 9 - CPM2000 Wiring Diagram
9.1
Loss of Socket/Automation
The Manual Restore rule is a command that may be issued
on the Sur-Gard console to jump back to the first entry.
The CPM and automation must connect to all resources
announced all the time. In the CPM's case this means that
a socket is presented for each automation to connect to.
It is estimated that sockets may appear and disappear regularly as processes are terminated and reconstituted. After
5 seconds of loss the CPM2000 shifts to the next connection level. The connection level cases are.
As an Example of Source Destination
the Fall-down case
Table 1
Slot 1
CPM A TCPIP
Automation TCPIP
Slot 2
CPM A serial 1
Automation serial
Slot 3
END
Each slot may be populated by a selection. After 5 seconds in a slot not running the CPM2000 will go to the
next running resource (i.e. actively polling) until 'END' is
encountered. When End is encountered the unit will continuously try to connect to the last entry. One of the
switched negative output on the CPM (PGMOUT 1) will
be activated when automation fails.
9.2
CPM Redundancy
CPM's are directly redundant. The secondary CPM constantly monitors the first CPM by observing polling events.
If the primary is considered failed either by loss or by
agreed upon takeover, the unacknowledged signals on
the systems line-cards are flushed out of the failed CPM.
As the secondary CPM resumes polling the previously
unacknowledged signals are re-transmitted from the line
card in chronological order.
9.3
CPM Restoral
All contemplated scenarios for recovery of a CPM except
watchdog restart involve a serviceman. It is expected that
CPM restoral will be manually switched from the console.
31
Section 10 - MLR2000 Computer Interface
The CPM2000 is able to send alarm messages to a computer
connected to the TCP/IP or serial port. This section describes the
communication procedures, and the communication formats
available for use.
Flow diagram for Automation LOOPMode (0)
Power Up/Restart
10.1 Virtual connectivity
Each CPM2000 has one IP address and a number of associated ports. Each MLR2000 receiver may have up to two
CPM2000's, configured as a primary CPM plus an
optional 'hot backup' CPM. Internally, socket programming uses specific ports for expected tasks. The MLR2000
is the 'Server' in a connection-oriented protocol (Berkeley
Socket 4.3BSD).
In the case of an IP Fall-down, serial ports will carry the
same 'stream' of traffic as TCP/IP, as backup communications channels.
As the CPM does not attempt to save state, when it fails
communications are switched to the backup CPM. Line
cards will re-transmit unacknowledged packets through
the system, restoring any CPM message loss.
CPM2000(A)
Ethernet Port
Active?
Manual Re-start from
Console (Reset Fallback)
Yes
Poll
Automation
No
CPM2000 (A)
Serial Port
Active?
Manual Re-start from
Console (Reset Fallback)
Yes
No
Flow diagram for Automation FALL BACK Mode (1)
Power Up/Restart
10.2 Automation Mode
In automation mode it is expected that the primary connection is via TCP/IP networking on the 10BaseT Ethernet
connection. To setup this mode a menu will prompt the
user for an IP Address. Once the IP address is set up all
other options and setups may be done via the Sur-Gard
Console Package running on a Windows 9x/2000/XP platform.
The TCP/IP connection is the primary output of the
CPM2000 for automation computer alarms. It is estimated that sockets may appear and disappear regularly as
processes are terminated and reconstituted. After 5 seconds of socket loss, a socket loss is declared and automation output is shifted to the next connection level, which is
the serial automation output connection.
10.2.1 First configuration: LOOP (0)
If both outputs are present, the CPM2000 will send to the
TCP/IP until it fails, proceed to the serial until it fails, proceed back to the TCP/IP until it fails ... and so on.
10.2.2 Second configuration: FALL BACK (1)
If both outputs are present, the CPM2000 will send to the
TCP/IP until it fails, proceed to the serial until it fails, and
will keep trying on the serial continuously, or until the
reset fallback command is generated from the console, in
which case it would go back to try the TCP/IP connection.
10.2.3 Third Configuration: ALL (2)
The CPM2000 will always send to all connected outputs.
If at least one output replies with a ACK, then the alarm is
considered as transmitted regardless if the other output
acknowledged it or not. This setting is NOT recommended.
CPM2000 (A)
Ethernet Port
Active?
Manual Re-start from
Console (Reset Fallback)
Yes
Poll
Automation
No
CPM2000 (A)
Serial Port
Active?
Manual Re-start from
Console (Reset Fallback)
Yes
No
Flow diagram for Automation ALL Mode (2)
Power Up/Restart
No
No
CPM2000 (A)
Ethernet Port
Active?
CPM2000 (A)
Serial Port
Active?
Yes
Yes
Poll
Automation
10.3 TCP/IP Ports
Each CPM2000 has a user selectable IP address and Port
base address which is applied on the next reboot. Originally the unit will be shipped with IP address 10.0.7.00 on
both , the primary and the secondary CPM.
Table 2
Base Port #
1024
1025
1026
Port Name
Sur-Gard Console
Port
SG-Automation
Port
2nd-Automation
Port
Reserved
Reserved
Base +
Base
Base + 1
Base + 2
1027
Base + 3
1028
Base + 4
...
...
1034
Reserved
Base + 9
The primary point to be made is that the base port is user
configurable as is the IP address.
32
10.4 Client Side Connects
10.6 Status Addressing
The Automation 'Client' attaches a socket to the CPM
'server as per the following diagram after Stevens 'UNIX
Network Programming' Prentice Hall 1990 section 6.2.
Line card status will be reported via physical addressing.
The line-cards will be assigned by shelf and slot number.
All device status information is in Sur-Gard format. The
reporting of status on this port, automation output, CPM
display and printer will relate to physical addressing. Physical addressing was chosen to facilitate maintenance, error
outputs will include the physical address to assist in maintenance.
10.5 Stream Packet Structure
The stream is an encapsulation of MLR2000 Automation
Serial Output.
Server (CPM)
10.7 Overview of Communication
Connection Oriented Protocol
socket ()
bind ()
listen ()
accept ()
When the CPM2000 receives data from a Line Card, it forwards the data to the automation and awaits an acknowledgment signal from the computer. The CPM2000 also
monitors the connection to the computer by sending a
supervisory 'heartbeat' signal to every port every 10 seconds. If the 'heartbeat' transmission determines that the
computer is off-line or disconnected, a message similar to
this will be sent to the printer:
Com Absent! or SG TCP/IP Absent
NOTE: The message indicates the time and date
that communications through COM1 were determined to be interrupted.
When COM1 communications are re-established, a message similar to this one will be printed:
Com Restored or SG TCP/IP Restored
NOTE: The message indicates the time and date
that communications through COM were determined to be re-established.
Client (Automation)
socket ()
connection establishment
connect ()
data (request)
write ()
read ()
write ()
data (reply)
read ()
33
CPM2000 Internal Status Messages:
Description
Printer Message
Automation message
24V Battery Low
24V Battery Low
YT0000
24V Battery Restored
24V Battery Restored
YR0000
5V Failure
5V Failure
YT0001
5V Restored
5V Restored
YR0001
Fan Circuit Failure
Fan Circuit Failure
YX0000
Fan Circuit Restored
Fan Circuit Restored
YZ0000
Operator activity mode.
Programming Entered
LB0000
Primary CPM2000 Failure
Primary CPM2000 Failure
YX0001
Printer #1 Error
Printer#1 Error
VZ0001
Printer #1 Restored
Printer#1 Restored
VY0001
Printer #2 Error
Printer#2 Error
VZ0002
Printer #2 Restored
Printer#2 Restored
VY0002
Printer #x Error
Printer#x Error
VZ000x
Printer #x Restored
Printer#x Restored
VY000x
PSU2000 AC Source A Failure
PSU-AC A Fail
AT0000
PSU2000 AC Source A Restored
PSU-AC A Restored
AR0000
PSU2000 AC Source B Failure
PSU-AC B Fail
AT0001
PSU2000 AC Source B Restored
PSU-AC B Restored
AR0001
PSU2000 DC Source A Failure
PSU-DC A Fail
YP0003
PSU2000 DC Source A Restore
PSU-DC A Restore
YR0003
PSU2000 DC Source B Failure
PSU-DC B Fail
YP0004
PSU2000 DC Source B Restore
PSU-DC B Restore
YR0004
Secondary CPM2000 Failure
Secondary CPM2000 Failure
YZ0002
Serial Port #1 not responding.
COM#1 Absent.
YC0001
Serial Port #1 responded ACK
COM#1 Restored
YK0001
Serial Port #2 not responding
COM#2 Absent.
YC0002
Serial Port #2 started polling
COM#2 Restored
YK0002
TCP/IP Printer error
TCP/IP Printer Error
VZ0000
TCP/IP Printer Restored
TCP/IP Printer Restored
VY0000
TCP/IP Socket 1025 Failed
SG -TCP/IP Failed
NT1025
TCP/IP Socket 1025 Restored
SG -TCP/IP Restored
NR1025
UPS AC Fail (PGM
UPS AC Fail
AT0002
UPS AC Restored
UPS AC Restored
AR0002
UPS Low Battery Restore
UPS Low Battery Restore
YR0002
UPS Low Battery.
UPS Low Battery.
YT0002
Secondary CPM2000 Failure
Secondary CPM2000 Failure
YX0002
Line Fault
Line Fault
LTSStt
Line Restore
Line Restore
LRSStt
Fault Call
Fault Call
YCSStt
Fault Data
Fault Data
YNSStt
Line Card Reset
Line Card Reset
RRSStt
Line Card Restored
Line Card Restored
YESStt
Line Card Absent
Line Card Absent
YDSStt
Primary CPM2000 Reset
Primary CPM2000 Power Up
RR0000
Secondary CPM2000 Reset
Secondary CPM2000 Power Up
RR0001
Line Card Busy(Buffer Full)
Line Card Busy Out
YBSStt
Internal communication error with Line
card
Internal Comm Error
YOSStt
Checksum fail on DRL2000 Boot up
Checksum Failed
YFSStt
DRL Online Time-Out
DRL Online Time-Out
NYSsstt
Internal Communication Error with
Computer
Computer Internal Comm Error
NTSSoo
where
SS
tt
XXXX
= Shelf in Hex
= Slot in Hex
= Socket number
34
CPM2000 LCD Messages by priority:
VZ0000:
Parallel port Printer Error
VZ0001:
TCP/IP Printer Error
YC0001:
COM#1 Absent
YC0002:
COM#2 Absent
YT0000:
12V Battery Low
YT0001:
5V Failure
AT0000:
AC CPMA Failure
AT0001:
AC CPMB Failure
Special Messages:
S67890[#0000|ABLOCKEDCALL 1234567890][14]
S01001[#0000|ABLOCKEDCALL 12345 1234567890][14]
S01001[#0000|AAHS TABLE FULL]
10.8 Console Specifies which SG
Automation to Supervise
A selection which defines a combination of SG Sockets, Ports and Protocols may be active. This setup, is
saved in the configuration file. Also presented is the
selection of ports that may be supervised for the purposes of restorals or fall down.
35
Section 11 - PSU2000 Power supply Module
'AC' LED
It indicates the presence of AC.
