EZ-Bridge 3-Person EZ-Bridge

EZ-Bridge 3-Person EZ-Bridge
EZ-Bridge
and
3-Person EZ-Bridge
...are gentler forms of Bridge for those who might like to play, if it didn't make
them feel like a "dummy". These new versions of Bridge were created in 2002 by
John N. Zorich, Jr.
The most striking differences between the classic game of Bridge and EZ-Bridge
are:
-- Any bid is acceptable (e.g., you can bid from 1 to 13 tricks).
-- Bidding does not have to proceed alphabetically.
-- No one is forced to sit out as the silent "Dummy" hand, unless they want to.
-- Scoring is simple (one point per Trick won, no matter what suit is trump).
-- Any player can keep a paper record of who bid what suit, and who played what
cards (as long as everyone gets to see it).
3-Person EZ-Bridge is played like regular EZ-Bridge, except that there is a
permanent "dummy" hand, which the winning bidder gets to have as his/her
partner.
EZ-Bridge & 3-Person EZ-Bridge are trademarks of John Nicholas Zorich, Jr.,
who can be contacted at: [email protected]
"EZ-Bridge" is not to be confused with "Easybridge!". EZ-Bridge refers to the EZ-Bridge manual and is a new version of
Bridge. In contrast, Easybridge! refers to "educational services, namely, providing classes, seminars, workshops and
demonstrations for bridge teachers on specific teaching techniques to enhance the teaching experience and the ability of
students to learn duplicate bridge and on how to develop marketing programs for new client business development for
duplicate bridge clubs, districts and units" [quote from US Trademark Office, TESS database]. EZ-Bridge is trademarked
by John N. Zorich, Jr., whereas Easybridge is trademarked by Edith McMullin and is promoted by the American Contract
Bridge League.
EZ-Bridge
™
and
3-Person EZ-Bridge ™
Gentler Forms Of Bridge
For Those Who Might Like To Play Bridge,
If It Didn't Make Them Feel Like a "Dummy"
by
John N. Zorich, Jr.
( author of : Very Easy DOS, and Hazmat65 )
EZ-Bridge and 3-Person EZ-Bridge are
Trademarks of John Nicholas Zorich, Jr.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 1 of 24
Table of Contents
CHAPTER TITLE
PAGES
Preface
3
Introduction
4
EZ-Bridge
5 — 13
3-Person EZ-Bridge
14 — 15
Advice and Strategy
16 — 19
Final Comments
20
Glossary of Terms
21
Summary of Rules (EZ-Bridge)
22
Summary of Rules (3-Person EZ-Bridge)
23
EZ-Bridge Memory Help Form
24
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 2 of 24
Preface
The Classic game of Bridge is a bit too challenging for most people. To play well at
Classic Bridge, you need to have a great memory, and to pay attention with unwavering
concentration. The arguments spawned during games of Classic Bridge, because one
partner was not watching the play closely, are the stuff of movies and TV sitcoms.
I became interested in Classic Bridge when out of curiosity I began reading the "Bridge
Column" in the morning newspaper. My very observant wife then bought me for
Christmas a thick instruction book on Classic Bridge. To my surprise, the book
described itself as a beginner's instruction manual, even tho it was over 500 pages !!
That book described the Bidding practices, playing procedures, and scoring methods
that are fundamental to Classic Bridge. I found them intellectually challenging because
they were quite complicated compared to most any other card game. However,
because of its complexity, I was not able to find anyone among my family and friends
who were interested in playing with me -- they just didn't find it "fun".
That's why I developed EZ-Bridge. My family loves to play this new version of Bridge.
For example, my niece and nephew, and their traveling companions, while on Spring
Break from college recently, had a 3-hour wait between airplane flights. They spent the
entire 3 hours playing EZ-Bridge. My niece and nephew had played EZ-Bridge only
twice before, and had never played Classic Bridge; but they were able to explain EZBridge to their friends in just a few minutes, and to begin play immediately. They enjoy
playing EZ-Bridge -- they find it to indeed be "fun".
In contrast to Classic Bridge, to win at EZ-Bridge you don't have to memorize who Bid
what suit or who played what card. EZ-Bridge doesn't require anyone to sit out a Hand
as the non-playing "Dummy" or to refrain from Bidding just because they have a weak
Hand. EZ-Bridge doesn't require you to know brilliant Bidding strategies, or even to
have four players. Nor does it require you to know higher mathematics just to keep
score.
If you want to spend a relaxing time with family and friends in very friendly competition,
then EZ-Bridge is for you.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 3 of 24
Introduction
This book introduces two new versions of the "Classic" card game called "Bridge".
The first new version, which is called "EZ-Bridge", is designed for four players in two
teams of two persons each. It allows either all players to be active participants in every
Hand, or for one player, at his or her own discretion, to sit out a Hand every once in
awhile, as the "Dummy".
The second new version, which is called "3-Person EZ-Bridge", is designed for three
players. It is played almost identically to the 4-person version of EZ-Bridge, except that
there are no teams (the 3 persons play against each other, and the fourth "person" is a
permanent "Dummy").
Compared to Classic Bridge, both versions of EZ-Bridge incorporate simple rules for
Bidding, as well as simplified rules for scoring.
Finally, and possibly most important to your having fun with EZ-Bridge, both versions
allow one or more players to keep a paper record of who Bid which suit, and who played
which card, as long as all players are allowed to see what has been recorded.
Therefore, you do not need to have a good memory in order to formulate clever Bridge
strategies or to make brilliant Bridge plays like professional Bridge players.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 4 of 24
EZ-Bridge
How To Play (the basics)
EZ-Bridge is a card game played with a deck of either Poker or Bridge cards. Such
decks contain 52 cards in 4 "suits" (in addition, Poker decks also contain 2 "joker" cards,
which are not used in EZ-Bridge). The suits each have a symbol and a name, as shown
below:
♣
CLUBS
◊
DIAMONDS
♥
HEARTS
♠
SPADES
Each suit has 13 cards, one each of the following named or numbered values:
Ace (or "A")
King (or "K")
Queen (or "Q")
Jack (or "J")
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
I referred to them as "values" because the higher they are on that list, the more valuable
they are, just like in most games of poker. For example, the 10 of Hearts ( 10♥ ) is more
valuable than the 9 of Hearts ( 9♥ ), and the Queen of Hearts ( Q♥ ) is more valuable
than the 10♥, but the Ace of Hearts ( A♥ ) is the most valuable card in that suit.
In EZ-Bridge, one suit is not more valuable than another, except for the "Trump" suit,
the identify of which changes with every Hand. We'll discuss "Trump" suits in detail in a
later section of this book.
A "Hand" of Bridge is played with all 52 cards from a well-shuffled deck. Each player is
randomly given (that is, "dealt") 13 of the cards. Each Hand is played one "Trick" at a
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 5 of 24
time. A "Trick" is a set of four cards, one from each of the four players. The most
valuable card played in each Trick "wins" that Trick.
Each Trick is worth 1 point (we'll discuss more about this later). Points are earned only
by the team that won the Bidding. Bidding for a Hand takes place before the players
start playing the Hand. During Bidding, each player in turn makes a promise that she
and her partner will, together, win a certain number of Tricks in the Hand that is about to
be played. The first team to win 30 points wins the "game" (a Game lasts at least 3
Hands, because the most points that can be won in a single Hand is 13).
Bidding is like an auction, or a game of reverse "Name That Tune". When a player
makes a Bid, he is promising to win, together with his partner, at least the "Bid" number
of Tricks, in the Hand that is about to be played. After the first Bidder has made such a
promise, the next player has a chance to Bid either that same number of Tricks, or a
higher number of Tricks. The last player to Bid wins the Bid (that is, if the remaining
players say "Pass" when it's their turn to Bid, then the player who Bid last wins the Bid
for his team). In a later section of this book, Bidding will be described in more detail.
Players and Partners
EZ-Bridge requires 4 players (we'll talk about "3-Person EZ-Bridge" later on in this
book). Each player must partner with one of the other players, to form a team. Thus,
there are 2 teams comprising 2 players each.
Typically, during an evening's play of EZ-Bridge, the teams do not change membership.
However, you can do anything you want, in order to have fun. For example, in a
situation where a couple of married folks are playing together, the husbands could at
first team up against the wives, and later each husband could team up with his wife, to
play against the other couple.
For convenience, in this book, the names of the 4 players will always be:
North, South, East, and West
and the teams will always be constructed like this:
North + South
versus
East + West
but such descriptions are not meant to imply that team membership must remain
constant.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 6 of 24
Table and Seating
Almost any household table can be made suitable for EZ-Bridge; you can even play on
the floor. The only rule is that the players should all be able to face each other and to
comfortably reach the middle of the "table" where they have to place cards during the
game. Even the end of a long, formal, dining room table can work well.
Who sits where at the table is completely up to your discretion. The only rule is that
team members must sit opposite each other, and have a member of the other team on
their right and on their left, like so:
North
West
East
South
In that example, North and South are on one team, and East and West are on the other.
For convenience, in this book, the positions of the players will always be shown like they
are above, but this is not meant to imply that seating order must not change when you
play your own games.
Shuffling and Dealing
Among friends, it doesn't matter who shuffles or who deals. Some people hate to
shuffle. Some folks hate to deal. As long as everyone agrees on how it is to be done, it
does not matter who shuffles or deals. However, a common method for rotating these
tasks is described next:
Someone shuffles the deck. All players choose one card from the deck. Whoever has
the most valuable card is the first dealer; in the case of a tie, draw additional cards to
break the tie.
The first dealer shuffles the deck thoroughly and then deals one card to each player
(including herself), and then a second card to each player, and so on until each player
has 13 cards.
After the Bidding and playing of this first Hand of EZ-Bridge, the player to the left of the
first dealer now becomes the shuffler and dealer for the next Hand. For the Hand after
that one, the player to the left of the second dealer becomes the next dealer, and so on
around and around the table for each new Hand to be played.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 7 of 24
Bidding
As described above in the section entitled "How to Play (the basics)", before play
actually begins, the two teams Bid to determine which team can possibly gain points
(only the team that wins the Bidding, the "Winning Bid Team" can possibly gain points).
The other team will try to prevent Winning Bid Team from gaining any points (this team
is called the "Defending Team").
The Bidding process also determines which (if any) suit is "Trump" (what is meant by
"Trump" will be explained very shortly).
TRICKS
EZ-Bridge is played as a series of 13 Tricks, where a Trick is a set of 4 cards, placed
one at a time into the center of the table, one card by each of the players. After the first
Trick has been played, it is taken off the table and set to the side in a separate pile, one
pile for each team. Then the next Trick is played, and so on until no player has any
cards remaining in his Hand.
TRUMPS VS. NO-TRUMPS
As described above in the section entitled "How to Play (the basics)", Bidding is done by
one player at a time sequentially naming the number of Tricks that she thinks her team
can win in the Hand that is about to be played. A Bid states not only the number of
Tricks, but also states which suit will be "Trump".
A Trump suit is something like a wild card in poker. For example, if the Winning Bidder
won the Bidding with a Bid of "9 Clubs" then Clubs is the Trump suit; if so, then during
the subsequent play of the Hand, a 2♣ is more valuable than an a K◊. That is, the Trick
is won by whichever team played the 2♣, because a card in a Trump suit is more
valuable than a card in any other suit, even if the other suit card is a King or Ace.
The Bidder may decide, during the Bidding process, that her team could win more
Tricks if there were no Trump suit. If so, then the Bidder would Bid, for example, "8 NoTrumps".
WHO BIDS FIRST?
You can make up your own rules, if you like, about who Bids first, but there are certain
advantages and disadvantages to Bidding first. One way to make this fair is to always
have the dealer Bid first. However, if one person always deals, then keep a scrap-paper
record of who Bid first in the last Hand, and the player to the left of that player should
Bid first in the next Hand's Bidding.
For any one Trick's Bidding, the Bidding goes round and round the table, the next
Bidder always being the player to the left of the previous Bidder. Additional details are
given in the next few sections.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 8 of 24
BIDDING DETAILS
Let's assume that the players are arranged around a table like so, and that South starts
the Bidding:
North
West
East
South
Bidding is done by one player at a time, each player naming a number of Tricks+suit.
The very first Bid by the very first player (South in this case), can be any number of
Tricks from 1 thru 13.
For example, let's say South Bids "7 Spades". If all the remaining players do not Bid
(that is, if they all "Pass"), then the North/South team has won the Bid (and promises to
win 7 Tricks in the Hand that is about to be played), and Spades is Trump during the
Hand that is about to be played.
If, instead of Passing, West Bids "7 Clubs", and all the remaining players Pass, then the
East/West Team has won the Bid, and Clubs is Trump.
If instead of Passing after West's Bid, let's say North Bids "8 Spades", and everyone
else Passes, then the North/South team has won the Bid, and Spades is Trump. In EZBridge, no player can repeat the exact Bid of a previous player, even his partner's Bid or
even his own Bid. Thus, North could not have Bid "7 Spades".
If instead of Passing, East Bids "10 Diamonds", and everyone else Passes, then the
East/West team has won the Bid, and Diamonds is Trump. This Bid demonstrates that
you can Bid anything you like, as long as no one else has Bid it, and as long as the
number of Tricks Bid is not smaller than the last Bid. In other words, East could not
have Bid "7 Diamonds", because the last Bid was for 8 Tricks.
If instead of Passing after the East Bid, South Bids "10 No-Trump", and everyone else
Passes, then North/South team has won the Bid, and there is no Trump suit.
Bidding continues round and round the table, until everyone Passes after the last Bid.
The person who makes the last Bid is called the "Winning Bidder" (and her team is
called the "Winning Bid Team").
A last important note: During the Bidding, if a Player Passes, it doesn't mean that she
forfeits the right to Bid in subsequent rounds of Bidding. That is, if North Passes, but
East Bids, then even if South and West both Pass, North could choose to Bid after West
Passes, like so:
North
East
South
West
1st round
Pass
Bid
Bid
Pass
2nd round
Pass
Bid
Pass
Pass
3rd round
Bid
Pass
Pass
Pass
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 9 of 24
In that Bidding, North actually won the Bidding for her team, even tho she Passed on
the first round of Bidding.
Playing
WHO PLAYS THE FIRST CARD OF THE FIRST TRICK?
There are advantages to the team that plays the first card. To be fair, follow this rule:
the first card is played by the player to the left of Winning Bidder.
WHO PLAYS THE NEXT CARD?
The next card is played by the player to the left of the player who played the first card of
the Trick. The subsequent card is played by player to the left of that, and so on. Play
always is done in this fashion, going from one player to the player on his left, starting
with whichever player played the first card of the Trick.
WHO PLAYS THE FIRST CARD OF THE NEXT TRICK?
The first card of the next Trick is played by the player who won the previous Trick. That
is, whoever played the most valuable card in the previous Trick wins that Trick for her
team and has to play the first card of the next Trick.
HOW TO DETERMINE WHICH IS THE MOST VALUABLE CARD IN A TRICK
The first card played in a Trick determines what the other players must or can do. In
each Trick, the other players must play a card from their Hand that is in the same suit as
the first card played in that Trick. For example, if the first card is A♥, then the second
player must play another Heart card. This is called "following suit".
If a player has any cards of the same suit as the first card played in the Trick, the player
must follow suit. He can play any card in his Hand in that suit. However, if the player
does not have even one card in that suit, then the player can play any card in his Hand,
including a Trump suit card.
When all 4 cards have been played for a Trick, the most valuable card in the Trick
"wins" the Trick. Recall, from the "How to Play (the basics)" section earlier in this book,
the sequence of increasing value within a suit.
If the 5♥ was led in a Trick, and subsequent players played the 10♥ and J♥, followed by
the A◊ (in this case, Diamonds is not Trump), the Trick is won by the person who played
the J♥. The fact that the Ace is a more valuable card in general than a Jack is irrelevant,
because Hearts was the suit of the first card played in the Trick. Only the cards that
"follow suit" count toward the winning of the Trick, unless a Trump card has been
played. Here is that same Trick shown a different way (Clubs are Trump, but nobody
plays any here):
North
East
South
West
5♥
10♥
J♥
A◊
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
WINNER
South
Page 10 of 24
If one of the 4 cards in a Trick is a Trump card, then whoever played the most valuable
Trump card wins the Trick. For example, in the Trick shown below, North leads the A♥
but nobody has any more Hearts and so all play Diamonds (which in this case are
Trump):
North
East
South
West
A♥
2◊
3◊
4◊
WINNER
West (highest Trump)
In that Trick, West won by playing the highest Trump card.
Additional examples of Tricks, and who the winner is, are shown below (for convenience
in all these Tricks, North leads, and there are no Trump). In all these cases, the winner
is the player who played the highest card in the suit that was led by North:
North
East
South
West
2♥
Q♥
K♥
2◊
North
East
South
West
A♠
A♥
A♣
A◊
North
East
South
West
2♠
A♥
A♣
A◊
North
East
South
West
2♣
A◊
4♣
5♣
WINNER
South (highest Heart)
WINNER
North (highest Spade)
WINNER
North (highest Spade)
WINNER
West (highest Club)
TO BE OR NOT TO BE DUMMY
The partner of the Winning Bidder has the option to either play the Hand, just like all the
other players, or to lay her Hand face up for all to see. The Hand that is thus laid down
is called the "Dummy", and the person who laid down the Dummy Hand can take a biobreak, make a phone call, get a snack, etc., or otherwise not be involved in the game,
until it's time to Bid the next Hand.
When it comes time for "Dummy" to play a card, the Winning Bidder (that is, Dummy's
partner) decides which card is played. Anyone can physically move the chosen card to
the center of the table, even a Defending Team member.
The decision to be Dummy or to play is to be made by Winning Bidder's partner, on her
own, without consultation from Winning Bidder. This decision must be made prior to
Winning Bidder's partner playing her first card in the first Trick. When it is time for
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 11 of 24
Winning Bidder's partner to play that card, and if she has decided to not play the Hand
(that is, to actually be a Dummy), then the Dummy Hand is laid down for all to see, and
Winning Bidder decides what is to be played.
If the partner of the Winning Bidder does not want to be Dummy (that is, she wants to
actively play the Hand), then she simply keeps the cards in her hand and plays the
cards just like all the other players.
REMEMBERING WHO PLAYED WHAT
There is a great advantage in remembering who Bid what suit, who played what card,
and how many cards have been played of a particular suit.
For example, if you are about to lead the first card of the first Trick, and you have the
2◊, and you remember that your partner Bid "8 Diamonds" during the Bidding process,
then you might play that 2◊, in hopes that your partner can win the Trick with an A◊.
Another example: If you are about to lead the first card of the 7th Trick, and you know
that 12 Diamond cards have been played so far, and you hold the 2◊ (the last Diamond,
because there are only 13 cards of each suit), and there is no Trump suit (the winning
Bid was "8 No-Trump"), then you can lead that 2◊ and feel confident that you will win
the Trick. You win the Trick because you will have played the highest Diamond card in
the Trick, (recall from earlier discussions that cards that do not "follow suit" do not count
toward winning the Trick, unless they are Trump cards). You win even if the other 3
cards in the Trick are Aces !!
Remembering who Bid what suit, and who played what card, is difficult for most people.
In EZ-Bridge, it is OK for someone to keep a paper record of who Bid what suit and who
played what card, as long as all the players are allowed to see it at any time. This EZBridge book contains a copy of a form developed specifically for keeping such a record.
Use it, or create one of your own design.
Scoring
After all the Tricks have been played in a Hand, the team that won the Bidding counts
how many Tricks it has won. For example, if the North/South team won the Bidding,
and North won 5 Tricks and South won 3 Tricks then, the North/South team won 8
Tricks total.
IF TRICKS WON = TRICKS BID
If the team that won the Bidding wins exactly the number of Tricks they Bid, that is, the
number of Tricks they promised to win in their very last Bid prior to starting play of the
Hand, then they are awarded a number of points equal to the number of Tricks they Bid.
For example, if the winning Bid by North/South was "8 Hearts", and they won 8 Tricks,
they have earned 8 points. The Defending Team earns zero points.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 12 of 24
IF TRICKS WON = LESS THAN TRICKS BID
If the team that won the Bidding wins less than the number of Tricks they Bid, then they
lose points (or, in case they don't have any points yet , they "go negative, or "go in the
hole"). They lose four points for every Trick less than the number of Tricks they Bid. For
example, if the winning Bid by North/South was "8 Hearts", and they won only 5 Tricks,
they lose 12 of the points that they won on previous Hands (3 x 4 = 12). If they have no
points from previous Hands, then they "go in the hole" 12 points. If they "go in the hole"
12 points, and win 13 points in the next Hand, their total score will be then only be 1 (13
- 12 = 1). In this case too, the Defending Team earns zero points.
IF TRICKS WON = MORE THAN TRICKS BID
If the team that won the Bidding wins more than the number of Tricks they Bid, then
they are awarded a number of points equal to the number of Tricks they Bid plus 1/4
point for each Trick won above their Bid. For example, if the winning Bid by North/South
was "8 Hearts", and they won 11 Tricks, they have earned 8 and ¾ points (8 plus 3 x ¼
= 8 ¾). And again, the Defending Team earns zero points.
WINNING THE GAME, SET, MATCH
You probably have realized that you gain the most points in a Hand by Bidding as high
as possible, assuming you can win the Bid number of Tricks. For example, if South has
the strongest Hand possible (all 4 Aces, all 4 Kings, all 4 Queens, and a Jack), and
South win the Bid in "No-Trump", South will win all 13 Tricks. However, if South wins the
Bidding with a Bid of "5 No-Trump", the North/South team will not earn 13 points but
rather earn only 7 points ( 5 plus 8 x ¼ = 7 ).
You probably have realized that there is a powerful disincentive to over Bidding. For
example, if North Bids 13 Tricks but only wins 12, then the North/South team loses four
points rather than gaining 12.
The team that wins 30 points first wins the "Game". If you play longer, the first team to
win 3 games wins the "Set". If you play longer, the first team to win 2 Sets wins the
"Match". If you play all day, you could create additional rules (e.g., the first team to win 3
Matches wins the Tournament).
A Tournament can be played by whatever rules you decide. For example, if several
couples play all afternoon, each couple could play only one game with each other
couple and switch to a new couple as their opponent for each new game. At the end of
the afternoon, the couple who has won the most games (or maybe the most points)
wins the Tournament.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 13 of 24
3-Person EZ-Bridge
How To Play (the basics)
3-Person EZ-Bridge is played with three persons instead of four persons. That is the
major difference between EZ-Bridge and 3-Person EZ-Bridge.
Players and Partners
3-Person EZ-Bridge does not involve teams of players. Instead, each player is playing
to win on his or her own. And there always is a Dummy Hand (in effect, Dummy is the
fourth player).
Table and Seating
The same comments made previously for EZ-Bridge apply to 3-Person EZ-Bridge
regarding size and shape of the table used.
There are some significant differences between EZ-Bridge and 3-Person EZ-Bridge
regarding seating. Dummy is assigned a permanent position at the table, like so:
Dummy
West
East
South
Now comes the only difficult instruction in 3-Person EZ-Bridge: Whoever wins the
Bidding prior to playing a Hand must then get out of his chair, and exchange places with
the player who is sitting opposite Dummy, prior to starting the play of that Hand. That is,
the Winning Bidder must always sit opposite the Dummy Hand. For example, if East
wins the Bidding, then, after the chair switching, the seating will not look like the
configuration we just saw but rather will look like this:
Dummy
West
South
East
Notice that East switched places with South.
This new seating arrangement is maintained until after the next Hand's Bidding has
been completed, at which time whoever has won the Bid exchanges places with East.
For example if the next Bidding were won by West, then West would exchange seats
with East, and the resulting new seating arrangement would be:
Dummy
East
South
West
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 14 of 24
Shuffling and Dealing
All that has been said so far about EZ-Bridge shuffling and dealing also applies to 3Person EZ-Bridge. However, because players are frequently changing their seating
arrangement (as just described, above), it is best to keep a paper record of who dealt
last, and to proceed alphabetically to the next player. For example, if South deals the
first Hand, then West should deal the next Hand, and East the following Hand, no
matter where they are actually seated. Or make up your own system of a rotating the
deal, or don't rotate the deal at all (as described above for EZ-Bridge).
Bidding
All of the instructions given previously regarding EZ-Bridge apply also to 3-Person EZBridge. Keep in mind, however, that you are Bidding for how many Tricks you can win
together with the Dummy Hand. In a sense, Dummy and the Winning Bidder are a team.
Also keep in mind that if the Deal is not rotated (as described in the previous section on
"Shuffling and Dealing"), then it is best to keep a paper record of who started the
Bidding last, and to proceed alphabetically to the next player. This should be done to be
fair, because there are advantages and disadvantages to Bidding first.
3-Person EZ-Bridge has one exciting difference from regular EZ-Bridge, a difference
which usually results in very high Bidding. Prior to the start of any Bidding, the Dummy
Hand is laid out for all to see. Thus, even though you have a weak Hand, if Dummy has
a strong Hand, you may decide to Bid 8 or 9 Tricks.
Playing
After the Winning Bidder has moved into the chair opposite Dummy, the person to the
left of the Winning Bidder plays the first card.
Other than that, there is no playing difference between EZ-Bridge and 3-Person EZBridge. Of course the "Defending Team" is not really a team, but a temporary
partnership that comprises the 2 players who did not win the Bid. The job of the
Defending "Team" is to try to prevent the Winning Bidder "Team" from gaining any
points.
Scoring
There is no difference in scoring between EZ-Bridge and 3-Person EZ-Bridge, except
that points are won by individuals rather than by teams. Keep in mind that the Winning
Bidder gets to count not only the Tricks he has won, but also the Tricks won by Dummy.
Tournaments could be played as described above, in the Chapter on EZ-Bridge, except
that the Tournament winner would be an individual player rather than a team.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 15 of 24
Advice and Strategy
Bidding
GENERAL PRINCIPLES
During the Bidding, the goal is to Bid exactly the number of Tricks that you and your
partner can win during the subsequent play of the Hand.
However, you can't see each other's Hands, and it is unfair to use hand signals or code
words or show facial expressions that tell your partner what you have. The only honest
way to learn about the strength or weakness of partner's Hand is to listen to how partner
Bids for that Hand.
There are only 4 Aces, 4 Kings, 4 Queens, 4 Jacks, and 4 Tens. Those are the 20 most
valuable cards; these are called the "Honors" cards. If you have 5 Honors, then you
have an average Hand in that respect. If you have 6 of them, you have an above
average Hand. If you have 3 Aces, 1 Jack and 1 Ten, that too can be considered an
above average Hand because it has 3 of the very topmost Honors.
There are only 13 cards in each suit. On average, each player will have 3 cards in each
suit, with somebody having one extra card. If you have 2 suits with 4 cards each, or 5
cards in a suit, or none at all in one suit, you have an above average Hand (assuming
you have at least a few Honors somewhere in your hand).
OPENING ROUND BIDS
There are 13 Tricks and two teams, so one of the two teams is surely going to win at
least 7 Tricks. If you have an above-average Hand, and your partner has an average
Hand or even a slightly less than average Hand, then you and your partner can most
likely win at least 7 Tricks.
Therefore, if you are the first player to Bid on the first round of Bidding, and you have an
above-average Hand, you should Bid at least 7 Tricks. Whether you Bid 7◊, 7♣, 7♥, or
7♠ is a choice you have to make depending on which suit you have that is strongest (or
if you have equal strength in all suits, you might choose to Bid "7-No-Trump").
The first player must not Bid too high, but also must not Bid too low. For example,
suppose that North was dealt this unlikely Hand:
♣ A K Q J 10 9 8 7
◊ (none)
♥KQ8
♠AJ
If North Bids "7 Clubs", and everyone else Passes, and subsequently North-South win
11 Tricks, then North/South win only 8 points (7 + 4 x ¼ = 8). If North had started the
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 16 of 24
Bidding with "10 Clubs" and everyone then Passed, then North/South would earn 10 ¼
points for their 11 Tricks (10 + 1 x ¼ = 10 ¼ ).
Bidding too low on the opening Bid also allows the other Team to Bid, and that may
result in their winning the Bid (even if they don't have the better Hand).
For example, suppose that these very unlikely Hands were dealt::
♣
◊
A K Q J 10 9 8 7
(none)
♥KQ8
♠ AJ
♣
(none)
◊
QJ5432
♥
54
♠
KQ743
North
West
East
South
♣
65432
◊
(none)
♥
7632
♣
(none)
◊
A K 10 9 8 7 6
♥
A J 10 9
♠
98
♠ 10 6 5 2
North has 9 Honors, East has 6, South 1, and West 4. Both teams have 10 Honors. If
Diamonds are Trump, East-West will likely take a minimum of 9 Tricks. However, if
Clubs are Trump, North-South will likely take a minimum of 10 Tricks.
Suppose that North is the first Bidder. In order to prevent East-West from Bidding (and
discovering that they too have a great Hand), North might start the Bidding with "10
Clubs". East might not feel confident enough to then Bid "10 Diamonds" without
knowing what West has, and so may Pass; South and West will then surely Pass, and
thus North wins the Bid.
