2000 Approach Plus GPS Navigator Pilot Guide

2000 Approach Plus GPS Navigator Pilot Guide
2000
Approach Plus
GPS Navigator
Pilot Guide
Publication Number 82877
Trimble
2105 Donley Drive
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 432-0400
T
2000
Approach Plus
GPS Navigator
Pilot Guide
Publication Number 82877
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Software -240( )
Trimble • 2105 Donley Drive • Austin, TX 78758
(512) 432-0400
No part of this manual may be reproduced in any form
or by any means or used to make a derivative work
(such as translation, transformation or adaptation)
without permission from Trimble Navigation.
Copyright © 1997
T
2105 Donley Drive
Austin, TX 78758
(512) 432-0400
Limited Warranty
I.
T
HARDWARE
TRIMBLE NAVIGATION, LTD. (“TRIMBLE”), 2105 Donley Drive, Austin, TX
78758, hereby warrants to the first retail purchaser only, that hardware
purchased hereunder will be free from defects in material and workmanship
for a period of two (2) years from the date of installation, not to exceed thirty
(30) months from the date of shipment from TRIMBLE’s factory. Should
defects be found, TRIMBLE at its option, will repair or replace the product in
which physical defects in materials or workmanship occur. The foregoing
states the sole liability and obligation of TRIMBLE arising out of this warranty,
and such warranty is subject to the following CONDITIONS AND LIMITATIONS.
(A) The defect shall occur under normal use and service for which this
product was intended. TRIMBLE shall not be obligated or liable under this
Warranty for defects which TRIMBLE’s examination discloses are due to: (1)
tampering, (2) misuse, (3) abuse, (4) neglect, (5) improper storage or
maintenance, (6) use in a manner beyond which such equipment is normally
intended to be used, (7) improper repair or poor workmanship by those who
are not authorized by TRIMBLE to repair the products or use of defective
material by such unauthorized persons, and (8) any other cause except for
defects in material or workmanship caused by TRIMBLE.
(B) The warranty card supplied with the product must be completed and
returned to TRIMBLE within 15 days of installation of the product in order for
this Warranty to become effective.
(C) The product is sold and installed by an authorized dealer. A list of all
authorized TRIMBLE dealers may be obtained from TRIMBLE.
(D) The company must have received a copy of a completed FAA Form 337
covering installation of the product in the purchaser’s aircraft, or equivalent
documentation showing installation of the product by the authorized TRIMBLE
dealer.
(E) The product shall be returned to TRIMBLE via the dealer with transportation charges prepaid. After correction of the defects, the products will be
returned to the purchaser, transportation charges prepaid, except for returns
to purchasers in foreign countries, which purchasers shall be responsible for
payment of such charges from the American Port of exit to purchaser’s place
of business. The risk of loss or damage to all products in transit shall be
assumed by the party initiating the transportation of such products.
II.
DATA
TRIMBLE warrants that the media on which the database is recorded will be
free from defects in materials and workmanship under normal use for a
period of two (2) years from the Delivery Date. Purchaser’s sole and
exclusive remedy, and TRIMBLE’s sole and exclusive liability, under this
warranty will be TRIMBLE’s replacement of the media.
III.
ITEMS NOT COVERED BY WARRANTY
EXCEPT FOR THE EXPRESS WARRANTIES GRANTED IN SECTIONS I AND II
ABOVE, TRIMBLE MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED,
WITH RESPECT TO ITS PRODUCT AND DISCLAIMS THE SAME. TRIMBLE
MAKES NO EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY WITH RESPECT TO THE
DESIGN, ADEQUACY, ACCURACY, RELIABILITY, SAFETY OR CONFORMANCE WITH GOVERNMENT STANDARDS OR REGULATION OF ANY FLIGHT
PROCEDURE PRESCRIBED BY A GOVERNMENT AUTHORITY, INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. FURTHER, TRIMBLE
MAKES NO WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH RESPECT TO THE
ADEQUACY, ACCURACY, RELIABILITY, SAFETY, OR CONFORMANCE WITH
GOVERNMENT STANDARDS OR REGULATIONS, OF ANY INFORMATION
CONTAINED IN THE PRODUCT WHICH IS PUBLISHED BY OTHERS OR WHICH
TRIMBLE OBTAINED FROM OTHERS.
FURTHER, TRIMBLE MAKES NO EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY WITH
RESPECT TO THE COMPLETENESS OF ANY DATA, FLIGHT INFORMATION, OR
FLIGHT PROCEDURE CONTAINED IN ITS PRODUCT. TRIMBLE DOES NOT
INCLUDE ALL AVAILABLE DATA IN ITS PRODUCT.
IV.
LIMITATIONS ON WARRANTY
THIS WARRANTY IS LIMITED TO THE ORIGINAL RETAIL PURCHASER, EXCEPT
WHERE THE PRODUCT IS USED OR PURCHASED PRIMARILY FOR THE
PURCHASER’S PERSONAL OR FAMILY USE, THIS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF
ALL OTHER WARRANTIES EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT
LIMITATION, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, IF ANY, AND SAID IMPLIED WARRANTIES
ARE HEREBY EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED AND DISCLAIMED.
WHERE THE PRODUCT IS USED OR PURCHASED PRIMARILY FOR THE
PURCHASER’S PERSONAL OR FAMILY USE, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, IF ANY, ARE
HEREBY EXPRESSLY LIMITED TO TWO (2) YEARS FROM THE DATE OF
PURCHASE OF THE PRODUCT.
SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF AN
IMPLIED WARRANTY, OR OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES,
THEREFORE, THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS CONCERNING THE EXCLUSION OF
IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND LIMITATIONS OF DAMAGES MAY NOT APPLY TO
YOU. THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC RIGHTS, AND YOU MAY
ALSO HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE.
Purchase Date
Model Number
Serial Number
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
TRIMBLE’S LIABILITY ARISING OUT OF THIS AGREEMENT SHALL NOT
EXCEED THE AMOUNTS PAID BY YOU TO OBTAIN THE PRODUCT. TRIMBLE
SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL OR
OTHER TYPES OF DAMAGES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOSS OF
USE, LOST PROFITS, AND PERSONAL INJURY. TRIMBLE EXPRESSLY
EXCLUDES AND DISCLAIMS SUCH DAMAGES RESULTING FROM OR CAUSED
BY, THE USE, OPERATION, FAILURE, MALFUNCTION OR DEFECT OF ANY
TRIMBLE PRODUCT, WHETHER OR NOT LIABILITY FOR SUCH DAMAGES IS
DUE TO TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), CONTRACT, WARRANTY, OR
STRICT LIABILITY. THESE LIMITATIONS WILL APPLY EVEN IF TRIMBLE OR
AN AUTHORIZED DEALER HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGE, AND NOTWITHSTANDING ANY FAILURE OF ESSENTIAL
PURPOSE OF ANY LIMITED REMEDY. YOU ACKNOWLEDGE THAT THE
AMOUNT PAID FOR THE PRODUCT REFLECTS THIS ALLOCATION OF RISK.
SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION OF
LIABILITY FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE
LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
To obtain service under this warranty contact: Trimble Navigation Avionics
Service at (512) 432-0400.
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Insert latest change pages and destroy superseded pages.
LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Dates of Original and Change pages are:
Revision
Revision
Revision
Revision
A
B
C
D
Page Description
May 12, 1997
August 25, 1997
November 14, 1997
June 29, 1998
Page No.
Title Page
Date
June 29, 1998
List of Effective Pages
A-B
June 29, 1998
Record of Revisions
C
May 12, 1997
Table of Contents
i- iv
v
vi
vii
viii
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
May 12, 1997
November 14, 1997
May 12, 1997
Introduction
I-1 - I-6
I-7 - I-8
May 12, 1997
November 14, 1997
Chapter 1 - Getting Started
1-1 - 1-13
1-14
May 12, 1997
August 25, 1997
Chapter 2 - Using the Navigator
2-1
May 12, 1997
2-2
June 29, 1998
2-3 - 2-10 May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 - Approaches
3-1 - 3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6 - 3-20
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
May 12, 1997
Chapter 4 - The Waypoint Key
4-1 - 4-22
May 12, 1997
Chapter 5 - The Flight Plan Key
5-1 - 5-18
May 12, 1997
Chapter 6 - The NAV Key
6-1
6-2 - 6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6 - 6-12
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
November 14, 1997
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Page A
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Insert latest change pages and destroy superseded pages.
LIST OF EFFECTIVE PAGES (continued)
Page Description
Page No.
Chapter 7 - The Calculator Key
7-1 - 7-18 May 12, 1997
7-19 - 7-20 June 29, 1998
Chapter 8 - The Auxiliary Key
8-1
May 12, 1997
8-15
June 29, 1998
8-16 - 8-28 May 12, 1997
Chapter 9 - The Message Key
9-1 - 9-6
9-7
9-8
9-9 - 9-10
9-11
9-12
May 12, 1997
November 14, 1997
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
November 14, 1997
May 12, 1997
Appendix A
A-1 - A-16
May 12, 1997
Appendix B
B-1 - B-12
May 12, 1997
Appendix C
C-1 - C-9
C-10 - C-11
C-12
C-13 - C-14
C-15 - C-16
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
May 12, 1997
June 29, 1998
May 12, 1997
Glossary of Terms
G-1 - G-8
May 12, 1997
Index
Ind-1 June 29, 1998
Ind-10
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Date
Page B
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
RECORD OF REVISIONS
Assigned To (Job Title)
Rev Revision Insertion
No.
Date
Date
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Location
By
Rev Revision Insertion
No.
Date
Date
By
Page C
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Navigator Functions .......................................... I-2
Safety First ............................................................... I-3
Other Things You Should Know ............................... I-4
Warranty Information ....................................... I-4
Service Information .......................................... I-4
Quick Reference Card..................................... I-4
Installation Manual ........................................... I-4
Jeppesen Database - General Use ................ I-5
Jeppesen Database - International Use ........... I-5
Altitude Sources .............................................. I-6
Air and Fuel Data Computer ............................ I-6
1
Getting Started
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
The Navigator Components ........................... 1-2
The Jeppesen Navigation Database .............. 1-3
1.2.1 NavData Card .................................... 1-5
The Power Switch ......................................... 1-7
The LED Display ........................................... 1-7
Operation Overview ....................................... 1-8
1.5.1 Basic Operating Principles ............... 1-11
1.5.2 The Internal Annunciator Lights .........1-12
Revision A
May 12, 1997
i
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
2 Using the Navigator
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
3
Power-Up ......................................................
ENT Key ........................................................
Data Selector Knobs .....................................
2.3.1 Page Selection...................................
2.3.2 Data Entry ..........................................
Direct-to Key..................................................
Mode Restore ................................................
Entering a Flight Plan ....................................
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
Approaches
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
What is a GPS Approach? ............................. 3-2
The Basic Rules of GPS Approaches ........... 3-3
How to Select the Approach .......................... 3-4
How to Join an Active Approach in the Middle 3-6
Enable the Approach ..................................... 3-7
3.5.1 View APPROACH ENABLE Status .... 3-7
3.5.2 Update the Baro Setting ..................... 3-8
3.5.3 Disable the Approach ......................... 3-8
3.6 How to Perform a Course Reversal .............. 3-8
3.6.1 Procedure Turn Course Reversals .... 3-9
3.6.2 Holding Pattern Course Reversals ...3-10
3.6.3 Teardrop Course Reversals .............. 3-11
3.7 How to Fly a DME Arc Approach ...................3-12
3.8 Missed Approach ..........................................3-14
3.8.1 Missed Approach Before the MAP ....3-14
3.8.2 Missed Approach Beyond the MAP ...3-15
3.9 How to Fly a GPS Approach .........................3-15
3.10 RAIM .............................................................3-18
3.10.1 RAIM Prediction ................................3-19
3.10.2 RAIM Prediction on the Approach .....3-21
ii
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Table of Contents
4
The Waypoint Key
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
Waypoint Information ..................................... 4-2
The Waypoint Displays .................................. 4-4
Selecting Airport, VOR, NDB, Intersection ...........
or User Waypoints ......................................... 4-8
4.3.1 Select a Waypoint by Identifier ........... 4-9
4.3.2 Select a Waypoint by City Name ....... 4-9
4.3.3 Select a Waypoint by Waypoint Name
..........................................................4-10
4.3.4 Scan Waypoint Identifiers .................4-10
Selecting Approach, SID, and STAR Procedures
............................................................. 4-11
4.4.1 To Fully Define a Procedure ..............4-13
4.4.2 To Select a Procedure Name ............4-13
4.4.3 To Select a Transition .......................4-14
Activating a Waypoint or Procedure from WPT
.............................................................4-15
4.5.1 Selecting Direct Steering to Waypoint in
WPT .................................................4-15
4.5.2 Activating a SID or STAR Procedure 4-15
4.5.2.1 Select Direct to the First Waypoint ....................................4-16
4.5.2.2 Join a Leg of the Procedure 4-16
4.5.2.3 Direct-to Any Waypoint in the
Procedure ...........................4-16
User Waypoints ............................................4-17
4.6.1 Creating a User Waypoint .................4-17
4.6.2 Editing a User Waypoint ...................4-19
4.6.3 Erasing a User Waypoint ..................4-19
Activating an Approach Procedure ................4-20
4.7.1 Select Direct-to the First Approach
Waypoint ...........................................4-20
4.7.2 Join a Leg of the Approach Procedure
..........................................................4-20
Revision A
May 12, 1997
iii
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.7.3
4.7.4
4.7.5
5
Direct to Any Waypoint in the Approach
Procedure .........................................4-21
Fly Direct to the FAF .........................4-21
Intercept the Final Course Inbound ...4-22
The Flight Plan Key
5.1
5.2
5.3
Flight Plan Modes .......................................... 5-2
Entering Waypoints and Procedures ............. 5-4
Building a Flight Plan ..................................... 5-6
5.3.1 Adding a Waypoint by Identifier .......... 5-6
5.3.2 Adding a Waypoint Using WPT .......... 5-7
5.3.3 Adding a Waypoint Using NRST ........ 5-7
5.3.4 Adding a Procedure ........................... 5-8
5.4 Editing a Flight Plan ....................................... 5-9
5.4.1 Insert, Replace or Delete Waypoints 5-10
5.4.2 Insert a Procedure ............................ 5-11
5.4.3 Replace or Delete a Procedure ........5-12
5.4.4 Editing a SID or STAR Procedure .....5-12
5.5 Review Legs of a Flight Plan ........................5-13
5.6 Reversing a Flight Plan .................................5-14
5.7 Activating a Flight Plan..................................5-14
5.7.1 Join a Flight Plan Leg ........................5-14
5.7.2 Direct-to a Flight Plan Leg ................5-15
5.8 Canceling an Active Flight Plan ....................5-15
5.9 Erasing a Flight Plan ....................................5-16
5.10 Nearest Waypoints and Agencies .................5-16
5.11 Holding Patterns ...........................................5-17
5.11.1 Holding at a FPL Waypoint ................5-18
5.11.2 Holding Outside of a Flight Plan ........5-18
5.11.3 Holding After a Missed Approach ......5-18
iv
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Table of Contents
6
The Nav Key
6.1
6.2
7
Nav Mode ....................................................... 6­2
6.1.1 Nav Displays ...................................... 6­3
6.1.2 Advisory Waypoint ............................. 6­4
6.1.3 The Time Display ............................... 6­5
6.1.4 The Vertical Navigation Display .......... 6-6
Ground Track Displays .................................. 6­7
6.2.1 Track Error Graphic Display .............. 6­7
6.2.2 CDI Display ........................................ 6­9
6.2.2.1 Cross-Track Errors – Ground
Track ............................. 6­9
6.2.2.2 CDI Scale ............................. 6­9
6.3
Waypoint Information Mode ...............6­10
The Calculator Key
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
Entering Data in the CALC Mode ................... 7­2
Flight Plan/Fuel Pages................................... 7­3
7.2.1 Time, Distance and Speed Calculations ..
........................................................... 7­3
7.2.2 Fuel Management Calculations ......... 7­5
7.2.3 Fuel Remaining Page ........................ 7­7
7.2.4 Fuel At Arrival Page ............................ 7­8
7.2.5 Minimum Fuel Page ........................... 7­8
7.2.6 Total Fuel Used Page ......................... 7­9
7.2.7 Engine Fuel Flow Page .....................7­10
Air Data Pages ............................................. 7­11
7.3.1 Pressure Altitude Calculations .......... 7­11
7.3.2 Density Altitude Calculations .............7­12
7.3.3 True Airspeed (TAS) Calculations .....7­13
7.3.4 Winds Aloft Calculations ...................7­15
7.3.5 Crosswind and Head Wind
Calculations ......................................7­16
Saving the Present Position .........................7­18
7.4.1 Copy a Phonetic Waypoint ................7­18
Vertical Navigation Profiles ...........................7-19
Revision D
June 29, 1998
v
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8
The Auxiliary Key
Auxiliary Mode Features ......................................... 8-2
8.1 The Checklist Mode ....................................... 8-3
8.1.1 Creating and Naming Checklists ....... 8-3
8.1.2 Using a Checklist .............................. 8-5
8.1.3 Editing a Checklist ............................. 8-6
8.1.4 Inserting and Deleting Checklist Items 8-7
8.1.5 Deleting a Checklist ........................... 8-9
8.2 The System Status Mode .............................8-10
8.2.1 The Date/Time Display .....................8-10
8.2.2 The Present Position Display ........... 8-11
8.2.2.1 The Altitude Display .............8-12
8.2.2.2 Entering Manual Altitude ......8-13
8.2.2.3 Pressure Altitude and GPS
Altitude ................................8-14
8.2.3 The Voltage and Temperature Display
..........................................................8-14
8.2.3.1 The Crystal Offset and Memory
Battery Display ....................8-15
8.2.3.2 The GPS Antenna Display...8-15
8.2.4 The Database Expiration Display .....8-16
8.2.5 The Software Revisions Display .......8-16
8.2.6 The System Code Display ................8-17
8.3 The Sensor Status Mode ..............................8-17
8.3.1 GPS Sensor Status ..........................8-17
8.3.2 Estimated Accuracy ..........................8-19
8.3.3 GPS Satellites Tracked Display ........8-20
8.3.4 GPS Satellite Status Display .............8-20
8.3.4.1 Satellite Database ...............8-21
8.3.5 GPS Sensor Reset ...........................8-22
8.3.6 GPS Satellite Availability ...................8-22
8.3.7 Approach RAIM Availability ................8-23
8.4 The Configure Mode .....................................8-24
8.4.1 Selecting a Parallel Offset ................8-24
8.4.2 I/O Interface Check ...........................8-26
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Revision A
May 12, 1997
Table of Contents
8.4.3
8.5
9
The Dead Reckoning Display - Demo
Mode .................................................8-26
8.4.4 The Display Diagnostic Page ...........8-28
User Setup Mode ..........................................8-28
The Message Key
9.1
9.2
9.3
Accessing Messages .................................... 9-2
System Messages ......................................... 9-4
Advisory Messages ....................................... 9-6
9.3.1 Database Advisory Messages ........... 9-7
9.3.2 Flight Plan Advisory Messages .......... 9-8
9.3.3 Approach Advisory Messages ............ 9-9
9.3.4 Parallel Track Advisory Messages ..... 9-9
9.3.5 Fuel Management
Advisory Messages ...........................9-10
9.3.6 AIRWATCH™ Advisory Messages ... 9-11
9.3.7 Other Advisory Messages ................. 9-11
Appendix A - Reference
Appendix B - The GPS System: How It Works
Appendix C - The User Setup Mode
Glossary
Index
Revision C
November 14, 1997
vii
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
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viii
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Introduction
Introduction
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus is a powerful navigation management system desinged for simple operation. It is an advanced GPS
system that provides IFR en route, terminal, and approach navigation.
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus is capable of postion accuracies
better than 15 meters, anywhere, any time, and in any weather. The
Navigator has low susceptibility to jamming and interference, and as
an integral part of the future ATC system, its growth potential is great.
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus calculates your position in three
dimensions: latitude, longitude and altitude. It uses Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites, is completely automatic and requires no
initialization.
Your Trimble 2000 Approach Plus uses a state of the art,
panel-mounted design, and features:
• A twelve-channel GPS receiver that calculates position
and monitors signal integrity.
• Direct access to worldwide data on Airports, Approaches,
SIDs, STARs, VORs, NDBs, Intersections, and special
use airspaces is contained in the Jeppesen database card
used by the Navigator. To access information on airports
in the contiguous United States, use the three letter
airport identifier (for example, LAX, instead of KLAX), or
the city or object name. Outside the contiguous United
States, use the ICAO identifier (for example, CYYZ), or
the city or object name
• Push-button and knob-selection functions that are simple
and consistent, making them easy to learn and remember.
Its annunciator lights clearly show your unit’s mode of
operation and any messages it issues.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
I-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus Navigator
The Navigator Functions
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus performs a wide variety of navigation functions.
Direct Navigation
Designate a destination and fly directly
to it from any position.
Flight Plan Navigation
Define a flight plan with up to 40
waypoints and be guided automatically
along the selected route.
Position Finding
Determine current position in terms of
latitude and longitude or bearing and
distance from any point.
ETA/Fuel Consumption
Monitor a flight’s progression and
determine accurately the time of arrival
and fuel consumption.
Emergency Navigation
Determine the nearest Airport, VOR,
NDB, or Agency with the press of one
button.
Controlled Airspace
Receive immediate notification if the
aircraft is approaching a controlled
airspace, or if a selected flight plan leg
enters a controlled airspace.
Preflight Planning
Determine the distance and bearing to
destination, distance and bearing of any
leg, total flight plan distance, and other
useful information before departure.
Navigator Functions
Access information or perform calculations including Waypoint data (such as
airport communication frequencies;
runway lengths, and approach type);
Estimated time enroute and time of
arrival; Ground track and ground speed;
Minimum safe altitude; Minimum
enroute safe altitude; Desired and
actual tracks; Winds aloft; Fuel range;
True air speed; Density altitude calculation.
I-2
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Introduction
Safety First
Trimble has designed and built the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus with
all possible care. Many factors, however, can affect aircraft safety.
Please observe the following precautions.
Follow the fundamental rule of aircraft navigation: NEVER RELY ON
A SINGLE NAVIGATION SYSTEM! Errors or malfunctions are always
possible in any system, and double-checking navigation information
should be a standard procedure.
Maintain the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus and other equipment
properly to ensure that it operates according to specifications.
Update the Jeppesen database card regularly for the most current
information. Jeppesen issues an update approximately every 28
days. See the Jeppesen subscription packet enclosed with the
Trimble 2000 Approach Plus or refer to the subscription form in this
manual for information on subscribing to this update service.
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus has a wealth of features and
information. But remember the most important rule of flight: SEE
AND BE SEEN.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
I-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus Navigator
Other Things You Should Know
Warranty Information
Be sure to fill out and return the Registration and Warranty Card as
soon as you purchase your unit. The tear-out card is located at the
front of this guide. When you return this card, we will send you a
complimentary copy of Trimble’s GPS: A Guide to the Next Utility.
Service Information
Authorized service for your Trimble 2000 Approach Plus is available
by returning the unit to Trimble or a Trimble-authorized repair center.
Any customizing of the unit will be erased during system servicing
(i.e., Serial Setups, Flight Plans, User Waypoints, Personal Messages). If you have purchased the optional flight planning and
configuration software, be sure to save your customized settings so
they can be restored when the unit is returned to you. To return the
unit directly to Trimble, send it to:
Trimble
2105 Donley Drive
Austin, Texas 78758
Attn: Service Department
Phone: (512) 432-0400
FAX: (512) 836-9413
Quick Reference Card
A Quick Reference Card is included with this guide. The card
summarizes the steps required to perform frequently used Navigator
functions. Once you become familiar with the operation of your
Trimble 2000 Approach Plus, this card will be a helpful reminder.
Installation Manual
Installation information for your Trimble 2000 Approach Plus is
contained in a separate Installation Manual that came with the unit.
The person who installs your Navigator—probably your dealer—will
use this manual to install the unit in your aircraft.
I-4
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Introduction
Jeppesen Database - General Use
The navigation database used with the Navigator is produced by
Jeppesen NavData Services. The International database card
provides access to data on Airports, VORs, NDBs, Intersections, and
Airspace Boundaries. The North American database card also
includes MSAs. Both the North American (part number 81461-10) and
International (part number 81461-11) database cards are required for
complete worldwide information. Any card other than the these will
cause the message:
êDATAêBASEêCARDêTYPE
êêêêêêNOTêVALID
This database information is quite reliable. However, the identifiers
are not unique! About 120 NDB and Intersection identifiers are
repeated anywhere from 2 to 5 times in the Jeppesen database.
Therefore, it is important to double check waypoint information.
Users finding incorrect information in the database are encouraged to
call Jeppesen NavData Services at (303) 799-9090 and report a
Trimble database problem.
This guide includes additional information about database features in
the section where they are introduced.
Jeppesen Database - International Use
Database coverage for International airspaces is limited. For example, there are no UNI frequencies available in the International
database. Also, information on Restricted Airspaces and MSAs is not
currently available for International airspaces. Contact Jeppesen
NavData Services for complete information on International coverage.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
I-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus Navigator
Altitude Sources
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus accepts altitude data from several
sources including:
• encoder altitude (pressure) through a serializer
• Baro or Pressure from an ARINC 419 Airdata computer
• Baro or pressure from an ARINC 429 Airdata computer
• Baro or pressure from an ARINC 407 synchro transmitter
See your Flight Manual Supplement for the type used in your installation.
Air and Fuel Data Computer
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus Navigator, when coupled with an air
and fuel data computer, can automatically calculate:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I-6
fuel remaining
flight time remaining
fuel to destination
fuel efficiency
fuel consumed
density altitude
true airspeed
wind direction
wind speed
crosswinds
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Introduction
About This Guide
This guide is designed to get you up to speed as quickly as possible
using the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus.
This manual is valid for the software version indicated on the title
page. An alpha character in the parentheses indicates a minor
modification to the initial software release. Revisions are indicated
with the letters A-Z. For example, 240(A) is a revision to software
version 240.
Chapter 1, Getting Started, is an introduction to the Trimble 2000
Approach Plus, including physical descriptions of components, their
uses and functions.
Chapter 2, Using the Navigator, contains basic operating instructions for data entry, direct-to, and flight plan activation.
Chapters 3-9 include information on the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus
modes, displays, and functions.
The Appendices include detailed information about GPS technology
and are followed by a glossary and an index.
You may also wish to use the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus’s Demo
capability, which lets you try out many of the unit’s functions while on
the ground. Instructions for using the Demo feature are in Chapter 8.
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I-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus Navigator
This Page Intentionally Left Blank
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Revision C
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Chapter 1 Getting Started
Chapter
1
Getting Started
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus is a powerful navigation management system designed for simple operation. Chapter 1 introduces
the user to the primary components and the major functions of the
Trimble 2000 Approach Plus. Chapter 2 presents the basic use of
the Navigator, including the most frequently used features. Chapter 3
presents the Navigator Approach Procedures, while the remaining
chapters explain each major mode of operation in detail.
This chapter covers the following topics:
• Information Displays
• Keys
• Selector Knobs
• Annunciator Lights
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1-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
1.1
The Navigator Components
The front panel of the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus includes six
components:
• Jeppesen database card slot
• A power switch
• The LED display
• The function keys
• Two selector knobs
• Annunciators
MESSAGE
ANNUNCIATOR
LED
DISPLAY
NAV STATUS
LARGE,
ANNUNCIATORS
OUTER
SELECTOR
NINE
KNOB
FUNCTION
KEYS SMALL,
POWER
INNER
SWITCH
SELECTOR
KNOB
JEPPESEN NAVDATA
CARD SLOT
1-2
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Chapter 1 Getting Started
1.2
The Jeppesen Navigation Database
The Navigation Database, produced by Jeppesen NavData Services,
is a sophisticated product, providing access to reliable, worldwide
data on Airports, Approaches, SIDs, STARs, VORs, NDBs, Intersections, and Airspace Boundaries. The North American and International database cards together provide complete worldwide information. The NavData Database Card contains the following information
(see exceptions below on the International Database Card):
Reported Public-Use Airports and Military Bases with Runways
of 2000 Feet or Greater
• Identifier, City Name, State/Country, Facility Name
• Runway Number, Length, Width and Surface Type (Hard,
Gravel, Turf, or Soft), Traffic Pattern Direction
• Field Elevation and Beacon Availability
• Lighting Availability on at Least One Runway
• IFR Approach, Aircraft Services Availability
• ATIS, Approach, Tower, Ground, CTAF and Unicom
Frequencies (when multiple frequencies exist, only one
is given). Range of 118.00 to 136.975 for Com frequencies.
• Latitude and Longitude
Approaches
• Airport Identifier associated with Approach
• Approach Name (with Runway when applicable)
• Initial Approach Fixes (IAFs) and Transitions
• DME Arcs
• Approach Waypoints with Type Identifiers (IAF, FAF, MAP,
MAHP, Intermediate Waypoints)
• Latitude and Longitude of Approach Waypoints
Standard Instrument Departures
• Airport Identifier associated with SID
• SID Name
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
• Applicable Runways
• SID Transitions
• SID Waypoints
• Latitude and Longitude of SID Waypoints
Standard Terminal Arrivals
• Airport Identifier associated with STAR
• STAR Name
• STAR Transitions
• STAR Waypoints
• Latitude and Longitude of STAR Waypoints
VORs and NDBs
• Identifier, City Name, State/Country, Facility Name
• Frequency (range of 180 to 713 KHz for NDBs; range of
108 to 117.95 for VOR frequencies) and Morse Code for
identifier
• Latitude and Longitude
Intersections
• Name and Region
• Latitude and Longitude
Minimum Safe Altitudes
Controlled Airspace Advisories and Frequencies
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Chapter 1 Getting Started
• Nearest Controlling Agency and Frequency (when
multiple frequencies exist, only one is given)
Note that the International NavData Database Card does not contain
Unicom frequency information, nor Minimum Safe Altitudes.
Information provided is as reported by governing agencies and
Jeppesen. The database information is provided as a reference and
is not to be solely depended upon for navigation communication,
takeoff, landing, or guidance. Depending on the reporting agency,
some information may be missing or inaccurate. Also, the International Database may be missing certain classes of data and does
not contain minimum safe altitudes. Always check local agency
documents for full and correct information.
CAUTION
When executing terminal area procedures (SIDs, STARs and
Approaches), note that the Navigator database will contain all the
waypoints associated with those procedures, but not necessarily
all the legs. For example, a missed approach procedure may
require the pilot to fly runway heading to 3000 feet, then turn left to
intercept an inbound course to the Missed Approach Holding Point
(MAHP). For this procedure, the navigator will have only the
identifier and coordinates of the MAHP, not the procedures for
arriving at it. The pilot should always consult the appropriate
publication to ensure the procedure is flown correctly.
1.2.1
NavData Card
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Insert the card into the Navigator with the gold contacts facing up.
The card will slide smoothly into the slot when properly inserted. If it
does not, remove the card and verify the orientation.
The NavData card supplied with your Navigator was current when the
unit was shipped from the factory. The data on the card is updated
every 28 days by Jeppesen, so it is important to monitor the expiration date. To receive database updates, complete the subscription
form enclosed with the system or use the form located in the front of
this guide.
WARNING
Removing the data card with power applied cancels the active flight
plan. The Navigator displays the messages
êDATAêCARDê REMOVEDê
êREPLACEêTOêRESTART
and
êDATAêCARDê REMOVEDê
êFPLêCANCELLED
until a card is reinserted, at which time the unit restarts.
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Chapter 1 Getting Started
If the card is not present at power-on, you will receive a “DATABASE
MISSING” message. If the card has expired you will get a “DATABASE
EXPIRED” message.
1.3
The Power Switch
The Navigator has one power switch, located at the top of the unit.
To activate the unit, push the power switch to the ON position.
is automatically adjusted based on the ambient light.
When the power is turned on, the Navigator performs self-diagnostic
tests and begins its automatic position initialization. When these
tests are completed the Fuel on Board message appears. Refer to
Section 2 for information on completing initialization.
1.4
The LED Display
The Navigator displays information on a two line LED screen. The
ŽLAX®ê120­ê143¡ê0:34
{ÒÞÒÞÛÞÒÞÒ}Ÿ124­250‹
displayed information varies, depending on the selected mode. For
example, a typical NAV mode display looks like this:
The top line of the display indicates that to the Los Angeles Airport,
bearing is 120°; distance is 143 nautical miles; estimated time en
route is 34 minutes. The bottom line indicates that the CDI is
centered; current track is 124°; current ground speed is 250 knots.
The LED screen features automatic dimming. The screen intensity
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
1.5
Operation Overview
The pilot controls the operation of the Navigator with the KEYS and
the SELECTOR KNOBS. ANNUNCIATOR LIGHTS alert the pilot of
system messages, current navigation mode, and parallel track
selection.•
• The Mode Keys select a major function category.
• The Function keys provide specific operations.
• The Selector knobs are used to control the display and
modification of information.
Keys, Modes, Knobs, and Data Pages
The Navigator’s operation is organized into MODES,
FUNCTIONS, and DATA PAGES.
A Mode Key provides access to the Navigator’s modes, or states.
The nine keys are:
The navigation key is used to view navigation and
position information along your selected route.
The waypoint key is used to view information such
as bearing and distance, runway, name, frequencies, and position.
The flight plan key is used to view the active flight
plan, stored flight plans, and to build and edit flight
plans.
The calculator key enables you to perform fuel and
airdata computations.
The auxiliary key is used for a variety of functions.
Use it to view system information such as date,
time, and GPS receiver status. Use it to view your
custom checklist, set a parallel track offset, and
select data base search regions. It enables your
installer to set installation-specific parameters
such as audio volume and serial interface setups.
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Chapter 1 Getting Started
The nearest key is used to view information about
the 20 nearest airports, approaches, VORs,
Agencies, NDBs, intersections, and user
waypoints.
The direct-to key is used to change your flight path.
Use it to fly direct to any waypoint in the data base
and to activate a flight plan.
The message key is used to view system messages and to display your current CDI scaling.
The enter key is used for data entry. Press it to
obtain a flashing cursor in an editable data field.
The Selector knobs are used to control the display and edit
information.
The small, inner knob is used to change the top
line of the display or to change data under the
cursor.
The large, outer knob is used to change the bottom
line of the display, to advance the cursor within a
data field, and to advance the cursor between data
fields.
A key may have one or more modes. The Navigator displays mode
names bracketed by asterisks. For example, the System Status
mode of the AUX key is displayed as
*SYSTEM STATUS*.
A mode may have one or more DATA PAGES. Data pages may
display status information about the Navigator, or contain data fields
that may be edited.
A data page may also have additional information displayed either on
a secondary data page or on the upper or lower line of the current
page.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Selecting Keys, Modes, and Data Pages
When pressed, the key lights to indicate that this is the active key,
and one of the modes of that key is displayed. Pressing the key
again displays the next mode, and so on. When the last mode is
reached, pressing the key again will cycle back to the first mode.
If the displayed mode contains data pages, then rotating the
sequences through the data pages. If a data page has additional
information related to the current data page, this may be displayed by
turning the
. The additional information may be a secondary data
page, or another line of data on the current data page.
When the last data page is reached, rotating the
in the opposite
direction sequences back through the data page, or to another line of
data on the current data page.
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Chapter 1 Getting Started
Entering Information
Some data pages contain editable fields. The
and
key
are used to enter or change information on a data page. To do this:
• Rotate the
to select the desired data page of the
active function.
• Press
• Rotate the
to move within the data field.
• Rotate the
to edit information in the data field.
• Press
1.5.1
to initiate editing.
to complete the data entry.
Basic Operating Principles
The following principles apply to all Navigator functions:
Selects displayed Waypoint, Procedure, or Flight
Plan for activation.
(1st Press)
Activates course steering as selected
(abort by pressing the NAV key).
(2nd
Press)
Opens any editable field on displayed page.
(1st Press)
Accepts entered data.
(2nd
Press)
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Press a key (NAV, WPT, FPL, CALC, AUX, NRST)
multiple times to select desired mode. Hold for 1
to 1½ seconds to return to Primary page of key.
Use the small, inner selector knob to:
• Change any editable field (course, distance, or
procedure) located within chevrons (< >).
(small,
inner
selector
knob)
• Change alphanumeric or available option/
function of selected field while editing.
• Scroll through Primary pages and top lines of
displayed mode.
Use the large, outer selector knob to:
• Move between editable fields on displayed page.
(large,
outer
selector
knob)
1.5.2
• Scroll through Secondary pages and bottom lines of
displayed mode.
The Internal Annunciator Lights
The internal Annunciator Lights are located above and to the right of
the LED display. They are visible only when lit.
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Chapter 1 Getting Started
MSG
The MSG annunciator light flashes when there is a
new message to view. If there are multiple
messages that you have not yet viewed, the light
continues to flash until all messages have been
viewed. Some messages keep the light on steady
after you have viewed them as a reminder that the
condition that caused the message is still unresolved.
CDI scaling settings are always available under the
MSG key.
If the Navigator is wired to your audio panel, you will
hear a beeping tone anytime the MSG annunciator
is flashing.
(Details of the Navigator messages are presented
in Chapter 9.)
WPT
The Waypoint annunciator light alerts you to
waypoint arrival. When approaching the active
waypoint, the light will illuminate with the lead time
as determined by the sum of the selected lead time
and the computed turn anticipation time. Lead time
may be changed by your installer, with the factory
set default equal to 10 seconds. Turn anticipation
time is computed by the Navigator based on the
course difference between the current leg and the
next leg, assuming a standard rate of turn. If the
waypoint is the last waypoint, turn anticipation time
is zero.
PTK
The Parallel Track annunciator is on when you
have selected a track parallel to the current leg’s
track. Press the
offset.
HLD
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May 12, 1997
key to view the selected
The Hold annunciator light alerts the pilot that the
Active Flight Plan is suspended at the current Active
Waypoint.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
APR
The Approach Annunciator comes on at 2 nm
inbound to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) when all
Approach requirements are met. The requirements are: an Approach Profile is Activated,
Approach mode is Enabled, Approach RAIM is
predicted to be available at the FAF and MAP, and
the aircraft is located between the FAF (from 2 nm
inbound) and the MAP on or near the final approach
NOTE:
The RAIM and GPS internal annunciator lights have no function in
software versions -0240 and higher.
1-14
Revision B
August 25, 1997
Chapter 2 Using the Navigator
Chapter
2
Using the Navigator
The Navigator operating procedures are designed to minimize the
pilot memory items and to behave consistently across all operating
modes and pages. This manual uses the following naming conventions.
Navigator
Refers to the TNL 2000 Approach Plus Navigator.
Selector Knobs Refers to the two concentric knobs on the face of
the Navigator.
Key
Refers to any of the keys on the face of the Navigator.
Mode
Navigator functions accessed by pressing a key.
Page
Data within a function, accessed by rotating the
knobs.
Waypoint
A single point, such as a VOR, NDB or Airport.
Procedure
A collection of waypoints such as SIDs or STARs
and Approaches.
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2-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
2.1
Power-Up
To activate the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus GPS Navigator, push on
the power switch located on the upper-right side of the unit. The
Navigator automatically executes a self-test, displaying the results on
the screen.
As part of the self-test process, the Navigator performs a lamp test
that illuminates:
• all internal annunciators
• all external annunciators
• all keys
When the self-test is complete, the Navigator displays the last
computed fuel quantity value.
• If the value is correct, press any key to begin Navigation.
or
• If the fuel value is incorrect, use the selector knobs to
enter the correct value.
• Press
2.2
The
to complete the entry.
ENT Key
key is used to begin and end all data entry.
• Press
to open a field.
• Use the Data Selector Knobs (described next) to change
or select the data.
• Press
2-2
to close the field.
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Chapter 2 Using the Navigator
2.3
Data Selector Knobs
The concentric selector knobs have two operating modes: page
selection and data entry.
2.3.1
Page Selection
Most Navigator modes have more than one page of data available.
Turn the small knob to go from page to page. Use both the large and
small selector knobs to change the top and bottom display lines.
2.3.2
• Use the
knob to change the top line of the display.
• Use the
knob to change the bottom line of the display.
Data Entry
Data selection is accomplished using the
knobs.
key and the selector
• Use the
knob to move the cursor within a field and to
move from field to field.
• Use the
• Press the
knob to change the data under the cursor.
key to complete the entry.
Some data fields, such as procedure names, have chevrons (< >)
around them. You may change the data in these fields by simply
knob. You do not need to press
rotating the
close the field; although that also works.
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May 12, 1997
to open and
2-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
2.4 Direct-to Key
The
key is used to change your flight path. Use this key to fly
direct-to any waypoint in the data base, enter a holding pattern, and to
activate a stored flight plan.
This key requires two consecutive presses to change your flight path.
After the first press, review the data on the display screen. Note the
proposed course and waypoint. Change the course as desired
(course for a “join leg” is fixed by the leg waypoints and cannot be
changed). For reference, set your CDI or HSI to the proposed course.
Once you are satisfied with the proposed flight path change, press the
key a second time to execute the change. The Navigator will automatically change to the Primary Navigation page.
Use
to set course
JOINêLEGê229­êBATSN°
FLYêCOURSE<086­>-Dº
TOêBUMBY°
êêêêêêêGUO¶
If you did not change the course offered by the Navigator after the first
key press, the Navigator centers the CDI. If you selected a
course to/from the waypoint, the Navigator will deflect the CDI as
appropriate to the aircraft’s position relative to the selected course.
Press
instead of the second
changing your flight path.
press to abort without
If you select direct-to a waypoint from a waypoint mode while you are
on an active flight plan, the navigator will cancel the flight plan on the
second
first
press. In this circumstance, notice the display after the
press contains the phrase “...& CANCEL FPL”.
FLY COURSE<010­>-Dº
ADS®
2-4
& CANCEL FPL
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Chapter 2 Using the Navigator
To change your flight path:
• Select a waypoint from
, or a flight
.
plan from
• Press
, or from
.
• To change the course, use the
knob.
• Set your CDI or HSI for reference to the new course.
• Press
to execute.
• Press
to abort without changing your flight path.
2.5 Mode Restore
To return the
,
,
,
,
or
key to the
power-on default mode, press and hold the key for at least 1 second.
No data is lost or affected by this action.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
2.6
Entering a Flight Plan
This section explains step-by-step how to enter a flight plan. The flight
for this example is from Austin, Texas (KAUS) to Ft. Worth, Texas
(KFTW). The following are waypoints on this route:
AUSA
AUSV
GROWNI
EDDEEI
SARGEI
MCDONI
ACTV
SLUGG1STAR
FTWA
The steps for entering this sample flight plan follow:
• Press
until the display says, STORED FLIGHT
PLAN or NO STORED FLIGHT PLAN.
• Turn either the
or the
until the display says,
ADDêNEWêFLIGHTêPLAN
startê++end
• Press
.
When
is pressed, the right plus symbol (+) on the bottom line
becomes a flashing field ready for editing. Select the waypoint type (A,
_APRCH, _SID, _STAR, V, N, I, or ualpha) here. In this sample flight
plan, the first waypoint to be entered is an airport, AUS. So the
flashing letter on the bottom line must be an “A”.
Rotate
to select
waypoint type.
ADDêNEWêFLIGHTêPLAN
startê+®êêêêê-end
2-6
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Chapter 2 Using the Navigator
• If necessary, turn the
to an “A”.
to change the flashing character
Follow the steps to enter the waypoint identifier, AUS.
to move the cursor to the next field so that
• Turn the
you can select the airport identifier.
to display “A”.
• Turn the
• Turn the
to move the cursor to the next field.
to select “U”.
• Use the
• Turn the
to move the cursor to the next field.
• Turn the
to select “S”.
ADDêNEWêFLIGHTêPLAN
startê+®AUSêê-end
• Press
flight plan.
to complete the entry and add AUS to the
EDITêFLIGHTêPLAN
AUS®êê++end
The next waypoint is the AUS VOR. Therefore, the flashing letter on
the bottom line must be v.
• Press
to enter the next waypoint.
• Turn the
until the flashing character is a “V”.
• Turn the
to move cursor to the next field.
and
alternately to select characters “A”,
• Turn the
“U”, and “S” for the AUS VOR.
• Press
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May 12, 1997
to complete entry of the waypoint.
2-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
The intersections must be entered next.
to begin entry of the next waypoint, GROWN
• Press
intersection.
• Turn the
to select
waypoint type.
EDITêFLIGHTêPLAN
AUS®êê+Iêê-end
• Turn the
tion.
until the flashing letter is an “I” for intersec-
• Turn the
to move the cursor to the next field.
• Turn the
to select the letter “G” for the GROWN
intersection.
• Alternate turning the
field and the
GROWN.
• Press
to move the cursor to the next
to select the remaining letters in
to complete this entry.
Repeat the steps for entering GROWN to add the remaining intersections (EDDEE, SARGE, and MCDON).
Add the ACT VOR.
• Press
to begin entry of the VOR.
• Turn the
to change the flashing waypoint type to a “V”.
• Turn the
to move the cursor to the next field and the
to select the letters of the identifier, ACT.
• Press
2-8
to end this entry.
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Chapter 2 Using the Navigator
After ACTV, add the destination airport, then the _STAR.
• Press
to begin entry of the destination airport.
• Turn the
“A”.
to change the flashing waypoint type to an
• Turn the
to move the cursor to the next field and the
to select the letters of the identifier, FTW.
• Press
to end this entry.
• Press
to begin entry of the STAR.
Rotate the
to select
the procedure type.
EDITêFLIGHTêPLAN
ACT·ê+_STARêê-end
• Turn the
until flashing field is _STAR.
• Press
.
The Navigator chooses the first STAR associated with your destination, FTW. To select other STARS for FTW, use the
• Turn the
.
to select SLUGG1.
. (There is no prompt for this step. The
• Press
key will not be flashing.)
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2-9
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Select a transition.
to select the ACT transition.
• Turn the
• Press
.
• Press
to add a STAR to the flight plan.
• Press
to complete the FPL editing process.
• Turn the
counterclockwise until LEG 1 is displayed in
the lower left.
AUS®ê-ºFTW®êêêêê176¡
LEGê1:êAUS®êêêêŽAUS·
• Press
,
to activate the flight plan. (The
key will not flash to prompt you.)
On the successful conclusion of these steps, the flight plan has been
entered and activated.
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Chapter 3 Approaches
Chapter
3
Approaches
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus allows you to fly non-precision
approaches to airports with published GPS-overlay and GPS-only
approach procedures from data stored on the NavData® card. GPS
overlay approaches, while identical to the underlying VOR or NDB
procedure, provide greater accuracy and continuous course and
distance information not available otherwise. GPS-only approaches,
unlike VOR or NDB based approaches, can be designed such that
the final approach course is aligned with runway heading.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
3.1 What is a GPS Approach?
A GPS approach is a sequence of waypoints linked together just like
a user-created flight plan , except that the TSO C-129 standards
require that a GPS approach be extracted from the NavData® card as
a single procedure. You may delete or replace this procedure, but
you cannot edit this procedure.
Every GPS approach must have at least two waypoints; a Final
Approach Fix (FF) and a Missed Approach point (MA). Most have a
Missed Approach Holding (MH) point or other missed approach
point.
Many approach waypoints are unnamed on the published Terminal
Procedures. These include waypoints like DME positions, intersection of two radials, DME arc end points, etc. In addition, many overlay
approaches need a Final Approach Fix to comply with TSO C-129(A1)
requirements. Some Jeppesen approach charts depict these
waypoint names; NOS charts do not. Until all the published charts
depict the waypoint names, you must correlate the Jeppesen
NavData information displayed on the Navigator with the published
procedures to ensure proper interpretation of the waypoint identifiers.
The most common waypoint names are:
RWxx
Runway xx threshold missed approach waypoint.
MAxx
Runway xx missed approach waypoint.
Drrrd
DME arc waypoint defined by a radial and a
distance from the arc reference VOR. In this
convention, rrr is the FROM radial in degrees and d
is a letter of the alphabet representing the distance
in nautical miles. For example, A=1nm, J=10nm.
CFxx or CFxxx
Course fix waypoint for a runway xx or VOR radial
xxx.
FFxx or FFxxx
Final approach fix for a runway, xx or radial, xxx.
NxxHP
NDB approach runway xx intermediate holding
pattern waypoint.
3-2
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Chapter 3 Approaches
To aid in identifying approach waypoints, the Navigator displays
subscripted letters after the identifier to indicate the waypoint type.
IF
Initial Approach Fix.
B
Intermediate Fix (Intersection available in
WPT).
W
Intermediate Fix (Terminal waypoint not available in
WPT)
FF
Final Approach Fix.
MA
Missed Approach Point.
MH
Missed approach Holding point.
DM
DME arc reference waypoint.
The 2000 Approach Plus accommodates procedure turns and
holding pattern course reversals. These legs are depicted in the
flight plan as
PTURNR
HOLDL
The subscripted letter, R or L, indicates turn direction.
For software versions 240B and later, the subscripted letters L and R
are not displayed with procedure turns.
3.2 The Basic Rules of GPS Approaches
There are two types of GPS approaches: overlay and GPS. Overlay
approaches are based on existing procedures. GPS approaches
are new approaches designed specifically for GPS. You fly both
types exactly the same according to the following rules.
The approach must be on the NavData® card and the
card must be current.
You may select the approach at any time prior to reaching
the final approach fix.
You may join the approach at any point or leg in the
procedure except you may not join the FAF-MAP leg or
select direct-to the MAP. Both are prohibited by the TSO.
If you attempt to do either, the Navigator will offer the final
approach course to the FAF instead.
Revision D
June 29, 1998
3-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
En route, the CDI is 5 nm full scale. Within 30 nm of the
MAP, the CDI is 1 nm full scale. On the FAF-to-MAP leg,
the CDI is 0.3 nm full scale. You can view the CDI
scaling at any time under the
key.
Within a 30 nm radius of the airport, the Trimble 2000
Approach Plus prompts you for the barometric setting.
key. If
Enter the barometric setting and press the
you do not enable at this time, the unit prompts you again
at 3 nm from the FAF. If you do not set it at this point, the
GPS will not illuminate the approach annunciator at the
FAF.
The distance and bearing displayed on the Trimble 2000
Approach Plus is always relative to the current TO
waypoint.
If the green APR (approach) annunciator is not on at the
FAF, execute the published missed approach procedure.
If you are off course on the FAF to MAP leg, do not use the
,
key sequence to center the CDI. This will
cancel the approach and begin the missed approach
sequence.
When flying the missed approach, fly all procedures and
observe all altitude restrictions as published on the
printed charts.
3.3 How to Select the Approach
There are two ways to select an approach with the Trimble 2000
Approach Plus. You can add an approach procedure to a flight plan
. When you add an approach procedure to a
or select one from
flight plan, the Trimble 2000 Approach Plus places the procedure at
the end of the flight plan, replacing the destination airport, if it was
specified. If you select an approach procedure from WPT, the
Trimble 2000 Approach Plus treats this procedure as any other flight
plan, except that it prohibits editing of the procedure.
To insert an approach into the active flight plan:
• Press
to get to the active plan display. Note: If you
press and hold the
key for one second, the unit will
display the active plan and active leg.
3-4
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 Approaches
• Press
twice to open the flight plan for input. Note: It
does not matter where you insert the approach, the
Trimble 2000 Approach Plus will place it at the end of the
flight plan.
• If the approach modifies the active leg, you will be
prompted to press
modify the active leg.
to cancel the flight plan and
• Rotate
to _APRCH then press
. The Trimble
2000 Approach Plus presents the approaches for your
destination airport. (Note: If the flight plan has no
destination airport, the Navigator presents the approach
for the last airport you viewed in WPT or NRST. In this
case, press
, use the selector knobs to choose the
desired airport identifier, then press
the selection.)
• Rotate
and rotate
to complete
to display the desired approach. Press
to select the desired transition. Press
to complete the selection.
• Press
plan.
to insert the approach into the active flight
• To select a different leg or reactivate the flight plan, rotate
knob counter-clockwise until the desired leg is
the
displayed.
• Press
twice to join that leg.
To activate an approach from the WPT mode:
• Press
repeatedly to get to the APPROACH mode.
• Press
then rotate
approach and transition.
and
to select the desired
• Press
twice to activate the approach. Note: This
cancels the active flight plan and provides guidance
direct-to the first waypoint of the approach.
Once the approach is activated, the primary NAV page is displayed.
and use the
knob. Note:
To review the procedure, press
The first leg is –D–> IAF, indicating direct-to the initial approach fix.
Revision D
June 29, 1998
3-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
3.4
How to Join an Active Approach in the Middle
When you are receiving radar vectors, it is common to join the
approach at some intermediate leg or waypoint, or intercept the final
approach course inbound.
To join an active approach leg:
• Press
to view the active flight plan.
• Use the
knob to view the desired leg (A to B).
once. If you want to join the leg, press
• Press
again. If you want to proceed direct-to either end of the
leg, use the
knob to select the waypoint then press
again.
Note: You may join the approach at any point or leg in the
procedure except you may not join the FAF-MAP leg or
select direct-to the MAP. Both procedures are prohibited
by TSO C-129.
To join the final approach course inbound or proceed direct-to the
FAF.
• Press
to view the approach page. If the desired
approach is not the one in the display, press
use the
and
and
knobs to select it.
• For direct-to the FAF, rotate the
left.
knob one click to the
• To intercept the final approach course inbound, rotate the
knob two clicks to the left.
• Press
3-6
twice.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 Approaches
3.5
Enable the Approach
Once you have selected an approach and are within 30 nm of the
airport, the Navigator Plus prompts you to input the barometric
setting and enable the approach. If you did not enable the approach
when prompted 30 nm from the airport, the Navigator Plus will
prompt you again 3 nm from the FAF. If you ignore this prompt, the
Navigator Plus will not illuminate the Approach light.
APPROACHêENABLE?êENT
BARO:ê30¤ê
Enter the baro setting then press
to enable the approach.
APPROACHêENABLED
BARO:ê30¤
The Navigator Plus uses the barometric setting to correct the
pressure altitude received from the aircraft altitude encoder. The
Navigator Plus uses the altitude information when there are insufficient satellites available to do RAIM or 3D (4 satellite) navigation. If
your installation provides baro altitude to the Navigator Plus, this
screen will display the altitude in place of the baro setting, and the
approach will enable automatically when within 30 nm of the airport.
3.5.1
View APPROACH ENABLE Status
Once you are within 30 nm of your destination airport, you may view
the Approach Enable status by pressing the
key.
If you have already enabled the approach, the bottom line of the
display alternates between displaying the baro setting and the name
of the selected approach.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
3-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
3.5.2
Update the Baro Setting
To update the baro setting after you have enabled the approach:
• Press
to view the APPROACH ENABLE status.
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to change the baro setting.
• Press
3.5.3
.
Disable the Approach
If, for any reason, you want to disable the approach after you have
enabled it:
3.6
• Press
to view the APPROACH ENABLE status.
• Press
.
• Use the
knob to select the ENABLED field.
• Use the
knob to select DISABLE.
• Press
.
How to Perform a Course Reversal
The Navigator Plus supports three types of course reversals associated with non-precision approaches: procedure turn course reversals, holding pattern course reversals, and teardrop course reversals. For procedure turn course reversals, the Navigator Plus
provides a course outbound prior to the reversal and a course
inbound once the reversal has been executed. For holding pattern
3-8
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 Approaches
3.6.1 Procedure Turn Course Reversals
The Navigator Plus provides guidance outbound to the procedure
turn, prompts you with the outbound heading, then, once you have
turned inbound, automatically track-changes to the inbound course.
No operator intervention is required. No hold light will illuminate.
Once you have passed the IAF, the Navigator Plus automatically
provides an outbound course to the p-turn. As you cross the p-turn
point outbound, the GPS displays an advisory message to execute
the procedure turn
EXECUTEêP-TURN
TURNêTOêXXX
where XXX is the procedure turn outbound heading. Press
to
acknowledge this prompt. Fly the procedure turn manually, noting
that the GPS CDI is providing guidance relative to the outbound
course. As you turn to within 80 degrees of the inbound course and
are at least 3 nm out from the FAF, the GPS provides guidance
inbound. Thereafter, the GPS provides guidance through the remainder of the approach.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
3-9
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
3.6.2 Holding Pattern Course Reversals
The Navigator Plus provides guidance to the holding pattern hold
point and then guidance along the holding course back to the
holding fix. No operator intervention is required. No hold annunciator
will illuminate.
As you pass over the holding fix the first time, the Navigator Plus
track-changes to show published course guidance inbound to the fix:
EXECUTEêHOLDêPATTERN
TOêINBOUNDêCRSêXXX­
where XXX is the inbound course to the holding fix. Press
to
acknowledge this prompt. Fly one turn through the pattern, using
standard entry procedures. As you pass over the fix for the second
time, the Navigator Plus automatically sequences to the next
waypoint in the approach. Thereafter, the GPS provides guidance
through the remainder of the approach. To remain in the holding
pattern, follow the instructions in section 5.11, Holding Patterns.
3-10
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 Approaches
3.6.3 Teardrop Course Reversals
The Navigator Plus provides guidance outbound from the teardrop fix
along the outbound leg. When the distance outbound from the fix is
greater than the length of the inbound leg, the GPS provides a course
inbound. Thereafter, the GPS provides guidance through the remainder of the approach.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
3-11
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
3.7
How to Fly a DME Arc Approach
Flying a DME Arc approach is just like flying a flight plan. Simply
keep the CDI centered while the Navigator Plus provides precise
guidance along the curved path of the DME Arc leg. You can fly direct
to either Arc endpoint or choose to join the Arc along its length.
The Navigator Plus does make distinctions between curved DME Arc
legs and normal (straight) legs. While on the Arc leg, the Primary
Nav page displays information relative to the DME arc and relative to
the TO waypoint (the end point of the Arc).
While on the Arc leg, the top line displays:
• Bearing and distance from present position to the end of
the arc.
• Desired Track. This is a line tangential to the curved line
of the arc, updated as you progress along the arc.
While on the Arc leg, the bottom line displays:
• Course Deviation (XTK) relative to the curved path of the
arc.
• Identifier of the DME Arc reference station.
• Distance from the DME Arc reference station.
The waypoints of the approach in the example are named using the
conventions described previously.
D161KIF
DME arc waypoint that is on the 161 degree
radial from the reference station, at 11 DME
(K is eleventh letter of the alphabet). Also the
start of the arc.
CD11W
Course fix point for runway 11 at CEC. Also
the end of the arc.
ROZEYFF
The final approach fix.
MA11MA
The missed approach point for runway 11.
The other DME Arc distinction is in the approach waypoints. The
Navigator Plus data base contains the DME Arc reference point,
indicated by the suffix DM. This point is placed between the arc end
points to allow you to join the arc along its length.
3-12
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 Approaches
Revision A
May 12, 1997
3-13
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
The data base waypoints that comprise the CEC VOR/DME 11,
D161K transition are:
D161KIF - CECDM - CD11W - ROZEYFF MA11MA - CECMH
To intercept the DME Arc leg, use the
key to join the D161KTIF
to CECDM leg or the CECDM to CD11W leg.
3.8
Missed Approach
Although normal procedure would dictate selection of a Missed
Approach at the Missed Approach Point when the airport environment
is not in sight, you may elect to select Missed Approach prior to
reaching the MAP. Also, while on the FAF to MAP leg, the Navigator
Plus may recommend execution of a Missed Approach in the event of
a RAIM loss or system failure.
3.8.1
Missed Approach Before the MAP
Once you are established on the final approach, the FAF to MAP leg,
you may execute a missed approach at any time by pressing
.
When you execute the missed approach while on the FAF to MAP leg,
the Navigator Plus will:
• Change the CDI scale from 0.3 nm to 1 nm full scale.
• Turn on the Hold light indicating that it is not going to
sequence at the MAP waypoint.
• Provide steering TO the MAP point, thence on an outbound track straight out FROM the MAP.
Upon reaching the MAP, execute the published climb out procedures.
To resume sequenced steering to the Missed Approach Holding
Point, press
3-14
.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 Approaches
3.8.2
Missed Approach Beyond the MAP
As you pass the MAP, the Navigator Plus provides steering straight
out FROM the MAP and illuminates the
key as a prompt.
Waypoint sequencing is suspended at the MAP to allow you to
comply with all published missed approach procedures before
proceeding to the Missed Approach Holding Point. To resume
waypoint sequencing to the Missed Approach Holding Point, press
twice.
To execute a missed approach after passing the MAP:
• Comply with the published missed approach procedures.
• Press
to resume waypoint sequencing to
the Missed Approach Holding Point
3.9
How to Fly a GPS Approach
Non-precision approaches flown with the Trimble 2000 Approach
Plus all follow these same basic series of events.
• Select the desired approach from the WPT mode or add
the approach procedure to the active flight plan.
• Enable the approach by entering the baro setting when
prompted by the Navigator Plus. This prompt happens
automatically when you are 30 nm from your destination.
(The Navigator Plus will prompt you again near the FAF if
you ignore the initial prompt.)
key and the
and
knobs to select
• Use the
the procedure entry point. You may intercept any leg up
to the FAF - MAP leg or select direct-to any waypoint up to
the FAF.
• If the procedure is a DME arc or straight-in, your work is
done. Keep the CDI centered while the Trimble 2000
Approach Plus guides you to the MAP.
• Establish yourself on the final course inbound.
• Ensure the approach light is ON as you cross the FAF
inbound. If the light is not on, execute a missed approach after passing the MAP.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
3-15
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
• If the approach light is ON, fly to the MAP, following the
published vertical profile.
• To execute a missed approach prior to crossing the MAP,
. Remember, always fly to the MAP,
press
even if you went missed approach at the FAF.
• After you have crossed the MAP and complied with all
published missed approach procedures, press
to resume waypoint sequencing to the missed
approach holding fix.
WARNING!
A direct course from the MAP to the holding point may
violate the published missed approach procedure.
Always fly all missed approach procedures.
• Once you have instructed the Navigator Plus to execute
the missed approach at or beyond the MAP by pressing
, the Navigator Plus provides course guidance direct to the waypoint following the MAP and
waypoint sequencing is active.
• When the TO waypoint is the missed approach holding
point (mh), the Navigator Plus automatically illuminates
the HOLD annunciator to remind you that this is the
holding fix.
• At waypoint passage, the TO/FROM flag on the CDI
indicates FROM and the Navigator Plus provides
guidance outbound FROM the waypoint.
• To fly the holding pattern, press
, enter the pub-
lished holding course TO the waypoint using the
knob. Press
. Fly the holding pattern like a VOR/
DME hold. (See Section 5-11 for instructions on holding
at any waypoints other than the missed approach holding
point.)
3-16
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 3 Approaches
3.10 RAIM
RAIM, Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitor, is a method employed
by the computers in the Navigator Plus to monitor the integrity of the
navigation information received from the satellites. RAIM estimates
an upper limit on the position accuracy available under the conditions
dictated by the satellites. The limit is completely dependant upon the
number of satellites in view and their relative positions in the sky (their
geometry). TSO C-129 specifies three RAIM limits: En route, Terminal and Approach.
The Navigator Plus applies the more stringent Terminal limit to both
the en route and terminal flight phases. It applies the Approach limit
to the approach phase.
The satellites transmit information, called almanac data, about their
orbital positions and health. The Navigator Plus uses the almanac
data to predict the available satellite coverage and therefore the RAIM
limit, for any location at any time in the future. The Navigator Plus
limits the prediction time to 24 hours.
TSO C-129 contains strict requirements governing the use and
availability of RAIM as it pertains to the approach flight phase:
• RAIM predictions must indicate that approach RAIM will
be available for the duration of the FAF to MAP leg;
• Approach RAIM must be in use at the FAF
• Approach RAIM cannot be unavailable for more than five
minutes while between the FAF and MAP.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
3-17
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
3.10.1 RAIM Prediction
In order to fly a non-precision approach, the Navigator Plus must
have sufficient satellite coverage at the destination airport to provide
approach RAIM. The Navigator Plus uses almanac information to
provide RAIM limit predictions for a destination and time (within the
next 24 hours). These predictions are for plus and minus fifteen
minutes of the ETA. You may edit the ETA field to determine the
RAIM availability at other times. You may edit the airport identifier to
determine RAIM availability at any airport in the data base.
If your Active Flight Plan ends with an airport or approach, the RAIM
prediction uses that airport for the prediction. If your Active Flight Plan
does not end in an airport or approach, or you have no Active Flight
key.
Plan, the prediction uses the airport last viewed under the
The Navigator Plus uses the ETA as determined by present ground
speed and wind, if available.
Use the Approach RAIM page found under Sensor Status Mode of the
Auxiliary key to determine the RAIM limit availability at a destination
and time.
• Press
mode.
repeatedly to get to the SENSOR STATUS
• Rotate the
knob clockwise to access the APR RAIM
AVAILABLE page.
To change the ETA:
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to change the ETA.
• Press
.
To change the airport identifier:
• Press
.
• Use the
knob to place the cursor in the identifier field.
• Use the selector knobs to change the airport identifier.
• Press
3-18
.
Revision A
May 12, 1995
Chapter 3 Approaches
When approach RAIM is available at the selected destination and
time:
APRêRAIMêAVAILABLE:
EUG®ê21:57±êé15êMIN
When approach RAIM is not available at the selected destination and
time:
RAIMêNOTêAVAILABLE
PDXê14:57±
In the event navigation is not available due to satellite coverage:
NAVêNOTêAVAILABLE
PDXê14:57±
Revision A
May 12, 1997
3-19
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
3.10.2 RAIM Prediction on the Approach
At two miles from the FAF, the Navigator Plus predicts the RAIM limit
available for the remainder of the approach, to the MAP, at present
ground speed. If Approach RAIM is predicted , the Navigator Plus
illuminates the approach light. If not, the Navigator Plus displays the
message:
RAIMêPREDICTEDêN/A
EXEêMISSEDêAPR(DIR)
At the FAF, the Navigator Plus ensures that Approach RAIM is in use.
If so, the Navigator Plus continues with the approach. Otherwise, the
Navigator Plus displays the message:
APPROACHêRAIMêLOST
EXEêMISSEDêAPR(DIR)
If RAIM availability is lost for five minutes while on the FAF to MAP
leg, the Navigator Plus displays the message:
APPROACHêRAIMêLOST
EXEêMISSEDêAPR(DIR)
If the Navigator Plus detects a failed satellite, it displays the message:
RAIMêERROR
POSITIONêFIXêINVALID
RAIMêERROR
EXEêMISSEDêAPR(DIR)
3-20
Revision A
May 12, 1995
Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
Chapter
4
The Waypoint Key
The
key features eight modes:
• Airport
• Approach
• SID
• STAR
• VOR
• NDB
• Intersection
• User
Each press of the WPT key selects the next mode. Press and hold
the key for one second to return to the Airport mode. Within each
mode, you will find information unique to the waypoint or procedure
category.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
4-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.1
Waypoint Information
The Navigator Plus uses the Jeppesen NavData Database Card to
provide direct access to worldwide data on waypoints and procedures.
The waypoint categories are: Airports, VORs, NDBs, and Intersections. The procedure categories are: Approaches, SIDs and STARs.
Both the North American and International database cards are
required for complete worldwide information. The following describes
the database information available from the Waypoint mode. The
small letter after a waypoint identifier denotes the waypoint category.
Airports (A) or (M)
Identifier, city name, airport name, communications frequencies, field elevation, runway information, lighting, approach
information, services, and latitude/ longitude. The (M)
denotes a military operation.
Approaches
Airport Identifier associated with Approach, Approach Name
(with Runway, when applicable), IAFs and Transitions, DME
Arcs, Approach Waypoints with Type Identifiers (IAF, FAF,
MAP, MAHP, Intermediate Waypoints).
Standard Instrument Departures
Airport Identifier associated with SID, SID Name, Applicable
Runways, SID Transitions, and SID Waypoints.
Standard Terminal Arrivals
Airport Identifier associated with STAR, STAR Name, STAR
Transitions, and STAR Waypoints.
VORs (V)
Identifier, city name, VOR name, navigation frequency,
Morse code for identifier, and latitude/longitude.
NDBs (N)
Identifier, city name, NDB name, navigation frequency,
Morse code for identifier, and latitude/longitude.
4-2
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
Intersections (I)
Identifier, region name, and latitude/longitude.
User Waypoint (U)
User identifier and latitude/longitude.
All Categories
Bearing to waypoint.
Distance to waypoint.
Radial from waypoint (Press and hold the
radial).
Revision A
May 12, 1997
key for From
4-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.2
The Waypoint Displays
The Navigator Plus contains information about each waypoint in the
data base. The available information varies depending on the
waypoint category.
To access these displays:
• Press
to display the Airport mode.
• Rotate the
displays.
knob clockwise to view the different
Some typical displays are shown below.
Airport
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
HOUSTONêêêêêêêêêêêTX
HOUSTON INTERCONTINE
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
ATSê124.05APPê120.05
TWRê125.35GNDêê121.7
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
CTFê-----êUNIê122.95
ELEVATIONêêêê 98Æ
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
BEACON,êêêêLIGHTING,
IFRêAPCH,êSERVICES
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
14±ê12000x150Æ,êHARD
,êLEFTêTRAFFIC
ŽIAH®êê086­1400¡ClsB
“29­58ˆ¤ì¶ê95­20ƒª¤³
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Revision A
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
Approach
Turn the
knob right to display these pages.
IAH®ê<VOR/DME14L>APR
IAH®ê<VOR/DME14L>APR
IAF/TRAN:êCONHOï
LEG01:êCONHOïêCF14L³
IAH®ê<VOR/DME14L>APR
IAH®ê<VOR/DME14L>APR
LEG02:êCF14L³êKINKSð
LEG03:êKINKSðêMA14Lñ
IAH®ê<VOR/DME14L>APR
LEG04:êMA14LñêCOSBI°
Turn the
knob left to display these pages.
IAH®ê<VOR/DME14L>APR
IAH®ê<VOR/DME14L>APR
APRêCRS 154­ŽKINKSð
DIRêêTOêFAF:êKINKSð
SID
ADS®ê<DALL9êêêêê>SID
RWY:ALLêTRAN:EIC·
Turn the
knob right to display these pages.
ADS®ê<DALL9êêêêê>SID
ADS®ê<DALL9êêêêê>SID
LEG01:êDFW·êêêBOXOR°
LEG02:êBOXOR°êRESLR°
ADS®ê<DALL9êêêêê>SID
LEG03êRESLR°êEIC·
Revision A
May 12, 1997
4-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
STAR
Turn the
knob right to display these pages.
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
TRAN:ABI·êêêRWY:15
LEG01:êABI·êêêCOTTN°
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
LEG02:êCOTTN°CURVIN°
LEG03:êCURVIN°êAQN·
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
LEG04:êAQN·êêêMARKM°
LEG05:êMARKM°êBRYAR°
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
LEG06:êBRYAR°êHULEN°
LEG07:êHULEN°êFLATO°
ADS®ê<AQN4êêêêêê>STR
LEG08:êFLATO°êCREEK°
VOR
Turn the
knob right to display these pages.
ŽAUS·êê087­1281¡
ŽAUS·êê087­1281¡
AUSTINêêêêêêêêêêêêTX
AUSTIN
ŽAUS·êê087­1281¡
ŽAUS·êê087­1281¡
VORêFREQUENCYê117.1
CODE:êÞ-êÞÞ-êÞÞÞ
ŽAUS·êê087­1281¡
“30­17ˆ§¥¶ê97­42ìª³
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
NDB
ŽAU¶êêê113­ê693¡
AUSTINêêêêêêêêêêêêTX
Turn the
knob right to display these pages.
ŽAU¶êêê113­ê693¡
ŽAU¶êêê113­ê693¡
AUSTIêêAUSTIN
NDBêFREQUENCYê353.0
ŽAU¶êêê113­ê693¡
ŽAU¶êêê113­ê693¡
CODE:êÞ-êÞÞ-ê
“30­14¦¢¶ê97­37…¦¥³
Intersection
ŽEDDEE°110­ê675¡
REGION:SOUTHêCENTRAL
Turn the
knob right to display this page.
ŽEDDEE°110­ê675¡
“30­46ˆ¨¤¶ê97­33€§©³
User
ŽTRMBLë270­ê0€¢¡
“37­23…©©¶122­02‚©¢³
Revision A
May 12, 1997
4-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.3
Selecting Airport, VOR, NDB, Intersection
or User Waypoints
There are four methods for selecting Airport, VOR, and NDB
waypoints:
• Enter the waypoint identifier.
• Enter the waypoint city name.
• Enter the waypoint name.
• Scan the identifiers in the database.
Identifier
ŽIAH®ê086­1400¡ClsB
HOUSTON
TX
City Name
Waypoint
Name
ŽIAH®ê086­1400¡ClsB
HOUSTON INTERCONTINE
There are two methods for selecting Intersection and User waypoints:
• Enter the waypoint identifier.
• Scan the identifiers in the database.
Once you have selected the desired identifier, you may view additional waypoint information in the bottom line of the display.
• Rotate the
knob to view additional waypoint information on the bottom line of the screen.
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
4.3.1 Select a Waypoint by Identifier
Use this method to select a waypoint by Indentifier. This is by far the
most commonly used method.
until the desired category is selected.
• Press
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob, in either direction, until the desired
letter is displayed.
knob clockwise to select the next character
• Rotate the
field.
• Repeat the previous two steps until the desired waypoint
identifier is displayed.
• Press
to complete the selection.
4.3.2 Select a Waypoint by City Name
Use this method to select a waypoint by City Name. There are many
duplicate City Names in the data base. To select between duplicate
city names, position the cursor under the last letter of the City Name,
then use the
knob to move among the duplicates.
• Press
until the desired category is selected.
• Press
.
• Use the
field.
knob to position the cursor in the City Name
knob, in either direction, until the desired
• Rotate the
letter is displayed.
• Rotate the
field.
knob clockwise to select the next character
• Repeat the previous two steps until the desired City Name
is displayed.
• Press
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to complete the selection.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.3.3 Select a Waypoint by Waypoint Name
Use this method to select a waypoint by Waypoint Name.
• Press
until the desired category is selected.
• Turn the
knob one click to the right to view the
Waypoint Name field.
• Press
.
• Use the
knob to position the cursor in the Waypoint
Name field.
knob, in either direction, until the desired
• Rotate the
letter is displayed.
• Rotate the
field.
knob clockwise to select the next character
• Repeat the previous two steps until the desired City Name
is displayed.
• Press
to complete the selection.
4.3.4 Scan Waypoint Identifiers
Use this method to select a waypoint scanning through the entire data
base.
• Press
until the desired category is selected.
• Use the
knob to select a Waypoint Identifier.
Once you have selected the desired identifier, you may view additional waypoint information in the bottom line of the display.
knob to view additional waypoint informa• Rotate the
tion on the bottom line of the screen.
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
4.4
Selecting Approach, SID, and STAR
Procedures
Approach, SID, and STAR procedures differ from waypoints in that
the procedures are lists of waypoints linked together as a subroute,
selected by airport identifier. Some airports have multiple procedures
with multiple transitions that depend on your direction of flight and
runway in use. Once you have completed the selection and activated
the procedure, the Navigator Plus retrieves the entire procedure from
the NavData card.
The Approach, SID, and STAR Procedure modes include several
pages for each procedure. These pages are controlled by the
knob and appear in the display’s bottom line.
Once activated, you may edit SID and STAR procedures. You may
not edit Approach procedures.
Approach procedures are defined with up to three parameters:
• Airport identifier
• Approach name
• Transition name
Name
Identifier
IAH®
<VOR/DME14L>APR
IAF/TRAN:
CONHOï
Transition
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SID and STAR procedures are defined with up to four parameters:
• Airport identifier
• SID or STAR name
• Transition name
• Runway
Procedure Type
(SID)
Name
Identifier
ADS® <DALL9
>SID
RWY:ALL TRAN:EIC·
Transition
Runway
Name
Identifier
ADS® <AQN4
TRAN:ABI·
Transition
Procedure Type
(STAR)
>STR
RWY:15
Runway
Some SIDs do not have an associated transition. In this case, the
transition field is blank.
The Approach, SID and STAR categories default to the procedures
available for the airport that is currently displayed in the Airport
category.
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
4.4.1 To Fully Define a Procedure
• Press
until the desired procedure category is
selected (Approach, SID, STAR).
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob counterclockwise until the flashing
cursor is placed in the Airport field.
• Edit the Airport identifier with the rotary selector knobs.
knob until the flashing cursor is placed in
• Rotate the
the procedure name field.
• Edit the name field with the rotary selector knobs. Note
that the Navigator Plus only display available procedure
names as you rotate the selector knob.
knob clockwise until the flashing cursor is
• Rotate the
placed in the procedure transition field.
• Edit the transition field with the rotary selector knobs.
Note that Navigator Plus displays only available transitions as you rotate the selector knob.
knob until the flashing
• For a SID or STAR, rotate the
cursor is placed in the runway field.
• Edit the runway field with the rotary selector knobs. Note
that Navigator Plus displays only available runways as
you rotate the selector knob.
• Press
to complete the procedure selection.
4.4.2 To Select a Procedure Name
To change just the procedure name for a selected airport and procedure:
• Rotate the
knob to select another procedure name. (If
the airport has only one named procedure, the Navigator
Plus ignores the knob rotation.)
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.4.3 To Select a Transition
To change just the transition for a selected airport and procedure:
• Press
• Rotate the
.
knob to select another IAF/Transition.
to complete the IAF/TRAN selection. (If the
• Press
airport has only one transition, the Navigator Plus ignores
the knob rotation.)
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
4.5
Activating a Waypoint or Procedure from
WPT
Although waypoints and IFR procedures may be linked together in a
Flight Plan, it is often more convenient to activate them autonomously,
especially when a clearance change requires immediate selection of a
waypoint or procedure not included in the stored plan.
4.5.1 Selecting Direct Steering to Waypoint in WPT
Any waypoint, in any Waypoint mode category, may be selected as
the Active Waypoint. After the second press of the direct-to key, the
Navigator Plus automatically switches to the NAV mode.
• Select a waypoint (Airport, VOR, NDB, Intersection, User).
• Press
once.
• Use the
knob to change the course to/from the
waypoint, if desired.
a second time to make the waypoint the
• Press
Active Waypoint.
4.5.2 Activating a SID or STAR Procedure
Any SID or STAR Procedure listed in the Jeppesen NavData Database may be activated from the WPT mode using the
key. The
Navigator Plus has three options for activating SID and STAR
Procedures:
• Fly direct to the first waypoint.
• Join any leg of the procedure.
• Fly direct to any waypoint.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.5.2.1 Select Direct to the First Waypoint
Use this option to fly the entire procedure.
• Select a SID or a STAR.
• Press
once.
• Use the
knob to change the course to/from the
waypoint, if desired.
to make the first waypoint the Active
• Press
Waypoint and activate the procedure.
4.5.2.2 Join a Leg of the Procedure
Use this option to join any leg of the procedure.
• Select a SID or a STAR.
• Use the
knob to select the desired leg.
• Press
once and note the leg’s course.
• Press
a second time to join the leg and activate the
procedure.
4.5.2.3 Direct-to Any Waypoint in the Procedure
Use this option to fly direct to any waypoint of the procedure.
• Select a SID or a STAR.
• Use the
waypoint.
knob to select the leg with the desired
• Press
once.
• Use the
knob to select the desired waypoint; left to
select the first waypoint of the leg, right to select the
second.
• Note the course to the waypoint. Use the
change the course, if desired.
4-16
knob to
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
• Press
a second time to fly direct to the waypoint
and activate the procedure.
4.6
User Waypoints
You may store up to 250 User Waypoints in the Navigator Plus’s
internal data base. Once stored, you may edit or erase User
Waypoints. A User Waypoint may have any alphanumeric name from
one to five characters long.
4.6.1
Creating a User Waypoint
The Navigator Plus features three methods for defining User Waypoints.
• Present Position
• Latitude and Longitude
• Bearing and Distance from another waypoint
To create a user waypoint from aircraft present position:
• Press
to get to the USER mode.
• Rotate the
knob right or left to get to ADD WAYPOINT? (ENT)
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to name the waypoint
. Display is now SAVE USING THIS POSI• Press
TION? (ENT)
• Press
to store waypoint as present position.
To create a user waypoint defined by a latitude and longitude:
• Press
to get to the USER mode.
• Rotate the
knob right or left to get to ADD WAYPOINT? (ENT).
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to name the waypoint.
. Display is now SAVE USING THIS POSI• Press
TION? (ENT).
• Rotate the
knob right to get to SAVE USING LAT/
LON? (ENT).
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to enter the latitude and longitude.
to store the waypoint.
• Press
To create a user waypoint as a range and bearing from another
waypoint:
• Press
to get to the USER mode.
• Rotate the
knob right or left to get to ADD WAYPOINT? (ENT).
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to name the waypoint.
. Display is now SAVE USING THIS POSI• Press
TION? (ENT).
• Rotate the
(ENT).
• Press
knob right to get to WPT+RNG&BRG?
.
• Use the
key,
key and selector knobs to
choose the base waypoint.
• After you have selected the base waypoint, press
.
• Use the selector knobs to enter the bearing and distance
FROM the base waypoint.
• Press
4-18
to store the waypoint.
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
4.6.2
Editing a User Waypoint
You may edit the name or position of any stored user waypoint.
To edit a user waypoint:
• Press
to get to the USER mode.
• Use the
knob to view the desired waypoint.
knob right or left to get to EDIT ? (ENT).
• Rotate the
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to edit the waypoint name, latitude
and longitude as desired.
to save the changes.
• Press
4.6.3
Erasing a User Waypoint
You may erase any stored user waypoint.
To erase a user waypoint:
• Press
to get to the USER mode.
• Use the
knob to view the desired waypoint.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob right or left to get to ERASE ? (ENT).
.
to confirm the erasure. (Press any other key
• Press
to abort the erasure and retain the waypoint.)
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.7 Activating an Approach Procedure
Any Approach Procedure listed in the Jeppesen NavData Database
may be activated from the WPT mode using the
key. The
Navigator Plus has several options for activating Approach Procedures:
• Fly direct to the first waypoint.
• Join any leg of the procedure except the FAF to MAP leg.
• Fly direct to any waypoint up to the FAF.
• Direct to the FAF.
• Intercept final approach course inbound.
4.7.1 Select Direct-to the First Approach Waypoint
Use this option to fly the entire procedure.
• Select the Approach.
• Press
once.
• Use the
knob to change the course to/from the
waypoint, if desired.
to make the first waypoint the Active
• Press
Waypoint and activate the procedure.
4.7.2 Join a Leg of the Approach Procedure
Use this option to join any leg of the procedure up to the FAF to MAP
leg.
• Select an Approach.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob clockwise to select the desired leg.
once and note the leg’s course.
• Press
a second time to join the leg and activate the
procedure.
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Chapter 4 The Waypoint Key
4.7.3 Direct to Any Waypoint in the Approach Procedure
Use this option to fly direct to any waypoint of the procedure.
• Select an Approach.
• Use the
waypoint.
knob to select the leg with the desired
• Press
once.
• Use the
knob to select the desired waypoint; left to
select the first waypoint of the leg, right to select the
second.
• Note the course to the waypoint. Use the
change the course, if desired.
knob to
a second time to fly direct to the waypoint
• Press
and activate the procedure.
4.7.4 Fly Direct to the FAF
Use this option to fly direct to the Final Approach Fix.
• Select the Approach.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob one click counterclockwise.
once.
• Note the course to the waypoint. Use the
change the course, if desired.
knob to
a second time to fly direct to the FAF and
• Press
activate the procedure.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
4.7.5 Intercept the Final Course Inbound
Use this option to intercept the published final approach inbound to
the FAF.
• Select the Approach.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob two clicks counterclockwise.
once.
• Note the course.
a second time to join the course inbound to
• Press
the FAF and activate the procedure.
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Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
Chapter
5
The Flight Plan Key
The Flight Plan Key features four modes:
• Active Plan
• Active Plan Legs
• Stored Flight Plans
• Stored Flight Plans Legs.
The first press of the key takes you to Active Plan mode, the second
to Active Plan Legs. The third press takes you to Stored Flight Plans,
the fourth to Stored Flight Plans Legs. Each additional press switches
between Stored Flight Plans and Stored Flight Plans Legs. To return
to Active Plan mode, press and hold the
key for one second.
Use the
key to select a stored flight plan for activation, view,
edit, or cancel the active flight plan, and to create, edit, review,
reverse or erase stored flight plans.
The Navigator Plus lets you store up to 400 waypoints in up to 40
flight plans. The maximum number of waypoints in any one plan is
40. A typical flight plan would follow this format:
• Departure airport
• SID procedure
• En route waypoints (VORs and Intersections)
• STAR
• Approach for destination airport
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5-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
5.1
Flight Plan Modes
The four FPL modes contain several data pages each.
Active Plan or “NO ACTIVE FLIGHT PLAN”.
(first
press)
Displays the departure and destination waypoints
and waypoint identifiers of current leg. Use either
selector knob to change legs. Legs are denoted as
NOW, NEXT, or LAST.
NOêACTIVE
FLIGHTêPLAN
LAX®êê-ºPHX®êêACTIVE
NOW:êPDZ·êêŽPSP®
Press
leg.
to edit. Press
to fly the displayed
Active flight plan legs page (if an Active flight plan
(second exists) displays a leg waypoint pair along with
press) bearing, distance and ETE for the leg. Legs are
denoted as NOW, NEXT 1, or LAST 1. Use either
selector knob to change legs.
NEXTê2:PDZ·êêŽPSP®
082­êê51ƒ¡êETE ê0:26
Stored flight plans or “NO STORED FLIGHT
(third
press)
PLANS” message. Use the
knob to view other
stored flight plans. Displays the departure and
destination waypoints and waypoint identifiers of the
knob to
first leg of a stored flight plan. Use the
change legs. Legs are denoted as LEG 1, LEG 2…
NOêSTORED
FLIGHTêPLAN
LAX®êê-ºPHX®êê325¡
LEG 1:êLAX® êêŽPDZ·
5-2
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Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
Press the
plan, press
key to edit. To activate the flight
on the desired leg, choose direct-
to or join, then press
a second time.
To add additional flight plans, rotate the
knob
past the first or last stored flight plan to get the
“ADD NEW FLIGHT PLAN” display. Build another
knob to move back to the
flight plan or use the
stored flight plans.
ADD NEW FLIGHT PLAN
start ++end
Stored flight plan legs page. Use either selector
(fourth knob to change legs. Displays a leg waypoint pair
press) along with bearing, distance, and ETE for the leg.
Legs are denoted as LEG 1, LEG 2…
LEG 2: PDZ·
ŽPSP®
082­ 51ƒ¡ ETE
0:26
To activate the flight plan, press
on the
desired leg, choose direct to or join, then press
a second time.
Press and Hold the
the active flight plan.
key at any time to return to the active leg of
The
key flashes when the Navigator Plus is displaying the
Active Legs or Stored Legs pages.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
5.2
Entering Waypoints and Procedures
When editing or creating a flight plan, you have the choice of entering
waypoints, by identifier, directly with the
key and selector
knobs, or selecting waypoints from one of the
or Nearest
modes by identifier, name, or city name. Use the direct entry method
when you know the identifier. Use the WPT or Nearest method when
you do not know the identifier.
You can enter SID, STAR, and Approach procedures into any flight
plan from the Active Plan or Stored Flight Plans mode. It is best if you
build the flight plans starting with the departure airport and ending with
the destination airport. The Navigator Plus can then present the SID
for the departure airport and the STAR and Approach for the destination airport.
The Navigator Plus will accept only one SID, one STAR, and one
Approach in a flight plan.
When entering waypoints and procedures, you first select the
waypoint or procedure type then the waypoint identifier. The waypoint
types are:
A
Airport waypoint type
_APRCH
Approach procedure type
_SID
SID procedure type
_STAR
STAR procedure type
V
VOR waypoint type
N
NDB waypoint type
I
Intersection waypoint type
U
User waypoint type
When entering waypoints, select the waypoint type, select the
identifier, then press
5-4
to insert the waypoint into the flight plan.
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Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
EDIT FLIGHT PLAN
ADS®
+·BUJ
-DFW·
Waypoint Type
EDIT FLIGHT PLAN
ADS®
+_STAR -DFW·
When entering procedures, select the procedure type, select the
complete procedure (airport, name, transition and runway), then press
to insert the procedure into the flight plan.
When you add an Approach procedure to a flight plan, the Navigator
Plus replaces the destination airport with the procedure and closes
the editing session. If you later delete the Approach procedure, the
Navigator Plus reinserts the related airport as the last waypoint of the
plan.
As long as you do not edit waypoints of a SID or STAR procedure, the
Navigator Plus will treat the procedure as a single entry. If you delete
or replace the unedited procedure, the Navigator Plus deletes or
replaces the entire procedure. If you edit the procedure, the Navigator
Plus converts it into a series of separate waypoints. To remove the
edited procedure, you must delete each waypoint of the procedure.
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5.3
Building a Flight Plan
Flight plans are created from the Stored Flight Plans mode. You may
enter the waypoint identifier directly or select a waypoint from WPT or
Nearest. You may enter SID, STAR, and Approach procedures now,
or use Active Flight Plan edit to add them later.
To build a new flight plan:
• Press
to get to “STORED FLIGHT PLANS”.
• Rotate either knob left or right until “ADD NEW FLIGHT
PLAN” is displayed.
• Note the flashing ++ symbols between “start” and “end”.
These symbols indicate the waypoint insertion point.
When a flight plan has more than two waypoints, use the
knob move the insertion point.
• Press the flashing
to add the first waypoint.
• Add waypoints and procedures as described in the
following paragraphs.
• To exit Flight Plan Create, press
displayed.
when ++ is
5.3.1 Adding a Waypoint by Identifier
If you know the waypoint identifier:
• You must have the flashing ++ symbols displayed.
• Press
to get a flashing category letter.
• Use the
knob to select a waypoint category.
• Use the selector knobs to enter the identifier.
• Press
5-6
to add the waypoint.
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Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
5.3.2 Adding a Waypoint Using WPT
If you do not know the waypoint identifier, use
waypoint by name or city name.
to select the
• You must have the flashing ++ symbols displayed.
• Press
.
• You can change the category by pressing the
until the desired category is selected.
key
key and selector knobs to select the
• Use the
waypoint by name or city name.
• Press the flashing
flight plan.
key to enter the selection into the
5.3.3 Adding a Waypoint Using NRST
To add a waypoint to a flight plan from the list of nearest waypoints:
• You must have the flashing ++ symbols displayed.
• Press
.
• You can change the category by pressing the
until the desired category is selected.
key
• Use the
knob to choose a waypoint from the list of 20.
• Press
to enter the selection into the flight plan.
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5.3.4 Adding a Procedure
To add a procedure to the flight plan:
• You must have the flashing ++ symbols displayed.
• Press
to get a flashing category letter.
• Use the
knob to select a procedure category.
• Press
.
You can change the procedure category by pressing
until the desired category is selected.
• Use the
procedure.
• Press
5-8
key and selector knobs to select the
to enter the procedure into the flight plan.
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Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
5.4
Editing a Flight Plan
In the edit mode, you can add, replace, or delete waypoints and
procedures from the selected flight plan. You can edit the active flight
plan or a stored flight plan at any time. The steps are the same,
except for some special considerations given to the waypoints of the
Active Leg.
You cannot edit a Flight Plan from the legs page, denoted by a
flashing
key.
Approach procedures can only be replaced or deleted. You cannot
edit Approach procedures.
SID and STAR procedures can be replaced, deleted, or edited. When
you edit a SID or STAR procedure in a flight plan, the Navigator
breaks that procedure into individual waypoints. You can no longer
replace or delete an edited procedure. But since the procedure is
now broken into separate waypoints, you can replace or delete any of
the individual waypoints.
If you attempt to edit the waypoints of the Active Leg, the Navigator
displays the message:
(FPL)êTOêCANCELêAND
MODIFYêACTIVEêLEG
If you confirm the edit request by pressing
, the Navigator
cancels the current flight plan, leaving the current leg guidance
(guidance between From and To waypoints) intact. Complete the edit
then reactivate the flight plan with the
key.
To edit a stored flight plan, you begin by pressing
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.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
5.4.1 Insert, Replace or Delete Waypoints
This paragraph describes how to edit waypoints in the flight plan.
For information on editing SID, STAR, and Approach procedures, see
the following paragraphs.
To add, delete, or replace a waypoint in a flight plan:
key and selector knobs to get to the
• Use the
desired flight plan.
• Press
to get the flashing ++ symbols.
• Use the
knob to select the edit point in the flight plan.
To insert a waypoint:
• Press
.
• Use the
knob to select a waypoint category.
• Use the selector knobs to select a waypoint.
• Press
to add the waypoint to the flight plan.
To replace or delete the waypoint to the right of the ++:
• Use the
knob to select REPLCE, or DELETE.
• Press
.
• Repeat the insert and replace/delete steps as necessary.
• Press
5-10
to quit the editing session.
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Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
5.4.2 Insert a Procedure
Usually, you will want to insert procedures that are associated with
your planned departure and destination airports. If, however, you
choose procedures that are not associated with these airports, the
Navigator uses several rules to ensure that the selected SID, STAR,
and Approach procedures are placed into the flight plan correctly.
When you insert a SID, the Navigator places it at the
beginning of the flight plan, replacing the departure
airport.
When you insert a STAR, the navigator places it just
before the destination airport.
When you insert a STAR for an airport that is not the
destination airport in the flight plan, the Navigator will
replace the original destination airport with the airport
associated with the STAR you selected.
When you insert an Approach, the navigator places it at
the end of the flight plan, replacing the destination airport.
To add a procedure to a flight plan:
key and selector knobs to choose the
• Use the
desired flight plan.
• Press
to get the flashing ++ symbols.
• Use the
knob to select the edit point in the flight plan.
• Press
.
• Use the
knob to select a procedure category.
• Press
to get to the procedure selection page.
If the departure or destination airport does not have a
procedure of the type you selected, the Navigator
displays a message stating the fact. Press
to
return to editing or
to choose a procedure from
another airport (note the rules mentioned above).
• Select the procedure.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
• Press
to insert the procedure into the flight plan.
• Repeat the insert and replace/delete steps as necessary.
to quit the editing session.
• Press
5.4.3 Replace or Delete a Procedure
To replace or delete a procedure in a stored or active flight plan:
• Use the
key and selector knobs to choose the
desired flight plan.
• Press
to get the flashing ++ symbols.
• Use the
knob to move to any portion of the procedure.
When in the procedure, the display flashes:
“REPLCE”, “STAR”, or “SID.”
To Replace the procedure:
• Press
.
• Select a new procedure.
• Press
to insert the procedure in place of the old.
To Delete the procedure:
• Use the
knob to select “DELETE”.
• Press
to delete the procedure.
• Press
to quit the editing session.
5.4.4 Editing a SID or STAR Procedure
To edit a SID or STAR procedure in a stored or active flight plan:
• Use the
key and selector knobs to choose the
desired flight plan.
• Press
5-12
to get the flashing ++ symbols.
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Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
• Use the
knob to move to any portion of the procedure.
When in the procedure, the display flashes:
“REPLCE” “STAR” or “SID” or “APRCH”
knob until the display flashes “EDIT”
• Rotate the
“SID”.
• Press
to display the ++ symbol.
The procedure is now broken into individual waypoints.
• Edit the waypoints as desired. Reference the Insert,
Replace, or Delete Waypoints section of this manual.
5.5
Review Legs of a Flight Plan
The Legs page of the Active and Stored Flight Plans mode provide
bearing, distance, and ETE for each leg of the flight plan. ETE is
based on current ground speed.
For stored flight plans, legs are named LEG 1, LEG 2, …
For the active plan, legs are named LAST 2, LAST 1, NOW, NEXT 1,
NEXT 2…
To view the bearing and distance of any leg in any stored or active
Flight Plan:
For Active Plan legs:
• Press
twice ( FPL key is flashing).
• Use either knob to move between legs.
For Stored Plan legs:
• To get to STORED FLIGHT PLANS, press
there is no active flight plan; press
there is an active flight plan.
twice if
three times if
• Use the
knob to select a stored flight plan.
• Press
(FPL key is flashing).
• Use either knob to move between legs.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
5-13
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
5.6
Reversing a Flight Plan
You may reverse any stored flight plan. If the flight plan contains SID,
STAR, or APPROACH procedures, these procedures are automatically replaced with the associated airport as part of the reversal
process.
To reverse the order of any stored flight plan:
• Select a stored flight plan.
• Rotate the
is displayed.
• Press
5.7
knob left until the flashing word REVERSE
.
Activating a Flight Plan
You may activate a flight plan on any of its legs or direct-to any of its
waypoints. After you have built or recalled the desired flight plan, use
the
knob to view the legs. Use the
key to activate the plan.
Activating a new flight plan automatically cancels an existing active
flight plan. You do not have to cancel the old one manually to activate
a new one.
You have two choices when activating a flight plan:
Join the displayed leg.
Fly direct to either waypoint in the leg.
5.7.1 Join a Flight Plan Leg
To join a leg of a stored flight plan:
• Select a stored flight plan.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob clockwise to select the desired leg.
once and note the leg’s course.
• Press
a second time to join the leg and activate the
procedure.
5-14
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
5.7.2 Direct-to a Flight Plan Leg
To fly direct-to any waypoint of a stored flight plan:
• Select a stored flight plan.
• Use the
waypoint.
knob to select the leg with the desired
• Press
once.
• Use the
knob to select the desired waypoint; left to
select the first waypoint of the leg, right to select the
second.
• Note the course to the waypoint. Use the
change the course, if desired.
knob to
a second time to fly direct to the waypoint
• Press
and activate the procedure.
5.8
Canceling an Active Flight Plan
There are three ways to cancel the Active Flight Plan:
• Use the Cancel selection from Active Plan mode.
• Activate a different flight plan.
to select a destination from WPT or
• Use
NRST mode.
Selecting CANCEL from Active Plan mode leaves the current From
and To waypoint while canceling the remainder of the flight plan.
Now, the first press of the
PLAN.
key displays NO ACTIVE FLIGHT
Activating a flight plan automatically cancels an existing active flight
plan. You do not have to manually cancel the old one to activate a
new one.
Selecting direct-to any waypoint or procedure from WPT or NRST
mode automatically cancels the existing active flight plan.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
5-15
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
To cancel an Active Flight Plan:
• Press
to view the Active Plan.
• Rotate either knob left or right until CANCEL is displayed.
to cancel the flight plan.
• Press
5.9
Erasing a Flight Plan
You may erase any stored flight plan. Erasing is a two-key process
(
and
), where the second key press gives you the
opportunity to change your mind.
To erase a stored flight plan:
• Select a stored flight plan.
• Rotate the
displayed.
• Press
knob left until the flashing word ERASE is
.
• Note the prompt ERASE FLIGHT PLAN ( FPL ).
• Press
to confirm and erase.
or
• Press
5.10
to abort the erase process.
Nearest Waypoints and Agencies
The Nearest Key (
) provides immediate access of up to 20 of
the nearest Airports, Approaches, VORs, Agencies, NDBs, Intersections, and User-created waypoints within a 200 nm radius.
Waypoints and Approaches are displayed in order of their distance
from the aircraft’s current position. Nearest SID and STAR procedures are not provided.
The Waypoint and Approach data available in the NRST modes is the
same information that is accessed from the WPT modes. Procedures
for access to this data, and selection of Waypoints or Approaches, is
identical to WPT.
5-16
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 5 The Flight Plan Key
To locate the waypoint or approach that is closest to the aircraft’s
current position:
• Press
until the desired waypoint category is
displayed.
knob clockwise to view the 20 nearest
• Rotate the
waypoints.
Each rotation of the knob brings up the next waypoint, in order of
proximity to the aircraft’s current position.
• To access additional information on the displayed
waypoint, rotate the
knob.
For the Approach category:
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob counterclockwise to place the cursor
in the Airport field.
knob until the desired Airport is displayed
• Rotate the
(only available Approaches are displayed).
Use
5.11
to activate the displayed Waypoint or Approach.
Holding Patterns
You may fly a holding pattern at any waypoint in the data base. If the
holding fix is in the Active Flight Plan, you must instruct the Navigator
to Suspend (hold) automatic waypoint sequencing. If you have no
Active Flight Plan but are navigating direct-to a waypoint, there is no
need to Suspend waypoint sequencing.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
5-17
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
5.11.1 Holding at a FPL Waypoint
In order to hold at a waypoint, it must be your TO waypoint. If it is not,
use the
waypoint.
key and the
key to make the holding fix the TO
To hold at a fix that is in your Active Flight Plan:
• Make sure the desired holding fix is your TO waypoint.
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob right to “SUSPEND”.
knob to enter the inbound holding course, TO
• Use the
the holding fix. Set your OBS for visual reference. You
key to quickly get the reciprocal of the
may use the
displayed course.
• Press
. Note that the HOLD light is illuminated.
5.11.2 Holding Outside of a Flight Plan
To hold at a waypoint that is not part of an Active Flight Plan:
• Press
.
• Use the
knob to enter the inbound holding course, TO
the holding fix. Set your OBS for visual reference. You
key to quickly get the reciprocal of the
may use the
displayed course.
• Press
. The HOLD light does not illuminate.
5.11.3 Holding After a Missed Approach
See Section 3.9, How to Fly a GPS Approach, for instructions on
holding at the missed approach holding waypoint.
5-18
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 6 The Nav Key
Chapter
6
The NAV Key
The
key features two modes:
• NAV
• Waypoint Information.
The first press of the key takes you to Nav, the second to Waypoint
Information. Additional presses toggle between the two modes.
Each mode contains multiple pages.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
6-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
6.1 Nav Mode
The Primary Nav Page of Nav mode is the most frequently used page
in the Navigator Plus. Once you have activated a waypoint or flight
plan for navigation, using the
key, the Primary Nav Page
provides the information needed to navigate the aircraft along the
selected route of flight. The top line displays bearing, distance, and
ETE to the current destination. The bottom line displays the built-in
CDI, aircraft ground track, and ground speed.
Each line has eight pages available. Some of the data, such as
heading and True Air Speed (TAS), is available if you have the
optional air data computer installed and connected. If the option is
not available, the data fields contain dashes. Starting with the
Primary Nav page and rotating the knobs clockwise, the pages
contain:
Top Line
• TO-waypoint name, Bearing, Distance and ETE.
• TO-waypoint ETE and ETA.
• Heading, TAS, and wind if equipped with optional airdata
computer, or “—”.
• Heading or “——”, Track and Drift Angle or “——”
• Current Track and recommended altitude (odd or even)
or Vertical Navigation Profile Information
• Desired Track, Fly left or right to correct cross track error,
XTK error.
• MSA and MESA.
• TKE graphic, DTK and Distance to the to-waypoint.
Bottom Line
• CDI, Track and Ground Speed.
• Current Track and recommended altitude (odd or even)
or Vertical Navigation Profile Information
• Heading, TAS, and wind if equipped with optional airdata
computer, or “—”.
• Heading or “——”, Track and Drift Angle or “——”.
• MSA and MESA.
• TO-waypoint ETE and ETA.
• Desired Track, Fly left or right to correct cross track error,
XTK error.
• Advisory Waypoint range and bearing.
6-2
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Chapter 6 The Nav Key
6.1.1
Nav Displays
These illustrations depict the Nav Mode displays for the top and
bottom lines respectively, corresponding to the order in which they
appear (clockwise).
Top Line Displays
ŽLAX®ê124­ê227¡ê0:54
ETEêê0:54êETAêê3:53z
›125­255‹ê134­/005‹
¿ÆÆÆÆÃÆÆÆƾš124­227¡
›125­êêŸ124­êê™001­±
MSAêê5ƒêêMESAê10…
Ÿê124­êMAINTAINêEVEN
or
š122­êFLY^000­ê^0€£¡
ATê12…êFORê5ƒê¸ê600ê
Bottom Line Displays
þÒÞÒÞÛÞÒÞÒÿŸ124­250‹
Ÿê124­êMAINTAINêEVEN
or
ŽLAX®ê124­ê227¡ê0:54
ATê12…êFORê5ƒê¸ê600
š122­êFLY^000­ê^0€£¡
›125­255‹ê134­/005‹
ETEêê0:54êETAêê3:53z
›125­êêŸ124­êê™001­±
MSAêê5ˆêêMESAê10…
Revision D
June 29, 1998
6-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
You may create various display combinations from these pages. The
selector knob controls the top display line. The
selector knob
controls bottom display line. If you leave Nav mode, the last pages
viewed are displayed when you return. Press and hold
for 1
second to restore the pages to power-on settings.
To change the NAV mode display:
• Press
.
• Use the
knob to select the desired top line display.
• Use the
knob to select the desired bottom line display
bottom lines respectively, corresponding to the order in which they
appear (clockwise).
6.1.2
Advisory Waypoint
The Navigator Plus features an Advisory Waypoint page available on
the bottom line of the Primary Nav mode display. This page displays
range, bearing, and ETE to the last waypoint viewed in either WPT or
NRST. Use this feature to monitor your position relative to any
waypoint in the database without altering your flight path. Note that
any time you use the
or
key, the last waypoint you viewed
is the Advisory Waypoint.
To use the Advisory Waypoint feature:
• Select the waypoint from
6-4
or
.
Revision C
November 14, 1997
Chapter 6 The Nav Key
6.1.3
The Time Display
The Navigator Plus determines Estimated Time Enroute (ETE) and
Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) for the TO waypoint and for each
waypoint in the active flight plan along the flight path. Times to the TO
waypoint are available from the primary NAV page.
ETE to the TO waypoint:
êŽSFO®ê009­ê220¡êê1:15
ETE and ETA to the TO waypoint:
êETEê1:15LêETAê14:24L
Flight Plan Leg times are available under the second NAV page.
êŽSFO®ê14:24Lê1:15
Flight plan leg ETE is also available under the second FPL page when
a flight plan is active. See the FPL section for details.
Total time and distance through the active flight plan is available
under the second NAV page by going to the last waypoint in the flight
plan.
If your installation provides True Air Speed (TAS) and Heading inputs
to the Navigator Plus so that wind is available, the Navigator Plus
computes these times based on current TAS and computed wind. In
this type of installation, the symbols “--:--” may be displayed for some
leg ETEs if you are flying at low airspeeds in high winds, such that the
wind velocity is greater than TAS. In this circumstance, the wind is
preventing any forward progress along the desired track.
NOTE
Wind and time information under the CALC page are computed using
current ground speed or pilot-entered ground speed; they are not
corrected for wind.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
6-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
6.1.4
The Vertical Navigation Display
Vertical Navigation (VNAV) Profiles display descent or climb informakey. Instruction to the active waypoint as entered under the
tions for entering VNAV information are described in Section 7.5.
If the aircraft is not yet at the descent or climb starting point, or if you
have not entered VNAV information, the following is displayed under
the
key:
Ÿê124­êMAINTAINêODD
The current track is 124°. Maintain ODD altitude based on VFR/IFR
altitude rules.
If you have entered VNAV information, the following will be displayed
under the
point:
key when you reach the climb or descent starting
ATê12…êFORê5ƒê¸ê600ê
This indicates your altitude is 12,500 feet, the target altitude is 5,300
feet and you should descend at 600 feet per minute to reach the
desired altitude.
During the climb or descent, the navigator will provide several
messages. These include when to begin the climb or descent, the
time to the target altitude and when to level off. When the MSG
annunciator light flashes, press
6-6
to view these messages.
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Chapter 6 The Nav Key
6.2
Ground Track Displays
The Ground Track pages in NAV mode provide information on the
desired track (DT), the ground track (TK), track error (TKE), and the
distance off-track, in both graphic and numeric formats.
6.2.1
Track Error Graphic Display
The Track Error (TKE) Display is available in graphic form on both the
top and bottom lines of the primary NAV display (press the NAV
button for approximately one second until display defaults to primary
NAV mode.) The top line TKE graphic provides information on TKE
only and is available at any time. The bottom line TKE graphic
provides information on both CDI and TKE simultaneously (unless
your installer has disabled this feature during setup).
Scaling is 10° per mark except when the approach annunciator is on,
in which case scaling is 5° per mark.
For a CDI-only graphic on the lower line of the display, the CDI
symbol (the vertical line representing the Course Deviation) is seven
pixels high, and extends the entire height of the LED cell. For the
combined TKE/CDI graphic, the CDI symbol is a vertical line five
pixels high (top five), while the TKE symbol is a vertical line two pixels
high (bottom two).
Revision D
June 29, 1998
6-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
To access the top line TKE graphic from the primary NAV display:
• Rotate the
counterclockwise one click.
¿ÆÆÆÆÄÆÆÆƾ295­êê21¡
{ÞÞÞÞÛÞÞÞÞ}Ÿ294­158‹
The scale on the top line provides TKE graphic information of aircraft
nose position relative to desired track. The moving symbol is not a
fly-to symbol, but rather an indication of current nose position.
Bearing to the Active Waypoint and distance-to-go are also displayed
on the top line. The CDI located on the bottom line is a fly-to symbol
and provides course deviation left and/or right of desired track.
The following display illustrates the combined CDI/TKE graphic
found on the primary NAV page.
ŽSFO®ê295­ê21€¡êê7:59
{ÞÞÈÞØÞÞÞÞ}Ÿ294­158‹
When the CDI symbol and TKE symbols are coincident, standard
course intercept is being flown as described below.
To smoothly intercept the desired track represented by the location of
the CDI indicator, turn the aircraft toward the CDI fly-to symbol until
the TKE symbol is located directly under the CDI symbol. Maintaining
this relationship throughout the intercept will result in a shallowing of
the intercept angle. To increase the rate of intercept, merely oversteer
the TKE symbol relative to the CDI indicator.
6-8
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Chapter 6 The Nav Key
6.2.2
CDI Display
6.2.2.1 Cross-Track Errors – Ground Track
The internal CDI simulates a mechanical course deviation indicator.
When the flashing vertical bar is centered on the Ø, the aircraft is on
course. If the flashing bar is to the left or right of the Ø, a cross-track
error is occurring. To correct the error, fly towards the “needle” as in
conventional VOR navigation.
{ÒÞÒãØÞÒÞÒ}Ÿ124­250‹
If the cross-track error is greater than the full scale setting of the CDI,
the left or right bracket will change to a flashing arrow, indicating the
direction to steer to center the CDI. Additionally, the cross-track error
distance will be displayed numerically in nautical miles (nm), statute
miles (sm), or kilometers (km) (the units used depend on how the
installer configured the unit). If cross-track error is greater than 9.9, it
will be displayed as a whole number up to 99. The following figure
illustrates a cross-track error of 2.6 nm, with an internal CDI sensitivity setting of 1.0 nm full scale.
¹ÞÞÞ2†¡ÞÞÞ}Ÿ149­250‹
6.2.2.2 CDI Scale
Each mark on the Navigator Plus CDI (Ø, vertical bar, or dot)
corresponds to one dot on the external CDI. Scaling is automatically
controlled by the Navigator Plus at 5.0 nm enroute, 1.0 nm terminal,
and 0.3 nm during the approach.
The example below shows the en route mode display when the
scaling is 5 nm. Each bar represents 1.0 nm.
þÒÒÒÒØÒÒÒÒÿ
Revision D
June 29, 1998
6-9
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Below is the terminal mode display when the scaling is 1 nm. Each
dot represents 0.2 nm.
þÞÞÞÞØÞÞÞÞÿ
The display below illustrates approach mode with scaling of 0.3 nm
and the APR annunciator ON. Each dot represents 0.06 nm.
þÞÞÞÞØÞÞÞÞÿ
If the internal CDI was configured at installation for 2.5 nm full scale,
the enroute display looks like the one below. Each bar represents 1
nm.
þÒÞÒÞØÞÒÞÒÿ
6.3 Waypoint Information Mode
The Waypoint Information pages contain information about the Active
Flight Plan waypoint. Use the
points on the top line. Use the
information about the waypoints.
knob to move through the wayknob to view the available
Some information is computed “through the flight plan”. For example, distance through the flight plan is computed by adding the
distance of each leg of the flight plan from present position to the
selected waypoint, as opposed to the distance direct from present
position to the selected waypoint.
The Navigator Plus displays times (ETE and ETA) that are corrected
for wind speed and direction when wind is available. See 6.1.3.
You can fly direct-to any waypoint displayed in the mode with the
key.
6-10
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Chapter 6 The Nav Key
To access the NAV Waypoint Information mode displays:
• Press
to get to WAYPOINT INFORMATION.
• Use the
waypoint.
knob to select the desired active plan
• Use the
display.
knob to select the desired information
Turning the
knob left one click displays:
• Bearing and direct distance to the WPT on the top line
and distance and ETE to the waypoint through the flight
plan on the bottom line. Distance is displayed as dashes
(- - -) for waypoints you have passed.
Turning the
knob left one more click displays:
• ETA to the waypoint through the flight plan.
• Fuel remaining at the waypoint.
• Fuel needed to reach the waypoint, through the flight
plan.
Turn the
waypoint.
knob to the right to display information about the
See “The Waypoint Displays” for details about these pages.
Revision D
June 29, 1998
6-11
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
This Page Intentionally Left Blank
6-12
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
Chapter
7
The Calculator Key
The
key allows you to perform many common E6B computer
functions and other calculations.
The
key features three modes:
• Flight Plan/Fuel
• Air Data
• Save Present Position
This chapter covers the following topics available with the calculator
key:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Time, Distance, and Speed
Fuel Management
Winds Aloft
Pressure Altitude
Density Altitude
True Airspeed
Crosswind and Head wind
Save Present Position
Revision A
May 12, 1997
7-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
7.1
Entering Data in the CALC Mode
In general, to enter information and perform calculations in the CALC
mode:
• Press
to access the desired CALC mode.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob to move to the desired page.
.
• Rotate the
knob to move to the desired field.
• Rotate the
knob to change information in a field.
• Continue this procedure until all information is entered.
• Press
to complete the entry.
When one field is updated, all pages containing that field reflect the
current information.
All the CALC mode displays (except Pressure Altitude page) use data
provided by the Navigator Plus or external sensors. When manually
editing data, returning to NAV mode erases the changes.
7-2
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
7.2
Flight Plan/Fuel Pages
Flight Plan calculations are available in the Fuel Management and
Time, Distance, and Speed pages. These pages show current flight
plan data and information when available. They may also be used as
a flight planning calculator.
If you are flying an Active Flight Plan, these pages use the current
ground speed and external fuel computer or user-entered rate of fuel
consumption to compute the following:
• Estimated Time En route (ETE)
• Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA)
• Flight Plan Distance (DIST)
• Rate of Fuel Consumption
The Fuel Management and Time, Distance, and Speed pages also
estimate the amount of fuel required to arrive at the current destination. If you are flying a multi-leg flight plan, the data reflects calculations from present position through the flight plan to the final destination.
7.2.1
Time, Distance and Speed Calculations
To display the Time, Distance and Speed page:
• Press
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
knob to display the Time, Distance and
• Rotate the
Speed page.
The Time, Distance, and Speed page shown below indicates the flight
plan ground speed is 160 knots; flight plan distance is 191 nautical
miles; the flight plan time (ETE) is 1 hour and 11 minutes; the estimated time of arrival (ETA) is 9:25 local time.
FPLêGSê160‹êETEê1:11
êDISTêê191¡êETAê9:25L
Revision A
May 12, 1997
7-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
All the fields displayed (except ETA) may be edited at any time for
different flight plan calculations.
Distance, ground speed, and ETE may be manually edited to view
different flight plan data. The following chart shows how each
changed field initiates new calculations:
Changed Field
Calculation Affected
ETE
Distance
Ground Speed
Distance, ETA
ETE, ETA
ETE, ETA
To edit a field in the Time, Distance and Speed page:
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to move through the editable fields.
• Rotate the
field.
knob to change the data in the selected
• Press
7-4
.
to accept the changes.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
7.2.2
Fuel Management Calculations
To display the Fuel Management page:
• Press
• Rotate the
page.
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
knob to display the Fuel Management
The Fuel Management page below indicates that the estimated fuel
required to reach the destination is 14.5 gallons; fuel consumption
rate is 12.3 gallons per hour; the remaining distance is 190 nautical
miles; fuel efficiency is 13.0 nautical miles per gallon. The fuel
consumption rate is taken from the Air and Fuel Data Computer input,
if available, or from user input.
FUELêŽêDESTêêê14…GAL
FLOWêê12ƒGHêêê13€¡PG
The fuel required and current fuel consumption rate fields may be
edited. Such changes affect the distance field of the previous page.
The fuel required field displays the fuel needed to reach your destination at current GS and consumption rate. The fuel efficiency is always
computed by using the ground speed from the Time, Distance, and
Speed page. This is the aircraft’s current ground speed unless a new
value has been entered.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
7-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
For flight planning, you can determine the maximum remaining flight
range and fuel efficiency. Enter the remaining usable fuel and current
fuel consumption rate as follows:
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob to move through the editable fields.
• Rotate the
field.
knob to change the data in the selected
• Press
to accept the changes.
The DIST field on the previous page changes, showing the maximum
remaining flight range.
Editing the fuel or rate-of-consumption field results in changed values
as shown below:
Changed Field
Calculation Affected
Fuel
Rate
Distance
Distance (previous page)
Distance, MPG
Fuel
Distance can be edited on the Time, Distance, and Speed page.
Changing or computing a value on one page automatically changes
the other page, but does not affect current flight data.
Fuel management calculations are based on the information the user
enters and the aircraft’s current ground speed. The user is responsible for monitoring fuel reserves, changes in fuel consumption rates
and changing wind conditions.
7-6
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
7.2.3
Fuel Remaining Page
The initial fuel on board is entered during the power-up sequence.
The Navigator Plus keeps track of Fuel Remaining, based on fuel rate
information from the Air and Fuel Data Computer, if one is used, or
from user input.
To display the Fuel Remaining page:
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to display the Fuel Remaining page.
FUELêREMAININGê175„
êRANGEê14:15êê2137¡
The Fuel Remaining page provides the following information:
• Fuel Remaining (initial fuel minus fuel used)
• Flight Time Remaining (fuel remaining divided by fuel
consumption rate)
• Range (flight time remaining times ground speed)
To edit the Fuel Remaining field:
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
until you reach the Fuel Remaining Page.
• Press
.
• Use the
field.
to change the value in the fuel remaining
• Press
to accept the changes.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
7-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
7.2.4
Fuel At Arrival Page
To display the Fuel at Arrival page:
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to display the Fuel at Arrival page.
The Fuel At Arrival page provides the following information:
• Fuel At Arrival (fuel remaining minus fuel used)
• Flight Time Reserve (Fuel at Arrival divided by Fuel
Consumption Rate)
• Reserve (flight time reserve times ground speed)
FUELê@êARRIVALêê53ƒ
RESERVEêê4:28êê671¡
The Navigator Plus calculates the amount of fuel that will be available
on board when the aircraft reaches its final destination. This display
provides the pilot with the necessary information to evaluate the
reserve fuel situation early enough to take necessary action.
7.2.5
Minimum Fuel Page
The Minimum Fuel Page features two editable fields used by the
Navigator Plus to warn you of impending fuel quantity shortages.
To display the Minimum Fuel Page:
• Press
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Minimum Fuel page.
MIN.êFUELêINêMINUTES
ONêBOARDê30/@DESTê45
7-8
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
The ON BOARD value is used by the Navigator Plus to display the
Exhausted Fuel message when the flight time remaining (at the
current ground speed and burn rate leaves you less than 30 minutes
of fuel at your destination.
The @DEST value is used by the Navigator Plus to display the Using
Fuel Reserve message when the flight time remaining (at the current
ground speed and burn rate) leaves you less than 45 minutes of fuel
reserve at your destination.
To change the time of the Fuel Reserve message or the Fuel Exhausted message:
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob to move through the editable fields.
• Rotate the
knob to change the setting.
• Press
7.2.6
to save the changes.
Total Fuel Used Page
To display the Total Fuel Used page:
• Press
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Total Fuel Used page.
The Total Fuel Used page provides the following information:
• Total Fuel Used
• Total Used by Left Engine
• Total Used by Right Engine
TOTALêUSEDêêêêêê41‚
LEFTêê19ˆêRIGHTê21„
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The Navigator keeps track of the fuel used since the last fuel entry.
When installed in a single engine aircraft, or without an Air and
Fuel Data Computer, the second line (Left and Right Engine
usage) is not displayed.
When the Navigator is turned off, the Fuel Used is reset to zero.
The Fuel Remaining is not reset. This feature is useful for multistop flights where the fuel used for each leg may be monitored
while keeping track of the total fuel remaining.
7.2.7
Engine Fuel Flow Page
The Navigator provides a digital readout of the engine fuel flow
quantity to a tenth of a gallon per hour, liter per hour or pound per
hour, as selected using the
key.
To display the Engine Fuel Flow page:
to access the FLT PLAN/FUEL mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
page.
knob to display the Engine Fuel Flow
ENGINEêFUELêFLOW
LEFTê99ˆêRIGHTê103
This page is not displayed when the Navigator is installed in a single
engine aircraft or when there is no Air and Fuel Data Computer.
(Total fuel flow information is available on the main Fuel Management
page; see Total Fuel Page).
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Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
7.3
Air Data Pages
Air data calculations are available in the Air Data pages. Use these to
compute:
• Altitude
• TAS
• Wind
7.3.1
Pressure Altitude Calculations
To access the Pressure Altitude mode:
• Press
to access the Air Data mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Pressure Altitude
Calculation page.
The Pressure Altitude page provides the following information:
• Pressure Altitude
• Barometric Pressure Setting
• Indicated Altitude
Pressure Altitude and Indicated Altitude are measured in thousands of
feet or thousands of meters.
Barometric Pressure Setting is measured in inches of mercury, from
28.00 in. to 31.00 in. or in millibars, from 948 mb to 1050 mb as
selected by the user.
In the example below, the Pressure Altitude page indicates that the
barometric pressure setting is 30.32 inches of mercury, the pressure
altitude is 11,200 feet, and barometric altitude is 11,600 feet.
BRê30ƒ¤êPRSêALTê11‚
êêêêêêêBAROêALTê11†
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To enter the information required for pressure altitude calculations:
• Press
.
• Rotate the
to move through the editable fields.
• Rotate the
to change the data in the selected field.
• Press
to accept the changes.
A change in barometric setting or indicated altitude initiates new
calculations in related fields, according to the chart below:
Changed Field
Calculation Affected
Barometric Setting
Indicated Altitude
Pressure Altitude
Pressure Altitude
Changes made for pressure altitude will be reflected in the Density
Altitude and TAS displays.
7.3.2
Density Altitude Calculations
• Press
to access the Air Data mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Density Altitude
Calculations page.
The Density Altitude page provides the following information:
• Density Altitude in thousands of feet or thousands of
meters.
• Ram Air Temperature (degrees Celsius) - the Total Air
Temperature as indicated on an uncorrected temperature
probe (typically labeled OAT in light aircraft and RAT in
corporate/commercial aircraft. See True Airspeed Calculations section for a complete definition).
• Pressure Altitude in thousands of feet or thousands of
meters.
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Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
In the example below, the Density Altitude page indicates that density
altitude is 13,300 feet; the Ram Air Temperature (Total Air Temperature) is 19° Celsius; pressure altitude is 10,500 feet.
DENSITYêALTITDEê13ƒ
RATê19½êPRSêALTê10…
To enter the information required for density altitude calculations:
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob to move through the editable fields.
• Rotate the
field.
knob to change the data in the selected
• Press
to accept the changes.
A change in either RAT or pressure altitude initiates new calculations
in related fields, according to the chart below:
7.3.3
True Airspeed (TAS) Calculations
Changed Field
Calculation Affected
RAT
Pressure Altitude
Density Altitude RAT
Density Altitude
Density Altitude
• Press
• Rotate the
tions page.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
to display the Air Data mode.
knob to access the True Airspeed Calcula-
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
The True Airspeed page provides the following information:
• True Airspeed in knots, statute miles per hour, or kilometers per hour.
• Outside Air Temperature (OAT, degrees Celsius) the True
Air Temperature of the ambient corrected for temperature
rise, compressibility, etc.
• Mach Number (non-dimensional) True Airspeed divided
by Speed of Sound at current Pressure Altitude.
• Indicated Airspeed in knots, statute miles per hour, or
kilometers per hour.
• Ram Air Temperature (RAT, degrees Celsius) - the Total
Air Temperature as indicated on an uncorrected temperature probe .
For an Indicated Airspeed of 321 knots, Ram Air Temperature of +14°
C, and a Pressure Altitude of 20,000 feet (not displayed on this page),
the True Airspeed page shown below indicates that the True Airspeed
is 438 knots, true Outside Air Temperature is -11 ° C, and Mach
number is .69.
TASê438‹êOAT-11½êM†ì
IASê321‹êRATê14½
OAT and TAS presented on the CALC-TAS page are dependent on
the “K” Factor entered in the initial configuration of the aircraft. This
“K” Factor only applies to the standard Ram Air Temperature gauge
located on the instrument panel and is only used to determine the true
Outside Air Temperature (OAT) for manual TAS calculations as
described below. When an Air Data Computer (such as the Shadin
ADC 200) is installed in the aircraft, displayed ADC parameters
generally are based on a “K” Factor of 1.0.
To enter the information required for true airspeed calculations:
• Press
7-14
.
• Rotate the
knob to move through the editable fields.
• Rotate the
field.
knob to change the data in the selected
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Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
• Press
to accept the changes.
For manual calculations, ensure that the desired Pressure Altitude
has been entered on the previous CALC page.
A change in IAS, RAT, TAS, OAT, or Mach initiates new calculations
in related fields, according to the chart below:
Changed Field
Calculation Affected
IAS
RAT
TAS
OAT
Mach
TAS, OAT, Mach
TAS, OAT
OAT, Mach, IAS
TAS, RAT
TAS, OAT, IAS
Changes made in TAS calculations will be reflected in the Winds Aloft
calculations.
7.3.4
Winds Aloft Calculations
• Press
to access the Air Data mode.
• Rotate the
tions page.
knob to display the Winds Aloft Calcula-
The Winds Aloft page provides the following information:
• Wind Direction and Speed
• True Airspeed and Heading
The Winds Aloft page shown below indicates that the wind is from 25°
true at 28 knots, given a true airspeed of 153 knots and a heading of
070°. Wind direction is given in degrees TRUE, not degrees magnetic.
WINDê’êê25­ê‘êatê28‹
êêêTASê153‹êHDGêê70­
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This page determines the winds aloft based on
(1)
the current track and ground speed from the NAV page,
(2)
magnetic variation,
(3)
the TAS from the TAS page, and
(4)
the manually-entered HDG, or HDG from the Air and Fuel
Data Computer.
To enter information required for Winds Aloft calculations:
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob to move through the editable fields.•
Rotate the
field.
• Press
knob to change the data in the selected
to accept the changes.
A change in either the TAS or heading fields initiates new calculations
in related fields, according to the chart below:
7.3.5
Changed Field
Calculation Affected
TAS
Wind Speed, Wind Direction
Heading
Wind Speed, Wind Direction
Crosswind and Head Wind Calculations
• Press
to access the Air Data mode.
knob to display the Crosswind and Head
• Rotate the
wind Calculations page.
The Crosswind and Head wind page provides the following information:
• Crosswind
• Head wind
• Runway Direction
• Wind Direction (magnetic) and Speed
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Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
The Crosswind and Head wind page shown below indicates that the
crosswind component is 16 knots; the Head wind component is 19
knots for runway 31, when the wind is from 270° True at 25 knots.
X-WINDê16‹êêHEADê19‹
êRWYê31êWNDê270­ê25‹
To enter the information required for crosswind and head wind
calculations:
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob to move through the editable fields.
• Rotate the
field.
knob to change the data in the selected
• Press the
key to accept the changes.
A change in either the runway number, wind direction or wind speed
initiates new calculations in related fields, according to the chart
below:
Changed Field
Calculation Affected
Runway Number
Wind Direction
Wind Speed
Crosswind, Head wind
Crosswind, Head wind
Crosswind, Head wind
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
7.4
Saving the Present Position
The Save Present Position mode is used to save the aircraft’s
present position. The Navigator provides 10 phonetic waypoints,
alpha-juliet, for temporary storage of present position waypoints.
Each time you save present position, the Navigator stores the
position in the next phonetic waypoint, overwriting that waypoint. After
10 consecutive saves, the alpha waypoint is overwritten.
To save a present position:
• Press
to access the Save Present Position Mode.
• Press
until you get to the USER mode.
PRESSê(ENT)êTOêSAVE
POSITIONêTOêalpha
• Press
7.4.1
to save the present position.
Copy a Phonetic Waypoint
You may save any phonetic waypoint by copying it to a user waypoint.
• Use the
knob to view the phonetic waypoint of interest.
For example, chrly.
knob one click either direction to display
• Rotate the
“EDIT chrly? (ENT)”.
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to change the name.
• Press
7-18
.
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Chapter 7 The Calculator Key
7.5
Vertical Navigation Profiles
Vertical Navigation (VNAV) can be used for climb or descent profiles.
The Navigator creates a VNAV profile to the active waypoint based on
the current ground speed.
The calculation is made using a pilot-entered starting altitude,
ending altitude, desired rate (or angle) of descent or climb, and the
desired distance from the active waypoint for the ending altitude.
Using this information, the Navigator calculates the VNAV descent or
climb starting point and the altitude required to follow the profile.
Press
to display the advisory messages indicating when the
level-off point has been reached.
The illustration below shows a descent is from 12,500 feet to 10,500
feet at a rate of 200 feet per minute. The active waypoint is the Santa
Monica VOR at 10,500 feet.
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To enter VNAV profile information:
STARTING ALTITUDE
ENDING ALTITUDE
VNAV:onêê12…êŽê10…
êê200:ê29¡ê’SMO·
DISTANCE
DESCENT/CLIMB
RATE
ACTIVE
WAYPOINT
• Press
to access the NAV Profile mode.
• Press
.
• Rotate the
clockwise to turn VNAV on.
• Rotate the
to move to the next editable field.
• Use the
to change the starting altitude.
• Use the selector knobs to continue moving through and
changing the editable fields.
• Press
to save the changes.
View VNAV Profile information under the
7-20
key.
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
Chapter
8
The Auxiliary Key
Use the
key to control and monitor information in the Navigator
Plus. The
key features five modes:
• Checklist
• System Status
• Sensor Status
• Configure
• User Setup
Once the desired mode is selected, rotate the
access additional information displays.
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and
knobs to
8-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Auxiliary Mode Features
Checklist
Creating, editing, using, and deleting checklists. User checklists
may include such information as custom data, commonly used
frequencies, etc.
System Status
Date, Time, Present Position, System operating conditions,
Data Base and Software revisions.
Sensor Status
GPS Status and Accuracy, Satellite Data, GPS Availability,
Approach RAIM Availability.
Configure
Parallel Offset, I/O Interface Check, Dead Reckoning/Demo
Mode, Display Diagnostic
User Setup
If this mode is available, it will include Database Search
Regions, Airwatch, Safeguard/Personal Message, Save/Load
Configuration.
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
8.1
The Checklist Mode
Use the checklist mode to create up to 10 custom checklists with up
to 26 entries each.
8.1.1
Creating and Naming Checklists
To create and name a customized checklist:
to access the Checklist mode.
• Press
The checklist message flashes on the screen and then the title for the
last selected checklist is displayed. If no checklists have been
created, the Navigator Plus displays:
êêêNOêCHECKLISTS
knob until the following display appears:
• Rotate the
ê0:êINSERTêATêSTART
INSERTêLISTê0ê(ENT)
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob to select the first letter or number in
the name field.
• Rotate the
knob to move to the next space in the field
and select the next character using the
knob.
• Continue this process to finish the entry.
• Press
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May 12, 1997
when the entry is complete.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
The checklist number is listed on the top line of the display shown
below. The first item in the list, A, is listed on the bottom line.
INSERTê0Aêêêêêê(ENT)
êA:
.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to select the first letter or number of
the checklist item.
knob to move to the next space in the field
• Rotate the
and select the next character using the
knob.
• Continue this process to finish the entry.
when the entry is complete.
• Press
The Navigator Plus will display:
INSERTê0Bêêêêêê(ENT)
êB:êINSERTêATêEND
Continue this process until all items (up to 26) are entered in the
key to store the checklist.
checklist. Press the
To enter another checklist:
• Rotate the
knob until the bottom line of the Navigator
Plus displays “INSERT LIST 0 (ENT)”.
• Rotate the
knob until the Navigator Plus displays:
ê1:êINSERTêATêEND
INSERTêLISTê1êê(ENT)
• Press
and enter a new checklist as described
previously.
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
8.1.2
Using a Checklist
You can access a checklist at any time during flight.
To activate a checklist:
to access the Checklist mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to select the desired list.
0:êFIRST
A:êFUELêPUMP
To check off the first item in the list:
• Press
.
0:êFIRST
¬A:êFUELêPUMP
A check mark appears next to the item and the Navigator Plus
displays the next item on the list. After all the items on the list have
been checked off, a check mark is displayed next to the list name.
Rotate the
knob to go to the next list.
You may exit the Checklist mode at any time by pressing any key.
When you return to the Checklist mode, the Navigator Plus returns to
the last checklist displayed. You can proceed with checking off items
as though there had been no interruption. The check marks will
remain until the Navigator Plus is powered down.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8.1.3
Editing a Checklist
Once a checklist is created, you can edit the checklist name or any of
the items in the list.
To edit an entry in a checklist:
.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to select the list to be edited.
knob until the Navigator Plus displays the
• Rotate the
“EDIT LIST” option:
.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to select the item in the checklist or
the checklist title to be edited.
.
• Press
0:êFIRST
EDITêLISTê0êêê(ENT)
• Rotate the
knob to change the character.
• Rotate the
character.
knob to move the cursor to the next
• Continue this process to finish updating the entry.
when the entry is complete.
• Press
EDITê0êTITLEêê(ENT)
ê0:êTAKEOFF
• Rotate the
to edit, or
• Press
8-6
knob to select another item in the checklist
to complete editing.
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
8.1.4
Inserting and Deleting Checklist Items
Once a checklist is created, you can add or delete items.
To insert a new item into a checklist:
to access the Checklist mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to select the list to be edited.
• Rotate the
displayed.
knob until the “EDIT LIST” message is
.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob until the Navigator Plus displays:
knob to select the position in the checklist
• Rotate the
in which to insert the new item.
.
• Press
ê0:êTAKEOFF
EDITêLISTê0êêêê(ENT)
• Using the selector knobs, enter the new item.
• Press
.
INSERTê0Aêêêêêê(ENT)
êA:êALTIMETER
• Edit more items or press
to complete editing.
The new item is inserted into the checklist as the new item B. The
former item B and all the following items move down one position.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
To delete an item from the checklist:
to access the Checklist mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to select the list to be edited.
• Rotate the
displayed.
knob until the “EDIT LIST” message is
.
• Press
• Rotate the
delete.
knob to select the item in the checklist to
• Rotate the
knob until the Navigator Plus displays:
• Press
to delete the item.
DELETEê0Cêêêêêê(ENT)
êC:êALTIMETER
• Press
to confirm the deletion. (Press any other key
to abort the deletion process.)
When an item is deleted from a checklist, all the remaining checklist
items move up one position.
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
8.1.5
Deleting a Checklist
Once a checklist is created, the checklist may be deleted.
To delete a checklist, follow these steps:
to access the Checklist mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to select the list to be deleted.•
knob until the “DELETE LIST” message is
Rotate the
displayed.
• Press
.
ê2:êLANDING
CONFIRMêDELETEê(AUX)
• Press
to confirm the deletion.
When a checklist is deleted, all the lists that follow move up one
position.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8.2
The System Status Mode
The System Status mode provides quick access to system status
information. The six status pages include the following:
• Date/Time Display
• Present Position/Altitude Information
• Voltage and Temperature Display
• Database Expiration Information
• Software Revision Information
• Software Code Display
8.2.1
The Date/Time Display
The first page in the System Status function displays the local date,
local time, time zone and Zulu (UTC) time.
The Time page shown below indicates that the current date is
February 28, 1997; the day is Friday; the time is 6:29, the time zone is
Pacific Standard Time; the current Zulu time is 14:28:53. When GPS
Satellites are available, the time and date are set automatically.
FRIDAYêê28-FEB-97
15:04:57zêPSTê07:04
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
Time zones are selected from the following list:
PST
PDT
MST
MDT
CST
CDT
EST
EDT
AST
ADT
Pacific Standard Time
Pacific Daylight Savings Time
Mountain Standard Time
Mountain Daylight Savings Time
Central Standard Time
Central Daylight Savings Time
Eastern Standard Time
Eastern Daylight Savings Time
Atlantic Standard Time
Atlantic Daylight Savings Time
Pre-programmed time zones are not available for International use.
For operation outside of North America, enter the time offset from
UTC. For example, the time offset for Melbourne, Australia would be
UTC + 10.
8.2.2
The Present Position Display
The Present Position page displays the aircraft’s current position in
one or two coordinate systems.
to access the System Status mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to display the Present Position page.
PRESENTêPOSITION
“37­23…¨ª¶122­02‚¨³
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8.2.2.1 The Altitude Display
The Altitude page displays the current altitude and altitude source. In
case of an altitude source failure, use this page to enter a manual
altitude for use by the GPS receiver.
To access the Altitude page:
to access the System Status mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to display the Present Position page.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Altitude page.
The Altitude page below indicates the current altitude is 10,253 feet
and the source is pressure, with the GPS 3D altitude available as a
backup.
ALTITUDE:ê10253Æ
SOURCE:êPRS/GPS-3D
Your altitude encoder provides pressure altitude to the Navigator Plus
in compliance with TSO C-129. This pressure altitude augments the
GPS position and RAIM computations, extending the RAIM coverage
in cases where satellite coverage alone is inadequate for 3D position
solutions and RAIM. In case of external altitude source failure and 2D
GPS operation, you may enter altitude manually. If the external
altitude source is valid or the GPS is operating in 3D mode, the
Navigator Plus will not accept manual altitude input.
Depending on the GPS mode and the state of the aircraft altitude
encoder input, you may see any of these altitude sources:
BARO/GPS-3D
The altitude source is BARO from an Air Data Computer.
The GPS is operating in 3D, GPS computed altitude is
available.
BARO/GPS-2D
The altitude source is BARO from an Air Data Computer.
The GPS is operating in 2D mode, no GPS altitude is
available.
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
PRS/GPS-3D
The altitude source is pressure from the encoder. The
GPS is operating in 3D, GPS computed altitude is
available.
PRS/GPS-2D
The altitude source is pressure from the encoder. The
GPS is operating in 2D mode, no GPS altitude is available.
GPS-3D
The altitude source is GPS 3D computed altitude.
HELD/GPS-2D
The altitude source is held at the last known value. The
GPS is operating in 2D mode, no GPS altitude is available.
MANUAL/GPS-2D
The altitude source is your manual entry. The GPS is
operating in 2D mode, no GPS altitude is available.
OLD
The Navigator Plus is not receiving external altitude nor
computing GPS solutions.
8.2.2.2 Entering Manual Altitude
To enter a manual altitude when the source is HELD, MANUAL or
OLD:
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Present Position page.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Altitude page.
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to set the altitude.
• Press
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.
8-13
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8.2.2.3 Pressure Altitude and GPS Altitude
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
to display the Present Position page.
knob to the right to view the current
• Rotate the
pressure and GPS altitudes.
The display below indicates that the current pressure altitude is
10,250 feet. The source is encoder input. GPS altitude is 9,843 feet.
PRESêALTê10250êENCDR
GPSêALT:ê9843Æ
Altitude displays may include the following sources:
ENCDR (Encoder)
The Navigator Plus is receiving pressure altitude from an
external altitude encoder.
None
The altitude source is not available and altitude is
displayed as dashes (for either pressure or GPS altitude).
8.2.3
The Voltage and Temperature Display
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
ture page.
knob to display the Voltage and Tempera-
The Voltage and Temperature page below indicates that the input
voltage is 14.2 volts; temperature inside the unit is 33o Celsius.
INPUTêVOLTAGE:ê14.2V
INTERNALêTEMP:êê33­C
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
8.2.3.1 The Crystal Offset and Memory Battery Display
This page provides maintenance information.
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
ture page.
knob to display the Voltage and Tempera-
• Rotate the
knob to select the Crystal Offset page.
The GPS Receiver Crystal Offset page below indicates that the crystal
frequency offset is 13 Hz from nominal and the memory battery is 3.67
volts.
CRYSTLêOFFSET:êê13Hz
MEMORYêBATTERY:3.67·
8.2.3.2 The GPS Antenna Display
This page provides maintenance information.
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
ture page.
knob to display the Voltage and Tempera-
• Rotate the
knob to display the GPS Antenna page.
The GPS Antenna page display shown below indicates that the
voltage across the antenna leads is currently 4.36 volts and the
current is 65 milliamps.
GPSêANTENNA:êêê4ƒ¨êV
êêêêCURRENT:êêêê65mA
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8.2.4
The Database Expiration Display
The Database Expiration page displays the expiration date of the
NavData card.
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
page.
knob to display the Database Expiration
The Database Expiration page below indicates that the current
database expires on February 28, 1997.
DATABASEêEXPIRATION
êêêêê28-FEB-97
8.2.5
The Software Revisions Display
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
page.
knob to access the software revisions
The Trimble 2000 Approach Plus GPS Navigator contains two
processors, each with its own software code:
• Navigation and I/O Processor
• GPS Processor
The Software Revisions page lists the software revision numbers.
REVISION::êêNAV2†¤¢
GPS5€¤-0812êA
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
8.2.6
The System Code Display
• Press
to access the System Status mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the System Code page.
The System Code page lists the system revision for the Trimble 2000
Approach Plus GPS Navigator software. This revision number
matches the last four digits of the unit part number found on the ID
plate.
SYSTEMêCODE:ê0240
êêêêêêêc1996
8.3
The Sensor Status Mode
The Sensor Status mode allows quick access to sensor diagnostic
information as well as the system navigation mode. The sensor status
pages include the following:
• GPS Status
• Estimated Accuracy
• GPS Satellite Status
• GPS Sensor Reset
• GPS Satellite Availability
• Approach RAIM Availability
8.3.1
GPS Sensor Status
The GPS Status page displays current operating mode, RAIM mode,
and Position Dilution of Precision (PDOP).
RAIM provides verification that GPS accuracy is sufficient for use as a
supplemental means of navigation during IFR En route, Terminal, and
Non-precision Approach operations. In the event “RAIM” status
reverts to “NO RAIM”, use of GPS for en route navigation is still
approved, but must be cross-checked with VOR, DME, etc.
PDOP is a measurement of the geometry of the satellites. The
smaller the number, the greater the precision.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
8-17
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
To access the GPS Status Display:
to access the Sensor Status mode.
• Press
The GPS Status page indicates that the GPS receiver is computing
position in three dimensions, pressure altitude is available, RAIM is
active, RAIM Mode is “Approach”, and the Position Dilution of Precision is 1.6.
GPS
mode
RAIM
status
GPS:ê3D/PRSêêêêêRAIM
MODE:êAPRêêêPDOP:ê1†
RAIM
mode
An explanation of the GPS status codes follows.
3D/BARO
The GPS is operating in 3D, external baro altitude input is
available.
3D/PRS
The GPS is operating in 3D, external pressure altitude
input is available.
3D
The GPS is operating in 3D, no external altitude source is
available
2D+ BARO
The GPS is operating in 2D using external baro altitude in
the position solution.
2D+PRS
The GPS is operating in 2D using external pressure
altitude in the position solution.
2D+HELD
The GPS is operating in 2D using the last known altitude
in the position solution.
2D+MANL
The GPS is operating in 2D using pilot entered altitude in
the position solution.
8-18
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
RAIM status will display:
RAIM
Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitor is active.
NO RAIM
Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitor can not provide
the required integrity for phase of flight; use of GPS for
navigation is still approved, but must be cross-checked
with VOR, DME, etc.
RAIM/B
Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitor is active and using
automatic altitude aiding.
RAIM mode will display:
TERM
RAIM to terminal limits of TSO C-129.
APR
RAIM to approach limits of TSO C-129
PDOP varies according to the positional relationship of the satellite in
view.
8.3.2
Estimated Accuracy
The Navigator Plus computes an estimate of the worst case position
error based on the accuracy of the signals and the geometry of the
GPS Satellites. This estimate is displayed on the Estimated Accuracy
page.
To display the Estimated Accuracy page:
• Press
to access the Sensor Status mode.
• Rotate the
knob counterclockwise.
ESITMATEDêACCURACY:
GPS:0€¤¡
Revision A
May 12, 1997
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8.3.3
GPS Satellites Tracked Display
• Press
to access the Sensor Status mode.
• Rotate the
knob clockwise.
The GPS Satellites Tracked page displays the identification numbers
of all the Space Vehicles (SVs) being tracked by the Navigator Plus.
The GPS Satellites Tracked page below indicates that the GPS
receiver is currently tracking nine satellites. The satellites being
tracked are numbers 1, 9, 12, 15, 21, 23, 25, 28, and 31. The Trimble
2000 Approach Plus GPS Navigator tracks all satellites in view.
GPSêTRACKêê9:ê31ê28
ê1ê9ê12ê15ê21ê23ê25
A flashing number on the GPS Track page indicates that the associated satellite is being tracked but not used in the position solution due
to poor signal strength, bad geometry, manual deselection, or
classification of satellite as unhealthy.
8.3.4
GPS Satellite Status Display
The GPS Satellite Status page displays elevation, azimuth, and signal
level for each satellite.
To access the GPS Satellite Status Display:
to access the Sensor Status mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob clockwise.
The GPS Satellite Status page below indicates that satellite (SV for
Space Vehicle) number 3 is being received with a signal to noise ratio
of 10.0; it is currently at an elevation of 29° above the horizon and an
azimuth of 248° true.
GPSêSV:ê03êêSIGê10.0
êêêELVê029­êAZMê248­
8-20
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
If a negative elevation appears in this page, it is an indicator that the
satellite is below the horizon and not available for use.
knob. You
To access information on other satellites, rotate the
may view the status of all satellites whether or not they are currently
being tracked.
8.3.4.1 Satellite Database
You may prohibit the GPS receiver from using any satellite in the
constellation by disabling that SV from the Satellite Status Page. You
should only disable a satellite due to a NOTAM about that satellite.
To disable a satellite:
• Press
to access the Sensor Status mode.
knob to view the desired satellite.
• Rotate the
• Press
.
• Rotate the
knob to disable the SV.
.
• Press
GPSêSV:ê03êDISABLED
êêêELVê029­êAZMê248­
To enable a satellite previously disabled:
to access the Sensor Status mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
• Press
to view the desired satellite.
.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob until the ENABLE or SIG is displayed.
.
When the Navigator Plus is turned off then back on, all manually
disabled satellites are re-enabled.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
8-21
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8.3.5
GPS Sensor Reset
The Sensor reset causes the GPS receiver to go through its poweron and satellite acquisition sequence as if the unit had been turned
off and on.
• Press
to access Sensor Status mode.
• Rotate the
Reset page.
knob clockwise to display the GPS Sensor
RESETêGPSêSENSOR?
êêêêêêêêêêêêêêê(ENT)
• Press
• Press
8.3.6
.
to confirm reset.
GPS Satellite Availability
The availability page provides coverage predictions for the current
location at any date or time.
• Press
• Rotate the
below.
to access the Sensor Status mode.
knob clockwise to view the display shown
The Satellite Availability page shown below indicates that GPS three
dimensional positioning is available 24 hours at the current location
on September 19, 1996.
GPSêAVAIL:ê19-SEP-96
3-D:ê24êHRêCOVERAGE
8-22
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
If coverage is less than 24 hours, use the
available satellite navigation period.
knob to view the next
Enter a specific date or to select between visibility computation for two
or three-dimensional positioning:
• Press
.
• Use the selector knobs to change the date.
• Press
to compute.
The position used for satellite visibility computations is the last
computed fixed position. If the Dead Reckoning (DR) mode has been
set, the visibility will be computed for the present DR position.
8.3.7
Approach RAIM Availability
The Approach RAIM Available page provides RAIM predictions for
your destination airport ±15 minutes of your ETE, through the flight
plan.
The Approach RAIM Available page also provides RAIM prediction for
any Airport and Time entered by the User. To access the function:
• Press
to access the Sensor Status mode.
• Rotate the
knob clockwise to display the
Approach RAIM Availability page.
APRêRAIMêAVAILABLE:
AUS®ê17:37±êé15êMIN
When an Approach is active, or your flight plan ends with an airport,
the associated Airport will automatically be displayed along with the
time of arrival through the flight plan.
Revision A
March 17, 1997
8-23
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
To determine Approach availability at any Airport:
.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to move between the Airport field and
the Time field.
• Rotate the
as required.
knob to change the Airport ID and/or Time
In the event RAIM is not available at the selected Airport and Time,
the following will be displayed:
RAIMêNOTêAVAILABLE:
SJC®ê15:37±
8.4
The Configure Mode
The configure mode is used to establish parameters for the following:
• Parallel Track Offset (PTK)
• I/O Interface Check
• Dead Reckoning/Demo Mode
• Display Diagnostic
8.4.1
Selecting a Parallel Offset
Parallel track offsets from 99.99 nm left to 99.99 nm right are available
from the parallel offset page. A parallel offset changes the displayed
cross track error and the CDI, it does not affect the course or distance
to the next waypoint. The PTK annunciator is lit when you select an
offset other than 0.0 nm.
8-24
Revision A
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Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
The Navigator Plus features two Parallel Offset modes:
Auto Cancel
In this mode, the Navigator Plus automatically
cancels the offset when you pass the last waypoint
in the flight plan.
No Cancel
In this mode, the Navigator Plus retains the offset
beyond the last waypoint in the flight plan.
When the PTK annunciator is lit, you may view the selected offset
key.
from the
Once you have selected an offset, the Navigator Plus maintains that
offset through the remainder of the flight plan or until cancelled.
The Navigator Plus cancels the offset after any
operation.
When an approach is enabled, the Navigator Plus cancels the parallel
offset and prohibits additional offset selection while the approach is
enabled.
To access the Parallel offset feature:
• Press
to access the Configure mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Parallel Offset page.
PTKêOFFêêAUTOêCANCEL
ê3€¢¡êRIGHT
The display above indicates a parallel offset of 3 nautical miles, an
offset direction of Right and Auto Cancel mode.
To select a Parallel Offset:
• Press
. The Navigator Plus displays the last selected
offset value, direction and mode.
• Use the selector knobs to choose the offset value,
direction and mode.
• Press
Revision A
March 17, 1997
. The PTK annunciator lights.
8-25
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8.4.2
I/O Interface Check
The Configure mode provides of a means of verifying the CDI, flags,
and external annunciators.
To access the I/O Interface Check page:
• Press
to access the Configure mode.
• Rotate the
page.
knob to display the I/O Interface Check
.
• Press
TESTêCDIê#1:5L
USEêKNOBêêêêêêêêê(ENT)
8.4.3
The Dead Reckoning Display - Demo Mode
Use the Dead Reckoning Demo mode to simulate the Navigator inflight operation while on the ground. In this mode, you enter ground
speed and ground track under the NAV key to simulate flight. This
mode is not available when the Navigator is receiving enough satellite
signals to navigate. In order to use it, you must have the aircraft in a
hanger, the you must cover the antenna, or you must deselect all
satellites.
To select DEMO operation:
• Press
to access the Configure mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the Dead Reckoning page.
When the demo mode is available, the Navigator displays:
DEADêRECKONING:êêêON
ê(DEMOêMODE)êêê(ENT)
8-26
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 8 The Auxiliary Key
When the demo mode is not available because the Navigator is
receiving enough satellites to navigate, it displays:
DEADêRECKONING:êêOFF
To select a starting position for your demonstration flight:
• Press
.
• Use the standard method of selecting a waypoint from the
WPT or APT/VOR mode.
.
• Press
Activate a flight plan to fly.
To simulate flight, enter a ground speed and track:
to access the Primary NAV Mode display.
• Press
• Press
.
ŽLAX®ê120­ê143¡ê7:43
{ÕÞÕÞÛÞÕÞÕ}Ÿ124­250‹
• Rotate the
knob to move among the editable fields.
• Rotate the
knob to set the ground track and ground
speed values.
• Press
.
The entry is now complete and the Dead Reckoning/Demo mode is
enabled. You may now use the Demo mode to demonstrate the
Navigator features.
Update ground speed and track as desired. At every track change,
the Navigator will set track to an appropriate intercept value for the
new leg. Change track as you like.
Revision A
March 17, 1997
8-27
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Upon reaching the last waypoint in the flight plan, the Navigator will
set ground speed to zero.
The Navigator will not illuminate the approach light in the demo mode.
Since RAIM is not available, the Navigator behaves accordingly; at the
FAF-MAP track change, the HLD light illuminates, indicating that the
Navigator will not automatically sequence at the MAP and the APR
light does not illuminate.
8.4.4
The Display Diagnostic Page
Use the Display Test page to check the display and internal
annuciator lights.
To access the Display Test page:
• Press
• Rotate the
page.
to access the Install mode.
knob to display the Display Diagnostic
The “DISPLAY DIAGNOSTIC” message appears briefly. Horizontal
lines move through all the fields of both lines of the display. The
annunciator lights and push-button keys light in sequence. This
pattern continues until you turn the selector knobs or press a key.
8.5
User Setup Mode
The User Setup mode, if available, allows you to configure the
Navigator Plus to your specific needs. You can choose the database
search regions, set the AIRWATCH™ feature to your specification,
secure the Navigator Plus, and save or load the Navigator Plus’s
configuration. Instructions for the User Setup mode are in Appendix
D.
8-28
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 9 The Message Key
Chapter
9
The Message Key
The Navigator keeps you apprised of all critical information that
relates to the current flight. A flashing MSG annunciator light prompts
you to view messages. If the Navigator is wired to your audio panel,
you also will hear a beeping tone anytime the MSG annunciator is
flashing.
This Chapter covers:
• Understanding flashing and non-flashing indicators
• Display messages
• Message priority
• Interpreting System, Parallel Track, and Advisory
messages
Revision A
March 17, 1997
9-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
9.1
Accessing Messages
The Navigator uses an internal and an external MSG annunciator
light to communicate special messages to the user.
New messages are indicated by flashing internal and external MSG
annunciators. If there are multiple messages that have not been
viewed yet, the light continues to flash until all messages have been
viewed. Old messages that are still relevant cause the internal
message indicators to remain on (steady rather than flashing) as a
reminder that the condition that caused the message is still
unresolved. The external MSG annunciator flashes only when there
is an unread message; otherwise, it is off.
Messages are displayed in order of priority. New System messages
have highest priority:
New System
New Advisories
Old System
Old Advisories
Parallel Track Offset
9-2
Revision A
March 17, 1997
Chapter 9 The Message Key
If a message is waiting, the MSG annunciator is illuminated. To
access messages:
• Press the
key.
• The first message is displayed and the
illuminated.
key is
The message below is an Advisory message indicating that the
installed Jeppesen NavData Card is out of date.
DATABASEêOUT-OF-DATE
EXPIREDê28-Feb-97
The first message appears on the screen. If more than one message
is waiting, the
press the
key will remain lit. If this is the case, continue to
key and read through all waiting messages.
When the
key is no longer lit, all messages have been viewed
and the Navigator is returned to the previous mode in use.
If a message continues to be relevant, the internal MSG annunciator
remains lit; the external annunicator is off. The message can be
viewed again by pressing the
Revision A
March 17, 1997
key.
9-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
9.2
System Messages
New System messages are given highest priority and are always
displayed first.
The following is a list of System messages and an explanation for
each.
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
DEAD RECKONING
ENTER GS & TRACK
The receiver is not doing
any position fixes. This
message is always issued
when the Navigator is first
turned on. It will extinguish
when the Navigator has
locked on to enough
satellites to navigate.
Enter GS and Track from
NAV to operate in DR.
GPS POSITION
RESTORED
The Navigator is no longer
in Dead Reckoning mode.
Normal system operation
has been restored. Entry
of Ground Speed and
Track no longer required.
RAIM UNAVAILABLE
The Navigator Plus is
unable to perform RAIM due
to insufficient satellites.
Cross check position with
other approved navigation
sources.
RAIM RESTORED
The Navigator Plus is now
receiving sufficient satellite
signals to perform RAIM.
Cross checking with other
sources is not required.
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL
BATTERY BACK-UP FAIL
The internal battery has
failed. As a result, all stored
waypoints and flight plans
were erased. All setup data
is lost.
System is inop.
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL
ALIGNMENT ERROR CH#1
BITE has detected a GPS
receiver failure.
Cross check position with
other approved navigation
sources.
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL
ALIGNMENT ERROR CH#2
BITE has detected a GPS
receiver failure.
Cross check position with
other approved navigation
sources.
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL
BITE has detected a GPS
SIGNAL PROCESSOR ERR receiver failure.
Cross check position with
other approved navigation
sources.
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL
Cross check position with
other approved navigation
sources.
9-4
BITE has detected a GPS
receiver failure.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 9 The Message Key
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL
I/O TIMEOUT
BITE has detected a GPS
receiver failure.
Cross check position with
other approved navigation
sources.
GPS DISABLED BY USER
SEE INSTALL: SERIAL
The Navigator has been left
in a test mode. Contact
your maintenance facility or
the factory.
System is inop.
DATABASE MISSING
The database card is
missing or is not installed
properly.
1. Turn unit off.
2. Install database card.
3. Restart unit.
DATABASE CARD TYPE
NOT VALID
The installed NavData card
is invalid. Verify the data
card is an approach card.
1. Turn unit off.
2. Install correct
database
card for 2101 I/O Plus.
3. Restart unit.
EXTERNAL ALTIMETER
LOST COMMUNICATION
The communication link
from the altitude serializer
(encoder) has failed.
1. Turn unit off.
2. Install correct
database
card for 2101 I/O Plus.
3. Restart unit.
EXTERNAL ALTIMETER
IS IN ERROR
Bad data was received
from the altitude serializer
(encoder). This message
may appear due to warmup time required by
external altimeter source.
Check altitude input
EXTERNAL ALTIMETER
DATA OK
External altimeter source
now operating normally.
None
GPS: ANTENNA FAULT
BITE has detected a GPS
antenna failure.
Cross check position with
other approved naviation
sources.
LOW VOLTAGE:
INPUT VOLTAGE: 10.6V
The input voltage is below
11V for a 14V aircraft or in
a range between 18V and
22V for a 28V aircraft.
Check aircraft generator/
alternator.
WAYPOINT RECORD NOT
FOUND IN DATABASE
The selected waypoint or
waypoint in the flight plan
is not in the currently
installed database.
Replace or delete the
waypoint.
CROSS TRACK ERROR
GREATER THAN 4 ¡
The difference between
the current track and the
desired track is greater
than four nautical miles.
This message is off
unless enabled during
installation.
Maneuver the aircraft to
intercept selected track.
MANUAL MAGNETIC
VARIATION IN USE
System was left in test
mode. Manually entered
magnetic variation is use
instead of computed
magnetic variation.
System is inop.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
9-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
AIR DATA COMPUTER:
FUEL FLOW SENSR FAIL
The fuel flow sensor to
the air data computer is
not working properly.
Check fuel flow input
source.
FAULT ON EXTERNAL
APR ANNUNCIATOR
BITE has detected a
short circuit.
None.
FAULT ON EXTERNAL
HLD ANNUNCIATOR
BITE has detected a short
circuit.
None.
FAULT ON EXTERNAL
MSG ANNUNCIATOR
BITE has detected a short
circuit.
None.
FAULT ON EXTERNAL
WPT ANNUCIATOR
BITE has detected a short
circuit.
None.
INTERNAL CDI: ±5.0¡
EXTERNAL CDI: ±5.0¡
Indicates the current
setting for the internal
and external CDI. This
message is always
available.
None
RAIM ERROR
RAIM has detected an
error in the GPS position
solution.
If flying an approach,
execute a Missed
Approach. Cross check
position with other
approved navigation
sources.
POSITION IS OUTSIDE
OF CURRENT GRID
Operator has selected a
grid reference system
other than WGS84 and the
viewed position is outside
the selected system.
None.
If one of the following messages is displayed, record the number (xx)
displayed and contact the factory.
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
PRCSSR BUS ERROR xx
CONTACT FACTORY
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
ADDRESS ERROR xx
CONTACT FACTORY
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
ILLGL INSTRUCTION xx
CONTACT FACTORY
ZERO DIVIDE xx
CONTACT FACTORY
9-6
Revision A
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Chapter 9 The Message Key
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
CHECK REGISTER xx
CONTACT FACTOR
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
PRIVILEGE VIOLTN xx
CONTACT FACTORY
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
ILLEGAL INTERRUPT xx
CONTACT FACTORY
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
TRAP OVERFLOW xx
CONTACT FACTORY
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
STACK FULL ERROR xx
CONTACT FACTORY
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
MESSAGE ROUTINE
xxxxx NOT FOUND
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
ERROR IN MSG FIND
MESSAGE x NOT FOUND
BITE has detected a
system computer failure.
System is inop.
The following system message will be displayed only with software
versions 240B and later.
Message
GPS CONFIG INVALID
IFR NOT ALLOWED
9.3
Condition
The software configuration
of the GPS does not match
the system definition
Pilot Action
System is inop.
Advisory Messages
Advisory messages are shown after any existing system messages.
The following are examples of Advisory messages and an explanation
for each.
9.3.1
Database Advisory Messages
Message
DATABASE OUT-OF-DATE
EXPIRED 27 FEB 97
Revision C
November 14, 1997
Condition
The database card has
expired.
Pilot Action
Verify navigation/route
data using current
information.
9-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
9.3.2
Flight Plan Advisory Messages
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
TURN TO 320°
in 0:XX
The Turn Anticipation
display will continuously
update to keep the pilot
apprised of the approaching
turn. Once this message is
displayed, the MSG
annunciator light remains lit
until display timer reaches
zero. This message is OFF.
See Section 8.
None.
TURN TO INTERCEPT
NEW COURSE 320°
This message appears at
each track change. It
displays the desired track of
the new leg.
Set HSI/CDI to displayed
course.
EXECUTE HOLD PATTERN
TO INBOUND CRS XXX°
This message appears
when the next leg is a
holding pattern course
reversal.
Set HSI/CDI to displayed
course. Maneuver aircraft
to intercept the inbound
course to the holding fix.
Press NAV or MSG to
acknowledge.
EXECUTE P-TURN
TURN TO XXX°
This message appears
when the next leg is a
procedure turn. The
suggested heading is the pturn outbound heading.
Manually execute the pturn according to
published procedures.
Press NAV or MSG to
acknowledge.
ARRIVAL AT PAO A
WITHIN 59 SECONDS
When approaching final
destination , the pilot
receives a countdown
advisory. This message is
OFF. See Section 8.
None.
DESTINATION WAYPOINT
IS LAT 0.0 LON 0.0
The flight plan includes a
waypoint that does not exist
in the current database
card or in User waypoint
memory. Usually due to the
waypoint being deleted or
renamed in the current
database update.
DUPLICATE WAYPOINTS
IN FLIGHT PLAN
9-8
The flight plan contains
waypoint(s) that are
identical to waypoints in the
procedure (SID, STAR,
APPROACH) just added.
Replace or delete waypoint
from the flight plan.
1) Review flight plan.
2) Edit as necessary.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Chapter 9 The Message Key
9.3.2
Flight Plan Advisory Messages (cont.)
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
MAX PLAN # REACHED
NO MORE ADDITIONS
40 flight plans have been
stored and the FPL
memory is full.
Delete a stored flight plan
to enter another.
NO ROOM TO ADD
TERMINAL PROCEDURE
40 flight plans have been
stored and FPL memory is
full.
Delete a stored flight plan
to enter another.
MAXIMUM # REACHED•
NO MORE ADDITIONS•
250 User waypoints have
been stored and User
waypoint memory is full.
Delete a stored User
Waypoint to enter
another.
9.3.3
Approach Advisory Messages
Message
APPROACH ENABLE?
ENT BARO: 29.92
9.3.4
Condition
Enter current baro setting
and enable the approach.
Pilot Action
1) Use knob to set the baro.
2) Press ENT to enable the
approach.
Parallel Track Advisory Messages
Message
Pilot Action
Condition
PARALLEL OFFSET
CANCELLED
Parallel offset was
cancelled. Any direct-to will
cancel the offset, as will
enabling an approach.
None.
PTK OFF AUTO CANCEL
10.00¡ RIGHT
Displayed when a parallel
offset is selected. In this
example, parallel offset
has been set for 10 nm
right and the Auto Cancel
option has been selected.
The parallel track will be
cancelled, when an
approach is enabled, when
the course-to-destination
differs from the desired
track by 45º or more, or
when the “one minute to
arrival” message is
displayed.
None.
Revision D
June 29,1998
9-9
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
9.3.4
Parallel Track Advisory Messages (cont)
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
PTK OFF NO CANCEL
10.00 ¡LEFT
In this example, parallel
offset has been set for 10
nm left and the No Cancel
option has been selected.
The parallel track will not be
cancelled upon arrival at
the destination.
None.
PTK OFF AUTO CANCEL
APPROACH ENABLED
Selected offset was
cancelled when the
approach was enabled.
Parallel offset cannot be
set while an approach is
enabled.
None.
9.3.5
Fuel Management Advisory Messages
When the fuel on board is not zero, the following messages may
appear.
Message
Condition
Pilot Action
CAUTION: USING FUEL
RESERVE TO POAA
If the amount of time
remaining at current fuel
flow rate is less than the
time to reach the
destination plus the
amount of time you
selected on the Minimum
Fuel page under the
key (45 minutes is
the default), this
advisory will appear. This
message is deleted once
Verify fuel remaining.
CAUTION: EXHAUSTED
FUEL WITHIN 0:29
The calculated fuel required
to reach the destination on
the Fuel Management page
is more than the fuel
remaining on the Fuel
Remaining page. This
message is deleted once
viewed.
Verify fuel remaining.
CAUTION: NOT ENOUGH
FUEL TO REACH PAOA
The flight time remaining
on the Fuel Remaining
page is less than 30
minutes (the timing on this
message can be edited
key). This
using the
message is deleted once
viewed.
Verify fuel remaining.
9-10
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Chapter 9 The Message Key
9.3.6
AIRWATCH™ Advisory Messages
When AIRWATCH™ is enabled, the Navigator displays advisories
regarding controlled and restricted airspace. A message to contact the
appropriate agency is wrapped on the second line of the display. The
frequency on which to contact the agency is also shown. Examples
are shown below.
Message
INSIDE
SAN FRANCISCO ClsB
Condition
Pilot Action
You are within the San
Francisco Class B airspace.
Contact Bay approach on
frequency 120.9.
Contact ATC
CLOSE
R 2533 RESTRICTED
You are within 10 nm of the
R2533 restricted airspace.
There is no contact agency
or frequency.
None.
IN PATH
SANTA BARBARA ClsC
You will enter the Santa
Barbara Class C airspace in
approximately 10 minutes
on present track and speed.
Verify flight plan.
IN FUTURE TRACK
SANTA BARBARA ClsC
You will enter the Santa
Barbara Class C airspace in
approximately 10 minutes
on present track and speed.
Verify flight plan.
INSIDE
CONTACT BAY APP ON
INSIDE
BAY APP ON 120.9
9.3.7
Other Advisory Messages
The following advisory message will be displayed only with software
versions 240B and later.
Message
Condition
CLEAR BATTRY BACKED
MEMORY SUCCESSFUL
The unit has been reset
using the 3-finger reset and
the battery backed memory
has been successfully
cleared.
Revision C
November 14, 1997
Pilot Action
None.
9-11
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
This page intentionally left blank.
9-12
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
Appendix
A
Reference
Revision A
May 12, 1997
A-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
A.1
State and Province Codes
The following codes are used to identify States and Provinces in
the Jeppesen North American NavData database listed in
alphabetical order by identifier.
State or Province
Code
State or Province
Code
ALBERTA
ANGUILLA
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARUBA
ARKANSAS
ANTIGUA
ARIZONA
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BAHAMAS
BELIZE
BERMUDA
BARBADOS
CALIFORNIA
CANADA
COLORADO
COLOMBIA
COSTA RICA
CONNECTICUT
CUBA
CAYMAN ISLANDS
DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
DELAWARE
DOMINICA
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
GUADELOUPE
GRENADA
GUATEMALA
HAWAII
HONDURAS
HAITI
IOWA
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
AB
AIA
AL
AK
ANT
AR
ATG
AZ
BC
BHS
BLZ
BMU
BRB
CA
CAN
CO
COL
CRI
CT
CUB
CYN
JAMAICA
JOHNSTON IS
ST KITTS
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
ST LUCIA
MASSACHUSETTS
MANITOBA
MARYLAND
MAINE
MEXICO
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSOURI
MISSISSIPPI
MONTSERRAT IS
MONTANA
MARTINIQUE
NEW BRUNSWICK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
NEBRASKA
NEWFOUNDLAND
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NICARAGUA
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NOVA SCOTIA
NEVADA
NORTHWEST
TERRITORIES
NEW YORK
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
ONTARIO
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
JAM
JTN
KNA
KS
KY
LA
LCA
MA
MB
MD
ME
MEX
MI
MN
MO
MS
MSR
MT
MTQ
NB
NC
ND
NE
NF
NH
NIC
NJ
NM
NS
NV
A-2
DC
DE
DMA
DOM
FL
GA
GLP
GRD
GTM
HI
HND
HTI
IA
ID
IL
IN
NW
NY
OH
OK
ON
OR
PA
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
State or Province
Code
PANAMA
PRINCE EDWARD IS
QUEBEC
PUERTO RICO
RHODE ISLAND
RUSSIA
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
EL SALVADOR
SASKATCHEWAN
MIQUELON IS
CAICOS IS
TURKS IS
TENNESSEE
TOBAGO
TEXAS
UNITED STATES
UTAH
VIRGINIA
ST VINCENT
BRITISH VIRGIN IS
VIRGIN IS
VERMONT
WASHINGTON
WISCONSIN
WEST VIRGINIA
WYOMING
YUKON TERRITORY
PAN
PE
PQ
PRI
RI
RUS
SC
SD
SLV
SK
SPM
TCA
TCA
TN
TTO
TX
USA
UT
VA
VCA
VGB
VIR
VT
WA
WI
WV
WY
YK
Revision A
May 12, 1997
A-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
A.2
Country Codes
The following codes are used to identify Countries in the
Jeppesen International NavData database.
Country
Code
AFGANISTAN
AFG
ANGOLA
AGO
ALBANIA
ALB
UNTD ARAB EMIRATES ARE
ARGENTINA
ARG
ARMENIA
ARM
AMERICAN SAMOA
ASM
ANTARCTICA
AUS
AUSTRALIA
AUS
AUSTRIA
AUT
AZERBAIJAN
AZE
BURUNDI
BDI
BELGIUM
BEL
BENIN
BEN
BURKINA FASO
BFA
BANGLADESH
BGD
BULGARIA
BGR
BAHRAIN
BHR
BELORUSSIA
BLR
BOLIVIA
BOL
BRAZIL
BRA
BRUNEI
BRN
BHUTAN
BTN
BOTSWANA
BWA
CENTRAL AFRICAN REP CAF
SWITZERLAND
CHE
CHILE
CHL
CHINA, PR OF
CHN
IVORY COAST
CIV
CAMEROON
CMR
CONGO
COG
COOK IS
COK
COLOMBIA
COL
COMOROS
COM
CAPE VERDE
CPV
CYPRUS
CYP
CZECH
CZE
GERMANY
DEU
DJIBOUTI
DJI
DENMARK
DNK
FAROE IS
DNK
A-4
Country
Code
ALGERIA
ECUADOR
EGYPT
CANARY IS
MELILLA
SPAIN
ESTONIA
ETHIOPIA
FINLAND
FIJI IS
FALKLAND IS
FRANCE
FAERO IS
CAROLINE IS
MICRONESIA
PALAU
GABON
UNITED KINGDOM
GEORGIA
GHANA
GIBRALTAR
GUINEA REP
GAMBIA
GUINEA-BISSAU
EQUTORIAL GUINEA
GREECE
GREENLAND
FRENCH GUIANA
GUAM
MARIANA IS
HAWAII
HONG KONG
CROATIA
HUNGARY
INDONESIA
INDIA
CHAGOS ARCH
IRELAND
IRAN
IRAQ
ICELAND
DZA
ECU
EGY
ESP
ESP
ESP
EST
ETH
FIN
FJI
FLK
FRA
FRO
FSM
FSM
FSM
GAB
GBR
GEO
GHA
GIB
GIN
GMB
GNB
GNQ
GRC
GRL
GUF
GUM
GUM
HI
HKG
HRV
HUN
IDN
IND
IOT
IRL
IRN
IRQ
ISL
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
Country Codes
Country
Code
Country
Code
ISRAEL
ITALY
JORDAN
JAPAN
JOHNSTON I
KAZAKHSTAN
KENYA
KYRGYZSTAN
KAMPUCHEA
KIRIBATI
KOREA
KUWAIT
LAOS
LEBANON
LIBERIA
LIBYA, SPA JAMAH.
SRI LANKA
LESOTHO
LITHUANIA
LUXEMBOURG
LATVIA
MOROCCO
MOLDOVA
MALDIVES
MARSHALL IS
MIDWAY I
MALI
MALTA
UNION OF MYANMAR
MONGOLIA
MARIANA IS
MOZAMBIQUE
MAURITANIA
MAURITIUS
MALAWI
MALAYSIA
MAYOTTE
NEW CALEDONIA
NIGER
NIGERIA
NIUE
NETHERLANDS
NORWAY
NEPAL
ISR
ITA
JOR
JPN
JTN
KAZ
KEN
KGZ
KHM
KIR
KOR
KWT
LAO
LBN
LBR
LBY
LKA
LSO
LTU
LUX
LVA
MAR
MDA
MDV
MHL
MID
MLI
MLT
MMR
MNG
MNP
MOZ
MRT
MUS
MWI
MYS
MYT
NCL
NER
NGA
NIU
NLD
NOR
NPL
NAURU
NEW ZEALAND
OMAN
PAKISTAN
PERU
PHILLIPINES
PAPUA NEW GUINEA
POLAND
KOREA, DPR OF
PORTUGAL
PARAGUAY
FRENCH POLYNESIA
QATAR
REUNION
ROMANIA
RUSSIA
RWANDA
SAUDI ARABIA
SUDAN
SENEGAL
SINGAPORE
ASCENSION
ST HELENA
SOLOMON IS
SIERRA LEONE
SOMALIA
SAO TOME & PRINCIPE
SURINAME
SLOVAKIA
SLOVENIA
SWAZILAND
SWEDEN
SEYCHELLES
SYRIA
CHAD
TOGO
THAILAND
TAJIKISTAN
TURKMENISTAN
TONGA
TUNISIA
TURKEY
TUVALU
TAIWAN
TANZANIA
NRU
NZL
OMN
PAK
PER
PHL
PNG
POL
PRK
PRT
PRY
PYF
QAT
REU
ROM
RUS
RWA
SAU
SDN
SEN
SGP
SHN
SHN
SLB
SLE
SOM
STP
SUR
SVK
SVN
SWZ
SWE
SYC
SYR
TCD
TGO
THA
TJK
TKM
TON
TUN
TUR
TUV
TWN
TZA
Revision A
May 12, 1997
A-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Country Codes
Country
Code
UGANDA
UKRAINE
URUGUAY
UNITED STATES
UZBEKISTAN
VENEZUELA
VIETNAM
VANUATU
FUTUNA IS
WESTERN SAMOA
ARMENIA
KYRGYZSTAN
AZERBAIJAN
KAZAKHSTAN
MOLDOVA
RUSSIA
TAJIKISTAN
WAKE I
YEMEN ARAB REP
YUGOSLAVIA
BOPHUTHATSWANA
CISKEI
NAMIBIA
SOUTH AFRICAN REP
SOUTHWEST AFRICA
TRANSKEI
VENDA
ZAIRE
ZAMBIA
ZIMBABWE
UGA
UKR
URY
USA
UZB
VEN
VNM
VUT
WLF
WSM
XJA
XJI
XJJ
XJK
XJO
XJR
XJT
XJW
YEM
YUG
ZAF
ZAF
ZAF
ZAF
ZAF
ZAF
ZAF
ZAR
ZMB
ZWE
A-6
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
A.3
ARINC Maps
A.3.1 United States
Figure A-1: ARINC Map (United States)
Revision A
May 12, 1997
A-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
A.3.2 Standard ARINC Geographic Coverages
Refer to Figure A-2 for the standard ARINC geographic coverages.
Figure A-2: Standard ARINC Geographic Coverages
A-8
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
A.4
GPS Status Messages
GPS Status Messages include the following:
GPS:
ANTENNA FAULT
The GPS antenna is not connected or is not operating
properly.
GPS:
NO GPS TIME
Satellite signal levels are too low to receive.
GPS:
NO SV AVAILABLE
No satellites are in view at this time.
GPS:
NO USABLE SVs
Tracking at least one SV. Time is being obtained.
GPS:
NOT AVAILABLE
GPS sensor has failed.
GPS:
ONLY n USABLE SV
Tracking 1 or 2 SVs. Need 3 for position fix.
GPS:
PDOP TOO HIGH
Tracking at least three SVs, but geometry is bad.
GPS:
RECEIVER FAIL
The GPS receiver is not functioning correctly and
requires service.
GPS:
USING n SV 2-D
Tracking 3 or more SVs. Computing a 2-D position.
GPS:
USING 4 SV 3-D
Tracking 4 or more SVs. Computing a 3-D position.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
A-9
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
A.5
Changing NavData Cards During Flight
The Domestic and International NavData cards have few overlapping waypoints (except Hawaii). When crossing NavData card
boundaries, we recommend making two separate flight plans,
one for each card. Fly the flight plan of the card currently being
used. Change cards when it becomes necessary, then activate
the second flight plan to continue on the next leg.
Perform the following steps to change the NavData card:
1. Remove the NavData card currently being used. The
currently active FPL is cancelled. The current TO
waypoint is preserved.
2. Insert the desired NavData card.
3. Select a FPL for the inserted card.
A-10
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
A.6
Local Geodetic Reference Datums
Datum
Locality
Adindan
AFG
Ain El Abd 1970
Alaska (NAD-27)
Alaska/Canada
NAD-27
Anna 1 Astro 1965
ARC-1950 mean
Ethiopia, Mali, Senegal, Sudan
Somalia
Bahrain Is.
Alaska
Alaska/Canada
Cocos Is.
Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Zaire
Swaziland, Zimbabwe
ARC-1960 mean
Kenya, Tanzania
Ascension Island '58
Ascension Is.
Astro Beacon "E"
Iwo Jima Is.
Astro B4 Sor. Atoll
Tern Is.
Astro Pos 71/4
S. Helena Is.
Astronomic Stn. '52
Marcus Is.
Australian Geodetic 1952 Australia, Tasmania
Australian Geodetic 1984 Australia, Tasmania
Bahamas (NAD-27)
Bahamas except San Salvador
Bellevue (IGN)
Efate & Erromango Is.
Bermuda 1957
Bermuda Is.
Bogota Observatory
Colombia
Bukit Rimpah
Indonesia
Camp Area Astro
Antarctica
Campo Inchauspe
Argentina
Canada Mean (NAD27)
Canada incl. Newfoundland
Canal Zone (NAD27)
Panama Canal Zone
Canton Island 1966
Phoenix Is.
Cape
South Africa
Cape Canaveral mean
Florida & Bahama Is.
Carribean (NAD27)
Barbados, Caicos Is., Cuba,
Dominican Rep.,
Grand Cayman, Jamaica,
Leeward Is., Turks Is.
Carthage
Tunisia
Central America (NAD27) Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador,
Guatemala
Chatham 1971
Chatham Is., NZ
Revision A
May 12, 1997
A-11
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Chua Astro
Corrego Alegre
(Provisional)
Cuba (NAD27)
Cyprus
Djakarat (Batavia)
DOS 1968
Easter Island 1967
Egypt
European 1950 mean
European 1950
European 1979 mean
Finish Nautical Chart
Gandajika Base
Geodetic Datum '49
Ghana
Ordnance Survey of
Great Britain '36
Greenland (NAD27)
Guam 1963
Gunung Segara
Gunung Serindung 1962
GUX 1 Astro
Herat North
Hjorsey 1955
Hong Kong 1963
Hu-Tzu-Shan
Indian
Iran
Ireland 1965
ISTS o73 Astro '69
Johnston Island '61
Kandawala
Kerguelen Island
A-12
Paraguay
Brazil
Cuba
Isle of Cyprus
Sumatra Is.
Gizo Is., Solomon Is.
Easter Island
Egypt
Austria, Denmark, Finland,
France, Germany, Gibralter,
Greece, Italy, Netherlands,
Norway, Portugal, Spain,
Switzerland
Western Europe
Austria, Finland, Nethrlands,
Norway, Spain, Sweden,
Switzerland
Finland
Republic of Maldives
New Zealand
Ghana
England, Isle of Man, Scotland,
Shetland Isles, Wales
Greenland
Guam Is.
S.E. Borneo
S.W. Borneo
Guadalcanal Is.
Afghanistan
Iceland
Hong Kong
Taiwan
Bangladesh, India, Nepal
Iran
Ireland
Diego Garcia
Johnston Is.
Sri Lanka
Kerguelen Is.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
Kertau '48
La Reunion
L.C. 5 Astro
Liberia 1964
Luzon
Mahe 1971
Massawa
Merchich
Mexico (NAD27)
Midway Astro '61
Mindanao
Minna
Montjong Lowe
Nahrwan
Namibia
Naparima, BWI
North America 1927 mean
North America '83
Observatorio 1966
Old Egyptian
Old Hawaiian mean
Old Hawaiian, Maui
Old Hawaiian, Oahu
Old Hawaiian, Kauai
Oman
Pico De Las Nieves
Pitcairn Astro '67
Puerto Rico
Quatar National
Qornoq
Rome 1940
SAD-69/Brazil
Santa Braz
Santo (DOS)
Sapper Hill '43
Schwarzeck
Sicily
Sierra Leone 1960
Revision A
May 12, 1997
West Malaysia, Singapore
Mascarene Is.
Cayman Brac Is.
Liberia
Philippines except Mindanao
Mahe Is., Seychelles
Eritrea
Morocco
Mexico
Midway Is.
Mindanao Is.
Nigeria
Celebes Is.
Saudia Arabia
Namibia
Trinidad, Tobago
CONUS
Alaska, Canada,
Central America, CONUS,
Mexico
Corvo, Santa Cruz, Flores Is.
Egypt
Hwaiian Is.
Maui
Oahu
Kauai
Oman
Canary Is.
Pitcairn Is.
Puerto Rico, Virgin Is.
Quatar
S. Kalaallit Nunaat
Sardinia
Brazil
Saint Miguel, Santa Maria Is.
Espiritu Santo Is., New Hebrides
East Falkland Is.
Nambia
Sicily
Sierra Leone
A-13
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Provisional South
South American
1969 mean
South Asia
Provisional South
Chilean 1963
S.E. Asia (Indian)
Southeast Base
Southwest Base
Tananarive
Observatory '25
Thai/Viet (Indian)
Timalai 1948
Tokyo mean
Tristan Astro 1968
Unites Arab
Emirates (Nahrwan)
Viti Levu 1916
Voirol
Wake-Eniwetok '60
WGS-72
WGS-84
Yacare
Zanderij
A-14
Bolivia, Chile, Colombia,
Ecuador, Guyana, Peru,
Venezuela
Argentina, Bolivia
Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador,
Guyana, Paraguay, Peru,
Venezuela, Trinidad, Tobago
Singapore
South Chile
Bangladesh, India, Kampuchea,
Laos, Nepal, Thailand, Vietnam
Porto Santo, Maderia Is.
Azores
Madagascar
Thailand, Vietnam
Brunei, E. Malaysia
Japan, Korea, Okinawa
Tristan da Cunha
United Arab Emirates
Viti Levu Is.
Algeria, Tunisia
Marshall Is.
Former World
World
Uraguay
Surnam
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix A Reference
NOTES
Revision A
May 12, 1997
A-15
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
NOTES
A-16
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix B The GPS System
Appendix
B
The GPS System: How It Works
GPS (Global Positioning System) is a navigation system based on a
constellation of 24 satellites orbiting the earth at very high altitude.
This system was established and is maintained by the U.S. Department of Defense. GPS can give three-dimensional position measurements accurate to within 50 feet (15 m).
GPS is based on satellite ranging: calculating a position by measuring the distance to several different satellites. If we know that the
distance from satellite A is 11,000 miles, then we must be somewhere
on an imaginary sphere centered on the satellite and having a radius
of 11,000 miles as shown in Figure B-1. If, at the same time, the
distance from satellite B is known to be 12,000 miles, then we must be
on the circle where the two spheres intersect, as shown in Figure B-2.
If we also know that we are 13,000 miles from satellite C, our position
is further restricted to the two points in space where the three spheres
intersect, as shown in Figure B-3. One of these points is usually
impossible (for example, far out in space). GPS receivers have
various techniques for distinguishing the correct point from the
incorrect one. Theoretically, these three measurements are all we
need to determine the position of our aircraft.
The basic idea behind measuring the distance to a satellite is the
“velocity times travel-time” equation we all learned in school:
Distance = Velocity x Time
The GPS system works by calculating how long a radio signal from a
satellite takes to reach us, and then calculating the distance to the
satellite based on that time. We know the velocity of light (about
186,000 miles per second). So if we can determine exactly when the
GPS satellite started sending its radio signal, and exactly when we
received it, we can calculate how long the signal took to reach us.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
B-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
11,000 miles
Figure B-1
Figure B-2
Two measurements put us
somewhere on this circle
Three measurements put
us at one of two points
Figure B-3
B-2
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix B The GPS System
How can the GPS receiver determine exactly when the signal left the
satellite? The satellites and receivers are very precisely synchronized
to generate the same pattern of radio signals at exactly the same
time. This pattern, or code, is a complicated string of pulses that
appears to be random, but is in fact, carefully determined. Since the
code appears to be random, it is often referred to as “pseudorandom
code”.
When the GPS receiver receives a satellite code, it measures the time
that elapsed between when it generated that code and when it
received the same satellite code. Plugging this value into the equation above will give us the distance from our aircraft to the satellite.
Of course, the measurements must be very precise—down to a
nanosecond, or one billionth of a second. The satellites achieve this
accuracy by means of atomic clocks that are amazingly precise. GPS
receivers are equipped with very precise electronic clocks—but not
always precise enough. Fortunately, trigonometry says that if three
perfect measurements locate a point in three-dimensional space, then
four imperfect measurements can eliminate any clock offset (as long
as the offset is consistent). So by making an extra satellite range
measurement, we can eliminate clock offset.
An example will help explain this. For simplicity (and to eliminate the
need for three-dimensional graphics), let’s use a two-dimensional
example, such as a ship at sea (where altitude is already known).
This means that, if our clocks were perfect, we would need only two
range measurements to locate ourselves exactly on the surface of the
earth. The third range measurement will be our “extra” one.
But, if we add our one-second offset to the drawing, the three shaded
lines show three possibilities for our location—the “pseudo ranges”
caused by our slow clock.
The GPS receiver, upon receiving this series of points, assumes that
its clock is off. It applies algebra to compute where the three points
could possibly intersect, and gives this intersection as our true
location.
Since an aircraft GPS system operates in three dimensions, it needs
four measurements to cancel out any error. This means that it can’t
determine a truly accurate position unless it has four satellites within
range above the horizon. Until all 24 satellites are in place, there may
be times when fewer than four satellites are available overhead.
During these times, altitude from an encoder or manual input can
permit continued navigation at reduced accuracy.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
B-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
Consider the example in Figure B-4. Suppose our receiver’s clock is
consistent, but is 1 second slow. And, let’s say that the signal from
satellite A takes 4 seconds to reach us, while the signal from satellite
B takes 6 seconds. So we really are where the two solid lines
intersect.
A
B
4 Seconds
6 Seconds
Figure B-4
But, our imperfect receiver would think the signal from satellite A took
5 seconds to reach us, and that from satellite B, 7 seconds. So our
receiver thinks we are where the two shaded lines intersect—which
could be miles from our actual location.
Now let’s add a third measurement to the calculation. The signal from
satellite C takes 8 seconds to reach us, and our receiver thinks it’s 9.
From Figure B-5 we can see that the three solid lines intersect at our
true location.
A
B
5 Seconds
(wrong time)
7 Seconds
(wrong time)
C
9 Seconds
(wrong time)
Figure B-5
B-4
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix B The GPS System
There are some other sources of minor errors in the GPS system.
Tiny variations can occur in the altitude, speed, and position of a
satellite. These changes are monitored by the Department of
Defense, and the corrections are sent back to the satellite, where they
are broadcast along with the pseudo codes. Other variations can be
caused by ionospheric and atmospheric delays. Another possible
source of error is
“Geometric Dilution of Precision,” which means that the intersection
point of two ranges is slightly less accurate when the satellites are
close together. In a typical case, the sum of these errors would
amount to no more than 100 feet (30m); in a worst case, no more
than 200 feet (70m).
For military purposes, the Department of Defense can also introduce
deliberate errors into the system using an operational mode called
“selective availability,” or S/A. The stated accuracy with S/A on is as
follows:
• Better than 100m, 95% of the time
• Better than 300m, 99% of the time
The other 1% is undetermined, the DOD can set the accuracy
reduction much higher!
A sophisticated form of GPS, differential GPS, allows precise measurements down to a centimeter (1" = 2.54 cm). Such ultra-precise
measurements are based on at least fifteen minutes of GPS data
collection at a stationary location and very precise knowledge of a
reference point. This form of GPS is used in surveying and is being
tested as a precision landing system.
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B.1
GPS Information Center
Precise Worldwide Position, Velocity, and Time
GPS enables land, sea, and airborne users to determine their threedimensional position, velocity, and time anywhere in the world with
unprecedented accuracy. Satellite-based GPS is the most precise
radio navigation system available today or in the foreseeable future.
GPS consists of three segments: space, control, and user. The
space segment will ultimately contain 21 operational satellites about
10,900 nautical miles above the earth. The satellites complete an
orbit cycle every 12 hours and provide direct line-of-sight radio
frequency signals to users worldwide. A ground control network
tracks the satellites, determines orbits precisely, and transmits orbit
definition data to each satellite. Navigation and position fixing using
GPS is accomplished by passive trilateration. Users measure range
to and compute the position of four satellites and process the measurements to determine three-dimensional position and time.
Although GPS was originally designed to enhance the war-fighting
capability of U.S. and allied military forces, the unprecedented
accuracies already available from the system have given rise to a
wide variety of civil GPS applications. As the GPS reaches full
maturity, applications are anticipated to continue to emerge, and
worldwide civil land, sea, and airborne users are expected to out
number military users by a sizeable margin.
B-6
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Appendix B The GPS System
Civil GPS Information Center
In order to accommodate the needs of the large worldwide civil GPS
user community, the U.S. Government has established GPS Information Center (GPSIC). Operated and maintained by the United States
Coast Guard for the Department of Transportation, the primary
functions of the GPSIC are to provide information to and serve as the
point of contact for civil GPS users.
Information Available
Information available from the GPSIC is called the Operational
Advisory Broadcast, which contains the following general categories of
GPS performance data:
• Current constellation status (satellite health data)
• Future status (planned outages of satellites)
• Almanac data (suitable for making GPS coverage and
satellite visibility predictions)
Information Media
GPS Operational Advisory Broadcast information is available from the
GPSIC in the following forms:
• Computer bulletin boards
• Voice tape recording
• Voice broadcasts
• Facsimile broadcast
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All GPSIC services are provided free of charge. Registration for the
GPSIC bulletin board is done on-line at the first session.
COMMS PARAMETERS
• Asynchronous - 8 Data Bits
• 1 Start Bit, 1 Stop Bit
• No Parity
• Full Duplex
• XOn/XOff
• Both Bell and CCITT Protocols
The GPSIC computer bulletin board may be accessed by dialing
(703) 313-5910 for modem speeds of 300-14,400 bps.
The telephone number for the voice tape recording is
(703) 313-5907.
Information Requests
In additional to the prerecorded Operational Advisory Broadcast
information available, the GPSIC is prepared to respond to individual
user inquiries, comments, or concerns regarding civil access to and
use of the GPS. The GPSIC will accept calls of this nature from civil
users 24 hours a day. The number is (703) 313-5900.
Written comments, questions, or concerns on the GPS or operation of
the GPSIC may be addressed to:
Commanding Officer
U.S. Coast Guard ONSCEN
7323 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA 22310-3998
(703) 313-5400
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Appendix B The GPS System
Other Information Sources
GPS status information may also be obtained from the following
sources:
• WWV/WWVHHF radio broadcasts WWV minutes 14 &
15; WWVH minutes 43 & 44) - (5, 10, 15, 20 MHz)
• Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) weekly Notices to
Mariners
• DMA broadcast warnings (NAVAREA, HYDROLANT, and
HYDROPAC)
• DMA NavInfoNet, ANMS
1200 BAUD - (301) 227-5295
2400 BAUD - (301) 227-4630
9600 BAUD - (301) 227-4424
• USCG Broadcast Notices to Mariners
• NAVTEX Data Broadcast
- (518 kHz)
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Users must register off-line before accessing the DMA NavInfoNet. A
user ID and information booklet is available by writing the National
Imagery and Mapping Agency, Hydrographic/Topographic Center
(ATTN: MCN/NAV-INFONET), Bethesda, MD 20816-5003 or calling
(301) 227-3296.
GPS Information Center Users' Manual
Detailed information on the GPSIC services and how the services may
be obtained is available in a GPS Information Center Users’ Manual.
The Users’ Manual may be obtained by calling (703) 313-5900 or
writing the Information Center.
NOTE
Satellite visibility window predictions are not offered
by the GPSIC. This information is available from
commercial sources or from commercially available
software.
Civil GPS Service Steering Committee
In addition to the services provided by the GPSIC, the U.S. Government has established a Civil GPS Service Steering Committee
(CGSSC). The purpose of the CGSSC is to address issues and
problems that relate to the civil use of the GPS and to provide a forum
for discussions between civil GPS users and the DOD.
The CGSSC consists of an Executive Council, General Committee,
and five Subcommittees:
• Precise Positioning and Surveying
• Timing
• Reference Station
• International
• Carrier Phase Tracking
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Revision A
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Appendix B The GPS System
The CGSSC is jointly chaired by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Coast Guard. Points of contact are:
U.S. Department of Transportation
Research and Special Programs Administration
400 7th Street, S.W., Room 9402
Washington, DC 20590-0001
Phone: (202) 366-4433
Fax: (202) 366-3666
Commandant (G-NRN)
U.S. Coast Guard
2100 Second Street, S.W.
Washington, DC 20593-0001
Phone: (202) 267-0283
Fax: (202) 267-4427
The CGSSC meets about every three months, and the General
Committee meetings are open to all interested parties.
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Appendix C The User Setup Mode
Appendix
C
The User Setup Mode
The User Setup mode allows you to configure the Navigator Plus to
your preferred settings. From the User Setup mode, you can modify
the following features:
Database Search Regions
AIRWATCH™
SAFEGUARD™ and Personal Messages
Save/Load Configure
Once the settings have been chosen, the User Setup mode can be
disabled, providing protection for the preferred settings. (Enable is the
factory default.) To disable/enable the User Setup mode:
to access Configure mode.
• Press
to display the Display Diagnostic page.
• Turn the
• While the display test is running, press the key sequence
• Press
,
,
.
.
• Select DISABLE or ENABLE as desired, using the
• Press
.
.
When disabled, the USER SETUP screen and functions are unavailable.
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C.1
Database Search Regions
You may select specific states and regions for a database search.
These search parameters can include up to 6 regions, states, provinces or countries. “ALL” is the factory default setting for this page.
You can also restrict a database search by specifying the following
regions in the United States:
nw
North West
sw
South West
nc
North Central
sc
South Central
ec
East Central
ne
North East
se
South East
These U.S. Regions correspond to the ARINC regions. Their boundaries are different from those used in government publications. Refer
to Appendix A for regional maps, and a list of state, province and
country codes.
The display below indicates that database searches will be made for
the individual countries of France, Germany and Italy.
SEARCHêREGIONS:êFRA
DEUêITA
The display below indicates that database searches will be made for
the northeast region, California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, and Colorado.
SEARCHêREGIONS:êsw
CAêêNVêêAZêêUTêêCO
C-2
Revision A
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Appendix C The User Setup Mode
To establish Database Search Regions:
to access the User Setup mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
• Press
• Rotate the
knob to display the Search Regions page.
.
knob to move through the editable fields.
knob to select the desired region, state,
• Rotate the
province, or country code.
• Continue this process to enter up to 6 search
parameters.
• Press
to complete the selection.
Defining a search region will not restrict searches in the
NRST mode, or restrict searches for restricted airspaces.
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C.2
AIRWATCH™ - The Airspace Alert System
The Airspace Alert page allows you to enable or disable specific
Special Use airspaces from the AIRWATCH™ search feature. The
factory default AIRWATCH™ setting is OFF.
The Navigator Plus monitors aircraft position in relation to the boundaries of Special Use airspaces in the United States and provides a
warning of impending airspace penetration. AIRWATCH™ does not
take into consideration hours of operation or vertical boundaries
associated with controlled airspaces.
The display below indicates that AIRWATCH™ is ON and ALL
airspaces are being monitored. If individual airspaces have been
enabled or disabled, the word “SELECTED” will appear instead of
“ON” in this display.
AIRWATCH:êêêêêêêêON
ALLêAIRSPACES
To turn AIRWATCH™ ON/OFF or to designate SELECTED airspaces:
• Press
to access the User Setup mode.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob to access the AIRWATCH™ page.
.
• Rotate the
• Press
knob to select ON, OFF or SELECTED.
.
• If SELECTED is chosen, rotate the
optional airspaces.
and rotate the
• Press
each SELECTED airspace.
• Press
• Rotate the
C-4
knob to display
knob to enable or disable
to confirm each selection.
to display the next airspace.
Revision A
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Appendix C The User Setup Mode
C.3
SAFEGUARD™ and Personal Message
To access the SAFEGUARD™ and Personal Message page:
• Press
to access the Install mode.
• Rotate the
knob to display the SAFEGUARD™ and
Personal Message page.
C.3.1
The SAFEGUARDTM Feature
The Navigator Plus’s security feature, SAFEGUARD™, is secured by
an access code. A Factory Access Code of up to 8 characters is
issued for the Navigator Plus and is entered during installation.
If the Navigator Plus is removed from the tray while SAFEGUARD™ is
enabled, it cannot be used again without first entering the access
code.
The bottom line of the SAFEGUARD™ display indicates whether the
SAFEGUARD™ jumper is properly installed on the mounting tray. If it
is NOT OK, it will be impossible to enable the SAFEGUARD™ feature.
Do not enable SAFEGUARD™ until you are sure you have the correct
password. A card with the password was shipped with your Navigator
Plus.
To enable or disable the SAFEGUARD™ feature:
to access the Install mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
MSG” page.
knob to display the “SAFEGUARD/PERS
• Rotate the
knob to display the SAFEGUARD™ page.
SAFEGUARD:êENABLED
GUARD:êNOTêOK
• Press
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.
C-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
SAFEGUARD:êENABLED
êCODE:ê--------(ENT)
• Rotate the
code.
and
• Press
knobs to enter the correct access
when the entire code has been entered.
The SAFEGUARD™ feature is now enabled or disabled.
During normal operation, the Navigator Plus will not require an
access code. If SAFEGUARD™ is enabled and the unit has been
removed from the aircraft, the request for an access code will appear
when the unit is next powered-up.
C.3.2
Creating a Personal Access Code
You may create a Personal Access Code to use in place of the
factory provided access code. The factory code must be entered
before the new code can be created.
To enter a new personal access code:
• Press
to access the Install mode.
• Rotate the
MSG” page.
knob to display the “SAFEGUARD/PERS
knob to display the “PERSONAL ACCESS
• Rotate the
CODE” page.
• Press
.
OLDêACCESSêCODE
êCODE:ê--------(ENT)
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Appendix C The User Setup Mode
• Use the
and
knobs to enter the previous access
code or the Factory Access Code.
• Press ENT
.
NEWêPERSONALêACCESS
êCODE:ê--------(ENT)
• Use the
and
• Press
when the entry is completed.
knobs to enter the new access code.
Once you have created a new Personal Access Code, you can use
either the original Factory Access Code or the new Personal Access
Code.
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C.3.3
Creating Personal Messages
Personal messages are displayed when the Navigator Plus is turned
on. The factory default message is “Welcome to the World of Modern
Navigation.”
To enter a personal message:
• Press
to access the Install mode.
• Rotate the
MSG” page.
knob to display the “SAFEGUARD/PERS
knob to display the “NEW PERSONAL
• Rotate the
MESSAGE” page.
.
• Press
• Rotate the
access code.
and
knobs to enter your personal
TRIMBLEêNAVêN3077U
AUSTINêTEXAS
• Press
• Rotate the
to move among the editable fields.
• Rotate the
to change the personal message.
• Press
C-8
.
.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
Appendix C The User Setup Mode
C.4
Saving and Loading the Navigator Plus
Configuration
Navigator Plus configuration can be saved to or loaded from a
Memory Card (also called the RAM Card) or an IBM PC. The Memory
Card is a data storage device that fits in the slot on the front of the
Navigator Plus normally used by the Jeppesen NavData Database
Card.
Data on the Memory Card can be updated with an IBM PC, or the PC
may be interfaced directly to the Navigator Plus, when used in
conjunction with the optional Trimble Flight Planning and Configuration software known as NavPak. When the PC is interfaced directly to
the Navigator Plus, appropriate cabling must be provided between the
Navigator Plus rear connector and the PC (typically a standard 9-pin
connector is installed in the aircraft to accommodate interface to the
PC).
The RAM card and NavPak are sold separately. Contact your Trimble
dealer for details.
WARNING
Do not load or save configuration data during flight while navigating.
Data should be loaded or saved during preflight or postflight.
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C.4.1
Saving Configuration to the Memory Card
To save the current Navigator Plus configuration to the Memory Card:
• With the Navigator Plus off, remove the NavData card and
insert the RAM card.
• Turn the Navigator Plus on.
to access the User Setup mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob display the “Save/Load Config” page.
knob to select “SAVE CONFIGURATION
• Rotate the
VIA RAM CARD (ENT)”.
• Press
.
The Navigator Plus will display the status of the Memory Card and
ask for confirmation to write to the card.
• Press
to begin data transfer to the Memory Card.
During the data transfer, the display will indicate the amount of data
transferred by showing the percentage of transfer in the upper righthand corner. When the transfer is complete, the display will show
100%.
During the SAVE process, the Navigator Plus can detect some
problems with the Memory Card. If an error occurs, the user can exit
the SAVE process by pressing any of the Navigator Plus Keys.
To return the Navigator Plus to normal operation:
• Turn the Navigator Plus off.
• Replace the RAM Card with the NavData Card.
• Turn the Navigator Plus on.
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Revision D
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Appendix C The User Setup Mode
C.4.2
Loading Configuration from the Memory Card
To load the Navigator Plus configuration from the Memory Card:
• With the Navigator Plus OFF, remove the NavData card
and insert the RAM card.
• Turn the Navigator Plus on.
to access the User Setup mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob until the “SAVE/LOAD CONFIG,
TURN OUTER KNOB” message is displayed.
knob to select “LOAD CONFIGURATION
• Rotate the
VIA RAM CARD (ENT)”.
• Press
.
The Navigator Plus displays “CLEAR BEFORE LOAD?”. There are
two options:
to clear the existing configuration and load
• Press
the new one.
OR
• Rotate the
knob to display “APPEND CARD DATA”.
to add the configuration from the Memory
• Press
Card to the existing Navigator Plus configuration.
During the data transfer, the display will indicate the amount of data
transferred by showing the percentage of transfer in the upper righthand corner. When the transfer is completed, the display will show
100%. It is not possible to stop the data transfer once it is started.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
If an error is detected before the transfer begins, the transfer will not
start. In this case, an advisory message appears and the MSG
indicator on the Navigator Plus starts to flash. The advisory message
directs you to make the necessary corrections.
During the LOAD process, if a record error is detected, an advisory
message is displayed on the bottom line. If an error is found in a
record, that record is not transferred to the Navigator Plus, but the
load operation continues.
During a LOAD process for which you have selected the APPEND
option, the data being loaded is automatically checked for compatibility with the existing data. If an incompatibility is found in a record, that
record is not transferred to the Navigator Plus, but the load operation
continues.
A load error is displayed as follows:
LOADêCONFIGêê17
INVALIDêID:êUDLATU
The invalid ID is located on line 17 of the NavPak file.
If more than 10 errors or incompatibilities are detected, the data
transfer is aborted. The error message below is displayed:
LOADêCONFIGê48
MAXêERRORS:êABORTING
When any errors are reported, the Navigator Plus contains a partial
(and probably corrupted) data set. The configuration process should
be repeated.
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Appendix C The User Setup Mode
C.4.3
Saving Configuration via Serial Port
To save the current Navigator Plus configuration onto an IBM PC:
• Connect the Navigator Plus to the PC using the cable
prepared by your installer.
to access the User Setup mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob until the “SAVE/LOAD CONFIG,
TURN OUTER KNOB” message is displayed.
knob to select “SAVE CONFIGURATION
• Rotate the
VIA SERIAL PORT (ENT)”.
• Press
.
• Prepare the PC to receive Navigator Plus configuration
data and write it to file.
During the data transfer, the display will indicate the amount of data
transferred by showing the percentage of transfer in the upper righthand corner. When the transfer is completed, the display will show
100%.
During the SAVE process, the Navigator Plus can detect some
processing problems. If an error occurs, the user can exit the SAVE
process by pressing any of the Navigator Plus keys.
To ensure proper Navigator Plus operation, turn the Navigator Plus
off and then back on after the Save operation.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
C.4.4
Loading Configuration via Serial Port
To load the Navigator Plus configuration from an IBM PC:
• Connect the Navigator Plus to the PC using the cable
prepared by your installer.
to access the User Setup mode.
• Press
• Rotate the
knob until the “SAVE/LOAD CONFIG,
TURN OUTER KNOB” message is displayed.
knob to select “LOAD CONFIGURATION
• Rotate the
VIA SERIAL PORT (ENT)”.
LOADêCONFIGURATION
CLEARêBEFOREêLOADê?
• Press
.
• Press
to clear the existing configuration and load
the new one.
OR
• Rotate the
knob to display “APPEND DATA FILE”.
to add the configuration from the IBM PC
• Press
compatible to the existing Navigator Plus configuration.
• Prepare the PC to send the data file to the Navigator
Plus.
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Appendix C The User Setup Mode
During the data transfer, the display will indicate the amount of data
transferred by showing the percentage of transfer in the upper righthand corner. When the transfer is completed, the display will show
100%. The data transfer can only be stopped by turning off the
Navigator Plus.
If an error is detected before the transfer begins, the transfer will not
start. An advisory message appears and the MSG annunciator starts
to flash. The advisory message directs the user to make the necessary corrections.
During the LOAD process, if a record error is detected, an advisory
message is displayed on the bottom line. If an error is found in a
record, that record is not transferred to the Navigator Plus, but the
load operation continues.
During a LOAD process for which the user has selected the APPEND
option, the data being loaded is automatically checked for compatibility with the existing data. If errors are detected, the MSG annunciator
begins to flash. The number of the bad record and the number of the
character within the record are displayed on the second line. If an
incompatibility is found in a record, that record is not transferred to the
Navigator Plus, but the load operation continues.
A load error is displayed as follows:
LOADêCONFIGê17
INVALIDêID:êUDLATU
The invalid ID is located on line 17 of the NavPak file.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
If more than 10 errors or incompatibilities are detected, the data
transfer is aborted. The following error message is displayed:
LOADêCONFIGê48
MAXêERRORS:êABORTING
When any errors are reported, the Navigator Plus contains a partial
(and probably corrupted) data set. The configuration process should
be repeated.
To ensure proper Navigator Plus operation, turn the Navigator Plus off
and then back on after the Load operation.
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Glossary
Glossary of Terms
absolute altitude
Actual altitude above the surface of the earth.
auto fix
The ability of a GPS receiver to start position calculations without
being given an approximate location and approximate time.
AUX (auxiliary mode)
AUX mode contains the functions not used directly for navigation, but
as a supplementary to navigation functions.
barometric altitude
Altitude above the surface of the earth as measured by barometric
pressure; a relative measure of altitude.
bandwidth
The range of consecutive frequencies comprising a signal.
C/A code
The standard (Clear/Acquisition) GPS code: a sequence of 1023
pseudo-random, binary, biphase modulations on the GPS carrier at
a chip rate of 1.023 MHz. Also known as the “civilian code.”
carrier-aided tracking
A signal processing strategy that uses the GPS carrier signal to aid
the code loop tracking.
carrier frequency
The frequency of the unmodulated fundamental output of a radio
transmitter.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
CDI
Course Deviation Indicator; a visual display of distance offset from
the desired course.
channel
A channel of a GPS receiver, consisting of the circuitry necessary to
track the signal from a single GPS satellite.
clock bias
The difference between the clock’s indicated time and true universal
time.
continuous receiver
A GPS receiver which has from five to twelve channels used in
environments that are highly dynamic or require high accuracy.
control segment
A worldwide network of GPS monitoring and control stations that
ensure the accuracy of satellite positions and their clocks.
cross-track error
A measure of the distance of an aircraft from its desired track; usually
in nautical miles.
data message
A 1500-bit message included in the GPS signal that reports the
satellite’s location, clock corrections, and condition. Included is
rough information on the other satellites in the constellation.
datum
A mathematical model (ellipsoid or spheroid) which best represents
all or one area of the Earth's surface.
desired track
The desired track between current position and the selected destination. Aircraft HSI's OBS (OMNI bearing selector) or HDG bug should
be set to match the desired track.
differential positioning
Precise measurement of the relative positions of two receivers
tracking the same GPS signals.
G-2
Revision A
May 12, 1995
Glossary
Dilution of Precision
The multiplicative factor that modifies range error. It is caused solely
by the geometry between the user and the set of satellites used.
Known as DOP, GDOP or PDOP.
Doppler-aided
A signal processing strategy that uses a measured Doppler shift to
help the receiver smoothly track the GPS signal. Allows more
precise velocity and position measurement.
Doppler shift
The apparent change in the frequency of a signal caused by the
relative motion of the transmitter and receiver. Doppler shift measurements provide extremely accurate velocity measurements.
ephemeris data
Predictions of current satellite positions that are transmitted to the
user in the data message.
field
A part of the Navigator’s LED display that contains one discrete piece
of information; for example, one letter of an identifier, or the bearing
to a waypoint.
frequency band
A particular range of frequencies.
frequency spectrum
The distribution of signal amplitudes as a function of frequency.
function keys
The Navigator’s -D> (DIRECT), ENT, and MSG keys.
geometric dilution of precision
See Dilution of Precision.
GPS
Global Positioning System; a satellite-based navigation system.
great circle
The shortest distance between two points on the earth’s surface.
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
ICAO
International Civil Aviation Organization; assigns identifiers to
waypoints throughout the world. The Trimble Navigation System
uses these identifiers for international waypoints; it uses FAA
identifiers for waypoints in the continental U.S.
identifier
The FAA code or ICAO code that identifies an Airport, VOR, NDB, or
Intersection.
ING
Irish National Grid
intersection
The crossing of two VOR radials or victor airways.
ionosphere
The band of charged particles 80-120 miles above the earth’s
surface.
ionospheric refraction
The change in the propagation speed of a signal as it passes
through the ionosphere.
L-band
The group of radio frequencies extending from 390 MHz to 1550 MHz.
The GPS carrier frequencies (1227.6 MHz and 1575.42 MHz) are in
the L-band and/or UHF frequency band.
LAT/LON
Latitude/Longitude
LED
Light Emitting Diode, used in the Navigator's display.
LSEA
Lowest Safe En route Altitude.
MEA
Minimum Enroute Altitude.
G-4
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Glossary
MESA
Minimum Enroute Safe Altitude to destination waypoint, allowing
1000 feet of clearance over the highest terrain.
MGRS
Military Grid Reference System
mode keys
The NAV, WPT, FPL, CALC, AUX, and APT/VOR keys on the Navigator, which determine the mode in which it is operating.
MSA
Minimum Safe Altitude calculated for present position, allowing 1000
feet over highest terrain and obstacles in current geographic sector.
multi-channel receiver
A GPS receiver that can simultaneously track more than one satellite
signal.
multiplexing channel
A channel of a GPS receiver that can quickly sequence through a
number of satellite signals.
NDB
Non-Directional Beacon.
OSGB
Ordnance Survey of Great Britain
P-code
The Precise or Protected code. A very long sequence of pseudorandom binary biphase modulations on the GPS carrier at a chip rate
of 10.23 MHz, which repeats about every 267 days. Each one-week
segment of this code is unique to one GPS satellite and is reset
each week.
PDOP
See Dilution of Precision (DOP).
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TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
pseudo-random code
A signal with random-noise-like properties. It is a very complicated,
repeating pattern of 1s and 0s.
pseudo-range
A distance measurement based on the correlation of a satellitetransmitted code and the local receiver’s reference code, not
corrected for errors in synchronization between the transmitter’s
clock and the receiver’s clock.
RAIM
RAIM Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring.
satellite constellation
The arrangement in space of a set of satellites. The GPS constellation consists of 24 satellites in 6 orbital planes.
scroll
To move (characters) to the left across the LED display in order to
show more information.
sequencing receiver
A receiver of less than four channels that collects GPS data by
switching from one satellite to the next in sequence.
space segment
The part of the whole GPS system that is in space (i.e., the satellites).
spread spectrum
A system in which the transmitted signal is spread over a frequency
band much wider than the minimum bandwidth needed to transmit
the information. This is done by modulating with a pseudo-random
code (for GPS).
SIDs
Standard Instrument Departures
STARs
Standard Terminal Arrivals
G-6
Revision A
May 12, 1995
Glossary
static positioning
Location determination when the receiver’s antenna is
presumed to be stationary in the earth. This allows the use of
various averaging techniques that improve accuracy by factors of over
1000.
TK
Track, the actual magnetic course.
true altitude
Altitude above mean sea level.
UPS
Universal Polar Stereographic.
user interface
The way a receiver conveys information to the person using it; the
controls and displays.
user segment
The part of the whole GPS system that includes the receivers of GPS
signals.
UTC
Coordinated Universal Time.
UTM
Universal Transverse Mercator
VNAV
Vertical Navigation; the ability to establish a vertical descent profile.
The Navigator provides for a VNAV calculation and provides vertical
guidance information to the pilot.
VOR
Very High-Frequency Omnidirectional Range transmitter used for
aircraft navigation.
Revision A
May 12, 1997
G-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
This page intentionally left blank.
G-8
Revision A
May 12, 1995
Index
Index
A
minimum safe 1­4
pressure
Abbreviations
7­1, 7­11, 7­12, 7­14, 8­14
approach 3­3
calculations 7­12
waypoint type 4­2, 4­3, 5­4
source 8­12, 8­14
Access Code C-5
BARO/GPS-2D 8­12
factory C-5
BARO/GPS-3D 8­12
personal C-6
encoder 8­14
Active Flight Plan. See Flight
GPS-3D 8­13
Plan: active
HELD/GPS-2D 8­13
ADD NEW FLIGHT PLAN 5­3
MANUAL/GPS-2D 8­13
Air and Fuel Data Computer 7­14
none 8­14
Air Data
OLD 8­13
calculations 7­1, 7­11. See
PRS/GPS-2D 8­13
also CALC key: modes: Air
PRS/GPS-3D 8­13
Data
Annunciators 1­2, 1­8, 1­12
pages 7­11
APR 1­14, 3­4
altitude 7­11, 7­12
HLD 1­13
pressure altitude 7­11
MSG 1­13, 9­2
TAS 7­11, 7­13
PTK 1­13, 8­24, 8­25
wind 7­11, 7­15, 7­16
WPT 1­13
Airport 1­3, 4­2
Antenna
database information 1­3
GPS 8­15
departure 1­3, 5­1, 5­11
Approaches
destination 3­4, 3­5, 5­11
1­3, 1­5, 3­1, 3­3, 4­2, 4­5,
identifier 1­3, 1­4
4­11, 4­13, 4­21, 5­1
Airspace Alert C-4
activate 3­5, 4­20
Airspeed 7­1
active 3­6
AIRWATCH C-4
join 3­6
Controlled Airspace Advisories
add to flight plan 3­4
1­4
airport identifiers 1­3
Almanac Data 3­17
annunciator 3­4. See also
Altitude 7­11, 8­12
Annunciators: APR
density 7­1, 7­12, 7­13
availability 8­24
calculations 7­12
barometric setting 3­4
display 8­12
update 3­8
entering 8­13
course reversal
GPS 8­14
holding pattern 3­10
indicated 7­11
PTURN 3­9
manual 8­13
teardrop 3­11
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Ind-1
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
destination airport 3­5
direct-to
FAF 4­21
first waypoint 4­20
disable 3­8
DME arc 3­2, 3­12
bearing and distance 3­12
bottom line displays 3­12
top line displays 3­12
enable 3­7, 3­15
status 3­7
FAF-MAP leg 3­3
final
join 3­6
final approach fix 3­2
flying 3­15
GPS 3­1, 3­3, 3­15
summary 3­15
holding pattern
PTURN 3­9
intercept final course 4­22
join 3­3, 3­6, 4­20
missed 3­14
names 1­3
non-precision 3­15
overlay 3­3
procedure turns 3­8
procedures
defined by 4­11
RAIM
3­17, 3­18, 3­19, 3­20, 8­17
availability 8­23
select 3­4
transition 3­5
waypoints 1­3, 3­2, 3­12
abbreviations 3­3
identifiers 3­2
names 3­2
APR
annunciator 1­14. See also
Annunciators: APR
ARINC
maps A-7, A-8
Auto Cancel 8­25
AUX Key 1­8, 8­1
AUX modes 8­2
Ind-2
checklist 8­3
configure 8­1, 8­24
dead reckoning 8­26
display diagnostic 8­28
I/O interface check 8­26
parallel offset 8­24
sensor status 8­1
estimated accuracy 8­19
GPS 8­17
RAIM 8­23
satellite availability 8­22
satellite status 8­20
system status 8­1, 8­10
database expiration 8­16
software revisions 8­16
voltage and temperature
8­14
User Setup 8­1, 8­28
B
BARO/GPS-2D 8­12
BARO/GPS-3D 8­12
Barometric Pressure 7­11, 8­12
C
CALC key 1­8, 7­1. See also
Keys: CALC
modes 7­1
Air Data 7­1, 7­11
displays 7­2
entering data 7­2
Flight Plan/Fuel
7­1, 7­3, 7­8, 7­9, 7­10
FlightPlan/Fuel 7­7
fuel management 7­5
Save Present Position
7­1, 7­18
Time/Distance/Speed 7­3
Calculator Key. See CALC key
Cancel Flight Plan. See Flight
Plan
CDI 6­9, 8­24
scaling 1­13
Change Flight Path. See Flight
Path
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Index
Checklists 8­1, 8­2, 8­3
creating 8­3
deleting 8­9
deleting items 8­7, 8­8
editing 8­6
inserting items 8­7
naming 8­3
number 8­4
using 8­5
Codes
country
list A-4, A-5, A-6
province
list A-2
state
list A-2
Configuration
data transfer C-15
error C-15
loading C-11
error C-15
memory card C-11
using IBM PC C-14
via serial port C-14
saving C-10
memory card C-10
using IBM PC C-13
via serial port C-13
Configure 8­1, 8­2, 8­24
database search regions C-2
dead reckoning 8­24, 8­26
I/O interface check 8­26
parallel offset 8­24, 8­25
save/load 8­24, C-9
Controlled Airspace. See
AIRWATCH
Country Codes
list A-4, A-5, A-6
Course Deviation 3­12
Course Deviation Indicator. See
CDI
Course Reversal 3­8, 3­9, 3­10
procedure turn 3­9
Cross Track Error 8­24
Crosswind. See Wind: crosswind
Crystal Offset 8­15
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Current Track 7­16
D
Data Entry 2­3
Data Pages 1­10, 1­11, 2­1, 2­3
flight plan 5­2
fuel management 7­5
primary 1­12
secondary 1­10, 1­12
Database 1­3, 1­5, 4­2
card slot 1­2, 1­6
changing database cards A-10
expiration 8­16
NavData card 1­5, 4­2
search regions C-2, C-3
ARINC regions C-2
U.S. regions C-2
Database Expiration Information
8­10
DATABASE EXPIRED 1­7
DATABASE MISSING 1­7
Database Search Regions
ARINC regions A-7, A-8
international regions A-8
maps A-7, A-8
U.S. regions A-7
Dead Reckoning
8­23, 8­24, 8­26
demo mode 8­26
ground speed 8­27
starting point 8­27
track 8­27
Demo Mode 8­26
Departure Airport. See Airport:
departure
Desired Track 3­12
Destination Airport. See Airport:
destination
Direct-to
activate
waypoint/procedure 4­15
waypoint 2­4, 4­21
Direct-to Key 1­9, 1­11, 2­4, 3­4
approach 3­15
flight plan 5­14
flight plan modes 5­2
Ind-3
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
holding pattern 5­18
missed approach 3­14
Display Diagnostic 8­28
Distance 7­4, 7­6
DME arc
3­2, 3­3, 3­12, 3­16. See
also Approaches
DR. See Dead Reckoning
E
ENT key 1­11, 2­2
Enter Key. See ENT key
Entering Information 1­11
Estimated Accuracy 8­17, 8­19
Estimated Time En route (ETE)
6­5
Estimated Time Enroute (ETE)
7­3, 7­4
Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA)
3­18, 6­5, 7­3
F
FAF. See Final Approach Fix
Final Approach Fix
1­14, 3­2, 3­3, 4­21. See
also Approaches
Final Course
intercept 4­22
Flight Path 2­4
change 2­4, 2­5
Flight Plan
activate 2­4, 5­3, 5­14
active 5­1, 5­2
active legs 5­1
add approach 3­4, 5­4
add procedure 5­5, 5­8
add SID 5­4
add STAR 5­4
approach
add 5­11
building 5­6
calculations 7­1
cancel 2­4, 5­15, 5­16
create 5­3, 5­4, 5­6
data pages 5­2
Ind-4
direct-to 5­3
edit 5­4, 5­9
enter 2­6
erase 5­16
legs 5­2
active 5­2, 5­13
direct-to 5­15
join 5­3, 5­14
review 5­13
stored 5­2, 5­3, 5­13
modes 5­2
procedures 5­4
add 5­8, 5­11
delete 5­12
edit 5­12
insert 5­11
replace 5­12
reverse 5­14
SID
add 5­9, 5­11
delete 5­9
edit 5­9, 5­12
STAR
add 5­9, 5­11
delete 5­9
edit 5­9, 5­12
stored 5­1, 5­2
stored legs 5­1
suspend 5­18
waypoints 5­4
add 5­6, 5­9, 5­10
delete 5­9, 5­10
insert 5­10
replace 5­9, 5­10
Flight Plan Distance (DIST) 7­3
Flight Plan Key. See FPL Key
Flight Plan/Fuel Pages 7­3
Flight Time Reserve 7­8
FPL Key 1­8, 5­1
modes 5­1
Fuel 1­7, 2­2
at arrival 7­8
calculations 7­1, 7­5, 7­6, 7­9
consumption 7­5
efficiency 7­5
estimated 7­5
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Index
flow 7­10
H
management 7­3, 7­5
Heading 7­15, 7­16
minimum 7­8
Headwind. See Wind: headwind
on board 1­7
remaining 7­6, 7­7, 7­9, 7­10 HELD/GPS-2D 8­13
HLD
reserve 7­8, 7­9
annunciator 1­13
total used 7­9
Hold 5­18
G
after missed approach 5­18
annunciator. See Annunciators:
GPS
HLD
altitude 8­14
course reversals 3­3
annuciator. See Annunciators:
flight plan waypoint 5­18
GPS
outside flight plan 5­18
antenna 8­15
Holding Pattern 3­10, 5­17. See
messages A-9
also Hold
GPS: ANTENNA FAULT A-9
course reversal 3­10
GPS: NO GPS TIME A-9
GPS: NO SV AVAILABLE A-9 I
GPS: NO USABLE SVs A-9
I/O Interface Check 8­26
GPS: NOT AVAILABLE A-9
GPS: ONLY n USABLE SV A- Indicated Airspeed 7­14
Initial Approach Fix (IF) 3­3
9
GPS: PDOP TOO HIGH A-9 Initialization 1­7
Install 8­1, 8­2
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL A-9
Install and Test Setup 8­26
GPS: USING 4 SV 3-D A-9
Install Mode
GPS: USING n SV 2-D A-9
display diagnostic 8­28
satellite
install and test setup 8­26
disable 8­21
personal messages C-5, C-8
enable 8­21
SAFEGUARD C-5
satellite availability
Intercept Final Course 4­22
8­17, 8­20, 8­22
Intermediate Fix 3­3
satellite status
International
8­17, 8­20, 8­21
Database 1­3. See also
sensor reset 8­17, 8­22
Jeppesen Navigation
status 8­17, 8­18
Database
2D+ BARO 8­18
search regions A-1
2D+HELD 8­18
Intersections 1­4, 4­3, 4­7
2D+MANL 8­18
2D+PRS 8­18
J
3D 8­18
3D/BARO 8­18
Jeppesen Navigation Database
3D/PRS 8­18
1­3, 1­5, 4­2
status messages A-9
card slot 1­2
GPS-3D 8­13
changing database cards A-10
Ground Speed
country codes A-4, A-6
7­3, 7­4, 7­5, 7­16
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Ind-5
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
expiration 1­6
information 1­3, 1­5
North American 1­3, 4­2
province codes A-2
state codes A-2
subscription 1­6
Join leg 4­15, 4­16, 4­20
K
Keys 1­2, 1­8, 1­10, 2­1
AUX 1­8, 8­1, 8­2
CALC 1­8, 7­1
Direct-to 1­9, 2­4
ENT 1­11, 2­2, 2­3
FPL 1­8, 5­1
MSG 1­9, 9­1
NAV 1­8, 6­1, 6­10, 6­11
NRST 5­16
WPT 1­8, 4­1, 4­4
Knobs. See Selector Knobs
L
LED display 1­2, 1­7
automatic dimming 1­7
brightness level 1­7
Local Time 8­10
M
Mach Number 7­14
Magnetic Variation 7­16
MAHP. See Missed Approach
Holding Point
MANUAL/GPS-2D 8­13
Maps
ARINC A-7, A-8
Memory Battery 8­15
Memory Card C-9
Message Key. See MSG key
Messages 9­1
accessing 9­2
advisory 9­2, 9­6
GPS messages
GPS: ANTENNA FAULT A-9
GPS: NO GPS TIME A-9
GPS: NO SV AVAILABLE A-9
Ind-6
GPS: NO USABLE SVs A-9
GPS: NOT AVAILABLE A-9
GPS: ONLY n USABLE SV A9
GPS: PDOP TOO HIGH A-9
GPS: RECEIVER FAIL A-9
GPS: USING n SV 2-D A-9
GPS: USING n SV 3-D A-9
priority 9­2
RAIM error 9­4
system 9­2, 9­4
explanation 9­4
Miles Per Gallon (MPG) 7­3
Minimum Safe Altitude 1­4
Missed Approach
3­2, 3­3, 3­14, 3­16
beyond the MAP 3­14, 3­15
procedure 3­4
select 3­14
Missed Approach Holding Point
1­5, 3­2, 3­3, 3­14, 3­15
Modes 1­10, 2­1
approach 3­5, 4­11
checklist 8­1, 8­3
configure 8­1, 8­24
FLT PLAN/FUEL 7­3, 7­5
install 8­1
NAV 6­1, 6­2. See also NAV
mode
restore 2­5
sensor status 8­1
SID 4­11
STAR 4­11
system status 8­1, 8­10
User 4­17
waypoint 4­1
MSG Annunciator. See Annunciators: MSG
MSG key 1­9, 9­1
N
NAV key 1­8, 6­1
NAV mode 6­2
CDI 6­9
display 6­3
Estimated time en route 6­5
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Index
Estimated Time of Arrival 6­5
ground track display 6­7
pages 6­2
bottom line display 6­2, 6­3
top line display 6­2, 6­3
primary page 6­2
track error display 6­7
waypoint information 6­10
NavData card 1­3, 1­5, 3­3
Navigation Key. See NAV key
Navigation Page
primary 2­4
NavPak C-9
NDB 1­4, 4­2, 4­7
NO ACTIVE FLIGHT PLAN 5­2
No Cancel 8­25
NO STORED FLIGHT PLANS 5­2
NRST 5­7
key 1­9, 5­16
modes 5­16
O
OAT. See Outside Air Temperature (OAT)
OAT "K" Factor 7­14
Operation Overview 1­8, 1­11
annunciators 1­8. See also
Annunciators
keys 1­8. See also Keys
selector knobs 1­8. See also
Selector Knobs
Outside Air Temperature 7­14
Outside Air Temperature (OAT)
7­12, 7­14
P
PDOP. See Position Dilution of
Precision (PDOP)
Personal Messages C-5
creating C-8
Phonetic Waypoints 7­18. See
also Waypoint: phonetic
Position Dilution of Precision
(PDOP) 8­17, 8­19
Power Switch 1­2, 1­7, 2­2
Power-Up 2­2
Present Position
display 8­11
saving 7­18
Present Position/Altitude 8­10
Pressure Altitude 7­1, 8­14
Procedure
2­1, 2­3, 4­11, 4­16. See
also Approaches; Standard
Instrument
Departure; Standard
Terminal Arrival
activating 4­15
defining 4­13
delete 5­12
entering 5­4
join leg 4­15, 4­16, 4­20
replace 5­12
select transition 4­14
selecting 4­13
Procedure Turns 3­8
Province Codes
list A-2
PRS/GPS-2D 8­13
PRS/GPS-3D 8­13
PTK
annunciator 1­13. See also
Annunciators: PTK
Page 2­1
R
selection 2­3
Parallel Offset 8­24, 8­25
RAIM
auto cancel 8­25
3­17, 8­12, 8­17, 8­19, 9­4
no cancel 8­25
annunciator. See Annunciators:
selecting 8­24, 8­25
RAIM
Parallel Track
approach
annunciator. See Annunciators:
3­17, 3­18, 3­19, 3­20
PTK
APR 8­19
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Ind-7
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
8­17, 8­20, 8­22
GPS satellite status
8­17, 8­20, 8­21
disable satellite 8­21
enable satellite 8­21
GPS sensor reset 8­17, 8­22
GPS status 8­17, 8­18
SID. See Standard Instrument
Departure
Software Code Display 8­10
Software Revision Information
8­10, 8­16
Speed 7­3, 7­4, 7­5
Standard Instrument Departure
1­3, 1­5, 4­1, 4­2, 4­5, 4­11, 4­13, 4­16, 5­1
activating 4­15
add 5­5
defined by 4­12
delete 5­5
edit 5­12
edit proceudre 5­12
Standard Terminal Arrival
1­4, 1­5, 4­1, 4­2, 4­6, 4­11, 4­13,
4­16, 5­1
S
activating 4­15
add 5­5
SAFEGUARD C-5
defined by 4­12
disable C-5
delete 5­5
enable C-5
edit procedure 5­12
NOT OK C-5
STAR. See Standard Terminal
Satellite. See GPS: satellite
Arrival
availability 8­17
State Codes
coverage 3­18
list A-2
status 8­17
Stored Flight Plans. See Flight
Save Present Position 7­1, 7­18
Plan: stored
Save/Load Configuration
Suspend waypoint sequencing
8­24, C-9
5­17
Selector Knobs
SV. See GPS: satellite; Satellite
1­2, 1­8, 1­9, 2­1, 2­3
System Code Display 8­17
large 1­9, 1­12
System Status 8­1, 8­2, 8­10
small 1­9, 1­12
database revision information
Self-Diagnostic Test 1­7, 2­2
8­10, 8­16
Sensor Status 8­1, 8­2, 8­17
present position/altitude
approach RAIM availability
8­10, 8­11, 8­12
8­17, 8­23
software code display
estimated accuracy 8­17, 8­19
8­10, 8­17
GPS satellite availablity
availability
3­18, 3­19, 8­17, 8­23, 8­24
definition 3­17
enroute 3­17
limit 3­18
prediction
3­17, 3­18, 3­20, 8­23
status 8­19
NO RAIM 8­19
RAIM/B 8­19
TERM 8­19
terminal 3­17
Ram Air Temperature (RAT)
7­12, 7­14
RAM Card C-9
Range 7­7
RAT. See Ram Air Temperature
Receiver Autonomous Integrity
Monitor. See RAIM
Reverse Flight Plan. See Flight
Plan: reverse
Runway 1­3
direction 7­16
Ind-8
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Index
software expiration information W
8­10, 8­16
Waypoint 2­1, 4­1
time display 8­10
abbreviations 5­4
voltage and temperature
activating 4­15
display 8­10, 8­14
active 4­15
T
add 4­17
advisory 6­4
TAS. See True Airspeed
airport 4­1, 4­2
Temperature 8­10
selecting 4­8
Time display 6­5, 8­10
annunciator. See Annunciators:
Time, distance, speed calculaWPT
tions 7­1, 7­3
approches 1­3, 4­1, 4­2
Time Zones 8­11
bearing to 4­3
Transition
categories 4­2
select 4­14
direct to 4­15, 4­16, 4­21
True Airspeed
displays 4­4
7­1, 7­11, 7­13, 7­14, 7­15, 7­16
airport 4­4
calculations 7­14
approaches 4­5
intersection 4­7
U
SID 4­5
STAR 4­6
User Waypoints
user 4­7, 4­17
4­3, 4­7, 4­17. See also
VOR 4­6
Waypoints: user
distance to 4­3
bearing and distance 4­17
editing 4­19
creating 4­17, 4­18
enroute 5­1
editing 4­19
entering 5­4
erasing 4­19
hold 5­18
latitude and longitude 4­17
identifiers 3­2, 4­10
present position 4­17
abbreviations 4­2, 4­3
UTC Time 8­10
scan 4­10
information 4­2, 4­10
V
intersections 4­1, 4­3, 4­7
Vertical Navigation Display 6­6
selecting 4­8
Vertical Navigation Profiles 7­19
key 4­1
VNAV 7­19
NDB 4­1, 4­2, 4­7
VNAV Profiles 6­6, 7­20
selecting 4­8
creating 7­20
nearest 5­16
using 6­6
phonetic 7­18
Voltage and Temperature Display
copy 7­18
8­10, 8­14
radial from 4­3
VOR 1­4, 4­2, 4­6
selecting 4­8
by city name 4­9
by identifier 4­9
by waypoint name 4­10
Revision D
June 29, 1998
Ind-9
TRIMBLE 2000 Approach Plus
sequencing
hold 5­17
SIDs 4­1, 4­2
STARs 4­1, 4­2
user 4­1, 4­3, 4­7, 4­17
editing 4­19
selecting 4­8
VOR 4­1, 4­2
selecting 4­8
Waypoint key. See WPT key
Wind
aloft
calculations 7­15, 7­16
calculations 7­1, 7­11, 7­16
crosswind 7­1, 7­16, 7­17
direction 7­15, 7­16
headwind 7­1, 7­16, 7­17
speed 7­15, 7­16
Winds aloft
calculations 7­15
WPT
Annunciator 1­13
WPT key 1­8, 4­1
Z
Zulu Time 8­10
Ind-10
Revision D
June 29, 1998
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