'BATTERY OK' LED
It indicates the battery status
(ON when battery is charged).
'Trouble' LED
It indicates a trouble in the
power supply.
36
Section 12 - Automation Protocols
The Sur-Gard MLR2000 receiver sends the various protocols to
report signals to the central station computer via an RS232
port. The complete description of protocols is available upon
request.
12.1 Data Byte protocol
The Sur-Gard MLR2000 receiver uses a default configuration of 9600 Baud, one start bit, 8 data bits, no parity bit,
and one stop bit structure to transmit and receive signals
on the RS-232 port. This protocol can be programmed on
the receiver to enable different configurations.
12.2 Acknowledgment of the Signal
The Sur-Gard receiver requires an acknowledgment signal
[ACK] (Hex 06) from the computer software within 4 seconds for each message sent. Failure to receive the [ACK]
will result in the retransmission of the same signal three
times before giving up. The same thing happens if the
receiver receives a [NAK] (hex 15). In case of communication failure with the computer, the Sur-Gard receiver can
store up to 127 times the number of lines installed in its
internal memory. The communication is resumed when
the first ACK is received on the heartbeat.
37
Section 13 - Detailed Description of Computers
13.1 COM Responses
13.2 Automation Absent
When the CPM2000 sends an event to the computer, it
checks for 3 responses: Ack, Nack or Unknown/No
Response
An ACK tells the CPM2000 the computer got the event
successfully. A NACK tells the CPM2000 the computer got
the message but didn't understand it. The CPM will
attempt to send the message 20 times. If after 20
attempts it continually got NACK from the computer, the
CPM and line card will send a communication error event
to the printer, and then begin attempting to send the next
event in the Line card buffer to the computer. Any other
response from the computer, including no response will
cause the CPM to attempt to send the message again, up
to 4 attempts. If after 4 attempts the CPM got no
response or an unknown response, it will assume nothing
is connected and generate an alarm.
When the computer is not responding to transmissions,
the CPM will generate a 'COMx Absent' or 'TCP/IP
Absent' trouble. When a trouble occurs, the CPM will
continue to attempt to send a signal to the computer until
it gets a response.
The CPM2000 will use the heartbeat signal to poll automation for a response. It will make 4 attempts, then wait
the next Heartbeat time before making another 4
attempts. The typical heartbeat interval is 30 seconds.
Supervisory Heartbeat Signal Protocol (1):
1RR000sssssssssss@ssss[DC4]
RR: Receiver number (Real programmed number. Never virtual).
s: Space Character.
@: Supervisory Signal.
[DC4]: Terminator, 14 Hex.
This signal is used to supervise the communication
between the receiver and the computer. It is sent to the
computer about every 30 seconds and is programmable
from the receiver. The computer should acknowledge this
signal with an [ACK].
The CPM can be programmed to send a test signal to the
computer once every 01-99 seconds to test the connection between the CPM and the computer (30 seconds is
recommended). If a heartbeat fails to get a response from
the computer, the CPM will immediately transmit the
heartbeat again, up to 4 attempts.
If all automation outputs failed, the CPM will start the
manual mode operation. (See manual mode). If the linecards buffers are full, the line-cards will stop answering
the calls.
38
Appendix A - DRL2000 Communication Formats
NAME
HANDSHAKE
DATA
BAUD
FORMAT
EXTENDED
KISS OFF
DTMF
1900Hz
1900Hz
DTMF
DTMF
DTMF
1800Hz
1800Hz
FSK
FSK
FSK
FSK
1800Hz
1800Hz
1800Hz
1800Hz
DTMF
10bps
10bps
DTMF
DTMF
DTMF
20bps
20bps
110/300
110
300
300
40bps
40bps
40bps
40bps
4/1(oprion),4/2
3/1,4/1(or 3/2),4/2
4/2,4/1,3/1
10/2/1/3/2
4/2/1/3/2/3
4/3/1
3/1,4/1(or 3/2),4/2
4/2,4/1,3/1
FSK
FSK
FSK
3/1,4/2
4/2,3/1
3/1+parity
4/2+parity
3/1+parity
NO
NO
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
YES
NO
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
ITI
Modem II
Modem IIE
Modem IIIa2
2300Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
Radionics
Dual Tone
1400Hz
1400Hz
Dual Tone
Dual Tone
2300Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
ITI
Modem II
Modem IIE
Modem II
2300Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
RadionicsBFSK
RadionicsBFSK
Sescoa S. Speed
S.F. Ademco
S.F. Ademco
SIA FSK
Level 1, 2, and 3.
Silent Knight Fast
Silent Knight Fast
Silent Knight FSK0
Silent Knight FSK1
Silent Knight FSK2
Sur-Gard
Sur-Gard
Sur-Gard
Sur-Gard
WESTEC *
Contact ID Safety net *
SF Ademco safety net
DMP Serial 1
DMP Serial 3
Varitech
Adcor
1400Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
Dual Tone
Dual Tone
SIA
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
Dual Tone
Dual Tone
DTMF
Serial
Serial
DMP
DMP
2300Hz
2300Hz
FSK
FSK
1800Hz
DTMF
DTMF
FSK mark
Space
1900Hz
1900Hz
FSK
FSK
FSK
DTMF
DTMF
DTMF
DTMF
42
42
40bps
DTMF
DTMF
110 bps/
300 bps
14bps
14bps
110
110
110
DTMF
DTMF
DTMF
DTMF
3/2
3/2
4/3+Checksum
4/8/1
4/8/1 + Checksum
Tonal data, ACK
3/1,4/1(or 3/2),4/2
4/2,4/1,3/1
4/1
4/1
4/2
4/1,4/2,4/3
4/3+Checksum
4/1,4/2,4/3
4/3+Checksum
YES
4/2+parity
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
FSK
FSK
FSK
Pulse
110
110
110
Pulse
DMP
DMP
4/1, 4/2
3/1, 3/2
NO
NO
NO
NO
DMP
DMP
2300Hz
2300Hz
Ademco Express
Ademco Slow
Ademco Slow
ADT Focus *
ADT Multi-point II *
ADT SIA *
Contact ID
Contact ID
FBI Super Fast
Franklin
Franklin
ITI
Modem II
Modem IIE
Modem IIIa2
Radionics
Radionics
Radionics
* Not available on the standard version.
39
1400Hz
2300Hz
2300Hz
1400Hz
1400Hz
--
Appendix B - Decimal - HEX - Binary Conversion Chart
DEC
HEX
000
001
002
003
004
005
006
007
008
009
010
011
012
013
014
015
016
017
018
019
020
021
022
023
024
025
026
027
028
029
030
031
032
033
034
035
036
037
038
039
040
041
042
043
044
045
046
047
048
049
050
051
052
053
054
055
056
057
058
059
060
061
062
063
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
Binary
0000 0000
0000 0001
0000 0010
0000 0011
0000 0100
0000 0101
0000 0110
0000 0111
0000 1000
0000 1001
0000 1010
0000 1011
0000 1100
0000 1101
0000 1110
0000 1111
0001 0000
0001 0001
0001 0010
0001 0011
0001 0100
0001 0101
0001 0110
0001 0111
0001 1000
0001 1001
0001 1010
0001 1011
0001 1100
0001 1101
0001 1110
0001 1111
0010 0000
0010 0001
0010 0010
0010 0011
0010 0100
0010 0101
0010 0110
0010 0111
0010 1000
0010 1001
0010 1010
0010 1011
0010 1100
0010 1101
0010 1110
0010 1111
0011 0000
0011 0001
0011 0010
0011 0011
0011 0100
0011 0101
0011 0110
0011 0111
0011 1000
0011 1001
0011 1010
0011 1011
0011 1100
0011 1101
0011 1110
0011 1111
DEC
064
065
066
067
068
069
070
071
072
073
074
075
076
077
078
079
080
081
082
083
084
085
086
087
088
089
090
091
092
093
094
095
096
097
098
099
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
HEX
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
Binary
DEC
0100 0000
0100 0001
0100 0010
0100 0011
0100 0100
0100 0101
0100 0110
0100 0111
0100 1000
0100 1001
0100 1010
0100 1011
0100 1100
0100 1101
0100 1110
0100 1111
0101 0000
0101 0001
0101 0010
0101 0011
0101 0100
0101 0101
0101 0110
0101 0111
0101 1000
0101 1001
0101 1010
0101 1011
0101 1100
0101 1101
0101 1110
0101 1111
0110 0000
0110 0001
0110 0010
0110 0011
0110 0100
0110 0101
0110 0110
0110 0111
0110 1000
0110 1001
0110 1010
0110 1011
0110 1100
0110 1101
0110 1110
0110 1111
0111 0000
0111 0001
0111 0010
0111 0011
0111 0100
0111 0101
0111 0110
0111 0111
0111 1000
0111 1001
0111 1010
0111 1011
0111 1100
0111 1101
0111 1110
0111 1111
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
40
HEX
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
8A
8B
8C
8D
8E
8F
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
9A
9B
9C
9D
9E
9F
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
AA
AB
AC
AD
AE
AF
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
BA
BB
BC
BD
BE
BF
Binary
0100 0000
0100 0001
0100 0010
0100 0011
0100 0100
0100 0101
0100 0110
0100 0111
0100 1000
0100 1001
0100 1010
0100 1011
0100 1100
0100 1101
0100 1110
0100 1111
0101 0000
0101 0001
0101 0010
0101 0011
0101 0100
0101 0101
0101 0110
0101 0111
0101 1000
0101 1001
0101 1010
0101 1011
0101 1100
0101 1101
0101 1110
0101 1111
0110 0000
0110 0001
0110 0010
0110 0011
0110 0100
0110 0101
0110 0110
0110 0111
0110 1000
0110 1001
0110 1010
0110 1011
0110 1100
0110 1101
0110 1110
0110 1111
0111 0000
0111 0001
0111 0010
0111 0011
0111 0100
0111 0101
0111 0110
0111 0111
0111 1000
0111 1001
0111 1010
0111 1011
0111 1100
0111 1101
0111 1110
0111 1111
DEC
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
HEX
C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
CA
CB
CC
CD
CE
CF
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
DA
DB
DC
DD
DE
DF
E0
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
EA
EB
EC
ED
EE
EF
F0
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
FA
FB
FC
FD
FE
FF
Binary
0100 0000
0100 0001
0100 0010
0100 0011
0100 0100
0100 0101
0100 0110
0100 0111
0100 1000
0100 1001
0100 1010
0100 1011
0100 1100
0100 1101
0100 1110
0100 1111
0101 0000
0101 0001
0101 0010
0101 0011
0101 0100
0101 0101
0101 0110
0101 0111
0101 1000
0101 1001
0101 1010
0101 1011
0101 1100
0101 1101
0101 1110
0101 1111
0110 0000
0110 0001
0110 0010
0110 0011
0110 0100
0110 0101
0110 0110
0110 0111
0110 1000
0110 1001
0110 1010
0110 1011
0110 1100
0110 1101
0110 1110
0110 1111
0111 0000
0111 0001
0111 0010
0111 0011
0111 0100
0111 0101
0111 0110
0111 0111
0111 1000
0111 1001
0111 1010
0111 1011
0111 1100
0111 1101
0111 1110
0111 1111
Appendix C - ASCII Character Chart
Corresponding ASCII
with library on printer
(Option 70)
HEX Character
20
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5C
Space
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
\
41
Appendix D - Printer Words: Options [60-6F]
The English Printer Library is provided and can be selected by programming the event codes to the corresponding word.
Words available:
Hex #
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
40
41
42
43
44
45
Printer Words
Hex #
MEDICAL
PENDANT TRANSMITTER
FAIL TO REPORT IN
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
FIRE ALARM
SMOKE
COMBUSTION
WATER FLOW
HEAT
PULL STATION
DUCT
FLAME
NEAR ALARM
RESERVED
PANIC ALARM
DURESS
SILENT
AUDIBLE
POLICE
DURESS
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
BURGLARY
PERIMETER
INTERIOR
24 HOUR
ENTRY/EXIT
DAY/NIGHT
OUTDOOR
TAMPER
NEAR BURGLARY ALARM
SILENT BURG ALARM
GENERAL ALARM
POLLING LOOP OPEN
POLLING LOOP SHORT
EXPANSION MODULE FAILURE
SENSOR TAMPER
EXPANSION MODULE TAMPER
SILENT ALARM
AUXILIARY
NO ACTIVITY
DOOR FORCED
24 HOUR NON-BURGLARY
GAS DETECTED
REFRIGERATION
LOSS OF HEAT
WATER LEAKAGE
FOIL BREAK
LOW BOTTLED GAS LEVEL
HIGH TEMPERATURE
LOW TEMPERATURE
DAY TROUBLE
LOSS OF AIR FLOW
EXPLOSIVE GAS
CARBON MONOXIDE
FAIL TO CHECK IN _ GUARD’S TOUR
FREEZE ALARM
SPRINKLER
LATCHKEY
DOOR LEFT OPEN
RESERVED
RESERVED
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
9A
9B
42
Printer Words
FIRE SUPERVISORY
LOW WATER PRESSURE
LOW CO2
GATE VALVE SENSOR
LOW WATER LEVEL
PUMP ACTIVATED
PUMP FAILURE
ENVIRONMENTAL
EMERGENCY
FOIL ALRM
SYSTEM TROUBLE
AC LOSS
LOW SYSTEM BATTERY
RAM CHECKSUM BAD
ROM CHECKSUM BAD
SYSTEM RESET
PANEL PROGRAM CHANGED
SELF-TEST FAILURE
SYSTEM SHUTDOWN
BATTERY TEST FAILURE
GROUND FAULT
REPEATER TAMPER
RF RECEIVER TAMPER
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESTORE ALARM
OPENING ALARM
CLOSING ALARM
SOUNDER/RELAY
BELL 1
BELL 2
ALARM RELAY
TROUBLE RELAY
REVERSING
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
SYSTEM PERIPHERAL
POLLING LOOP OPEN
POLLING LOOP SHORT
EXPANSION MODULE FAILURE
REPEATER FAILURE
LOCAL PRINTER PAPER OUT
LOCAL PRINTER FAILURE
EXPANSION MODULE DC LOSS
EXPANSION MODULE LOW BATTERY
EXPANSION MODULE RESET
COMMUNICATION
TELCO 1 FAULT
TELCO 2 FAULT
LONG RANGE RADIO
FAIL TO COMMUNICATE
LOSS OF RADIO SUPERVISION
LOSS OF CENTRAL POLLING
USER TX USWR
LOW RECEIVED SIGNAL STRENGTH
RESERVED
PROTECTION LOOP
PROTECTION LOOP OPEN
PROTECTION LOOP SHORT
FIRE TROUBLE
EXIT ALARM
LOSS OF RADIO SUPERVISION
SENSOR TROUBLE
LOSS OF SUPERVISORY - RF
LOSS OF SUPERVISORY - RPM
SENSOR TAMPER
Hex #
9C
9D
9E
9F
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
AA
AB
AC
AD
AE
AF
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
BA
BB
BC
BD
BE
BF
C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
CA
CB
Printer Words
Hex #
CC
CD
CE
CF
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
DA
DB
DC
DD
DE
DF
E0
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
EA
EB
EC
ED
EE
EF
F0
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
FA
FB
RF TRANSMITTER. LOW BATTERY
SMOKE HI-SENSOR
SMOKE LOW-SENSOR
INTRUSION HI-SENSOR
INTRUSION LOW-SENSOR
SELF TEST FAIL
OPEN/CLOSE
O/C BY USER
GROUP O/C
AUTOMATIC O/C
KEYSWITCH O/C
DEFERRED O/C
CANCEL
REMOTE ARM/DISARM
QUICK ARM
RESERVED
CALLBACK REQUEST MADE
SUCCESSFUL DOWNLOAD ACCESS
UNSUCCESSFUL ACCESS
SYSTEM SHUTDOWN
DIALER SHUTDOWN
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
ACCESS DENIED
ACCESS REPORT BY USER
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
GROUP CLOSING
GROUP OPENING
ARMED STAY
O/C EXCEPTION
EARLY O/C
LATE O/C
FAIL TO O/C
AUTO ARM FAIL
O/C PARTIAL ARMED
EXIT ERROR
USER PRESENT
RECENT CLOSE
SOUNDER/RELAY DISABLED
BELL 1 DISABLE
43
Printer Words
BELL 2 DISABLE
ALARM RELAY DISABLE
TROUBLE RELAY DISABLE
REVERSING RELAY DISABLE
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
DIALER DISABLED
RADIO TRANSMITTER DISABLED
MESSAGE ALRM
SERVICE ALARM
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
ZONE BYPASS
FIRE BYPASS
24 HOUR ZONE BYPASS
BURGLARY BYPASS
GROUP BYPASS
SWINGER BYPASS
UNBYPASS ALARM
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
MANUAL TRIGGER TEST
PERIODIC TEST REPORT
PERIODIC RF TRANSMISSION
FIRE TEST
STATUS REPORT TO FOLLOW
LISTEN-IN TO FOLLOW
WALK TEST MODE
OFF NORMAL CONDITION
VIDEO TRANSMITTER ACTIVE
RESERVED
EVENT LOG OVERFLOW
TIME/DATE RESET
TIME/DATE INACCURATE
PROGRAM MODE ENTRY
PROGRAM MODE EXIT
EXCEPTION SCHEDULE CHANGE
EVENT LOG 50% FULL
EVENT LOG 90% FULL
EVENT LOG RESET
SCHEDULE CHANGE
Appendix E - Panels Compatibility List
Panel
Acron Avenger 4000
Adcor PPD-3
ADT Safewatch Pro 3000
Ademco Vista
Ademco Vista 10SE
Ademco Vista 20
ADT Focus 7604-030
Apex 2100E
Apex Advantage
Apex System E
Aritech-Moose Advisor
Aritech-Moose Discovery 1000
Aritech-Moose Z900
Aritech Moose Z1100-1
Aritech-Moose Z1100-E
AT&T System 8300
Formats
20 BPS
Acron Superfast
Ademco Contact ID
10 BPS
DTMF
10 BPS
20 BPS
Any DTMF Format
Ademco Contact ID
10 BPS
15 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS
15 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS Silent Knight
10 BPS Radionics
Ademco Contact ID
10 BPS
15 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
Any DTMF Format
SIA
10 BPS
15 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
BFSK
Modem II
10 BPS
10 BPS Sescoa
15 BPS
20 BPS Sescoa
20 BPS
40 BPS
BFSK
10 BPS Silent Knight
14 BPS Silent Knight
20 BPS Franklin
40 BPS Radionics
10 BPS
10 BPS Sescoa
15 BPS
20 BPS
20 BPS Sescoa
40 BPS
BFSK
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco High Speed
SIA
Passed/Failed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
44
Panel
C&K System 236
C&K System 238
CADDX Ranger 8980E
CADDX Ranger 9000E
DMP 1512/105
DMP 1812
DMP 1912XR/114
DMP XR5/103
DMP XR10/106
DMP X20
DMP XR200/101
DMP XR200/104
DSC NT9005
DSC NT9010
DSC PC580
DSC PC1000
DSC PC1500
DSC PC1550
DSC PC1555
Formats
10 BPS
20 BPS
Any DTMF Format
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
DTMF
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS (Radionics)
DTMF
SIA
DMP
Ademco Contact ID
DMP
40 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
DMP
40 BPS
DMP
Ademco Contact ID
40 BPS
DMP
Modem IIE
Ademco Contact ID
Modem II
Modem IIE
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
Modem IIE
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
Passed/Failed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Supported
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Panel
DSC PC1575
DSC PC2500
DSC PC2525
DSC PC2550
DSC PC3000
DSC PC4000
DSC PC4010 V1X
DSC PC4010 V2.X
DSC PC4010 V3.X
DSC PC4020 V1.X
DSC PC4020 V2.X
DSC PC4020 V3.X
DSC PC4020KT V1.X
DSC PC40X0 V3.12Y
DSC PC5008 V2.3A
Formats
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
Passed/Failed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
SIA
Passed
10 BPS
20 BPS
SIA
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Panel
DSC PC5010 V1.X
DSC PC5010 V2.X
DSC WSS 5010 V2.1
DSC PC5015 V2.20
DSC PC5016 V1.0
DSC PC5020 V3.20
DSC PC6010 V2.10
DSC PC8400
DSC SN4030 V2.0Y
DSC SN4030 V3.0Y
DSC WLS-900
DTI DSS 665
Electronics Line Summit 3208
FBI XL4600
FBI XL4612
ITI Caretaker +
ITI Caretaker
ITI Commander 2000
ITI Commander 3000
ITI Concord
ITI Concord Express
ITI Pro 3000
ITI Pro 4000
45
Formats
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Sur-Gard 4/3
SIA
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
Scantronics
SIA
10 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
FBI Superfast
10 BPS
20 BPS
ITI FSK
ITI FSK
20 BPS
ITI FSK
20 BPS
ITI FSK
Ademco Contact ID
ITI FSK
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
ITI FSK
ITI FSK
Passed/Failed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Supported
Not Supported
Not Supported
Fair
Not Recommended
Fair
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Panel
ITI Simon
ITI SX-IVB
ITI SX-V
ITI SX-V Special
ITI RF Commander
ITI Ultragard / Pro 5000
ITI Fonesafe
Microtech Galaxy 500
Napco 1016E
Napco 2600
Napco 3000
Napco GEM-P1632
Optex-Morse Gensys 824
Optex-Morse MDC-16C
Paradox Digiplex
Radionics D2071A
Radionics D2112
Radionics D2212
Radionics D4012
Radionics D4112
Radionics D6112
Formats
ITI FSK
ITI FSK
ITI FSK
ITI FSK
ITI FSK
20 BPS
ITI FSK
ITI FSK
DTMF
SIA Level 1
SIA Level 2
SIA Level 3
10 BPS
15 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
BFSK
10 BPS Silent Knight
20 BPS Franklin
40 BPS Radionics
BFSK
DTMF
Modem II
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco Contact ID
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
BFSK
Varitech
10 BPS
20 BPS
Ademco H.S.
SIA
40 BPS
BFSK
20 BPS
Modem II
20 BPS
Modem IIE
40 BPS
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
BFSK
Modem IIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Passed/Failed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Supported
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
46
Panel
Radionics D7112
Radionics D7212
Radionics D7412
Radionics D8112G2
Radionics D8112
Radionics D9112
Radionics D9412
Scantronics Avenger IX AV9000
Silent Knight 5104
Silent Knight 1410
Silent Knight 2820
Silent Knight 4720
Silent Knight 5107
Silent Knight 5204
Silent Knight 5207
Sur Gard DC1664LC
Sur Gard P16/P16LC
Formats
BFSK
Modem IIA
BFSK
Modem IIA
BFSK
Modem IIE
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
BFSK
Modem II
Modem II
BFSK
Modem IIE
BFSK
Modem IIIA2
10 BPS
20 BPS
Any DTMF Format
20 BPS
BFSK
SIA
SK FSK1
20 BPS Silent Knight
BFSK
Silent Kinght FSK 1
SIA
10 BPS Sescoa
20 BPS Silent Knight
BFSK
Silent Kinght FSK 1
Silent Kinght FSK 2
SIA
Silent Kinght FSK 1
10 BPS Sescoa
10 BPS Silent Knight
20 BPS Silent Knight
SIA
Silent Knight FSK
20 BPS Silent Knight
Silent Knight FSK
BFSK
SIA
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
10 BPS
15 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
Passed/Failed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Not Verified
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Panel
Sur Gard P1664LC
Linear 1704/SSD
Westec 800
Westec 900
Westec 2000 Old
Westec 2000 C2K
Westec 3000
Westec 4000
Westec 5000
Formats
10 BPS
20 BPS
40 BPS
Any DTMF Format
SIA
Linear FSK
Westec Format 3
Westec Format 1
Westec Format 2
Westec Format 5
Westec Format 5
Westec Format 5
Westec Format 6
Passed/Failed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Not Supported
Not Supported
Not Supported
Not Supported
Not Supported
Not Supported
Not Supported
Not Supported
ADT A910
ADT Focus D50
ADT Focus 45
ADT Focus 45B
ADT Focus 48
ADT Focus 100B
ADT Focus 100C
ADT Focus 100D
ADT Focus 200
ADT Focus 200B
ADT Focus 200P
ADT Focus7580
ADT Safewatch + RF
ADT Unimode 5
Multi-point II
ADT SIA
Old Focus FSK
Multi-point II
Old Focus FSK
Old Focus FSK
Multi-point II
ADT SIA
ADT SIA
ADT SIA
ADT SIA
Old Focus FSK
ADT SIA
ADT SIA
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
Passed
47
IMPORTANT - READ CAREFULLY:
DSC Software purchased with or without Products and Components is copyrighted and is purchased under the following license terms:
3. COPYRIGHT - All title and intellectual property rights in and to the SOFTWARE
• This End-User License Agreement (“EULA”) is a legal agreement between You (the comPRODUCT (including but not limited to any images, photographs, and text incorporated into
pany, individual or entity who acquired the Software and any related Hardware) and Digital
the SOFTWARE PRODUCT), the accompanying printed materials, and any copies of the
Security Controls, a division of Tyco Safety Products Canada Ltd. (“DSC”), the manuSOFTWARE PRODUCT, are owned by DSC or its suppliers. You may not copy the printed
facturer of the integrated security systems and the developer of the software and any related
materials accompanying the SOFTWARE PRODUCT. All title and intellectual property rights
products or components (“HARDWARE”) which You acquired.
• If the DSC software product (“SOFTWARE PRODUCT” or “SOFTWARE”) is intended to
in and to the content which may be accessed through use of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT are
be accompanied by HARDWARE, and is NOT accompanied by new HARDWARE, You
the property of the respective content owner and may be protected by applicable copyright or
may not use, copy or install the SOFTWARE PRODUCT. The SOFTWARE PRODUCT
other intellectual property laws and treaties. This EULA grants You no rights to use such
includes computer software, and may include associated media, printed materials, and
content. All rights not expressly granted under this EULA are reserved by DSC and its
“online” or electronic documentation.
suppliers.
• Any software provided along with the SOFTWARE PRODUCT that is associated with a sep4. EXPORT RESTRICTIONS - You agree that You will not export or re-export the SOFTWARE
arate end-user license agreement is licensed to You under the terms of that license agreement.
PRODUCT to any country, person, or entity subject to Canadian export restrictions.
5. CHOICE OF LAW - This Software License Agreement is governed by the laws of the
• By installing, copying, downloading, storing, accessing or otherwise using the SOFTWARE
Province of Ontario, Canada.
PRODUCT, You agree unconditionally to be bound by the terms of this EULA, even if this
6. ARBITRATION - All disputes arising in connection with this Agreement shall be
EULA is deemed to be a modification of any previous arrangement or contract. If You do not
determined by final and binding arbitration in accordance with the Arbitration Act, and the
agree to the terms of this EULA, DSC is unwilling to license the SOFTWARE PRODUCT to
parties agree to be bound by the arbitrator’s decision. The place of arbitration shall be Toronto,
You, and You have no right to use it.
Canada, and the language of the arbitration shall be English.
SOFTWARE PRODUCT LICENSE
7. LIMITED WARRANTY
The SOFTWARE PRODUCT is protected by copyright laws and international copyright
(a) NO WARRANTY - DSC PROVIDES THE SOFTWARE “AS IS” WITHOUT
treaties, as well as other intellectual property laws and treaties. The SOFTWARE PRODUCT is
WARRANTY. DSC DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE SOFTWARE WILL MEET YOUR
licensed, not sold.
REQUIREMENTS OR THAT OPERATION OF THE SOFTWARE WILL BE
1. GRANT OF LICENSE This EULA grants You the following rights:
UNINTERRUPTED OR ERROR-FREE.
(a) Software Installation and Use - For each license You acquire, You may have only one
(b) CHANGES IN OPERATING ENVIRONMENT - DSC shall not be responsible for
copy of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT installed.
problems caused by changes in the operating characteristics of the HARDWARE, or for
(b) Storage/Network Use - The SOFTWARE PRODUCT may not be installed, accessed,
problems in the interaction of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT with non-DSC-SOFTWARE or
displayed, run, shared or used concurrently on or from different computers, including a
HARDWARE PRODUCTS.
workstation, terminal or other digital electronic device (“Device”). In other words, if You
(c) LIMITATION OF LIABILITY; WARRANTY REFLECTS ALLOCATION OF
have several workstations, You will have to acquire a license for each workstation where the
RISK - IN ANY EVENT, IF ANY STATUTE IMPLIES WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS
SOFTWARE will be used.
NOT STATED IN THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT, DSC’S ENTIRE LIABILITY UNDER
(c) Backup Copy - You may make back-up copies of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT, but You
ANY PROVISION OF THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT SHALL BE LIMITED TO THE
may only have one copy per license installed at any given time. You may use the back-up
GREATER OF THE AMOUNT ACTUALLY PAID BY YOU TO LICENSE THE
copy solely for archival purposes. Except as expressly provided in this EULA, You may not
SOFTWARE PRODUCT AND FIVE CANADIAN DOLLARS (CAD$5.00). BECAUSE
otherwise make copies of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT, including the printed materials
SOME JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF
accompanying the SOFTWARE.
LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, THE ABOVE
2. DESCRIPTION OF OTHER RIGHTS AND LIMITATIONS
LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
(a) Limitations on Reverse Engineering, Decompilation and Disassembly - You may not
(d) DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES - THIS WARRANTY CONTAINS THE ENTIRE
reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the SOFTWARE PRODUCT, except and only
WARRANTY AND SHALL BE IN LIEU OF ANY AND ALL OTHER WARRANTIES,
to the extent that such activity is expressly permitted by applicable law notwithstanding this
WHETHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED (INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
limitation. You may not make any changes or modifications to the Software, without the
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE) AND OF ALL
written permission of an officer of DSC. You may not remove any proprietary notices,
OTHER OBLIGATIONS OR LIABILITIES ON THE PART OF DSC. DSC MAKES NO
marks or labels from the Software Product. You shall institute reasonable measures to
OTHER WARRANTIES. DSC NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER
ensure compliance with the terms and conditions of this EULA.
PERSON PURPORTING TO ACT ON ITS BEHALF TO MODIFY OR TO CHANGE THIS
(b) Separation of Components - The SOFTWARE PRODUCT is licensed as a single
WARRANTY, NOR TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER WARRANTY OR LIABILITY
product. Its component parts may not be separated for use on more than one HARDWARE
CONCERNING THIS SOFTWARE PRODUCT.
unit.
(e) EXCLUSIVE REMEDY AND LIMITATION OF WARRANTY - UNDER NO
(c) Single INTEGRATED PRODUCT - If You acquired this SOFTWARE with
CIRCUMSTANCES SHALL DSC BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL,
HARDWARE, then the SOFTWARE PRODUCT is licensed with the HARDWARE as a
CONSEQUENTIAL OR INDIRECT DAMAGES BASED UPON BREACH OF
single integrated product. In this case, the SOFTWARE PRODUCT may only be used with
WARRANTY, BREACH OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE, STRICT LIABILITY, OR ANY
the HARDWARE as set forth in this EULA..
OTHER LEGAL THEORY. SUCH DAMAGES INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO,
(d) Rental - You may not rent, lease or lend the SOFTWARE PRODUCT. You may not make
LOSS OF PROFITS, LOSS OF THE SOFTWARE PRODUCT OR ANY ASSOCIATED
it available to others or post it on a server or web site.
EQUIPMENT, COST OF CAPITAL, COST OF SUBSTITUTE OR REPLACEMENT
(e) Software Product Transfer - You may transfer all of Your rights under this EULA only as
EQUIPMENT, FACILITIES OR SERVICES, DOWN TIME, PURCHASERS TIME, THE
part of a permanent sale or transfer of the HARDWARE, provided You retain no copies,
CLAIMS OF THIRD PARTIES, INCLUDING CUSTOMERS, AND INJURY TO
You transfer all of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT (including all component parts, the media
PROPERTY. WARNING: DSC recommends that the entire system be completely tested
and printed materials, any upgrades and this EULA), and provided the recipient agrees to the
on a regular basis. However, despite frequent testing, and due to, but not limited to,
terms of this EULA. If the SOFTWARE PRODUCT is an upgrade, any transfer must also
criminal tampering or electrical disruption, it is possible for this SOFTWARE
include all prior versions of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT.
PRODUCT to fail to perform as expected.
(f) Termination - Without prejudice to any other rights, DSC may terminate this EULA if You
fail to comply with the terms and conditions of this EULA. In such event, You must destroy
all copies of the SOFTWARE PRODUCT and all of its component parts.
(g) Trademarks - This EULA does not grant You any rights in connection with any trademarks
or service marks of DSC or its suppliers.
© 2010 Digital Security Controls
Toronto, Canada • www.dsc.com
Sales: 1-888-888-7838
Tech. Support (Canada & USA): 1-800-503-5869
Printed in Canada
2 9 0 3 4 6 3 7 R0 0 5
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising