PDF - Lenovo Press
Redbooks Paper
David Watts
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical
Introduction
Introduction
The four-way Intel Xeon MP-based x365 is the follow-on to the popular x360 and offers
second-generation Enterprise X-Architecture technology in a rack-dense 3U form factor. The
x365 is targeted at database, e-mail, e-commerce and ERP applications.
This paper introduces the new xSeries 365 and describes the technical aspects of the server.
Topics in this paper are:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
“Overview of the x365” on page 1
“Current models” on page 2
“IBM XA-32 second-generation chipset” on page 3
“Processors” on page 5
“System memory” on page 8
“PCI subsystem” on page 13
“RXE-100 Remote Expansion Enclosure” on page 18
“Redundancy” on page 22
“Light path diagnostics” on page 23
“Operating system support” on page 23
This document has been updated to correct some technical inaccuracies. Changes are
marked with change bars.
Overview of the x365
The following are the key features of the x365:
򐂰 XA-32 second-generation chipset.
򐂰 Models with one or two Intel Xeon MP processors, up to 2.8 GHz and 2 MB L3 cache,
upgradable to four-way.
Click here to check for updates
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004. All rights reserved.
ibm.com/redbooks
1
򐂰 1 GB or 2 GB memory standard, expandable to 32 GB (16 DIMM slots), using
high-performance ECC DDR DIMMs.
򐂰 Active Memory with Memory ProteXion, memory mirroring and ChipKill.
򐂰 Four 133 MHz and one 100 MHz Active PCI-X slots.
򐂰 Integrated LSI 1030 dual-channel Ultra320 SCSI controller with integrated RAID-1
support. Addition support for internal RAID arrays using an optional ServeRAID adapter.
򐂰 Six internal hot-swap drive bays for up to 876 GB of internal storage.
򐂰 Integrated Dual Broadcom 5704 PCI-X Gigabit Ethernet.
򐂰 Support for an RXE-100 Remote Expansion Enclosure for up to 12 additional PCI-X slots.
The RXE-100 can be used exclusively by one x365 or can be shared between two x365s
(six slots to each server).
򐂰 3U rack-optimized tool-free chassis.
򐂰 Remote Supervisor Adapter II standard.
򐂰 Supports the IBM Integrated xSeries Adapter for iSeries (IXA) for a direct high speed link
to an iSeries server.
򐂰 One-year warranty (for machine type 8861) or 3-year warranty (for machine type 8862).
Standard warranty is on-site, 9 hours per day, 5 days per week, next business day
response.
Figure 1 shows the x365 and major components on the front of the unit.
CD-ROM
drive
Operator
panel
Diskette
drive
Six hot-swap
disk drive
bays
USB port
Panel release button to
display light path panel
Processor tray
Figure 1 Front panel of the x365
Current models
The x365 models, shown in Table 1, were announced in December 2003.
Table 1 x365 models
2
Model
Standard/max CPUs
L2 cache
L3 cache
Standard/max memory
Std/max power
8861-1RX
1x Xeon MP 2.0 GHz / 4
512 KB
1 MB
1 GB (2x 512 MB) / 32
1x 950 W / 2 max
8862-1RX
1x Xeon MP 2.0 GHz / 4
512 KB
1 MB
2 GB (4x 512 MB) / 32
1x 950 W / 2 max
8862-2RX
2x Xeon MP 2.5 GHz / 4
512 KB
1 MB
2 GB (4x 512 MB) / 32
2x 950 W / 2 max
8862-3RX
2x Xeon MP 2.8 GHz / 4
512 KB
2 MB
2 GB (4x 512 MB) / 32
2x 950 W / 2 max
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
The x365 supports one, two, three, or four processors.
All models support a maximum of 32 GB using 2 GB DIMMs in 16 sockets. However, models
other than 8862-3RX require the replacement of the 8-socket memory board to support 16
DIMMs.
The x365 has five internal PCI-X slots and one internal PCI slot. The attachment of a single
RXE-100 Remote Expansion Enclosure is supported, providing an additional six or 12 PCI-X
slots. Connectivity is via a single RXE expansion connection as shown in Figure 2.
Furthermore, the PCI-X slots in a single RXE-100 can be shared between two x365 servers.
See “RXE-100 Remote Expansion Enclosure” on page 18 for more details.
The RXE-100 has six PCI-X slots standard, upgradable to 12 PCI-X slots, giving the customer
up to a total of 11 PCI-X or 17 PCI-X slots, respectively.
One RXE expansion
connection
xSeries 365
1-4 Xeon MP processors
1-32 GB
5 PCI-X slots and 1 PCI slot
6 hot-swap drive bays
RXE-100
6 PCI-X slots
12 PCI-X slots
Figure 2 x365 configurations
IBM XA-32 second-generation chipset
The x365 uses the second generation of the IBM XA-32 chipset, which also powers the x445
and x455 high-performance servers. The architecture consists of the following components:
򐂰 One to four Xeon MP processors
򐂰 One Cyclone 3.0 Memory Controller
򐂰 Two Winnipeg 4.0 PCI Bridges
Figure 3 shows the block diagram of the x365.
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
3
CPU 1
CPU 2
CPU 3
CPU 4
3.2 GBps
DDR
SMIE
DDR
DDR
3.2 GBps
2 GBps
Memory
controller
SMIE
2 GBps
133 MHz
PCI bridge
100 MHz
3.2 GBps
2-way
interleave
DDR
RXE
Expansion
Port
(2 GBps)
IBM XA-32
core chipset
3.2 GBps
400 MHz
PCI bridge
33 MHz
1
USB
Gigabit
Ethernet
2
3
4
5
6
RSA II
Ultra320
SCSI
I/O*
EIDE
64-bit
64-bit
33 MHz 100 MHz
PCI
PCI-X
Four PCI-X slots:
64-bit 133 MHz
* Keyboard, mouse, diskette, serial
Figure 3 xSeries 365 system block diagram
One PCI bridge supplies three of the four 64-bit 133 MHz PCI-X slots on three independent
PCI-X buses. The other PCI bridge supplies the other three PCI-X slots (all 64-bit, but the bus
speeds vary), all the onboard PCI devices, plus the interface to the optional RXE-100
expansion enclosure.
This design is similar to the x445 and x455 with the following major differences:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
No SMP scalability ports
No Cache and Scalability Controller
No XceL4 Server Accelerator Cache
Different PCI-X slot configuration
RSA II occupies one of the six PCI-X slots, not a separate dedicated PCI slot
The rear panel of the x365 is shown in Figure 4.
4
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Remote Supervisor Adapter II
(with Video port)
Ethernet 1
Ethernet 2
RXE Management
port
SCSI
AC
AC
1
2
3
4
5
6
USB 2
USB 1
Serial
Keyboard
Mouse
RXE Expansion port
Figure 4 Rear view of the x365
Processors
The x365 uses Intel Two Xeon MP “Gallatin” processors. The x365 use different processors
as described in Table 2; however, all models support one, two, three, or four processors.
Table 2 Processors used in the x365 models
Model
Processor
L2 cache
L3 cache
Installed
Upgrade option
8861-1RX
Xeon MP 2.0 GHz
512 KB
1 MB
1
73P7073
8862-1RX
Xeon MP 2.0 GHz
512 KB
1 MB
1
73P7073
8862-2RX
Xeon MP 2.5 GHz
512 KB
1 MB
2
73P7074
8862-3RX
Xeon MP 2.8 GHz
512 KB
2 MB
2
73P7075
The upgrade options include one processor and one VRM. The VRM must be installed if the
option is to be installed as CPU 3 or CPU 4. The VRMs for CPUs 1 and 2 are integrated onto
the processor board.
All CPUs used in a server must be the same type, speed, and L2/L3 cache size.
The processors are easily accessible from the front of the server on a sliding tray.
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
5
The processor tray
pulls out from the
front of the server
and houses the
CPUs, VRMs and
memory controller.
2
3
4
1
Figure 5 x365 processor tray
The VRMs for processors 1 and 2 are integrated on the microprocessor board; the VRMs for
processors 3 and 4 come with the processor options.
See “Processors” on page 5 for a further discussion about what you should consider before
implementing an x365 solution.
The Xeon Processor MP (code named “Gallatin”) uses the ZIF socket design. This smaller
form factor means that the x365 can have up to four processors in a 3U chassis.
The Xeon MP processor has three levels of cache, all of which are on the processor die:
򐂰 Level 3 cache is equivalent to L2 cache on the Pentium III Xeon. The x365 processors
contain either 1 MB or 2 MB L3 cache.
򐂰 Level 2 cache is equivalent to L1 cache on the Pentium III Xeon and is 512 KB in size. The
L2 cache implements the Advanced Transfer Cache technology, which means
L2-to-processor transfers occur across a 256-bit bus in only one clock cycle.
򐂰 A new Level 1 execution trace cache, 12 KB in size, is “closest” to the processor and is
used to store micro-operations (that is, decoded executable machine instructions); it
serves those to the processor at rated speed. This additional level of cache saves decode
time on cache hits. There is an additional 8 KB data cache for data related to those
instructions, which is clocked at twice the speed of the processor’s clock rate.
For more information, see the Intel Technology Overview white paper, available from:
http://www.intel.com/eBusiness/pdf/prod/server/xeon/ds020903.pdf
Intel has also introduced a number of features associated with its NetBurst
micro-architecture. These are available in the x365, including:
򐂰 400 MHz frontside bus
The Pentium III Xeon processor in older servers had a 100 MHz frontside bus that equates
a burst throughput of 800 MBps. With protocols such as TCP/IP, this has been shown to
be a bottleneck in high-throughput situations.
6
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
The Xeon Processor MP improves on this by using two 100 MHz clocks, out of phase with
each other by 90 degrees, and using both edges of each clock to transmit data. This is
shown in Figure 6 on page 7.
100 MHz clock A
100 MHz clock B
Figure 6 Quad-pumped frontside bus
This increases the performance of the frontside bus without the difficulty of high-speed
clock signal integrity issues. Since the bus is eight bytes wide, the end result is an effective
burst throughput of 3.2 GBps, which can have a substantial impact, especially on
TCP/IP-based LAN traffic.
򐂰 Hyper-Threading
Hyper-Threading technology enables a single physical processor to execute two separate
code streams (threads) concurrently. To the operating system, a processor with
Hyper-Threading appears as two logical processors, each of which has its own
architectural state, that is, its own data, segment and control registers, and its own
advanced programmable interrupt controller (APIC).
Each logical processor can be individually halted, interrupted, or directed to execute a
specified thread, independently from the other logical processor on the chip. Unlike a
traditional two-way SMP configuration that uses two separate physical processors, the
logical processors share the execution resources of the processor core, which includes
the execution engine, the caches, the system bus interface, and the firmware.
Note: Hyper-Threading is enabled by default on the x365, but can be easily disabled in
the BIOS.
Hyper-Threading technology is designed to improve server performance by exploiting the
multi-threading capability of operating systems, such as Windows 2003 and Linux, and
server applications, in such a way as to increase the use of the on-chip execution
resources available on these processors.
Fewer or slower processors usually achieve the best gains from Hyper-Threading because
there is a greater likelihood that the software can spawn sufficient numbers of threads to
keep both paths busy. The following performance gains are likely:
– Two physical processors: 15–25 percent performance gain
– Four physical processors: 1–13 percent gain
– Eight physical processors: 0–5 percent gain
Tests have shown that software often limits SMP scalability, but customers should expect
improved results as software matures. Best-case applications today are:
–
–
–
–
Databases
Java
Web servers
E-mail
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
7
Note that Microsoft licensing of the Windows Server 2000 operating systems is by number
of processors (four-way for Server, eight-way for Advanced Server, 32-way for Datacenter
Server). Therefore, the appearance of twice as many logical processors can potentially
affect the installation of the operating system. See “Operating system support” on page 23
for details.
Windows 2003 Server operating systems understand the concept of physical processors
versus logical processors. For more information about Hyper-Threading, see the following
URLs:
http://www.intel.com/technology/hyperthread/
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/server/evaluation/performance/reports/hype
rthread.asp
򐂰 Advanced Dynamic Execution
The Pentium III Xeon in older servers had a ten-stage pipeline. However, the large number
of transistors in each pipeline stage meant that the processor was limited to speeds under
1 GHz due to latency in the pipeline.
The Xeon Processor MP has a 20-stage pipeline, which can hold up to 126 concurrent
instructions in flight and up to 48 reads and 24 writes active in the pipeline. The lower
complexity of each stage also means that future clock speed increases are possible.
It is important to note, however, that the longer pipeline means that it now takes more
clock cycles to execute the same instruction as compared to the Pentium III Xeon.
For more information about the features of the Xeon Processor MP, go to:
http://www.intel.com/design/Xeon/xeonmp/prodbref/
System memory
The x365 has one or two GB standard, implemented as two or four 512 MB PC266 (also
known as PC2100) ECC DDR DIMMs.
As standard, the x365 supports either eight or 16 DIMMs depending on the model, as listed in
Table 3, although models supporting eight DIMMs can be upgraded. Features such as
Memory ProteXion and memory mirroring are only available when the server has 16 DIMM
sockets.
The x365 comes standard with eight or 16 DIMM sockets, depending on the model, as listed
in Table 3.
Table 3 Memory DIMMs in x365 models
Model
Standard DIMM
sockets
Standard RAM
Upgrade to 16 sockets
8861-1RX
8
1 GB (2x 512 MB)
Use Memory Upgrade Card, 73P9710
8862-1RX
8
2 GB (4x 512 MB)
Use Memory Upgrade Card, 73P9710
8862-2RX
8
2 GB (4x 512 MB)
Use Memory Upgrade Card, 73P9710
8862-3RX
16
2 GB (4x 512 MB)
Not needed
With 16 sockets and using 2 GB DIMMs, the x365 can have up to 32 GB RAM.
8
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Important: The ramifications of the number of sockets goes beyond simply the amount of
RAM that can be installed without also replacing the memory card. Active Memory features
Memory ProteXion and memory mirroring are only available when the server has 16 DIMM
sockets.
The memory is two-way interleaved (meaning that memory DIMMs are installed in pairs) with
two ports to the memory controller supporting up to 6.4 GBps data transfers.
There are a number of advanced features implemented in the x365 memory subsystem,
collectively known as Active Memory:
򐂰 Memory ProteXion
Memory ProteXion, also known as “redundant bit steering,” is the technology behind using
redundant bits in a data packet to provide backup in the event of a DIMM failure.
Currently, other industry-standard servers use 8 bits of the 72-bit data packets for ECC
functions and the remaining 64 bits for data. However, the x365 needs only 6 bits to
perform the same ECC functions, thus leaving 2 bits free. In the event that a chip failure on
the DIMM is detected by memory scrubbing, the memory controller can re-route data
around that failed chip through the spare bits (similar to the hot-spare drive of a RAID
array). It can do this automatically without issuing a Predictive Failure Analysis (PFA) or
light path diagnostics alert to the administrator. After the second DIMM failure, PFA and
light path diagnostics alerts would occur on that DIMM as normal.
Important: Memory ProteXion is only available when the 16-socket memory board is
installed (either standard, or via the Memory Upgrade Card, 73P9710).
򐂰 Memory scrubbing
Memory scrubbing is an automatic daily test of all the system memory that detects and
reports memory errors that might be developing before they cause a server outage.
Memory scrubbing and Memory ProteXion work in conjunction with each other and do not
require memory mirroring to be enabled to work properly.
When a bit error is detected, memory scrubbing determines if the error is recoverable or
not. If it is recoverable, Memory ProteXion is enabled and the data that was stored in the
damaged locations is rewritten to a new location. The error is then reported so that
preventative maintenance can be performed. As long as there are enough good locations
to allow the proper operation of the server, no further action is taken other than recording
the error in the error logs.
If the error is not recoverable, then memory scrubbing sends an error message to the light
path diagnostics, which then turns on the proper lights and LEDs to guide you to the
damaged DIMM. If memory mirroring is enabled, then the mirrored copy of the data in the
damaged DIMM is used until the system is powered down and the DIMM replaced.
򐂰 Memory mirroring
Memory mirroring is roughly equivalent to RAID-1 in disk arrays, in that memory is divided
in two ports and one port is mirrored to the other half (see Figure 8 on page 11). If 8 GB is
installed, then the operating system sees 4 GB once memory mirroring is enabled (it is
disabled in the BIOS by default). Since all mirroring activities are handled by the hardware,
memory mirroring is operating system independent.
Certain restrictions exist with respect to placement and size of memory DIMMs when
memory mirroring is enabled. See “Memory mirroring” on page 12 for details.
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
9
Important: Memory mirroring is only available when the 16-socket memory board is
installed (either standard, or via the Memory Upgrade Card, 73P9710).
򐂰 Chipkill memory
Chipkill is integrated into the XA-32 second-generation chipset and does not require
special Chipkill DIMMs. Chipkill corrects multiple single-bit errors to keep a DIMM from
failing. When combining Chipkill with Memory ProteXion and Active Memory, the x365
provides very high reliability in the memory subsystem. Chipkill memory is approximately
100 times more effective than ECC technology, providing correction for up to four bits per
DIMM (eight bits per memory controller), whether on a single chip or multiple chips.
If a memory chip error does occur, Chipkill is designed to automatically take the
inoperative memory chip offline while the server keeps running. The memory controller
provides memory protection similar in concept to disk array striping with parity, writing the
memory bits across multiple memory chips on the DIMM. The controller is able to
reconstruct the “missing” bit from the failed chip and continue working as usual.
Chipkill support is provided in the memory controller and implemented using standard
ECC DIMMs, so it is transparent to the OS.
In addition, to maintain the highest levels of system availability, if a memory error is detected
during POST or memory configuration, the server can automatically disable the failing
memory bank and continue operating with reduced memory capacity. You can manually
re-enable the memory bank after the problem is corrected via the Setup menu in the BIOS.
Memory mirroring, Chipkill, and Memory ProteXion provide multiple levels of redundancy to
the memory subsystem. Combining Chipkill with Memory ProteXion enables up to two
memory chip failures per memory port on the x365, for a total of four failures sustained.
1. The first failure detected by the Chipkill algorithm on each port does not generate a light
path diagnostics error, since Memory ProteXion recovers from the problem automatically.
2. Each memory port could then sustain a second chip failure without shutting down.
3. Provided that memory mirroring is enabled, the third chip failure on that port would send
the alert and take the DIMM offline, but keep the system running out of the redundant
memory bank.
The DIMM sockets are houses in the memory cassette and accessible through two clear
doors. You do not need to remove the memory cassette to install DIMMs.
10
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
The memory cassette partially removed from the
server chassis (eight-DIMM board). The clear
plastic doors open for easy access to DIMMs.
The eight-DIMM board,
from above
Figure 7 x365 memory cassette
The DIMM sockets are divided into two ports. When memory mirroring is enabled (16-DIMM
socket board only), memory is mirrored from one port to the other.
The DIMM sockets are also divided up into banks. A bank is the pair of DIMMs required for
two-way interleaving. The banks are shown in Figure 8.
Bank 3
Bank 1
Bank 7
Bank 5
Bank 1
Bank 2
Bank 3
Bank 4
Port 2
Port 1
Bank 2
Bank 4
Port 2
Bank 6
Bank 8
Port 1
Figure 8 Eight-DIMM board and 16-DIMM board showing bank and port arrangements
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
11
Key configuration rules are:
򐂰 Because the x365 uses DDR (two-way interleaving) memory, DIMMs must be installed in
banks (two DIMMs). Supported DIMMs are:
– 512 MB DIMMs (part number 33L5038)
– 1 GB DIMMs (part number 73P2031)
– 2 GB DIMM (part number 73P2030) (Note: 33L5040 is not supported)
򐂰 The above DIMMs can all be used at the same time, but both DIMMs in a bank must be
the same size.
򐂰 On the 1RX and 2RX models, if you want to install more than eight DIMMs, you must also
replace the existing eight-DIMM memory board with the memory upgrade card, 73P9710.
򐂰 DIMMs sockets must be filled in a specific order to maintain balance across the two ports.
This order is described in the x365 Option Installation Guide.
򐂰 If you want to install the full 32 GB, you will need to remove the existing 512 MB DIMMs
and fully populate the memory board with 2 GB DIMMs.
Memory mirroring
Memory mirroring is available on the x365 for increased fault tolerance. It requires the
16-DIMM memory board be installed.
The feature is roughly equivalent to RAID-1 in disk arrays, in that memory is divided in two
ports and one port is mirrored to the other half (see Figure 8 on page 11). If 8 GB is installed,
for example, then the operating system sees 4 GB once memory mirroring is enabled (it is
disabled in the BIOS by default).
Memory mirroring is operating system independent, since all mirroring activities are handled
by the hardware.
When memory mirroring is enabled, the data that is written to memory is stored in two
locations. One copy is kept in the port 1 DIMMs, while a second copy is kept in the port 2
DIMMs. During the execution of the read command, the data is read from the DIMM with the
least amount of reported memory errors through memory scrubbing, which is enabled with
memory mirroring.
Memory scrubbing is an automatic and regular test of all the system memory that detects and
reports memory errors before they cause a server outage.
If memory scrubbing determines that the DIMM is damaged beyond use, read and write
operations are redirected to the remaining good DIMM. Memory scrubbing then reports the
damaged DIMM and the light path diagnostics display the error. If memory mirroring is
enabled, then the mirrored copy of the data in the damaged DIMM is used until the system is
powered down and the DIMM replaced. After the damaged DIMM is replaced, memory
mirroring then copies the mirrored data back into the new DIMM.
Key configuration rules relating to memory mirroring:
򐂰 You must have the 16-DIMM board installed either as standard (3RX model) or as an
option, part number 73P9710.
򐂰 Memory mirroring must be enabled in the BIOS (it is disabled by default).
򐂰 Both ports must have the same total amount of memory, and must have identical DIMMs.
In other words, DIMMs must be installed in matched quads to support memory mirroring.
Partial mirroring is not supported. See the x365 Option Installation Guide for information
on the exact installation order required.
12
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Restriction: Hot-add and hot-swap memory are not supported on the x365.
PCI subsystem
As shown in Figure 3 on page 4, there are six full-length hot-swap PCI-X slots internal to the
x365. These each support 3.3 V, 32-bit or 64-bit, PCI or PCI-X adapters. The slots support
adapters of different speeds:
򐂰 Slot 1 is a 64-bit, 33 MHz slot. It contains the standard Remote Supervisor Adapter II.
򐂰 Slot 2 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 100 MHz. It also has an slot extension to support the
ServeRAID 6i.
򐂰 Slot 3 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz.
򐂰 Slot 4 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz.
򐂰 Slot 5 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz.
򐂰 Slot 6 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz.
Slots 3–6 are on separate PCI-X buses so the adapter speeds they support are not affected
by other devices. Slot 2 shares its PCI-X bus with the onboard Ethernet and SCSI controllers,
so careful selection of the adapter in this slot is important, as it will affect the performance of
these onboard devices.
See “x365 PCI slots” on page 14 for details on what adapters are supported.
The PCI subsystem also supplies these I/O devices:
򐂰 LSI Logic 1030 dual Ultra320 SCSI with integrated RAID-1
򐂰 Broadcom dual port 5704 10/100/1000 Ethernet
򐂰 Remote Supervisor Adapter II installed in Slot 1, which also supplies video
򐂰 EIDE interface
򐂰 Serial port
򐂰 Three USB ports (one on the front panel, two on the rear)
Notes: There is no parallel port on the x365. For parallel port connections, use the
NetVista USB Parallel Printer Cable, part number 19K4164.
The Remote Supervisor Adapter II supplies the video for the server. The video subsystem
is powered by an ATI Radeon chip with 8 MB of video memory.
With the addition of an RXE-100 Remote Expansion Enclosure, you can connect an
additional six or 12 PCI-X adapters to the x365. See “RXE-100 Remote Expansion
Enclosure” on page 18 for details.
SCSI subsystem
The SCSI subsystem comprises a LSI Logic 1030 Dual Ultra320 SCSI controller. This allows
for independent control of both channels. The Ultra320 ports are attached to an internal HDD
backplane and an external connector at the rear of the system (see Figure 4 on page 5). The
integrated SCSI controller with RAID capabilities supports only RAID level-1. The SCSI
configuration is achieved using the LSI Logic Configuration Utility program.
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
13
ServeRAID adapters can also be installed and used to control the internal hot-swap drives or
external disk enclosures such as the EXP300. The adapters currently supported are:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
ServeRAID-6i (must be installed in slot 2)
ServeRAID-6M
ServeRAID-4Lx
ServeRAID-4Mx
The ServeRAID-4H is also supported but only for external disk enclosures, as the adapter
with internal connectors is too high for the 3U server chassis.
See ServerProven for the latest list of supported adapters:
http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/controllers/matrix.html
For a comparison of features of members of the ServeRAID family, see:
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/tips0054.html
Note: LSI RAID level-1 is not compatible with ServeRAID RAID level-1. Therefore, if the
operating system is installed on drives connected to the integrated LSI chipset, the
operating system will need to be reinstalled should the customer decide to move to a
ServeRAID adapter. For more information, see:
http://www.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=psg1MIGR-46174
x365 PCI slots
As shown in Figure 3, there are five full-length 64bit PCI-X slots and one full-length PCI slot
internal to the x365.
RXE
Expansion
Port
(2 GBps)
PCI bridge
100 MHz
133 MHz
PCI bridge
33 MHz
1
USB
Gigabit
Ethernet
2
3
4
5
6
RSA II
Ultra320
SCSI
I/O*
EIDE
64-bit
64-bit
33 MHz 100 MHz
PCI-X
PCI
Four PCI-X slots:
64-bit 133 MHz
* Keyboard, mouse, diskette, serial
Figure 9 xSeries 365 system block diagram (partial)
These six slots are implemented as follows:
򐂰 Slot 1 is a 64-bit, 33 MHz PCI slot. It contains the standard Remote Supervisor Adapter II,
which is a 32-bit 66 MHz adapter (and runs at 33 MHz in this slot). Slot 1 shares a PCI bus
with devices such as USB, CD-ROM, diskette, mouse, and keyboard controllers.
14
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
򐂰 Slot 2 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 100 MHz. This slot supports the ServeRAID-6i
adapter. (It is also the only slot that supports the ServeRAID-6i.) Slot 2 shares a PCI-X bus
with the LSI SCSI controller and the Broadcom Ethernet controller.
򐂰 Slot 3 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz. It does not share the bus with any devices.
If you plan to install the IXA adapter (for connectivity to an IBM Eserver iSeries server), it
must be installed in this slot.
򐂰 Slot 4 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz. It does not share the bus with any devices.
򐂰 Slot 5 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz. It does not share the bus with any devices.
򐂰 Slot 6 supports adapters up to 64-bit, 133 MHz. It does not share the bus with any devices.
Certain restrictions apply to adapters in these slots:
򐂰 Slot 2 will operate at 100 MHz or the rated speed of the installed adapter, whichever is
slower. However, if you install an adapter that runs less that 100 MHz (for example, a 66
MHz card), it will adversely affect the performance of the SCSI and Ethernet controllers
since these devices are on the same bus.
򐂰 Slots 3–6 can accept adapters rated at speeds ranging from 33 MHz to 133 MHz. The slot
speed will slow down to the speed of the adapter. For example, if the adapter is a 66 MHz
card, the bus will operate at 66 MHz.
򐂰 32-bit adapters can be installed in any of the slots and will run in 32-bit mode. For slot 2, a
32-bit adapter and the 64-bit SCSI and Ethernet controllers can coexist on the same bus.
The 32-bit adapter will run in 32-bit mode, and the 64-bit devices will run in 64-bit mode.
򐂰 The SCSI and Ethernet controllers on the bus with slot 2 are PCI-X devices. You can
install a PCI (not PCI-X) adapter, but the entire bus, including the SCSI and Ethernet
controllers, will operate in PCI mode with a loss in performance.
Important: If you install a PCI or slow PCI-X adapter in slot 2, you will impact the
performance of the SCSI and Ethernet subsystems.
Note also that you cannot hot-add a PCI adapter into slot 2, because the bus is running in
PCI-X mode and cannot switch to PCI mode without rebooting.
򐂰 The iSeries IXA adapter is a double thickness card. If you do plan to install the IXA adapter
in slot 3, you will not be able to use slot 4.
Tip: Take the time to understand these rules and to select the best slots for your adapters.
Incorrect choices can result in a loss of PCI adapter performance.
In summary, Table 4 lists the supported adapter speeds. Take into account the speed
reductions when there are two adapters installed in a bus, as described above.
Table 4 Supported adapter speeds in each slot
Slot
Width (bits)
Supported adapter speed (MHz)
1
32 or 64
33 MHz (the standard 32-bit 66 MHz Remote Supervisor
Adapter II operates in 32-bit 33 MHz mode)
2
32 or 64
33 or 66 or 100 (installing 33 and 66 adapters will affect
performance of the SCSI and Ethernet controllers)
3
32 or 64
33, 66, 100 or 133
4
32 or 64
33, 66, 100 or 133
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
15
Slot
Width (bits)
Supported adapter speed (MHz)
5
32 or 64
33, 66, 100 or 133
6
32 or 64
33, 66, 100 or 133
Other configuration information:
򐂰 Video adapters are not supported.
򐂰 The PCI slots supports 3.3 V adapters only. 5 V adapters are not supported.
򐂰 The ServeRAID 4H adapter is not supported for internal drives because the adapter is too
high to fit in the 4U server when a cable is attached to its internal connector.
򐂰 The system scans PCI-X slots to assign system resources. The system attempts to start
the first device found. The search order is:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
CD-ROM
Diskette drive
Integrated dual Gigabit Ethernet controller
Integrated SCSI devices
Internal PCI slot 1
Internal PCI-X slots (in the order 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
If an RXE-100 is attached, the order is:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
CD-ROM
Diskette drive
Integrated dual Gigabit Ethernet controller
Integrated SCSI devices
Internal PCI slot 1
Internal PCI-X slots (in the order 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
RXE-100 slots (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6, B1, B 2, B3, B4, B5, B6)
򐂰 IBM Integrated xSeries Adapter (IXA) is supported for high-speed host attachment to
iSeries.
Figure 10 The IBM Integrated xSeries Adapter
The following configuration points apply when installing this adapter:
– The adapter is only supported in slot 3 of the x365.
– The adapter takes up the space of two slots, so slot 4 is unusable.
– The IXA is a 66 MHz PCI adapter.
16
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
– Jumper 26 on the I/O planar must be moved from position 1-2 to 2-3. See the xSeries
365 Option Installation Guide for details.
See the following for more information about the adapter and integration with iSeries
servers:
http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/iseries/windowsintegration/
Broadcom dual Gigabit Ethernet controller
The x365 offers a dual Gigabit Ethernet controller integrated standard in the system. The
x365 includes one dual-port Broadcom BCM5704 10/100/1000 BASE-T MAC (Media Access
Controller) on the PCI-x 64-bit 100 MHz bus. The BCM5704 has the following features:
򐂰 Supports full and half-duplex performance at all speeds (10/100/1000 Mbps, auto
negotiated).
򐂰 Includes integrated on-chip memory for buffering data transmissions to ensure the highest
network performance.
򐂰 Includes dual onboard RISC processors for advanced packet parsing.
򐂰 Backward compatibility with today's 10/100 network.
The Broadcom controller also includes software support for failover, layer-3 load balancing,
and comprehensive diagnostics.
Category 5 or better Ethernet cabling is required with RJ-45 connectors. If you plan to
implement a Gigabit Ethernet connection, ensure that your network infrastructure is capable
of the necessary throughput to match the server’s I/O capacity.
Remote Supervisor Adapter II
The x365 includes as standard the Remote Supervisor Adapter II service processor. This
adapter provides the same functionality as the Remote Supervisor Adapter II option available
for other xSeries servers. Key features of the Remote Supervisor Adapter II over the original
Remote Supervisor Adapter include:
򐂰 System-independent graphical console redirection
– Built-in video compression hardware eliminates drivers.
– Graphics response, up to five times faster than with its predecessor, makes monitoring
and control more efficient.
– System-independent installation eliminates the need to install service processor
drivers, helps save IT staff time, and reduces installation complexity.
򐂰 Remote diskette and CD-ROM drive support
– Enables remote booting and software loading of the server for:
•
•
Application or operating system installation and updates
Single server deployment
– Performs configuration remotely; helps save IT time and money by reducing on-site
presence and server downtime.
򐂰 Scriptable command-line interface and text-based serial console redirect
– Command-line interface supports program control of server management functions
using scripts.
– Serial text redirect provides access to text-mode BIOS and text-based system consoles
such as Linux, NetWare, and Windows EMS (Emergency Management Services).
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
17
– Program control of text-based console using scripts.
– Two serial ports supported; the extra serial port can be used to redirect the console of
an additional device.
– PPP support.
򐂰 User authentication and authority features
– User IDs, passwords, and login permission attributes can be stored in an LDAP server.
– Enhanced user authority levels set the access rights for users to match job
responsibilities for managing your xSeries servers.
– Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encrypts the data transmitted between LDAP server and
the Remote Supervisor Adapter II
򐂰 Investment protection
– Supports IBM Interconnect (RS-485) connection with other xSeries servers.
– Integrates with IBM Director and Director Agent.
The card has the following physical attributes:
򐂰 Half-length, 32-bit, up to 66 MHz PCI adapter (when installed in the x365, the adapter runs
at 33 MHz)
򐂰 IBM ASIC with integrated PowerPC 405 core executing at 200 MHz
򐂰 16 MB SDRAM and 4 MB flash ROM
򐂰 External cable with single high-density connector, dual RJ-48 ports, and two serial ports
򐂰 External connectors:
– One high-density connector supporting two RS232 (9-pin) serial ports and the ASM
interconnect
– Analog video (system video)
– 10/100 Base T Ethernet Port (RJ-45)
򐂰 Two status LEDs (externally visible on the bracket) and two status LEDs on the Ethernet
port
RXE-100 Remote Expansion Enclosure
The x365 can be connected to a single RXE-100 (8684-1RX) to provide an additional six or
12 PCI-X slots to the server. In addition, two x365 servers can share the slots of
RXE-100—six slots each.
The RXE-100 has six 133 MHz 64-bit PCI-X slots as standard and can accept adapters with
speeds ranging from 33 MHz to 133 MHz. With the optional six-slot expansion kit (part
number 31P5998) installed, the RXE-100 has 12 slots. Each set of six adapter slots is divided
into three buses of two slots each, as shown in Figure 11 on page 19.
18
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
RXE Expansion Port
B
Bus: C
Slot: 6
5
4
A
3
2
1
Figure 11 RXE-100 PCI-X expansion board (6 slots)
For each of the three buses (A, B, C), one of the following can be installed:
򐂰 One 64-bit PCI-X 133 MHz adapter (in the odd-numbered slot), running at up to 133 MHz
򐂰 Two 64-bit PCI-X 133 MHz adapters running at up to 100 MHz
򐂰 Two 64-bit PCI or PCI-X, 33 or 66 MHz adapters
These slots can accept adapters rated at speeds ranging from 33 MHz to 133 MHz. When
deciding which adapters to put in which slots, consider the following:
򐂰 Each adapter has a maximum rated speed and each bus also has a maximum rated
speed.
򐂰 Installed adapters will operate at the slowest of three speeds:
– The rated speed of adapter 1 in the bus
– The rated speed of adapter 2 in the bus
– The rated speed of the bus
򐂰 32-bit adapters can be installed in any of the slots and will run in 32-bit mode. 32-bit and
64-bit adapters can coexist in 64-bit slots on the same bus. The 32-bit adapters will run in
32-bit mode, and the 64-bit adapters will run in 64-bit mode.
򐂰 When installing a 133 MHz PCI-X adapter, remember that it must be installed in the first or
odd-numbered slot in the bus (that is, in slots 1, 3, or 5).
򐂰 Like the x365, a PCI-X and a PCI adapter can be installed in slots on the same bus in the
RXE-100. However, these two adapters will both operate in PCI mode.
In addition, if you have a PCI-X adapter installed, you cannot hot-add a PCI adapter to the
same bus. This is because with just the PCI-X adapter installed, the bus is running in
PCI-X mode, and you cannot hot-add a PCI adapter into a bus that is in PCI-X mode.
򐂰 With Windows NT 4.0 Enterprise Edition, certain token-ring adapters do not work in some
slots in the RXE-100. See RETAIN tip H175383 for more information:
http://www.pc.ibm.com/qtechinfo/MIGR-42139.html
Cabling
The cabling used to connect the RXE-100 to the x365 is shown in Figure 12. The figure
shows both an RXE-100 with six PCI-X slots installed and one with 12 slots installed. The
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
19
difference is the addition of a small loop between two of the management ports on the
RXE-100.
Connecting to a six-slot RXE-100
Connecting to a 12-slot RXE-100
xSeries 365
AC
AC
AC
1
RXE
Management
Port
2
3
4
5
6
RXE Expansion
Port
RXE Management
A (in) Port
xSeries 365
RXE-100
RXE Expansion Port
RXE
Management
Port
AC
1
2
3
4
6
RXE Expansion
Port
RXE Management
A (in) Port
RXE Expansion Port
5
RXE-100
Additional management
cable between A (out)
and B (in)
Figure 12 Connecting the x365 to an RXE-100 (left: six slots in the RXE-100; right: 12 slots in the RXE-100)
There are two types of cables used to connect the RXE-100 to the x365:
򐂰 Remote I/O cable, for data
This cable connects from the x365 RXE Expansion Port to the RXE-100. Two lengths are
available:
– 3.5 m Remote I/O cable kit (part number 31P6102)
– 8 m Remote I/O cable kit (part number 31P6103)
The RXE-100 ships with a 3.5 m Remote I/O cable to connect the unit to the x365. This
cable is long enough when the devices are in the same rack as each other. For installation
in an adjacent rack, use the optional 8 m Remote I/O cable kit.
򐂰 Interconnect management cable, for control
The RXE-100 also includes a 3.5 m interconnect management cable, which is used to
connect the RXE Management Port on the x365 to the RXE Management A (In) Port on
the RXE-100.
Two lengths are available:
– 3.5 m interconnect management cable kit (part number 31P6087)
– 8 m interconnect management cable kit (part number 31P6088)
Important: This cable has standard RJ-45 connectors on each end, but it is not the
same wiring as a standard Ethernet network cable, nor a crossover cable. Ensure that
the proper cables listed above are used for this connection.
If the RXE-100 has the second set of six PCI slots installed, use the short interconnect
management cable (supplied with the PCI slot option kit) to connect Management A (out)
Port to Management B (in) Port.
The 8 m interconnect management cable is suitable for inter-rack configurations.
20
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Tip: Power to the RXE-100 is controlled by the x365, via the interconnect management
cable and under the control of the Remote Supervisor Adapter.
Sharing the RXE-100 with two x365 configurations
The x365 will support sharing of the RXE-100. The RXE-100 must have 12 PCI-X slots
installed, and each x365 will have access to six slots. Connections are shown in Figure 13.
xSeries 365
AC
AC
1
RXE
Management
Port
2
3
4
5
6
RXE Expansion
Port
RXE Management
A (in) Port
RXE Management
B (in) Port
RXE-100
RXE Expansion
Port A
RXE Expansion
Port B
xSeries 365
AC
AC
1
RXE
Management
Port
2
3
4
5
6
RXE Expansion
Port
Figure 13 Sharing an RXE-100 between two x365 configurations
The data cable connects to the RXE-100 using the RXE Management B (in) Port. The short
cable that is used in the non-shared 12-slot configuration is not used in this configuration.
This configuration requires additional cables be ordered:
򐂰 One remote I/O cable, either 3.5 m (part 31P6102) or 8 m (part 31P6103)
򐂰 One Interconnect management cable, either 3.5 m (31P6087) or 8 m (31P6088)
Restriction: There are no supported configurations for sharing Remote I/O enclosures
with other servers, such as the x360, x440, x445, x450 or x455.
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
21
Redundancy
The x365 has the following redundancy features to maintain high availability.
򐂰 Six hot-swap multi-speed fans.
Six, hot-swap, multispeed fans to provide cooling redundancy and enable individual fan
replacement without powering down the server. In the event of a fan failure, the other fans
will speed up to continue to provide adequate cooling until the fan can be hot-swapped by
the IT administrator. In general, failed fans should be replaced within 48 hours following
failure.
򐂰 One or two 950 W hot-swap power supplies with separate power cords.
As per Table 1 on page 2, the 1RX models have one power supply standard and the 2RX
and 3RX models have two power supplies standard. With either 110 V or 220 V power, the
second power supply provided redundancy in case the first supply fails.
򐂰 Six hot-swap hard disk drive bays with onboard support for RAID-1.
Together with the integrated LSI Logic 1030 dual Ultra320 SCSI, they can be configured to
create a RAID-1 disk array for the operating system. Various ServeRAID adapters are also
supported to form other RAID levels.
򐂰 The two Gigabit Ethernet ports can be configured as a team to form a redundant pair.
򐂰 The memory subsystem has a number of redundancy features, including memory
mirroring, as described in “System memory” on page 8.
The layout of the front panel of the x365, showing the location of the drive bays, power
supplies, and fans, is shown in Figure 14.
Hot-swap
power supplies
Active Memory
redundancy
features
Hot-swap
redundant fans
Hot-swap disk
drive bays
Figure 14 Redundancy features of the x365
22
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Light path diagnostics
To limit the need to slide the server out of the rack to diagnose problems, a light path
diagnostics panel is located at the front of the x365. This panel slides out from the front of the
server to view all light path diagnostics-monitored server subsystems. In the event that
maintenance is then required, the customer can slide the server out from the rack and, using
the LEDs, find the failed or failing component.
Light path diagnostics is able to monitor and report on the health of CPUs, main memory,
hard disk drives, PCI-X and PCI adapters, fans, power supplies, VRMs, and the internal
system temperature.
Panel release button to display
light path diagnostics panel
PS1 TEMP VRM
PS2
Light path diagnostic indicators are on
the side of this swing-out unit.
PCI DASD NMI
FAN CPU MEM
NR
SP
EXP OVER SPEC
LOG
REMIND
Figure 15 Light path diagnostic panel
Note that the pair of 7-segment LEDs on the top of the swing-out unit are development debug
tools only.
Operating system support
Table 5 on page 24 lists the supported operating systems for the x365 and the level of support
for Hyper-Threading technology provided by the operating system. For the latest support
information, see ServerProven:
http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/compat/nos/matrix.shtml
In the column titled Hyper-Threading Support:
򐂰 None indicates that the operating system does not recognize the logical processors that
Hyper-Threading enables.
򐂰 Yes indicates that the operating system recognizes the logical processors and can execute
threads on them but is not optimized for Hyper-Threading. From a licensing perspective, if
Hyper-Threading is enabled, the operating system will need to be licensed for twice the
number of physical processors to take full advantage of the processors’ capabilities.
򐂰 Optimized indicates that the operating system recognizes the logical processors and the
operating system code has been designed to take full advantage of the technology. From a
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
23
licensing perspective, the logical processors do not count towards the number of
processors for which an operating system is licensed.
򐂰 Ignores indicates that the operating system recognizes the logical processors when
Hyper-Threading is enabled, but the operating system ignores them.
Table 5 x365 operating system support
Operating system1
Release
Support2
Hyper-Threading
Windows 2000 Server
SP3
Yes
Yes
Windows 2000 Advanced Server
SP3
Yes
Yes
Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition
Initial
Yes
Optimized
Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
Initial
Yes
Optimized
NetWare
6.5
Yes
Optimized
Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS
2.1
Yes
Yes
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
3.0
Planned
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server
8.0
Yes
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server
9.0
Planned
VMware ESX Server
2.0
Yes3
Yes
Ignores 4
Notes for Table 5:
1. While operating systems may support eight-way or larger systems, scalability is a function
of both the operating system and the application/workload. Applications must be
specifically designed to take advantage of larger SMP systems.
2. Some operating systems are supported at general availability (GA)—these are marked
with “Yes”. Those operating systems marked with “Planned” are planned to be supported
after GA.
3. Virtual machines running on VMware ESX Server 2.0 will only be dual processor capable
if the VMware ESX Virtual SMP module is also purchased.
4. Hyper-Threading can be enabled. However, VMware ESX Server 2.0 will not make use of
any logical processors.
The team that wrote this Redpaper
This Redpaper was produced by a technical specialist at the International Technical Support
Organization, Raleigh Center.
David Watts is a Consulting IT Specialist at the International Technical Support
Organization in Raleigh. He manages residencies and produces IBM Redbooks on
hardware and software topics related to IBM xSeries systems and associated client
platforms. He has authored over 35 IBM Redbooks, Redpapers and Solution Assurance
Product Review Guides; his most recent books include Implementing Systems
Management Solutions using IBM Director. He has a Bachelor of Engineering degree from
the University of Queensland (Australia) and has worked for IBM for over 15 years. He is
an IBM ^ Certified Specialist for xSeries and an IBM Certified IT Specialist.
24
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
Dan Hurlimann, Senior Engineer, xSeries development, Austin
Milan Miklos, WW Service Planning & Support, Raleigh
Glenn Myrto, xSeries Mechanical Development, Raleigh
Richard Rudd, x365 World Wide Product Manager, Raleigh
Ori Schafman, xSeries Technical Specialist, Israel
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
25
26
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consult
your local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area. Any
reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product,
program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not
infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the user's responsibility to
evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document. The
furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in
writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where such
provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION
PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of
express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made
to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make
improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time
without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in any
manner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the
materials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.
IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without incurring
any obligation to you.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their published
announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the
accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the
capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate them
as completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.
All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business
enterprise is entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrates programming
techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs in
any form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application
programs conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which the sample
programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore,
cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs. You may copy, modify, and
distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM for the purposes of developing, using,
marketing, or distributing application programs conforming to IBM's application programming interfaces.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2004. All rights reserved.
27
This document created or updated on January 29, 2004.
®
Send us your comments in one of the following ways:
򐂰 Use the online Contact us review redbook form found at:
ibm.com/redbooks
򐂰 Send your comments in an Internet note to:
redbook@us.ibm.com
򐂰 Mail your comments to:
IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization
Dept. HZ8 Building 662
P.O. Box 12195
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2195 U.S.A.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:
Eserver™
Eserver™
ibm.com®
iSeries™
xSeries®
Chipkill™
IBM®
NetVista™
Notes®
PowerPC®
Predictive Failure Analysis®
Redbooks™
RETAIN®
ServerProven®
ServeRAID™
Redbooks(logo)
™
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
Intel, Intel Inside (logos), MMX, and Pentium are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States, other
countries, or both.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the
United States, other countries, or both.
Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems,
Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.
SET, SET Secure Electronic Transaction, and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure Electronic
Transaction LLC.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
28
IBM Eserver xSeries 365 Technical Introduction
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising