skyline corporation manufactured home installation manual

skyline corporation manufactured home installation manual

SKYLINE

CORPORATION

MANUFACTURED

HOME

INSTALLATION

MANUAL

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1 — Introduction ................................................. 4

Chapter 2 — Defi nitions ................................................. 5

Chapter 3 — Site Preparation

Zone Maps .................................................. 6

Site Grading ............................................. 7-8

Description of Soils .................................... 8

Chapter 4 — Foundation and Support Requirements

Design Requirements ................................. 9

Design Procedures .............................. 9-10

Acceptable Footings ................................ 10

Placement in Freezing Climates .............. 10

Proper Sizing of Footings ......................... 10

Permanent Foundations .......................... 10

Severe Wind Areas ................................... 10

Special Snow Load Conditions ................. 10

Important Reference Documents .............. 10

Typical Installations ...................................11

Typical Pier Construction .......................... 12

Support Requirements ......................... 13-15

- Single Wides ....................................... 13

- Double Wides ................................. 14-15

Sidewall Openings .................................... 15

Pavilion Dormer Blocking ......................... 16

Footing Sizes ...................................... 16 -17

Chapter 5 — Set-Up Procedures

Moving Home to Location ......................... 18

Positioning Home ..................................... 18

Leveling and Blocking .......................... 18-20

- Single Wides .................................. 18-19

- Double Wides ...................................... 20

Adjustable Outrigger ................................. 21

Use of Water Level ................................... 22

Double Wide Interconnection .............. 23-24

Tie Down Instructions .......................... 25-26

Over-The-Roof Straps .............................. 26

Anchor Tables Wind Zone I .................. 27-29

Anchor Tables Wind Zone II & III ......... 30-31

Anchor Tables for 102” Sidewalls ............. 32

Longitudinal Tie Down Instructions ........... 33

Tie Down Example .................................... 34

WARNING

ONLY EXPERIENCED PERSONS

KNOWLEDGEABLE OF MANUFACTURED

HOME SET-UP PROCEDURES SHOULD SET UP

THIS HOME

Double Wide Exterior Closure ............... 35-37

- Masonite Siding ..................................... 35

- Vinyl Lap Siding ..................................... 36

- HardiPanel & HardiPlank Siding ............ 37

Installation of Shingle Roof ................... 38-39

Double Wide Utility Interconnection ....... 40-43

- Bonding ................................................ 40

- Electrical Crossover .............................. 40

- Heating Crossover ................................. 41

- Gasline Crossover ................................. 42

- Waterline Cross Connect ....................... 42

- Drainline Cross Connect ....................... 43

Installation of Exterior Light Fixtures .......... 43

Venting of Skirting and Crawlspace ............ 43

Metal Roof Tightening ................................. 43

Porches & Decks ........................................ 43

Chapter 6 — Installation of Optional Features

Electrical Dryer Venting .............................. 44

Gas Dryer Installation ................................. 44

Gas Water Heater Venting .......................... 44

Grill/Range Venting ..................................... 44

Paddle Fan Installation .......................... 45-46

- Flush Ridge Beam ................................. 45

- Protruding Ridge Beam ......................... 46

- False Beam ........................................... 46

Air Conditioning Electrical Connect ............ 47

Evaporative Cooler ..................................... 47

Dealer Installed Blend Air ........................... 48

Expanding Rooms, Slide-Outs ................... 49

Site Attached Structures ............................. 49

Hinged Roofs and Eaves ............................ 49

Ceiling Fans ................................................ 49

Telephone and Cable TV ............................ 49

Fireplace Installation ................................... 49

Field Installed Hearth .................................. 49

Field Installed Fireplace Chimney .............. 50

Chapter 7 — Utility System Connection and Testing

Drainage - Connection ................................ 51

Drainage - 1, 1-1/2, 1-3/4 & 2 Bath ............. 51

Outside Panel Box ...................................... 53

Electrical ................................. 53

Multi-Section Frame Bonding ..................... 54

Feed Connections ................................... 54

Typical Meter Base Installation ................... 55

Meter Base & Panel w/Masthead ............... 55

Chapter 8 — Protective Window Coverings ................ 56-61

Chapter 9 — Final Inspection

Final Inspection .......................................... 62

Installation Inspection Checklist ................. 62

NOTE: THIS MANUAL IS INTENDED TO INSTRUCT AND TO ASSIST ALREADY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL IN

PROPER INSTALLATION OF SKYLINE MANUFACTURED HOMES. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO ENABLE SOME-

ONE UNFAMILIAR WITH MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION TO PERFORM THE INSTALLATION.

SET-UP SHOULD BE DONE ONLY BY QUALIFIED PEOPLE. WHOEVER DOES THE SET-UP SHOULD GUARAN-

TEE THEIR WORK IN WRITING FOR A REASONABLE TIME AND SHOULD, IF NECESSARY, AGREE TO RELE-

VEL THE HOME WITHIN 90 DAYS AFTER THE INITIAL SET-UP.

Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

PLEASE READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS PRIOR TO SET-UP!

This Skyline home was engineered, constructed and inspected for conformance to the Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards in effect on the date of manufacture. This

National Standard sets forth comprehensive requirements for design construction, fi re safety, plumbing, heating systems and electrical systems for manufactured homes designed to be used as dwellings.

This manual contains detailed installation instructions, including specifi cations and procedures for erection and hookup of your manufactured home. It has been written in an objective and easyto-understand manner so it can be understood by people without extensive technical training. It discusses the set-up of the home from preparing the site through fi nal inspection. It includes many tables and fi gures giving important data for proper set-up. Careful adherence to this manual by the homeowner and installation crew, and consultation with a registered professional or structural engineer in those unusual circumstances it does not cover, will assure you of a quality, safe and affordable home for many years to come.

Prior to locating or relocating your home, contact the local authority having jurisdiction for installation to see if permits for such procedures as blocking, anchoring, or utility connections are required. Inspections may be required during installation. On private property, zoning or development covenants may apply and should be taken into consideration. NOTE: Preparations of the site, when accomplished by others than the home installer, may not be in accordance with these instructions.

THE IMPORTANCE OF CORRECT SET-UP CANNOT BE

OVEREMPHASIZED. Correct set-up is absolutely essential to homeowner satisfaction. If you are not absolutely certain of the proper procedure or you encounter unusual conditions, please contact your factory service representative.

THE INSTRUCTIONS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE MINI-

MUM REQUIREMENTS. APPLICABLE LOCAL OR STATE

LAW MAY HAVE OTHER OR GREATER REQUIREMENTS

WHICH MUST BE COMPLIED WITH TO OBTAIN OR REGAIN

THE RIGHT TO OCCUPY THE HOME.

The recommended procedures contained in this manual are intended to assist in proper installation of this home. Field experience may justify alternate acceptable procedures which, when completed, result in performance at least equal to that which will result from conformance to the details and specifi cations herein. For example, on double wide installation you may fi nd it advantageous, due to local conditions, to bolt the fl oors together prior to bolting roof halves together, or vice versa. Either method is acceptable as long as the bolting schedule is adhered to.

NOTE: A MANUFACTURED HOME SET UP IN THE

WRONG STRUCTURAL ZONE DOES NOT MEET THE

REQUIREMENTS OF THE FEDERAL MANUFACTURED

HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS.

BEFORE COMMENCING SET-UP, SEE CONSTRUCTION

INFORMATION, LOCATED IN THE MASTER BEDROOM

CLOSET OR AT THE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION PAN-

ELBOARD, FOR DESIGNATION OF ZONE FOR WHICH

THE HOME WAS CONSTRUCTED.

SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION SUCH AS EXPANDO

UNITS, TRIPLE WIDE UNITS, AND PERIMETER BLOCKED

UNITS WILL BE COVERED IN SUPPLEMENTS TO THIS

MANUAL. CONTACT YOUR FACTORY OR DEALER IF

THIS HOME HAS ANY SUCH FEATURES AND YOU DO NOT

HAVE THE APPLICABLE SUPPLEMENTS.

WARNING: ONLY TRAINED CREWS SHOULD INSTALL

THE HOME. INSTALLERS SHOULD FOLLOW THE SAFE-

TY INSTRUCTIONS PROVIDED IN THIS MANUAL.

THIS HOME WEIGHS SEVERAL TONS

USE ENOUGH TEMPORARY WOOD BLOCKING TO SUP-

PORT THE HOME DURING SET-UP.

No one should be allowed under the home unless it is securely in place, even if it is not moving.

4

The technical content of the Installation Manual has been reviewed by PFS Corporation and found to be in accordance with the Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards.

Chapter 2

DEFINITIONS

ANCHORING EQUIPMENT:

Straps, cables, turnbuckles and chains, including tensioning devices, that are used with ties to secure a manufactured home to ground anchors.

ANCHORING SYSTEM:

A combination of ties, anchoring equipment, and ground anchors that will, when properly designed and installed, resist the wind’s overturning the home or moving it sideways.

FOOTING:

That part of the support system that sits directly on the ground at, below or partly below grade to support the piers.

PERIMETER SUPPORT:

The portion of a support system that supports the sidewalls at the fl oor line.

PIER:

That portion of the support system between the footing and the manufactured home, exclusive of caps and shims.

Types of piers include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Manufactured Steel Stands

2. Manufactured Concrete Stands, and

3. Concrete Blocks

SITE, MANUFACTURED HOME:

A parcel of land designed and designated for the location of one manufactured home, its accessory building or structures, and accessory equipment for exclusive use of the home’s occupants.

STABILIZING SYSTEM:

A COMBINATION OF PROPERLY INSTALLED ANCHORING AND SUPPORT SYSTEM.

STAND, MANUFACTURED HOME:

That area of a manufactured home site which has been reserved for placement of a manufactured home.

SUPPORT SYSTEM:

A combination of footings, piers, caps and shims that will, when properly installed, support the manufactured home.

5

Chapter 3

SITE PREPARATION

ZONE MAPS OF THE UNITED STATES

ROOF LOAD ZONE MAP

HEATING AND COOLING ZONE MAP

IN WIND ZONES II AND III, UNLESS THE HOME AND

ITS ANCHORING AND FOUNDATION SYSTEM HAVE

BEEN DESIGNED FOR THE INCREASED REQUIRE-

MENTS OF EXPOSURE ‘D’ OF ANSI/ASCE 7-88, IT

SHOULD NOT BE LOCATED WITHIN 1500 FEET OF

THE COASTLINE.

WIND ZONE MAP

The following local governments listed by state (county/ parishes, unless noted otherwise) are located in WIND

ZONE II:

ALABAMA - Baldwin and Mobile

FLORIDA - All counties except those identifi ed as being within

Wind Zone III.

GEORGIA - Bryan, Camden, Chatham, Glynn, Liberty and

McIntosh

LOUISIANA - Acadia, Allen, Ascension, Assumption, Calcasieu, Cameron, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Evangeline, Iberia. Iberville, Jefferson Davis, LaFayette, Livingston,

Pointe Coupee, St. Helena, St. James, St. John the Baptist,

St. Landry, St. Martin, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, Vermillion,

Washington, West Baton Rouge and West Feliciana.

MAINE - Hancock and Washington

MASSACHUSETTS - Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Nantucket and Plymouth

MISSISSIPPI - George, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl

River and Stone

NORTH CAROLINA - Beaufort, Brunswick, Camden, Chowan,

Columbus, Craven, Currituck, Jones, New Hanover, Onslow,

Pamlico, Pasquotank, Pender, Perquimans, Tyrrell and

Washington

SOUTH CAROLINA - Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Horry, Jasper and Williamsburg.

WIND ZONE II (continued):

TEXAS - Arkansas, Brazoria, Calhoun, Cameron, Chambers,

Galveston, Jefferson, Kenedy, Kleberg, Matagorda, Nueces,

Orange, Refugio, San Patricio and Willacy

VIRGINIA (The cities of)- Chesapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth,

Princess Anne and Virginia Beach

The following local governments listed by state (county/parishes, unless noted otherwise) are located in WIND ZONE III:

FLORIDA - Broward, Charlotte, Collier, Dade, Franklin, Gulf,

Hendry, Lee, Martin, Manatee, Monroe, Palm Beach, Pinellas and Sarasota

LOUISIANA - Jefferson, La Fourche, Orleans, Plaquemines,

St. Bernard, St. Charles, St. Mary and Terrebonne

NORTH CAROLINA - Carteret, Hyde and Dare.

The following states and territories are within

WIND ZONE III:

State of HAWAII

ALASKA - Costal regions between the 90 mph isotach on

ASCE 7-88 wind map and the coast.

U.S. TERRITORIES - American Samoa, Northern Mariana

Islands, Trust Territory of Pacifi c Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands.

6

SITE PREPARATION (Continued)

SITE PREPARATION

The importance of site preparation for a problem-free installation cannot be overstated. All vegetation must be removed from under the home site. The site must be properly graded and sloped to provide for storm drainage runoff. In particular, the area under the home must be graded to prevent water accumulation. Skyline Corp. recommends the home site slope 10 feet in all directions away from the home. If the home is sited on sloping terrain or a hillside, the soil must be graded on all sides to channel storm runoff around the home and not under it. If the home is set in a pit, it is extremely important to provide water drainage from under and around the home.

150 square feet of fl oor area. The required ventilators are to be approximately equally spaced around the perimeter of the home with a ventilation opening within three (3) feet of each outside corner.

Proper support of the manufactured home must allow for soil conditions in the immediate area. Pier footings must be placed on fi rm undisturbed soil (not loose fi ll) or soil which has been compacted to at least 90 percent of its maximum relative density. Support piers may also be placed directly on concrete slabs designed for manufactured home placement as found in manufactured home communities.

WARNING: THE AREA UNDER AND AROUND THE HOME

MUST BE SLOPED TO PREVENT WATER ACCUMULATION.

EXCESSIVE MOISTURE UNDER THE HOME CAN CAUSE

UNNECESSARY DETERIORATION, AND CAUSE CONDEN-

SATION PROBLEMS, WHICH COULD AFFECT THE HOME’S

WARRANTY. IT COULD ALSO AFFECT THE STABILITY OF

THE FOOTINGS AND PIERS WHICH SUPPORT THE HOME.

If the home is to be perimeter skirted or “pit-set,” ventilation of the under-fl oor area is required to minimize the effect of moisture under the home. Ventilation openings must be provided in the under-fl oor enclosure or skirting on at least three (3) sides (preferable on all sides) with a net area of at least one square foot per

After completion of grading and fi lling (if necessary), the bearing capacity of the soil at the depth of the footings should be determined. A pocket penetrometer (available from engineering supply houses) or other method acceptable to local jurisdictions may be used. If the soil cannot be tested but can be identifi ed, use the foundation bearing pressures shown in Figure 3-1 as a guide. If the soil cannot be identifi ed, use the lowest value, 1,000 PSF.

Under unusual conditions, or if the soil appears to be peat or uncompacted soil, consult a local geologist or professional engineer for aid.

CAUTION

EXCESSIVE WATER IN THE SOIL UNDER THE HOME WILL CAUSE UNNECESSARY DETERIORATION OF THE HOME

AND AFFECT THE COMFORT LEVEL IN THE HOME. CONTINUOUS STANDING WATER UNDER THE HOME CAN CAUSE

CONDENSATION PROBLEMS AND AFFECT THE HOME’S WARRANTY.

PREVENTION OF WATER BENEATH THE HOME

SINGLE SECTIONAL

DO CROWN AND

GRADE SITE TO

SLOPE AWAY

FROM HOME

DON’T GRADE

SITE SO THAT

WATER COLLECTS

BENEATH THE HOME

DO CROWN AND

GRADE SITE TO

SLOPE AWAY

FROM HOME

DO CROWN

AND GRADE

SITE TO

SLOPE AWAY

FROM HOME

DOUBLE SECTIONAL

DON’T GRADE

SITE SO THAT

WATER COLLECTS

BENEATH THE HOME

TRIPLE SECTIONAL

DON’T GRADE

SITE SO THAT

WATER

COLLECTS

BENEATH

THE HOME

7

SITE PREPARATION (Continued)

GROUND BARRIER

There is a strong tendency for ground moisture to be drawn into the home, greatly complicating efforts to control humidity and condensation.

A ground moisture-vapor retarder of 6 mil. rated polyethylene plastic, vinyl or similar material laid on the ground surface under the home is recommended to assist in controlling the humidity in the home.

General Description of Soils

Soil Type

Based on the Unifi ed Classifi cation System

Allowable Pressure

(Pounds Per Square Foot)

No allowances made for overburden pressure, embedment, depth, water table height, or settlement problems.

Rock or Hard Pan 4,000 and up

Sandy Gravel and Gravel

2,000

Sand, Silty Sand, Clayey Sand

Silty Gravel, or Clayey Gravel

Clay, Sandy Clay,

Silty Clay, or Clayey Silt

Uncompacted Fill

1,500

1,000

Special Analysis is Required

Peat or Organic Clays Special Analysis is Required

8

NOTE:

To be used only when none of the following is available: a. Soils investigation and analysis of the site.

b. Compliance with the local building code.

c. Competent opinion by a local engineer or building offi cial.

d. If the soil bearing capacity is less than 1,000 PSF, consult a professional engineer for foundation system requirements.

FIG. 3-1

CHAPTER 4

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT

REQUIREMENTS

NOTE: This chapter covers only foundations. Page 11 summarizes the usual types. Set-up procedures and methods for securing the home to its foundation are discussed in Chapter 5.

A home that is certifi ed for a higher roof load zone than the area that it is installed may be set on a foundation system that is designed for the roof load zone for that area of the country.

For example, a home that is certifi ed to withstand a 30 PSF roof load is installed in a 20 PSF roof load zone area. The support under the home need only be designed for the 20 PSF roof load, in accordance with the requirements set forth in this manual.

PIERS

Importance. Incorrect size, location or spacing of piers may cause serious structural damage to the home. It is important to install piers around the perimeter if required for the home.

Failure to do so may lead to sagging fl oors, walls and roofs.

Acceptable Types. Piers may be concrete blocks or pressure treated wood, capped and shimmed with wedges, or adjustable manufactured metal or concrete devices (see Figure

4-2). Manufactured piers should be listed and labeled for the required load capacity.

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS

Load-Bearing Capacity. The load that each pier must carry depends on factors such as the dimensions of the home, the roof live load, the spacing of the piers, and the way they are used to support the home. Center beam/marriage wall blocking is required for multisection homes.

See tables 1 and 2 for pier capacities. Manufactured piers must be rated to at least these capacities, and locally constructed piers must be designed to transmit these loads safely.

Confi guration. Figure 4-2 shows the recommended arrangement of concrete piers constructed on-site. Concrete blocks should have nominal dimensions of at least 8” x 16”. They must be stacked with their hollow cells aligned vertically.

When piers are constructed of blocks stacked side-by-side, every layer should be at right angles to the previous one (See

Figure 4-2).

Cap hollow block piers as shown in Figure 4-2 to distribute the structural load evenly across them. Caps may be of solid masonry or hard wood, and of the same length and width as the piers they rest upon. Avoid plywood, as it may lead to unwanted settling or movement.

Use 4” x 6” hardwood shims (wedges) to level the home and fi ll any gaps between the base of the I-beam and the top of the pier cap. Always use shims in pairs (See Figure 4-2). Drive them in tightly so they do not occupy more than 1” of vertical space. When the space to be shimmed is less than the minimum thickness of available caps or concrete blocks, dimension lumber may be used under the caps.

Select manufactured pier heights so that their adjustable risers do not extend more than recommended by the manufacturer when fi nally positioned.

All piers must rest on footings that either extend below the frost line or are otherwise protected from frost effects, and are placed on either undisturbed soil or compacted fi ll.

DESIGN PROCEDURES

Piers Less Than 36” High. Construct piers less than 36” high out of single, open or closed-cell concrete blocks, 8” x 8” x

16”. Install them so that the long side is at right angles to the supported I-beam (See Figure 4-2). Position open cells vertically upon the footers. (See Figure 4-1). Horizontal offsets should not exceed 1/2” top to bottom. Mortar is not normally required. Manufactured piers should be listed and labeled. Do not extend their adjusting studs beyond the limits specifi ed by the manufacturer.

Piers 36” to 80” High. Construct all piers between 36” and

80” high, and all corner piers over three (3) blocks high, out of double, interlocked concrete blocks (See Figure 4-2). Mortar will not normally be required.

Piers Over 80” High. Where permitted by local codes, lay them in concrete mortar with steel reinforcing bars inserted in the block cells and fi ll the cells with concrete. Where such construction is not permitted by local codes, have piers over

80” high designed by a registered professional or structural engineer.

Location and Spacing. The location and spacing of piers depend upon the dimensions and weight of the home, the roof load zone, size, and type of construction of the footings.

Other factors such as the location of doors or other openings and heavy pieces of furniture are also important. In general locate piers no more than 2’ from either end, and not over 10’ o.c.

Single-Section Homes. Figure 5-2 shows the recommended locations and spacing of piers for single-section homes.

Multi-Section Homes. Figure 5-3 shows the recommended location and spacing of piers for multi-section homes.

Under Doors and Heavy Furniture. Place additional piers on both sides of exterior doors, sidewall openings wider than

4’ (such as sliding glass doors), at Pavilion dormers, under porch posts, wood stoves, and under the expected locations of heavy pieces of furniture such as pianos, organs, waterbeds, etc.

9

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS (Continued)

DESIGN PROCEDURES (Continued)

Footings. Support every pier with a properly designed footing, as follows.

bearing perimeter foundation). A permanent foundation design, which meets most local codes, may be available from Skyline

Corporation. Please contact the Skyline division which manufactured the home or Skyline’s National Director of Consumer

Affairs.

ACCEPTABLE TYPES OF FOOTINGS.

Concrete. Footings may consist of precast or poured-in-place concrete, pads, slabs, or ribbons with a 28-day compressive strength at 3,000 psi.

Flood-Prone Areas. Skyline Corporation does not recommend locating homes in river or coastal fl ood-prone areas.

Pressure-Treated Permanent Wood. Two layers of 2” thick pressure-treated wood planks, with the long dimension of the second layer placed perpendicular to that of the fi rst, fastened with cut edges painted or retreated, may also be used.

Special elevation and anchoring techniques are required when locating in a fl ood-prone area. Consult a registered professional or structural engineer to make sure that the home design and construction conform to applicable federal, state and local codes and regulations. The FEMA publication listed below contains design and construction recommendations.

Other Materials. You may also use other materials approved for this use by local authorities if they provide equal loadbearing capacity and resistance to decay.

PLACEMENT IN FREEZING CLIMATES.

Conventional Footings. For frost-susceptible soils, the most cost effective method of preventing the harmful effects of ground frost heave is usually by placing the footing below the frost line. Consult local authorities to determine frost penetration. In the absence of a local code, use the frost penetration map as a guide.

Existing manufactured home communities may be located on frost-susceptible soils in which homes historically have been installed on piers or slabs located above the frost line. For these communities, if there is a history of these homes not experiencing any deleterious effects from frost-heave and the homes are setup, supported and skirted as described herein, then footings are not required to extend below the frost line.

Severe Wind Areas. Special foundation and anchoring techniques are required when locating in a severe wind area.

Consult a registered professional or structural engineer. The

HUD foundations design guide referenced herein contains recommendations for designing foundations and anchoring systems. Do not place your home in a wind zone more severe than the one indicated on the data plate located by your home’s main electrical panel.

Special Snow Load Conditions. Homes designed for and located in heavy snowfall areas or subject to other extreme loading conditions may require special piers or footings. See tables and/or special manufacturer’s instructions provided with your home.

IMPORTANT REFERENCE DOCUMENTS

• Foundation plans available from manufacturer.

• ANSI/NCSBCS A225.1-1987, “Manufactured Home

Installations,” NCSBCS, 505 Huntmar Park Drive, Herndon,

VA 22070, (703)437-0100.

Floating Slab System. When properly engineered by a registered professional engineer, compatible with the anchorage requirements of Chapter 5, and acceptable to the local authority having jurisdiction, a “fl oating slab system” may be used above the frost line.

• ASCE 7-88, “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and other Structures,” ASCE, 345 East 47th Street, New York,

Insulated Foundations. Footings may also be placed above the frost line when the home is provided with a perimeter foundation or skirting having insulation properties suffi cient to prevent freezing of the soil under or adjacent to every loadbearing component of the foundation and acceptable for this purpose by the local authority having jurisdiction. Useful design guidelines may be found in references at the end of this chapter. Insulation systems should be compatible with the requirement to cross ventilate the entire space under the home.

• FEMA 85, “Manufactured Home Installation in Flood

Hazard Areas,” FEMA, Washington, DC 20472,

(202)646-2708, September, 1985.

HUD Handbook 4930.3 (1989), “Permanent Foundations

Guide for Manufactured Housing,” HUD, 415 7th Street,

S.W., Washington, CD 20410.

• “All Weather Wood Foundation Systems Manual,” National

Forest Products Association, 1619 Massachusetts Ave.,

N.W., Washington, DC 20036, June, 1976.

Proper Sizing of Footings. Proper sizing of footings depends upon the load-carrying capacity of both the piers and the soil.

See Table 4 for recommended footing sizes. See Table 4B for minimum required concrete footing thickness. Footing size in no case shall be less than 144 sq. in. or smaller than the pier it supports.

• “Design Guide for Frost-Protected Shallow Foundations,”

Prepared for U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Develop- ment by NAHB, Upper Marlboro, MD, June, 1994,

Instrument No. DU100K000005897.

• “Building Foundation Design Guidebook,” Document No.

DE 88013350, National Technical Information Service,

5285 Port Royal Road, Springfi eld, VA 22161.

Permanent Foundations. Check local building codes and regulations and consult a registered professional or structural engineer when you are setting your home on a permanent foundation (such as a full basement, crawl space or load-

10

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS (Continued)

MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATIONS

SINGLE OR MULTI-SECTION HOMES

TYPES OF FOUNDATION SYSTEM - MAIN COMPONENTS(*)

1. Piers-Ground Anchors. Home rests on piers of concrete block, formed-in-place concrete, permanent wood or steel pedestals on permanent wood, crushed stone or concrete footers. Ground anchors in soil angled to resist straps or embedded in concrete deadmen in soil. Straps tied to the frame, with or without over-the-top straps.

2. Concrete Slab or Continuous Footing. Home rests on a concrete slab or ribbons of concrete. Straps tied between frame and perimeter footers or concrete slab. Skyline Corp. recommends installing earth anchors prior to pouring concrete slab. Concrete slab should be sloped to prevent water accumulation under home.

3. Pile/Post System. Home rests on piles/posts placed suffi ciently deep in the ground to resist all wind, snow, frost heave and earthquake forces. Straps fasten home to the piles/posts or caps placed thereon.

4. Concrete or Concrete Block Load-Bearing Perimeter Walls (Basement or Crawl Space). Home rests on exterior loadbearing walls which sit on concrete footings’ weight to resist all external forces. The fl oor connection to foundation resists external forces.

*For Skyline multi-section homes, the mating walls are supported by piers or support walls with straps and ground anchors, providing resistance to downward and uplift forces.

TYPICAL FOOTING PADS FIG. 4-1

16”

SINGLE PAD FOOTING

16”

8”

16”

DOUBLE PAD

FOOTING

SINGLE PAD FOOTING 24”

11 1/4”

DOUBLE PAD

FOOTING

TRIPLE PAD FOOTING

LOAD DISTRIBUTING

PAD FOR SUPPORT

DOUBLE PAD

FOOTING

TWO DOUBLE PAD

FOOTING

LOAD DISTRIBUTING PAD

FOR SUPPORT (24” X 24” X 4”)

QUAD PAD FOOTING

TWO DOUBLE PAD FOOTING

16”x16”x4” CONCRETE PAD FOOTINGS 8”x16”x4” CONCRETE PAD FOOTINGS

TRIPLE PAD FOOTING

2”x12”x24” WOOD PAD FOOTINGS

11

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS (Continued)

TYPICAL PIER CONSTRUCTION

I-Beam frame

Gap between top of pier and main frame may be hardwood plate (not exceeding 2” in thickness) and shims (not exceeding 1” in thickness). Shims shall be at least 4” wide and 6” long, fi tted and driven tight between wood plate or pier and main frame. 2” or 4” solid concrete block may fi ll remainder of gap.

Cap — Wood or concrete, 2” x 8” x 16” installed with 16” dimension perpendicular to the I-beam frame.

Single open or closed cell concrete blocks 8” x 8” x 16” (open cells placed vertically upon footer) installed with 16” dimension perpendicular to the I-beam frame.

Footing - Solid concrete or other product approved for the purpose.

Size according to Table 4.

Ground Level

Footing below frost line when subject to frost heaving.

SINGLE BLOCK PIER - 8000 LBS. MAXIMUM CAPACITY. PIER

CAPACITY MUST BE EQUAL TO OR MORE THAN REQUIRED

FOOTER CAPACITY.

Concrete grouting

Cap - Solid concrete block or equivalent.

Steel reinforcing bars

Double Interlocked Blocks,

Max. Height is 80”.

For piers exceeding 80 inches in height the concrete blocks should be fi lled with concrete grouting and steel reinforcing rods should be used.

DOUBLE BLOCK PIER - 14000 LBS. MAXIMUM CAPACITY. PIER CAPACITY

MUST BE EQUAL TO OR MORE THAN REQUIRED FOOTER CAPACITY.

Footings placed on fi rm undisturbed soil or in controlled fi ll free of grass and organic materials compacted to a minimum load bearing capacity of 1000 PSF.

30

35 40

1

6

3

15

10

30

25

20

Frost Penetration Map

1

AVERAGE DEPTH OF FROST PENETRATION — IN INCHES

12

FIG. 4-2

SOURCE: U.S. Dept. of Commerce Weather Bureau

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS (Continued)

SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS

The design loads and minimum footing sizes used in the selection of the support structure are set forth in Table 4.

The loads and footing sizes are the minimum values to be used for the support structure and are based on the indicated roof live load and a fl oor live load of 40 PSF.

All load bearing supports and footings may be subject to approval by the local Enforcement Agency.

The support requirements for homes designed for 60 PSF and higher roof load (and those specifi cally indicated middle and north zone homes) are found in the supplement accompanying this manual entitled “Manufactured Home Installation for Perimeter

Blocking.”

Contact the Skyline division that built the home for more information concerning perimeter blocking.

TABLE 1

PIER-LOADING UNDER MAIN I-BEAMS

SINGLE-WIDE HOMES

12’ WIDE HOMES 14’ WIDE HOMES

16’ WIDE HOMES

Pier

Spacing

Under

Main

I-Beams

(Ft.)

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

6

7

4

5

8

9

10

Wt. Per Foot

See Note 4

2130

2660

3190

3720

4250

4780

5320

532

2420

3020

3620

4230

4830

5440

6040

604

2560

3190

3830

4470

5110

5750

6380

638

2410

3020

3620

4220

4820

5430

6030

603

2740

3420

4110

4790

5480

6160

6850

685

2940

3670

4410

5140

5880

6610

7340

734

2700

3370

4050

4720

5400

6070

6750

675

3060

3830

4590

5360

6120

6890

7650

765

3320

4150

4980

5810

6640

7470

8300

830

NOTES:

1. See Table 4 for minimum footing sizes based on pier loads and allowable soil bearing capacities. The footing sizes and pier loads are minimums required for the applicable conditions. The footing shall not be smaller than the pier it supports of 144

2. The maximum spacing of supports is not to exceed 10 feet.

3. Where it is impractical to maintain spacing, such as in the axle area, the average of the distance to each adjacent support may be used to determine support requirements. For example: if the distances to the adjacent supports were 6’-0” and 8’-0”, the average spacing would be 7’-0”.

6’-0” 8’-0”

Pier A Pier B Pier C

The average spacing for pier B would be (6 + 8) / 2 = 7 ft., therefore, pier B would be designed for 7 ft. pier spacing.

4. The last line in the above Table is the weight per foot each main I-beam is carrying. Multiply this number by the span a pier is carrying to determine the required capacity of that pier.

13

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS (Continued)

TABLE 2

PIER LOADING UNDER MAIN I-BEAMS

DOUBLE-WIDE HOMES

20’ WIDE HOMES 24’ WIDE HOMES 26’ & 28’ WIDE HOMES

32’ WIDE HOMES

Pier

Spacing

Under

Main

I-Beams

(Ft.)

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

8

9

10

6

7

4

5

Wt. Per Foot

See Note 5

1810

2270

2720

3170

3630

4080

4540

454

2060

2580

3100

3610

4130

4640

5160

516

2170

2710

3260

3800

4340

4880

5420

542

2100

2630

3150

3680

4200

4730

5250

525

2390

2980

3580

4180

4770

5370

5970

597

2560

3190

3830

4470

5110

5750

6380

638

2360

2950

3540

4130

4720

5310

5900

590

2630

3350

4020

4690

5360

6030

6700

670

2940

3670

4410

5140

5880

6610

7340

734

2680

3350

4020

4690

5360

6030

6700

670

3000

3750

4500

5250

6000

6750

7500

750

3320

4150

4980

5810

6640

7470

8300

830

NOTES:

1. See Table 4 for minimum footing sizes based on pier loads and allowable soil bearing capacities. The footing sizes and pier

loads

2. The maximum spacing of supports is not to exceed 10 feet.

3. Where it is impractical to maintain spacing, such as in the axle area, the average of the distance to each adjacent support may be used to determine support requirements. For example: if the distances to the adjacent supports were 6’-0” and 8’-0”, the average spacing would be 7’-0”.

6’-0” 8’-0”

Pier A Pier B Pier C

The average spacing for pier B would be (6 + 8) / 2 = 7 ft., therefore, pier B would be designed for 7 ft. pier spacing.

4. Concentrated loads at marriage line (see Table 3).

5. The last line in the above Table is the weight per foot each main I-beam is carrying. Multiply this number by the span a pier is carrying to determine the required capacity of that pier.

14

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS (Continued)

Span

Between

Columns

(Ft.)

See note 1

20’ WIDE HOMES

TABLE 3

PIER LOADING UNDER CENTERLINE BEAMS

DOUBLE-WIDE HOMES

24’ WIDE HOMES 26’ & 28’ WIDE HOMES

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

32’ WIDE HOMES

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

6

10

12

14

16

18

20

24

900

1500

1800

2100

2400

2700

3000

3600

1200

2000

2400

2800

3200

3600

4000

4800

1500

2500

3000

3500

4000

4500

5000

6000

1080

1800

2160

2520

2880

3240

3600

4320

1440

2400

2880

3360

3840

4320

4800

5760

1800

3000

3600

4320

4800

5400

6000

7200

1260

2100

2520

2940

3360

3780

4200

5040

1680

2800

3360

3920

4480

5040

5600

6720

NOTES:

1) Where a column is located between two openings, sum the loads for each opening to obtain the required pier load.

2) See table 4 for minimum footing sizes based on pier loads and allowable soil bearing capacities.

3) The concentrated load consist of roof load only.

4) Pier locations at the marriage wall are marked with paint or metal indicator straps.

5) Piers used side by side to obtain the required load are permissible.

2100

3500

4200

4900

5600

6300

7000

8400

1350

2250

2700

3150

3600

4050

4500

5400

1800

3000

3600

4200

4800

5400

6000

7200

PIER LOADING AND INSTALLATION UNDER SIDEWALL DOORS AND WINDOWS

2250

3750

4500

5250

6000

6750

7500

9000

Unit sidewall

Unit sidewall

Typical door or window opening - Width varies

- see table below.

A

Floor joists

Floor joists

4x4 block, 4” longer than joist spacing.

Installed such that it spans joists on either side of door jamb.

Nominal

Unit

Width

(Ft.)

Typical Pier

A

See note 6.

Pier installed when joist is not under door jamb.

Pier installed when joist is under door jamb.

SECTION ‘A-A’

TABLE 3A

78.5” MAX. OPENING 108” MAX. OPENING 48” OPENING

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

Typical Pier

121” MAX. OPENING

Pier Load

(Lbs)

20 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

30 PSF

Roof

Zone

Pier Load

(Lbs)

40 PSF

Roof

Zone

12

14

16

18

20

24

26

28

32

500

550

600

650

440

500

520

540

590

640

710

780

840

570

640

680

700

760

790

870

960

1040

690

790

830

860

940

810

890

980

1050

720

810

860

880

950

1050

1160

1270

1380

920

1050

1110

1140

1240

1280

1430

1570

1700

1130

1280

1360

1400

1530

1110

1230

1340

1450

990

1110

1180

1210

1310

1440

1600

1750

1890

1270

1440

1520

1570

1710

1760

1960

2260

2340

1550

1760

1870

1930

2110

1250

1370

1500

1620

1100

1250

1320

1350

1470

1610

1780

1960

2120

1420

1610

1710

1750

1910

1980

2200

2420

2620

1730

1980

2100

2160

2360

NOTES:

1) Piers are required at all entry doors and window openings greater than four feet.

2) Piers are also required at bay windows where the sidewall opening is greater than four feet.

3) Piers are not required at door and window openings located along endwalls.

4) Piers are not required at some door and window locations if the fl oor has been reinforced at the factory. Contact the division that built your home to

determine if this is applicable to your home.

5) See table 4 for minimum footing sizes based on pier loads and allowable soil bearing capacities.

6) Maximum pier setback is 6”. If pier load (from table 3A) is 1240 lbs. or less, and nominal unit width is 12’, 14’, 20’, 24’, 26’, or 28’, then setback may be 10”

max. If pier load (from table 3A) is 1930 lbs. or less, and nominal unit width is 16’, 18’, or 32’, then setback may be 10” max.

7) For piers between multiple openings, sum the loads for each opening to obtain the required load.

15

FOUNDATION AND SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS (Continued)

PAVILION DORMER BLOCKING

Pier required at locations marked with an arrow.

NOTES:

1) All units that have a Pavilion dormer require additional perimeter blocking.

2) Install piers under door/window openings and at each end of Pavilion wall.

Install piers 4’-0” o.c. max between end of pavilion wall and door/window opening.

3) See table 3A for required pier capacities under windows or doors.

4) Piers located at each end of wall and spaced 4’-0” o.c. shall support 1300 lbs. min.

5) For roof loads in excess of 40 PSF, install piers per the “Manufactured

Home Installation for Perimeter Blocking” supplement.

TABLE 4

FOOTING SIZES

FOOTING SIZES (IN x IN) OR EQUAL AREAS (SQ. IN.)

REQUIRED

PIER

LOAD

CAPACITY

(POUNDS)

1000 PSF

REQUIRED

AREA

(SQ. IN)

TYPICAL

SIZES

(IN.xIN.)

ALLOWABLE SOIL BEARING VALUE

1500 PSF 2000 PSF

REQUIRED

AREA

(SQ. IN)

TYPICAL

SIZES

(IN.xIN.)

REQUIRED

AREA

(SQ. IN)

TYPICAL

SIZES

(IN.xIN.)

3000 PSF

REQUIRED

AREA

(SQ. IN)

4000 PSF 6000 PSF

TYPICAL

SIZES

(IN.xIN.)

REQUIRED

AREA

(SQ. IN)

TYPICAL

SIZES

(IN.xIN.)

REQUIRED

AREA

(SQ. IN)

TYPICAL

SIZES

(IN.xIN.)

1500

2000

2500

3000

3500

4000

4500

5000

5500

6000

6500

7000

7500

8000

8500

9000

9500

10000

792

864

936

1008

1080

1152

1224

1296

1368

1440

216

288

360

432

504

576

648

720

12x20

16x20

18x20

20x22

22x24

24x24

26x26

26x28

28x30

30x30

30x32

32x32

32x34

34x34

34x36

36x36

36x38

38x38

528

576

624

672

720

768

816

864

912

960

144

192

240

288

336

384

432

480

12x20

12x20

12x20

16x20

18x20

20x20

20x22

22x22

22x24

24x24

24x26

26x26

26x28

28x28

28x30

30x30

30x32

30x32

396

432

468

504

540

576

612

648

684

720

144

144

180

216

252

288

324

360

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

14x20

16x20

18x20

18x20

20x20

20x22

22x22

22x24

24x24

24x24

24x26

26x26

26x28

26x28

264

288

312

336

360

384

408

432

456

480

144

144

144

144

168

192

216

240

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

14x20

16x20

16x20

18x20

18x20

20x20

20x22

20x22

22x22

22x22

180

198

216

234

252

270

288

306

324

360

144

144

144

144

144

144

144

162

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

14x20

14x20

16x20

16x20

18x20

18x20

144

144

156

168

180

192

204

216

228

240

144

144

144

144

144

144

144

144

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

12x20

16

FOOTING

SIZE

16”x16”

18”x18”

24”x24”

16”x32”

32”x32”

12” Round

16” Round

18” Round

24” Round

36” Round

TABLE 4A

COMMON FOOTING SIZES AND CAPACITIES

FOOTING CAPACITY AT VARIOUS ALLOWABLE SOIL BEARING VALUES (Pounds)

1000 PSF 1500 PSF 2000 PSF 3000 PSF 4000 PSF 6000 PSF

1780

2250

4000

3555

7110

785

1395

1765

3140

7070

2665

3375

6000

5335

10665

1180

2095

2650

4710

10600

3555

4500

8000

7110

14220

1570

2790

3535

6280

14135

5335

6750

12000

10665

21335

2355

4190

5300

9425

21205

7110

9000

16000

14220

3140

5585

7070

12565

10665

13500

24000

21335

4712

8375

10600

18850

TABLE 4B

MAXIMUM FOOTING SIZE PER FOOTING THICKNESS

PIER

DESCRIPTION

4”

Minimum Footing Thickness

6” 8”

Single Concrete

Block

30”x30” square

36” round

40”x40” square

____

____

____

Double Concrete

Block

38”x38” square

44” round

48”x48” square

____

____

____

Single or Double

Steel Pier

34”x34” square

40” round

45”x45” square

____

____

____

Quad steel Pier 46”x46” square

____

____

____

____

____

Single Concrete

Block

Double Concrete

Block

Single or Double

Steel Pier

Quad steel Pier

22”x22” square

28” round

30”x30” square

36” round

26”x26” square

32” round

38”x38” square

44” round

30”x30” square

38” round

38”x38” square

46” round

34”x34” square

42” round

46”x46” square

____

38”x38” square

48” round

46”x46” square

____

42”x42” square

____

____

____

Single Concrete

Block

Double Concrete

Block

Single or Double

Steel Pier

Quad steel Pier

Single Concrete

Block

Double Concrete

Block

Single or Double

Steel Pier

Quad steel Pier

20”x20” square

24” round

28”x28” square

32” round

24”x24” square

28” round

36”x36” square

40” round

16”x16” square

20” round

24”x24” square

28” round

20”x20” square

24” round

32”x32” square

36” round

26”x26” square

32” round

34”x34” square

40” round

30”x30” square

36” round

42”x42” square

48” round

20”x20” square

24” round

28”x28” square

34” round

24”x24” square

30” round

36”x36” square

42” round

32”x32” square

40” round

40”x40” square

48” round

36”x36” square

44” round

48”x48” square

____

26”x26” square

30” round

34”x34” square

40” round

30”x30” square

34” round

42”x42” square

48” round

46”x46” square

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

34”x34” square

42” round

42”x42” square

____

39”x39” square

46” round

48”x48” square

____

12”

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

____

Note:

1. Concrete blocks are 8”x16” minimum.

2. Steel piers have 12” square base minimum.

3. Double steel pier may not be used on this footing.

17

CHAPTER 5

SET-UP PROCEDURES

WARNING: WHEN SETTING UP THIS HOME, THE FOLLOWING PRECAUTIONS

REGARDING JACKING MUST BE FOLLOWED.

Moving Home To Location: Make sure the following items are completed before placing the home:

• The site is properly prepared. See Chapter 3.

• All concrete work necessary to setting the home is fi nished.

• Utilities are installed or available.

• Any trenching, for crossover drain lines or for wheels that will be left in place, is complete.

• Items that could be diffi cult to install after the home is sited

(such as anchors and ground moisture retarders) are in their proper locations.

CAUTION: THE HOME WEIGHS SEVERAL TONS. USE

ADEQUATE TEMPORARY SUPPORT BLOCKING TO

SAFEGUARD WORKERS. SKYLINE CORP. RECOM-

MENDS WOOD BLOCKING.

Positioning Home. When not placing the home on a concrete slab or poured-in-place footings, mark the corners of the home and lay out footings and support devices close to where they will be used. Then move the home or fi rst section into position.

Leveling and Blocking — Single-Wide Homes.

1. Before doing any jacking, place support piers for the home in the location under the home as specifi ed in the home installation instructions.

2. Use a minimum of two jacks, each with a rating of at least ten tons.

3. Jack only on the main chassis I-beam. Locate the jack directly under the vertical web of the I-beam. Do not jack on the seam (joint between fl anges) of a twin I-beam.

4. Use a large 3/8 inch thick steel plate, C-channel or other equivalent plate between the main chassis I-beam and the jack head to distribute the load.

5. The jack base and any blocking must be located on fi rm ground.

6. Do not operate the jacks while you are under the main

I-beams of the home.

7. Use jacks only for raising the home. Do not rely on the jacks to support the home.

18

8. Place 4” x 6” x 48” min. safety timbers between the Ibeams and ground in case of jack failure. Timber should be hardwood.

9. Raise the home in small increments and provide additional blocking between the home and the piers and safety piers as the home is raised.

10. Do not go under the home while it is supported on the jacks unless safety timbers capable of supporting the home are in place.

FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE WARNINGS MAY RESULT

IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.

Reminders before jacking...

1. Use only jacks in good condition with a minimum rating of

10 tons.

2. Use a minute man C-Channel jacking plate or equivalent between jack and steel I-beam to distribute the concentrated loads. (See Figure 5-1)

3. Use a fi rm support under the jack base to prevent tipping or settling of the jack. Skyline recommends a 12” x 12” or larger pad.

4. Always follow the sequence of jacking outlined below to avoid overstressing structural members.

‘I’-BEAM

FIG. 5-1

C-CHANNEL 8” LONG

10 TON JACK

JACK SUPPORT - LOCATE

ON FIRM SOIL

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

The jacking procedure is as follows:

1. After the home is located in its fi nal position, you can preliminarily level it by using the hitch jack but only after adequately wheel blocking the home so it does not roll.

2. Jack up one side of the home by placing one jack just forward of the front spring hanger and the other just behind the rear spring hanger. These two jacks must be operated simultaneously to raise the home. Jack low side of the home fi rst. Install footings and piers; one just forward of the front jack and another just behind the rear jack (taking care not to exceed the correct spacing selected from Table 1 or 2).

3. Next, jack the main I-beam at the front and position a pier within 2’-0” of the end of the I-beam. At the completion of this step, this side of the home should be approximately level.

4. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 for the other side of the home. At the completion of this step, the home should be roughly level from front to rear and from side to side.

5. Place the remaining pier supports under the main I-beam on each side taking care to maintain a maximum distance of no more than the spacing determined from Tables 1 or 2 with piers located with 2”-0” of each end of each I-beam. (See Fig.

5-2)

6. Level the home within reasonable tolerances, using a 6 foot carpenter’s level, water level, or similar equipment. The fi nal height adjustment is obtained by jacking the I-beam and placing hardwood shims between the piers and I-beam, or other approved methods such as adjustable piers. THIS

LEVELING PROCESS IS IMPORTANT FOR APPEARANCE

AND IS ESSENTIAL FOR THE PROPER OPERATION OF

DOORS, WINDOWS, AND THE DRAINAGE SYSTEM.

7. Place additional supports at each side of sidewall door and window openings over 4’0” wide. (See Table 3A)

8. Within 90 days after initial set-up, the home should be releveled, if necessary to compensate for any pier settlement.

Follow the procedure in Item 6 above.

NOTE: DURING THE LEVELING OR RELEVELING PRO-

CESS, LOOSEN FRAME TIES AND OVER-THE-ROOF TIES

(IF PROVIDED) PRIOR TO JACKING HOME.

2’-0”

I-BEAM

MAXIMUM PIER

SPACING

AS SELECTED

FROM TABLE 1

TYPICAL

PIER

FIG. 5-2

10’-0”

MAX.

2’-0”

19

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

LEVELING AND BLOCKING, DOUBLE-WIDE HOMES

With the exception of the requirement for support under the marriage wall of double-wide units, leveling and blocking procedures are the same as for single-wide units. The site must be prepared as previously described. Special consideration must be given to the footings and pier construction required by (1) local soil conditions, (2) depth of frost line and (3) special requirements for local jurisdictions. It may be desirable to construct the footings and piers (to grade height) prior to moving the home to its fi nal location. Preconstruction of the footings and piers to grade may be accomplished by referring to the pier location diagram, Figure 5-4, making special note of the additional piers required at centerline beam supports. If there are questions regarding pier locations, please contact the division for aid. Piers located at the centerline may carry much higher loads than other pier locations.

PROPER BLOCKING OF THE CENTERLINE BEAM IS

VITAL TO THE PERFORMANCE OF A DOUBLE-WIDE

HOME.

Pier at centerline within 1’ of front and rear wall. This pier required only if there is a column located at the front or rear wall. (See Table 3)

2’-0” Max.

FIG. 5-4

Varies*

I-BEAM

Piers required at all interior column locations, per

Table 3. (See detail)

FOOTINGS AND PIERS SHOWN

FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES

ONLY — ANY APPROVED SYS-

TEM MAY BE USED.

RIM JOIST

AT MARRIAGE LINE

WHERE AVAILABLE PIERS DO NOT HAVE

THE CAPACITY REQUIRED BY TABLE

3 FOR CONCENTRATED LOADS-2 OR

MORE PIERS MAY BE USED. THE SUM

OF PIER CAPACITIES AT EACH SUP-

PORT POINT SHALL BE AT LEAST EQUAL

TO THE LOADS SPECIFIED IN TABLE 3.

Max. Pier spacing as selected from Table 2.

20

FIG. 5-3

*Dimensions vary. If pre-construction of footing is desired, contact the Skyline division that manufactured the unit for applicable dimensions.

Centerline Support pier location indicator-Metal strap or centerline joist marked with paint beneath home or label indicating pier location.

FIG. 5-5

UPLIFTED CON-

NECTOR CAPACITY

IS 1242# EACH TO

BE RESISTED BY

ANCHORING

EQUIPMENT

CABLE & THIMBLE

SYSTEM SHOWN

FOR ILLUSTRATION

ONLY — ANY

APPROVED METHOD

MAY BE USED

1/4” CABLE

THIMBLE

INSERTED IN

CONNECTOR

HOLE.

GALVANIZED STEEL

CABLE 7/32” DIA.

(7x7) OR 1/4” DIA.

(7x17) TENSION

CABLE PER

TIE-DOWN

INSTRUCTIONS

UPLIFT CONNECTOR CAPACITY IS

3114# EACH TO BE RESISTED BY

ANCHORING EQUIPMENT.

1/4” CABLE

CLAMPS

SLOT IN STRAP IS FOR INSTALLA-

TION OF STANDARD HURRICANE

STRAP DESCRIBED ON PAGE

25. CONNECT TIE-DOWN STRAP

DIRECTLY TO UP-LIFT CONNECTOR

AS SHOWN BY FIG. 5-12. (SPLICE

DEVICE NOT REQUIRED)

TYPICAL MARRIAGE WALL STRAPS

MARRIAGE WALL

STANDARD

HURRICANE STRAP

CAPACITY IS 3150#

PER STRAP

RIM JOIST

STANDARD HURRICANE

STRAP IS TO BE CON-

NECTED DIRECTLY TO

APPROVED ANCHOR.

STRAP IS ATTACHED TO

WALL IN FACTORY.

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

INSTALLATION OF “ADJUSTABLE OUTRIGGER”

Perimeter joist

5-#12x2” wood screws

Thrust Bracket

Typical transverse fl oor joist

6”

+ or -

1/2”

Pipe

Main Unit I-Beam. Must be

10” deep or more.

Threaded Rod must be seated in corner of

I-Beam web/fl ange.

ADJUSTABLE

OUTRIGGER

Adjustment nut

3/4” threaded rod

INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

1. Locate the fl oor joist that requires support.

2. Mark I-beam directly under the fl oor joist to align “Adjustable Outrigger”.

3. Adjust nut on threaded rod so it clears the frame fl ange for easy adjustment.

4. Set threaded rod in the pipe and against the frame.

5. Set thrust bracket on the fl oor joist and secure it with fi ve #12 x 2” screws. If there is insulation installed between bottom board and fl oor joist, cut a small slit in the bottom board and insulation. Move the insulation away from the area where the thrust bracket is to be installed. Install bracket and repair bottom board with provided bottom board tape.

6. Adjust proper pressure by tightening the nut, until the perimeter joist is square and level.

7. If the “Adjustable Outrigger” is to be exposed to the weather after installation, or installed in highly corrosive environment, then it shall be painted with an exterior grade paint.

NOTES:

1. The “Adjustable Outrigger” is intended as an alternate to perimeter piers at door and window openings. Page 6 of this manual requires perimeter piers at sidewall door and window openings that are 4 feet wide or wider.

2. The “Adjustable Outrigger” is to be installed at the building site at time of setup. It may be factory supplied and shipped loose or purchased separately by the dealer. The thrust bracket is listed by Preferred Construction Inspections (#1055-11). The threaded rod meets ASTM standard A307-1994 and the nut meets ANSI/ASME standard B18.2.2-1986. All necessary parts for the “Adjustable Outrigger” assembly are included in the package, and are purchased together.

3. The maximum load carrying capacity of the “Adjustable Outrigger” is 1400 lbs. See page 15, Table 3A for required pier loads at door and window openings.

4. These instructions are applicable ONLY to “The Adjustable Outrigger” manufactured by Manufactured Housing Foundations

Systems Inc. (A subsidiary of Oliver Technologies, Inc.)

5. The “Adjustable Outrigger” is to be temporarily removed if the home is to be retransported, and then reinstalled after setup.

6. The “Adjustable Outrigger” is not available for use on 18’ singlewides, 14’ singlewides with 75.5” I-Beam spacing or 16’ singlewides with 82.5” or 75.5” I-Beam spacing.

21

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

FIG. 5-6

USE OF WATER LEVEL

VALVE

CONTAINER

WATER LINE

Tube

SUPPORT DEVICE

MATERIAL TO MAKE LEVEL

• Five Gallon Pail with Lid

• Plastic Tubing — 100 feet x 3/8” or 1/2”

• Cork — 1-1/2”

• Male Barbed Fitting — 3/8” x 3/4”

• Steel Washer — 7/8”

• Nut — 3/4”

• Female Barbed Fitting — 3/8” x 1/2”

• Male Valve — 1/2”

• Pipe Sealant

• Food Coloring — 8 oz..

“HOW TO USE A WATER LEVEL”

PLACE AT ANY POINT AROUND HOME

Unroll Tubing: Position level where it is to be used. Take care not to have kinks in it, step on it or lay anything on it.

Check for Air Bubbles: To remove any lower valve below bottom of container and open. Close valve when they are out.

Container Location: Located so valve can reach all areas of home. Build up container so water line in valve end of tubing is at the predetermined height support devices will be set.

Leveling of Support Device: Secure valve above determined height and open. Adjust device as needed. Close valve and move to next support device.

NOTE: Level all support devices before lowering home.

22

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

DOUBLE-WIDE INTERCONNECTION

The procedure for connecting the homes is as follows.

1. Remove the temporary closure materials (polyethylene and batten strips) and position the halves as close together as possible in the fi nal desired location. Do not remove temporary beam supports until step 7 has been completed.

2. Move the fi rst section of home into its desired position.

Block and level it in the same manner as described for a single section home. Skyline Corp. recommends, if possible, the heavy half be blocked and leveled fi rst as it is easier to lift and roll the light half and fi t into place.

3. Install sill sealer insulating material (provided) around the ceiling (to the ridge beam at the ceiling panel line), endwalls and fl oor mating line. Fasten sill sealer with staples or nails.

See fi gure 5-8A.

4. Slide the two halves together with rolling and jacking equipment. Care must be taken during rolling and jacking operations to avoid overstressing structural members. With the halves together at the fl oor, align the fl oors at the ends of the home. It is better to have a minor misalignment under the siding where it cannot be seen and will not cause a problem, than a small misalignment that will be observed in the interior of the home.

5. With the home aligned at the fl oor and supported by its foundation, join the fl oors using 3/8” x 3” (4-1/2” lags with double perimeter joist) lag screws 2 to 3 feet on center. A gap between halves up to 1” is allowable. Gaps larger than 1/2” must be fi lled with plywood or lumber shims. For 1/2” max gaps, increase fastener length 1”. Use the procedures outlined on page 16 to level the home and check supports and footings with tables 2 and 3.

6. To obtain access into the ceiling cavity to bolt or alternately lag screw the ridge beam sections together, fold back the underlayment paper and remove the 16” wide sheathing panel(s) at the peak. Note that the shingles may not have been installed on one or both halves, at the 16” wide area at the peak. If one side is shingled, it is intended that the beams be lag screwed together. If neither side is shingled, the beam may be lag screwed or bolted together. Bolts to be 3/8” x 4-

1/2”. Lag screws to be 3/8” x 5”. Install lag screws or bolts at

24” o.c. with 6 additional lag screws at 3” o.c. over interior beam supports. (If marriage walls and ridge beam halves have been plated with 3/8” sheathing, then the bolts or lags must be increased in length by 3/4” to 5-3/4”.) Predrill 1/4” pilot holes for the lag screws at 1-1/2” down from the top of the beam and with a maximum offset from the horizontal of 45 degrees. A gap between beam halves up to 1” is allowable.

Gaps larger than 1/2” must be fi lled with plywood or lumber shims. For 1/2” max gaps, increase fastener length 1/2”. For

1” max. gaps increase fastener length 1-1/4”. See Fig. 5-7.

7. Prior to interconnecting the ridge beam halves, examine the ridge beam ends. Should there be a slight misalignment, it can be eliminated by placing a jack under the low side of main beam on one half and use the jack to raise the beam.

The alignment can be held by properly bolting or lag screwing the beam halves together. See Fig. 5-8.

8. Place additional pier supports at the centerline at the interior column locations marked on the fl oor with indicator straps or paint (see Figure 5-3 and 5-4 and Table 3). Skyline

Corp. provides pier location diagrams for all multiwide models. These diagrams show the required locations of piers and are very useful in determining pier placement prior to taking receipt of home. Additional piers are required each side of exterior doors and sidewall openings greater than 4’ in width.

See Table 3A for these pier load requirements.

9. Toe-nail endwall centerline studs together using 16d nails

10” o.c.

10. If home has double mating walls, then fasten the mating wall columns together with #8 x 4” screws 16” o.c. Shim any gaps at columns with plywood or lumber and increase fastener length to achieve min. penetration. See Figure 5-7A.

NOTE: (1) When beam support consists of a column instead of Centerline bearing wall, use 6 bolts/lags at 3” o.c. each side of column.

(2) Beam marked with paint at column locations.

3”

3”

2”

24” 24” 24” 24” 24”

1-1/2”

Roof Ridge Beam

24”

Endwall

Hall bearing wall

FIG. 5-7

#8X4” wood screws at 16” o.c.

Either fastener location shown is acceptable. If post is constructed from

2x4s or 2x6s use toe-screw location.

(1-1/2” penetration required.)

FIG. 5-7A

Mating line

Interior support post confi gurations (typ.)

23

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

DOUBLE-WIDE INTERCONNECTION (Continued)

NOTE: IT IS IMPORTANT TO HAVE ROOF/CEILING SEC-

TIONS FLUSH AT MATING LINE PRIOR TO FASTENING OF

RIDGE BEAM HALVES. IF THEY ARE NOT FLUSH, THEN

THE LOW SIDE SHOULD BE RAISED BY JACKING WITH A

WOOD POST OR STEEL PIPE WITH A WOOD OR METAL

PAD AT THE CEILING. PLACE THE BASE OF THE JACK

ACROSS THE FLOOR MATING LINE SO THAT IT RESTS

ON BOTH HALVES. JACK AGAINST CEILING ONLY IN

AREAS WHERE THERE IS NO MARRIAGE WALL.

Pad on ceiling section to be raised.

Base over both fl oors at mating line.

FIG. 5-8

Ridge beam

Install sill sealer (provided) at endwalls, fl oor mating line and ridge beam bottom fl ange.

Mating line rim joist

FIG. 5-8A

ATTACHMENT OF GYPSUM PANELS AT DOUBLE-WIDE CENTERLINE

Some multiple-wide units will have a gypsum panel left off at the centerline for fi eld attachment. Fasten the factory supplied gypsum wallboard panel(s) at the center of the endwalls after the units have been attached. Fasten the panel(s) to the wall framing as described in fi gure 5-8B below.

Blocking if required, will be factory provided.

Centerline of Unit

Gypsum Wallboard

Panels

24

Fasten 5/16” gypsum panels to framing with 3/16”x1” staples or 1” washer head screws 6” o.c. around perimeter &

12” o.c. in the fi eld. Fasten 1/2” gypsum w/1-5/8” x 0.099” gypsum nails 8” o.c. or 1-1/4” type ‘w’ drywall screws 12” o.c. If gypsum is overlaying 3.6mm lauan, then increase fastener lengths 1/4”. Gypsum may be glued to framing

(optional) in combination with w/mechanical fastening above. Use an approved glue.

4’ for fi eld installed

gyp. Panel.

INTERIOR VIEW

FIG. 5-8B

Center gypsum panel is fi eld installed. All required gypsum panels, fasteners and adhesives are supplied by the factory.

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

MANUFACTURED HOME TIE-DOWN INSTRUCTIONS

The support system must also resist lifting, sliding, and overturning forces resulting from side winds. A method used is to install ground anchors and tie-down straps in addition to the piers. Tie-downs as described are the minimum necessary if the home is to withstand its design loads without dislocation.

On multi-section homes, sections must be fastened together and level before tie-down straps are installed.

WARNING

BEFORE GROUND ANCHOR INSTALLATION, DETERMINE

THAT THE ANCHOR LOCATIONS AROUND THE HOME

WILL NOT BE CLOSE TO ANY UNDERGROUND ELECTRI-

CAL CABLES, WATER LINES OR SEWER PIPING. FAIL-

URE TO DETERMINE THE LOCATION OF UNDERGROUND

ELECTRICAL CABLES MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS PER-

SONAL INJURY OR DEATH.

NOTE: IN THE FRAME TIE-DOWN SYSTEM, IT IS IMPOR-

TANT TO USE MATERIALS OF PROPER DESIGN AND OF

ADEQUATE QUALITY. THE MATERIAL SPECIFICATIONS

CONTAINED HEREIN SHOULD BE CONSIDERED AS

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS.

Materials not furnished with the home which will be necessary to complete the tie-down system must meet the requirements set forth below. Such materials would include:

1. Cable or steel strap with a breaking strength of at least

4,725 pounds e.g. galvanized aircraft cable at least 1/4” diameter or Type 1, Finish B, Grade 1 steel strapping 1-1/4” wide and 0.03” thick, conforming with ASTM D3953-91.

2. Galvanized connection devices such as turnbuckles, eyebolts, strap buckles, and cable clamps should be rated at

3,150 working load minimum.

3. Ground anchors — capable of withstanding at least a

4,725 pound pull. Anchors must be installed as specifi ed by the anchor manufacturer. Stabilizers or concrete collars may be required by anchor manufacturer.

THE HOME MUST BE IN ITS FINAL LEVEL POSITION

PRIOR TO TYING IT DOWN.

The procedure for tying down the manufactured home is as follows:

1. Position and install the ground anchors under exterior walls so that the fi nal strap angle and height (H) will be within the limits shown in tables 5 thru 6C.

2. Connect the straps to the frame and ground anchors (See

Figs. 5-9 and 5-10). Straps wrapped around the I-Beam as shown in Fig. 5-9 require protection from premature failure due to sharp corners. Fig. 5-9A illustrates one method to protect against sharp corner damage. Other methods (such as beam clamps — Tie-Down Engineering part no. 59003 or equivalent) approved by the local building authority having jurisdiction may be used.

3. Tighten the straps using the tensioning device provided with the ground anchors. Use caution to avoid overtensioning the straps which might pull the home off the piers. It is recommended that all straps be tightened only enough to remove slack. Then, after all straps are installed and the slack removed, tension the straps.

4. The strap tension should be rechecked at frequent intervals until all pier settlement has stopped.

CAUTION: DURING THE RELEVELING PROCESS, DO

NOT JACK THE HOME AGAINST TIGHT STRAPS.

Protect sharp corners with 26Ga. (0.019” min.) x 2” galvanized steel strapping material formed to fi t around beam fl anges.

Sharp corner protection at top and bottom of beam if strap is wrapped around beam.

FIG. 5-9A

Unit I-Beam

25

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

MANUFACTURED HOME TIE-DOWN INSTRUCTIONS (Continued)

OPTIONAL OVER-THE-ROOF STRAP PROCEDURE

If over-the-roof straps are provided (optional on all homes) they may be connected to ground anchors as specifi ed in the following procedure in order to achieve additional stability in extreme winds. Note that the frame tie-down procedure on page 25 is still mandatory.

STEP 1

STRAP BUCKLE

NOT PROVIDED

PULL TIGHT

DOWN TO ANCHOR

STEP 2

Strap to frame tie-down procedure

Note: Beam attachment device may be run to top or bottom of I-

Beam if device is approved in that manner.

FIG. 5-9

Materials not furnished with the home which will be necessary to properly connect the over-the-roof straps are:

1. Ground anchors capable of withstanding at least 4,750 pound pull when installed in the soil at the site.

2. Strap end connection devices (See Fig. 5-10).

THE HOME MUST BE IN ITS FINAL LEVEL POSITION WITH

FRAME TIES INSTALLED BEFORE CONNECTING THE

OVER-THE-ROOF STRAPS.

The procedure for over-the-roof strap installation is as follows:

1. Position and install the ground anchors so that the strap will be vertical after attachment to the anchor. The anchor may be installed slightly beneath the home to avoid interference with skirting (See Fig. 5-11).

2. Insert the minuteman connector yoke through the eye in the anchor and insert slotted bolt through the yoke.

3. Place end of strap through slotted bolt and remove slack by turning bolt. DO NOT TENSION UNTIL BOTH ENDS OF

STRAP ARE CONNECTED.

4. Tension and lock minuteman connector in position; consult instructions furnished with connectors.

5. Check strap tension (See step 4 under frame tie-down procedure).

6. For double-wide homes see Fig. 5-12 for the splice connection at the centerline.

1 1/4”

MIN.

MINUTEMAN

STRAP DEVICE OR

EQUIVALENT

OPTIONAL UNDER-SKIN

STEEL STRAP (FACTORY

INSTALLED)

APPROVED

ANCHOR

FIG. 5-10

1. Insert end of the strap through the slat on the splice device, allowing

15” of strap to extend through the device.

2. Make a 180 degree bend in the strap and slide a strap seal over the double thickness of strap, positioning the strap seal as close to the splice device as possible. Compress the strap seal on the strap with a pair of vise grip pliers or hammer, or crimp strap seal with an A-B

Chance crimping tool. (Make all bends in the strap as sharp as possible by crimping with vise grip or larger pliers).

3. Bend strap back over the seal and insert back through the slot on the splice device. Flatten bend with vise grip pliers or hammer.

4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 with the mating strap. Draw the completed assembly down to the ridge beam by tensioning the strap in the ground anchor.

26

ANCHOR

FIG. 5-12

FIG. 5-11

DOUBLEWIDE OPTIONAL

OVER-THE-ROOF STRAPS

STRAP SEAL

SPLICE DEVICE

STRAPS TO BE

INSTALLED

VERTICALLY

ANCHOR

STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 3

MIN STRAP ANGLE

MAX. STRAP ANGLE

MIN STRAP ANGLE

MAX. STRAP ANGLE

TABLE 5

STRAP ANGLE TABLE FOR STANDARD HEIGHT PIERS - WIND ZONE 1

SINGLE-WIDES

ANCHORS/STRAPS 12’ O.C.

18 DEGREES

47 DEGREES

DOUBLE-WIDES

ANCHORS/STRAPS 12’ O.C.

8 Degrees, 10.5 Degrees for 32’ Wides

43 Degrees, 54.5 Degrees for 32’ Wides

ANCHORS/STRAPS 14’ O.C.

22 DEGREES

37 DEGREES

ANCHORS/STRAPS 14’ O.C.

8 Degrees, 12.5 Degrees for 32’ Wides

33 Degrees, 47 Degrees for 32’ Wides

MIN STRAP ANGLE

MAX. STRAP ANGLE

DOUBLE-WIDES WITH 5/12 ROOF PITCH

ANCHORS/STRAPS 8’ O.C.

7.8 Degrees, 9.2 Degrees for 24’ Wides, 4.9 Degrees for 32’ Wides

40.3 Degrees, 43.0 Degrees for 24’ Wides, 37.3 Degrees for 32’ Wides

NA

-

-

MIN STRAP ANGLE

MAX. STRAP ANGLE

DOUBLE-WIDES WITH 7/12 ROOF PITCH

ANCHORS/STRAPS 6’ O.C.

21.7 Degrees, 10.4 Degrees for 32’ Wides

48.3 Degrees, 41.0 Degrees for 32’ Wides

NA

-

-

MIN./MAX. PIER HEIGHTS FOR STANDARD HEIGHT PIERS - WIND ZONE I

SINGLE-WIDES

WIND ZONE I

ANCHORS/STRAPS 12’ O.C.

ANCHORS/STRAPS 14’ O.C.

MAIN I-BEAM SPACING (in)

12 ft

WIDES

14 ft

WIDES

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

75.5

12

36

14

48

82

12

32

12

44

99.5

12

23

12

35

75.5

13

25

17

34

82

12

34

13

31

16 ft

WIDES

18 ft

WIDES

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

16

60

-

-

13

56

-

-

12

47

12

58

19

42

-

-

15

40

-

-

99.5

12

16

12

25

12

33

-

-

MAIN I-BEAM SPACING (in)

20 ft

WIDES

24 ft

WIDES

26 ft

WIDES

28 ft

WIDES

28 ft

WIDES

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

75.5

12

23

12

36

12

42

12

48

-

-

DOUBLE-WIDES

WIND ZONE I

ANCHORS/STRAPS 12’ O.C.

82

-

-

12

32

12

39

12

45

-

-

99.5

-

-

12

23

12

30

12

35

12

35

75.5

12

14

12

22

12

25

12

29

-

-

ANCHORS/STRAPS 14’ O.C.

For doublewides with 8’ ceiling height and Wind Zone I, subtract 5” from max. pier height and 5 degrees from max. strap angle. Not applicable to 5/12 or 7/12 roof models.

19

12

23

12

82

-

-

12

27

-

-

99.5

-

-

12

14

12

18

12

21

12

43

MAIN I-BEAM SPACING (in)

24 ft

WIDES

28 ft

WIDES

32 ft

WIDES

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

75.5

-

-

-

-

12

28

DOUBLE-WIDES WITH 5/12 ROOF PITCH

ANCHORS/STRAPS 8’ O.C.

82

12

-

-

25

-

-

99.5

-

-

12

27.5

12

30.5

75.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

NA

82

-

-

-

-

-

-

99.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

MAIN I-BEAM SPACING (in)

28 ft

WIDES

32 ft

WIDES

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

-

-

75.5

-

-

DOUBLE-WIDES WITH 7/12 ROOF PITCH

ANCHORS/STRAPS 6’ O.C.

82

-

-

-

-

99.5

12

34

12

35

75.5

-

-

-

-

NA

82

-

-

-

-

99.5

-

-

-

-

See Table 5 & 5A for spacing 6” typ.

Buckle - See Fig. 5-9

Strap - See page

25 for specs.

I-Beam

A

A

Strap

Anchor

ANCHOR TIE DOWN DETAIL FIG. 5-13

1” min.

Main Frame

Strap Angle

Anchor rated and installed per

Anchor manufacturer’s instructions SECTION A-A

H

27

MIN. STRAP ANGLE

MAX. STRAP ANGLE

TABLE 5A

STRAP ANGLE TABLE FOR HIGHER THAN STANDARD PIERS

SINGLE-WIDES WIND ZONE I

ANCHORS/STRAPS 8’ O.C.

18 DEGREES

63 DEGREES

WIND ZONE I

ANCHORS/STRAPS 6’ O.C.

-

-

MIN. STRAP ANGLE

MAX. STRAP ANGLE

DOUBLE-WIDES

ANCHORS/STRAPS 8’ O.C.

6 Degrees, 7 Degrees for 32’ Wides

63 Degrees, 67 Degrees for 32’ Wides

ANCHORS/STRAPS 6’ O.C.

4 Degrees, 5.5 Degrees for 32’ Wides

70 Degrees, 73 Degrees for 32’ Wides

MAIN I-BEAM SPACING (in)

12 ft

WIDES

14 ft

WIDES

16 ft

WIDES

18 ft

WIDES

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

MIN./MAX. PIER HEIGHTS FOR HIGHER THAN STANDARD PIERS

SINGLE-WIDES WIND ZONE I

75.5

12

66

14

72

18

72

-

-

WIND ZONE I

ANCHORS/STRAPS 8’ O.C.

82

12

59

13

72

17

72

-

-

99.5

12

42

12

64

14

72

18

72 -

-

-

-

75.5

-

-

-

-

ANCHORS/STRAPS 6’ O.C.

82

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

99.5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

MAIN I-BEAM SPACING (in)

20 ft

WIDES

24 ft

WIDES

26 ft

WIDES

28 ft

WIDES

32 ft

WIDES

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

H MIN (in)

H MAX (in)

12

72

12

72

-

-

75.5

12

42

12

67

DOUBLE-WIDES

ANCHORS/STRAPS 8’ O.C.

82

-

-

12

60

12

72

12

72

-

-

12

55

12

65

12

99.5

-

-

12

43

72

75.5

12

60

12

72

12

72

12

72

-

-

ANCHORS/STRAPS 6’ O.C.

82

12

72

12

72

-

-

-

-

12

72

99.5

-

-

12

60

12

72

12

72

12

72

See Table 5 & 5A for spacing

6” typ.

28

I-Beam

A

A

Strap Anchor

ANCHOR TIE DOWN DETAIL FIG. 5-14

Buckle - See Fig. 5-9

Main Frame

Strap Angle

Anchor rated and installed per

Anchor manufacturer’s instructions

1” min.

Strap - See page 25 for specs.

H

SECTION A-A

TIE-DOWN DETAILS FOR EXTRA TALL PIERS (UP TO 88”)

WIND ZONE I ONLY

TABLE 5B

Straps and anchors to be installed 6’-0” o.c. maximum.

99.5”

TYPICAL SINGLE-WIDE

A

H

H

99.5”, except 24’ wides may be 99.5”,

82” or 75.5”

TYPICAL DOUBLE-WIDE

NOMINAL UNIT WIDTH

Strap Angle, A

(degrees)

Pier Height, H

(degrees)

Min.

Max.

Min.

Max.

Singlewides

14’

8

69.9

12

88

16’

8

63.9

12

88

24’

9.1

39.9

18

88

Doublewides

28’

12.1

34.6

28

88

32’

15.7

32.2

40

88

28’

13.7

34.6

29

88

Doublewides with

5/12 Roof Pitch

32’

7.5

32.2

19

88

Notes:

1) Straps and anchors to be rated for 3150 lbs. of working stress min.

2) See page 25 for strap material specifi cation, connection to I-Beam and all other setup information.

3) See page 12 for required pier construction.

Straps and anchors to be installed 12’-0” o.c. maximum.

8’-0” o.c.

maximum for units with 5/12 roof pitch

A

29

STANDARD TIE-DOWN DETAILS

TABLE 6

STRAP ANGLE STRAP ANGLE

SEE NOTE #1

ANCHOR TO BE RATED FOR 3684# OF WORKING STRESS, TOTAL FOR

BOTH STRAPS.

(INSTALLED PER ANCHOR MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS SEE NOTE 3)

INSTALL STRAP & ANCHORS

6’-8’ @ ZONE II

5’-4” @ ZONE III

&

4’-0” @ ZONE II & III

FOR SHED ROOF

SINGLEWIDES

SEE TABLE FOR ELEVATION &

STRAP ANGLE LIMITATIONS

SINGLE-WIDE

SEE NOTE #1

STRAP ANGLE

STRAP ANGLE

ANCHOR TO BE RATED FOR 3684# OF WORKING STRESS, TOTAL FOR BOTH

STRAPS.

(INSTALLED PER ANCHOR MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS SEE NOTE 3)

DOUBLE-WIDE

*

USE 24’ WIDE RESULTS FOR 12’ HALF OF 22’ WIDE DOUBLE WIDES

WIDTH

12’

14’

12’ SHED ROOF

14’ SHED ROOF

16’

18’

20’ OR 22’ *

24’

28’

32’

16’ SHED ROOF

MIN. & MAX.

ELEVATION

14” TO 25”

12” TO 27”

25.2” TO 34.6”

23.4” TO 38.4”

16” TO 36”

20” TO 44”

12” TO 15”

12” TO 22”

12” TO 23.5”

12” TO 33”

21” TO 27.5”

WIND ZONE II

MIN. & MAX.

DIAGONAL STRAP ANGLE

25° TO 40°

20.5° TO 40°

41° TO 50°

36° TO 50°

20.5° TO 40°

20.5° TO 40°

34° TO 40°

24.5° TO 40°

23° TO 40°

16.6° TO 39.3°

25.9° TO 32.4°

MIN. & MAX.

ELEVATION

14” TO 26”

12” TO 28”

25.2” TO 34.6”

23.4” TO 38.4”

15.5” TO 38”

19” TO 47”

12” TO 16”

12” TO 23.5”

12” TO 25.5”

12” TO 36”

21” TO 27.5”

WIND ZONE III

MIN. & MAX.

DIAGONAL STRAP ANGLE

25° TO 41°

20.5° TO 41°

41° TO 50°

36° TO 50°

19.5° TO 41°

19.5° TO 41°

34° TO 42°

24.5° TO 42°

23° TO 42°

16.6° TO 41.8°

25.9° TO 32.4°

NOTES:

1) FOR STRAP MATERIAL SPECIFICATION, CONNECTION TO FRAME I-BEAM & OTHER SETUP INFORMATION, REFER TO SKYLINE INSTALLATION

MANUAL

2) FOR ANCHORING SYSTEMS, THE INSTRUCTIONS SHALL INDICATE: A) THE MINIMUM ANCHOR CAPACITY REQUIRED; B) ANCHORS SHOULD BE

CERTIFIED BY PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER, ARCHITECT, OR A NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED TESTING LABORATORY AS TO THEIR RESISTANCE,

BASED ON THE MAXIMUM ANGLE OF DIAGONAL TIE AND/OR VERTICAL TIE LOADING AND ANGLE OF ANCHOR INSTALLATION, AND TYPE OF SOIL

IN WHICH THE ANCHOR IS TO BE INSTALLED; C) GROUND ANCHORS SHOULD BE EMBEDDED BELOW THE FROST LINE AND BE AT LEAST 2

INCHES ABOVE THE WATER TABLE; D) GROUND ANCHORS SHOULD BE INSTALLED TO THEIR FULL DEPTH, AND STABILIZER PLATES SHOULD

STANDARD SPECIFICATION FOR STRAPPING, FLAT STEEL AND SEALS.

3) ANCHORS RATED @ 3150# OF WORKING STRESS TOTAL FOR BOTH STRAPS, MAY BE USED IF STRAP & ANCHOR SPACING IS REDUCED TO 5’-8”

@ WIND ZONE II AND 4’-6” @ WIND ZONE III. STRAPS AND ANCHORS MAY BE INSTALLED 4’-0” O.C. ON SHED ROOF SINGLEWIDES WITH

4) THE A-B CHANCE STRAP SEAL DEVICE DEPICTED BY FIG. 5-12 MAY BE USED AS DIRECTED FOR ATTACHING THE REQUIRED DOUBLEWIDE

5) STANDARD TIE-DOWN DETAILS ARE NOT APPLICABLE TO 5/12 ROOF PITCH DOUBLEWIDES @ WIND ZONE II & III.

30

SKYLINE CORP.

TIE-DOWN DETAILS FOR 5/12 ROOF PITCH

DOUBLE WIDES AT WIND ZONE II & III

TABLE 6A

Sidewall straps are factory installed.

Standard Strap location

Straps and Anchors to be spaced

5’- 4” o.c. max. @

Zone II

& 4’- 0” o.c. max. @

Zone III.

Ground anchor

(typical).

Unit Width

24’

26’

28’

32’

H (max.)

48”

WIND ZONE II (100 mph)

H (min.)

12”

Angle (max.)

23.2 degrees

48” 12” 20.3 degrees

48”

48”

12”

12”

20.3 degrees

18.96 degrees

Angle (min.)

6.12 degrees

6.12 degrees

5.28 degrees

4.91 degrees

Unit Width

24’

26’

28’

32’

WIND ZONE III (110 mph)

H (max.)

48”

H (min.)

12”

Angle (max.)

23.2 degrees

20.3 degrees 48”

48”

48”

12”

12”

12”

20.3 degrees

18.96 degrees

Angle (min.)

6.12 degrees

6.12 degrees

5.28 degrees

4.91 degrees

NOTES:

1) Straps and anchors to be rated for 3150 lbs. of working stress (min.).

2) See page 25 for strap material specifi cation, connection to I-Beam and other setup information.

3) The A-B chance strap seal device depicted by Fig. 5-12 may be used as directed for attaching the

required doublewide centerline straps to ground anchors.

31

TIE-DOWN DETAILS FOR UNITS WITH 102” SIDEWALLS

TABLE 6B

Factory installed sidewall strap. Not required at Wind

Zone I.

Alternate Strap angle (A).

Alternate Tiedown Strap location. Wind Zone II or III only.

Standard Tiedown

Strap location

Standard

Strap angle (A).

H

TYPICAL DOUBLEWIDE

Ground anchor (typical).

Alternate Tiedown Strap location.

Wind Zone II or III only.

Factory installed sidewall strap. Not required at Wind

Zone I.

Alternate Strap angle (A).

Standard Tiedown

Strap location

H

Standard Strap angle (A).

Ground anchor (typical).

TYPICAL SINGLEWIDE

Wind

Zone I

Wind

Zone II

Wind

Zone III

H (Max.)

H (Min.)

A (Max.)

A (Max.)

H (Max.)

H (Min.)

A (Max.)

A (Max.)

H (Max.)

H (Min.)

A (Max.)

A (Max.)

14’ Singlewides

32”

12”

45.0 degrees

19.0 degrees

28”

13”

41.0 degrees

22.0 degrees

33”

12”

45.7 degrees

20.4 degrees

STANDARD TIE-DOWN STRAP LOCATIONS

16’ Singlewides

44.5”

14”

46.0 degrees

18.0 degrees

37”

17.5”

40.5 degrees

22.0 degrees

44”

15.5”

45.5 degrees

19.7 degrees

28’ Doublewides

36”

12”

50.0 degrees

7.0 degrees

25”

12”

41.5 degrees

23.0 degrees

29”

12”

45.8 degrees

23.0 degrees

32’ Doublewides

49.5”

12”

51.0 degrees

10.0 degrees

35”

12”

41.0 degrees

16.6 degrees

41”

12”

45.5 degrees

16.6 degrees

28’ Doublewides with 5/12 roof pitch

23.5”

12”

38 degrees

9 degrees

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Wind

Zone II

Wind

Zone III

H (Max.)

H (Min.)

A (Max.)

A (Max.)

H (Max.)

H (Min.)

A (Max.)

A (Max.)

14’ Singlewides

ALTERNATE TIE-DOWN STRAP LOCATIONS

16’ Singlewides 28’ Doublewides 32’ Doublewides

28’ Doublewides with 5/12 roof pitch

48”

12”

20.0 degrees

5.2 degrees

48”

12”

20.0 degrees

5.2 degrees

48”

12”

18.6 degrees

4.8 degrees

48”

12”

18.6 degrees

4.8 degrees

48”

12”

20.6 degrees

5.4 degrees

48”

12”

20.6 degrees

5.4 degrees

48”

12”

19.0 degrees

4.9 degrees

48”

12”

19.0 degrees

4.9 degrees

NOTES:

1) Straps and anchors to be rated for 3150 lbs. of working stress (min.).

2) See page 25 for strap material specifi cation, connection to I-Beam and other setup information.

3) Main I-Beam spacing to be 99.5” min. on all units.

4) Not available on 5/12 roof pitch units at Wind Zone II or III.

32

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Straps and Anchors to be spaced

12’-0” o.c. max. at

Wind Zone I.

8’-0” o.c. max. on

5/12 roof pitch units

@ Wind Zone I.

5’-4” o.c. max. at

Wind Zone II.

4’-0” o.c. max. at

Wind Zone III.

32’ Doublewides with 5/12 roof pitch

27.5”

12”

34.5 degrees

6 degrees

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32’ Doublewides with 5/12 roof pitch

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I-BEAM

I-BEAM

TYPICAL SINGLE-WIDE

I-BEAM

I-BEAM

I-BEAM

I-BEAM

TAG UNIT

TYPICAL DOUBLE-WIDE

LONGITUDINAL TIEDOWNS GROUND ANCHOR

MAX. HORIZONTAL ANGLE

(SEE TABLE)

TYPICAL DOUBLE-WIDE

I-BEAM

I-BEAM

I-BEAM

FRONT OR REAR

CROSS MEMBER

I-BEAM

TOP VIEW TYPICAL TRIPLE-WIDE

MAIN I-BEAM

SHOULDER-TYPE EYE BOLT, NUT &

WASHER NOT PROVIDED

MAIN I-BEAM

LONGITUDINAL TIEDOWNS

GROUND ANCHOR

STRAP

FRONT OR REAR

CROSS MEMBER

GROUND LEVEL

CABLE-FRAME TIE-DOWN CONNECTION

VERTICAL ANGLE IS MEASURED FROM STRAP TO LEVEL HORIZONTAL PLANE @ ANCHOR

SIDE VIEW

2 TIE-DOWN STRAPS @ FRONT & REAR OF EACH FLOOR. WIND ZONE II

ANGLES (DEGREES)

MAX. VERTICAL ANGLE

MAX. HORIZONTAL ANGLE

NOMINAL UNIT WIDTH (feet)

SINGLEWIDES DOUBLEWIDES

12’ 14’ 16’ 18’ 24’ 26’ 28’

32’

46 35 18 NA 42

37

32 13

20 20 20 NA 20

20

20 20

DOUBLEWIDES w/5/12 ROOF PITCH

24’

35

26’

28

28’

19

32’

NA

20 20 20 NA

TRIPLEWIDES

TAG UNITS

23

20

42

20

2 TIE-DOWN STRAPS @ FRONT & REAR OF EACH FLOOR. WIND ZONE III

ANGLES (DEGREES)

MAX. VERTICAL ANGLE

MAX. HORIZONTAL ANGLE

NOMINAL UNIT WIDTH (feet)

SINGLEWIDES DOUBLEWIDES

12’ 14’ 16’

18’ 24’ 26’ 28’ 32’

32 NA NA NA 27

17 NA

NA

20

20

NA NA 20

20 20

NA

DOUBLEWIDES w/5/12 ROOF PITCH

24’

11

20

26’

NA

NA

28’

NA

NA

32’

NA

NA

TRIPLEWIDES

TAG UNITS

NA 27

NA

45

4 TIE-DOWN STRAPS @ FRONT & REAR OF EACH FLOOR. WIND ZONE II

ANGLES (DEGREES)

MAX. VERTICAL ANGLE

MAX. HORIZONTAL ANGLE

NOMINAL UNIT WIDTH (feet)

SINGLEWIDES DOUBLE-

12’ 14’ 16’ 18’

24’

26’ 28’

32’

62 57 51 45 61

58 56

50

45

45

45 45 45

45 45

45

DOUBLEWIDES w/5/12 ROOF PITCH

24’

57

45

26’

54

45

28’

51

45

32’

43

45

TRIPLEWIDES TAG UNITS

52

45

NA

NA

4 TIE-DOWN STRAPS @ FRONT & REAR OF EACH FLOOR. WIND ZONE III

ANGLES (DEGREES)

MAX. VERTICAL ANGLE

MAX. HORIZONTAL ANGLE

NOMINAL UNIT WIDTH (feet)

SINGLEWIDES DOUBLEWIDES

12’ 14’ 16’

18’ 24’ 26’ 28’ 32’

56 49 41 31

54 51 47

39

45

45

45 45

45 45 45

45

DOUBLEWIDES w/5/12 ROOF PITCH

24’

49

45

26’

45

45

28’

41

45

32’

28

45

TRIPLEWIDES TAG UNITS

42 NA

45

NA

NOTES:

1) Longitudinal Tiedowns are in addition to diagonal tiedowns along the main rails.

2) Ground anchors, straps & cables (including eyebolt, nut, etc.) shall be capable of resisting an ultimate load of 4725 lbs. (3150 lbs. design) min. Install ground anchor in accordance with ground anchor manufacturer’s installation instructions. See note 2 page 29.

3) Anchorage system subject to local inspection at the time of installation.

4) Other methods approved by local building authorities may be used.

5) Longitudinal tiedowns are not required at wind zone I.

6) If a doublewide unit has a roof pitch exceeding 3/12 (i.e. 4/12) then use 5/12 roof pitch requirements.

33

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

TIE-DOWN STRAP INSTALLATION EXAMPLE

To properly install ground anchors and tie-down straps for a home, certain criteria must be established. This criteria is as follows:

1. Width of the home.

2. Main I-beam spacing of the home.

3. Wind Zone area where home is to be placed.

4. Distance from bottom of I-beam to ground.

5. Torque reading of the soil.

6. Nominal roof pitch of unit (for double-wides).

For this example assume the home being installed is a 14 foot wide (single-wide) by 66 feet long. The home is being installed in Wind Zone I, and the main I-beam spacing has been established at 99-1/2 inches. The home has a 12 inch tall I-beam, and the clearance from the I-beam to the ground is measured at 20 inches. To determine the distance (H) from the ground to the underside of the fl oor add the I-beam depth

(12”) to the clearance between I-beam and the ground (20”).

Therefore H=12”+20”=32”.

From Table 5 on page 27 (Wind Zone I) determine the maximum allowable strap spacing. Enter table at left hand side for

14’ wides, and check the maximum pier height (H) for 99.5”

I-beam spacing. H max.=35” with straps/anchors spaced at 12’ o.c. maximum. Therefore, tie-down strap spacing should not exceed 12 foot on center. If the home were placed in a Wind

Zone II or III area, the tables on pages 30 or 31 would be used.

Next, determine the correct soil anchors to be used. An anchor soil test probe is required to test the soil where the example home is to be set. The soil test probe looks like a long drill bit with a fi tting at the top which accepts a torque wrench. The torque required to turn the probe, when the probe reaches the desired anchor depth, is measured. The anchor manufacturer provides a chart relating the measured torque value to the type of anchor required to provide the desired holding force.

AN INCORRECTLY SELECTED ANCHOR WILL NOT

PROVIDE THE REQUIRED LOAD RESISTANCE.

For this example, assume a torque of 300 inch-pounds was measured at a probe depth of 4 feet. A class 4 soil is indicated from the anchor manufacturer data. The correct anchor would be identifi ed and rated for a class 4 soil.

Soil anchors must be installed as directed by the anchor manufacturer. If the direction of the pull is not in line with the shaft of the anchor, a concrete cylinder collar or a ground anchor stabilizer plate is required. The anchor manufacturer installation instructions should describe the correct anchor placement with regard to direction, water table level and frost line location.

34

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

DOUBLE-WIDE EXTERIOR CLOSURE

HARDBOARD SIDING

Fasten the precut strip of Masonite with 8d galvanized nails

(head should be painted to match the siding) 4” o.c. around the perimeter and 8” o.c. on the intermediate studs. Apply trim and caulking at the centerline, horizontal joints and around windows (if required) as illustrated by the details in Figure

5-18. (In cases where the Masonite has to be cut to fi t in the fi eld, the ripped edges should be stained to match the siding with acrylic latex stain).

Note: Use 8d galvanized box nails w/min. 3/16” dia. heads at 4” o.c. around perimeter and 8’ o.c. at intermediate studs.

Figure A

Vertical Masonite Application

16” o.c. max.

typical studs

3/8” typ.

4” typ.

4” typ.

4”

8” typ.

4” typ.

4-3/8”

1-1/8” typ.

Perimeter Joist

Unit

Centerline

Stain bottom edge

Figure C

Vertical Joint

Masonite Siding

Use 8d galvanized box nails 4” o.c. w/min.

3/16” dia. heads

Masonite Siding

Figure B

Double Wide Masonite

Close-Off Application

Unit

Centerline

Butyl caulking at joint

Masonite Close-off fi eld installed w/8d galvanized box nails 8” o.c. at Wind

Zone I, 6” o.c. at Wind

Zones II and III.

Stain edges to match Masonite

(See note 1)

Figure D

Horizontal Joint

Masonite Siding

Caulk joint w/ butyl caulking

Masonite Strip (rip from siding sheets)

Stain Edges to match

Masonite Siding

(May be lap siding)

Masonite Siding

8d galvanized box nails 4” o.c.

Flashing

Use 8d galvanized box nails 4” o.c.

8” typ. At Wind

Zone I, 6” Typ. At

Wind Zone II & III

Figure E

Typical Window Trim Application

Caulk with butyl caulking to match trim

1/2”

Typ.

Butyl caulking to match trim (fi ll rabbetted area)

NOTE:

1. All ripped edges to be stained with matching acrylic latex

stain from siding mfr.

Use 8d galvanized box nails w/min 3/16” dia. heads

FIG. 5-18

35

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

DOUBLE-WIDE EXTERIOR CLOSURE

VINYL LAP SIDING

The siding panels should be attached using galvanized steel or aluminum 16 ga. 1/2 by 1-1/2” staples. (6d galvanized nails may also be used). Staples should be driven so that there is a

1/32” clearance between the siding and staple crown to allow some lateral movement. Fasten every 16” at the stud location.

See Figure 5-19 Detail A for proper fastening.

Snap the bottom course of siding into the starter strip and fasten to the wall. Leave a 1/4” space at corner posts and

‘J’ channels around window and door openings to allow for expansion. Do not fasten within 4” of an accessory. Vertical butt joints in panels should overlap 1”. Do not fasten the panel within 4” of the joint. Install vinyl, aluminum, felt or other suitable material for fl ashing at bottom corners of doors and windows per Figure 5-19 Detail E. Apply caulk around siding and light blocks, water faucets, or other small penetrations.

Install successive courses similarly to the fi rst. Butt joints in adjacent courses should be offset approximately 24” for best appearance. Joints in alternate courses should be aligned vertically (See Figure 5-19 Detail B).

Panels will have to be cut at headers and sills. A single panel should extend without joints across the width of the opening. When cutting a panel at a sill, measure the distance between the bottom of the opening and the top lock of the lower course, then deduct 1/4” (See Fig. 5-19 Detail C).

Slide the cut panel into the under sill trim and install. Note that the under sill trim piece may have to be furred to maintain the proper pitch of the siding.

Measure and cut the header panel in the same manner as indicated above.

The top sections at the gable will need to be angle cut. Use two scrap pieces of siding to make a pattern (See Fig. 5-19

Detail D). Interlock one piece with the siding panel below.

Hold the other piece on top against the gable. Mark a line on the bottom piece and cut. Use this piece as a pattern for cutting gable pieces. Install the gable pieces by interlocking with the lower course, sliding into the gable ‘J’ rail and fastening.

If a home has been provided with “Craneboard” solid core vinyl siding, then read and follow the special instructions provided with this manual.

Mark Angle for Cut

Stagger Panels

As Shown

DETAIL B

DETAIL C

DETAIL D

2 Scrap Pieces of Siding

Pattern for

Angle

Incorrectly

Applied

Correctly

Applied

DETAIL A

Incorrectly

Applied

FIG. 5-19

J-Trim

All Purpose

Trim

DETAIL E

J-Trim

6”

(Approx)

Diverter

1/2” Min.

12”

36

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

DOUBLE-WIDE EXTERIOR CLOSURE

JAMES HARDIE “HARDIPLANK” OR “HARDIPANEL” SIDING

“Hardiplank” and “Hardipanel” are fi ber-cement siding panels. “Hardiplank” is a lap style siding, and “Hardipanel” is a panel type siding. Fasten the siding panels to framing members with 6d galvanized nails (2” long min. -2-1/4” with

“Hardiplank” at Wind Zones II and III) per the details shown in

Figure 5-20 below. “Hardiplank” siding requires 2 additional fasteners evenly spaced between studs into sheathing at Wind

Zone II and III only. “Hardiplank” siding is not allowed within 3 feet of a sidewall/endwall corner at Wind Zone III.

Finish siding by painting with an exterior grade, semi-gloss acrylic or latex paint. All ripped edges of panels should be painted to match.

Figure A

Hardiplank

Siding

Rim Joist or

Exterior wall bottom plate

Figure B

Hardiplank

Siding

1/4” to 1/2”

Figure C

Hardiplank

Siding

1”x1” Wood Stop

Figure E

Starter Detail

Inside Corner

Fasten with 6d nails

12” to 16” o.c.

6d nail required at each stud location (16” o.c.). 2 additional nails required at Wind Zones II and III.

These fasteners shall be evenly spaced between studs into a 3/8” (min.) structural sheathing.

1”x2” Wood Stops

Outside Corner

Figure D

Lap joints must fall at stud. Stagger joints at least 2 stud bays. 48” min. between joints at same course. 2 Stud bays required from wall corner to 1st joint.

3/8” to 1/2”

Lap Joint

Figure F

Window frame

Fasten with 6d nails 12” to 16” o.c.

Hardiplank

Siding

3/4” to 1”

Hardiplank

Siding

1-1/4” min.

overlap

1-1/4” min.

overlap

Flash, shim, gap

3/16” and caulk.

Figure G

HardiPlank Nailing

This fastening style is required at Wind Zones

II & III

2” min. from corners

6d nail 6” o.c. at edges

& 2” o.c. in fi eld at Wind

Zone I. 6d nails 5” o.c. at edges & 5” o.c. in fi eld at

Wind Zones II & III.

Hardiplank

Siding

3/8” min.

3/8” min.

HardiPanel Application

Cover joints with lumber battens or caulk.

Window Detail

NOTE:

Double studs are required within 3 feet of a sidewall/endwall corner at Wind Zones II and III. Fasten HardiPanel siding panels to both studs at double stud locations.

FIG. 5-20

37

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

SHINGLE ROOF CLOSURE

INSTALLATION OF SHINGLED ROOF:

1. Fold back underlayment paper.

2. Remove the 16 inch wide sheathing at the ridge beam of one or both halves which was temporarily secured to the roof at the factory.

3. Bolt the ridge beam together as outlined on page 23. For models with heat ducts in the roof cavity make the interconnection of two units by running the provided fl exible duct through the access hole in the ridge beam. After the mechanical connection is made, tape the joint with 2 inch wide duct tape.

4. See Fig 5-21. Reinstall the 3/8” x 16” wide sheathing by fi rst reinstalling the factory provided sheathing panel clips (2 per bay), then fasten using 15 gauge x 7/16” x 1-1/2” staples or

8d twist nails 4 inches on center at butt joints and at each truss between joints. Special fastening may be required at trusses located over shearwalls. These trusses will be marked with a paint spot on the truss top chord. Fasten roof sheathing to these trusses with fasteners spaced 2” o.c. (3” o.c. — if truss is doubled — to both trusses).

5. If home is to be set in a Wind Zone II or III area, then apply a 6” wide strip of asphalt cement to the roof decking on both halves of home, directly adjacent to the roof peak.

6. Tack roof underlayment paper back in place.

7. Staple additional underlayment strip down, centered at ridge.

8. Fasten drip cap to sheathing at roof edge (above felt).

9. Complete installation of shingles (See Fig. 5-22).

10. Cut shingles for ridge cap and install as shown in Figures

5-24 and 5-25.

NOTE: TO PREVENT WIND LIFTING AND POSSIBLE

LEAKAGE, THE RIDGE CAP SHINGLES SHOULD BE

ORIENTED WITH RESPECT TO PREVAILING WINDS AS

INDICATED IN FIG. 5-25.

11. Install closure cap at eave joint (See Fig. 5-26).

12. See supplement for ridge vent if applicable.

Field installed sheathing

16”

Ridge Shingles

Site installed shingles (4 or 5 courses)

Underlayment paper

Underlayment strip

Sheathing

18” shingle

24” shingle

24” shingle

30” shingle

36” shingle

Underlayment paper folded back for beam bolting.

Ridge beam

FIG. 5-21

Drip cap

See Fig. 5-23 for fastening requirement

If the roofi ng in the area of the front rake has been covered to protect from wind damage during transit, the protective covering and fasteners are to be carefully removed. Seal the fastener holes with asphalt roofi ng cement.

FIG. 5-22

OPTIONAL CENTERLINE METAL FLASHING AND SHINGLE INSTALLATION.

Install shingles (each section) to centerline.

10” strip of underlayment paper installed over metal fl ashing and below shingles.

Shingle ridge cap - install per fi gures 5-23 thru 5-25

8”x32Ga. (min.) or .019” (min.) aluminum metal roll fl ashing. Fasten with

1”x1” - 1/4”x16Ga. Galvanized staples or roofi ng nails at 16” o.c. both sides.

FIG. 5-22A

38

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

DOUBLE-WIDE SHINGLED ROOF

FASTENERS:

Use 1” crown x 1” leg 16 GA. galvanized staples or 1 1/4” 12 GA. galvanized roofi ng nails with 3/8” diameter heads

36” Shingle

CUT SHINGLE INTO 3 PIECES

AS SHOWN BY DOTTED LINE

12”

WIND ZONE I

36” Shingle

1

2 3

12”

WIND ZONE II & III

Nail 1” from each end 5 5/8” above exposed butt & 5/8” above each cut out

FIG. 5-23

Nail or staple ridge shingles as indicated.

See fi g. 5-23 for fastener sizes.

6 1/2”

1”

Direction

Prevailing Wind

FIG. 5-24

Apply caulking to closure cap

5” Exposure

Ridge line

FIG. 5-25

Secure closure cap with #6x3/4” screws at locations indicated

FIG. 5-26

39

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

DOUBLE-WIDE UTILITY INTERCONNECTION

ELECTRICAL INTERCONNECTION OF DOUBLE-WIDES

Bonding

gether with the provided bonding wire and lugs (See page 54).

Electrical Crossover

NOTE: ALL ON-SITE ELECTRICAL WORK MUST BE

PERFORMED BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL. BEFORE

CONNECTING ELECTRICAL CROSSOVER ASSURE

THAT POWER HAS NOT YET BEEN CONNECTED.

Endwall Crossover

The procedure for this interconnection is as follows:

1. Feed wires from side B through metallic wire protectors into junction box or Sub-Panel in side A (See Fig. 5-27).

2. Staple wires within 8 inches of junction box or Sub-Panel to side of stud at centerline of stud.

3. Remove cover from junction box inside home; cut wires to length allowing a minimum of 4 inches of free wire extend- ing from box.

4. Strip approximately 1 inch of wire and connect like circuit numbers (white to white, black to black, ground to ground, red to red on multi-circuits and 240V circuits) with the provided wire nuts.

5. Push wires into box and replace cover.

NOTE: SOME MODELS MAY HAVE ELECTRICAL

CROSSOVERS AT FRONT AND REAR.

NM or SE cable

Pull box

Plywood or OSB access cover

FIG. 5-28A

Endwall

Side A

Access to junction

Endwall box - inside home

Side B

Factory installed wire protectors c

L

FIG. 5-27

Pull box

Hole or notch in joists

Plywood access cover

FIG. 5-28B

Below Floor Crossover

The correct procedure is as follows:

1. Remove the pull box covers and install the provided conduit and conductors between the boxes (See Fig. 5-28).

2. Using the provided wire connectors, connect like circuit numbers (white to white, black to black, ground to ground, red to red on multi-circuits and 240V circuits).

3. Push wires into boxes and replace covers.

Below Floor Crossovers

In Floor Pull Box

The correct procedure is as follows:

1. Remove plywood access covers and cut bottom board for access to wires (See Fig. 5-28A).

2. Feed wires around bottom of marriage line fl oor joists and into junction box.

3. Cut wires to length allowing a minimum of 4” free wire extending into box.

4. Strip approximately 1 inch of wire and connect like circuit numbers (white to white, black to black, ground to ground, red to red on multi-circuits and 240V circuits).

5. Replace access covers and tape bottom board with pro-

Pull box

Pull box

Field installed conduit & conductors

(materials provided)

FIG. 5-28

In Floor Pull Box

The correct procedure is as follows:

1. Remove plywood access cover to pull box and cut bottom board on opposite half for access to wires (See Fig. 5-28B).

2. Feed wires through hole or notch in joists into junction box.

3. Attach wires as described in steps 3 and 4 for endwall

crossover.

4. Replace access cover and tape bottom board with pro-

40

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

UTILITY INTERCONNECTION

In Floor Cable Splice

The correct procedure is as follows:

1. Remove bottom board access covers (See Fig. 5-28C).

2. Feed cable through hole or notch in joists.

3. Connect cable splice together.

4. Replace access covers with provided bottom board tape.

Cable Splice

FIG. 5-28C

Exterior access panel on both halves.

Fasten with wood screws to wall studs.

Endwall studs

Hole or notch in joists

20 Amp Non-

Metallic cable splice - Type

NM - 1 or cable splice manufactured by moiex-etc.

(part no.

19045).

Factory installed wire protectors over notches in studs

Marriage Line for

Double wide

FIG. 5-28D

During transit free ends of cable are coiled and secured in the wall cavity.

SUPPORT

STRAPS (TYP.)

CL

NOTE: If unit has multiple cable splices the circuits will be identifi ed by the attached code markers.

Endwall Cable Splice

The correct procedure is as follows:

1. Remove access panels on exterior side of endwall (See

2. Uncoil wire located inside endwall.

3. Connect cable splice halves together.

4. Reinstall access panels.

Note: If unit has multiple cable splices the circuits will be identifi ed by the attached code markers.

Heating Crossover

There are two basic hookup procedures for all designs.

The fi rst procedure is the standard design and is a single 12” diameter fl exible duct. The second procedure is an optional design that includes a varying number of 5” or 6” crossover ducts that are installed in the fl oor.

The method of installation for the standard design is as follows:

1. Connect each end of the provided insulated 12” diameter fl exible duct to the metal duct connector on each half of the home by sliding duct over metal tabs on duct

connector.

2. After mechanical connections are made, tape each connection with 2-inch wide duct tape to ensure an

3. Permanently secure the crossover duct with straps as shown in Fig. 5-29. Do not allow duct to rest on the ground. Maintain at least a 4-inch clearance between duct and the ground.

The method of installation for optional design with standard frame is as follows:

1. Remove access panels at crossover ducts. The access panels are located below the fl oor.

2. Cross cut bottom board at 8” holes in reinforcing plates.

3. Extend the fl exible ducts from each half through the access holes (See Fig. 5-29A).

DUCT

NOTE: Some models may require that an axle or axles be removed to connect the crossover duct or connect the home air distribution system to the heating - cooling appliance.

DUCT

CROSSOVER DUCT

FIG. 5-29

NOTE: 5 STRAPS AS SHOWN TO FLOOR JOISTS.

MINIMUM CLEARANCE TO GROUND TO BE 4”.

41

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

UTILITY INTERCONNECTION

4. Connect the fl exible ducts together per the provided manufacturer instructions using the splicing collar provided.

5. Install a strap around duct and attach to the rim joists.

6. Tape bottom board closed with provided tape.

The method of installation for the optional design with integral fl oor/frame or Perimeter frame is as follows:

1. Locate crossover locations as indicated by spray paint on rim joists and bottom board.

2. Cut out bottom board at rim joists for crossover connec-

tions.

3. Cut the bottom board below fl oor for access to fl exible ducts (See Fig. 5-29A).

4. Extend the fl exible ducts through the cutouts in the rim joists from the half with the furnace to the other half.

5. Connect the fl exible ducts together per the provided manufacturer instructions using the splicing collar provided.

6. Push the fl oor insulation against rim joist and tape bottom board closed with provided tape.

Heating Crossover with V-Bonnet

Some double-wide units will require a V-Bonnet duct connector to be installed prior to connection of the crossover ducts. The proper method of installation is as follows:

1. Remove axle if required for access to furnace area.

2. Fit tabs inside V-Bonnet and secure with #8x3/4” screws in holes provided on tabs (3 per side — 12 total) (See Fig. 5-

29B).

3. Install fl exible crossover ducts per the standard crossover duct design described on the previous page.

Floor Joist

Bottom Board

INSULATION RIM JOIST

FLEXIBLE

DUCT

FLOOR

DECKING

42

BOTTOM

BOARD

STRAP

SPLICING

COLLAR

PLYWOOD

REINFORCING PLATE

(TYP. EACH SIDE)

OPTIONAL CROSSOVER DUCTS FOR STANDARD FRAME

FLEXIBLE

DUCT

RIM JOIST

SPLICING

COLLAR

FLOOR

DECKING

BOTTOM

BOARD

OPTIONAL CROSSOVER DUCTS FOR INTEGRAL

FLOOR/FRAME OR PERIMETER FRAME.

FIG. 5-29A

LSL OR LVL BEAM w/

INTEGRAL FLOOR

FRAME STEEL I-BEAM w/PERIMETER FRAME

ACCESS

AREA (TYP.)

Unit I-Beam

As Viewed from below

FIG. 5-29B

V-Bonnet

Gasline Crossover

Applicable only to models with gas appliances on both halves. The listed fl exible connector supplied with the home must be used to make the connection. This connector will be located beneath the home.

NOTE: DO NOT USE TOOLS TO CONNECT OR REMOVE

FLEXIBLE CONNECTOR QUICK DISCONNECT.

1. Remove protective caps from the connector.

2. Connect the quick disconnect fi tting.

3. Test for leaks with soapy water.

Waterline Cross Connect.

Applicable only to models with plumbing on both halves

(See Fig. 5-30, 5-31, and 5-31A).

1. Remove the shipping caps from water lines and install

2. Check for leaks.

3. In areas where exposed piping is subject to freezing, protect exposed piping with heat tapes listed for use on manufactured homes, and insulation. It is recommended that only U.L. listed heat tapes be used and installed in accordance with their listing.

SET-UP PROCEDURES (Continued)

UTILITY INTERCONNECTION

HOLES IN

SIDE JOIST

ALT. WATER LINE CROSSOVER

BRASS ADAPTER

COPPER FLEX PIPE

BRASS ADAPTER

NOTE:

FIG. 5-30

WRAP WATER LINE

CONNECTOR WITH

INSULATION IN

FREEZING CLIMATES.

FLOOR

FLOOR

DECKING

INSULATION

INSPECTION AND

ACCESS COVERS TO

PERMIT CONNECTION

AND INSULATION OF

WATER LINES

FIG. 5-31

ALT. WATER LINE CROSSOVER

Centerline

MAKE WATER CROSSOVER

WITH CONNECTORS PRO-

VIDED WITH THE HOME

INSTALLATION OF EXTERIOR LIGHT

FIXTURES

ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS SHOULD BE MADE

ONLY BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL. MAKE SURE

POWER IS OFF BEFORE INSTALLING LIGHT.

The correct procedure is as follows:

1. Install threaded tube in the strap secured to the fi xture outlet box as shown in Fig. 5-33.

2. Apply caulking around base of light fi xture to insure a water tight seal to side wall. (NOTE: On units with

Masonite or vinyl siding, make certain the fl ashing ring is installed around outlet box.)

3. Connect wires, black to black, white to white, and ground to ground, using wire nuts.

4. Push wires into box and secure fi xture in position using the nut provided on the threaded tube. Install the bulb.

FACTORY INSTALLED

LIGHT BOX

NOTE: SOME LIGHTS WILL USE

TWO BOLTS WHICH THREAD

INTO THE MOUNTING STRAP IN

LIEU OF THE THREADED ROD

ILLUSTRATED

FIG. 5-33

THREADED ROD

Access Panels

FIG. 5-31A

Access Panel

Frame

Drainage Line Cross Connect

Applicable only to models with plumbing on both halves.

The connection may be made with fi eld assembly of factory supplied parts (refer to drainage of 2 bath models, page 48), or when the below fl oor plumbing is factory installed, a fl exible coupler is used as follows: Use only the approved fl exible coupler provided (1-1/2 inch or 3 inch, as required). See Fig.

5-32.

1. Slip the fl exible coupler over one end of the drainage line.

2. Align the pipes and center the coupler over the joint.

3. Tighten the clamps and check for leakage.

DRAINAGE PIPE

VENTILATION OF SKIRTING AND CRAWL

SPACE ENCLOSURE

Skirting or other crawl space enclosures, such as foundations, not only add to the appearance of the home but also provide important benefi ts in the reduction of heat loss. Enclosures also aid in reducing the danger and inconvenience of damaged plumbing through freeze-up.

Skyline Corporation recommends enclosing the underside of the home; however, it is very important that any enclosure be adequately ventilated. Ventilation openings need to be provided in the foundation or skirting along at least the two long walls of the home. The total area of ventilation openings should be at least 1 square foot for each 150 square feet of crawlspace area. An opening should be located within 3 ft. of each corner.

FIG. 5-32

APPROVED FLEXIBLE

COUPLER

METAL ROOF TIGHTENING

Metal roofs may be tightened by the use of bonded washers secured to the roof truss with #8 x 1-1/4” screws, placed in rows of four across with width of the roof and spaced at approximately 48” o.c. along the length of the roof. Care must be taken to assure that the screws are placed to penetrate the truss. After application, the screw heads and washers are to be sealed with a roof sealant material.

PORCHES AND DECKS

Some Skyline manufactured homes are constructed with factory-built porches or decks along the front, rear or main entry door side of the home. Porches and decks may be constructed with pressure treated wood fl oors which readily permit the passage of rain and/or snow through the fl oor.

The area under porches or decks constructed with pressure treated decking lumber must be separated from the crawl space enclosure of the remainder of the home. Excessive moisture in the crawl space can be the cause of window or ceiling condensation and other problems associated with high moisture levels in the home.

43

CHAPTER 6

INSTALLATION OF OPTIONAL FEATURES

ELECTRIC DRYER VENTING

Homes factory equipped with an electric dryer receptacle will also have the moisture-lint exhaust system roughed-in. To complete the moisture-lint exhaust system the following must be performed:

1. Remove the covers over the vent hole in the fl oor.

2. Push the duct through the hole provided in the fl oor and connect to the dryer in accordance with the dryer

NOTE: Some dryer manufacturers require that metallic duct be connected to the dryer and routed through fl oors and/or sidewalls.

3. Secure the termination fi tting at the outside edge of the fl oor:

GAS DRYER INSTALLATION

Homes factory equipped with a gas dryer will also have the moisture-lint exhaust duct and termination fi tting provided. To complete a roughed-in system follow steps 1-5 under Electric

Dryer Venting.

Homes with “stubbed-in” gas service will also have the moisture-lint exhaust system roughed-in. However, the exhaust duct and termination fi tting are not provided. Such termination fi tting should be supplied with dryer at time of installation. The gas connection and completion of the moisture-lint exhaust system must be made by qualifi ed personnel in accordance with the dryer manufacturer’s installation instructions. The gas connection must be tested (See Utility Hook-up and Testing) prior to use of the appliance. To complete the moisture-lint exhaust system, follow steps 1-5 under Electric

Dryer Venting.

NOTE: The termination fi tting must be installed such that the dryer does not exhaust beneath the home. This may be accomplished by attaching the fi tting to a piece of exterior grade plywood or, if the home is skirted, directly to the skirting.

4. Secure the fl exible duct to the termination fi tting with the provided clamp. (Do not use sheet metal screws or other devices which extend into the interior of the duct.)

5. Seal the duct penetration through the fl oor with a good grade of caulking.

GRILL/RANGE VENTING

When a home is provided with a combination range (cook top)/grill that contains its own exhaust system, the exhaust must be routed such that it does not terminate beneath the home. To complete the exhaust system the following must be performed:

1. Remove the cover on the factory installed exhaust pipe protruding from beneath the fl oor in the vicinity of the

range.

2. Secure the provided termination fi tting at the outside edge

CAUTION: MATERIALS WHICH MAY BE PROVIDED FOR

THE MOISTURE-LINT EXHAUST SYSTEM ARE NOT

ACCEPTABLE FOR INSTALLATION OF GAS DRYERS.

3. Run the provided fl exible metallic duct between the elbow protruding from the fl oor and the termination fi tting. Sup- port the duct and make the connections per the manufacturer’s installation instructions provided with the

grill/range.

GAS WATER HEATER VENTING

Homes factory equipped with certain types of gas water heaters may require special provisions to ensure proper ventilation.

If the gas water heater installed in your home is not independently vented to the exterior of the home through a grilled opening in an exterior water heater door, then the following provisions must be followed.

A. If the home is set on a crawlspace, or piers and skirting are used, then an air intake opening with a minimum free area of 32 square inches must be provided in the foundation wall or skirting. If the opening is covered by louvers or screen, the total free area must be 32 square inches. The air intake opening should be located as close as practical to the water heater location.

B. If your home is set on a basement and a factory installed basement exterior venting system has not been provided, then the following steps must be taken:

1. Fabricate a plenum box to encompass the air inlet assembly without alteration to the air inlet assembly itself. This

plenum must have a minimum horizontal dimension of eight (8) inches. The minimum clearance between the air inlet

assembly and the inner wall of the plenum shall be two (2) inches. The vertical height of the plenum shall be as

necessary to accommodate the air inlet assembly without alteration. The air inlet assembly is a round tube that is

2. To ensure proper air entry into the fabricated plenum box, a 6 inch minimum round (or equivalent cross-sectional area)

duct is required. The duct shall be of a smooth surface, rigid variety (no fl ex pipe) and shall be connected to the

plenum in a manner that does not reduce the cross sectional area of the pipe.

3. The air inlet shall be of damperless type and provide a free area not less than the cross-sectional area of the duct. A

screen, if used, shall be 1/4 x 1/4 inch minimum.

44

INSTALLATION OF OPTIONAL FEATURES (Continued)

PADDLE FAN INSTALLATION FOR DOUBLE-WIDE HOMES

WIRED FOR MOUNTING ON CENTER BEAM

A. FLUSH RIDGE BEAM

For proper ceiling fan installation, an electric outlet box and the decorative center beam to contain the box have been provided for attachment to the ridge beam at the unit centerline.

4. a. Insert the ceiling wire through a knockout hole in the side of the electrical box. NOTE: It may be necessary to cut a notch from the top on the supply wire side of the center beam hole to allow the supply wire to be inserted in electrical box without binding against center beam during

installation.

CAUTION: BEFORE FOLLOWING THE STEP-BY-STEP

PROCEDURE, BE SURE THAT POWER TO FAN WIRE IS

OFF.

b. Leave approximately 4” of wire free in the box.

1. Remove the fan manufacturer’s installation instructions from the package and determine the method of fan attach - ment to the beam. (Also see Fig. 6-1 below.)

5. Secure the center beam in place over the center line joint.

Be sure that the fan supply wire is not pinched or penetrated

with beam fasteners.

2. If the center beam (shipped loose) does not contain a precut hole for the electrical box, cut a hole with a hole saw approximately 1/4” larger than the box diameter at the proper location (center line of hole should line up with location of supply wire through ceiling) and centered in the width of the beam.

6. Secure electrical box to ridge beam with #8 x 2 1/2” wood screws through the two holes in the top of the box.

7. Strip about 3/4” of insulation from the white and black

8. Position the noncombustible fl ash ring (provided) over the electrical box so that fi nished surface (adjacent to electrical box) which is to be covered by fan canopy is not exposed.

3. Install the box in the hole and secure fl ange (plastic box only) to the center beam with 4 - #6 x 1” screws.

9. Follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions for mounting the fan assembly to the box and for electrical wiring of the fan. Use provided electrical connectors for splicing wire. Be certain that the fan is grounded as speci-

fi ed in manufacturer’s instructions and that wires are

DOUBLE WIDE RIDGE BEAM

CEILING BOARD

SUPPLY WIRE COILED &

SECURED FOR SHIPMENT

NOTCH BEAM AT HOLE IF NECESSARY FOR

WIRE CHASE

SECURE BOX TO 2x6 CENTER BEAM WITH

4-#6x1” WOOD SCREWS (FIELD INSTALLED)

NOTE: APPLICABLE TO U.L. LISTED PADDLE FAN WITH A

SWIVEL TYPE MOUNTING BRACKET.

FIG 6-1

2x6 CENTER BEAM — SHIPPED LOOSE FOR

FIELD INSTALLATION

HOLE FOR BOX CUT THROUGH 2x6 (MAY BE

CUT IN PLANT OR IN FIELD)

SECURE BOX TO RIDGE BEAM

WITH 2-#8x2 1/2” WOOD SCREWS

(FIELD INSTALLED)

ELECTRICAL BOX (SEE NOTE 1)

SUPPLY WIRE INSERTED IN FIELD

THROUGH SIDE KNOCKOUT OF BOX

45

INSTALLATION OF OPTIONAL FEATURES (Continued)

B. PROTRUDING RIDGE BEAM

For proper ceiling fan installation, a prefabricated box has been provided and includes the electrical box for containment of the spliced wires with their connectors.

3. Place the prefab box in its fi nal position on the beam and secure the box to the beam with #6x2” wood screws (pro- vided) in the metal corner braces.

4. Strip about 3/4” of insulation from the white and black con-

The prefab box is also designed to conceal the wire which is run through the ceiling where the fan is to be located.

CAUTION: BEFORE FOLLOWING THE STEP-BY-STEP

PROCEDURE, BE SURE THAT POWER TO FAN WIRE IS

OFF.

1. Remove the fan manufacturer’s installation instructions from the package and determine the method of fan attach- ment to the beam. (Also see Fig. 6-2).

2. Insert the ceiling wire through a side knockout hole in the electrical box. Secure the wire in the electrical box clamp

at a point approximately 4” from its end.

CEILING

LINE

5. Position the noncombustible fl ash ring (provided) over the electrical box so that the fi nished surface (adjacent to electri- cal box) which is to be covered by fan canopy is not exposed.

6. Follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions for mount- ing the fan assembly to the box and for electrical wiring of the fan. Use provided electrical connectors for splicing wires. Be certain that fan is grounded as specifi ed in manufacturer’s instructions and that wires are connected properly (white to white and black to black).

BEAM

FAN WIRE

FROM CEILING

FIG. 6-2

ELECTRICAL BOX

CLAMP WIRE AT BOX INLET:

CLAMP PROVIDED WITH BOX.

(4” MIN. FREE CABLE IN BOX)

C. FALSE RIDGE BEAM

For proper ceiling fan installation, an electrical box and a decorative foam block have been provided for attachment to the false beam at the unit centerline.

The prefab box is also designed to conceal the wire which is run through the ceiling where the fan is to be located.

CAUTION: BEFORE FOLLOWING THE STEP-BY-STEP

PROCEDURE, BE SURE THAT POWER TO FAN WIRE IS

OFF.

PRE-FAB BOX FASTENED TO

BEAM w/2-#6X2” SCREWS

EACH SIDE

6. Strip about 3/4” of insulation from the white and black

7. Follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions for mount- ing the fan assembly to the box and for electrical wiring of the fan. Use provided electrical connectors for splicing wires. Be certain that fan is grounded as specifi ed in manufacturer’s instructions and that wires are connected properly (white to white and black to black).

Ridge Beam

1. Remove the fan manufacturer’s installation instructions from the package and determine the method of fan attach -

ment to the beam (See Fig. 6-2A).

2. After ridge beam halves have been secured together, fasten bottom halves of false beam together with 16d nails

16” o.c. (max).

3. Attach gypsum close-off panel (provided) with staples 6” o.c. around perimeter.

4. Secure decorative foam block to false beam with 2-16d nails or 2-#8x3” screws.

5. Attach electrical box (U.L. listed for use with paddle fan) per its listing (installation) requirements (provided).

46

False Beam

Toe-nail bottom halves of false beam together w/16d nails 16” o.c.

Gypsum closeoff panel - fasten to false beam w/staples 6” o.c. around perimeter.

FIG. 6-2A

Electrical wire - factory installed paddle pan.

Decorative foam block.

Fasten to beam w/2-16d nails or 2-#8x3” screws.

Electric box - U.L. listed for use with paddle fan. Secure to false beam per its installation requirements.

INSTALLATION OF OPTIONAL FEATURES (Continued)

AIR CONDITIONING ELECTRICAL CONNECTION

(Factory Provided Circuits)

THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTION SHOULD BE

MADE ONLY BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL. THE

COMPLETED INSTALLATION MUST CONFORM

TO ARTICLE 440 OF THE NATIONAL ELECTRI-

CAL CODE AND APPLICABLE LOCAL CODES.

Factory installed branch circuits for air conditioning are indicated on the data plate under the heading “Rating of Factory Installed Circuit.” The maximum full load ampere draw for the desired air conditioning unit must not exceed the indicated branch circuit rating. “A” coil air conditioning units installed must be listed for use with the furnace in this home; for air conditioning installation, see the instructions shipped with the air conditioner. If a self-contained air conditioner is to be installed and connected to the heating supply duct the installation must include a damper beneath the furnace to prevent cool air from “backing-up” into the furnace during the cooling mode and a damper at the air conditioner supply to prevent heated air from “backing-up” into the air conditioner during the heating mode. It is recommended to wrap the dampers with insulation.

The electrical connection is via a branch circuit terminating in a junction box beneath the home

(See Fig. 6-3). The fi eld installation wiring beyond the junction box must incorporate a fused disconnect (sized in accordance with NEC Article 440) located within sight of the condensing unit. The maximum fuse size to be used with fused disconnect is marked on the condenser data plate. The acceptability of the air conditioning equipment, rating the location of disconnect means, fuse type branch circuit protection, and connections to the equipment are to be determined by the local inspection authority.

For some models the electrical connection is made to the home via a separate rigid conduit. The conduit is 1” and is run from the panelboard and terminates below the bottom board. A PVC cap is cemented to the end of the conduit and this must be cut off to provide access to the panel board. Wiring is then installed from the panelboard to the air conditioner per all applicable NEC & local codes and all requirements listed above.

Condensation should not be allowed to drain under home.

NOTE:

REFER TO N.E.C. AND AIR COND.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS

DISTRIBUTION

PANELBOARD

FIELD PROVIDED

& INSTALLED

FUSED DISCONNECT

REMOTE

CONDENSING

UNIT

JUNCTION BOX

BENEATH HOME

CONDUIT

FIG. 6-3

NOTE: THE ELECTRICAL CONNECTION SHOULD BE

MADE ONLY BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.

1. On models equipped for installation of optional evaporative cooler, install the roof-mounted cooler according to the instructions with the cooler. For coolers without an integral air duct the cooler box shall be lined with 0.013 in. metal. The factory installed branch circuit for the cooler is sized for a maximum cooler electrical load of 12 amperes. 120 V. AC, 60 Hz.

2. Remove the cover from the roof-mounted junction box and make the connection of the color-coded wires using the provided wire nuts. The electrical portion of the installation is now complete (See Fig. 6-4).

COLOR CODE

WHITE ................................................... Neutral

YELLOW ................................................ Pump

BLACK ................................................... High Fan

RED ....................................................... Low Fan

GREEN .................................................. Ground

ROOF

EVAPORATIVE COOLER

LOCATED ON

ROOF OF HOME

WEATHERPROOF

BOX

ROOF

JACK

FIG. 6-4

47

INSTALLATION OF OPTIONAL FEATURES (Continued)

STANDARD BLEND-AIR INSTALLATION WITH DEALER

INSTALLED EXTERIOR HEATING/COOLING

Figure 6-5 below depicts the Evcon Standard

Blend-Air installation used with homes designed for dealer installed exterior heating-cooling systems.

The Evcon Standard Blend-Air unit provides wholehouse ventilation and is designed to operate when the exterior heating or cooling system is in use.

The following information is important when electrically interconnecting the Standard Blend-Air with the exterior heating-cooling unit system:

1. The Standard Blend-Air must be connected to a

heating-cooling unit with transformer having at

least a 40 Va. Capacity.

2. The wiring of 4-wire thermostat cable from the

Blend-Air control to the exterior heating-cooling

controls is to be as follows:

-Green Connector - blower continuous run

-Red connector - 24 v. supply

-White connector - system heating

-Yellow connector - system cooling

Roof Line

Ceiling Cavity

Chase fully enclosing fl ex duct.

Standard Blend-Air control box

Access panel removed, exposing damper tube assembly.

Grille with fi lter (Access to Blend Air fi lter)

4-Wire thermostat cable to outdoor unit. See manufacturer instructions for wiring to exterior heat-cooling unit.

Factory installed 4-wire thermostat cable to indoor thermostat.

Box airtight (except @ air return & grille with fi lter).

48

Return Air

Note: The Unit must be operated from one transformer having at least

40 Va. Capacity.

FIG. 6-5

INSTALLATION OF OPTIONAL FEATURES (Continued)

EXPANDING ROOMS, SLIDE-OUTS, ETC.

Where optional expanding rooms, slide-outs, tip-outs, etc. are provided, specifi c instructions and directions are provided for proper installation and set-up.

TELEPHONE AND CABLE TV

Careless installation of telephone and cable television lines may be hazardous. Electrical circuits, plumbing and duct work are contained in the fl oor and walls of the home. Avoid contact with these systems when drilling into and placing cables in these cavities. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE INSTRUC-

TIONS MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY OR

DEATH.

INSTALLATION OF SITE INSTALLED

ATTACHED STRUCTURES

All site installed attached structures, including garages, porches, steps, stairways and landing must be designed and constructed to support all of their own dead load and all of the live load to which it will be subjected. Attached structures should be constructed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions and all applicable local codes. In particular, attached garages generally require fi re protection and

GFCI electrical circuit protection as required by local code.

FIREPLACE INSTALLATION

Because of transportation restrictions, fi replaces require on-site installation of additional section(s) of approved, listed chimney pipe, a spark arrestor and a rain cap assembly.

The fi replace manufacturer’s installation instructions and all required components for proper installation are included in each home with a fi replace.

HINGED ROOFS AND EAVES

Where optional hinged roof and/or hinged or prefabricated fi eld installed eaves are provided, supplemental installation instructions are provided.

CEILING (PADDLE) FANS

Site provided and installed ceiling fans are to be installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

To reduce the risk of injury, the minimum dimension from the trailing edge of the fan blade to the fl oor must be in accordance with the manufacturer’s requirements.

SITE INSTALLED FIREPLACE HEARTH

EXTENSION

The home will be shipped with fi replace installed. The blocking between the bottom of the fi replace and the fl oor shall be removed. The carpet where the hearth is going to be placed shall be removed. A bead of noncombustible fi replace mortar or gasket cement shall be run to seal the joint between hearth extension and face of the fi replace. The edge of the hearth extension shall be placed under the fi replace surround and centered in front of the fi replace. The carpet tackstrip shall then be placed around the hearth to secure it. (See Fig. 6-6).

Non-combustible mortar or gasket cement

Hearth extension

FIG. 6-6

Fireplace

49

INSTALLATION OF OPTIONAL FEATURES (Continued)

FIELD INSTALLED TERMINATION OF FIREPLACE CHIMNEY.

Termination cap - fi eld installed

10 feet or less

Storm collar - fi eld installed

Flashing - fi eld installed

Top section of fl ue pipe - fi eld installed

Factory installed thimble

Ridge Beam (typical)

Factory installed fl ue pipe

Truss (typical)

Flue pipe

Upper and side shingles overlap fl ange and are set in asphalt cement

Lower part of fl ange overlaps lower shingles

SHINGLE INSTALLATION AROUND FLUE PIPE

1) Install shingles up to edge of factory cut-out in roof decking. Cut shingles installed under roof fl ashing are set in asphalt cement.

2) Place fl ashing over pipe section and shingle and set in asphalt cement. Tack fl ashing to roof deck at top 2 corners with roofi ng nails.

3) Resume shingle application. Cut shingles in successive courses to fi t around the pipe and embed them in asphalt cement where they overlap the fl ashing. Secure shingles with roofi ng nails through fl ashing and apply asphalt cement over nail heads.

4) The completed installation should appear as shown above, with the lower part of the fl ange overlapping the lower shingles and the side and upper shingle overlapping the fl ange.

NOTES:

1) The upper portion of the fi replace chimney assembly has been left off due to transportation height restrictions.

2) The fi nal section of fl ue pipe, roof fl ashing, storm collar and termination cap for the fi replace are required to be fi eld

installed.

3) Remove temporary close-off material from roof and top of fl ue pipe that has been factory installed.

4) Install parts listed in 2 above per the fi replace manufacturer’s instructions.

5) Install roof shingles around chimney pipe per instructions above or per ARMA residential asphalt roofi ng manual

instructions.

6) All required parts for completion of chimney have been shipped with the home, including the manufacturer’s installa- instructions.

7) Applicable only to Coleman Deluxe II model, 36ECMII solid burning

8) All other aspects of the setup of the home are to be in accor- dance with this manual.

50

WARNING

This appliance has been shipped

with the fl ue assembly partially disassembled. The fl ue assembly

must be completed in accordance with the installation instructions

prior to use of this appliance.

The label above has been placed on the fi replace in your home if the chimney assembly is required to be fi eld completed.

CHAPTER 7

UTILITY SYSTEM CONNECTION AND TESTING

Many local jurisdictions have special requirements for utility connections and on-site inspection of these connections. Consult with the proper authorities prior to utility connection. Use only qualifi ed service personnel, familiar with local codes and licensed where required.

The drainage and water systems were tested for leaks prior to shipment from the factory. It is essential that they be rechecked by qualifi ed personnel for leaks that may have been caused by vibration during transportation.

WATER

The water system has been designed for an inlet water pressure of 80 psi. If the manufactured home is installed in areas where the water pressure exceeds 80 psi, a pressure reducing valve should be installed. The water system may be connected to any safe, potable water source. The connection is via a single 3/4 inch inlet beneath the home. A master shut-off full fl ow valve must be installed in the water supply line adjacent to the home; this valve should be a full port gate or ball valve with threaded or solder joints. After removing the aerators from all the faucets, open all the faucet valves and allow the water to run for 15 minutes. This should remove any foreign particles left in the line that might cause an unpleasant taste or become lodged at faucet washers and cause dripping faucets. All exposed water piping subject to freezing should be protected by insulation and electric heat tapes (with an integral thermostat) listed for use with manufactured homes. It is recommended that only UL listed heat tapes be used and installed in accordance with their installation instructions.

DRAINAGE — CONNECTION

The drainage connection is made at the 3-inch main drain outlet. Care should be exercised to slope and support the drain line from the home to the site sewage system (1/4” per foot slope).

DRAINAGE — 1, 1 1/2, 1 3/4 & 2 BATH

When applicable the parts required to bring all drain lines to a single point are provided as follows:

1. Pipe and fi ttings.

2. 1/4 pint of ABS solvent cement.

3. 10 feet of 3/4” x 28 gauge plumbing strap.

4. Ten 1/4” x 1” stove bolts.

The procedure for bringing all drain lines to a single point is as follows:

1. Remove caps on drain outlets and connect supplied parts together as shown by the drain line schematic shipped with the house. (Do not apply cement).

2. Check to be sure that the assembly has the proper 1/4 inch drop per foot.

3. Mark each joint to aid in reassembly. Start at outlet end of system and remove, cement and reassemble each slip joint one at a time. Be sure to apply the cement on both male and female ends with a good even coating.

4. Using the 3/4” x 28 gauge strapping, strap the drain line to the center crossmembers of the frame placing a strap at each member (4 feet apart). Use a 1/4” x 1” stove bolt to secure strap in place.

5. Connect home drain to site sewage system as for single bath previously discussed.

6. Check completed system for leaks.

WARNING: IMPROPER OR INADEQUATE TESTING, CON-

NECTION OR MODIFICATION OF ANY PART OF GAS OR

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS, ESPECIALLY BY UNQUALIFIED

PERSONNEL, MAY BE EXTREMELY DANGEROUS AND

MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.

GAS — The gas piping system was designed for a range of

7 to 10 1/2” of water column for natural gas and 11 to 14” of water column for LP gas. The manufactured home gas supply pressure must be within this range for safe and effi cient operation of the gas piping system.

51

UTILITY SYSTEM CONNECTION AND TESTING (Continued)

The gas piping system was pressure tested for leaks prior to shipment; however, it is essential that the system be retested by qualifi ed personnel for leaks prior to use. (Many utility companies require this on-site test.) The instructions printed on the tag near the gas supply connection must be followed (See Fig. 7-1).

In some localities, utility companies and/or building inspectors may require additional tests as follows:

1. Isolate all appliances with appliance shut-off valves.

PRESSURE SHALL BE MEASURED WITH A MERCURY

MANOMETER OR SLOPE GAUGE CALIBRATED IN

INCREMENTS OF NOT GREATER THAN 1/10 POUND.

2. Pressurize the system to 3 psi and isolate the source of pressure from the gas piping.

3. Check the gauge after 10 minutes; there should be no drop

4. Check the piping to appliances by pressurizing to at least

10 inches but no more than 14 inches water column and applying a bubble solution to all joints and fl exible connec-

tors.

CAUTION: DO NOT PRESSURIZE THE SYSTEM ABOVE

THE PRESSURES STATED ABOVE.

The connection to the gas supply should be made only by authorized representatives of the utility.

NOTE: BEFORE A TEST IS BEGUN, THE TEMPERATURE

OF THE AMBIENT AIR AND OF THE PIPING SHOULD BE

APPROXIMATELY THE SAME — CONDUCT THE TEST AT

SUCH A TIME DURING THE DAY WHEN AIR TEMPERA-

TURES WILL REMAIN CONSTANT.

Combination LP — Gas and Natural Gas System

This gas piping system is designed for use of either liquefi ed petroleum gas or natural gas.

NOTICE: BEFORE TURNING ON GAS BE CERTAIN APPLIANCES ARE DE-

SIGNED FOR THE GAS CONNECTED AND ARE EQUIPPED WITH CORRECT

ORIFICES. SECURELY CAP THIS INLET WHEN NOT CONNECTED FOR USE.

When connecting to lot outlet, use a listed gas supply connector for manufactured

100,000 Btuh

250,000 Btuh

Before turning on gas, make certain all gas connections have been made tight, all appliance valves are turned off, and any unconnected outlets are capped.

After turning on gas, test gas piping and connections to appliances for leakage with soapy water or bubble solution, and light all pilots.

52

Fig. 7-1

NOTE: DO NOT BUBBLE CHECK BRASS GAS LINE FITTINGS WITH SOLUTIONS CONTAINING AMMONIA.

UTILITY SYSTEM CONNECTION AND TESTING (Continued)

ELECTRICAL

ALL ELECTRICAL WORK SHOULD BE PERFORMED

ONLY BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL. The electrical supply connection to the manufactured home may be made by any of the following methods depending on the manufactured home construction and electrical service: a. Listed 50 ampere manufactured home power supply cord.

(50 amp service only) b. Permanent feeder connected to a factory installed mast weatherhead assembly. The routing, connection and support of the service drop is to be in accordance with codes.

c. Permanent feeder routed to the distribution panel through the factory installed feeder raceway which terminates beneath the manufactured home. A junction box or

approved tured home feeder raceway to the supply raceway beneath

the manufactured home. The proper feeder conductor sizes and the required junction box sizes are given in

OUTSIDE DISTRIBUTION PANEL BOARD

Accessibility to distribution panel board, and the use of unit switches as disconnect means, is subject to the requirements of the local inspection authority.

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM TEST

With approved testing equipment, the following tests should be performed before connecting to the power source:

• Continuity Test of Circuit Conductors

A continuity test with all branch circuit breakers and switches controlling individual outlets in the “on” position should be conducted. There should be no evidence of connection between any of the supply conductors (including neutral) and the grounding circuit.

• Continuity Test of Electrical Grounding System

All noncurrent carrying metal parts of the electrical system including fi xtures, appliances and the chassis of the home should be tested for continuity with the grounding circuit.

The following test should be conducted after connecting and energizing the electrical system:

• Polarity and Grounding Tests of 15 and 20 AMP Receptacle

Outlets

With circuits and lighting circuits energized, use a receptacle polarity tester to check polarity and grounding of each receptacle outlet.

After the connection has been made, the following tests should be conducted using approved test equipment:

1. Continuity test of circuit conductors

2. Polarity test

3. Continuity test of electrical grounding system

MANUFACTURED HOME ELECTRICAL SUPPLY REQUIREMENTS

TABLE 7

MAXIMUM LOAD

& MAIN BREAKER

SIZE (AMP)

CONDUCTOR

GROUNDING

CONDUCTOR

SIZE (AWG)

FACTORY INSTALLED

FEEDER RACEWAY

1

TRADE SIZE (IN.) (TWO LINE

AND ONE

NEUTRAL)

50

100

125

150

200

225

#6

#3

#2

2-1/0 & 1-#2

2-3/0 & 1-1/0

2-3/0 & 1-1/0

#10

#8

#6

#6

#6

#4

1. Conductor size and feeder raceway sized for copper, 75 degree C rated conductors, types RH, RHH, RHW without outer covering, THW or XHHW.

1”

1-1/4”

1-1/2”

1-1/2”

2”

2-1/2”

MINIMUM

JUNCTION BOX

SIZE

6”x6”x6”

8”x8”x4”

10”x10”x4”

10”x10”x4”

12”x12”x4”

15”x12”x4”

WARNING

CARELESS INSTALLATION OF TELEPHONE AND CABLE

TELEVISION LINES MAY BE HAZARDOUS. The manufactured home walls contain electrical circuits and the fl oor section may contain electrical circuits, plumbing or duct work.

Extreme care must be exercised during drilling through and placing of communication cables within these cavities, to avoid contact with these home systems. Such work should be performed only by qualifi ed personnel. FAILURE TO FOL-

LOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS MAY RESULT IN SERIOUS

PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.

53

UTILITY SYSTEM CONNECTION AND TESTING (Continued)

Multisection Frame Bonding

B HALF A HALF

Front or rear crossmembers or any set of outriggers on opposite halves

Ground clamp with screw

Ground wire should be the same used on panel box

Typical Under Chassis

Feed Connections

FLOOR a. Flex conduit b. Feeder conductors c. Junction box d. Raceway e. Conduit connector f. Approved electrical

connectors g. Insulated bushing d e a b

CONDUCTORS

B - Black “hot

R - Red “hot”

W - White “neutral”

G - Green “grounding”

FLOOR d g f b e a

Typical Meter Base Installation and Grounding

BRANCH

CIRCUIT

MAIN

DISCONNECT

METER BASE

GROUNDING

ELECTRODE

EXTERIOR METER / PANEL BOX COMBINATION

JUMPER

GROUND

BUS

BAR

OVERHEAD ENTRANCE

MAIN PANEL ENCLOSURE

BONDED TO

ENCLOSURE

METER BASE

NEUTRAL BUS BAR

SERVICE

ENTRY

54

CHASSIS

BONDING

WIRE

GROUNDING

LUG ON

CHASSIS

TO GROUNDING

ELECTRODE

GROUNDING

ELECTRODE

CONDUIT

OR CABLE

SERVICE

MAIN PANEL

METER BASE

MAIN

PANEL

GROUNDING

ELECTRODE

SERVICE - DROP CONDUC-

TOR CLEARANCES AND AT-

TACHMENT SHALL BE PER

NEC 230-24 AND 230-26.

UNDERGROUND ENTRANCE

MAIN PANEL

METER

BASE

SERVICE

HEAD

STRAP

CONDUIT

GROUNDING

ELECTRODE

ENTRANCE BELOW ROOF LINE

UTILITY SYSTEM CONNECTION AND TESTING (Continued)

METER BASE AND PANELBOARD WIRING WITH MASTHEAD

ALL ELECTRICAL WORK SHOULD BE PERFORMED

ONLY BY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL.

For homes with a factory installed meter base and masthead, the correct procedure for wiring is as follows:

1. The outdoor (weatherproof) meter socket and service entrance panel may be mounted at any location on the exterior walls of the home with a fi xed roof overhang.

2. Bond the service entrance conduit to the service entrance

panel with an insulated bonding & grounding bushing.

Use #6 (AWG) copper between ground lug on the bushing

& terminal on the panel. Use #4 (AWG) copper between ground lug on the bushing & terminal on the panel with

200 and 225 amp service. Where threaded coupling and

threaded bosses on enclosures with joints exist, they shall be made up wrench-tight in lieu of grounding bushing and

strap.

3. A label is attached outside the home and near the service entrance conduit termination which reads: “This con-

nection for 120/240 volt, 3 Pole, 3 Wire, 60 Hertz

in the blank space.

4. A red label is attached adjacent to the service entrance breaker, which states: “WARNING - Do not provide

electrical power until grounding electrode is installed and connected (see installation instructions).”

5. The grounding conductor shall be connected to the and clamps. Connections depending on solder shall not be used. Rod and pipe electrodes shall not be less than

8 feet (2.44m) in length and shall consist of the following materials, and shall be installed in the following manner:

(1) Electrodes of pipe or conduit shall not be smaller than

3/4 inch trade steel and, where of iron or steel, shall have the outer surface galvanized or otherwise metal- coated for corrosion protection.

(2) Electrodes of rods of steel or iron shall be at least 5/8 inch (15.87mm) in diameter. Nonferrous rods or their equivalent shall be listed and shall not be less than 1/

2 inch (12.7mm) in diameter.

(3) The electrode shall be installed such that at least 8 feet (2.44m) of length is in contact with the soil. It shall be driven to a depth of not less than 8 feet

(2.44m) except that where rock bottom is encoun- tered, the electrode shall be driven at an oblique angle not to exceed 45 degrees from the vertical or shall be buried in a trench that is at least 2-1/2 feet (762mm) deep. The upper end of the electrode shall be fl ush with or below ground level.

Other methods of grounding electrode shall be in accordance with National Electric Code Article 250, Part H.

6. Equipment grounding connectors shall be bare, covered, or insulated. Covers or insulation shall be continuous and green, or green with one or more yellow stripes.

7. Approved fi ttings to be site installed on end of service entrance conduit to protect cables from abrasion.

8. Connect feeder conduit to conduit stub at distribution

panelboard.

9. See Fig. 7-2 below.

Site Installed Masthead

The masthead may be shipped loose for fi eld installation due to transportation height. The correct procedure for installing the masthead is as follows:

1. Remove the temporary transportation cover from the meter base.

2. Remove the 3” lag screws and the straps from the 2x4 blocks between the wall studs.

3. Install the masthead and the feeder conductors as shown in Fig. 7-2 below.

4. Reinstall the 3” lag screws and the straps over the conduit.

5. Note that all the conductors are to extend 18” (min.) from the weather head. The masthead shall extend at least 30”

(min.) above the roof line.

Service Entrance conduit (Rigid)

1-1/4” min. at 100 amp

1-1/2” min at 125 amp

1-1/2” min. at 150 amp

2” min. at 200 amp

2-1/2” min at 225 amp

Clamp-on weather head

Roof fl ashing

RED

BLACK

WHITE

(neutral)

1/4” x 3” lag screws

2 hole galvanized

pipe strap

Service Entrance Breaker

Run feeder in Rigid or EMT conduit.

1-1/4” min. at 100 amp

1-1/2” min. at 125 amp

1-1/2” min. at 150 amp

2” min. at 200 amp

2-1/2” min at 225 amp

U.L. listed outdoor (Type 3R) meter socket and service equipment panel. Pictorial only, actual equipment may vary with each manufacturer.

Field install 4 wire feeder to distribution panelboard. Use copper 75 degree C rated conductors (types RH, RHH,

RHW, w/o covering THW or XHHW).

At 100 amp service - 3-#3 (AWG) w/#8 (AWG) ground

At 125 amp service - 3-#2 (AWG) w/#6 (AWG) ground

At 150 amp service - 2-1/0 (AWG),1-#2 (AWG) w/#6

(AWG) ground

At 200 amp service - 2-3/0 (AWG), 1-1/0 (AWG) w/#6

(AWG) ground

At 225 amp service - 2-3/0 (AWG), 1-1/0 (AWG) w/#6

(AWG) ground

Service grounding electrode conductor, #6 (AWG) bare copper. Coil 6’ below fl oor to grounding electrode. (Use #4 AWG with 200 or 225 amp service.)

FIG. 7-2

Threaded Hub

Conduit, rigid or

EMT. To be fi eld installed

55

CHAPTER 8

PROTECTIVE WINDOW COVERINGS

If your home is destined to be set in Wind Zones II or III, then it has been designed to install protective window and door coverings, in the event of a windstorm. Two different types of protective coverings are available. Your home may have either, or both of these types.

and door openings. The plywood is attached to the 2 x 4 members with #8 wood screws. The type of plywood, screw length, and screw spacing will vary with the window or door size. See Table 8 for these requirements. Note that the window sizes listed in

Table 8 are the small dimension of the window or door (See Figure 8-1).

Large openings (such as sliding glass doors) are required to be covered with a plywood and lumber frame assembly. See

Table 8 to determine when this is required, and Figure 8-2 for frame construction.

Window

Size. See

Table 8.

2x4 Receiver

Window

Size. See

Table 8.

FIG. 8-1

Plywood face grain

Plywood face grain

#8 wood screws.

See Table 8 for size and spacing.

Window Size. See Table 8.

2x4 Receiver

56

FIG. 8-2

2x2 any grade SPF

6” o.c.

6” o.c.

Plywood face grain

3/8” plywood, APA Rated Exterior

Sheathing with 20/0 span rating.

Fasten 2x2s to 2x4s with 2-8d nails at each connection.

Plywood seam over 2x4.

#8x3-1/2” wood screws, 6” o.c.

into 2x4 receiver.

Fasten plywood to 2x framing members w/full PVA white glue and 6d nails or #8x2” screws 6” o.c. all around.

#2 SPF 2x4s, laid fl at, 16” o.c.

PROTECTIVE WINDOW COVERINGS (Continued)

TABLE 8

MAXIMUM

WINDOW

SIZE

14.5”

24.5”

30.5”

36.5”

40”

46.5”

72”

PLYWOOD TYPE REQUIREMENTS

WIND ZONE II

STANDARD

WALL AREA

WALL AREA

WITHIN 3’

OF CORNER

1

2

4

6

7

8

10

1

3

5

7

8

10

10

STANDARD

WALL AREA

1

3

5

6

8

10

10

WIND ZONE III

WALL AREA

WITHIN 3’

OF CORNER

1

4

7

8

9

10

10

WOOD

SCREW

SPACING

16” O.C.

16” O.C.

16” O.C.

12” O.C.

12” O.C.

10” O.C.

6” O.C.

All plywood for protective window coverings is APA rated exterior sheathing. Thickness and span ratings will vary with window or door size. Plywood listed below, with a higher number than is required by Table 8, may be substituted for a lower numbered plywood.

1. 3/8” with 20/0 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2” wood screws.

2. 1/2” with 24/0 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2” wood screws.

3. 3/8” with 24/0 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2” wood screws.

4. 1/2” with 32/16 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2” wood screws.

5. 5/8” with 32/16 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2-1/4” wood screws.

6. 3/4” with 40/20 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2-1/4” wood screws.

7. 5/8” with 40/20 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2-1/4” wood screws.

8. 7/8” with 48/24 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2-1/2” wood screws.

9. 3/4” with 48/24 span rating. Fasten to receiver w/#8x2-1/4” wood screws.

10. Plywood with wood frame required.

3’

3’

3’ 3’

3’

3’

3’

3’ 3’

3’

3’ 3’

FIG. 8-3

In the event of a windstorm, the corners of this home will sustain higher wind pressure than the rest of the home. Therefore, it is required that windows and doors located within 3 feet of any corner be designed to withstand these higher pressures. Figure

8-3 shows the typical locations of the corners. Table 8 has separate columns indicating the plywood requirements for standard wall area and wall area that is within 3 feet of a corner.

After the windstorm is over and the plywood has been removed, all holes made by the screws in the 2 x 4s should be fi lled with a weather-resistant caulk.

57

PROTECTIVE WINDOW COVERINGS (Continued)

The second type of protective covering is to attach 3/4” plywood directly to the window frame. The plywood is attached to the window frame with #8 screws around the windows frame (top, bottom and sides). The specifi c instructions for each window manufacturer are shown below and on the next page.

WARNING: STORM SHUTTERS CANNOT WITHSTAND SEVERE STORMS. TO AVOID PERSONAL INJURY OR

DEATH, CONTACT LOCAL EMERGENCY SERVICES NOW TO IDENTIFY EMERGENCY SHELTER IN THE EVENT OF

This direct fastening application was designed and tested for use on Philips Products series #22, 23 and 24 lap windows. Do not use on any other products.

DUE TO THE LIMITED TIME BETWEEN WHEN A STORM

WARNING IS ISSUED AND WHEN THE STORM COULD HIT

AT YOUR LOCATION, WE RECOMMEND YOU DO THE

FOLLOWING BEFORE A STORM WARNING IS ISSUED:

INSTRUCTIONS FOR INSTALLING SHUTTERS ONTO A

PHILIPS PRODUCTS LAP MOUNTED ALUMINUM WINDOW

1. For each window size, measure the width and height of the

1. Purchase #8 x 1” sheet metal screws (enough for all the

windows).

2. Buy shutters and get them cut to size, and marked. The shutters must be 3/4” thick plywood.

3. Store shutters and screws together in a dry place where they will be accessible.

SCREW LOCATION DETAIL

3/8” (top & sides)

SCREW LOCATION DETAIL

dimensions.)

2. Determine how many shutters of this size are needed and

get them cut to the proper dimensions.

3. Mark each shutter as to where on the home it goes, as well as marking which end goes up.

4. Mark the screw locations on the shutter (as shown below).

5. With the help of an assistant, lift the shutter up to the window and center it on the window.

6. Position the shutter so that the bottom edge of the plywood is even with the bottom of the exterior fl ange of the frame

sill.

7. Fasten the shutter to the window with #8 x 1” sheet metal screws. Make certain the shutter does not shift out of

position.

8” maximum

3/18” (bottom only)

3/4” PLYWOOD SHUTTER

HORIZONTAL CROSS SECTION OF

A TYPICAL

ALUMINUM WINDOW INSTALLATION

WITH AN ATTACHED STORM SHUTTER

VERTICAL CROSS SECTION OF SHUTTER

ATTACHED TO FRAME HEAD AND SILL

WINDOW EXTERIOR FLANGE

FRAME HEAD

FRAME SILL

WINDOW FRAME

JAMB

ROUGH

OPENING STUD

INSTALLATION

FASTENER

7/16” HARDBOARD

IMPORTANT:

DUE TO THE SHORTNESS

OF THE EXTERIOR FLANGE

ON THE FRAME SILL, THIS

DIMENSION MUST BE

MAINTAINED.

3/4” shutter

EXTERIOR

#8x1” screw

7/16” TRIM

3/8” (at top and sides)

58

3/18” (bottom only)

PROTECTIVE WINDOW COVERINGS (Continued)

500 AIRPORT DR. MANSFIELD, TEXAS 76063 (817)473-4421

INSTALLATION OF PROTECTIVE COVERING

AS REQUIRED BY H.U.D. FOR ZONE II AND III

The following pages illustrate the application of an exterior window protection in the event of storms (such as hurricanes) as required by H.U.D.

Please Note: Installation of protective coverings (such as those listed below) will negate egress of the window.

Homes with protective coverings (such as those listed below) cannot be occupied while the coverings are in place.

Parts Required: 1. 3/4” plywood — enough for each window in the home.

2. #8 x 1” wood screws or longer (see below for quantity).

The installation steps apply to both the vertical and horizontal sides of window. The size of the window will affect the number of fasteners needed.

For windows with a face measurement of 30” wide by 30” high (or any smaller size), install 3 fasteners, spaced eight (8) to twelve (12) inches apart on the head and on the sill. Install four (4) fasteners, spaced eight (8) to twelve (12) inches apart on both the left and right frame sides.

For windows larger than 30” x 30” with 46” x 60” being the maximum size, add one fastener to each side for each additional eight (8) to twelve (12) inches in width and height.

To determine the plywood size, (use 3/4” thick plywood) measure the width and height of the outside (exposed) return fi n

(edge to edge).

Position plywood over the window. With plywood supported, drive one fastener through the plywood and window return fi n near center of the window sill. Repeat this procedure for the other required sill fasteners. With covering attached at sill, continue driving fasteners around perimeter of the plywood using the above spacing formula.

After the storm has passed, reverse the above procedure to remove the covering.

Store materials for future use.

7/16” TRIM

APPROX 1/2”

#8x1” Screw

@ 12” o.c. Max.

HARDBOARD 7/16

Wood As Required By Design

3/4 Ply Wood HORIZONTAL SECTION

Aluminum Window Jamb

Wood As Required By Design

As Per MFG. Standard

INTERIOR OF HOME

WINDOW

RETURN

FIN

HARDBOARD 7/16

59

PROTECTIVE WINDOW COVERINGS (Continued)

500 AIRPORT DR. MANSFIELD, TEXAS 76063

(817)473-4421

Installation of Protective Covering as required by H.U.D. for Zone II and III

The following pages illustrate the application of an exterior window protection in the event of storms (such as hurricanes) as required by HUD.

Please note: Installation of protective coverings (such as those listed below) will negate egress of the window. Homes with protective coverings (such as those listed below) cannot be occupied while the coverings are in place.

Parts required: 1. 3/4” plywood — enough for each window in the home.

2. #8 x 1 1/4” OR 1 1/2” wood screws (see below for quantity).

The installation steps apply to both the vertical and horizontal sides of windows. The size of the window will affect the number of fasteners needed.

For windows with a face measurement of 30” wide x 30” high

(or any smaller size), install 3 fasteners, spaced eight (8) to twelve (12) inches apart on the head and on the sill. Install four (4) fasteners, spaced eight (8) to twelve (12) inches apart on both the left and right frame sides.

For windows larger than 30” x 30” with 46” x 60” being the maximum size, add one fastener to each side for each additional eight (8) to twelve (12) inches in width and height.

To determine the plywood size, (use 3/4” thick plywood) measure the width and height of the return fi n (edge to edge).

Position plywood over the window. With plywood supported, drive one fastener through the plywood and window nailing fi n near center of window sill. Repeat this procedure for the other required sill fasteners. With covering attached at sill, continue driving fasteners around perimeter of the plywood using the above spacing formula.

After the storm has passed, reverse the above procedure to remove the covering. Store materials for future use. Be sure to fi ll all holes left by the removal of the screws with a suitable silicone type sealant. Material should have a long life rating.

This will prevent water and air from entering the home.

60

WINDOW

RETURN FIN

VINYL SIDING

Exterior Sheathing

AS PER MFG STANDARD

VINYL WINDOW

FRAME

3/4” PLYWOOD

#8x1 1/4” SCREW

@ 12” O.C. MAX

HOME INTERIOR

WOOD AS REQD.

BY DESIGN

Exterior Sheathing

PROTECTIVE WINDOW COVERINGS (Continued)

Protective coverings may also be installed over doors and sliding glass doors in a different manner than described previously.

First, remove the mounting screws holding the door frame to the exterior wall. Then place the plywood (or wood frame) from

Table 8 over the door opening and fasten the plywood and door frame back into the wall studs through the same holes in the door frame. Use #8 x 3” wood screws 12” o.c. for doors. Use #8 x 4” wood screws 6” o.c. for sliding glass doors. See Figure 8-6 for a typical application of this type of protective covering.

Door Size

See Table 8

Door Frame

Wall Studs

Plywood from Table 8

#8 x 3” Wood Screws

12” o.c. max. #8 x 4”

Wood Screws 6” o.c. for a sliding glass door.

SECTION B-B

Plywood face grane

#8 x 3 Wood Screws 12” o.c. max. #8 x 4 “

Wood Screws 6” o.c. for a sliding glass door

FIG. 8-6

Due to the limited time between when a storm warning is issued and when the storm could hit at your location, Skyline recommends that the items necessary for the protective coverings be purchased and prepared before a storm warning is issued. Cut plywood to size and mark it relative to window/door location. Store plywood and fasteners together in a dry place where it will be accessible. Once the protective coverings have been installed, the home should not be occupied.

61

CHAPTER 9

FINAL INSPECTION

Make a fi nal inspection when home installation is complete to make sure that no items have been overlooked and that all work was done properly. Place special emphasis on the following “checklist” items:

Water and Drain System. All water and drain systems work properly and do not leak.

Appliance Function and Operation. All fi xtures and appliances have been tested and work properly.

Windows, Doors and Drawers. All windows, doors and drawers work properly.

Egress Windows. One window in each bedroom is designated as a secondary exit to be used in case of emergency.

Each exit window is labeled as such with operating instructions. All shipping hardware should be removed, and the window should operate as explained in the window manufacturer’s instructions.

Exterior Siding and Trim. There are no gaps, voids, or missing fasteners, and all seams are sealed.

Stack Heads and Vent Pipe Flashings on Roof. All stack head or vent pipe fl ashings are properly attached and sealed.

Composition Roof. All shingles are properly attached, none are loose or missing, and all holes are fi lled.

Skirting Ventilation. The skirting around the home has non-closing vents, located at or near each corner as high as possible to cross-ventilate the entire space under the home.

The free area of these vents must be equal to at least onesquare foot for every 150 square feet of fl oor area of the home. The vent size must be increased to allow for insect screens, slats, louvers, etc., used over the open vent area.

Low-Hanging Trees and Bushes. If there are any low-hanging trees or bushes near the home, trim or cut them. Think about the plants’ possible movement during windy conditions or when covered by snow or ice.

Exhaust Fan Operation and Air Flow. Check all exhaust fans for proper operation and air fl ow.

Bottomboard. Carefully inspect the bottom covering of the home for loosening or tears from installation of pipes or wires.

Seal openings around the fl oor perimeter, pipes or pipe hangers and splits or tears with weather-resistant tape.

Anchors and Straps. Be sure the correct number of anchors have been installed at the proper angle, and that all straps have been tightened.

Interior Details. Inspect for, and correct, all interior fi nishing details, such as loose molding, carpet seams, etc. The retailers’ representative should inspect the home with the homeowner, give the homeowner a copy of the Homeowner’s

Manual, and brief the homeowner about maintaining the home.

INSTALLATION INSPECTION CHECKLIST

TO ENSURE PROPER HOME INSTALLATION AND HOMEOWNER SATISFACTION, THE FOLLOWING

ITEMS SHOULD BE CHECKED DURING OR PROMPTLY AFTER THE INSTALLATION AND BEFORE THE

HOMEOWNER TAKES POSSESSION:

INSTALLATION/PLACEMENT:

Alignment/Close-Off DW

Level

Foundation

Tie-Downs

UTILITY CONNECTIONS

Fuel

Water

Electric

Sewage

Cross-Over Duct

EXTERIOR

Doors

Windows

Roof

Siding/Trim

INTERIOR

Ceiling

Trim

Electrical Systems/Fixtures

Cabinets

Furniture

Keys

All Warranties

Paneling

Floor Covering/Drapes

Doors

Plumbing

Appliances

All Manuals

62

63

Corporate Offi ce — P.O. Box 743 — Elkhart, Indiana 46515

Visit us at our web site at www.skylinecorp.com

01/15/07

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