Self-Contained Air Conditioner or Heat Pump

Self-Contained Air Conditioner or Heat Pump
Self-Contained
Air
Conditioner
or
Heat Pump
USER’S
INFORMATION
MANUAL FOR
OPERATION
AND
MAINTENANCE
OF YOUR NEW
AIR
CONDITIONER
OR
HEAT PUMP
NOTE TO
INSTALLER:
This manual
must be
left with the
equipment user.
1
Outdoor-Air Blower
2
Outdoor-Air Coil
3
Compressor
4
Indoor-Air Blower
5
Electric Heat (Optional)
6
Condensate Drain
7
Disconnect Box and Controls Section
8
Reversing Valve (Heat Pump Models Only)
9
Indoor-Air Coil (Behind Filter and Return-Air Grille)
10
Return-Air Filter (Behind Return-Air Grille) (May Be Field
or Factory Supplied)
11
Return-Air Grille (Optional)
1
7
2
3
8
4
9
5
10
6
11
Fig. 1—Air Conditioner/
Heat Pump Components
2
WELCOME TO
EFFICIENT HOME
HEATING AND
COOLING COMFORT
Congratulations on your excellent
choice and sound investment in home
heating and cooling comfort!
Your new air conditioning or heat pump
unit represents the latest in engineering
development and is one of the best selfcontained units available today.
Your new unit is among the most
energy-efficient and reliable air
conditioning products available today.
To assure its dependability, spend just a
few minutes with this booklet now.
Learn about the operation of your air
conditioner or heat pump, and the small
amount of maintenance it takes to keep
it operating at its peak efficiency.
With minimal care, your new air
conditioner or heat pump will provide
you and your family with heating and
cooling comfort—both now and for
years to come.
! WARNING
Improper installation, adjustment,
alteration, service, maintenance,
or use can cause explosion, fire,
electrical shock, or other conditions which may cause personal
injury or property damage. Consult a qualified installer, service
agency, or your distributor or
branch for information or assistance. The qualified installer or
agency must use factory-authorized kits or accessories when
modifying this product.
! WARNING
To prevent personal injury, death,
or property damage, read and follow all instructions and warnings,
including labels shipped with or
attached to unit before operating
your new air conditioner or heat
pump.
YOUR COMFORT
SYSTEM
Identifying Your System
Take the time to familiarize yourself
with the type of system you have. This
knowledge will be of use in
understanding the basic operation of
your new air conditioner or heat pump.
The self-contained type has an indoor
and an outdoor coil, both contained
within a single cabinet. The unit may
also have optional electric heat. (See
Fig. 1.)
The unit has a rating plate affixed to the
upper front panel which provides
necessary information for specific
identification of a unit. You should
familiarize yourself with the product,
model, and serial numbers listed on the
rating plate.
IMPORTANT FACTS
To better protect your investment and to
eliminate unnecessary service calls,
familiarize yourself with the following
facts:
• Your air conditioning or heat pump
system should never be operated
without a clean air filter properly
installed. Plan to inspect the filter
periodically. A clogged air filter will
increase operating costs and shorten
the life of the unit. We recommend
changing the indoor-air filter every
month.
• Supply-air and return-air registers
should not be blocked. Drapes,
furniture, and toys are some of the
items commonly found obstructing
registers. Restricted airflow lessens
the unit’s efficiency and life span.
• For your new air conditioner or heat
pump to function properly, it MUST
have a constant outdoor-air supply.
For most applications, the unit draws
the air needed to operate from under
your home. A common problem is
that many people install underpinning
or cement blocks/bricks without
providing adequate ventilation. The
unit requires a minimum of 700 sq in.
of net free area for the outdoor-air
supply YEAR ROUND. If you are
going to/or have underpinned your
home, please refer to the Why the
Area Under Your Home is
Important section for more
information.
• Your multipurpose indoor thermostat
is the control center for your home
comfort system. You should
familiarize yourself with its proper
operation. Attempting to control the
3
system by other means—for instance,
switching the electrical supply power
ON and OFF—may cause damage to
the unit.
• On heat pump systems with some
thermostats, increasing the
thermostat more than 2° during
heating mode may cause the
supplemental electric heaters to be
turned on to satisfy the thermostat.
Needless use of supplemental heat
reduces potential energy savings.
• Thermostat “jiggling’’ causes a time
delay to interrupt operation for 5
minutes. This protects the
compressor against rapid cycling
which is potentially damaging to your
compressor.
• You may find that you can maintain
greater personal comfort by running
the fan continuously. “Air pockets’’
can form due to the structure of the
house, placement of registers, etc.
These air pockets may be too cool or
warm for your liking. Continuous fan
operation minimizes any temperature
differences. Also, systems equipped
with elec-tronic air cleaners and/or
humidifiers offer the added benefits of
having the air continuously cleaned
year-round, and humidified during the
winter season.
• Your air conditioner or heat pump
will remove humidity from your
home during the cooling season.
After a few minutes of operation
water should trickle from the
condensate drain of the cooling coil.
Check this occasionally to be sure the
drain system is not clogged. Of
course, don’t expect to see much
drainage if you live in a very dry
environment. It is important to make
sure the condensate drain tube is
piped to an appropriate location
(usually the outside of your home).
Failure to do so can create a high
moisture problem, or excessive
defrosting may occur if you have a
heat pump unit.
• On initial start-up of your new air
conditioner or heat pump, allow a
minimum of 72 hr of run time for
mechanical wear in to achieve peak
performance. In the summer, allow
24 hr for removal of moisture.
LCD READOUT DISPLAYS
CURRENT ROOM TEMPERATURE,
DESIRED ROOM TEMPERATURE,
UNIT MODE SETTING,
AND FAN MODE SETTING.
TEMPERATURE SELECTOR
THERMOMETER
80
70
60
50
80
70
MODE
60
50
EM HEAT HEAT OFF COOL
SYSTEM SWITCH
FAN AUTO
FAN
MODE BUTTON SELECTS
BETWEEN OFF, HEAT, COOL
AND AUTO OPERATION. HEAT
PUMP THERMOSTAT MODELS
ALSO INCLUDE AN EMERGENCY
HEAT MODE.
RESET/FILTER
ON
FAN BUTTON CHOOSES BETWEEN
ON OR AUTO FAN OPERATION.
FAN SWITCH
RESET FILTER BUTTON
RESTARTS THE TIMER
UP AND DOWN BUTTONS
THAT CALCULATES THE
INCREASE OR DECREASE
NEXT AIR FILTER CHANGE
THE DESIRED TEMPERATURE
OR CLEANING.
SETTINGS.
Fig. 2—Typical Manual Changeover
Thermostat
(Heat Pump Model Shown)
• If you have installed a heat pump for
the first time, you should be aware of
certain operational characteristics that
are normal for all heat pumps. If you
have lived with an electric, gas, or oil
furnace in the past, you will notice that
your heat pump operates differently.
Air entering a conventional furnace at
60°F can be heated 60° to 100°. This
would make the warm air exiting the
registers 120° to 150°F depending on
the system. Your heat pump warms that
same 60°F air 20° to 25°. The warm air
exiting the registers is 80° to 85°F. This
air may feel cool because it is slightly
less than your body temperature.
However, it is sufficiently warm to
keep you comfortable and is adding
heat to your home. A heat pump will
run for much longer periods of time
than a conventional furnace. This
longer operational time is normal for
all heat pumps and is saving your
energy in comparison to a conventional
furnace. On days with outdoor
temperatures below 40°F, it is normal
for the heat pump to run for extended
periods of time and may be assisted by
auxiliary heat. Once you understand
the operation of your new heat pump,
you will appreciate its constant, even
heat and lower energy consumption.
• With a heat pump unit, frost or ice may
build up on the outdoor-air coil during
long periods of cold, humid weather.
When this occurs, your heat pump
senses this condition and goes through
a defrost cycle. During a defrost cycle,
the outdoor-air blower is turned off,
and the reversing valve reverses the
Fig. 3—Typical Autochangeover
Thermostat
(Heat Pump Model Shown)
flow of gas through the outdoor-air coil
so it is heated and the frost or ice melts.
You may notice the defrost cycle inside
your home by a faint click and hissing
sound and a slight change in the sound
created by the blower as the defrost
cycle begins and ends. During the
defrost cycle, you may also notice that
the air is quickly heated as the defrost
cycle ends. Outside the home, a cloud
of water vapor created by the melting
frost or ice may be visible as it is
exhausted out the roof or sidewall vent.
This is normal and keeps the unit
working efficiently. Do not be alarmed!
• Air Conditioner unit should not be
operated when outdoor temperatures
are below 55°F.
DRAIN REQUIREMENTS
For most applications, the condensate
drain will be routed under the home.
Check under your home to be sure the
condensate drain pipe is hanging free
and is located where the water will
drain. An additional drain pipe must
be connected to the condensate pipe,
sloped downward to the outside of your
home, and protected from freezing.
NOTE: Make sure the unit is operated in
a level position. If not, condensate water
may leak out and damage the floor.
OPERATING YOUR AIR
CONDITIONER OR
HEAT PUMP
THERMOSTAT OPERATION
The operation of your air conditioner or
heat pump system is controlled by the
indoor thermostat. You simply adjust
the indoor temperature, and it maintains
4
the indoor temperature at the level you
select. Most thermostats have 3
controls: a temperature control selector,
a FAN control, and a SYSTEM or
MODE control. (See Fig. 2 or 3.)
The temperature control selector is a
lever or set of buttons that allows you to
establish the degree of temperature that
you wish to maintain for your personal
comfort. Some thermostats possess 2
temperature control selectors: 1 for
setting the temperature desired during
the cooling cycle, and 1 for setting the
heating operation temperature.
Typical settings are 78°F for cooling and
68°F for heating.
The FAN control offers 2 options for
controlling the indoor-air blower:
AUTO and ON. When the FAN control
is set to AUTO, the blower will run only
while the thermostat operates the
cooling or heating equipment. When the
FAN control is set to ON, the blower
will run continuously—regardless of
whether cooling or heating equipment is
running. This setting allows for
continuous air circulation and filtration.
The SYSTEM or MODE control on
your thermostat offers the following
selections: COOL, OFF, and HEAT. The
heat pump thermostat has an additional
option: EM HEAT. Neither the cooling
nor heating equipment will operate
when the SYSTEM or MODE control is
set to OFF. With the SYSTEM or
MODE control set to COOL, your air
conditioner will operate or your heat
pump will operate in cooling mode
(depending on which type of system you
have installed). With the SYSTEM or
MODE control set to HEAT, the electric
heat will operate on an air conditioning
system or your heat pump will operate
in heating mode (depending on which
type of system you have installed).
The AUTO selection found on some
thermostats provides for automatic
changeover between cooling and
heating cycles. With the SYSTEM or
MODE control set to AUTO, the cooling
mode is activated when the indoor
temperature rises above the thermostat
cooling temperature setting, or the
heating mode will be activated when
the indoor temperature drops below
the thermostat setting for the heating
cycle.
Depending on your typical winter
heating needs, your heat pump system
may include a supplemental electric
heating source. The SYSTEM or
MODE control options HEAT and EM
HEAT provide convenient selection
between the 2 heating appliances. The
heat pump will operate when SYSTEM
or MODE control is set to HEAT.
Electric heat may also be utilized on
cold days to supplement heat pump
heating. With the
SYSTEM or MODE control set to EM
HEAT, the heat pump is turned off and
the supplemental electric heat is
activated. The unit is now operating as
an electric furnace.
On heat pump systems, the wall
thermostat and outdoor thermostat
regulate the use of supplemental electric
heat to maximize energy efficiency and
your home comfort.
In certain geographic areas and in
certain applications, electric heat is not
required. Any questions regarding your
application should be directed to your
dealer.
COOLING CYCLE
When operating in the cooling cycle,
your unit will run until the indoor
temperature is lowered to the level you
have selected. On extremely hot days,
your unit will run for longer periods of
time and have shorter “off’’ periods than
on moderate days.
The following are typical conditions
that add extra heat and/or humidity to
your home and force your cooling unit
to work longer to keep your home
comfortable:
• Entrance doors are frequently opened
and closed
• Laundry appliances are being
operated
• A shower is running
• More than the usual number of people
are present in the home
AIR EXHAUST
• More than the normal number of
electric lights are in use
• Drapes are open on the sunny side of
the home
HEATING CYCLE
With the SYSTEM or MODE control
of your indoor thermostat set to
HEAT, the heating section of your
home comfort system will operate
until room temperature is raised to
the level you have selected. Of course,
the heating unit will have to operate
for longer periods to maintain a
comfortable environment on cooler
days and nights than on moderate
ones.
DEFROST CYCLE
(Heat Pump Only)
When your heat pump is providing
heat to your home and the outdoor
temperature drops below 45°F, moisture
may begin to freeze on the surface of the
outdoor-air coil. If allowed to build up,
this ice would impede airflow across
the coil and reduce the amount of heat
absorbed from outside air. To maintain
energy-efficient operation, your heat
pump has an automatic defrost
cycle.
The defrost cycle will occur only if ice
is sufficient to interfere with normal
heating operation. After ice is melted
from the outdoor-air coil, the unit
automatically switches back to normal
heating mode.
Do not be alarmed if steam or fog
appears at roof exhaust or sidewall
vent during the defrost cycle. Water
vapor from the melting ice may
condense into a mist in the cold
outdoor air.
EMERGENCY HEAT
(Heat Pump Only)
The EM HEAT setting on your
thermostat refers to any supplemental
heating appliance that may be included
in your home comfort system.
Operation of EMERGENCY HEAT
source may be required if heating
demands exceed the capacity of the
heat pump, or if the heat pump
malfunctions.
5
RETURN
GRILLE
AND
FILTER
FLOOR
REGISTER
SUPPLY
AIR INTAKE
THROUGH
VENTS IN
BLOCK OR
SKIRTING
BOTTOM
BOARD
GROUND
AIR INTAKE
THROUGH
VENTS IN
BLOCK OR
SKIRTING
Fig. 4—Airflow Through Unit
WHY THE AREA UNDER
YOUR HOME IS
IMPORTANT
Your new air conditioner or heat pump
needs air from outside. In most
applications, this air is drawn from under
your home. The fan pulls air through
your underpinning or foundation vents
and into the unit intake. (See Fig. 4.)
FAILURE TO PROVIDE
FOUNDATION VENTS WITH
ADEQUATE AIRFLOW WILL VOID
YOUR UNIT WARRANTY.
The air is pulled across a radiator-like
coil, then pushed out through the roof cap
or sidewall vent. It is very important that
this air pathway be open and clear to keep
your unit working correctly. Refer to
Table 1 to determine the amount of
ventilation panels or vents needed for
your model.
The net free open areas (listed in Table 1)
are the minimum required. It is an
acceptable practice to use a larger
amount than listed.
Your underpinning vent panels or
foundation vents are rated for the amount
of air that passes through them in sq in.
of net free area. Tell your dealer and setup crew to ensure that you have the
correct amount of ventilation needed for
your unit.
! CAUTION
Do not vent a clothes dryer under
your home or near the outdoor-air
intake opening. Lint from a
clothes dryer will collect on the
outdoor-air coil and cause damage. This is not covered by the
unit warranty.
NOTE: In the winter, the crawlspace
venting must be left open to allow the
circulation of air into the unit intake.
Should the possibility of water pipes
freezing be a concern, refer to Building
an Outdoor Air Tunnel section.
Refer to Table 2 for air filter sizes.
MAIN
ON
TABLE 1—VENTILATION
REQUIREMENTS
UNIT SIZE
MINIMUM NET FREE
OPEN AREA (SQ IN.)
018
400
024
450
030
675
036
700
DOES YOUR HOME NEED
AN OUTDOOR AIR
TUNNEL?
NOTE: This is an OPTIONAL
installation procedure to alleviate
problems that may occur with your air
conditioner or heat pump unit and
various other appliances.
We recommend that this procedure be
used for any one or a combination of
the following conditions:
1. A fireplace is installed and gets its
fresh air from underneath the
structure.
Indication to Use: When your air
conditioner or heat pump turns on,
smoke from the fireplace
backdrafts and enters the structure.
2. A gas water heater is installed that
uses fresh air from underneath the
structure.
Indication to use: When your air
conditioner or heat pump turns on,
the pilot light for the water heater is
blown out.
3. In extremely cold regions where
the water pipes may freeze.
Indication to use: In the winter,
the pipes freeze.
If you determine that your home requires an outdoor air tunnel, consult
your dealer.
PERFORMING
ROUTINE
MAINTENANCE
With the proper maintenance and care,
your air conditioner or heat pump will
operate economically and dependably.
Maintenance can be accomplished
easily by referring to the following
directions. However, before
performing maintenance, consider
these important safety precautions:
TABLE 2—AIR FILTER SIZE CHART
UNIT SIZE
FILTER SIZE (IN.)
018
16 X 26
024
16 X 26
030
16 X 29
036
16 X 29
OFF
INDOOR-AIR COIL
Fig. 5—Main Electrical
Disconnect
• DISCONNECT ALL ELECTRICAL
POWER TO THE UNIT BEFORE
REMOVING ACCESS PANELS TO
PERFORM MAINTENANCE.
NOTE: THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN 1 ELECTRICAL
DISCONNECT SWITCH.
• ALTHOUGH SPECIAL CARE HAS
BEEN TAKEN TO MINIMIZE
SHARP EDGES IN THE
CONSTRUCTION OF YOUR UNIT,
BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL
WHEN HANDLING PARTS OR
REACHING INTO THE UNIT.
CHECK THE AIR FILTER
A dirty air filter reduces the efficiency of
your air conditioner or heat pump and
allows lint and dirt to accumulate on the
indoor-air coil. Lint and dirt on the
indoor-air coil can damage your unit and
void the warranty. The air filter should
be replaced at least once a month. To
remove the filter:
1. Pull up on the handle at the bottom
of the filter grille and raise the lower
edge of the filter grille until it clears
the base of the unit.
2. Pull out on the handle.
3. Swing the filter grille out and pull it
down out of the upper front panel.
4. Slide the wire retainer assembly
from the sides of the filter grille by
pushing outward on the side and
lifting upward on the wire retainer
assembly, then remove the filter
from the filter grille.
! CAUTION
Do not operate your air conditioner or heat pump without a filter in place, nor block the front of
the filter grill.
6
Eventually, minor amounts of lint and
dirt may pass through the filter and
collect on the indoor-air coil. These
minor accumulations can be carefully
vacuumed away with a brush
attachment on a vacuum cleaner. Care
must be taken to prevent bending the
soft fins on the coil. If the fins are
accidentally bent, most air conditioning
service technicians have a tool for
straightening bent fins.
UNIT EXHAUST AND
OUTDOOR-AIR INTAKE
The unit’s exhaust and outdoor-air
intake must remain clear. In most
applications, the exhaust is handled via
a roof cap vent, and the outdoor-air
intake is beneath the floor of the home.
Some applications may utilize a
sidewall vent or air intake. Check
the unit exhaust frequently. Keep it
free of all debris, snow, or ice. The
outdoor-air intake should also be kept
free of obstructions. Blocking the
exhaust or outdoor-air intake opening
will reduce the efficiency of your unit,
could damage it, and void your
warranty.
CONDENSATE DRAIN
The condensate drain is usually routed
beneath your home. Check the unit
condensate drain periodically. Keep it
free of anything that may block or
impede the flow of condensate water. If
there is any accumulation of foreign
matter in the drain pipe, it should be
removed and cleaned.
BEFORE YOU REQUEST
A “SERVICE CALL’’
• Check disconnect switches. Verify
that circuit breakers are ON or that
fuses have not blown.
• Check for sufficient airflow. Check
the air filter(s) for any accumulations
of dirt. Check for blocked return-air
or supply-air registers. Be sure
registers are open and unobstructed.
• Check the settings on your indoor
thermostat. If you desire cooling, see
that the temperature control selector is
set below room temperature and the
SYSTEM or MODE control is set to
COOL or AUTO. If you require heat,
be sure the temperature control
selector is set above room temperature
and the SYSTEM or MODE control is
set to HEAT or AUTO. The FAN
control should be set to ON for
continuous blower operation or AUTO
if you wish blower to function only
while the unit is operating.
If your comfort system still fails to
operate, contact your servicing dealer
for troubleshooting and repairs. Specify
your apparent problem, and state the
model and serial numbers of your
equipment. (You should have them
recorded on Page 8 of this booklet.)
With this information, your dealer may
be able to offer helpful suggestions over
the phone or save valuable time through
knowledgeable preparation for the
service call.
IF YOU REQUIRE
SERVICE
If your unit was installed by a contractor
on site, contact the installing contractor
for service. If your unit came
preinstalled with a manufactured
home, call 1-800-428-4326 for
assistance in finding the closest
distributor.
REGULAR DEALER
MAINTENANCE
In addition to the routine maintenance
that you perform, your home comfort
system should be inspected regularly by
a properly trained service technician.
The inspection (preferably each year,
but at least every other year) should
include the following:
• Routine inspection of air filter(s).
Replace or clean as required.
• Inspection and cleaning of the blower
wheel, housing, and motor.
• Inspection and, if required,
cleaning of indoor- and outdoor-air
coils.
• Inspection of the coil drain pan and
drain lines. Service should include
cleaning if required.
• A check of all electrical wiring and
connections.
• A check for secure physical
connections of individual
components within units.
7
• Operational check of the system
to determine actual working
condition.
Necessary repair and/or adjustment
should be performed at this time.
Your servicing dealer may offer an
economical service contract that covers
seasonal inspections. Ask for further
details.
FOR THE RECORD
Record the model, product, and serial
numbers of your new equipment in the
spaces provided. This information,
along with the other ready-reference
facts requested, will be necessary
should you ever require information or
service.
INSTALLATION DATA
Unit Serial Number:
Unit Model Number:
If unit was purchased with Home/Office.
(Home/Office information):
If unit was purchased separately from Home/Office:
Purchased From:
Purchased From:
Date of Purchase:
Date of Purchase:
Size of Home/Office:
Phone:
Maker of Home/Office:
Address:
Serial Number of Home/Office:
City:
Dealer Phone:
Fax:
State:
Zip:
Fax:
Dealer Address:
City:
State:
Zip:
®
BDP Co.
Printed in U.S.A.
12-95
Catalog No. 92-33MA-1A6B
OM01, 02-1
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