Alternatively, suppose South is the first Bidder. South has a much lower than average
Hand, so opening the Bidding at 7 Tricks is unwise. However, South does have 5 Spade
cards. South could Bid "2 Spades" (that is, promises to win 2 Tricks if Spades is trump),
in order to let Partner know that South's Hand is very weak and that its strongest suit is
Spades. Keep in mind that if South does open with such a Bid, the East/West team also
now know that South's Hand is very weak but relatively strong in Spades, and such
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 17 of 24
information could lead to East/West winning extra Tricks during the subsequent playing
of the Hand.
SUBSEQUENT BIDS
After all players have Bid once, the next round(s) of Bidding usually proceed differently
than the first round. For example:
North
East
South
West
1st round
Pass
3 Hearts
8 Diamonds
8 Clubs
2nd round
9 Diamonds
9 Clubs
Pass
Pass
3rd round
10 Diamonds
Pass
Pass
10 Clubs
4th round
Pass
Pass
Pass
In that Hand, West won the Bidding for the East/West team. Notice that even after a
player has Passed once, she can still Bid in subsequent rounds. Also notice what North
did: North has such a weak hand that he passed on the first round. However, North
must have a lot of Diamonds, because after hearing that Partner (South) has a very
strong hand in Diamonds (1st round Bid of 8 Diamonds), North proceeded to Bid up to
10 Diamonds!! In such a case, it might have been better for North to have opened
Bidding with, for example, 3 Diamonds, just to let partner (South) know something about
his hand.
Playing as the Winning Bid Team
The goal it to win as many Tricks as possible. However, playing Aces may not be the
best way to do that. For example, if the face-up Dummy Hand (let's pretend he's South)
has the Ace and Queen of Hearts, Winning Bidder (North), who doesn't know who has
the King of Hearts, may start a Trick by leading Hearts. After the first Defender (East)
has (most likely) laid down a low Heart card, Winning Bidder (North) may choose for
Dummy (South) to play the Queen, in hopes that East actually had the King. East may
have the King but might not want to play it for fear that Dummy would win the Trick with
the Ace. If East actually has the King but doesn't play it, then Dummy's Queen wins the
Trick. This scenario is shown diagramaticly below:
If Dummy (South) has A♥ and
Q♥, and East has the K♥, this is what happens:
North
East
South
West
2♥
5♥
Q♥
10♥
WINNER
South (highest Heart)
but if West has the K♥, this is what happens:
North
East
South
West
2♥
5♥
Q♥
K♥
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
WINNER
West (highest Heart)
Page 18 of 24
Having Dummy (South) play that Queen may be a good strategy, no matter what the
outcome, if Winning Bidder (North) is afraid that East or West may have only 2 hearts
total and therefore may be free to Trump the third Heart played. In other words, if the
first Heart Trick is won by the Ace, and the second Heart Trick is won by the King, then
the third Heart Trick lead would, theoreticly, be won by the Queen, if it isn't Trumped.
Sometimes it is best to play Trumps at first, to eliminate all Trump cards in Defenders'
Hands. This strategy may work well if the Winning Bid Team has many valuable cards
in at least one other suit; after the Defending Team has played all their Trump cards, the
Winning Bid team can play that other suit as if it were a "No-Trump" situation, and can
lead that suit for many winning Tricks in a row without fear of being Trumped.
There are many other possible strategies. The best ones are those that you can
remember how to use. Such knowledge will come from experience.
Playing as the Defenders
The job of Defending Team is to frustrate the Winning Bid Team. In general, Defenders
should try to win the first Trick and as many Tricks as possible prior to the Winning Bid
Team earning their first Trick. However, in some cases a better strategy might be to
hold on to high Honor cards that are sure winners (for example, the Ace of trumps), in
order to prevent the Winning Bid Team from getting on a Trick-winning streak.
There are many other possible strategies. The best ones are those that you can
remember how to use. Such knowledge will come from experience.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 19 of 24
Final Comments:
The purpose of EZ-Bridge is to enjoy yourself with family and friends. The game can
also be intellectually challenging and rewarding. Because it can seem to be selfgratifying to crush, destroy, and humiliate the opposing team with your brilliant play, you
may find yourself tempted to dominate your opponents rather than to have fun with
them. If you give in to such temptation, your opponents (friends and family) may not
want to play with you the next time you ask. I suggest that you keep in mind as your
primary goal the maintaining of good relations with your fellow players.
I hope you enjoy playing EZ-Bridge and 3-Person EZ-Bridge. If so, drop me a line to let
me know. My email address is:
[email protected]
From time to time, I will put new information about EZ-Bridge on my "website", which is
HTTP://BRIEFCASE.YAHOO.COM/JOHNZORICH
(the new information will be in a sub-folder named "EZ-Bridge" on that website).
John N. Zorich, Jr.
Sunnyvale, California
April 28, 2002
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
EZ-Bridge is the first in a series of "EZ" books.
Other EZ-books currently under development are titled:
EZ-Statistics
EZ-GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices)
EZ-OSHA Compliance
EZ-CE Marking
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 20 of 24
Glossary of Terms
BID
Before the start of each Hand, each player is given the opportunity to "Bid", that
is, to verbally state how many Tricks the player thinks that her team can win in
the subsequent Hand. The Bid states the number of Tricks and which suit (if any)
will be Trump.
GAME / SET / MATCH
If you are keeping score while playing EZ-Bridge, then the team that earns 30
points first wins the "Game". The team that first wins three Games wins the "Set".
The team that first wins 2 Sets wins the "Match".
HAND
The term "Hand" has more than one meaning. It refers to the 13 cards that you
possess at the start of play after Bidding (for example: "Dummy sure has a very
strong Hand!". It also refers to all 52 cards that everyone possesses (for
example, "Who dealt this Hand?" (or, as my father says when he has a weak
Hand: "Who dealt this mess?").
NO-TRUMP [ see also "Trump" below]
"No-Trump" describes the situation where the winning Bid has been for "NoTrump", that is, no suit has been chosen to be Trump.
PASS
If you do not Bid, then you are "Passing", that is, you "Pass" or have "Passed".
TRICK
A Trick comprises four cards, one from each player, placed into the center of the
table. The most valuable card wins the Trick. There are 13 Tricks in a Hand.
TRUMP [ see also "No-Trump" above]
Trumps are like wild cards in poker. They are the most valuable cards in the
Trick. During the play of a Hand, only one of the four suits can be Trump; that is,
all cards in that suit are Trump during the play of that Hand. For example, if
Hearts are Trump, then all the cards from 2♥ thru A♥ are Trump. The winning
Bid determines which suit is Trump; for example, if the winning Bid is "8 Spades",
then Spades are Trump.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 21 of 24
Summary of Rules (EZ-Bridge)
(see next page for Summary Rules of 3-Person EZ-Bridge)
EZ-Bridge
1.
Shuffle the deck very well, and deal each player 13 cards.
2.
Dealer Bids first (or make up your own rule). The player to the left Bids next,
and so on around an around the table.
3.
Bids must be for the number of Tricks to be won by the Bidder and Bidder's
team member combined, and for the suit that is to become Trump (or the
Bidder can say "no Trump").
4.
No Bid can be a duplication of a previous Bid (in that Hand). No Bid can be for
less than the last Bid (in that Hand). The last player to Bid wins the Bidding. He
is the Winning Bidder (because everyone else has Passed).
5.
The player to the left of the Winning Bidder plays the first card of the first Trick.
The winner of the first Trick plays the first card of the next Trick. The winner of
that Trick plays the first card of the next Trick, and so on for the rest of the
Tricks.
6.
After the Defender to the left of Winning bidder has played the first card of the
first Trick in a Hand, the next player (Winning Bidder's partner) may decide (on
her own without consultation from anyone) to either continue play as a regular
participant, or to sit out the Hand (as the "Dummy") by laying down her Hand
face up and allowing her partner to choose which card to play whenever
"Dummy" is supposed to play a card.
7.
All players must "follow suit" in a Trick after the first card has been played in
that Trick. If a player does not have a card in the suit that was led, then the
player can play any other card in his Hand.
8.
The most valuable card in a Trick wins the Trick.
9.
Only the team that wins the Bidding can earn points for winning Tricks; they
earn points only if they (combined) win at least the number of Tricks that they
Bid, otherwise they lose points.
10. The first team to earn 30 points wins the game.
11. It's OK for someone to keep a paper record of who Bid what suit and who
played what card in a Hand, as long as all players get to see it.
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 22 of 24
Summary of Rules (3-Person EZ-Bridge)
(see previous page for Summary Rules of regular EZ-Bridge)
3-Person EZ-Bridge
1.
Same basic rules as for EZ-Bridge, except that one of the players is the
permanent "Dummy" Hand.
2.
The Dummy Hand is laid out face up prior to the start of Bidding.
3.
Whoever wins the Bid must change seats with whichever player is seated
opposite the Dummy Hand.
4.
Whichever individual player earns 30 points first wins the game (the Winning
Bidder gets to count the Tricks earned by both her and Dummy).
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 23 of 24
Hand #
EZ Bridge Memory Help Form
_______
Player's Names
Rounds of
Bidding
Cards Played
A♣.
A◊
A♥
A♠
K♣.
K◊
K♥
K♠
Q♣.
Q◊
Q♥
Q♠
J♣.
J◊
J♥
J♠
10♣.
10◊
10♥
10♠
9♣.
9◊
9♥
9♠
8♣.
8◊
8♥
8♠
7♣.
7◊
7♥
7♠
6♣.
6◊
6♥
6♠
5♣.
5◊
5♥
5♠
4♣.
4◊
4♥
4♠
3♣.
3◊
3♥
3♠
2♣.
2◊
2♥
2♠
Hand results
Copyright 2002, by John N Zorich, Jr.
All Rights Reserved
Page 24 of 24
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement