SUPER NOVA INSERT RF
Specialists in fireplace design and manufacture
SUPER NOVA INSERT RF
INSTALLATION & OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
IMPORTANT:
INSTALLER, PLEASE LEAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS WITH THE UNIT ON COMPLETION.
10 YEAR FIREBOX WARRANTY
The firebox is covered by a 10 year warranty.
Other parts are covered by a one year limited warranty.
Head Office – 13 French Avenue, Brendale, Queensland 4500
Telephone – PH: (07) 3490 5500
Facsimile – FAX: (07) 3490 5520
Website: - www.kemlan.com.au
Business hours: - Monday to Thursday 7:30am-4:00pm. Friday 7:30am-2:00pm
Email: - sales@kemlan.com.au
DIMENSIONS
SUPER NOVA INSERT RF – STANDARD FASCIA/CAST IRON FASCIA
G
E
F
D
B
H
A
C
MEASUREMENTS
•
A
B
C
800
1000
645
D*
STD C / IRON
420
470
E*
STD C / IRON
327
377
F
G
H
820
605
305
Denotes measurement from standard and cast iron fascia, measurement is also dependent on fascia
position placement.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
PERFORMANCE:
Average peak heat output – 11.6 kW
Average Fuel consumption - 1.9 kg/hr.
Average efficiency – 66%
Weight – 128 kg.
*Average dry fuel (hardwood) consumption rate in kilogram/hour when heater is used normally and
safely.
FIREBOX IS DESIGNED TO BE INSTALLED IN A MASONRY (BRICKWORK OR
HEBEL BLOCK) CAVITY
CAUTION – The gap between the top of the unit and the brick work should be no more than
25mm. This will prevent the fascia being exposed to radiant heat from the flue. Any gap larger than
25mm, should be shielded with non-combustible material (Masonry, Metal and/or insulating material.)
Fans must be installed & operational at all times when a timber mantle is installed. Mantle must be
minimum of 600mm above the top of the unit.
Minimum Hearth Requirements – Thickness to be a minimum of 9mm non combustible material and
must extend 300mm in front of firebox door and 300mm
to each side of the firebox door.
NOTICE TO ALL INSTALLERS:
DURING THE INSTALLATION OF THE FAN, MAKE SURE TO PULL
THE FAN CORD OUT UNTIL THE CABLE TIE STOPS ON THE INSIDE
OF THE CONDUIT. DO NOT AT ANY CIRCUMSTANCE PUSH THE
CORD BACK THROUGH INTO THE BOX.
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTION
SUPER NOVA MASONRY/TIMBER CAVITY
INSTALLATION
Flue system to be installed
to suit AS/NZS 2918.2001
Ceiling
Triple skin flue system
(10”, 8” and 6”)
Rear timber stud wall
(combustible wall)
Register plate with vented upstands
Minimum 600mm below ceiling.
-----------------------------------------------Insul wool (supplied by installer) can
be placed on top of register plate
25mm air gap
6” Flue
600
Stainless steel flue pipe.
All flue pipes must be
connected with pop rivets
supplied by installer
1359
25mm min. air gap
750
Rear of unit to
Hebel Block – 30mm min.
9
Hebel Block –
min. thickness – 75mm
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTION
SUPER NOVA FULL MASONRY CHIMNEY
INSTALLATION
Improved heating efficiency is achieved by admitting cool air into the brick cavity where it is heated by the
outer skin of the firebox and active flues, then released back into the room via hot air outlet vents.
NOTE: - Top of brick chimney can be left open, where no trees can cause a build up of leaves etc. on top
the weather plate. Weep holes must be left at weather tray level as no smoke outlet holes will be needed in
sides of chimney.
End open as smoke outlet
Weep holes
S/steel weather tray
With upstand
6” Flue
Register plate with
vented upstands
Minimum 600mm
below ceiling.
Top vent 240 x 90
Directly below
register plate
Bottom vent 240 x 90
9
300
300
1000
300
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTION
SUPER NOVA METAL CHIMNEY INSTALLATION
Improved heating efficiency is achieved by admitting cool air into the brick cavity where it is heated by the
outer skin of the firebox and active flues, then released back into the room via hot air outlet vents.
plain
crimped
Run a bead of silicone down
the vertical seam of the outer
casing to the flashing
10” Flue
All 8”-10” assembled flues must
have the crimps pointing upwards
DETAIL A
8” Flue
6” Flue
A
B
Ceiling
Ceiling
Register plate with
vented upstands
Minimum 600mm
below ceiling.
crimped
Top vent 240 x 90
Directly below
register plate
plain
All 6” assembled flues must have
the crimps pointing downwards
DETAIL B
Bottom vent 240 x 90
9
300
Min. to
timber
1000
300
Min. to
timber
300
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTION
Alternate finish to full masonry chimney
S/steel Cowl
S/steel weather tray
With upstand
Run a bead of silicone down
the vertical seam of the outer
casing to the weather tray.
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
MINIMUM HEIGHT OF FLUE SYSTEM EXIT
INSTALLATION TO COMPLY WITH AS/NZS 2918
ANY NEARBY
STRUCTURE
3000
3000 OR LESS
MORE THAN 3000
600 MIN
INCREASE AS NECESSARY UNTIL
NOTHING WITHIN 3000 OF FLUE TOP
3000
1000 MIN IF CLEAR WITHIN
3000 OF TOP OF FLUE
3000 OR LESS
600 MIN
3000
INCREASE FROM 1000 MIN
UNTIL CLEAR WITHIN 3000 OF
TOP OF FLUE
8
ABOUT CURING
Your stove has been painted with the highest quality silicone stove paint and has special break-in
procedures to cure it with heat and make it hard.
VENTILATE WELL
Ventilate the house during the first three times the stove is used. The paint on the stove will give off smoke
heavy with carbon dioxide and has an odor. Without adequate ventilation, concentrations of smoke could
irritate, or be upsetting, so open doors and windows and use a fan if necessary. After these initial burns the
paint will be cured and there should be no more smoke.
DON’T TOUCH DURING CURING
Don’t touch the surface. It will be soft and gummy during this paint curing phase. Once cured, it will not be
soft again.
CURE WITH 3 FIRES
Most stoves cure with 3 burns. The first two (2) should be 250°F for 20 minutes, or about half a normal fire.
Let the stove cool down between burns. The last fire should be 500°F to 700°F for at least 45 minutes. The
point being, cure slowly without a hot fire.
Stoves with cooler surface temperature and those that have been painted with another colour before, will
take longer to cure.
Curing can usually be observed by the effect of the paint turning flat as the heat radiates out from hotter
parts of the stove.
So remember...
•Ventilate well
•Do not touch during curing
•Cure with 3 fires
•Call your dealer for any questions
INSTRUCTIONS FOR OPERATING YOUR
KEMLAN SLOW COMBUSTION WOOD
BURNING HEATER
1.
2.
Open the air inlet fully by sliding the air inlet control to high.
Crumple at least three double pages of newspaper into loose balls and place them into the centre of the
firebox.
Cross lay at least 15 to 20 pieces of kindling on top of the paper – if pine is used, the size should vary from
the thickness of a pencil to that of a knife handle – if hardwood is used split it even smaller.
3.
Light the paper and close the door.
Once the kindling is well alight, add a few pieces of slightly larger hardwood, split to approximately 25mm x
50mm (2” x 1”).
4.
Close the door and leave the air inlet control on high. When the hardwood is well alight (usually 5
to10minutes) and coals are starting to form, larger pieces of hardwood may be added – five or six pieces the
equivalent of 50mm x 50mm (2” x 2”) is ideal.
The object is to create a fiercely burning fire of reasonable small hardwood, which will quickly produce a
good bed of glowing coals on the floor of the firebox. This will take from 20 to 40 minutes depending on the
quality of the firewood.
5
Larger pieces of hardwood may now be added. Half fill the firebox and leave the air inlet control on high until
the wood is well alight then close the control approximately a third of its travel.
Usually about one hour after lighting, the air inlet control can be further shut down to achieve the desired
heat output.
When adding new firewood it is desirable to fully open the air inlet for approximately 10 to 15 minutes until
the new pieces are burning well, then it may be returned to its desired setting.
6.
To set the fire for overnight burn – two-thirds fill the firebox with hardwood and fully open the air inlet.
Once the fire is burning well, the air inlet control should be shut down approximately three-quarters of its
travel. Setting the air inlet control may be varied to suit your particular requirements and the quality and size
of your firewood.
Remember wet or green wood may cause a dramatic reduction in the heat output of your heater (refer to
“Operating Hints” for more details).
7.
Have the flue inspected at least once every 12 months as it may require cleaning.
8.
Clean out excess ash from the floor of the firebox when required. Do not remove all the ash and in particular
leave any pieces of charcoal in the heater as they are good fuel.
9.
If the glass door in your heater becomes dirty, your firewood is either green, wet or both. You may be
closing the air inlet down too soon after lighting or after adding new firewood.
To clean the glass, simply use some of the white ash in the firebox. Apply it with a damp cloth in a circular
motion. Remove residue with a clean cloth or paper. Do not clean the glass when the heater is operating.
10. To clean the painted surface, simply dust with a soft duster and wipe over with a damp cotton cloth. Only
clean when the heater is cool.
IMPORTANT:
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD ANY SOLVENTS SUCH AS METHYLATED SPIRITS, PETROL, MINERAL
TURPENTINE ETC BE ALLOWED TO COME IN CONTACT WITH THE PAINTED SURFACE OF THE HEATER AS
DAMAGE TO THE FINISH WILL RESULT. IF AN ACCIDENT DOES OCCUR, SPRAY CAN PAINT IS AVAILABLE FROM
YOUR NEAREST KEMLAN DEALER.
OPERATING HINTS
To get the best from your Kemlan heater it is essential that you use good firewood, and use it correctly Many people do not understand the
principle of using a wood burning appliance and we suggest that it will be worth your while to study the following extract from a well known
American publication.
PRINCIPLES OF COMBUSTION: HOW WOOD BURNS
Technically, wood does not burn. What burns is the volatiles and charcoal that are created. That is why wood will not catch on fire
immediately when you put a match to it; it has to first undergo the chemical changes that create the volatiles, and a match does not create
enough heat to activate the process. As kindling and paper evaporate the moisture in the wood, the wood absorbs heat. At a certain point,
gases are given off and when these volatiles reach 480 degrees F, or the “Flash point”, as it is called, they will burst into flame if sufficient
oxygen is present. The volatiles give off more heat than does charcoal, which is why a fire with flames (which burn the volatiles) produces
more heat than one that is all charcoal.
Since the volatiles are gases and since heat rises, taking the gases with it, it is very easy to create a situation in which most of the volatiles
go up the chimney almost as soon as they are produced. This is what happens with a roaring fire and, to a lesser extent, with an open fire.
One of the reasons (but only one) that a freestanding wood stove produces more heat than an open fire is that the volatiles are contained
within the firebox and are not so quickly dissipated up the chimney. A stove that is baffled is merely one that has interior construction
design to keep the volatiles in the firebox longer; the longer they are in the firebox, the more completely they burn. The more completely
they burn, the more heat is produced. It’s that simple.
Since the flames burn the volatiles and produce heat, the ideal situation is the longest possible flame path. As soon as wood burners
understand this, they tried to devise ways of making the flame path longer than in an ordinary open fire. Even though the role of oxygen in
combustion was not under- stood in Ben Franklin’s time, Franklin did realize the importance of more completely burned volatiles. His
solution was to try to invent a downdraft stove
– one that sent the volatiles back down through the fire – but he never succeeded in getting it to work. A downdraft goes against the nature
of volatiles, which is to rise. In more recent times, there have been some successful downdraft – or partial downdraft – stoves created and
some of the fireplace stoves and units utilise this principle. Ideally, it would be best if the volatiles could be redirected down through the fire
several times, until they were al- most totally consumed. This would not only make the maximum use of the heat potential of the wood; it
would reduce creosote build-up to almost zero. Perhaps someday an ingenious inventor will design a unit that does this; so far no has
been able to.
MOISTURE AND COMBUSTION
As we have seen, dry wood ignites faster and burns better – with higher heat production – than wet or green wood. The difference
between the amount of heat produced by dry wood and green wood is so great that a dry softwood of good grade will produce more heat
than green hardwood. Green white ash, for instance, is not as good a fuel as dry tamarack.
The reason for the superiority of dry wood is easy to understand. Heat cannot be produced until moisture has been driven off. Since even
so-called seasoned dry wood contains approximately 20 percent moisture, it takes time for any fire to begin producing useable heat. Wet
wood, which can have a moisture content of over 100 percent (due to the way moisture is measured), will take that much longer to produce
heat. Meanwhile, the fire will produce smoke and creosote and very little heat. This was brought sharply to my attention when I installed
my first wood heater. To my surprise and delight, I found it comfortably heated eight rooms, where I had expected to heat only two or
three. After some time, when I had someone helping me run the fire, I suddenly noticed that the house was chilly. We added more wood
and adjusted the draft controls, but nothing we did seemed to help. It finally occurred to me to check the woodpile. My friend had been
getting green wood from a stack that was drying, instead of from the dry-wood stack. The difference the green wood made was so
dramatic I will never forget it.
HOW TO TEST WOOD FOR DRYNESS
There are two easy ways for even a novice to spot dry wood. Dry wood tends to “check”. Look at the log ends and you will see cracks
radiating from the centre of the log. If the logs have been split, the cracks will be harder to find because wood tends to split along the
cracks.
Another test for dry wood is the sound it makes when two logs are banged against each other. Green wood will make sort of a dull thud;
dry wood makes a nice crisp, sharp sound. Once you have heard the two, you will remember the difference.
FROM THE ABOVE EXTRACT SEVERAL FACTS BECOME APPARENT:
1. It is vital that your firewood be dry and seasoned.
2. A good hot fire of kindling and smaller pieces of fuel must be established before adding larger logs.
3. The larger logs should be well alight before slowing down the combustion by adjusting the air intake.
4. A hot bed of coals needs to be maintained to ensure continued combustion in the firebox.
5. When new timber is added to the firebox the air control should be opened until the fuel is well alight before damping it down again. This
will take from 10 to 20 minutes.
6. When setting the controls for overnight burn you will need to experiment with the settings to suit your particular type of fuel. Very dense
hardwood requires more air to combust and over damping will result in charring and smoking causing the glass in the door to become dirty.
The same will apply with fuel which is not fully seasoned or is not dry enough. Kemlan have followed a policy since 1969 of checking on all
complaints about poor performance of their heaters and apart from a few instances of incorrect installation (mostly insufficient flue length)
all problems have been directly related to incorrect operation and/or poor fuel. We know you will experience many years of satisfaction
from your heater if you follow the above advice.
WARRANTY
1.
Kemlan wood heaters carry a warranty on the 6mm firebox for a period of ten (10) years.
2.
This warranty also covers other components of the heater for a period of one (1) year. These
components include the baffle plate, handle assembly, secondary air tubes and fan.
3.
Kemlan’s warranty covers the wood heaters against defects in materials and manufacture.
4.
THIS WARRANTY DOES NOT COVER –
4.1 Failure to comply with manufacturer’s operation instructions.
4.2 Normal wear and tear or damage caused by incorrect installation.
4.3 Any form of rust and/or corrosion to the painted finish of the heater.
4.4 Damage to the glass in the door, if the damage is caused by impact or misuse.
4.5 The cost of collection and delivery of the wood heater and/or parts.
4.6 Damage caused by water ingress.
4.7 Cost of removal of defective heater or re-installation of replacement heater.
4.8 Failure to use fireplace components supplied by Kemlan Industries Pty Ltd.
4.9 Cost of inspection for damaged heater.
5.
CLAIMS –
5.1 (I) Kemlan will provide a full replacement of the heater in the first five years after installation.
(ii) Replacement in the subsequent five years (i.e. sixth to tenth year after installation will be on the
following basis.
Owner will pay fifty percent of purchase price if the claim is made in the sixth year – tenth year after
purchase.
5.2
Replacement of heater subject to all conditions in section four of warranty.
5.3
Should any defects occur, contact the Kemlan distributor from whom you purchased the heater.
5.4
Under this warranty the defective parts will be repaired or replaced by Kemlan’s option, free of charge.
6.
The fireplace installation must comply with the relevant local statutes, ordinances, regulations and bylaws.
PLEASE COMPLETE AND RETAIN THIS SECTION FOR YOUR
RECORDS
Purchased from: .......................................................................................................
Address: ....................................................................................................................
Date of Purchase: ......................................................................................................
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising