UCR200D DIversity UHF Receiver

UCR200D DIversity UHF Receiver
UCR200D
DIVERSITY UHF RECEIVER
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
and trouble-shooting guide
LECTROSONICS, INC.
Rio Rancho, NM
Table of Contents
GENERAL TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION ......................................... 3
GENERAL TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION ......................................... 4
GENERAL TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION ......................................... 5
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS ............................ 6
REAR PANEL CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS ............................... 7
ANTENNA USE AND PLACEMENT ................................................ 8
INSTALLATION AND OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS ..................... 9
UCR200D REPLACEMENT PARTS and ACCESSORIES .............. 9
FREQUENCY BLOCKS AND RANGES ........................................ 10
TROUBLESHOOTING.................................................................... 11
SERVICE AND REPAIR .................................................................. 12
RETURNING UNITS FOR REPAIR ................................................ 12
SPECIFICATIONS AND FEATURES ............................................. 13
WARRANTY .................................................................... Back cover
2
UHF Wireless Diversity Receiver
GENERAL TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION
The UCR200D is a portable, high performance, dual-conversion,
frequency synthesized, UHF receiver. The RF performance is
extremely stable over a very wide temperature range, making the
UCR200D perfectly suited to the rough environmental conditions
found in the field. The proprietary audio processing includes a
dual-band compandor for very low distortion and a superior signal
to noise ratio. The squelch system is operated by a separate pilot
tone and mutes the audio output directly at the output connector.
The audio output is calibrated for exact level matching, with a ten
LED bar graph meter.
tool and a limited tool at that. The first line of defense must be the
system’s basic immunity to interference. That required a new look
at frequency agile receiver design.
FREQUENCY TRACKING FRONT-END
Our solution to the wide open front end problem was to design a
selective front end that can be tuned to the frequency in use. Since
we wanted this front end to be equivalent to our fixed frequency
front ends, this was a daunting task. Lectrosonics has always used
front ends with more sections and much more selectivity than any
other wireless manufacturer. The final design consisted of a total
of 6 transmission line resonators with variable capacitance applied
to each resonator by the hexadecimal switches. This allows each
resonator to be individually tuned by the hexadecimal switches for
any user selected frequency in a 25 MHz band.
DIVERSITY RECEPTION
The antenna phase switching diversity technique was chosen in
order to keep the receiver compact enough for camera mounted or
shoulder bag applications. This diversity reception technique
effectively minimizes dropouts in short range situations where
multi-path reflections can cause serious problems. The optimum
diversity reception is realized with the diversity antenna placed
away from the receiver, however, dropouts are significantly re­
duced with two antennas mounted directly on the receiver.
This sophistication produced a front end that was as selective as
fixed frequency designs, yet could cover the entire 25 MHz range.
The next step to improve the front end was to use good old
fashioned “brute force.”
RF SECTION
HIGH CURRENT LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS
The problem posed to the design staff was to retain the RF reliabil­
ity of the Lectrosonics’ fixed frequency designs but add the
flexibility of a frequency agile design. The universal (and poor)
way to build frequency agile systems is to design a wide open
front end that will pass any frequency within the tuning range of
the system. This leads to very poor RF performance with lots of
interference, driving the user to switch frequencies in an attempt to
sidestep the interference. This makes frequency agile receivers a
self fulfilling system; you have to use the frequency agility to get
away from the problems caused by the frequency agile design
compromises.
The gain stages in the front end use some rather special transistors
in a feedback regulated high current circuit that combine three
parameters that are generally at odds with one another. These are:
low noise, low gain and relatively high power. It is easy to
understand the advantages of low noise and high power capability
but why is low gain desirable? The answer is that in a receiver,
low gain allows the front end to handle stronger RF signals with­
out output overload, which is “increased headroom,” so to speak.
The result of a design that takes all three of these parameters into
consideration at once, is a low noise RF amplifier with a sensitiv­
ity rating equal or better than the best conventional design with a
hundred times less susceptibility to intermodulation interference.
The problem of frequency agility is further compounded when you
realize that frequency changes “on the fly” cannot be made on any
type of wireless system. For example, if there is suddenly an
interference problem with a system in use, on stage for instance, a
frequency change cannot be made without interrupting the pro­
gram. Basically, the show must go on. In multi-channel
applications, changing the frequency of one system will usually
produce all kinds of new intermodulation problems with the other
systems operating in the same location. Frequency agility is not
the universal panacea for interference problems. It is only another
Combining the high power gain stages with the tracking front end
produces a receiver that is unusually immune to single and mul­
tiple interfering signals close to the operating frequency and in
addition strongly rejects signals that are much farther away.
DOUBLE BALANCED DIODE MIXERS
In all wireless receivers, a mixer is used to convert the carrier
frequency to the IF frequency where most of the filtering and gain
in the receiver takes place. After doing all the right things in the
UCR200D
BLOCK DIAGRAM
RF MODULE
455KHZ
BP
FILTER
70 MHz
IF AMP
2ND MIXER
&
IF AMP
COUNTING
DETECTOR
AMP
AMP
ANTENNA
SWITCHING
RF LEVEL
LEDs
SAW
FILTER
FILTER
FILTER
FILTER
HEADPHONE
OUT
50KHz
LP FILTER
HI-LEVEL
DIODE MIXER
uP
uP
1ST
LOCAL
OSCILLATOR
uP
XTAL
CONTROLLED
2ND
OSCILLATOR
2:1
EXPANDER
TREBLE
23KHZ
LP
FILTER
VARIABLE
CUT-OFF
LP FILTER
OUTPUT
LEVEL
ADJUST
AUDIO
AMP
2:1
EXPANDER
BASS
XLR
OUT
PILOT
TONE
MUTE
TO DATA
DISPLAY
uP
Rio Rancho, NM – USA
3
GENERAL TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION
front end, it would be a shame to waste the performance with a
second rate mixer. In other designs that is exactly what happens
since mediocre mixers cause more intermodulation problems than
mediocre front ends. The only solution was a high power, double
balanced diode mixer driven by a local oscillator with more output
power than most wireless transmitters (50 mW). The mixer in the
UCR200D produces output at only the sum and difference signals,
with minimal spurious signals. This mixer offers a very high
overload threshold and a high degree of isolation between ports.
The IF output of this mixer is at 71 MHz which is unusually high
for a wireless receiver. This high frequency was chosen to increase
the image rejection in the front end to as high or a higher level than
our fixed frequency designs. The mixer is followed by high
current, low noise amplifiers and SAW filters to preserve the
superior RF performance.
SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE FILTER
The UCR200D is unique in that it uses state of the art SAW filters
in each IF section. The SAW filters are the only filter that can
combine sharp skirts, constant group delay, and wide bandwidth in
one filter. Though expensive, this special type of filter allows us to
follow the basic receiver rule of doing the primary filtering as early
as possible, at as high a frequency as possible and before high gain
is applied to the signal. Since these filters are made of quartz, they
are very temperature stable. Conventional LC filters at these
frequencies don’t begin to perform as well and in addition would
drift unacceptably in the elevated temperatures of an equipment
rack. After following the rule in a rigorous way, and due to the
sharp filtering action of the SAW filters, the 71MHz signal is
converted to the low frequency of 455 kHz. Lots of gain is then
applied in a conventional IC and the signal is then converted to
audio. 455 kHz is very unconventional for a second IF in a wide
deviation (±75 kHz) system. We chose to use 455 kHz to obtain an
outstanding AM rejection figure over a very wide range of signal
strengths and to produce an excellent noise improvement at low
signal strengths (capture ratio). To use an IF at 455 kHz requires
an unusual circuit to convert the IF to audio.
DIGITAL PULSE COUNTING DETECTOR
The UCR200D receiver uses an advanced digital pulse detector to
demodulate the FM signal, rather than a conventional quadrature
detector. The common problem with quadrature detectors is ther­
mal drift, particularly those that operate at higher frequencies like
10.7 MHz. Though the quadrature detectors may work well at
room temperature, if they are not carefully compensated, they will
produce amplitude changes and audio distortion in the elevated
temperatures of an equipment rack. Some manufacturers try to get
around the problem by tuning their systems at higher temperatures
after they’ve been on for some time. This just means that for the
first hours in a cool room the receiver is well out of specification or
after a few hours in a hot rack.
The UCR200D design presents an elegantly simple, yet highly
effective solution to this age old problem. The UCR200D detector
basically works like this: A stream of precision pulses is gener­
ated at 455KHz locked to the FM signal coming from the 455 kHz
IF section. The pulse width is constant, but the timing between
pulses varies with the frequency shift of the FM signal. The
integrated voltage of the pulses within any given time interval
4
varies in direct proportion to the frequency modulation of the radio
signal. Another way of describing it is that as the FM modulation
increases the frequency, the circuit produces more pulses and as
the modulation decreases the frequency, the circuit produces fewer
pulses. More pulses produces a higher voltage and fewer pulses a
lower voltage. The resultant varying voltage is the audio signal.
This type of detector eliminates the traditional problems with
quadrature detectors and provides very low audio distortion, high
temperature stability and stable audio level. The counting detector
also adds additional AM rejection, in addition to the limiting in the
IF section. The amplitude of the pulses is constant, so level
differences in the IF signal do not affect the pulse.
TRI MODE DYNAMIC FILTER
The audio signal is passed through a “dynamic noise reduction
circuit”. The cutoff frequency of this filter is varied automatically
by measuring the amplitude and frequency of the audio signal and
the quality of the RF signal. The audio bandwidth is held only to
that point necessary to pass the highest frequency audio signal
present at the time. If the RF level is weak, then the filter becomes
more aggressive. This results in a dramatic reduction of “hiss” at
all times. During passages with a high frequency content, this
filter gets completely “out of the way” and passes the signal with
no decrease in high-frequency response. Keep in mind that if hiss
is added to a signal, there is a psycho acoustic effect that makes
the sound seem brighter. The other side of this is that if hiss is
removed from a signal it will sound duller. Basically the ear’s
detection apparatus is pre-sensitized to high frequency sounds by
small amounts of high frequency hiss. Consider this effect when
making a judgment about the sound quality of various wireless
systems and this particular filter. We have satisfied ourselves
through elaborate tests that this filter is totally transparent.
PILOT TONE MUTE (SQUELCH)
The 200 system utilizes a separate ultrasonic tone modulation of
the basic carrier to operate the receiver squelch. In the transmitter,
a 32kHz tone is injected into the audio signal path just after the
compandor. The supersonic pilot tone is filtered out of the audio
signal immediately after the detector in the receiver so that it does
not influence the compandor or various gain stages.
The basic benefit of the pilot tone squelch system is that the
receiver will remain squelched (muted) until it receives the pilot
tone from the matching transmitter, even if a strong RF signal is
present on the carrier frequency of the system. Once a pilot tone is
received, the receiver will remain open during all signal condi­
tions.
The mute circuit drives a relay which physically disconnects the
output amplifier from the output. This provides complete muting
of the audio and the noise. The pilot tone function may be
bypassed with the Pilot Tone Disable switch (located on the front
panel.) When the pilot tone has been disabled with this switch, the
Pilot LED will glow red and the MOD function of the LED
bargraph meter on the front panel is disabled. The Pilot LED on
the front panel will glow green when the pilot tone has enabled the
receiver audio output.
UHF Wireless Diversity Receiver
GENERAL TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION
OUTPUT LEVEL ADJUST AND RANGE SWITCH
The front panel Output control will adjust the audio output within
the range set by the Lo/Mid/Hi range switch (located on the back
panel.) In the Lo position the adjustment range is from –50dBm to
–20dBm, the Mid position (center) allows an adjustment from
–30dBm to 0dBm, and the Hi position sets the audio output to a
fixed +8dBm with no front panel control.
POWER SUPPLY
The UCR200D may be operated from the supplied CH20 adapter,
or from an external 12 to 18 VDC source. The power supply has a
built in Poly-Fuse to protect the unit. This fuse is self healing by
simply disconnecting the power supply for about 15 seconds.
Rio Rancho, NM – USA
5
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS
POWER LED
When lit, this LED indicates that power is applied to the UCR200D
and adequate voltage is present to operate the unit.
PILOT LED
The audio output muting (squelch) function of the UCR200D is
controlled by a 32kHz tone modulation of the RF carrier. The
audio output is muted until this tone is present. This green LED
will remain on as long as the receiver audio is enabled by the pilot
tone.
TRANSMITTER MOD LEVEL METER
When the meter function switch is in the Mod position, the modu­
lation (audio level) of the incoming signal is indicated by a fast
responding LED strip. The strip is calibrated in 6dB steps over an
expanded scale (54dB) which provides an extremely accurate
visual “picture” of the signal dynamics, even at a distance away
from the receiver. Audio signal peaks easily exceed the response
time of VU meters, however, the LED strip is fast enough to track
even brief transients.
RF LEVEL INDICATORS
With the meter function switch in the RF position, the LED strip
indicates the level of the incoming RF signals. The LED strips are
calibrated to provide accurate indications from 1uV to 1mV. The
LEDs are highly visible from a distance, making antenna set up
more accurate. The LED strip is especially useful in
“troubleshooting” difficult antenna installations.
POWER SWITCH (and PILOT DISABLE)
This slide switch, and its corrosponding LED indicator, switches
the receiver from Off to On with Pilot enabled or ON with Pilot
disabled. The pilot LED will glow green when pilot tone is
MAIN
present, With the switch in the “ON (Pilot Off)” osition, the LED
will glow red. At turn on and off there is a delay built into the
receiver to allow various stages to stabilize before the audio output
is activated. This will prevent an audio “thump” when powering
up the receiver.
PILOT TONE DISABLE
The Power switch on the front panel is the Pilot Tone Disable.
This is a three position switch. The position toward the right (as
seen looking straight at the front panel) is the normal operating
position and allows the pilot tone to enable or disable the receiver
audio output. The other position, toward the left, will disable the
pilot tone action and will cause the receiver audio output to always
be enabled, even in the absence of a transmitter signal. This
position is only used for troubleshooting and should never be set
during actual use. When the pilot tone is disabled with this switch,
the Mod meter on the front panel is also disabled.
AUDIO OUTPUT LEVEL CONTROL
The front panel Audio Output Level control will adjust the audio
output within the range set by the Lo/Mid/Hi range switch (located
on the rear panel.) In the Low position the adjustment range is
from –50dBm to –20dBm, the High position (center) allows an
adjustment from –30dBm to 0dBm, and the Fixed position sets the
audio output to a fixed +8dBm with no front panel control.
ANTENNA CONNECTORS
These are standard 50 Ohm BNC type jacks for the RF input to the
receiver. The left jack is the main antenna (0) and the right jack is
for the diversity antenna (180).
ANTENNA PHASE LEDs
These two LEDs labeled “0” and “180” show the phase difference
of the signals being received at the two antennas.
POWER
PILOT
ON
ON
(PILOT OFF)
-42
1uV
MOD RF
6
-36
DIVERSITY
OFF
-30 -24 -18 -12 -6
10uV
100uV
0dB
1mV
0
180
UHF Wireless Diversity Receiver
REAR PANEL CONTROLS AND FUNCTIONS
DC IN JACK
MONITOR
The UCR200D can be powered from external 12 to 18 Volts DC
applied directly to this jack, or conventional 110 VAC sources via
the supplied CH20 adapter. The UCR200D is protected from
reverse polarity conditions which prevents damage if a positive
ground power source is applied. The center pin of this jack is
POSITIVE. This power connector is threaded to allow the plug to
be locked in preventing accidental pull-out.
This is an audio output to drive a wide variety of different types of
headphones. It is also usable as a second high quality audio output
to drive recorders or external audio devices. The level at this jack
is independantly adjustable with the associated knob.
AUDIO OUTPUT XLR JACK
This jack is a standard 3 pin XLR connector. For balanced
applications, Audio High is on pin 2, audio Low is on pin 3, and
audio Common is pin 1. For unbalanced use, the signal is devel­
oped between pin 2 (Audio High) and pin 1 (Audio Common or
Ground.) It’s not necessary or desirable to ground pin 3. (The
output is balanced and center tapped.)
RANGE SWITCH
The audio output range switch is located on the rear panel and is
the switch nearest the front panel. This switch controls the range
of adjustment of the front panel Audio Output control. In the Low
position the adjustment range is from –50dBm to –20dBm, the
High position allows an adjustment from –30dBm to 0dBm, and
the Fixed position sets the audio output to a fixed +8dBm with no
front panel control.
MONITOR
AUDIO OUT
LO MID HI
1
E
D
C
B
A
F 0 1
2
3
4
5
9 8 7
6
1.6MHz
E
D
C
B
A
F 0 1
2
3
2
3
4
5
9 8 7
6
100kHz
LECTROSONICS
DC IN
CH20
Rio Rancho, NM – USA
7
ANTENNA USE AND PLACEMENT
sound of the hum or hiss, or eliminate it. A drop-out situation may
be either better or worse as the crowd fills and/or leaves the room,
or when the transmitter or receiver is operated in a different
location.
There are two remote antenna assemblies included with this re­
ceiver. Position the antennas at least three or four feet apart and so
that they are not within 3 or 4 feet of large metal surfaces. If this is
not possible, try to position the antennas so that they are as far
away from the metal surface as is practical. It is also good to
position the receiver so that there is a direct “line of sight” be­
tween the transmitter and the receiver antenna. In situations where
the operating range is less than about 100 feet, the antenna posi­
tioning is much less critical. The antennas can also be configured
with one whip mounted directly onto the rear panel of the
UCR200D receiver, and the other one mounted remotely.
The UCR200D receiver offers a sophisticated diversity design
which overcomes drop-out problems in almost any imaginable
situation. In the event, however, that you do encounter a dropout
problem, first try moving the antenna at least 3 or 4 feet from
where it was. This may alleviate the drop-out problem on that
antenna. If drop-outs are still a problem, try moving the antenna to
an entirely different location in the room or moving the antennas in
closer to the transmitter location.
A wireless transmitter sends a radio signal out in all directions.
This signal will often bounce off nearby walls, ceilings, etc. and a
strong reflection can arrive at the receiver antenna along with the
direct signal. If the direct and reflected signals are out of phase
with each other a cancellation may occur. The result would be a
“drop-out.” A drop-out sounds like either audible noise (hiss), or
in severe cases, may result in a complete loss of the carrier and the
sound when the transmitter is positioned in certain locations in the
room. A drop-out normally sounds like “hiss” or a “swishing”
sound. Moving the transmitter even a few inches will change the
Lectrosonics transmitters radiate power very efficiently, and the
receivers are very sensitive. This reduces drop-outs to an insig­
nificant level. If, however, you do encounter drop-outs frequently,
call the factory or consult your dealer. There is probably a simple
solution.
REFLECTIVE SURFACE
IND
DIRECT
IRE
CT
SIG
NA
L
SIGNAL
DIRECT SIGNAL
RECEIVER
TRANSMITTER
INDIRECT SIGNAL
PHASE
CANCELLATION
MULTI-PATH DROPOUT
8
UHF Wireless Diversity Receiver
INSTALLATION AND OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
1. Connect the power cord.
2. Attach the antennas.
3. Connect the audio cable to the audio output XLR.
4. Set the front panel Audio Output Level control to minimum and set the Power switch to ON (right position.) Check to see that the
front panel Power LED lights up.
5. Adjust the transmitter gain. THIS IS PERHAPS THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP IN THE SET UP PROCEDURE. See your
transmitter manual (Operating Instructions section) for details on how to adjust the transmitter gain. In general, adjust the transmitter
gain so that the voice peaks will cause the 0dB LED on the front of the receiver to light on the loudest peak audio levels. This will
result in the best possible signal to noise ratio for the system without causing overload distortion.
6. Adjust the Audio Output control according to the type of input on your equipment. The Range switch sets the adjustment range of the
front panel Audio Output control and has three positions.
Low:
The adjustment range is from –50dBm to –20dBm.
Mid:
Allows an adjustment from –30dBm to 0dBm
High:
Sets the audio output to a fixed +8dBm with no front panel control.
The input levels of different cameras, VCRs, and PA equipment vary, which may require that you set the Audio Output control to an
intermediate position. Try different settings and listen to the results. If the output of the receiver is too high, you may hear distortion
or a loss of the natural dynamics of the audio signal. If the output is too low, you may hear steady noise (hiss) along with the audio.
The UCR200D audio output is designed to drive any audio input device from microphone level to +8dBm line level.
Note:
When using the +8 dBm HI position of the output range switch, do not ground pin 2 or pin 3 of the XLR output! The output impedance is
only 50 Ohms (unbalanced) when in the HI position and this is not enough to isolate the audio amplifier from a short to ground.
Distortion will result.
MONITOR
LEVEL
MONITOR
OUT
AMP
OUTPUT LEVEL ADJUST
AND RANGE SWITCH
511 LO
50
511
MID
AUDIO
AMP
XLR
OUT
2 (Hi)
HI
1k
1 (Common or Ground)
LO
MUTE
RELAY
50
511
511
MID
3 (Lo)
HI
UCR200D Simplified Audio Output Circuit
UCR200D REPLACEMENT PARTS and ACCESSORIES
Part No.
32251
35753
CH20
PS200
21586
Description
UHF Rubber Duck Antenna, straight connector
Velcro mounting strips
Zippered, padded vinyl system pouch
AC Power Adapter, 110V input, 12VDC output
Power supply cable locking plug on one end and a
Hirose plug on the other for hookup to a camera.
Power supply cable with locking plug on one end and pigtail leads on the other
Rio Rancho, NM – USA
9
FREQUENCY BLOCKS AND RANGES
The table below lists the factory designated frequency ranges
available for the UCR200D receiver. For convenience, the table
includes information about the UM200B belt-pack transmitter
antennas as well.
Each UCR200D receiver is built to cover a pre-selected range of
frequencies (a “block”) as shown below. The receiver will tune to
any of 256 different frequencies within this factory assigned block.
The UCR200D UHF Receiver antennas (model A8U) are color
coded to indicate the frequency block that they operate within.
The length of the antenna varies with the frequency block. The
actual length of the antenna is not as critical as it might appear in
the table below. The usable bandwidth of the A8U antennas are
+/- 50 MHz from the center frequency, so it is acceptable to use an
antenna from an adjacent block above or below the operating
frequency.
The color of the antenna sleeve is in keeping with standard resistor
value color codes for the second digit of the block number. Block
23 is not used since it covers a 608 to 614 MHz band that is not
allocated for use with wireless microphones.
FREQUENCY
RANGE
ANT SLEEVE
COLOR
ANTENNA
WHIP LENGTH
21
537.600 - 563.100
Brown
4.74"
22
563.200 - 588.700
Red
4.48"
23
588.800 - 614.300
Orange
4.24”
24
614.400 - 639.900
Yellow
4.01"
25
640.000 - 665.500
Green
3.81"
26
665.600 - 691.100
Blue
3.62"
27
691.200 - 716.700
Violet (Pink)
3.46"
28
716.800 - 742.300
Grey
3.31"
29
742.400 - 767.900
White
3.18"
30
768.000 - 793.500
Orange/Black
3.08"
31
793.600 - 819.100
Orange/Brown
2.99”
32
819.200 - 844.700
Orange/Red
2.92”
33
844.800 - 865.000
Orange/Orange
2.87”
BLOCK
Whip Length
A8U Receiver Antenna
Whip Length
A6U Transmitter Antenna
10
UHF Wireless Diversity Receiver
TROUBLESHOOTING
POWER SUPPLY AND FUSE
AUDIO SIGNAL QUALITY
LEDs not lit or dimly lit
Poor signal to noise ratio
• External power supply disconnected or inadequate.
• Transmitter gain set too low
• Main power supply fuse tripped. Turn the receiver off,
remove the cause of the overload and turn the receiver
back on.
• Noise may not be in wireless system. Mute the audio
signal at the transmitter and see if noise remains. If the
noise remains, then turn the power off at the transmitter
and see if it remains. If the noise is still present, then the
problem is not in the transmitter.
• Wrong polarity power source. The external DC in
requires POSITIVE to be on the center pin.
PILOT TONE SQUELCH
The PILOT indicator lamp on the front panel glows green to
indicate that the audio has been turned on at the transmitter, and
that the audio output on the receiver is enabled. When the lamp is
on, the audio is enabled. When the lamp is off, the audio is muted.
PILOT lamp on, but no sound
• Audio output cable bad or disconnected.
• If noise is still present when the transmitter is turned
off, try lowering the audio output level on the UCR200D
rear panel and see if the noise lowers correspondingly. If
the noise remains, the problem is not in the receiver.
• Receiver output is too low for the input of the device it
is feeding. Try increasing the output level of the
UCR200D and lowering the input gain on the device the
UCR200D is feeding.
Distortion
• Audio Output level set too low.
PILOT lamp does not come on when transmitter audio
switch is turned on
• It takes several seconds for the relay to actuate the
PILOT lamp. Turn the transmitter power and audio
switches on and wait 3 to 5 seconds for the lamp to come
on.
• Transmitter input gain too high. Check and/or re-adjust
input gain on transmitter according to the LEDs on the
transmitter and then verify the setting with the transmitter
audio level LED strip on the UCR200D front panel.
• Audio output level too high for the device the UCR200D
is feeding. Lower the output level of the UCR200D.
Normal audio on output but the Mod meter on the front
panel is not working.
• The Power switch may be in the “ON (Pilot Disable)”
position. This front panel switch should be in the rightmost position.
ANTENNAS AND RF SIGNAL STRENGTH
RF Level is weak.
• Antenna is disconnected or there is a bad connection
• Antenna may need to be moved or re-oriented
• Improper length of antenna, or wrong antenna. UHF
whip antennas are generally about 3 to 5 inches long.
UHF helical antennas may be shorter, but are often less
efficient.
Rio Rancho, NM – USA
11
SERVICE AND REPAIR
If your system malfunctions, you should attempt to correct or isolate the trouble before concluding that the equipment needs repair.
Make sure you have followed the setup procedure and operating instructions. Check out the interconnecting cords and then go through
the TROUBLE SHOOTING section in the manual
We strongly recommend that you do not try to repair the equipment yourself and do not have the local repair shop attempt anything
other than the simplest repair. If the repair is more complicated than a broken wire or loose connection, send the unit to the factory for
repair and service. Don’t attempt to adjust any controls inside the units. Once set at the factory, the various controls and trimmers do not
drift with age or vibration and never require readjustment. There are no adjustments inside that will make a malfunctioning unit
start working.
LECTROSONICS service department is equipped and staffed to quickly repair your equipment. In-warranty repairs are made at no
charge in accordance with the terms of the warranty. Out of warranty repairs are charged at a modest flat rate plus parts and shipping.
Since it takes almost as much time and effort to determine what is wrong as it does to make the repair, there is a charge for an exact
quotation. We will be happy to quote approximate charges by phone for out of warranty repairs.
RETURNING UNITS FOR REPAIR
You will save yourself time and trouble if you will follow the steps below:
A. DO NOT return equipment to the factory for repair without first contacting us by letter or by phone. We need to know the nature of
the problem, the model number and the serial number of the equipment. We also need a phone number where you can be reached 8
am to 4 pm (Mountain Standard Time).
B. After receiving your request, we will issue you a return authorization number (R.A.). This number will help speed your repair through
our receiving and repair departments. The return authorization number must be clearly shown on the outside of the shipping
container.
C. Pack the equipment carefully and ship to us, shipping costs prepaid. If necessary, we can provide you with the proper packing
materials. UPS is usually the best way to ship the units. Heavy units should be “double-boxed” for safe transport.
D. We also strongly recommend that you insure the equipment, since we cannot be responsible for loss of or damage to equipment that
you ship. Of course, we insure the equipment when we ship it back to you.
Mailing address:
Lectrosonics, Inc.
PO Box 15900
Rio Rancho, NM 87174
USA
Shipping address:
Lectrosonics, Inc.
581 Laser Rd.
Rio Rancho, NM 87124
USA
World Wide Web: http://www.lectrosonics.com
12
Telephones:
Regular:
Toll Free
FAX:
(505) 892-4501
(800) 821-1121
(505) 892-6243
Email: sales@lectrosonics.com
UHF Wireless Diversity Receiver
SPECIFICATIONS AND FEATURES
Operating Frequencies:
Frequency Adjustment Range:
Receiver Type:
Frequency Stability:
Front end selectivity:
Sensitivity
20 dB Sinad:
60 dB Quieting:
Squelch quieting:
AM rejection:
Modulation acceptance:
Image and spurious rejection:
Third order intercept:
Diversity method:
FM Detector:
Antenna inputs:
Audio outputs
Rear Panel XLR:
537.600 to 588.700 MHz; 614.400 to 793.500 MHz
25.5 MHz
Dual conversion, superheterodyne, 71MHz and 455kHz
±0.002 %
>22 dB at ±4 MHz
0.8 uV (-109 dBm), A weighted
1.0 uV (-107 dBm), A weighted
Greater than 125 dB
Greater than 60 dB, 2 uV to 1 Volt (Undetectable after processing)
>90 kHz
>100 dB
+12 dBm
Phased antenna diversity
Digital Pulse Counting Detector operating at 455kHz
Dual BNC female; 50 Ohm impedance
Monitor:
Front Panel Controls and Indicators:
Rear Panel Controls and features:
Power Options:
Weight:
Dimensions:
Nominal 600 Ohm balanced, three level ranges:
LO - Variable -50 dBm to -20 dBm
MID - Variable -30 dBm to 0 dBm
HI - +8 dBm line level.
0.5VRMS, 50 Ohm load
Main and Diversity antenna BNC connectors; Power on/pilot disable/off switch and LED;
Dual function pilot tone LED; Dual function 10 segment display for RF signal level and
transmitter audio level display; Two LEDs (0 / 180) to indicate the antenna phase.
XLR audio output jack; Monitor output jack and level control; Frequency selection switches;
External DC input; Audio level range select switch.
12VDC, 4.8W (400mA)
12 ozs
3.2" wide x 1.22" high x 5.1" deep
Typical System THD + Noise
Typical System Frequency Response
2.0%
+6
+3
1.0%
0dB
-3
0.5%
-6
-9
0%
-12
30
100
1kHz
10k
30
100
1kHz
10k
20k
20k
Adjustable LF Roll-off
Specifications subject to change without notice.
Rio Rancho, NM – USA
13
LIMITED ONE YEAR WARRANTY
The equipment is warranted for one year from date of purchase against defects in
materials or workmanship provided it was purchased from an authorized dealer. This
warranty does not cover equipment which has been abused or damaged by careless
handling or shipping. This warranty does not apply to used or demonstrator equipment.
Should any defect develop, we will, at our option, repair or replace any defective parts
without charge for either parts or labor. If we cannot correct the defect in your
equipment, we will replace it at no charge with a similar new item. We will pay for the
cost of returning your merchandise to you.
This warranty applies only to items returned to us, shipping costs prepaid, within one
year from the date of purchase.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights. You may have additional legal rights
which vary from state to state.
LECTROSONICS, INC.
581 LASER ROAD
RIO RANCHO, NM 87124 USA
Ph: (800)821-1121 or (505) 892-4501
Fax: (505) 892-6243
Email: sales@lectrosonics.com
Web: www.lectrosonics.com
September 23, 1999
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