ACD Systems!
Contents
C H AP TER 1 : G ETTI NG S TARTED
1
Welcome to ACDSee 17
1
About the ACDSee User Interface
1
Manage Mode
1
View Mode
1
Edit Mode
2
365 Mode
2
Switching Modes in ACDSee
2
Using Manage Mode
2
About the Manage Mode Panes
2
Manage Mode Drop-Down Menus
3
Working with Manage Mode Panes
4
Moving Panes
4
Docking Panes
4
Stacking Panes
4
Resizing Panes
5
Resetting the Layout
5
Using View Mode
5
Viewing images in full screen mode
6
Using the View Mode Panes
6
Using the Bottom Toolbar
6
Switching to Manage Mode
7
Using Edit Mode
7
Using 365 Mode
8
Uploading Images
C H AP TER 2 : G ETTI NG H EL P
8
9
Using the Quick Start Guide
9
Finding Other Resources and Support
9
C H AP TER 3 : MANAG E MOD E
11
Importing Files with ACDSee
11
Importing Photos From a Device
12
Importing Photos From a CD or DVD
17
Importing Photos From a Disk
17
Importing Photos From a Scanner
17
Importing Photos From a Mobile Phone Folder
18
Creating a Renaming Template
18
Browsing Files in the File List Pane
19
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
iv
Browsing Using the Folders Pane
22
Browsing Files By Date or Event
23
Browsing Favorite Files
25
Using the Catalog Pane
26
Changing Views
26
Filtering Files
27
Grouping Files
28
Sorting Files
29
Selecting Files
30
Previewing Images
30
Rotating Images
32
Comparing Images
32
Gathering Images in the Image Basket
34
Cataloging and Managing Files in ACDSee
34
Organizing with the Catalog Pane
34
Creating Categories
37
Assigning and Searching Categories and Ratings
38
Assigning Color Labels
40
Using the Properties Pane
43
Using the Map Pane
45
Creating and Assigning Hierarchical Keywords
47
Copying and Moving Files
48
Copying Images to the Clipboard
49
Pasting Files and Folders
49
Replacing or Overwriting Files
49
Renaming a File or Folder
50
Storing Files in Private Folders
50
Tagging Images
52
Manage Metadata Views and Presets
53
Adding ACDSee Metadata to Multiple Files
53
Removing IPTC Keywords from Auto Categories
54
Changing the Date and Time Properties of Images
55
Backing Up Your Files to Another Computer
56
Searching with ACDSee
57
Using the Quick Search Bar
57
Using the Search Pane
58
Searching with File Name Patterns
60
Using Selective Browsing
60
Searching with Auto Categories
61
Finding Duplicate Files
62
Finding Images Quickly
63
Sharing Files with ACDSee
63
Taking a Screen Capture
64
Emailing Images
65
Share / Email Using ACDSee 365
65
Creating a Desktop Screensaver
66
Viewing and Configuring a Slideshow
68
Sharing Slideshows and Screensavers
70
Creating a Desktop Slideshow
71
Creating a PDF
72
Creating a PowerPoint Presentation
72
Burning a CD or DVD
73
Creating an HTML Album
74
Uploading Images to Photo Websites
75
Creating a Contact Sheet
75
Creating Archives of Your Files
76
Extracting Archived (.zip) Files
77
Printing Images
77
Setting Printer Options
78
Setting Image Size and Positioning
79
Adding Text to Pages
80
Setting Contact Sheet Printing Options
80
About Batch Editing
81
Converting Multiple Images to Another File Format
81
Rotating or Flipping Multiple Images
82
Resizing Multiple Images
83
Adjusting Exposure For Multiple Images
84
Adjusting Batch Exposure Options
85
Renaming Multiple Files
86
About the ACDSee Database
87
Excluding Folders From the Database
89
Cataloging Files in the Database
90
Creating and Switching Between Multiple Databases
90
Converting an Older Database
91
Importing Database Information
91
Importing File Information From Other Sources
92
Exporting Database Information
93
Generating File Lists
93
Backing Up Your Database
94
Database Backup Tips and Strategies
94
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Database Backup Tips and Strategies
95
Restoring Database Information From a Backup
95
Maintaining the Database
96
Optimizing the Database
96
Rebuilding Thumbnails and Metadata
97
Quarantined Files
97
Working with Plug-ins
97
Managing Plug-ins
98
Viewing Plug-in Properties and Getting Help
98
C H AP TER 4 : VI EW MOD E
Viewing Images with Auto Advance
101
Displaying Text on Images in View Mode
101
Synchronizing View Mode to a Folder
102
Viewing Offline Images
103
Using ACDSee Quick View
103
Viewing Images in Another Application
105
Setting an Image as the Desktop Wallpaper
105
Viewing and Using Brush Files
105
Playing Video and Audio Files (for Windows Vista and XP® Users)
106
Playing Video and Audio Files (for Windows 7® and Above Users)
107
Selecting Part of a Media File
108
Saving Video Frames as Images (for Windows Vista and XP® Users)
108
Saving Video Frames as Images (for Windows 7® and Above Users)
109
Adding or Editing Image Audio
109
Selecting Part of an Image
110
Viewing File Properties in View Mode
111
Printing Images in View Mode
111
Showing Originals
112
Committing Changes
112
Zooming an Image
112
Setting the Zoom Level
113
Automatically Shrinking or Enlarging Images
113
Using the Navigator to View Select Areas of an Image
114
Panning a Magnified Image
114
Magnifying Specific Areas of an Image
115
C H AP TER 5 : ED I T MOD E
vi
101
117
In Edit Mode You Can:
117
Using Edit Mode
117
Using Presets in Edit
118
Using the Undo/Redo Button
119
Restoring Originals
119
Using the Edit Brush
119
Using the Gradient Tool
120
Using the Radial Gradient Tool
121
Using Blend Modes and Opacity
122
Saving Images in Edit Mode
123
Using Selections
124
Applying Edits or Effects to Selections
127
Reducing Red Eye
128
Removing Flaws
129
Adding Text to an Image
130
Adding Drawings to Your Image
131
Adding Borders
132
Adding a Vignette
136
Adding a Tilt-Shift Effect
138
About Special Effect Filters
138
Applying a Bathroom Window Effect
138
Applying a Blinds Effect
139
Applying a Bulge Effect
140
Applying a Collage Effect
140
Applying a Colored Edges Effect
141
Applying a Contours Effect
142
Applying a Crayon Drawing Effect
142
Applying a Crosshatch Effect
143
Applying a Dauber Effect
143
Applying an Edge Detect Effect
144
Applying an Emboss Effect
144
Applying a Furry Edges Effect
145
Applying a Glowing Edges Effect
146
Applying a Granite Effect
146
Applying a Lomo Effect
147
Applying a Mirror Effect
147
Applying a Negative Effect
148
Applying an Oil Paint Effect
148
Applying the Old Effect
149
Applying the Orton Effect
149
Applying an Outline Effect
150
Applying a Pencil Drawing Effect
150
Applying a Pixel Explosion Effect
151
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viii
Applying a Pixelate Effect
152
Applying a Posterize Effect
152
Applying a Radial Waves Effect
153
Applying a Rain Effect
153
Applying a Ripple Effect
154
Applying a Scattered Tiles Effect
155
Applying a Sepia Effect
156
Applying a Sheet Metal Effect
156
Applying a Shift Effect
157
Applying a Slant Effect
157
Applying a Sobel Effect
158
Applying a Solarize Effect
159
Applying a Stained Glass Effect
159
Applying a Sunspot Effect
160
Applying a Swirl Effect
160
Applying the Threshold Effect
161
Applying a Topography Effect
162
Applying a Water Effect
162
Applying a Water Drops Effect
163
Applying a Waves Effect
164
Applying a Weave Effect
164
Applying a Wind Effect
165
Creating a Custom Special Effect Filter (Convolution Effect)
166
Rotating an Image
167
Flipping an Image
168
Cropping an Image
168
Resizing an Image
169
Pixel Resize Options and Resulting Action
170
Adjusting Image Exposure
171
Adjusting Image Levels
172
Adjusting Levels Automatically
173
Adjusting Tone Curves
174
Adjusting Lighting
175
Adjusting White Balance
176
Adjusting Color Balance
177
Using the Histogram
177
Changing Image Color Depth
177
Using the Color Dialog Box
178
Sharpening an Image
179
Blurring an Image
180
About Noise and Noise Reduction
182
Removing Noise
182
Adding Noise
183
Adjusting Clarity
184
C H AP TER 6 : 3 6 5 MOD E
187
Working in 365 Mode
187
Creating a 365.acdsee.com Account
188
Uploading Images to 365.acdsee.com
188
Setting Folders to Automatically Sync to Web
189
Creating Folders and Setting Privacy
190
Changing the Rating System
191
Downloading Images
191
Using Transfer Manager
191
C H AP TER 7 : OP TI ONS AND C ONF I G U RATI ON
193
Setting the General Options
193
Setting the Manage Mode Options
193
Setting the Quick Search Options
194
Setting the File List Pane Options
194
Setting the Thumbnail Info Options
197
Setting the Thumbnail Style Options
198
Setting the Details View Options
199
Setting the Preview Pane Options
199
Setting the Folders Pane Options
200
Setting the Catalog Pane Options
200
Setting the Calendar Pane Options
201
Setting the CD/DVD Management Options
202
Setting the Properties Pane Options
202
Setting the File Management Options
202
Setting the Database Options
203
Setting the View Mode Options
204
Setting the Display Options
205
Setting the Edit Mode Options
206
Setting the ACDSee 365 Options
206
Setting the ACDSee Showroom Options
207
Setting the ACDSee Quick View Options
208
Setting JPEG Options
209
Setting the Media Options
209
Auto-hiding Panes and Panels
210
Using the Task Pane
210
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Customizing Toolbars
210
Customizing the Editing Tools Pane
211
Configuring External Editors
212
Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts
213
Changing the Display Theme
214
C H AP TER 8 : S H ORTC U TS
Manage Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
215
Manage Mode Mouse Shortcuts
218
View Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
218
View Mode Mouse Shortcuts
221
Calendar Pane Shortcuts
222
Edit Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
222
Edit Mode Mouse Shortcuts
223
365 Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
223
365 Mode Mouse Shortcuts
224
C H AP TER 9 : F I L E F ORMATS
x
215
227
About RAW Files
227
Registering and Associating Files
227
For Microsoft XP®
227
For Microsoft Windows Vista® or Windows 7®
227
For Microsoft Windows 8®
228
G L OS S ARY
229
I ND EX
239
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Welcome to ACDSee 17
Welcome to ACDSee, and congratulations on choosing the industry-leading digital photo management software.
ACDSee is the essential application for importing, organizing, viewing, enhancing, and sharing your digital photos and other media
files.
With ACDSee you can import your photos from your camera to your computer, categorize and rate your files, and manage photo
collections of any size—from a few hundred to a few hundred thousand. Choose to view thumbnail previews of any size, or use a
detailed list of file properties to sort your files. Can't find a particular photo? No problem—ACDSee includes a variety of powerful
searching tools and a Compare Images feature to eliminate duplicates.
View mode quickly generates high-quality displays of your images. You can run slideshows, play embedded audio, and display
multiple-page images in any of the more than 50 image and multimedia file formats.
Also, ACDSee includes a wide variety of image editing tools you can use to create, edit, and touch-up your digital images. Use tools
such as red eye reduction, crop, sharpen, blur, and photo repair to enhance or correct your images. Image editing tools, such as
exposure adjustment, convert, resize, rename, and rotate, can be performed on multiple files at the same time.
The user interface is completely customizable, and provides quick access to tools and features. You can customize the screen
layout, the order of images, toolbar display, and many other options to suit your preferences. ACDSee contains extensive contextsensitive Help to assist you as you move through the application.
ACDSee is a fast, powerful, and easy-to-use image management system that everyone from beginners to professionals can use and
enjoy.
About the ACDSee User Interface
Manage Mode
Manage mode is the main browsing and managing component of the user interface, and is what you see when you start ACDSee
using the shortcut icon on your desktop. In Manage mode, you can find, move, preview, and sort your files, and access organization
and sharing tools.
Manage mode consists of 12 panes, most of which can be closed when not in use. The File List pane is always visible, and displays
the contents of the current folder, the results of your latest search, or the files in your database that match your filtering criteria. A
status bar at the bottom of the Manage mode window displays information about the currently selected file, folder, or category.
You can open and close panes, move them to different areas of your screen, and stack them on other panes or dock them to the edge
of the window. Most panes also have additional options you can set to further customize their behavior and appearance.
Manage mode also features a toolbar and a set of drop-down menus. The toolbar provides buttons for your home folder, and for
navigating forwards and backwards through your folders. The drop-down menus provide quick access to the most common tasks.
View Mode
In View mode you can play media files and display images in full resolution, one at a time. You can also open panes to view
image properties, display areas of an image at varying magnifications, or examine detailed color information.
You can open View mode by selecting an image and clicking on the View mode tab, and you can use the filmstrip in View mode to flip
quickly between all of the images in a folder. View mode contains a toolbar with shortcuts to commonly-used commands, and a
status bar at the bottom of the window, which displays information about the current image or media file.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Edit Mode
Edit mode works on the image data already rendered to RGB. Edits are independently applied to the converted RGB data in the
order that you do them. This chain editing gives you full control over the pixels allowing creative freedom to apply precise
adjustments. This makes operations such as selections and blend modes possible.
365 Mode
365 mode provides an easy way to upload images to 365.acdsee.com to share with your contacts or the public. In 365 mode,
you can select the images on your computer and then drag and drop them directly into 365.acdsee.com.
Switching Modes in ACDSee
In ACDSee you can quickly switch between the four modes—Manage, View, Edit, and 365 mode.
The mode buttons are located at the top right of the ACDSee window:
To Switch from One Mode to Another:
Click one of the following mode buttons:
Manage: Import, browse, organize, compare, find, and publish your photos.
View: Display and examine photos at any magnification.
Edit: Fix and enhance photos using the pixel-based Edit tools.
365: Upload images to 365.acdsee.com to share with your contacts or the public.
Using Manage Mode
In Manage mode, you can browse, sort, catalog, manipulate, and share your files and images. You can combine different tools and
panes to perform sophisticated searching and filtering operations, and view thumbnail previews of images and media files.
You can also switch very quickly to the other modes by clicking the mode buttons in the top right corner.
The panes in Manage mode are fully customizable, and can be moved, resized, hidden, docked, or closed. You can also stack the
panes together for easy reference and accessibility, and to maximize your screen space.
If the pane you want to view is not visible, click View from the top left main toolbar and select a pane.
About the Manage Mode Panes
Manage mode consists of the following panes:
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Chapter 1: Getting Started
File List
This pane displays the contents of the currently selected folder, the results of your latest search, or the
files and folders that match your selective browsing criteria. The File List pane is always visible, and
cannot be hidden or closed. You can customize the File List pane by changing the way the files are
displayed, or the size of the thumbnails.
Folders
This pane displays the directory structure of your computer, much like the directory tree in Windows
Explorer. You can use the Folders pane to browse through the folders and display their contents in the File
List pane. You can also display the contents of multiple folders in the File List by clicking the Easy-Select
indicator opposite each folder, on the left side of the pane.
Calendar
This pane displays a calendar that you can use to organize and browse your files according to their
associated dates.
Favorites
This pane stores shortcuts to your favorite images, files, folders or even applications. Dragging an image,
file, or folder into the Favorites pane creates a shortcut to the original without affecting it in any way.
Search
This pane provides access to a powerful search utility. You can specify the type of search you want to
perform, and enter your search criteria into the fields provided in the Search pane.
You can also save a search and give it a name. Saved searches are listed on the Search pane and the
Catalog pane. On the Search pane, can select Saved searches from the drop-down list to run again. On
the Catalog pane, Saved Searches are listed below Auto Categories, where you can run them again by
clicking once on the Saved Search name.
Preview
This pane displays a thumbnail preview of any image or media file currently selected in the File List pane.
You can adjust the size of the thumbnail by resizing the Preview pane, and also specify whether you want
the Preview pane to play media files or just display the first frame.
Selective
Browsing
This pane combines input from the Folders, Catalog, and Calendar panes to limit the list of files in the File
List pane to those that match a specific set of criteria. You can include or exclude files by adjusting the
different criteria in the Selective Browsing pane.
Catalog
This pane lists the categories, auto categories, ratings, color labels, and saved searches to help you sort
and manage your files. You can also use the Special Items area in the Catalog pane to quickly view all of the
images on your computer, or see any uncategorized files in the current folder.
Task
This pane displays menus of commonly-used buttons and commands from the menus and toolbars. The
menus change dynamically based on your current location and selections in ACDSee.
Properties
This pane displays file properties and metadata for any file or folder you select in the File List pane. You
can use the Properties pane to view and edit metadata for your files, and the EXIF metadata included in
digital photos.
Map
This pane displays marked locations on a map for any file you select in the File List pane. You can use the
Map to view and mark the geographic location of your files.
Image Basket
While browsing through your files and folders, you can place images in the Image Basket to hold them
temporarily. You can then edit, print, or share those images without moving them all into a single folder.
Burn Basket
This pane provides the tools you need to group and organize files and then burn them to CDs and DVDs
from within ACDSee.
Manage Mode Drop-Down Menus
The drop-down menus in Manage mode give you quick access to often-used tasks. The drop-down menus include the following:
Import: Where you can import photos from cameras and other devices.
Batch: Where you can run all the batch editing processes.
Create: Where you can create slide-show files, PDFs, PowerPoint presentations, CD/DVDs, online albums, or archives.
Slideshow: Where you can configure and run a slideshow.
Send: Where you can upload to photo sites, an FTP, or share photos by email.
External Editors: Where you can list external editors for easy access.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Working with Manage Mode Panes
You can open and close panes in Manage mode to suit your preferences, and move, float, or stack any of the panes to customize the
layout of the Manage mode window.
To Open or Close Panes in Manage Mode:
Click View and select the pane you want to open or close.
Moving Panes
You can move a pane from a docked or floating position to a new location. You can move one pane at a time, or several stacked
panes.
To Move a Pane:
1.
Drag the pane's title bar and hold your cursor over any of the arrows of the Docking Compass.
2.
When the shaded marquee displays the position of the pane you want, release the mouse button.
3.
To return a pane to its previous location, double-click its title bar.
To Move a Docked or Floating Pane:
Do one of the following:
Drag the pane's tab to a new location. Only one pane moves.
Drag the pane's title bar to a new location. Any panes stacked beneath it also move.
If you use dual monitors, you can move the panes to your second monitor to free up space on your main monitor.
Docking Panes
When you select a pane in the Manage mode, the Docking Compass activates to help you place the pane precisely. The Docking
Compass consists of an outer and inner ring of arrows. When you hold your cursor over any of the arrows, a shaded marquee
displays the potential position of the pane.
To Dock a Pane in Manage Mode Window:
1.
Drag the pane's title bar or tab to activate the Docking Compass.
2.
To dock a pane around the outer edge of the window, hold your cursor over any of the outer arrows of the Docking Compass,
and then release the mouse button.
3.
To dock a pane around the outer edge of the File List pane, or any another pane, hold your cursor over the inner arrows of
the Docking compass, and then release the mouse button.
Stacking Panes
You can stack panes and reorder their tabs to suit your needs.
To Stack Panes:
1.
Do one of the following:
Drag one pane's title bar onto the title bar of another pane until the shaded marquee appears, and then release the
mouse button.
Drag one pane inside another, hold your cursor over the center of the Docking Compass, and then release the
mouse button.
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Chapter 1: Getting Started
2.
To reorder the panes, drag a tab to the left or right in the tab order.
3.
To separate a tabbed pane, drag the pane’s tab to another location on the screen.
Resizing Panes
You can resize all the panes in Manage mode, whether they are docked or floating.
To Resize a Docked Pane:
1.
Hold your cursor over the edge of the pane until the cursor changes to arrows and lines.
2.
Drag the edge of the pane to the size you want.
To Resize a Floating Pane:
Hold your cursor over the edge or corner of the pane and then drag the pane to the size you want.
Resetting the Layout
You can return all of the Manage mode panes to their default positions at any time.
To Reset the Manage Mode Layout:
Click View | Reset Layout.
Using View Mode
You can use View mode to display your images and media files using their actual dimensions or at a variety of magnifications. You
can also display a group of images in sequential order.
View mode contains four main areas:
View area: This is the main viewing area, which displays the current image or media file. You can customize the view, and
zoom in or out on your images and media files.
Bottom toolbar: Located below the main viewing area, the Bottom toolbar provides shortcut buttons to commonly-used
tools and commands, such as the zoom and scroll tools. You can customize the toolbar to use large or small icons, or you
can choose to not display the toolbar.
Filmstrip: This is an area below the main viewing area, which displays thumbnails of the images in the current folder or in
the group of images you selected in Manage mode. It provides a scroll bar along the bottom, so that you can scroll through
your images, and buttons for moving to the next or previous image.
Status bar: Located at the bottom of the window, the Status bar displays information and properties for the current image
or media file. It also displays icons for rating, color labels, and tagging that you can click to edit.
View mode can also display the Properties pane to show EXIF, IPTC and ACDSee metadata information about the image or file. View
mode also has the Navigator, Magnifying Glass and Histogram panes, each of which show detailed image information.
To Open an Image or Media File in View Mode:
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, do one of the following:
Select a file and press Enter.
Select a file and click the View mode button.
Double-click a file.
Right-click an image or media file, and then select View.
To Open a Group of Images in View Mode:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, select a group of images.
2.
Press Enter.
3.
To navigate through the images, do the following:
To view the next image in the sequence, click Next.
To view the previous image in the sequence, click Previous.
Viewing images in full screen mode
You can use the entire screen of your monitor to display images. In full screen mode, the window borders, menu bar, status bar,
and toolbars are hidden, and only the image is visible. If you want to always view your images in full screen mode, you can set this
option as the default for View mode.
To View Images in Full Screen Mode:
1.
Open an image or a group of images in View mode.
2.
Click View | Full Screen.
3.
Right-click the image to access the View mode tools and options via a context menu.
To Exit Full Screen Mode:
Do one of the following:
Press the F key.
Right-click the image and select View | Full Screen.
Use the keyboard shortcut F in View mode to toggle in and out of a full screen view.
Using the View Mode Panes
To Open the View Mode Panes:
1.
Open an image in View mode.
2.
Do one of the following:
Click View | Histogram to display the histogram for the image.
Click View | Magnifying glass to display a pane which shows the area of the image under your cursor at a higher
magnification.
Click View | Navigator to display a thumbnail overview of a magnified image.
Click View | Properties to display the IPTC, EXIF and ACDSee Metadata for the image.
Using the Bottom Toolbar
Use the Bottom toolbar to access commonly-used tools.
Bottom Toolbar
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Chapter 1: Getting Started
Add to image basket
Adds the image to the image basket.
Rotate left
Rotates the image to the left.
Rotate right
Rotates the image to the right.
Scroll
Pans or scrolls the image when the image is zoomed to a larger size than the
View mode area.
Select
Selects a rectangular area of the image.
Zoom
Zooms in or out on the image. Click to zoom in or right-click to zoom out.
Full Screen
Displays the image on a full screen. Press F to view full screen.
External Editors
Opens the file in an external editor of your choosing.
Show Original
Toggles between the original image and the edited image.
Navigator
Displays the Quick Navigator pane so you can see a thumbnail overview of a
magnified image. (Only visible for images that are zoomed in to a size larger
than will fit on the screen.)
Zoom slider
Controls the size of the image in the View mode area. Drag the slider to
adjust the size.
Zoom drop-down list
Displays a list of zoom sizes to select.
Actual Size
Returns the image to its actual size.
Fit Image
Reduces the image to fit within the View mode area.
Switching to Manage Mode
You can return to Manage mode at any time.
To Return to Manage Mode from View Mode:
Do one of the following:
Double-click the image.
Click the Manage mode button.
Using Edit Mode
Edit mode is where you can apply changes to the image. You can edit the overall look of your image by changing the lighting and
color, or you can crop, flip, resize, or rotate your image. You can also use selections to fix specific parts of the image. And you can
also add final touches to your image such as red eye removal, borders, and special effects.
In Edit mode, you can:
Use the Selection tool or Edit Brush to select and apply edits to a specific part of the image.
Remove flaws or red eye.
Add text, borders, a vignette, special effects, or drawings.
Crop, flip, resize, or rotate your images.
Adjust lighting using the exposure, levels, auto levels, tone curves, and lighting tools.
Adjust color using the White Balance or Color Balance tool.
Add details to your image using Sharpen, Remove Noise, Add Noise or Blur tools.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Using 365 Mode
You can use 365 mode to upload your images to 365.acdsee.com. 365.acdsee.com is an image sharing and storage service available
to ACDSee users. With 365 mode and 365.acdsee.com, you can upload and browse through your online images without having to
launch an Internet browser.
365 mode has two parts: 365.acdsee.com and Transfer. In 365.acdsee.com, you can browse through your images in your
365.acdsee.com account and modify your account settings. In Transfer, the screen splits into two. The bottom part of the screen
displays the images in your computer, and the top part of the screen displays your 365.acdsee.com. You can simply click images in
your computer displayed in the bottom part of the screen, and drag them into the top part of the screen to upload the images to your
365.acdsee.com account.
You cannot take an image from 365 mode and open it in Edit mode. To edit an image, select an image in Manage or View
mode and open it in Edit mode.
Uploading Images
To Upload Photos to Your 365.acdsee.com Account:
1.
In 365 mode, click Login.
2.
Login to your account.
3.
Click Transfer.
Your screen splits in two, with the bottom part of the screen displaying images in your computer.
4.
Select an image to upload. To select multiple photos, press the SHIFT or the CTRL key.
5.
Click and drag the image into the top part of the screen to upload it to your 365.acdsee.com account.
There is no upload size limit when uploading your images to your 365.acdsee.com account.
8
Chapter 2: Getting Help
Chapter 2: Getting Help
Using the Quick Start Guide
The Quick Start Guide contains a set of links on the left side that you can click to get a tour of the main features in ACDSee or set
some important preferences.
To Close the Quick Start:
Uncheck the Always show at start-up option in the bottom left corner of the dialog box, and click Close.
To Re-Open the Quick Start Guide:
On the Menu bar, click Help | Quick Start Guide.
To Use the Quick Start Guide for Quick Access to More Information:
Click the links on the left side of the Quick Start Guide or the Next button for a high-level tour.
To Set Preferences:
1.
Click Default start folder to select which folder to open at start-up.
2.
Click Display theme to select a window display theme.
3.
Click Backup reminder and set reminders to backup your database.
Finding Other Resources and Support
The Help menu on the ACDSee menu bar contains links to open plug-in help files and options that link you to the ACDSee Web site,
where you can find updates, newsletters, and system requirements.
Other links take you to the support page, to the registration page, or the community home page where you can join the community
and participate in the ACDSee forums.
The Help menu is also where you can convert a trial version of ACDSee to a full version by entering a license code.
Click Help to see the following menu options:
Plug-in Help
ACDSee 365 Help
Manage acdID Account
Check for Updates and Messages
Quick Start Guide
Product Support and Resources
Customer Support
ACDSee Products
ACDSee Community
Facebook
Twitter
About ACDSee
9
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Manage mode is the main browsing and managing component of the user interface, and is what you see when you start ACDSee
using the shortcut icon on your desktop.
In Manage mode, you can:
Import your photos from a device, CD or DVD, disk, or scanner.
Browse files and folders.
Catalog files by tagging them, adding categories, color labels, ratings, keywords and other metadata.
Search for files and create saved searches.
Publish and share files, including emailing files, creating slideshows, burning files to CD or DVD, and uploading images to
your favorite photo Web site.
Print images.
Edit batches of files.
Manage and maintain your ACDSee database.
Importing Files with ACDSee
You can use ACDSee to download images from devices like your digital camera, flash drives, CD/DVDs, scanners, mobile phones, or
other removable devices. In Manage mode, you can also use the File | Import | From Disk option to import files from a network,
and any kind of disk or drive that can be mapped, while preserving the original folders and subfolders.
Importing Files Using the Windows AutoPlay Dialog Box
When you connect your digital camera or other device to your computer, the Windows AutoPlay dialog box prompts you to choose
one of the following:
Import pictures using ACDSee: Select this option to open the Import dialog box. You can then select settings to rename,
backup, and place the files. You can save your import settings and give them a name so that you can re-use them later. You
can also create advanced settings for import dates and RAW + JPEG options if your camera takes both file formats. You can
also create a file renaming template to use with specific kinds of files or projects.
Manage pictures using ACDSee: Select this option to browse the files in ACDSee. You can then choose to import the files
or simply copy and paste the files from the device.
Import pictures and videos using Windows: Select this option if you prefer to use Windows to import the files.
Depending on the other applications installed on your computer, there may be additional options.
Importing Files from Specific Types of Devices
For more specific instructions, select the type of device you connected:
Importing Photos From a Device
Importing Photos From a CD or DVD
Importing Photos From a Disk
Importing Photos From a Scanner
Importing Photos From a Mobile Phone Folder
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
About Removable Devices
With ACDSee, there are several ways to obtain images from your digital camera, scanner, or memory card. For more information
about how your device communicates with your computer, please consult your device's Help file or manual. Some different types of
removable devices are:
USB Removable device: Removable devices include memory cards that you can attach to your computer using a USB card
reader, camera memory cards that insert directly into slots on the computer, or flash drives. USB removable devices are
detected by your computer and are shown in the structure as a removable drive.
Windows Image Acquisition (WIA): Cameras and scanners that use Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) drivers to
communicate with the computer. Some cameras, including Canon cameras, use WIA. ACDSee automatically detects the WIA
protocol.
TWAIN: Cameras and scanners that use the TWAIN interface. TWAIN-supported devices use TWAIN drivers that you must
install on your computer to communicate with the device. For more information about drivers, and whether or not your
device uses TWAIN, please consult your device's Help file.
You require DirectX 9.0c and QuickTime to copy and view audio or video files.
Importing Photos From a Device
The Import From dialog box gives you multiple options for importing your files from cameras, card readers, flash drives, and other
mass storage devices. If you want to simply import files with a few clicks, you can. Or you can select from several options to
streamline your workflow and perform multiple tasks with each import.
In the Import From dialog box, you can view the thumbnails of the files on the device by their date or file type. You can change the
size of the thumbnails to make it easier to select those you want to import or leave on the device, and then view only those you have
selected.
You can also choose the destination folder or subfolders for the files, create a backup set of files as you import, and rename the files
during the import process, automatically rotating them if your camera has this option. Advanced settings give you options to change
the date you want to use, and where to place RAW and JPEG files if your camera creates both file formats.
You can even organize your files as you import by adding Categories, IPTC and ACDSee Metadata.
Then you can save all these settings as a preset to use or adapt later.
If your camera connects to the computer as a removable drive, you can also simply copy photos directly from the File List
and Folders pane because ACDSee detects and displays the removable device in the Folders pane. If you are not sure how
your camera connects to your computer, please see About Removable Devices in Importing Files with ACDSee.
Some cameras, for example, Canon, use Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) to communicate with a computer. Some
scanners use TWAIN to connect to a computer. If your devices use these protocols, you can import by clicking From
Device or From Scanner on the File | Import menu. ACDSee automatically detects these protocols.
To Download Photos Using the Import From Dialog Box:
1.
Connect your camera or device to the computer. Make sure your camera is turned on, and the cable is properly connected to
your computer.
2.
Do one of the following:
If the Windows AutoPlay dialog box opens, select Import pictures using ACDSee.
If you have more than one device connected to your computer, select the device you want to use from the list, and
then click OK.
In Manage mode, click File | Import | From Device.
Press ALT + G on the keyboard.
3.
12
In the Import From dialog box, select from the import options as described below.
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
4.
Click Import.
5.
To browse your imported photos, click Yes when the Import Complete dialog box displays.
You may require Direct X 9.0c and QuickTime to download audio and video files from your camera.
Import From Options
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
View by
Choose Import
Settings
Date
Displays all the files grouped by the dates they were created. To deselect a date,
click the checkbox beside the date. To deselect all dates, click the All Dates
checkbox.
File Type
Displays all the files grouped by their file type. To deselect a file type, click the
checkbox beside the file type. To deselect all file types, click the All file types
checkbox.
View all
Displays all the thumbnails of the files on the device.
View selected
Displays only the files selected for import.
<x> Files selected
for import
Displays the number of files currently selected for import.
Zoom slider
Adjusts the size of the thumbnails as you drag the slider left (shrinks) or right
(enlarges).
Import settings
drop-down list
Displays the names of recently- used import settings to use again, or you can
select one of the following:
Current: Uses the current settings to import.
Last used: Uses the import settings from the last import.
None: Clears all the current import settings.
Save import
settings
Saves all the current import settings with a name so that you can use them
again. To save (or edit) import settings, select the Save icon and type in new
name (or re-save existing settings).
The new name for the import settings appears in the drop-down list.
Delete import
settings
Choose
destination
Destination dropdown list
Deletes the saved import settings currently selected in the Import settings dropdown list.
Displays the names of recently- used destinations to use again, or you can select
one of the following:
Last used: Uses the destination from the last import.
None: Clears all the current destination settings.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Place in
subfolders
Subfolders dropdown list
Displays the following pre-defined subfolder options to select:
Single folder by name: Creates a new subfolder with the name you
type into the Name field, which activates when you select this option. All
the files are placed into a folder with the new name.
Single folder by today's date: Creates one folder using today's date
as the name and places all the files into the folder.
Nested folder by today's date: Creates a series of nested folders, one
below the other, based on today's date and the format you select in the
Format field. The folders are created as the sample shows and all the
files are placed in the lowest folder.
Nested folders by file's date: Creates multiple sets of nested folders
based on the files' dates and on the format you select in the Format
field, which activates when you select this option. The folders are
created as the sample shows and the files are imported into the lowest
folders on each date.
Separate folders by file's date: Creates separate folders based on the
individual file dates in the format selected from the Format drop-down
options.
Preserve folder names: Preserves existing folder names when you use
the From Disk option to import. For example, if you have a flash drive or
CD containing images in a complex set of subfolders, the whole folder
tree is imported intact.
Backup to
Format
Displays date format options for the Nested folder options (see above).
Sample
Displays a sample of the nested folders that will be created using the current
settings (see above).
Backup destination
drop-down list
Creates a backup set of files using an exact duplicate of the subfolders you have
selected under Place in subfolders.
You can also do one of the following:
Click Browse and then navigate to an existing folder to use as a backup
destination.
Click Browse and then Make New Folder to create a new folder as a
backup destination.
While existing ACDSee metadata is included in the backup copy, any
Catalog settings (IPTC or ACDSee Metadata) added during import will
not be included.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Rename files to
Rename template
drop-down list
Renames each file as it imports according these predefined renaming templates:
Date/time - filename: Creates each filename using the file date and
time the file was created plus the original filename.
Date/time: Creates each filename using the file date and the time it was
created.
Camera - sequence number: Creates each filename using the camera
name and a sequential number starting at one.
Date/time - sequence number: Creates each filename using the file
date and the time it was created plus a sequential number starting at
one.
Camera - filename: Creates each filename using the camera name and
the original filename.
When you create and save your own renaming templates, they also appear in this
list for you to select.
Edit
Opens the Rename Templates dialog box where you can create and save your
own renaming templates.
Automatically
rotate images
Rotates your images automatically if your camera creates the information needed for this option to work.
Advanced
Opens the Advanced Import Options dialog box where you can change the date settings for files and
specify where to place RAW and JPEG files.
To set the ACDSee database, use one of the following as the file date:
Exif date: Uses the EXIF date embedded in the image by the camera.
File modified date: Uses the date the file was last modified.
Specific date: Uses the date you select by clicking the in the calendar drop-down arrow.
To specify where to place RAW+JPEG files select one of the following:
Place both in chosen destination folder: Places RAW and JPEG files in the folder you have
selected under Choose destination on the Import From dialog box.
Place JPEG in subfolder: Places the RAW files in the folder you have selected under Choose
destination on the Import From dialog box. Then creates a new subfolder with the name you type
into the Subfolder name field, which activates when you select this option. All the JPEG files are
placed into the new subfolder.
Place RAW in subfolder: Places the JPEG files in the folder you have selected under Choose
destination on the Import From dialog box. Then creates a new subfolder with the name you type
into the Subfolder name field, which activates when you select this option. All the RAW files are
placed into the new subfolder.
Organize settings
Properties pane
Metadata tab
Properties pane
Categories tab
Organize settings
drop-down list
Select the names of saved metadata presets or select Manage presets to open the
Manage Metadata Presets dialog box of options.
Enter ACDSee and IPTC Metadata into to the fields to add to the files you are importing.*
Opens the Keyword Picker dialog box where you can select existing keywords.
Assigns the imported files to any category selected in this tab. You can select multiple categories.
* The Import dialog gives access to new IPTC Core 1.1 metadata fields introduced in Pro 4.
The values set in the IPTC fields are reflected in their corresponding EXIF field.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Importing Photos From a CD or DVD
You can download photos from a CD or DVD using the Import From dialog box, or the Folders pane. Before you import photos, you
can browse to the CD and view them just like any other folder and then simply copy and paste them into a new location.
If you use the Import From dialog box, you can set the subfolder options to import complex folder structures intact, including all the
folder names. You can also organize your files as you import them, as well as create a duplicate backup folder, simultaneously.
To Import Photos from a CD or DVD:
1.
Insert the CD or DVD into the drive.
2.
Do one of the following:
If the Windows AutoPlay dialog box opens, select Import pictures using ACDSee.
If you have more than one CD or DVD drive connected to your computer, select the device you want to use, and then
click OK.
In Manage mode, click File | Import | From CD/DVD.
3.
In the Import From dialog box, select the Import From options you want to use, and then click Import.
4.
To browse your imported photos, click Yes when the Import Complete dialog box displays.
Importing Photos From a Disk
ACDSee makes it easy to import photos from any other storage device, computer, network, flash drive etc. In fact any device that
your computer can map to. When you connect a removable drive, or to a network, disk or another computer, ACDSee sees it as a
removable drive and you can browse to it, and around it, using the Folders pane. You can just copy and paste the files into ACDSee.
If the files in the disk or drive have a complex folder structure or you want to organize, rename, and back up the files as you import
them, it is worth using the Import From dialog box, which has import settings do all of these tasks simultaneously.
To Import Photos from a Disk:
1.
Connect the disk to the computer.
2.
Do one of the following:
If the Windows AutoPlay dialog box opens, select Import pictures using ACDSee.
If you have more than one disk or drive connected to your computer, select the device you want to use, and then
click OK.
In Manage mode, click File | Import | From Disk.
3.
In the Browse for Folder dialog box, navigate to the removable drive or device in the folder tree, and then click OK.
4.
In the Import From dialog box, select the options you want to use, and then click Import.
5.
To browse your imported photos, click Yes when the Import Complete dialog box displays.
Importing Photos From a Scanner
The Get Photos Wizard guides you through the process of downloading files from your scanner if it uses TWAIN. You can preview
the images you want to download, and specify a location for them on your hard drive.
To use the Get Photos Wizard, your scanner needs to use Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) or TWAIN. If you are not sure how your
scanner connects to your computer, see About Removable Devices.
To Download Photos from a Scanner:
1.
Connect your scanner to your computer. Make sure your scanner is turned on, and the cable is properly connected to your
computer.
2.
In Manage mode, click File | Import | From Scanner.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
3.
On the Source Device page, in the Device list, select the specific name of the scanner from which to download your files.
Click Next when you are ready to continue.
4.
On the File Format Options page, select the following options:
Documents to scan: If you want to scan a single document, do not make any selections in this section. If you
want to scan more than one document, select the Scan multiple documents checkbox, and then choose whether
to create an image for each document, or a single image for all the scanned documents.
Output file format: Select a file format to save your images. You can click the Settings button to select any filespecific options available for your chosen format. Note that not every file format has additional settings.
5.
Click Next when you are ready to continue.
6.
Finally, on the Output Options page, specify whether you want to rename your imported images using a name template, and
where to place them on your hard drive. When you are ready, click Next to copy your images.
7.
Select Browse to your new images if you want to view the files in Manage mode, and click Finish to return to ACDSee.
Importing Photos From a Mobile Phone Folder
The Mobile Phone Acquire Wizard will guide you through the process of downloading images from your mobile phone folder.
To Download Photos from Your Mobile Phone:
1.
In Manage mode, click File | Import | From Mobile Phone Folder.
2.
On the Welcome page, select the location of your mobile phone folder, and where you want to place the images on your hard
drive. You can select options to place images in a dated subfolder, and to remove the files from your device once they are on
your hard drive. Click Next when you are ready to continue.
3.
On the Downloaded Images page, preview your downloaded images. Click Next when you are ready to place the images on
your hard drive.
Creating a Renaming Template
In the Import From dialog box, you can create, name, and save a template that gives each file a unique name as they are imported
and placed on your hard drive. You can then re-use the template each time you import photos. Renaming templates can have a
numerical sequence, custom text, and file-specific information in each new file name. You can create and save different renaming
templates for different sorts of files. For example, you could have a different renaming template for a different camera, or a different
type of file.
To Create a Renaming Template:
1.
In the Import From dialog box, select Rename files to.
2.
From the drop-down list, select one of the following system templates:
Date/time - filename: Renames the files using the date and time each file was created and the original file name.
Date/time: Renames the files using the date and time each file was created.
Camera - sequence number: Renames the files using the camera name and a sequential number.
Date/time - sequence number: Renames the files using the date and time each file was created and a
sequential number.
Camera - filename: Renames the files with the name of the camera and each file's original name.
3.
To create your own renaming template, or add to a system template, click Edit.
4.
In the Rename Templates dialog box, select from the options as described in the table below.
5.
Click OK.
If you select the Skip video and audio files checkbox, the rename process will not rename video and audio files.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Rename Templates Options
System
template
drop-down
list
Click the drop-down list to select a different pre-defined system template.
New rename
template
Click to open the New Rename Template dialog box where you can type in a name for your own renaming
template. Give the renaming template a name that clearly identifies how you plan to use the template, or what
kind of information the name will contain. For example, Camera name_photographer.
When you click Save, the name of your new template is added to the drop-down list of system templates.
Delete
Deletes the renaming template currently selected in the drop-down list unless it is a pre-defined system
template, which cannot be deleted.
Rename
Template
Use this field to create the renaming template. You can type in the photographer's name and an underscore
between each element of the template to make it easier to read.
Use the following placeholders to ensure that each filename is unique:
Insert an *. When your files are renamed, the * will be replaced by the original file name.
Insert a #. When your files are renamed, each # will be replaced by a sequential number. If you have
a large number of files, insert several ##s. For example, if you enter ###, the first file renamed will
be numbered 001, the next 002, and so on. If you have over 1000 files, insert ####.
Insert a metadata placeholder < > and the data inside these brackets is replaced with whatever data
you have chosen. For example, if you choose <Camera:Model>, the model of the camera is inserted
into each file name.
Insert
Metadata
Click to open the Choose Properties dialog box, where you can select from a long list of metadata to insert into
your template.
Sample
As you type, or add placeholders in the Rename Template field, the same updates to show you a sample of how
renaming template will look.
Skip video
and audio
files
Skips the renaming of video and audio files during the rename process.
Browsing Files in the File List Pane
The File List pane is the large pane in the center of the Manage mode window. The File List pane displays the contents of the
currently selected folder, the results of your latest search, or the files and folders that match your selective browsing criteria. The
File List pane is always visible, and cannot be hidden or closed.
Files display as thumbnails in the File List pane by default. However, you can change the File List pane view from thumbnails to
details, list, icons, tiles, or filmstrip. You can sort your files according to name, size, image properties, and more. You can also use
filters to control which files display in the File List pane.
Using the File List Pane
There are three sections in the File List pane: the Contents bar, the File List drop-down lists, and the File List toolbar. The overlay
icons, which appear on the thumbnails, allow you to rate, tag, and label your images and indicate additional information, such as if
the file has been processed or geotagged.
The Contents Bar
The Contents bar is located at the top of the File List pane and describes what you are currently browsing. When you are using the
Folders pane, the Contents bar will display the path or paths to the folders you are browsing, as in the following example:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
If you are browsing files by category or rating with the Catalog pane, the Contents bar displays the selected classifications, as in the
following example:
The Contents bar also displays a date range when browsing with the Calendar pane, and a summary of your search criteria when
you use the Search pane.
File List Drop-Down Lists
Filter
Displays a list of filter options such as rating and category. You can also select Advanced Filters and
create a custom filter.
Group
Displays a list of file attributes that you can use to group files in the File List pane.
Sort
Displays a list of file attributes that you can use to sort the files in the File List pane.
View
Displays a list of view options for viewing files in the File List pane.
Select
Displays a list of file selection options.
File List Toolbar
Overlay Icons
20
Add to image basket
Adds selected images to the image basket.
Rotate left
Rotates selected images to the left.
Rotate right
Rotates selected images to the right.
Compare images
Opens selected images in the Compare Images Viewer.
Zoom slider
Controls the size of the thumbnails in the File List pane. Drag the slider to
adjust the thumbnails.
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Sound / Playing
Sound
Appears if the file contains embedded
or associated audio. The second icon
appears if you click on the sound icon
and the embedded sound begins
playing.
Right-click to play embedded
audio.
Rating
Appears if the file has been rated in the
ACDSee database.
Color Label
Appears if the file has been assigned a
color label.
Embed Pending
Appears if the file has ACDSee metadata Right-click and choose either:
stored in the ACDSee database that has
Embed ACDSee Metadata:
not yet been written to the file.
Writes the metadata to the
file.
Clear Embed Pending
Flag: Clears this overlay icon,
but does not write the
metadata to the file.
File format
Displays the file format.
Left-click to display the File
Information, Image Attributes, and
EXIF Metadata (summary) on the
File tab of the Properties pane.
Category
Appears if the file has been
categorized.
Left-click to open the Categories
section on the Organize tab of the
Properties pane.
Shortcut
Appears if the item is a shortcut to
another file.
Offline
Appears if the file is stored on an offline
device.
Excluded items
Appears if the file has been excluded
from the ACDSee database.
Tagged items
Appears if the file has been tagged.
Untagged items
Appears if the file has not been tagged.
Geotagged items
Appears if the file has been geotagged.
Left-click to open the Map pane.
Auto-rotate
Appears if the file has been
automatically rotated.
Left-click to rotate the image
original permanently and update
the EXIF information.
Edited
Appears if the file has been edited.
Changing Overlay Icon Visibility
You can change whether overlay icons are visible, visible in color, and which icons are in color.
To Change Overlay Icon Visibility:
In Manage Mode, at the top of the File List pane, do one of the following:
Click View | Toggle Overlay Mode to control whether the overlay icons are invisible, visible in grayscale, or visible in
color. Toggle the (]) key to move through the available modes.
Click View | Highlight Overlay to select which icons appear in color. Toggle the ([ ) key to select from the available
options.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Note that this does not apply to all overlay icons. For more control over which icons are visible, see Setting the Thumbnail
Info Options.
Maximizing the File List Pane
To make the most of your available screen space, you can choose to maximize the File List pane and hide the rest of the Manage
mode panes. The only parts of the Manage mode window that remain visible are the File List pane and whichever toolbars you are
currently using.
To Maximize the File List Pane:
1.
Click View | Maximize File List.
2.
To show only the File List pane and its toolbar, click View | Full Screen.
3.
Click the Close Full Screen button in the upper right corner to return to Manage mode.
Browsing Using the Folders Pane
The Folders pane displays a directory tree of all the folders on your computer, similar to Windows Explorer. You can select one or
more folders in the Folders pane to display their contents in the File List pane.
You can also use the Folders pane to create shortcuts to your favorite files, folders, or applications. Then, instead of having to
search for a specific file, you can quickly access it in the Favorites pane.
Whenever you browse to a folder using the Folders pane, the ACDSee database catalogs any images or media files in the folder.
To Open or Close the Folders Pane:
In Manage mode, click View | Folders.
When you connect a removable device, such as a mass storage device or digital camera, the Folders pane displays the device as
another drive, and assigns it a drive letter automatically.
You can access the device, and its contents, by clicking on it in the Folders pane.
Selecting Multiple Folders
Easy-Select bars are vertical columns of indicators on the left side of the Folders and Catalog panes. You can use the Easy-Select
bars to select multiple folders, categories, or ratings, and display their contents in the File List pane.
To Use the Easy-Select Bar:
In the Folders pane, select the indicator to the left of each folder with contents you want to display.
You can also use the Easy-Select bars with the Selective Browsing pane.
Creating and Managing Folders
You can use the Folders and File List panes to create, delete, rename, and move folders on your hard drive to help organize your
files.
To Manage Your Folders:
1.
In the Folders pane, browse to where you want to add, delete, or rename a folder.
2.
Do one of the following:
To create a folder, click File | New, and then select Folder. Type a name for the new folder and press Enter.
To delete a folder, select a folder and press Delete.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
To rename a folder, right-click the folder you want to rename and select Rename. Type a new name for the folder
and press Enter.
You cannot rename a drive or any folder on a read-only file system, such as a CD-ROM.
Browsing Files By Date or Event
With the Calendar pane you can browse your collection of image and media files using the dates associated with each file. The
Calendar pane includes Events, Year, Month, Day view and the Photo Calendar, which shows thumbnails per day within a month.
You can click any date in the Calendar pane to display a list of files associated with that date.
To Open the Calendar Pane:
In Manage mode, click View | Calendar.
The Calendar pane opens in the center File List pane area.
Your images will not display in the Calendar pane until you have either browsed the folder containing the images or used
the Catalog Files Wizard to catalog your images so they are in the ACDSee database.
If you are using the Photo Calendar, you only see thumbnails if there are photos on a particular day in that month. Days that
have no photo, are blank.
Calendar Pane View Options
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Events View
Switches the Calendar pane to Events view. In the Events view you see only those months during
which images or media files are available. Next to the month you see the number of dates on which
images or media files are available. Expand the month to see the dates and the number of pictures
available for those dates. You can add a description and a thumbnail image to help you remember the
event.
Year View
Switches the Calendar pane to Year view. In Year view you see a series of tables. Each table
represents a specific year. Next to the year you see how many images or media files are associated
with that year. The months during which images or media files are available are highlighted.
Month View
Switches the Calendar pane to Month view. In Month view you see a series of tables. Each table
represents a specific month. Next to the month you see how many images or media files are
associated with that month. The dates on which images or media files are available are highlighted.
Day View
Switches the Calendar pane to Day view. In Day view you see a series of tables. Each table represents
a specific day. Next to the date you see how many images or media files are associated with that date.
The time at which the images or media files are available are highlighted.
Photo
Calendar
Switches the Calendar pane to the Photo Calendar. In the Photo Calendar, you see a single month with
thumbnails for any day that contains photos. A pop-up of the first four images opens if you hover your
cursor over a thumbnail. Click on a thumbnail and all the pictures for that date display in the File List.
The total number of photos belonging to that month is in the top right corner of the calendar. Drag the
title bar to float this pane onto another monitor and drag a corner to resize it and make the thumbnails
bigger or smaller.
Options
Use the Calendar pane options to specify which date you want to use to organize your files. For
example, you can quickly change the setting so that the photos are displayed by the following:
Date the ACDSee database cataloged the file
Date the image was taken
Date the file was modified
Date the file was loaded to your computer
Select Options to open the Calendar dialog, where you can set filter options, choose the day to start
the week, and set clock formats.
Table of
Contents
Opens a list of event dates.
Only available in Events View.
Adding Descriptions and Thumbnails in Events View
You can add a description and a thumbnail image to dates in Events view to help you remember the event.
Try right-clicking the Calendar Title bar and select Floating to move the pane to a new location.
To Add a Description to a Date in Events View:
1.
Expand the month to see the dates on which images or media files are available.
2.
Click Enter event description here and replace the highlighted text with a new description.
3.
Press Enter or click outside of the description area. The description is saved.
To Select a Specific Thumbnail in the Events View or Photo Calendar:
24
1.
Expand the month to see the dates on which images or media files are available.
2.
Click on a date to display the images or media files in the File List pane.
3.
Click and drag an image or media file and drag it to the thumbnail area for the date.
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
When you release the mouse button the thumbnail is saved. You can reset the default thumbnail by right-clicking the
thumbnail and selecting Restore Default Thumbnail.
To Navigate a Long List of Dates in Events View:
1.
To expand and collapse specific groups click the +/- signs which are located on the left side of the group header.
2.
To expand and collapse all groups right-click a group header and select either Open All Groups or Close All Groups.
3.
To scroll through multiple groups click the Next Group and Previous Group buttons, which are located at the bottom of
the File List scroll bar.
4.
At the bottom of the Calendar pane scroll bar, click the Table of Contents button and select a date.
Browsing Favorite Files
Accessing the Favorites Pane
Click View | Favorites.
Creating a Shortcut
You can create shortcuts to folders and files, and even run executable files, from inside the Favorites pane. Favorite shortcuts can
be copied, renamed, moved, or deleted just like a folder. You can even use an executable shortcut to start another application from
inside ACDSee. You can also create a shortcut by dragging a file, folder, or executable file directly from the File List pane to the
Favorites pane.
To Create a Favorites Shortcut:
1.
In the File List pane, select a file, folder, or executable file.
2.
Do one of the following:
Right-click the item you selected, and then select Add to Favorites.
Click File | Add to Favorites.
3.
Type a name for the new shortcut and click OK.
Creating a New Folder
You can create a folder, or an entire directory tree, in the Favorites pane to help organize your shortcuts.
To Create a New Folder:
1.
In the Favorites pane, right-click the Favorites folder, or a folder you previously created, and then select New | Folder.
2.
Type the name of the folder and press Enter.
If you move a file or a folder that is a favorite, you break the link and the favorite no longer works.
Deleting a Shortcut or Folder
You can delete a shortcut or folder from within the Favorites pane.
To Delete a Shortcut or Folder:
In the Favorites pane, right-click the shortcut or folder, click Delete, and then click Yes to confirm that you want to delete the
shortcut or folder.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Using the Catalog Pane
The Catalog pane is one of the most useful panes in Manage mode as it provides so many tools for organizing, managing, and finding
your files. You can drag files into the categories, ratings, keywords, or color labels of the Catalog pane to assign and quickly
organize your files. The Auto Categories section can be used to find files with specific information such as file size, keywords, or
shutter speed. The Saved Searches section allows you to create and run custom searches. Special items such as the Image Well
display all the images on the computer in one click, or you can click Uncategorized to display only those that are not yet in a
category.
To Open the Catalog Pane:
In Manage mode, click View | Catalog.
The Catalog pane opens on the left, tabbed with the Folders and Calendar panes.
Easy-Select Bars
Select multiple albums, ratings, keywords, labels, and categories with the Easy-Select bars to display files matching these
selections in the File List pane.
To use the Easy-Select bar:
Select the indicator
to the left of one or more items in the Catalog pane to display the files in the File List pane that match
the specific set of criteria.
The ACDSee Database
Any organizing you do using categories, ratings, or labels (on the Catalog pane or the Properties pane) is stored in the ACDSee
database. If you choose to, you can then also embed this information in each individual file, making it easier to relocate and share
files, or retrieve the information from the file if you need to.
Changing Views
You can select different views to display your files in the File List pane, including thumbnail previews and file details. You can also
customize the appearance and size of thumbnails, and specify the information displayed in the Details view.
To Change the File List View:
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, under View, select from the following:
Views
Thumbs+Details
Displays file names and details in a list, and adds a thumbnail preview to the Filename column.
Filmstrip
Displays thumbnail previews of your files in a single row across the bottom of the File List pane,
and displays the currently selected file in an expanded Preview pane.
Thumbnails
Displays thumbnail previews of all image and media files in the File List pane. You can customize
the appearance of thumbnails, and specify what information to display with them.
Tiles
Displays each file in the File List pane on a "tile" that includes a thumbnail preview and file
information. You can resize the tiles using the Zoom slider.
Icons
Displays files in a list, represented by large default system icons for each file type.
List
Displays a list of file names and extensions.
Details
Displays a list of file names and details about each file, such as size, format, and creation date.
You can customize the appearance of the Details view mode, as explained below, and specify
what information it displays.
Toggle Overlay Mode
Controls whether overlay icons are invisible, visible in grayscale, or visible in color. Use the ( ])
key to choose.
Controls which overlay icon is colored. Use the ([) key to rotate through.
Highlight Overlay
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Customizing the Details View
You can set the Details view to automatically resize columns, display or hide grid lines, and select an entire row when you select a
column entry in that row. You can also change the appearance of the Details view, select which columns to display, and customize
the column order.
To Select Columns and Set Column Order:
1.
In Manage mode, from the File List drop-down, click View | Choose Details.
2.
In the Choose Details dialog box, do one or more of the following:
To add a column, select a folder or detail name in the Available Details pane, and then click Add. Adding a folder
adds all detail names within the folder.
To remove a column, select a detail name in the Currently Displayed Details pane, and then click Remove.
To move a column to the left in the File List pane, select its name in the Currently Displayed Details pane and click
Move Up.
To move a column to the right in the File List pane, select its name in the Currently Displayed Details pane and click
Move Down.
3.
Click OK.
You can click Reset to display only the default column names in the Currently Displayed Details pane, and you can also
move a column in the File List pane by dragging its header to a new position. A vertical line indicates where the column will
be inserted.
Filtering Files
You can use the Filter By options to identify the types of files and folders you want to display in the File List pane.
To Filter Files in the File List Pane:
Do one of the following:
Click View | Filter By and select a filter option.
Click the Filter drop-down and select a filter option.
If all your thumbnails seem to disappear, click Filter | All and they reappear.
To Create a Custom Filter:
1.
Do one of the following:
Click View | Filter By | Advanced Filters.
Click the Filter drop-down and select Advanced Filters.
2.
Select Apply filtering criteria.
3.
Select or clear one or more of the following options to show or hide that file or folder type in the File List pane:
Show image files
Show media files
Show folders
Show archive files
Select Show hidden files and folders to show files and folders that are normally hidden by your operating
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
system.
Select Show THM files to show thumbnail files.
4.
Click OK.
Grouping Files
If you have to browse a lot of images in the File List you should consider using Group By to organize images into different groups.
You may find it easier to find images when they are organized into groups. For example, if you use more than one camera, you can
quickly organize your images according to the camera you used to capture the images. Similarly, if you save your images into
different file formats you can quickly organize your images according to their file format.
Group By only works in the Thumbs, Thumbs + Details, Details, Tiles, and Icons views.
The Edited State group is particularly useful for finding images that you have edited.
To Group Files in the File List:
1.
Browse to the folder or folders containing your files.
2.
Do one of the following:
Click View | Group By and select a group option.
Click the Group drop-down and select a group option.
Navigating Through Groups in the File List
To Expand and Collapse Specific Groups:
Click the Expand or Collapse arrows, on the left side of the group header.
To Expand and Collapse All Groups:
Right-click a group header, and then select either Open All Groups or Close All Groups.
To Display a Preview of the Images in a Closed Group:
Hover your cursor over the group header.
To Scroll Through Multiple Groups:
Click the Next Group and Previous Group buttons at the bottom of the File List scroll bar.
To Display the Table of Contents:
Do one of the following:
Click View | Group By | Table of Contents.
Click the Group drop-down list and select Table of Contents.
At the bottom of the File List scroll bar, click the Table of Contents button.
To Quickly Jump to a Specific Group:
1.
Display the table of contents.
2.
Click the group that you want to display.
To Change the Sort Order of the Groups:
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Do one of the following:
Click View | Group By and select either Group Forward or Group Backward.
Click the Group drop-down and select either Group Forward or Group Backward.
Removing Groups from the File List
To Remove a Group:
Do one of the following:
Click View | Group By | None.
Click the Group drop-down list and select None.
Selecting Files in One or More Groups
To Select Files in Groups:
Do one of the following:
Click the group header to select all of the files in that group.
Press and hold the CTRL key and click two or more group headers to select all of the files in those groups.
Sorting Files
In Manage mode, you can sort your files according to different file properties to quickly organize your images, find specific files, and
create a range of files with similar attributes for easy selection.
To Sort Items in the File List:
1.
Click View | Sort By, and then select a sort option:
Filename
Size (KB)
Image Type
Modified Date
Image Properties
Caption
Rating
Tagged
More (sort by metadata, EXIF, file properties, image attributes, IPTC information, or multimedia attributes)
2.
To set the direction of the sort, click View | Sort By, and then select a direction:
Sort Forward
Sort Backward
Your sort settings are saved until you change them. For example, if you sort images in the File List pane according to
Rating, the images will remain sorted according to Rating until you change the sort settings.
Sorting Files Using Column Headers
You can quickly sort files in Details view mode using column headings.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
To Sort Files Using a Column Header:
1.
Click a column header. An arrow appears, indicating the sort direction.
2.
Click the column header again to change the sort direction.
Custom Sorting Files
You can use custom sorting to customize the order of files in the File List pane. After custom sorting your files, ACDSee automatically
saves the file order for the selected folder until you change it or delete the custom sort order.
To Customize the Sorting Order of Your Files:
1.
Select one or more files.
2.
Drag the selected files to a new location in the File List.
To delete a custom sort order, click View | Sort By, and then select Delete Custom Sort.
Selecting Files
In the File List pane, you can select all of your files and folders at once, select all of the files in the current folder, select only the
image files, or clear your selection entirely.
You can also set an option to automatically select new files whenever you add them to the File List. Click Tools | Options | File List
to set this option.
To Select Your Files or Folders:
Click a thumbnail to select the file.
CTRL + click to select more than one file.
SHIFT + click to select a number of files in a row.
Click off to the side in the file list pane to clear your selection.
To Select Your Files or Folders Using the Menu:
1.
In Manage mode, click Edit.
2.
Select one of the following:
Select All : Selects all files and subfolders in the current folder.
Select All Files: Selects all files in the current folder.
Select All Images: Selects all image files in the current folder.
Select Tagged: Selects all tagged image files regardless of their folder.
Select by Rating: Displays a list of ratings, and selects all files currently assigned to the rating you select.
Clear Selection : Clears your selection.
Invert Selection : Selects all files except for your original selections.
Previewing Images
You can preview image, audio, and video files in the Preview pane. The Preview pane displays a thumbnail of the currently selected
image or media file. You can resize the pane to adjust the thumbnail dimensions, and reposition the pane anywhere on your screen.
It can also display the highlights of the image's EXIF information for quick reference.
To Open or Close the Preview Pane:
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Do one of the following:
Click View | Preview.
Press CTRL + Shift + P.
To Show or Hide What Displays in the Preview Pane:
Right-click the Preview pane's title bar, select Image and Information, and then select one of the following:
Show Image: Displays only a preview of the image.
Show Information: Displays EXIF information about the image. This is called the Information palette.
The Information Palette
The Information palette provides immediate access to the most useful elements of an image's EXIF information. It includes:
Camera Name and Lens Model
Dimensions
File Size
Exposure Program
White Balance
Metering Mode
Flash
RAW (will be blank for files that are not RAW)
ISO
F-Stop
Shutter Speed
Exposure Compensation
Focal Length
If you are unsure what a certain symbol means, you can hover your mouse over it for a pop-up explanation.
To Customize the Preview Info:
You can customize what information displays at the bottom of the Information palette section of the Preview pane. The date and time
that the image was taken is selected by default.
1.
Right-click the date and time at the bottom of the Information palette in the Preview pane.
2.
Click Choose Preview Info...
3.
In the Choose Details dialog box, select the item listed under Currently Displayed Details and press the Remove button.
4.
From the Available Details column, choose an item by checking the checkbox next to it and pressing the Add button.
5.
Click OK.
To Preview Audio or Video Files:
1.
Click Tools | Options | Preview.
2.
Check the Preview audio and video clips checkbox.
3.
Click OK.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
The Information palette also displays in View and Edit mode. To turn off the Information palette, deselect Info Palette
under the View menu.
Rotating Images
You can rotate images in Manage and View modes using the Rotate icons in the bottom toolbar.
When you rotate unedited JPEG images, ACDSee performs a lossless rotation.
To Rotate Images:
1.
In Manage mode or View mode, select one or more images.
2.
Click the Rotate Left or Rotate Right icon in the bottom toolbar.
Rotate Icons
Rotate Left
Rotates the image 90° to the left.
Rotate Right
Rotates the image 90° to the right.
Comparing Images
You can use the Compare Images feature to compare a group of images. The tool highlights both the similarities and the differences
in the properties, metadata, and pixel intensity levels of images you select. You can save your preferred images to a new location on
your hard drive, or tag images you would like selected in Manage mode, and then delete, move, rename, or alter the images.
To Compare Images:
1.
In the File List pane, select the images that you want to compare.
2.
Click Tools | Compare Images.... Up to four images display in the Compare Images Viewer.
3.
To change which image displays in the comparison view, do one or more of the following:
In the Comparison List, right-click an image and click Send to Active View (indicated by a pale box).
In the Comparison List, drag an image to a box in the Compare Images Viewer.
In the Compare Images Viewer, right-click an image and click Next Image or Previous Image.
In the Compare Images Viewer, right-click an image and click File | Remove From View or click the Remove icon
in the image toolbar.
4.
To tag images, do one of the following:
In the Comparison List, click the checkbox that is located at the bottom of the image on the right side.
In the Compare Images Viewer, right-click an image and click Tag or click the Tag icon in the image toolbar.
Click the Tag All button in the bottom left corner to tag all of the images, or click Untag All to untag all of the
images.
5.
To rate images, right-click an image, click Set Rating, and then select an appropriate rating.
6.
To categorize images, right-click an image, click Set Categories, and then select an appropriate category (or create an
appropriate category).
7.
Click
, located in the bottom right corner.
Compare Images Toolbar
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Previous
Swaps the selected image with the previous image in the Comparison List.
Next
Swaps the selected image with the next image in the Comparison List.
Zoom In
Increases the magnification of the selected image.
Zoom Out
Reduces the magnification of the selected image.
Zoom menu
Opens a menu of zoom options. Select from the following options:
Actual Size: Displays the image at its original size.
Fit Image: Displays the image at the largest magnification that fits in the
Compare Images Viewer.
Fit Width: Displays the image to fit between the left and right sides of the
Compare Images Viewer.
Fit Height: Displays the image to fit between the top and bottom of the Compare
Images Viewer.
Zoom Lock: Displays all images at the zoom option of the current image. If the
zoom is adjusted, the new zoom level is applied to all images that you view.
Zoom To: Opens a dialog box where you can select a zoom option.
Pan Lock
Locks the panned image area, so that when you zoom and pan an image to a specific area,
the Compare Images Viewer displays the same area for all images you view.
Exposure warning
Indicates pixels that may be over or underexposed.
Properties
Displays properties for each image in the Compare Images Viewer. Click the Metadata
Setup button to specify which file properties are displayed.
The Compare Images tool displays the file properties in a field below each image.
Differences in properties are bolded, while similarities are displayed in regular font.
Histogram
Displays a histogram for each image in the Compare Images Viewer.
Metadata Setup
Opens a dialog box where you can select the metadata to display for each image in the
Compare Images Viewer (ensure Properties
is toggled to on).
One Image
Displays one image in the Compare Images Viewer.
Two Images
Displays two images in the Compare Images Viewer.
Three Images
Displays three images in the Compare Images Viewer.
Four Images
Displays four images in the Compare Images Viewer.
Properties Pane
If one image is displayed, this button opens the Properties, Histogram, Magnifying Glass,
and Navigator panes.
Help
Opens the Help file.
Image Toolbars
Each image in the Compare Images tool has a toolbar located below it. You can use this toolbar to adjust each image individually.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Save
Opens a dialog box where you can save the image with a different file name and a different
file format.
Previous
Swaps the displayed image with the previous image in the Comparison List.
Next
Swaps the displayed image with the next image in the Comparison List.
Zoom In
Increases the magnification of the image.
Zoom Out
Reduces the magnification of the image.
Delete
Deletes the image from your hard drive.
Remove
Removes the image from the Comparison List.
Tag
Tags the image so that it will remain selected when you close the Compare Images tool.
Gathering Images in the Image Basket
You can use the Image Basket to gather and hold images and media files from different locations or folders. Once you have placed
items in the Image Basket, you can use any of the tools or features in ACDSee to edit, share, or view those files.
To Use the Image Basket:
1.
To open the Image Basket, in Manage mode, click View | Image Basket.
2.
In the File List pane, select the files you want to add. Drag the items to the Image Basket, or right-click a selected item and
select Add to Image Basket.
3.
To remove one or more files, right-click the file, and then select Remove from Image Basket.
4.
To remove all files, right-click the Image Basket, and then select Clear Image Basket.
You can also add images to the Image Basket by dragging them from Windows Explorer.
Cataloging and Managing Files in ACDSee
In addition to its browsing, viewing, and editing capabilities, ACDSee features integrated management tools you can use to organize
and sort your images and media files. These tools include batch functions (tools that can alter or adjust multiple files at the same
time), category and rating systems, and a powerful database to hold all of your important image information.
You can use the ACDSee batch functions to convert the file format, rotate, resize, rename, and adjust the time stamp or the
exposure of a single image, a group of images all at once. With the category, color label, and rating systems, you can create a virtual
folder structure, and use it to find related images and media files with a single click.
ACDSee displays file properties and image information in an easily accessible Properties pane that you can use to directly add and
edit file information, including ACDSee metadata. You can add an author, description, notes, and keywords to your files, and adjust
the category and rating assignments at the same time.
Organizing with the Catalog Pane
The Catalog pane is one of the most useful panes in ACDSee as it provides many ways to catalog, sort, group, search for, and
manage your files.
Categories
Categories are an easy way to organize your files into context-related sections. When you assign a file to a category, you do not move
the file from its folder or create an extra copy. Your categories can be simple or complex and use any names you choose. There are
different icons to use for different categories to help you identify them at a glance. Once your files are in categories, you can search,
sort, group, and find them by category.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
One way to assign files to a category is to select and drag one or more files from the file list and drop them onto the category. Any file
that is assigned to a category has a blue tab above its thumbnail in the File List. A file can belong to multiple categories, but it will
only have one blue tab. For comprehensive categories management, use the Organize tab of the Properties pane.
Keywords
Keywording is a highly efficient way to group files in hierarchies that make sense to you and find them quickly in an expanding tree.
The hierarchical tree of keywords you have created in the Organize tab of the Properties pane is displayed in the Keywords section of
the Catalog pane without the need to select an image. Utilize this group to manage your keywords on the fly by using the context
menu (right-click). Keyword quickly by dragging a keyword onto an image, or by dragging an image onto a keyword.
Ratings
You can assign a numerical rating from 1 to 5 to your images and files. Once you have assigned ratings, you can search, sort, and
catalog your files based on the ratings, or a combination of ratings, categories, auto categories etc. A file can have only one rating.
When a file has a rating, the number appears on top of the thumbnail in the File List pane.
Color Labels
Color labels can be used in many ways to help you catalog your files. You can use different colors to represent different stages of
your workflow. As you review your photos you can assign them to the color labels and rename them accordingly.
Auto Categories
Most digital cameras create and embed information about the file as you take a photo. This information is called metadata and can
include the name and model of the camera, the file size, shutter speed, camera settings used in the shot and much more. ACDSee
uses this information to create auto categories. When you click on an auto category, ACDSee searches for images containing that
metadata. You can select one or more auto categories to find files, for example, photos of a certain size, taken by a particular
camera. You can also add to this data using the Properties panes.
Saved Searches
If you find yourself creating the same search criteria frequently, you can save the search to use again later. Saved searches appear
at the top of the Search pane but they also appear in the Catalog pane for you to re-run using a single click on the name or in the
white checkbox of the Easy-select bar.
To create a new saved search from the Catalog pane:
1.
In the Saved Searches area of the Catalog pane, click the New saved search icon.
The Search pane opens.
2.
Enter your search criteria and then click the Saved searches icon.
The new saved search appears in the Saved Searches on the Catalog pane and in the Saved Searches drop-down list of the
Search pane.
Special Items
You can use Special Items to quickly view all of the images in your database and any uncategorized images. Select one of the
following items:
Image Well: Displays all images cataloged in the ACDSee database. If you have a substantial image collection, it may take a
few moments to gather all of the information.
Embed Pending: Displays all the files with database data that has changed but has not yet been embedded in the files.
Uncategorized: Displays any images cataloged in the database that have not been assigned to a category.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
No Keywords: Displays any images cataloged in the database that have no ACDSee keywords assigned.
Tagged: Displays all the tagged photos on the computer.
You can assign a rating or category to any type of file, but the options in the Special Items area only apply to images.
The ACDSee Database and Embedded Data
When you assign a file to a rating, or category, this information is stored in the ACDSee database. If you choose to, you can also
embed this information in each individual file, making it easier to relocate and share files, or retrieve the information from the file if
you need to. As the database, information is always associated with a particular file. If you move or rename files using an application
other than ACDSee (like Windows Explorer) the link between the file and the ACDSee database will be broken. If this happens, and
you have embedded the information in each file, you can rebuild the database and retrieve all the information.
You can also use the Properties pane to add information to the ACDSee database like captions, keywords and much more. Taking the
time to assign categories and add keywords, notes, etc., makes it much easier to find and organize your files.
ACDSee uses XMP to embed ACDSee Metadata into each file. Only some file formats and file extensions support XMP. These
include GIF, JPEG, DNG, PNG, PSD, and TIF. In the case of these file formats, the ACDSee Metadata is embedded inside the
file and so you can rename or move the file outside of ACDSee and still be able to retrieve the ACDSee Metadata. For formats
that currently do not support XMP, including RAW and ABR, the ACDSee Metadata is written to a sidecar file that is stored in
the same folder as its file. Because a sidecar file is separate from the file itself, you need to rename or move them together,
or you could lose the ACDSee Metadata permanently.
Easy-Select Bars
The Easy-Select bars are the indicators on the left side of the Folders and Catalog panes. You can use the Easy-Select indicators to
select multiple folders or categories, and display their contents in the File List pane. In the Catalog pane you can also use the EasySelect indicators to select combinations of categories, ratings, auto categories, saved searches, and special items. For example, you
could display all your photos with a rating of 1 that belonged to the category People.
You can also use the Easy-Select indicators with the Selective Browsing pane (View | Selective Browsing).
When you use the Match Any/All buttons and the Easy-Select indicators together, the Catalog pane becomes a powerful search tool
for finding unique sets of files.
To Use the Easy-Select Bar:
In the Catalog pane, select the indicator to the left of each item with contents you want to display. The indicator changes
orientation to point to the item you have selected.
If you select a category, rating, or combination that does not have any files that match, the File List displays a message and
shows no thumbnails. The quickest way to return to a folder with files is to click the back arrow.
To View Cataloged Files:
Select one or more categories, ratings, auto categories, saved searches, or special items. Files assigned to those classifications
are displayed in the File List pane.
The Contents bar at the top of the File List pane displays whatever categories or items are currently selected. You can browse
through specific categories, ratings, or items within specific folders using the Selective Browsing pane.
Match All Match Any
There are two Match All/ Match Any drop-down lists on the Catalog pane; one at the top of the pane that affects categories and one
that affects saved searches. You can use the Match All and Any options to affect the display of thumbnails in the File List in the
following way:
Match All : To be included, a file has to belong to all the categories or searches you select. So the file has to be in both or all
of the categories or searches before it will display in the File List. Match All is more exclusive. You can use it to limit the
number of files that display and narrow a search down.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Match Any: To be included, a file can belong to any of the categories or searches you select. So any files in the selected
categories or searches will display in the File List. Match any is more inclusive.
Catalog Icons
Category
Identifies files that have been assigned to a category.
Ratings 1-5
Identifies file ratings.
New Saved search
Opens the Search pane so that you can create a new saved search.
Saved search
Displays the Save/Save As menu so you can save a search.
Easy-Select indicator (selected)
Selects the category, rating, auto category, or other item for display in the
File List pane.
Easy-Select indicator (not selected)
Does not select the category, rating, auto category, or other item for
display in the File List pane.
Match Any/All
Controls which images are displayed in the File List pane.
To hide the icons in the Catalog pane, click Tools | Options, and then select Catalog. Deselect the Show Icons checkbox
in the Options dialog box.
Creating Categories
Create and manage a system of categories for your images in the Organize tab of the Properties pane. You can easily customize your
category system in a way that makes sense to you.
Select the Organize tab in the Properties pane to create, rename, delete, and move your categories.
To Create a Category:
1.
Do one of the following:
Right-click a category in the Catalog pane, and then select New Category.
In Manage mode, click Edit | Set Categories | New Category.
2.
Select one of the following:
Create a new, top-level category
Create a sub-category within the current selection
3.
If you are creating a sub-category, select a top-level (or parent) category from the drop-down list. (If you right-clicked a
category in the Catalog pane, the new sub-category will be added below that category by default.)
4.
Type a name for the new category in the Name field.
5.
Click OK.
When you create a new top-level category, you can select an icon to help identify the category. The Icon drop-down only
appears if the Show Icons checkbox is selected on the Catalog page of the Options dialog box. In Manage mode, click
Tools | Options, and then select Catalog.
Manage Categories
To Manage Your Categories:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Select a category in the Catalog pane, and do one of the following:
To move the category, drag it to the new location.
To edit the category, right-click the selected category and select Edit.
To delete the category, right-click the selected category and select Delete.
Create Easy-Access Category Sets
If you have a long list of categories, or would like to break your categories up into different events or areas of interest, you can use
the Edit Category Sets feature.
To Create Easy-Access Category Sets:
1.
First create the categories you want in your set.
2.
In the Properties pane, click the Quick Categories drop-down list and select Manage Quick Categories.
3.
Enter your commonly used categories into the entry fields. For sub-categories, use the pipe key. Example: A|B|C.
4.
Click the Save button.
5.
Click OK. This category set will be listed in the Quick Category drop-down list.
6.
Select one or more files and click a button in the category set. The category will be assigned to the selected files. The button
text color will change to indicate that the category is assigned to currently selected files, and will display in italics if
assigned to only some (but not all) of the currently selected files.
Make sure the category button name matches the category name in the category tree.
Assigning and Searching Categories and Ratings
You can assign files to a rating, or one or more categories, without moving the file or making an extra copy.
If the Properties pane or Catalog pane is not visible in Manage mode, click View | Properties or View | Catalog.
Quickly Assign Ratings
1.
Hover over a thumbnail to display the gray box with diagonal line through it.
2.
Click the gray box to make your selection.
Example of Hovering Over a Thumbnail to Select a Rating:
1.
2.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
3.
The hover icons display in Thumbnail view only.
Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL + 0-5 to quickly rate a file.
The rating number you select can be reflected as a star rating in other applications. Give your favorite shots a high rating,
and your least favorite shots a low rating.
Assign and Search Categories and Ratings in the Catalog Pane
The Catalog pane allows you to both assign categories and ratings as well as search them.
To Assign Files to Categories or Ratings in the Catalog Pane:
1.
In Manage mode, do one of the following:
Drag selected files to a category or rating in the Catalog pane.
Drag the category or rating from the Catalog pane to selected files.
Right-click the files, and then click Set Categories and click the category in the fly out, or click Set Rating and
click the rating.
2.
In View mode, do one of the following:
Click Edit | Set Categories and then click the category to which you want to assign the file.
Right-click the file, click Set Categories, and then click the category to which you want to assign the file.
Click Edit | Set Rating and then click the rating to which you want to assign the file.
Right-click the file, click Set Rating, and then click the rating to which you want to assign the file.
On the status bar, click the rating icon, and then click a new rating. This icon only appears once a rating is set.
3.
If you are comparing images and want to categorize them, do one of the following:
Right-click one of the files, click Set Categories, and then click the category to which you want to assign the file.
Right-click one of the files, click Set Rating, and then click the rating to which you want to assign the file.
Ratings embedded by ACDSee can be seen in other applications supporting xmp:rating and vice versa. To embed metadata
into one or more selected files click Tools | Metadata | Embed ACDSee Metadata | Embed In Selected Files.
Use the Context Menu (Right-Click) in the Category Tree to Do the Following:
Assign Items
Remove Items
Create New Category
Search
Cut
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Copy
Paste
Delete
Edit Category
To Search a Category or Rating in the Catalog Pane:
Click the Category name or Rating number to display all corresponding files in the File List pane.
Assign Categories and Ratings in the Properties Pane
The Properties pane provides another way to assign categories and ratings.
To Assign Files to Ratings in the Properties Pane:
1.
In the File List pane, select the files you want to assign a rating.
2.
In the Properties pane, select the Metadata tab.
3.
Click the rating you want these files to have from the numbers listed at the top of the Properties pane.
To Assign Files to Categories in the Properties Pane:
1.
In the File List pane, select the files you want to assign a rating.
2.
In the Properties pane, select the Organize tab.
3.
Click the category you want these files to have from your Categories list.
Assign files quickly with a category sets button. See Create Easy-Access Category Sets.
Remove Categories or Ratings from Files
You can remove a file from a category or rating without moving or deleting the original file, or affecting any other files assigned to
that classification.
To Remove Categories or Ratings from Files:
1.
In the File List pane, select the files you want to remove.
2.
Do one of the following:
Right-click a selected file, and then click Set Rating | Clear Rating.
Right-click a selected file, click Set Categories, and then click the name of the category from which you want to
remove the file, or to remove all categories, click Uncategorize All Selected Items.
Clear a checkbox for a category or a radio button for a rating in the Catalog pane.
Right-click a category or rating in the Catalog pane, and then click Remove Items.
Assigning Color Labels
Color labels are useful for naming and quickly identifying your processing plans for your images. Different colors can be used to
represent different stages of your workflow. For example, as you review your photos you can quickly label files to upload, print,
reject, review, or sharpen, or any other term that matches your workflow needs. Once your files have been labeled, you can click a
color label in the Catalog pane to instantly display all of the files assigned to that label.
You can also use color labels in combination with the Group by, or Filter By features to refine your list. Color labels, like tagging,
categories, and ratings, are a way to set aside, organize, and group your photos without moving them into different folders.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
If the Properties pane or Catalog pane is not visible in Manage mode, click View | Properties or View | Catalog.
Create a Color Label Set
Begin by creating a label set so you can quickly select and assign specified labels. Once you have a label set in place, you can assign
your images to the appropriate labels corresponding to your workflow.
To Create a Color Label Set:
1.
In the Catalog pane, click the Labels settings button
2.
Enter names for your labels and click the Save icon.
3.
Click Save As from the Save Label Set dialog box.
4.
Enter a name for your new label set.
5.
Click OK.
and select Edit Label Sets.
Once you have created color label sets, you can access them from the Catalog pane by clicking the Labels settings button and
selecting from the drop-down list. Before assigning a color label, make sure the intended label set is active. The active label set
name is shown in brackets in the label header.
Assign Color Labels
You Can Assign Color Labels to Your Files by Using the Following:
Hover icons in thumbnail view
Catalog pane
Properties pane
Edit menu in Manage and View mode
Context menu
Keyboard shortcuts
ACDSee uses XMP to embed ACDSee Metadata into each file. Only some file formats and file extensions support XMP. These
include GIF, JPEG, DNG, PNG, PSD, and TIF. In the case of these file formats, the ACDSee Metadata is embedded inside the
file and so you can rename or move the file outside of ACDSee and still be able to retrieve the ACDSee Metadata. For formats
that currently do not support XMP, including RAW and ABR, the ACDSee Metadata is written to a sidecar file that is stored in
the same folder as its file. Because a sidecar file is separate from the file itself, you need to rename or move them together,
or you could lose the ACDSee Metadata permanently.
You can also set labels from the status bar in View, Develop, and Edit mode.
To Assign a Color Label Using the Label Line Hover Icon in Thumbnail View:
1.
Hover over a thumbnail to display the gray label icon.
2.
Click the gray label icon to make your selection.
Example of Hovering Over a Thumbnail to Click and Select a Color Label:
1.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
2.
3.
Use the overlay icon on one of a number of selected images to assign the label to all.
To Assign a Color Label to a File Using the Catalog Pane:
1.
In Manage mode, do one of the following:
Drag selected files to a color label in the Catalog pane.
Drag the color label from the Catalog pane to selected files.
To Assign Files to Color Labels in the Properties Pane:
1.
In the File List pane, select the files you want to assign a color rating.
2.
In the Properties pane, select the color label from the boxes along the top.
To Assign Color Labels Using the Edit Menu in Manage and View Mode: Click Edit | Set Label and then select a color.
To Assign Color Labels with the Context Menu: Right-click the file, click Set Label, then select a label name.
To Assign Color Labels Using Keyboard Shortcuts: Keyboard shortcuts are available for the five color labels, plus Alt-0 to clear the label (exactly the same as ratings, except Alt
is used instead of Ctrl)
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Alt-1
Alt-2
Alt-3
Alt-4
Alt-5
Alt-0
Search Images Assigned to a Label
To Search All Images in the Database Assigned to a Label:
Click the color label in the Catalog pane to display all corresponding files in the File List pane.
Use the Search box.
Use Quick Search.
To Search All Images in the File List Assigned to a Label:
Click the Filter drop-down above the File List pane and select a label name. All files assigned to that label in the current file list will
be selected.
To Select All Images in the File List Assigned to a Label:
Use Alt-1 through Alt-5 for the five colors, plus Alt-0 to clear the label (exactly the same as ratings, except it uses Alt instead of Ctrl
Removing Color Labels and Color Label Sets
To Remove a Color Label from a File:
1.
In the File List pane, select one or more files you want to remove a label from.
2.
Do one of the following:
Right-click a selected file, and then click Set Label | Clear Label.
In the Properties pane, click the gray unlabeled icon.
To Delete a Label Set:
1.
In the Catalog pane, click the Labels settings button and select Edit Label Sets.
2.
Select the set you want to delete from the Labels Sets drop-down list.
3.
Click the delete button.
Using the Properties Pane
The Properties pane displays all the metadata about your files. It also displays file properties such as file size, creation date, and
read-only or hidden status. You can use the Properties pane to add, change, or delete the metadata for image and media files.
The Properties pane is open in Manage mode on the right of the File List pane by default. The Properties pane is available in all
modes except 365 mode.
To Open the Properties Pane in Any Mode:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Click View | Properties.
The Metadata panel offers adjustable width for metadata fields. Simply hover between a corresponding label and field to
display the double arrow cursor. Click and drag to adjust width. Double-click to toggle between the width of the longest
label in the group or the longest label in the pane.
Properties Pane Areas
The Properties pane is divided into 3 tabs: Metadata tab, Organize tab, and File tab.
Use the overlay icons, which appear as you hover over a thumbnail, to tag, rate and add color labels to your images.
Alternatively, you can display these setting in the Properties pane by clicking Tools | Options | Properties Pane and
selecting Show Tagged, Rating, and Color Labels.
Metadata Tab
The Metadata tab displays the rating, category, IPTC, EXIF and ACDSee metadata stored with a photo. The ACDSee metadata fields
are available for you to enter the caption for your photographs as well as date, author, and notes. The keywords field is display-only
and can be entered in the Organize tab. The label field can be entered here or selected from the Labels section in the Catalog pane.
IPTC information is automatically embedded into your image, while ACDSee Metadata is not embedded in your files, but instead is
held in the database. ACDSee Metadata can be embedded into all your files (or just selected ones) by clicking the Tools | Embed
ACDSee Metadata command.
The IPTC data fields provide a standard means for entering and storing information about your photographs such as description,
creator, and copyright information. ACDSee supports fields defined in IPTC Core 1.1.
The EXIF data fields hold information captured by your camera such as shutter speed, camera model and GPS information.
Certain EXIF fields are no longer visible by default. The EXIF Artist, Copyright, Image Description, and Date/Time Original fields are
automatically modified when their matching IPTC fields are modified, (see table below). This change reflects the recommendations
of the Metadata Working Group (MWG). If you need to have these fields visible in the EXIF section you can adjust your settings by
clicking Tools | Options | Properties Pane and clicking the Manage Metadata Views button.
Matching IPTC and EXIF Fields
IPTC
EXIF
Description
writes to
Image Description
Creator
writes to
Artist
Copyright Notice
writes to
Copyright
Date Created
writes to
Date/Time Original
When ACDSee parses metadata from a file, the content of the field is displayed without mapping.
Organize Tab
The Organize tab displays a tree of categories and a tree of keywords. The Category tree context-menu (right-click) allows you to
add and delete categories and sub-categories. You can create category sets to quickly categorize your files. Right-clicking the
Keyword tree also allows the same options. Use the keyword tree to create a hierarchy to easily organize your files in a way that
holds meaning for you.
File Tab
The File tab displays detailed file information and image attributes for a selected file or files. You can set or change the Read-Only
and Hidden properties of a file or folder, and view a summary of any EXIF information contained in a file.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Embedding ACDSee Metadata into Files
If you have metadata in your files and they are copied, moved, or renamed, outside of ACDSee, the link between the file and
the database will be broken, but you can rebuild the database using the embedded data in the file.
ACDSee uses XMP to embed ACDSee Metadata into each file. Only some file formats and file extensions support XMP. These
include GIF, JPEG, DNG, PNG, PSD, and TIF. In the case of these file formats, the ACDSee Metadata is embedded inside the
file and so you can rename or move the file outside of ACDSee and still be able to retrieve the ACDSee Metadata. For formats
that currently do not support XMP, including RAW and ABR, the ACDSee Metadata is written to a sidecar file that is stored in
the same folder as its file. Because a sidecar file is separate from the file itself, you need to rename or move them together,
or you could lose the ACDSee Metadata permanently.
Using the Map Pane
Use the Map pane to add photo locations from anywhere in the world to your photos. You can then recall and view that information
for reference at any time. Use the map to select groups of files for further workflow steps, and select photos for display in View
mode.
The location of files displayed in the Map pane is based on the latitude and longitude information in the file properties. If you have a
camera with geotagging capabilities, the geographic location is automatically conveyed visually on the map. You can also add map
coordinates to files by dragging them directly onto the map and pressing the Save All button.
Geotagged images are indicated on the map with pins. You can click a pin on the map to select files within a geographic location for
viewing or processing. If your geotagged image pin is not displayed on the map, try using the keyboard shortcut F5 to refresh the
map.
The following file formats can be added to the map: JPG, TIFF, RAW, DNG, and PNG.
ACDSee automatically adds file information, including geographical tags, to the database as you browse. However, if you
have a large number of files, you may want to catalog those files first to speed up the loading time for the pins on the map.
To catalog your files, click Tools | Database | Catalog Files.
To Open the Map Pane:
In Manage mode, click View | Map (CTRL + SHIFT + M).
The Map pane appears above the File List pane in Manage mode by default. You can drag the Map title bar to a new location and
float the pane or dock it in another position like the other movable panes in ACDSee.
You can toggle the Map on and off with the keyboard shortcut CTRL+SHIFT+M in Manage mode.
To Add Files to the Map by Dragging:
1.
In Manage mode, drag one or more files onto the map.
2.
Click Save All in the top left corner of the map.
Ideally images should be geotagged prior to processing. If an image is geotagged after it has been edited and the Restore
to Original command is used, then the geotag will be lost.
To Delete a Pinned Location on the Map:
Right-click the geotagged image thumbnail and select Map | Remove from Map.
To View a Geotagged Image on the Map:
Right-click the geotagged image thumbnail and select Map | View on Map.
To Find a Location:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
To find a specific location, enter a place or landmark into the Search for Location field at the top right of the Map pane.
To Set Default Location, Zoom and Map Type:
1.
Pan to your preferred location on the map, then adjust the zoom-level and select your preferred map type (Map, Satellite, or
Terrain).
2.
Click Tools | Map | Set default map location.
Note: The map reflects the current File list. If the File list has images mapped to a different location from your default
setting, then that location will be displayed.
To pan and zoom the map to a specific location, enter the location into the Map search field and press Enter.
Reverse Geocoding:
The Reverse Geocoding command allows you to save location information into certain IPTC fields. These include: Country, Country
Code, State/Province, and Location.
1.
In Manage mode, drag one or more files onto the map.
2.
Click Save All in the top left corner of the map.
3.
Press the Reverse Geocode button to preview the location information.
4.
Click Save to save this information into the IPTC fields of the selected images.
If images with multiple different locations are selected, only one of those locations will be used to do the reverse lookup.
Using the Map Pane to Further Your Workflow
With the images from a particular location all selected, here are a few possible workflow options:
Enter Develop or Edit mode to process this selection together.
Use the Batch tool to apply the same settings on photos from the same location.
Click Slideshow to view and present a slideshow of the photos from this location.
Send photos from this location via email.
If a geotagged image does not display, try using the keyboard shortcut F5 to refresh the map.
Pin Legend
Indicates geotagged location.
Indicates more than one geotagged location in this area. (Zoom in to see locations)
Indicates selected geotagged location.
A dot on a pin of any color indicates unsaved image location.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Creating and Assigning Hierarchical Keywords
You can keyword your files in a hierarchy and maintain these groups in the Keyword tree. Select the Organize tab in the Properties
pane to create, rename, delete, and move your keywords.
Creating Keywords
To Create Keywords:
In the Properties pane, located to the right of the File List pane, do one of the following:
Right-click Keywords in the Organize tab, and then select New Keyword.
Type a keyword into the field of the Keyword group and press Enter.
To Keyword Files with Existing Keywords, Do One of the Following:
Select one or more files, then drag the keyword onto them.
Select one or more files, then check the box next to the appropriate keyword.
Select one or more files, then right-click the keyword. Select Assign items.
Select one or more files, then drag them onto the keyword.
To Establish a Hierarchy, Do One of the Following:
In the keyword field, type the lesser or more specific keyword, followed by the less than symbol, followed by the greater or
more general keyword.
Example:
Owl < Bird
or
Madrid < Spain < Europe
Right-click an existing keyword, then select New Keyword. The new keyword will automatically become a child to the
existing keyword.
When assigning multiple keywords to a file, it is important to note that separating keywords with commas will not generate
a hierarchy.
Managing Keywords
To Manage Your Keywords:
Select a keyword in the Organize tab, and do one of the following:
To unassign a keyword from a file, right-click the selected keyword and select Remove Items or uncheck the box.
To edit the keyword, right-click the selected keyword and select Edit.
To delete the keyword, right-click the selected keyword and select Delete.
To edit the keyword tree, click and drag the keyword to other parts of the tree.
To duplicate a keyword, right-click the selected keyword and select Copy, then Paste where desired.
To merge duplicate keywords, click and drag one keyword into the other.
To create a keyword from an existing category, click and drag the category into the keyword tree.
Creating Quick Keywords
In order to keep your keywords organized and streamline your workflow, you can use quick keywords by creating a group of related
keywords that hold an association for you. This is ideal for keywords you would like to be easily accessible, rather than buried in the
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
hierarchical tree. You can create multiple groups and choose between them based on the photos you are viewing at the time. You
can also add these keywords to your tree.
Example:
Italy
Florence
Venice
Lake Como
Rome
Milan
Verona
Genoa
Bologna
Naples
To Create Easy-Access Quick Keywords:
1.
In the Keyword group, on the Organize tab, select Manage Quick Keywords from the drop-down menu. The Quick
Keywords dialog box opens.
2.
Click the Save button and choose a name for your set. Click OK.
3.
Enter up to nine associated or commonly-used keywords into the open fields. To create a hierarchy within a field, use the
pipe key. Example: A|B|C.
4.
Click OK.
5.
Apply keywords from your set by selecting a file and clicking the applicable keyword from the Quick Keywords Table.
6.
A dialog will open asking if you would like to create this keyword. Click Yes. The keyword will be added to the tree. If you
specified a hierarchy in the keyword set, the parent keyword will appear in the tree with the child under it. The text of the
keywords in the table will change color to indicate that the keyword is assigned to the currently selected files, and will
display in italics if assigned to only some (but not all) of the currently selected files.
Copying and Moving Files
You can use the Copy To Folder and Move To Folder commands to relocate files and folders on your hard drive, and specify how to
handle overwriting existing files. You can also select from a list of previously accessed folders to save time looking through your
directory structure.
When you use ACDSee to relocate your files, by default any ACDSee Metadata associated with those files is copied to the
new location. However, if you do not want to copy the associated files, clear the Include related files for non-RAW
images checkbox.
When you do NOT use ACDSee to move or copy your files, you break the link to any database information you have added to
those files. This is because ACDSee cannot track the files. You will lose important categorizing and other database
information. You can fix this by clicking Change Binding and rebinding the database. If you have embedded the database
information in the files themselves, you can also retrieve this information using Tools | Database | Catalog Files.
ACDSee uses XMP to embed ACDSee Metadata into each file. Only some file formats and file extensions support XMP. These
include GIF, JPEG, DNG, PNG, PSD, and TIF. In the case of these file formats, the ACDSee Metadata is embedded inside the
file and so you can rename or move the file outside of ACDSee and still be able to retrieve the ACDSee Metadata. For formats
that currently do not support XMP, including RAW and ABR, the ACDSee Metadata is written to a sidecar file that is stored in
the same folder as its file. Because a sidecar file is separate from the file itself, you need to rename or move them together,
or you could lose the ACDSee Metadata permanently.
To Copy or Move Files:
1.
Do one of the following:
In the File List pane, select one or more files, and then click Edit | Copy To Folder or Move To Folder.
While viewing an image or media file in View mode, click Edit | Copy To Folder or Move To Folder.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
2.
In the Copy To Folder or Move To Folder dialog box, do one of the following:
Select the Folders tab, and locate the folder on your hard drive where you want to place the files.
Select the History tab, and select a folder from the list of recently-accessed folders.
Select Create Folder and enter the name of a new folder.
3.
In the Overwriting duplicate files drop-down list, select one of the following options to specify how ACDSee should
handle overwriting files:
Ask: Prompts you for confirmation when overwriting a file.
Rename: Prompts you to rename a file.
Replace: Overwrites any file with the same file name and extension.
Skip: Cancels the operation if there is a file with the same file name and extension.
4.
Click OK.
Copying Images to the Clipboard
You can copy an image to the Clipboard and then paste it into another application. Using the Copy Image command transfers only
the image data to the Clipboard: no EXIF, IPTC or metadata information is retained.
To Copy an Image:
1.
In Manage mode or View mode, select the image file you want to copy.
2.
Click Edit | Copy Image.
3.
Paste the image into your other application.
Pasting Files and Folders
You can cut or copy files to the Clipboard, and then paste them into another folder without losing your ACDSee metadata.
To Cut and Paste Files:
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List or Folders pane, select one or more files or folders.
2.
Click Edit | Copy or Cut.
3.
In the Folders pane, browse to a new location.
4.
Click Edit | Paste to place the files or folders into the new location.
Replacing or Overwriting Files
When copying or moving files from one location to another, a file name collision occurs if a file already exists in the destination folder
with the same file name and extension as a file you are relocating. In ACDSee, you can view both of the files involved in the Confirm
File Replace dialog box. If the files involved are image files, ACDSee displays thumbnail previews of both files, and provides options
to replace the existing file, rename, delete, or skip the file you are moving, or cancel the operation entirely.
To use the Confirm File Replace Dialog Box:
1.
If you are moving a number of files and want to handle all potential file name collisions in the same manner, select the Apply
to all checkbox.
2.
To help determine any differences between the two files, use the toolbar between the two preview fields to shrink or enlarge
the size of the previews.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
3.
Do one of the following:
To replace the destination file with the source file, click Replace.
To rename the new file before moving it into the destination folder, type a new name for the file in the Rename to
field, and then click Rename.
To skip this file, and leave both files intact, click Skip.
To delete either the destination or source file, click Delete below the file you want to remove from your hard drive.
To cancel the operation and not move or copy any more files, click Cancel.
In the Confirm File Replace dialog box, destination file refers to the file that exists in the target folder, and source file
refers to the file you are moving or copying.
Renaming a File or Folder
You can rename a file or folder on your hard drive in the Folders and File List panes.
To Rename a File or Folder:
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List or Folders pane, select the item you want to rename.
2.
Click Edit | Rename.
3.
Without removing or changing the file name extension, such as “.jpg”, type a new name for the file.
4.
Press Enter.
You can rename multiple files at the same time using the Batch Rename tool.
Storing Files in Private Folders
Private folders are secure folders where you can store confidential files. When you place files into a private folder, ACDSee moves
them from their current location into the private folder. Private folders are password-protected and the files in them can only be
viewed in ACDSee.
When you add files or folders to a private folder all information related to them is permanently removed from the database. Restoring
files and folders from a private folder does not restore information to the database. The only way you can preserve database
information related to the files or folders is to back up or export the database before you add them to a private folder.
To Open the Private Folder Pane:
In Manage mode, click View | Private Folder.
To Create a Private Folder:
1.
Close any open private folders.
2.
Right-click the private folder icon in the Private Folder pane and select Create Private Folder.
3.
In the Enter Password text box, type a password for the private folder. Your password must be less than 40 characters
long.
4.
In the Re-enter Password text box, type the password again to verify it.
5.
Click OK.
A new folder will not display in the Private Folder pane. Private folders are hidden and are only identified by their password. When
you have a private folder open you will see any subfolders that exist within the private folder, but do not confuse these subfolders
with the private folder itself.
To Open a Private Folder:
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
1.
Close any open private folders.
2.
Click View | Private Folder.
3.
Click the Open button in the Private Folder pane header.
4.
In the Enter Password text box, type the password of the private folder that you want to open.
5.
Click OK.
The contents of an open private folder remain visible until you close it. Remember to close your private folder if you have to
step away from your computer and do not want anyone to see its contents.
To Close a Private Folder:
Do one of the following:
Click the Close button in the Private Folder pane header.
Click File | Exit to exit ACDSee. The private folder is closed automatically.
To Add Files to a Private Folder:
1.
Open the private folder to which you want to add files.
2.
Click and drag the files onto the private folder icon in the Private Folder pane. A warning message displays.
3.
Click Yes to move the files to the private folder.
When you add files and folders to a private folder they are removed from their original location in the file system and added
to the password- protected private folder. There is no way to recover files and folders from a private folder if you have
forgotten your password. Ensure that you choose a password that you will be able to remember.
To Add an Existing Folder and its Contents to a Private Folder:
1.
Open the private folder to which you want to add files.
2.
Click and drag the folder onto the private folder icon in the Private Folder pane.
3.
Click Yes to move the folder and its contents to the private folder.
To Restore Folders and Files from a Private Folder:
1.
Open the private folder containing the folders or files that you want to restore.
2.
Select the folders or files and click File | Restore from Private Folder.
3.
Click the browse button, navigate to the folder where you would like to move the folders or files, and then click OK.
4.
Click OK.
ACDSee moves the folders or files from the private folder to the selected location. These folders and files are now visible to
anyone with access to the computer.
To Delete a Private Folder, or the Folders or Files in the Private Folder:
1.
Open the private folder containing the folders or files that you want to delete.
2.
Do one of the following:
To delete the private folder, right-click the private folder icon and select Delete.
To delete folders or files in a private folder, right-click them and select Delete.
A warning message displays.
3.
Click Yes to delete the private folder and all of its contents, or the selected folders or files in the private folder.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Use caution when deleting folders or files in private folders. If you delete folders or files in private folders they are
permanently destroyed. Restore the folders and files if you want to move them from the private folder to a non-secure
location on your computer.
Tagging Images
It is easy to take hundreds of photos at an important event like a wedding or a marathon. After you have transferred your photos to
your computer, you may want to review them and sort out your favorites. Tagging is a fast and easy way to identify your best photos
or to separate them for editing or review.
The tagging checkbox is at the bottom right corner of the thumbnails. Click the checkbox to tag or un-tag photos. Photos remain
tagged until you clear the checkmark from the checkbox.
You can display all your tagged photos with one click by clicking Tagged under Special items in the Catalog pane. Tagging, like
categories and ratings, is a way to set aside, organize, and group your photos without moving the files into different folders.
Tagging is intended as a temporary means of separating your images. Once tagged, you can move or apply categories and
ratings to the images, and then clear all of the tags. Categories, ratings, color labels, and folders are more effective for
organizing and grouping your images over a long period of time.
To Tag a Selected Image:
Use the keyboard shortcut \ backslash key to toggle the tag on.
Select the checkbox in the bottom right corner of the thumbnail.
Right-click on one or more thumbnails and select Tag.
In the Properties pane, select the tag checkbox at the top left corner in the Metadata tab.
To Untag a Selected Image:
Use the keyboard shortcut \ backslash key to toggle the tag off.
In the Properties pane, uncheck the tag checkbox at the top left corner in the Metadata tab.
To Untag All Tagged Images:
1.
Click Tagged in the Catalog pane to display all tagged files in the File List pane.
2.
Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL + A to select all.
3.
Click the backslash key \ to toggle the tag off.
To Display Tagged Photos:
In Manage mode, click View | Catalog to display the Catalog pane, then click Tagged in the Special Items section.
Tagged photos from all your folders display in the File List pane.
To Tag a Photo in View Mode:
Do one of the following:
In View mode, select the checkbox in the bottom right corner of the status bar.
In View mode, click View | Properties to display the Properties pane, click the Metadata tab, then select the Tagged
checkbox in the top left corner.
To Tag a Photo When You Are Comparing Images:
52
1.
In the Comparison List, select the checkbox in the bottom right corner of the image thumbnails.
2.
Click OK. The Compare Images Viewer closes. You will see a checkmark in the checkbox of the images that you tagged.
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Manage Metadata Views and Presets
To Select a Metadata View:
1.
Click View | Properties to open the Properties pane.
2.
Select the Metadata tab of the Properties pane.
3.
Click the Metadata View drop-down list in the Metadata tab to select one of the view options: Default Metadata View (most
commonly used fields), All EXIF, All IPTC, ACDSee Metadata, or saved custom views.
To Create a Customized Metadata View:
1.
Click the Metadata View drop-down list in the Metadata pane and select Manage Metadata Views.
2.
In the Choose Metadata to Display dialog box, select New Metadata View from the drop-down list.
3.
Click the plus + signs to expand the tree and toggle the checkboxes on and off to select your preferences. See Manage
Metadata View options below.
4.
Click the save button and enter a name for your customized view.
5.
Click OK.
Manage Metadata Views Options
When all items in a group are selected, the group checkbox is checked.
When no items in a group are selected, the group checkbox is clear.
When some, but not all items in a group are selected, the group checkbox is solid.
Toggle the checkboxes on and off to make your selections.
You can choose whether or not to display maker notes by selecting or deselecting the Display Maker Notes checkbox.
Adding ACDSee Metadata to Multiple Files
We recommend entering and editing metadata prior to processing your images. If you use the Restore to Original command the
metadata will be lost unless it was entered prior to processing (except in the case of RAW images).
You cannot set IPTC and EXIF information for read-only files, such as those on a CD-ROM.
If the Properties pane is not already open, select View | Properties.
To Add Metadata to One or More Files:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
1.
In Manage mode, select one or more files in the File List pane.
2.
In the Properties pane, select the Metadata tab.
3.
Enter information into the metadata fields.
4.
Click Apply or press Enter to apply your changes.
When you click Apply or Enter in Manage Mode, the focus is returned to the File List pane allowing you to quickly make
another file selection using your keyboard.
To include numbers in a sequence with your metadata, select the files and enter <#> as the start number, in whichever
field you want. Ex) Entering <5> will begin the sequence at 5.
Metadata Tab Keyboard Shortcuts
This Shortcut
Has This Result
TAB
Jumps focus forward from field to field.
SHIFT + TAB
Jumps focus backwards from field to field.
CTRL + K
Places the cursor in the ACDSee Metadata Keywords field of the Organize tab in the Properties pane.
ALT + K
Places the cursor in the IPTC Keywords field of the Metadata tab in the Properties pane.
ENTER
Applies your changes.
ESC
Discards your changes.
If you click away from the Properties pane, any metadata that you have just entered will be lost. You must click Apply or
press ENTER to apply your changes.
To Use Keyboard Shortcuts to Enter Metadata into the Same Field of Multiple Photos:
1.
Select the first photo in your list and enter content into a Metadata field.
2.
Press the Page Down key to move to the next photo. The cursor remains in the same field of the Properties pane for each
photo, allowing you to quickly enter content for the same field for multiple photos.
3.
Enter content into the field and again press Page Down to move to the next photo.
4.
Continue Step 3 until complete.
You do not need to click the Apply button when using this shortcut. You can use the Page Up key to move back to the previous photo.
Removing IPTC Keywords from Auto Categories
You can remove unused IPTC keywords from the ACDSee database. Once removed, the IPTC keywords will no longer display under
Keywords (IPTC) in the Photo Properties' Auto Categories list of the Catalog Pane.
This process also applies for the Supplemental Categories field. This field is only visible if selected from the Choose
Metadata to Display dialog box found under Tools | Options | Properties Pane by pressing the Manage Metadata
Views button.
To Remove IPTC Keywords and Supplemental Categories:
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
1.
In Manage mode, select any image which supports IPTC.
2.
If the Properties pane is not already displayed, click View | Properties.
3.
To ensure the image is writable, do the following:
Select the File tab and check to see if there is a check mark in Read only.
If there is a check mark the image is not writable. Deselect the Read only checkbox to make the file writable.
4.
In the IPTC section of the Metadata tab, click the keyword picker button
5.
In the IPTC Keywords Picker dialog box, click Edit List.
6.
Select the keyword you want to remove from the Value list.
beside the Keywords field.
To select more than one keyword, press and hold the CTRL key while selecting the keywords.
7.
Click Remove.
8.
Click OK.
9.
Click OK.
Only keywords that are not in use can be removed from the list. To find photos associated with a keyword, click the
keyword listed under Photo Properties in the Auto Categories list of the Catalog pane.
Changing the Date and Time Properties of Images
You can use the Batch Adjust Time Stamp tool to change the date and time properties of one or more images in Manage mode or in
View mode.
To Change the Date and Time Properties of a File:
1.
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, select one or more images, and then click Tools | Batch | Adjust Time Stamp.
In View mode, click Tools | Modify | Adjust Image Time Stamp.
2.
On the Date to Change tab, choose from the following:
Date to Change
EXIF date and time
3.
EXIF date/time original
The original date/time the image was
captured.
EXIF date/time digitized
The date/time the image was converted to
a digital image (usually the same as
original).
EXIF date/time
The date/time the image was lasted
edited.
File last-modified date and time
The date/time the image or file was lasted edited (for example image editing or
updates to metadata)
File creation date and time
The original date/time the file was created.
ACDSee database date and time
The date and time held in the ACDSee database.
On the Advanced Options tab, select the options for the Adjust Image Time Stamp tool described below, then click Next.
Advanced Options
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
4.
Accept defaults and
start conversion
Accepts the default settings for the new time stamp options. To start changing the date and
time of your images, click Adjust Time Stamp.
Automatically close
wizard when
finished
Closes the Adjust Image Time Stamp Wizard as soon as the process is complete.
Save current
settings as defaults
Remembers the current settings and applies them the next time you change time stamps.
On the Choose new time stamp page, select one of the following options:
Use different date and time: Replaces the selected date and time with another time stamp property from the
same file. Select the file property you want to use from the Select date and time drop-down list.
Use specific date and time: Changes the selected time stamp in each file to a specific date and time. Type the
new date and time for the time stamp in the Date and Time fields.
Shift to a new starting date and time: Replaces the earliest time stamp with a date and time you specify, and
shifts all later time stamps ahead accordingly. Specify the time stamp for the earliest file in the Date and Time
fields.
Shift date and time by a specific number: Shifts all the time stamps either forwards or backwards by a
specific number of hours (to adjust for time zones). Select either Shift forward or Shift backward, and type a
number into the Hours, Minutes, and Seconds spin boxes.
5.
Click Adjust Time Stamp to begin adjusting your files.
6.
When the wizard is finished, click Done to return to ACDSee.
Backing Up Your Files to Another Computer
The Sync Wizard will guide you through the process of creating a synchronized copy of your files to protect you from local hard
drive failure. You can synchronize your local folders with a network drive, remote computer, or external hard drive. You can name
the synchronization, specify the actions you want to take each time you synchronize your files, schedule the synchronization to run
at specific intervals, and edit or remove the synchronization at a later time.
The Sync Wizard does not backup your database when your files are copied to a new location. To back up files with
database information, use the ACD Database Backup Wizard.
To Create a Synchronization:
1.
In Manage mode, click File | Sync | Create Sync.
2.
On the Welcome page, click the Next button when you are ready to continue.
3.
On the Synchronization Options page, do the following:
In the Source folder field, specify the folder containing files you would like to copy.
In the Backup destination field, specify a folder on a network drive, remote computer, or external hard drive in
which to place the backup files.
In the Options area, specify how Sync should handle errors and logs.
In the Confirmations area, specify how Sync should handle file duplication conflicts.
Click Next when you are ready to continue.
4.
On the Synchronization Schedule page, do the following:
In the Name text box, type a name for your synchronization.
In the Schedule area, specify whether you would like to run the synchronization immediately, or schedule the
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
synchronization.
Click Finish when you are ready to complete the wizard.
Schedule: An account with no password cannot set up a schedule. You must set a password for your account for
schedules to work. A blank password will not work; you must have a real password with more than one character.
Updating or Deleting a Synchronization
You can adjust the settings of a synchronization, schedule it to run at regular intervals, or delete the synchronization from ACDSee.
To Update or Delete a Saved Synchronization:
1.
In Manage mode, click File | Sync | Edit Sync.
2.
In the Saved Synchronizations dialog box, select a synchronization from the list.
3.
Do one of the following:
To schedule the synchronization, click Schedule. Specify how often to run your synchronization, and then click
OK.
To adjust the settings, click Edit. In the Edit Synchronizations dialog box, update the folder containing files you
would like to copy, and a folder on a network drive, remote computer, or external hard drive in which to place those
files. In the Options area, update how Sync should handle errors and logs. In the Confirmations area, update
how Sync should handle file duplication conflicts. Click OK when you are finished.
To rename the synchronization, click Rename. Type a new name for the synchronization and click OK.
To delete the synchronization, click Delete.
4.
Click Close.
Running a Saved Synchronization
After you create a synchronization, you can run it at any time, even if it is scheduled to run at regular intervals.
To Run a Saved Synchronization:
In Manage mode, click File | Sync, and then select the name of the synchronization you want to run.
Searching with ACDSee
ACDSee includes a number of ways to search your computer for files and folders. You can use the Search pane to search by file
name, keywords, or image properties. You can create advanced searches to locate files that fall within a date or rating range and
then save and name the search to use later. You can also use the Duplicate Finder to locate and manage identical files.
For simpler searches, you can use the Quick Search bar to quickly locate files and folders, or search the database for specific names
and keywords. You can also customize the Quick Search bar to only search for specific items or certain parts of the database.
Also, you can use the Catalog pane to quickly locate and list all images on your hard drive, or to locate any files in a folder that have
not been categorized. If you are working with larger image collections, you can use Selective Browsing to specify broad or narrow
criteria for the images you want to display in the File List pane.
Using the Quick Search Bar
You can use the Quick Search bar in Manage mode to quickly locate files or folders. You can use the Quick Search options or basic
operators to refine or expand your search, and view the results in the File List pane.
The Quick Search feature always searches the following IPTC fields: Title, Headline, Description, Keywords, Creator, City, Location,
State/Province, Country, and Instructions. The Quick Search also searches Color labels and the ACDSee Metadata fields: Caption,
Author, Notes, and Keywords.
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
When ACDSee searches file names, it only considers the first term in the file name. For example, a file called Cat_Dog
would be found by searching for Cat, but not for Dog. Search terms are not case-sensitive.
To Run a Quick Search:
Do one of the following:
In the Quick Search bar, type the term or part of a word for which you want to search.
Click the drop-down list beside the Quick Search field and select a previously entered search term.
Quick Search Operators
You can use the following operators to further refine or expand your searches in the Quick Search bar. Note that a search term
cannot begin with an operator; it must start with a word.
Operator
Result
Examples
-
Searches for all items containing the first search term, and then
displays only those items that don't also contain the second search
term.
Cat -Dog returns all items that contain
Cat, except those that also contain Dog.
Be sure to insert a space before the
minus sign. If you do not insert a space,
ACDSee will assume you are searching
for a hyphenated word.
+
Searches for all items containing both the search term before and
after the operator. Those items that only contain one of the terms,
are excluded. The Quick Search bar treats spaces between words
as + operators.
Cat+Dog or Cat Dog returns items
containing both Cat and Dog.
Searches for all items containing one or the other of the search
elements.
Cat|Dog includes all items with either
Cat or Dog in the search.
|
Cat+Dog+-Kittens returns items that
include both Cat and Dog, but not those
that include Cat and Dog and Kittens.
Cat+Dog|Kittens includes items that
contain both Cat and Dog, and those that
contain Kittens.
Using the Search Pane
You can use the Search pane to search for your files and folders. You can do basic searching by file name or keyword phrase, and
create advanced searches to narrow your results by folders, categories, and image properties. You can also search for patterns in
file names and find duplicate files.
You can also save a search and give it a name. Saved searches are listed on the Search pane and the Catalog pane. On the Search
pane, can select Saved searches from the drop-down list to run again. On the Catalog pane, Saved Searches are listed below Auto
Categories where you can run them again by clicking once on the Saved Search name.
The Search pane will not return results for folders that are not cataloged in the ACDSee database. Cataloging happens
automatically when you browse to a folder. You can also click Tools | Database | Catalog Files.
To Open the Search Pane:
In Manage mode, click View | Search.
Search Pane Areas
The Search pane contains several areas to help you manage your searches. When you create a search, remember that the search
tool will only return files that match all of the criteria that you specify.
Saved Searches
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
In the Saved searches area, you can save a complex search to use later, select a search to run again, or delete a saved search.
Saved searches
If you have saved a search, it is listed in this drop-down list for you to select and run again.
When you click Start at the bottom of the pane, the search results are listed in the File List pane.
Saved searches are also listed on the Catalog pane, from where you can run them with a single
click on the Saved Search name.
Save a search
Click the Save icon, and then Save or Save As to save or overwrite a saved search. When the
Saved Search dialog opens, type in a name for the search. If you use a descriptive name, it makes
it easier to remember the criteria in your saved search.
Delete a search
Select a search from the drop-down list and then click the Delete icon. Click Yes to confirm the
deletion, when the prompt opens.
Files and Text
In the Files and Text area, you can identify what you are searching for, and where you want to search for it.
Search for files or
folders named
Type a portion of the file or folder name for which you want to search, or select a previous search
term from the drop-down list. You can also use wildcards to search for file name patterns. To
exclude all non-image files, click the right-arrow button beside the field and select Images only.
With the text
Type the text you want to search for within the ACDSee database. This can include portions of a
caption or keyword, or even the name of a folder or category that might contain the files you want
to find. When you search by both file name and a keyword or phrase, an item is included in the
search result only when it includes both criteria.
To specify what parts of the database you want to search, and indicate how to treat the text you
type in the field, click the arrow next to the field and select any of the following options:
Find all words: Only returns files that match all of the words you enter.
Find whole words only: Only returns files that contain the entire word, exactly as you
type it.
Search in Caption: Searches the Caption field of files in the database.
Search in Keywords: Searches the Keyword field of files in the database.
Search in Notes: Searches the Notes field of files in the database.
Search in Categories: Searches the Category assignments of files in the database.
Search in Folders: Searches in the name of folders in the database.
Search in Labels: Searches the labeled images by color.
Search in
Select one of the following options:
Entire database: Performs a search on the entire ACDSee database. Note that any
folders on your computer that have not been cataloged are not included in the search
results.
Specific folders and categories: Performs the search only within the categories and
folders you specify. Selecting this option opens the Categories and Folders area, where
you can select the location and categories in which you want to search.
Sync to file list settings
Imports the current Manage mode settings, including Selective Browsing settings, into the
Search pane. Note that this may also remove criteria from the Search pane.
Properties Area
In the Properties area, you can identify file properties that you want to search for, and specify ranges of values to include or exclude
from your search.
To Use the Properties Area:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
1.
Below the Search file properties field, click Add.
2.
In the Add Search Criteria dialog box, select one or more properties on which to base your search.
3.
Click OK.
4.
In the Properties area, click the hyperlinks to define conditional statements for each property.
5.
Click Start to perform the search.
Searching with File Name Patterns
You can type a text pattern into the Search pane's Search for files and folders named field to search for file names. You can
search for simple patterns such as portions of file names, or more advanced patterns that include wildcards.
File Name Pattern Wildcards
Wildcard
Result
Example
?
Matches any single character in the file name.
ca?.jpg results in cat.jpg, cap.jpg, and car.jpg, but
not cats.jpg
*
Matches zero or more characters in the file name.
cat* results in cat.jpg, cats.jpg, and cathy.jpg
[…]
Matches any of the enclosed characters.
ca[tr] results in cat.jpg or car.jpg, but not cap.jpg
[!…]
Matches any character not enclosed.
cat[!0] results in cata.jpg and catb.jpg, but not
cat0.jpg
[…-…]
Matches any character in the specified range.
cat[a-f0-9] results in cata.jpg, catb.jpg, catf.jpg
and cat0.jpg, cat1.jpg, …, cat9.jpg
\
Blocks the use of other wildcard characters that are
also characters permitted in a file name, such as
square brackets: [ ]. The * and ? characters are not
permitted in file names so this function does not work
with them.
Because square brackets are wildcards, if you
wanted to search for a file name that contains a
bracket, you must precede the bracket with a
backslash:
ACD\[123\] results in ACD[123].gif
Patterns are not case-sensitive. To use multiple patterns, separate the names with spaces or semicolons. To match a
pattern containing a space or semicolon, enclose the pattern in double quotation marks. If you do not include the *
wildcard in your pattern, the pattern is matched as a sub-string. For example, cat would match cat, cathy and bobcat, and
is equivalent to the pattern *cat*.
Using Selective Browsing
You can use selective browsing to browse for files that are located in a specific folder, assigned a specific date, and/or assigned to a
specific Catalog classification. By adjusting the selective browsing criteria, you can quickly include or exclude files from the File List
pane, and view only those files you want to browse.
To get the most out of selective browsing, it is recommended that you catalog and organize your files in the ACDSee database. The
more information you enter for your files, the more helpful you will find the selective browsing feature.
To Use Selective Browsing:
Open the Selective Browsing pane by clicking View | Selective Browsing. The pane appears on the left side of the File List
pane.
Setting Selective Browsing Criteria
The Selective Browsing pane is divided into three areas: Folders, Catalog, and Calendar, each of which corresponds to the Manage
mode pane of the same name. When the Selective Browsing pane is open, the Contents bar in the File List pane is replaced by the
Selective Browsing bar, which lists all of the current browsing criteria.
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
When you add a folder, date range, or organize method to the Selective Browsing pane, ACDSee excludes any files that do not match
that criteria. You can add or remove criteria to narrow or broaden your results.
To Add Selective Browsing Criteria:
With the Selective Browsing pane open, do any of the following:
In the Folders pane, select one or more folders.
In the Catalog pane, select one or more categories, and/or a rating.
In the Calendar pane, select one or more date ranges.
As each criteria is added to the Selective Browsing pane, ACDSee searches its database for files in that folder, that match the
date range, and are assigned to the classification, and displays them in the File List pane. You can then select those files and use
the ACDSee features to edit, share, move, and view them however you want.
You can also adjust or refine your criteria in the Selective Browsing pane:
To remove a selected criteria from the Selective Browsing pane, right-click any of the criteria, and then select Remove
From Scope.
To exclude all of a certain type of criteria, click the bar above the list, and toggle the option to include that type in the scope.
For example, to exclude the listed folders from the scope, click the Folders bar, and then click Include Folders in Scope.
The folders you selected will still be displayed in the Selective Browsing pane, but will not factor in the results.
To remove all criteria of a certain type, click the bar above the list, and select Clear All .
The default behavior for categories in the Selective Browsing pane is to display files that match any of the categories listed. You
can refine your results by choosing to display only those files that are assigned to all of the specified categories. To toggle
between behaviors, right-click the bar above the categories you selected, and select Match Any or Match All .
Tips for Selective Browsing
When you add a criteria to the Selective Browsing pane, you are indicating that the files you want to browse must have that
attribute. For example, if you select a folder in the Folders pane, then ACDSee displays only files in that folder. If you select a rating
in the Catalog pane, ACDSee displays only files assigned to that rating.
You can combine criteria to refine your selective browsing even further. For example, if you select a category and a date range, then
ACDSee displays only those files that belong to both the category and date range you selected. ACDSee does not display items that
fall within the date range unless they are also assigned to the correct category, and does not display files assigned to that category
unless they also match the date range.
Hiding the Selective Browsing Pane
You can use the Auto Hide feature to automatically hide the Selective Browsing pane and increase space for the File List pane. When
the pane is set to auto-hide, it rolls away when you click outside it, leaving only an edge displayed. You can access the pane again by
moving the cursor over the edge.
Searching with Auto Categories
Do you have hundreds, possibly thousands, of images? Do you use more than one camera? Do different members of your family
share cameras? Or do you have images on your computer that were captured by friends and family? If you answered yes to any of
these questions you should consider using auto categories to search for images.
You will see auto categories in the Catalog pane, below Labels. Double-click or click the plus sign (+) to expand auto category
groupings. Double-click or click the minus sign (-) to collapse the auto category groupings.
Some auto category information is added to your images by your camera. For example, cameras will record information such as the
camera make and model, the white balance settings you used, the focal length you used, and the aperture. You may want to
supplement that information with the city, province/state, or country in which you captured the images, as well as keywords or
copyright. You can do this by manually entering information in the Properties pane.
When you click on an auto category, ACDSee searches for images belonging to that category. For example, imagine that you use
more than one camera. You can expand the Photo Properties and Camera Model groupings, then select the category representing
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
your camera model. All images captured with that camera model will display. Similarly, imagine that your brother captures a lot of
images and sends them to you. You can expand the Photo Properties and Photographer groupings, then select your brother's name
from the list of photographers. All images captured by your brother will display.
Below are some tips for searching with auto categories.
Identifying Commonly Used Search Categories
If there are certain auto categories in the Photo Properties grouping that you use frequently, you can save time by adding them to
the Commonly Used grouping. Some Photo Properties groupings are available in the Commonly Used grouping by default. You can
add as many auto categories as you want to the Commonly Used grouping, and you can easily remove any grouping from the
Commonly Used grouping when you no longer need them.
To Add an Auto Category Grouping to the Commonly Used Grouping:
1.
Expand the Photo Properties grouping.
2.
Right-click the auto categories grouping that you want to add to the Commonly Used grouping, and select Add to
Commonly Used. The grouping is added to the Commonly Used grouping.
It remains visible in the Photo Properties grouping as well.
To Remove an Auto Category Grouping from the Commonly Used Grouping:
1.
Expand the Commonly Used grouping.
2.
Right-click the auto categories grouping that you want to remove from the Commonly Used grouping, and select Remove
from Commonly Used.
The grouping is removed from the Commonly Used grouping.
Refining Your Auto Categories Search
You can refine your auto categories search by selecting more than one auto category. For example, imagine that you are learning to
combine aperture and shutter speed settings to properly expose images in a variety of lighting and you want find images taken at
specific settings. If you click the Easy-Select indicator beside the f/16 aperture auto category and the 1/30 s shutter speed auto
category, ACDSee will search for images that belong to both of those auto categories.
When you select more than one auto category you can further control the search by selecting Match All or Match Any from the
Match Any/All drop-down list at the top of the Catalog pane. If you select Match Any, ACDSee will display any images associated with
the selected auto categories. If you select Match All, ACDSee will display only those images that are associated with all of the
selected auto categories.
You can also refine your auto categories search by selecting a category or rating. For example, imagine that you clicked on the
Photographer auto category and found over 1000 images. However, you only want to see the best images by that photographer.
Click the Easy-Select indicator beside 1 in the Ratings area of the Catalog pane. Only the images by that photographer with a rating
of 1 will display.
You can also use the Selective Browsing pane to refine your auto categories search. For example, imagine that you clicked on the
Camera Model auto category and ACDSee displayed over 1000 images. However, you only want to see the images that you took on a
specific date. Display the Selective Browsing pane by clicking View | Selective Browsing, then select the Calendar pane and
select the appropriate date. Only the images taken with that camera model on that day will be displayed.
Finding Duplicate Files
You can use the Duplicate Finder plug-in to search for duplicate files on your hard drive. Once you locate any duplicates, you can
rename or delete them to better manage your file collection.
The following steps are a basic overview of how to use the Duplicate Finder. There is also extensive context-sensitive Help in the
plug-in dialog box to provide you with additional information.
Limit your search by selecting only a portion of the photos or images in a folder.
To Find Duplicate Files:
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1.
In Manage mode, select a folder or images to search for duplicates.
2.
Click Tools | Find Duplicates.
3.
In the Duplicate Finder dialog box, on the Select Search Type page, add any other files and folders you want to search.
4.
Do one of the following:
To find duplicates within the files and folders you added to the list, select Find duplicates within this list of
files.
To compare files between the list you created and another group of files, select Find duplicates between these
files and another list.
5.
Click Next.
6.
If you are comparing the files with another list, add the files or folders you want to compare to the second list, and then click
Next.
7.
On the Search Parameters page, specify whether you want to find exact duplicates, or just files with the same name.
8.
Select Find images only if you only want to search for image files.
9.
Click Next.
10.
If no duplicates are found, click OK and refine your search or click Cancel to exit the Duplicate Finder.
11.
If duplicates are found, specify from which list you want to delete the duplicates, and then select the checkbox next to the
files you want to delete. You can also right-click a file name to open, rename, or delete a file.
12.
Click Next to review your changes, and then click Finish.
Finding Images Quickly
You can click on the name of a saved search to quickly re-run the search. You can select Special Items in the Catalog pane to locate
all of the images in your database, or list all of the images that you have not yet assigned to a category.
To Re-Run a Saved Search:
In Manage mode, in the Catalog pane, click the name of a saved search.
The results of the search display in the File List pane.
To Find All of Your Images at Once:
1.
In Manage mode, click View | Catalog to open the Catalog pane.
2.
In the Catalog pane, under Special Items, click Image Well.
To Locate Uncategorized Images:
1.
In Manage mode, click View | Catalog to open the Catalog pane.
2.
In the Catalog pane, under Special Items, click Uncategorized. The Image Well and Uncategorized features only display
images that have been cataloged in the database; they do not search your hard drive for specific file types.
To Locate Images That Haven't Been Keyworded:
1.
In Manage mode, click View | Catalog to open the Catalog pane.
2.
In the Catalog pane, under Special Items, click No Keywords.
Sharing Files with ACDSee
ACDSee makes it easy to share your images and other files with friends and family. You can email files directly from ACDSee, upload
images to a Web site, and create your own Web pages with the HTML Album plug-in.
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ACDSee includes a Burn Basket pane, to help you burn your images safely onto a disc. You can also create slideshows and
screensavers that you can give to anyone with a computer—they do not need ACDSee to view them.
Taking a Screen Capture
You can use the ACDSee Screen Capture utility to create images from different areas of your screen. You can select what areas to
capture, how you want to perform the capture, and where to store the captured image.
To Take a Screen Capture:
1.
In Manage mode or View mode, click Tools | Screen Capture.
2.
In the Source area of the Screen Capture dialog box, identify the part of the screen you want to capture. See the table below
for a description of the Source options.
3.
If you want to include your cursor in the output image, select the Include mouse cursor checkbox.
4.
In the Destination area, identify where you want to place the output image.
5.
In the Initiate capture area, identify how you want to take the screen capture.
6.
Click Start to launch the screen capture tool.
An icon appears in the Taskbar Notification area.
7.
Prepare your screen to show the area you want to capture, and then follow the steps that appear in the bubble above the
Screen Capture icon.
8.
To exit the Screen Capture utility without taking a screen capture, right-click the Screen Capture icon, and then select Exit
Screen Capture.
Screen Capture Options
Desktop
Current monitor
Captures an image of the entire area displayed on the screen.
Window
Entire window
Captures an image of the entire active window.
Content only
Captures an image of the window contents (does not include the frame or
title bar).
Fixed size
Captures an image of a fixed area on the screen.
Region
Click the drop-down button and select a dimension setting or select
Custom, and enter the dimension in pixels.
Object
Selected region
Captures a selected area of the screen. Click and drag your cursor to
surround the area you want to capture.
Child window
Captures an image of sections of the window. For example, a toolbar or
button.
Menu under cursor
Captures selected menu commands.
Include mouse cursor
Includes the cursor in the screen capture.
Destination options
Clipboard
Places a copy of the image on the Clipboard. From the Clipboard you can
paste the image in a new location.
File
Displays the Save dialog box to save the file; you can specify location,
format, and file name.
Editor
Opens the captured image in the default editor.
Hot key
Designates a keystroke combination to trigger the screen capture.
Initiate Capture
options
To set the Hot Key, press a key or combination of keys (e.g., CTRL + S) on
the keyboard; do not type in the box.
Timer
64
Takes a screen capture after a designated period. Choose enough time to
set up your desktop or window for the screen capture. The maximum
setting is 60 seconds.
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Emailing Images
You can use the Send Email Wizard to send images directly from ACDSee without opening an external email application. To use the
Send Email Wizard, you will need an active email account, and have a default email application set up on your computer, or have
access to an SMTP server.
To Email Your Images:
1.
In the File List pane, select the images you want to email, and then click File | Send | Email Images.
If you want to add other images, click Add. When you have finished adding images, click OK.
If you want to delete images, select an image and click Remove. The image is removed from the wizard, but not
deleted from ACDSee.
If you want to set email and image options, such as the maximum size for emails or the conversion of images to
JPEG, click Options. When you have finished selecting options, click Apply.
If you want to change the email account settings, to use either your default email client or an SMTP server, click
Change. When you have finished changing your email account settings, click OK.
2.
In the Send Email Wizard, click Next.
If you selected Send using your default email client, the wizard adds your images and email information to a
new email message. You can edit the message and then send it as you normally would.
If you selected Send through an SMTP server, in the wizard, enter the email address you want to send the email
to, a subject for the email, and a message. Click Next.
3.
When the images have been sent, click Finish to close the wizard.
Some Internet-based email applications such as Hotmail and Yahoo (free accounts) do not support SMTP and cannot be
used with the Send Email Wizard. For others, such as Gmail, Yahoo (upgraded accounts), and AOL, you must configure the
account for POP/SMTP. To learn how to configure these types of email accounts, visit their specific websites and search for
SMTP.
Share / Email Using ACDSee 365
Once you have activated your account with ACDSee 365, you can share your images through 365.acdsee.com.
To Email Your Images:
1.
In the File List pane, select the images you want to share, and then click File | Send | Share/Email using ACDSee 365.
2.
In the Share/Email with ACDSee 365 dialog box, enter a Name for your album of photos and select a Location from your
existing online folders.
3.
Enter one or more email addresses to send the images to.
You can click the Share with button to pull names from your address book.
4.
Select an upload size from the drop-down list.
5.
Click Upload.
6.
A new window opens providing the option to enter a message, enable download of full sized JPG, and create an access
password.
7.
Click OK.
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Creating a Desktop Screensaver
You can create a desktop screensaver using your own images. You can set the screensaver options to adjust how long each image is
displayed, set the background color, apply transition effects, and add header or footer text.
To Create a Screensaver:
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, select a group of images, and then click Tools | Configure Screensaver.
2.
In the ACDSee Screensaver dialog box, click Add to browse for more images to add to your screensaver, or select images
you do not want to include and click Remove.
3.
Click Configure, specify the options as described below, and then click OK.
4.
To automatically use the screensaver on your desktop, select the Set as default screensaver checkbox.
5.
When you are satisfied with your choices, click OK.
To Activate the Screensaver on Your Computer:
Select the Screen Saver tab in your Windows Display Properties dialog box, and then select ACDSee Screensaver from the
drop-down list.
ACDSee Screensaver Options
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
Basic
Select
transitions
Displays a list of transitions for you to select and plays each transition, variation, or effect in the
Preview as you select it.
Select all : Selects all the transitions and displays them randomly.
Clear all : Clears any selected transitions.
These transitions do not work with the 2-up, 4-up and Collage variations.
Variations
Click the drop-down list to select from the following:
None: Uses no variations
Pan and Zoom: Zooms in and pans across each slide during the time it is displayed.
2-up: Displays two images at a time.
4-up: Displays four images at a time.
Collage: Displays images as a collage where images overlap each other.
Effects
Click the drop-down list to select from the following:
None: Uses no effects.
Black & white: Displays all images in grayscale.
Sepia: Displays all images in sepia.
Vivid: Increases the saturation of the images to make colors brighter.
Soft: Blurs images slightly for a softening effect.
Background
color
Specifies the background color. Click the color picker to select or change the color. Click Other to set
a custom color in the Color dialog box.
Slide
duration
(sec)
Specifies how long you want the screensaver to display each image.
Advance General
d
settings
Select or clear the following options:
Stretch images to fit screen: Enlarges small images to fill the entire screen.
Play embedded audio: Plays any audio clips embedded in the images.
Slide order
Select one of the following options to specify the order to display your images:
Forward
Shuffle
Text
Display
header text
Displays a text caption at the top of each image. Set the options to specify the text you want to
display.
Display
footer text
Displays a text caption at the bottom of each image. Set the options to specify the text you want to
display.
Screensaver Text Options
Alignment
Specifies the alignment of the text captions.
Background color
Specifies a background color for the caption text.
Text
Specifies the text to display as a caption.
Font
Opens the Font dialog box where you can select or change the font options for your text.
Insert Metadata Tag
Inserts file-specific information called metadata into the caption.
Click to open the Choose Properties dialog box and select the metadata you want to insert.
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Viewing and Configuring a Slideshow
You can view a slideshow of images from Manage mode or from View mode. You can also configure your slideshow to start
automatically whenever you run it, and set the slideshow options to adjust how long each image is displayed, set the background
color, apply transition effects, and add header or footer text.
To Start a Slideshow in Manage Mode:
1.
Do one of the following:
In the File List pane, select a group of images.
In the Folders pane, select a folder.
Use the Easy-Select bar to select multiple folders that contain images.
2.
Click Tools | Slideshow (keyboard shortcut CTRL+ S)
To Start a Slideshow in View Mode:
Click Tools | Slideshow.
To Configure a Slideshow:
1.
In Manage mode, do one of the following:
In the File List pane, select a group of images.
In the Folders pane, select a folder or use the Easy-Select bar to select multiple folders that contain images.
2.
Click Tools | Configure Slideshow.
3.
In the Slideshow Properties dialog box, select or change the slideshow options as described below.
4.
To save your settings as the default slideshow behavior, select the Save current settings as default checkbox.
5.
Click OK.
Slideshow Options
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Chapter 3: Manage Mode
File Selection
Slideshow contents
Specifies which of the following media to include in the
slideshow:
All media in current folder: Displays all the files
(images or video) in the folder you have selected.
All media in current folder and subfolders:
Displays all the files in the currently selected folder
and its subfolders.
Selected media: Displays only the files that you
selected before opening the Slideshow Properties
dialog box.
Basic
Always use these contents for
this selection type and start
slideshow automatically
Retains the current Slideshow contents setting and starts
automatically the next time you launch the slideshow.
Select transitions
Displays a list of transitions for you to select and plays each
transition, variation, or effect in the Preview as you select it.
Select all : Selects all the transitions and displays
them randomly.
Clear all : Clears any selected transitions.
These transitions do not work with the 2-up, 4-up
and Collage variations.
Variations
Click the drop-down list to select from the following:
None: Uses no variations.
Pan and Zoom: Zooms in and pans across each
slide during the time it is displayed.
2-up: Displays two images at a time.
4-up: Displays four images at a time.
Collage: Displays images as a collage where images
overlap each other.
Effects
Click the drop-down list to select from the following:
None: Uses no effects.
Black & White: Displays all images in grayscale.
Sepia: Displays all images in sepia.
Vivid: Increases the saturation of the images to
make colors brighter.
Soft: Blurs images slightly for a softening effect.
Background color
Specifies the background color. Click the color picker to
select or change the color. Click Other to set a custom color
in the Color dialog.
Slide duration (sec)
Specifies how long you want the slideshow to display each
image.
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Advanced
General settings
Select or clear any of the following options:
Stretch images to fit screen: Enlarges small
images to fill the entire screen.
Play embedded audio: Plays any audio clips
embedded in the images.
Stretch video to fit screen: Enlarges video files to
fill the entire screen.
Autohide control bar: Hides the slideshow
controls whenever the cursor stops moving for more
than a few seconds.
Loop: Repeats the slideshow after displaying the
last image.
Slide order
Select one of the following options to specify the order to
display your images:
Forward
Shuffle
Text
Music directory
Displays music from the previously-selected folders, or you
can click Browse to find a new folder.
Display header text
Displays a text caption at the top of each image. Set the
options to specify the text you want to display.
Display footer text
Displays a text caption at the bottom of each image. Set the
options to specify the text you want to display.
Save current settings as default
Retains the current settings on all of the tabbed pages and
applies them the next time you view a slideshow.
Slideshow Text Options
Alignment
Specifies the alignment of the text captions.
Background color
Specifies a background color for the caption text.
Text
Specifies the text to display as a caption.
Font
Opens the Font dialog box where you can select or change the font options for your text.
Insert Metadata Tag
Inserts file-specific information called metadata into the caption.
Click to open the Choose Properties dialog box and select the metadata you want to insert.
Sharing Slideshows and Screensavers
You can view a slideshow of your images from Manage or View mode at anytime by clicking Tools | Slideshow (keyboard shortcut
CTRL+S in Manage mode). With ACDSee, you can also create slideshows and screensavers of your favorite photos, and send them
to friends and family, or display them on your website. You can even save your slideshow or screensaver project to edit at a later
time.
To Create a Slideshow:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Create | Slideshow File.
2.
On the Welcome page, to create a new slideshow, select the Create a new slideshow radio button. To specify what type of
slideshow you want to create, select one of the following options:
Standalone slideshow: Creates a single executable file (.exe) containing all of your images and everything
needed to view them. You can share this type of file with anyone who has a computer, even if they do not own
ACDSee.
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Windows screensaver: Creates a standard Windows screensaver file (.scr) that can be stored and used on any
Windows system.
Adobe Flash Player® slideshow: Creates a compact Adobe Flash file (.swf) that you can display on a Web site.
3.
To edit an existing slideshow or screensaver project, select the Load an existing slideshow project radio button, and
then click Browse to locate your project (.asw file).
4.
Click Next to continue.
5.
On the Choose your images page, you can view the images included in your slideshow, in the default order they will be
displayed. Click Add or Remove to change the images, and use the arrow buttons to reorder them. Click Next when you are
ready to continue.
6.
On the Set file specific options page, click the underlined words beside each thumbnail to set the individual options for each
image. These include transitions between photos, the duration of the transition and slide, text captions, and audio files to
play when the image is displayed. Note that the options available depend on your choice of output file format, and not all
formats support all options. Click Next when you are ready to continue.
7.
On the Set slideshow options page, set the timing for each slide to automatic or manual, the order to display slides, and
whether or not to hide the controls. You can also add audio files to play in the background, and adjust the quality, or speed,
of the transitions. Click Next when you are ready to continue.
8.
On the following pages, set the options for image size, location of your slideshow file and the project file.
9.
Finally, click Next, and wait a few moments while ACDSee generates your slideshow. When complete, you can launch your
slideshow and exit the wizard.
If you assign an audio file to an individual image, as well as to the whole slideshow on the Set slideshow options page, then
both audio files will play simultaneously when that slide displays.
Creating a Desktop Slideshow
You can use ACDSee Showroom to create a slideshow of your photos and display that slideshow in a small window on your computer
desktop. You can run up to 16 different slideshows on your computer at once.
You can configure the ACDSee Showroom window to always stay on top of other application windows. You can also configure it to
open when you start your computer. You do not have to open ACDSee to use ACDSee Showroom.
To Create a Desktop Slideshow with ACDSee Showroom:
1.
In Manage mode, navigate to a folder containing images that you want to add to the desktop slideshow.
2.
Do one of the following:
Click Tools | Create | ACDSee Showroom.
Click Start | Programs | ACD Systems | ACDSee Showroom.
The slideshow starts immediately and the ACDSee Showroom icon appears in the taskbar.
Using the ACDSee Showroom Slideshow Controls
There are a number of slideshow controls in the ACDSee Showroom window.
Click the Back or Forward buttons to display the previous or next photos in the slideshow.
Click the Pause button to pause the slideshow while a particular photo is displayed.
If you cannot see these slideshow controls in the ACDSee Showroom window, click anywhere in the window. The controls
disappear while the slideshow is playing so you can fully enjoy your photos.
To Create More Than One ACDSee Showroom:
With ACDSee Showroom open, do one of the following:
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
Right-click in the ACDSee Showroom window and select New Showroom.
Click the ACDSee Showroom icon in the taskbar and select New Showroom.
To Close ACDSee Showroom:
Do one of the following:
Click Close in the ACDSee Showroom window.
Click the ACDSee Showroom icon in the taskbar and select Exit ACDSee Showroom.
If you have configured ACDSee Showroom to open when you start your computer, it will automatically open the next time
you start your computer.
Creating a PDF
You can use ACDSee to combine your images into PDF (portable document format) files. The Create PDF Wizard will guide you
through the process of creating one or more PDF files from your images, or adding images to a PDF slideshow.
To Create a PDF:
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, select the images you want to share.
2.
Click Tools | Create | PDF.
3.
On the Welcome page of the Create PDF Wizard, select one of the following options, and then click Next:
Create a PDF slideshow: Combines all of your images into a single PDF file that you can view as a slideshow.
Create one PDF file containing all images: Combines all of the selected images into a single PDF file with
multiple pages.
Create one PDF file for each image: Converts each image into a separate PDF file.
4.
On the Choose images page, you can change the selected images, and use the arrow buttons to reorder them. Click Next to
continue.
5.
Do one of the following:
If you selected to create a PDF slideshow, set or change the transition options by clicking the hyperlink next to each
image. Click Next to set the order, color, and file name options for your slideshow. Click Next when you are ready
to continue.
If you selected to create one or more PDF files, specify a file name and location, and then click Next.
6.
Click Finish to close the wizard and return to ACDSee.
Creating a PowerPoint Presentation
You can create a PowerPoint presentation quickly from inside ACDSee using the Create PPT Wizard. The wizard walks you through
the process of creating or editing a presentation using your photos. You can set slide duration, the location of the file, number of
images per slide and whether or not to use a design template as a background. You can also add captions, a title, or notes to each
slide.
This feature only works if you have Microsoft PowerPoint® installed on your computer. The feature does not support RAW
files, so you will need to convert RAW files to another format.
To Create a PowerPoint Presentation:
72
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, select the images you want to share.
2.
Click Tools | Create | PPT.
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
3.
On the Choose images page of the Create PPT Wizard, click Add if you want to add more images.
4.
Click Next.
5.
On the Presentation Options page, do one or all of the following:
In the Presentation Options area, if this is a new presentation, set the duration that you want each slide to
display.
If you are editing a presentation, select Existing presentation to activate the Path field, and browse to your
presentation. Select whether you want to Insert slides at the beginning or end of the presentation.
Select the Number of images per slide from the drop-down list. (If you select more than one, the Title and Notes
options on the next page do not appear.)
Select Link to Image file if you want your images to stay linked to ACDSee rather than be embedded in the
presentation.
Click Use a design template if you want to use a background template and browse to the folder on your computer
to select it. (PowerPoint templates are usually under Microsoft Office | Templates | Presentation Designs.)
6.
Click Next.
7.
On the Text Options page, do one or all of the following:
On the Caption tab, type in a caption and select its background color and alignment. You can also select a different
font, or insert metadata like file name or picture dimensions. Captions appear at the bottom of the slide.
On the Title tab, type in a title for the slide and select its background color and alignment. You can also select a
different font, or insert metadata.
On the Notes tab, type in any notes that you want to appear in the Notes section attached to each slide. These notes
do not appear on the slide itself.
8.
Click Create.
The presentation opens in PowerPoint where you can edit it like any other presentation.
Burning a CD or DVD
You can use the Burn Basket to burn a CD or DVD of your photos and files, to use on a computer. You must have a CD or DVD writer
installed in your computer to use the Burn Basket.
With the Burn Basket, you can organize, arrange, and store your photos and files until you are ready to burn them to a disc. The
Burn Basket allows you to create your own folders, use existing folders, or have the Burn Basket create the folder structure
automatically.
To Create a CD or DVD:
1.
To open the Burn Basket pane, do one of the following:
In Manage mode, click View | Burn Basket.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Create | CD or DVD.
2.
From the drop-down list in the toolbar of the Burn Basket, select the device you want to use to create your disc. The options
in this drop-down list depend on the CD/DVD hardware you have on your computer.
3.
Click the Format Options button. The Format Options dialog box will open. Check or uncheck the box to specify whether
you want to include any ACDSee metadata associated with your files.
4.
You can use the left side of the Burn Basket to create a folder structure to organize the photos and files on the disc. To
create a new folder, right-click the name of a folder, "Volume Label" by default, and select New Folder from the context
menu. Type a name for the new folder and then press Enter.
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5.
To add photos or other files to your disc, drag them from the File List pane to the Burn Basket, or select the files you want to
add and then click Edit | Add to Burn Basket. You can use the buttons on the Burn Basket toolbar, as explained below, to
adjust the contents of the Burn Basket, or to save or load projects.
6.
When you are ready to create your disc, click
, located in the bottom right corner.
In order to be able to browse the contents of your disc while it is ejected, you may want to create an ACDSee Photo Disc.
Burn Basket Toolbar Buttons
Format Options
Opens the Format Options dialog box, where you can specify whether or not you
want to add a catalog to your data disc.
Add to Burn Basket
Adds the currently selected files or folders to the Burn Basket.
Remove From Burn Basket
Removes the currently selected files or folders from the Burn Basket.
Remove All
Clears the contents of the Burn Basket.
New Folder
Creates a new sub-folder.
Rename
Renames the currently selected file or folder.
Save Project
Saves the current contents and settings of the Burn Basket as a project file you
can edit later.
Load Project
Opens a previously saved Burn Basket project.
Creating an HTML Album
You can use the HTML Album Wizard to prepare photo collections for posting on the Internet. The HTML album includes slideshow
controls and a thumbnail display. You can select from a list of gallery style templates and then customize the gallery by adding your
own logo as an image or text to the header or footer. You can also change the fonts and colors used in the gallery.
To Create an HTML Album:
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, select the images you want to share.
2.
Click Tools | Create | HTML Album.
3.
On the Style Settings page of the Create HTML Album Wizard, select a Gallery Style from the Web page styles box.
After you select a Gallery Style and other settings, you can click Preview Gallery to see how those selections affect the
appearance of your HTML album. You can also generate your HTML album from any page in the HTML Album Wizard by
clicking Generate Album.
4.
Click Next.
5.
On the Gallery Customization page, do one or all of the following:
In the Gallery Title text box, type the title that you want to display at the top of the Web page.
Select Include header to display a header at the top of the Web page, or clear the Include header checkbox to
remove the header.
Select Include footer to display a footer at the bottom of the Web page, or clear the Include footer checkbox to
remove the footer.
If you want to display an image in the header or footer, select Use image and click Browse and select a company
logo, a photo of yourself, or another image to display in the header.
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If you want to display text in the header or footer, select Use information and click Set Information and add
enter the text that you would like to display.
In the Folder settings section, click Browse and select the folder where you would like to save the HTML album
files.
6.
Click Next.
7.
On the Thumbnail and Image page, do one or all of the following:
In the Thumbnail settings section, adjust the appearance and format of the thumbnails in the album.
In the Image settings section, adjust the appearance and format of full size images in the album.
In the Slideshow duration section, specify how long to display full size images during a slideshow.
In the Color and font settings section, click Color and font, adjust the colors and fonts used in the Web page,
and then click OK.
Click Save Settings to save the settings that you select for specific Web page styles. If you save the settings, you can
quickly reapply them to a Web page style from the Style Settings page of the Create HTML Album Wizard.
8.
Click Next to create your HTML album. You may need to wait a few moments while ACDSee generates the thumbnails and
creates the Web page.
9.
Click Create Another Album to create another album, or click Finish to exit the wizard and return to ACDSee.
You will need to use FTP or another method to post the HTML album files to your Web site.
Uploading Images to Photo Websites
You can upload your photos or images directly from ACDSee to sites like Flickr, SmugMug, Facebook, Zenfolio, and FTP sites. Of
course, you do need an account before you can upload pictures to these sites. You can create an account as part of the first upload
process from ACDSee if you wish.
You can select almost any image file type, including RAW and TIFF, and ACDSee will convert the file to JPG automatically
before uploading.
To Upload Photos to a Photo Website:
You can quickly upload your photos to photo sharing websites without having to leave ACDSee.
1.
2.
In Manage mode, select one or more images and click File | Send | To <Photo Website>...
In the <Photo Website> Uploader dialog box, press the Help button in the lower right corner and follow the instructions.
Creating a Contact Sheet
You can create contact sheets—thumbnail previews of your images arranged on pages — that you can use to organize and share
your images. You can use the Create Contact Sheet utility to save your contact sheets in multiple image formats, and as HTML image
maps. You can save your options as a preset for future use.
The size of the thumbnails depends on how many columns and rows the contact sheet displays, and how much space is displayed
between them.
To Create a Contact Sheet:
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, select the images you want to include.
2.
Click Tools | Create | Contact Sheet.
3.
In the Contact sheet format area, set the Contact sheet format options.
4.
In the Output Settings area, set the Output Settings options.
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5.
If desired, add or change the text on the page.
6.
Click OK.
If you do not specify an output file path, the Create Contact Sheet utility places a file named Contact Sheet.<ext> in your
default image folder. For multiple-page contact sheets, the utility adds a number to the file name; for example, Contact
Sheet3.bmp.
Contact Sheet Format Options
Thumbnail settings
Frame options
Thumbnail options
Page background options
Size
Specifies the number of columns and rows to create on each page.
Spacing
Creates a frame around each thumbnail. Specifies the amount of space
between rows or columns. In the Horizontal and Vertical spin boxes,
type a value to indicate the amount of space to display.
Use thumbnail frame
Creates a frame around each thumbnail.
Margin
Specifies the width of the frame.
Solid color
Specifies the frame's color. Click the color picker to define a color.
Tiled image
Specifies an image to use as a frame. Click Browse to locate the image
you want to use.
Colored drop shadow
Creates a drop shadow effect around each thumbnail. Click the color
picker to define a color.
Colored edge fade
Creates a fading frame effect around the image. Click the color picker to
define a color.
Colored matte
Uses a solid color as a background for the page. Click the color picker to
define a color.
Beveled edges
Creates a beveled edge effect on each thumbnail. This effect is not
displayed in the Preview window.
Solid color
Uses a solid color as a background for the page. Click the color picker to
define a color.
Tiled image
Uses a tiled image as the background for the page. Click Browse to
locate the picture you want to use.
Creating Archives of Your Files
You can use the Archive Creator plug-in to create archives of your images and media files. Archive Creator supports multiple archive
formats, and helps you manage your files using compression, encryption, and password protection tools.
To Create an Archive:
1.
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, select a folder or group of files.
2.
Click Tools | Create | Archive.
3.
In the Create Archive dialog box, in the Options area, click the Archive Type drop-down list and select the archive format
you want to create.
Some archive formats have additional settings that you can adjust by clicking the Settings button.
4.
Do any of the following:
To include the contents of any subfolders you selected, select the Include subfolders checkbox.
To include any hidden files in your archive, select the Include hidden files checkbox.
To remove the selected files and folders from your hard drive once they have been added to the archive, select the
Delete files after archiving checkbox.
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To protect the contents of your archive with a password, select the Password Protect Archive checkbox, and
type a password into the field beside it. Note that not all archive types support passwords, and some formats
require them.
5.
Type a path and file name into the Output File field, or click Browse to locate a folder on your hard drive.
6.
Select one of the following:
Add to existing archive: Adds your files to an existing archive. This option is only available if the archive
specified in the Output File field already exists.
Overwrite existing archive: Replaces any existing archive with the archive you are creating. This option is only
available if the archive specified in the Output File field already exists.
7.
When you are satisfied with your choices, click Create to begin archiving your files.
Extracting Archived (.zip) Files
You can extract archived (.zip) files very quickly and easily without leaving ACDSee. You can either extract the files to a folder or
simply double-click and view them.
To Extract an Archived File to a Folder:
1.
In Manage mode, navigate to the folder containing the archived file, using the Folders pane.
2.
Click the archived file in the File List.
3.
Click Edit | Extract to Folder.
4.
In the Extract to Folder dialog, navigate to, and select the folder where you want to keep the files.
5.
To create a new folder, click Create Folder, type in the name of the folder and then press Enter.
6.
Use the Overwriting duplicate files drop-down list if you want to specify what do so with files in the folder that have the
same name as those you are extracting. You can select any of the following:
Ask: To be asked what to do about each individual file.
Rename: Duplicates are given a new name.
Replace: Duplicate files are overwritten.
Skip: No duplicates are extracted.
7.
Click OK.
To View Files Inside an Archived File:
1.
In Manage mode, navigate to the folder containing the archived file.
2.
Double-click the archived file.
Thumbnails of the contents of the archived file open in the File List pane.
Printing Images
With the ACDSee print utility, you can print your images on any size of paper, in any orientation, and at any resolution your printer
can support. You can also use the print utility to create and print contact sheets, complete with headers, footers, and captions
specific to each image.
As you change the options in the Print dialog box, you can view a dynamically updated preview of the image and its position on the
page. You can adjust the output size, print multiple copies of each image, and change the orientation of the images on each page.
To Print Your Images:
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1.
Select the image or images you want to print.
2.
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, click File | Print.
In View mode, click File | Print All Images. (If you want to print a single image in View mode, select Print
Image.)
3.
Under Print layout, do one of the following:
Select Full page and then choose a print size from the Format list.
Select Contact sheet and then set the Contact sheet format options to define the appearance of your contact
sheet.
Select Layout and then choose one of the available layout options.
4.
On the Printer Options tab, specify the printer you want to use, the paper size, the number of copies you want, the range
of pages that you want to print, and image resolution.
5.
On the Page Settings tab, specify the image position on the paper and the margin widths.
6.
Specify the number of prints of each photo. If you are printing a Full page or a Contact sheet this option is available on
the Page Settings tab. If you are printing a Layout this option is available below the list of layouts.
7.
Add captions, headers, or footers. You can only add captions, headers, or footers if you are printing a Full page or a
Contact sheet.
8.
Click Print.
Setting Printer Options
When printing your images with ACDSee, you can specify which printer you want to use, and set the printer options on the Printer
Options tab in the Print dialog box.
Printer Options
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Printer
Specifies the printer you want to use. Select a printer from the drop-down list and click the Properties button
to set its options. Refer to the printer manufacturer's Help file or manual for more information.
Paper size
Specifies the size of the paper, e.g. Letter, Legal, A4.
Orientation
Specifies Portrait or Landscape page orientation.
Copies
Specifies the number of copies you want to print.
Print range
Select one of the following options:
All : Prints all of the pages in the document.
Pages from: Prints a range of pages. Specify the first and last pages of the range in the fields.
Resolution
Specifies a resolution in pixels-per-inch (PPI) for the image. The higher the value, the more dots per inch, and
the higher the resolution of the printed image. For example, 600 PPI is 360,000 (600 x 600) pixels per square
inch.
Filter
Specifies the resampling filter to use when printing images. Click the drop-down list and select one of the
following:
Box: Displays considerable tiling or jaggies when you resize an image.
Triangle: Produces good results for image reduction and enlargement, but displays sharp transition
lines.
Bicubic: Produces good results with photo-realistic images and with images that are irregular or
complex. Uses interpolation to minimize the raggedness normally associated with image expansion.
Bell: Smoothes the image.
B-Spline: Produces smooth transitions, but may cause excessive blurring.
Lanczos: Produces the sharpest images, but may also introduce some ringing artifacts.
Mitchell : Produces smooth transitions when enlarging photo-realistic images. This filter is good
compromise between the ringing effect of Lanczos and the blurring effect of other filters.
Gamma
Applies gamma correction to the printed images. Type a number from 0.10 to 3.00 in the Gamma value field
to adjust the gamma of the image. Higher values make the image appear brighter, while lower values make the
image appear darker.
Use EXIF
2.2 printing
when
available
Your camera may capture EXIF information that, when shared with your printer, will optimize printing results.
Select this option if your camera and printer support EXIF 2.2 printing.
Setting Image Size and Positioning
You can use the Page Settings tab in the Print dialog box to adjust and control the size of the images you are printing, and the
positioning of images on each page.
Page Settings Options
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Page position
Specifies where to place the image on each page.
Margins
Specifies the size of the margins. Type a value or click the arrows in the Top, Bottom, Left, and Right
spin boxes.
Number of prints
Specifies how many copies of each image to print. The print utility adds pages as required.
Automatically
rotate picture based
on print format
Specifies whether you want the print utility to determine automatically which orientation to use for each
image. If you select the checkbox, the print utility changes each page's orientation to best suit the
image you are printing.
Maintain aspect
ratio
Specifies whether you want the print utility to maintain the original image's aspect ratio. Select one of
the following options to indicate how the print utility should handle the aspect ratio for oversized
images:
Crop image to fit print format: Prints only the part of the image that fits within the print
format.
Shrink image to fit print format: Prints the entire image, reduced to fit inside the print
format.
Adding Text to Pages
You can add headers and footers to pages, and captions beneath your images.
To Add Captions to Your Printed Images:
1.
In the Print dialog box, click the Caption tab.
2.
Select Use caption text.
3.
Click Font to open the Font dialog box and set the font options.
4.
In the text box, type the text you want the caption to display.
5.
Click Insert Metadata to insert file-specific information into the caption for each image.
6.
In the Text alignment drop-down list, select the caption positioning.
7.
To set the maximum number of text lines for each caption to display, select the Number of lines checkbox, and then
specify a number in the field.
To Add Headers and Footers to Your Printed Pages:
1.
Do one of the following:
Click the Header tab and select Use header text.
Click the Footer tab and select Use footer text.
2.
Click Font to open the Font dialog box and set the font options.
3.
In the text box, type the text you want the header or footer to display.
4.
To insert the current page number or the total number of pages into the text, click Insert Page Number, and then select
an option from the menu.
5.
In the Text alignment drop-down list, select the header or footer positioning.
6.
To set a maximum number of text lines, select the Number of lines checkbox, and then specify a number in the field.
Setting Contact Sheet Printing Options
The Contact sheet format area of the print utility contains settings you can adjust to control the appearance, layout, and size of your
thumbnails. If you saved your format options as a preset you can select the preset.
Contact Sheet Format Options
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Thumbnail
settings
Size
Specifies the number of columns and rows to create on each page.
Spacing
Specifies the amount of space between rows or columns. In the Horizontal
and Vertical spin boxes, type a number to indicate the amount of space to
display.
Frame options
Use thumbnail frame
Creates a frame around each thumbnail.
Margin
Specifies the width of the frame.
Solid color
Specifies the frame's color. Click the color picker to define a color.
Tiled image
Specifies an image to use as a frame. Click Browse to locate the image you
want to use.
Thumbnail options Colored drop shadow
Page background
options
Creates a drop shadow effect around each thumbnail. Click the color picker to
define a color.
Colored edge fade
Creates a fading frame effect around the image. Click the color picker to define
a color.
Colored matte
Creates a matte effect around each thumbnail. Click the color picker to define a
color.
Beveled edges
Creates a beveled edge effect on each thumbnail. This effect is not displayed in
the Preview window.
Solid color
Prints a solid color as a background for the page. Click the color picker to
define a color.
Tiled image
Prints a tiled image as the background for the page. Click Browse to locate the
image you want to use.
About Batch Editing
In ACDSee you can make one type of edit to many images. For example, if you need to resize multiple images you can use the Batch
Resize tool. Or, if you need to rotate multiple photos by 90 degrees you can use the Batch Rotate/Flip tool.
You can speed up the batch editing workflow by tagging your files. For example, you can quickly tag the files you want to change,
then click Tagged in the Catalog pane to display all the tagged files in the File List pane. Then you can select the files and choose a
batch tool.
Converting Multiple Images to Another File Format
You can convert multiple images to any supported file format. You can set the options for each format individually, specify how to
handle multiple- page images, and apply the conversion defaults automatically. The Convert File Format Wizard guides you through
the process.
To Convert an Image to Another File Format:
1.
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, select one or more images, and then click Tools | Batch | Convert File Format.
In View mode, click Tools | Modify | Convert File Format.
2.
On the Select a format page, select a new format for your image or images from the list displayed on the Format tab.
3.
Select the Advanced Options tab to change the settings for this wizard.
4.
Click Next to continue.
5.
On the Set output options page, identify where you want to place the converted images, and specify how you want the
wizard to handle any file name conflicts by selecting one of the following options from the Overwrite existing files dropdown list:
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Ask: Prompts you when overwriting a file.
Skip: Cancels the operation if there is a file with the same file name and extension.
Replace: Overwrites the file without prompting for confirmation.
Rename: Prompts you to rename the file.
6.
Click Next to continue.
7.
On the Set multiple page options page, you can specify how you want to handle any multiple- page images you are
converting.
If you did not select any multiple-page images to convert, and did not specify a multiple- page image format as your output
file format, you can skip the options on this page.
8.
When you are satisfied with your choices, click Start Convert, and wait a few seconds while the wizard converts your
images.
Rotating or Flipping Multiple Images
You can rotate or flip multiple images at preset angles.
To Rotate or Flip an Image:
1.
In Manage mode, select one or more images, and then click Tools | Batch | Rotate/Flip.
2.
In the Batch Rotate/Flip Images dialog box, select the angle of rotation you want to apply. See below for an explanation of
each angle.
3.
If you select an image with multiple pages and want to apply the selected angle of rotation to all of the pages, select the
Apply to all pages of the current image checkbox.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Next Image to move on to the next selected image. The Next Image button is not available if the Apply to
all selected images box is checked.
If you select multiple images and you want to apply the same angle of rotation to all of them, select the Apply to all
selected images checkbox.
Click Options to specify how you want to save and store the images.
5.
When you are ready to apply the rotations to your images, click Start Rotate.
Rotate / Flip Angles
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Rotates the image counter-clockwise 90 degrees.
Rotates the image 180 degrees.
Rotates the image clockwise 90 degrees.
Rotates the image according to any EXIF data contained within the image. (Does not affect images without EXIF
information.)
Flips the image along the vertical axis.
Flips the image along the horizontal axis.
Flips the image along the vertical axis, and then rotates it counter-clockwise 90 degrees.
Flips the image along the vertical axis, and then rotates it clockwise 90 degrees.
You can also use the Rotate tool in Edit mode to rotate an image using a custom angle of rotation.
Resizing Multiple Images
You can resize a group of images by specifying their dimensions in pixels, specifying a percentage of their original size, or by
constraining them to a physical print size.
To Resize a Group of Images:
1.
In Manage mode, select one or more images, and then click Tools | Batch | Resize.
2.
In the Batch Resize Images dialog box, select one of the following options:
Percentage of original: Resizes the images to a percentage of their original size.
Size in pixels: Resizes the images to a specific size in pixels.
Actual/Print size: Resizes the images to specific printed dimensions.
3.
Set the options for your selection as explained in the table below.
4.
Click Options to specify how you want to save and store the images.
5.
When you are satisfied with your choices, click Start Resize.
You can also resize an image, and use alternate resampling filters, in Edit mode.
Resize Options
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Percentage of
original
Size in pixels
Percentage
Specifies how to resize the images. Enter a percentage less than 100 to reduce
the images, and greater than 100 to enlarge them.
Apply to
Specifies whether the resize is applied to the height, width, or both.
Width
Specifies the new width for the images in pixels.
Height
Specifies the new height for the images in pixels.
Resize
Specifies how to scale the images. Select one of the following options:
Enlarge only: Resizes only those images that are smaller than the
specified height and width.
Reduce only: Resizes only those images that are larger than the
specified height and width.
Enlarge or reduce: Resizes all images to the specified height and width.
Actual/Print
size
Preserve original
aspect ratio
Retains the width-to-height ratio of the original images.
Fit within
Specifies whether the aspect ratio is maintained based on the specified width. For
more information about how the different combinations affect the images, see
Pixel resize options and resulting action.
Units
Specifies the units of measurement.
Width
Specifies the new width for the images.
Height
Specifies the new height for the images.
Resolution
Specifies the print resolution for the images.
Preserve original
aspect ratio
Retains the width-to-height ratio of the original images.
Fit within
Specifies whether the aspect ratio is maintained based on the specified width. For
more information about how the different combinations affect the images, see
Pixel resize options and resulting action.
Adjusting Exposure For Multiple Images
In ACDSee, you can lighten or darken the colors of an image or a group of images with the Batch Adjust Exposure Wizard. You can
adjust each image individually and preview the changes before applying, or make adjustments to an image and automatically apply
the same changes to all of the images you selected.
You can also save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Adjust Image Exposure:
1.
In Manage mode, select one or more images, and then click Tools | Batch | Adjust Exposure.
2.
In the Batch Adjust Exposure dialog box, do one or more of the following:
To adjust image exposure, contrast, and fill light level, select the Exposure tab and adjust the options.
To precisely adjust the contrast and light levels in your images, select the Levels tab and set the options.
To adjust image exposure automatically, select the Auto Levels tab and set the options.
To precisely adjust the RGB color channels in your image, select the Tone Curves tab and set the options.
3.
Do one of the following:
Select the Apply settings to all selected images checkbox to apply the current settings to all of the images you
selected.
De-select Apply settings to all selected images and click Next Image to move to the next image, and then
repeat step 2 for each image you want to adjust.
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4.
Click Options to specify how you want to save and store the images.
5.
Click Filter All Images.
You can also adjust your image's exposure and color levels in Edit mode.
Adjusting Batch Exposure Options
You can use the options in the Batch Adjust Exposure dialog to correct the exposure of your images. There are four tabs in the
Exposure section: Exposure, Levels, Auto Levels, and Tone Curves.
To Use the Exposure Options:
In the Batch Adjust Exposure dialog box, use the following options.
Exposure Options
Exposure
Specifies the amount of light to add to all areas of the image.
Auto
Automatically corrects the exposure based upon the brightness of the image.
Contrast
Specifies the amount of difference between color and brightness in an image. Moving the slider to the right
darkens the shadowed areas in an image, while moving the slider to the left brightens them.
Fill Light
Specifies the amount of light to add to the darkest areas of the image.
Levels Options
Channel
Specifies the brightness or color channel you want to adjust.
Shadows
Specifies the black point of an image.
Move the slider or type a number from 0 to 255 into the spin box to define the blackest area of an image. As
the value increases, the dark colored areas of the image become darker.
Midtones
Specifies the gamma correction in an image.
Move the slider or type a number from 0.00 to 2.00 into the spin box to set the amount of gamma
correction. Higher values make the image appear brighter, while lower values make the image appear
darker.
Highlights
Specifies the white point of an image.
Move the slider or type a number from 0 to 255 into the spin box to define the whitest area of an image. As
the value increases, the light colored areas of the image become lighter.
Clipped %
Indicates how much of the image detail is lost due to black point and white point correction.
Black Point
Eyedropper
Click the button with the black eyedropper icon to adjust the black point. Select the area in the Before
image that you want to set as the black point for the After image.
Mid Point
Eyedropper
Click the button with the gray eyedropper icon to adjust the gamma correction value. Select the area in the
Before image that you want to set as the gamma correction value.
White Point
Eyedropper
Click the button with the white eyedropper icon to adjust the white point. Select the area in the Before
image that you want to set as the white point for the After image.
Auto Levels Options
Strength
Adjusts the amount of exposure applied to the image.
Auto Contrast and
Color
Adjusts color differences, brightness, and image color channels.
Auto Contrast
Adjusts the color differences and brightness only.
Auto Color
Balances color within the whole image.
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Tone Curves Options
Channel
Specifies the color channels to adjust.
Show Histogram
Toggles the histogram display.
Histogram
Displays a visual representation of the color information levels in the image, based on the selected channel.
Click and drag the line to manipulate the curve.
Renaming Multiple Files
You can use the Batch Rename tool to rename multiple files. You can specify a template with a numerical or alphabetical sequence,
save your template for future use, replace specific characters or phrases, and insert file-specific information into each new file
name.
To Rename a Group of Files:
1.
In Manage mode, select one or more files, and then click Tools | Batch | Rename.
2.
In the Batch Rename dialog box, do one or more of the following:
Select the Template tab to specify the Template options.
Select the Search and Replace tab to set the Search and Replace options.
Select the Advanced Options tab to adjust the settings for the Batch Rename tool.
Review your changes to the file names in the Preview field.
3.
Click Start Rename.
You cannot rename any file on a read-only file system, such as a CD-ROM.
Batch Rename Options
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Template
Select the Use Template to rename files checkbox to create a renaming template. You can specify a numerical
or alphabetical sequence for the new file names, and use the original file names, new names, or names based on
image metadata.
Template
Displays the template to use to rename the files.
Type an asterisk (*) to insert the original file name into the template. Use one or
more number signs (#) to insert numeric or alphabetic characters, depending
which options you selected.
Click the arrow on the drop-down list to select a recently-used template.
Clear Templates
Clears the recently-used templates from the Templates drop-down list.
Use numbers to replace
#'s
Replaces any number signs (#) in the template with sequential numeric
characters.
Use letters to replace #'s
Replaces any number signs (#) in the template name with sequential alphabetic
characters.
Start at
Specifies the first letter or number of the sequence.
Insert Metadata
Inserts file-specific information into the file name template.
Position the cursor in the Template field, and then click Insert Metadata to open
the Choose Property dialog box. Select the metadata you want to insert, and then
click OK.
File name case
Search and
Replace
Advanced
Options
Specifies upper or lower case for file names and file format extensions.
Select the Use Search and Replace to rename files checkbox to replace certain letters or words in the file
names. You can replace spaces with underscores, or change upper case letters to lower case, and combine your
changes with any naming template.
Search for
Identifies the characters you want to replace in the file names.
Replace with
Identifies the characters to use in place of the original text.
Case sensitive
Indicates whether you want to limit the search to the same case you typed in the
Search for field.
Select any of the Advanced Options to adjust the behavior of the Batch Rename tool.
Automatically close
wizard when finished
Closes the Batch Rename dialog box when the renaming process is complete.
Save current settings as
defaults
Stores the current settings and loads them the next time you rename files.
Warn about extension
changes
Provides a warning if you have changed the file extension as part of the template.
Automatically resolve
naming conflicts
Automatically resolves any naming conflicts by adding an underscore and a
sequential number to the end of each file name.
About the ACDSee Database
The ACDSee database stores image and media file information automatically when you browse your folders. This process is called
cataloging. The database increases the speed with which you can browse your computer, and you can use the information stored in
the database to sort, organize, search, and filter your images and media files. You can also backup, restore, and share database
information.
You can store cached thumbnail previews, and add or edit the following information for each image or media file on your computer:
Categories
Notes
Keywords
Color Labels
Authors
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Dates
Ratings
Captions
You can also choose to exclude folders from the database, and keep the contents of those folders separate from your other images
and media files.
When you add ACDSee Metadata to a file in ACDSee, the file is linked to the database. If you then copy, move, or rename
your files using programs other than ACDSee, such as Windows Explorer, the link to the database is broken and this can
cause the loss of ACDSee Metadata.
Embedding ACDSee Metadata in Files
If you edit or add ACDSee Metadata to your files, ACDSee automatically adds the new data to its database. If you have the Display
embed ACDSee metadata reminder checkbox selected in the Options dialog box, (click Tools | Options | Database), next time
you close ACDSee, the Embed ACDSee Metadata in Files dialog box opens and offers to embed the new data into the changed files
themselves. Embedding ACDSee Metadata in the files as well, is a safe way to back up this data and make it easier to retrieve if you
should need to.
For example, once you have assigned ACDSee Metadata to a file, the file is linked to the database. If the file is moved using Windows
Explorer, or any application other than ACDSee, the link will be broken. However if you have embedded this data in the file and the
link is broken, you can still retrieve the ACDSee Metadata using the embedded data in the files.
You can use ACDSee to rename, move, or copy the file—even to another computer—and the embedded ACDSee Metadata will
transfer with the file.
To Embed ACDSee Metadata in a File When You Are Prompted:
1.
Do one of the following:
To embed data in files that are on a network, select the Include Network Drives checkbox.
To write the information to a sidecar file if the file format does not support embedding inside the file, select the
Write sidecar files for formats that do not support embedded XMP.
To accept the current selection in the dialog and have these options happen automatically in future, select Do not
ask me this again.
2.
Click Yes to embed the data in the files. A progress bar appears, followed by the Embed Summary Report dialog that lists
the following:
Items Selected: Indicates the number of files that you selected.
Items Processed: Indicates the number of files actually that were processed. (If you selected files that did not
need to have date embedded, this number may be different from the Items Selected.)
Succeeded: Indicates the number of files that had data embedded.
Failed: Indicates the number of files that, for a variety of reasons, could not have data embedded. (To see the
Error Log, click View Errors.)
3.
Click Close.
To Embed ACDSee Metadata at Any Time:
You can embed data in files at any time.
Click Tools | Metadata | Embed ACDSee Metadata, and then select one of the following:
Embed in All Files: Embeds data for all files.
Embed in Selected Files: Embeds data for any files that you have selected.
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ACDSee uses XMP to embed ACDSee Metadata into each file. Only some file formats and file extensions support XMP. These
include GIF, JPEG, DNG, PNG, PSD, and TIF. In the case of these file formats, the ACDSee Metadata is embedded inside the
file and so you can rename or move the file outside of ACDSee and still be able to retrieve the ACDSee Metadata. For formats
that currently do not support XMP, including RAW and ABR, the ACDSee Metadata is written to a sidecar file that is stored in
the same folder as its file. Because a sidecar file is separate from the file itself, you need to rename or move them together,
or you could lose the ACDSee Metadata permanently.
The Embed Pending Flag
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, the following overlay icon appears on top of files that have ACDSee metadata stored in the
ACDSee database that has not yet been written to the file:
Right-click and choose either:
Embed ACDSee Metadata: Writes the metadata to the file.
Clear Embed Pending Flag: Clears this overlay icon, but does not write the metadata to the file.
Viewing Files That Have Data to Embed
If you want to see the files that have data that needs to be embedded, there is a quick way to list them using the Embed Pending
option.
To View Files That Have Data to Embed:
In the Catalog pane, under Special Items, click Embed Pending.
All the files that have data to embed are displayed in the File List.
Retrieving ACDSee Metadata That is Embedded in Files
If you simply browse to the folder where the files are located, some of the ACDSee Metadata is retrieved and written to the database.
The safest way to retrieve all the ACDSee Metadata, is to click Tools | Database | Catalog Files. Then the following applies:
If the files are GIF, JPEG, DNG, PNG, and TIF formats, all the data will be retrieved and written to the database.
If the files still have their sidecar files in the folder, and they still have the same file name, the database information is
retrieved and written to the database.
If the files have become separated from their sidecar files or renamed, their ACDSee Metadata cannot be retrieved and will
be lost.
Excluding Folders From the Database
You can choose to exclude folders from the database, and keep the contents separate from your other images and media files. By
default, the Program Files and Windows folders on your hard drive are automatically excluded from the database.
To Manage Your Excluded Folders Settings:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Excluded Folder Settings.
2.
In the Excluded Folders dialog box, do one of the following:
To exclude a folder from the database, click Add. Browse to a folder on your hard drive, and then click OK.
To remove a folder from the excluded folders list, select a folder in the list, and then click Remove.
To reset your excluded folders list to the default settings, click Reset to Defaults.
3.
When you are satisfied with your choices, click Close to return to ACDSee.
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Cataloging Files in the Database
ACDSee automatically adds file information and thumbnails to the database as you browse. You can use the Catalog dialog box to add
groups of files to the database without having to first browse the folders. This can be particularly useful when using ACDSee for the
first time, and when browsing or managing large collections of images as it reduces the loading time required for these folders.
The first time you run ACDSee, you are prompted to catalog your files.
To Catalog Your Files:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Catalog Files.
2.
In the Folders to Catalog section, select the checkbox next to the folders you want to catalog.
If you want to add folders that are not in the list, click Add folder, select the folders you want to include, and then click OK.
3.
In the Options section, select the information to add to the database.
4.
Click Start.
A progress bar shows your photos as they are cataloged.
5.
Click Finish.
If you are cataloging a large collection of files, do not disrupt the process, or use other software while it is running. For
large file collections, it is best to run cataloging overnight.
Creating and Switching Between Multiple Databases
ACDSee allows you to create multiple databases and switch between them at any time, giving you complete organizational control
over your photo collections.
When you open ACDSee for the first time, (and up until you create additional databases), you will be using the original database
called Default.dbin. It is located in: C:\Users\<Your Name>\AppData\Local\ACD Systems\Catalogs\<Version #>. All additional
databases that you create will be stored in this same location, unless you specify otherwise.
You can configure ACDSee to display the database it is currently running in the title bar of the application.
To Create a New Database:
1.
In Manage mode, open File | Database | New...
2.
In the New Database dialog box, enter a name for your new database.
3.
Browse to choose the location where the database will be stored, or leave it set to the existing location to store the new
database with your existing database, Default.dbin.
The database file will be stored with a folder of the same name. The database file and folder must always share exactly
the same name, or ACDSee will not be able to connect to the database.
4.
If you would like to have the name of your database displayed in the title bar of the application, select the Show database
filename in title bar checkbox.
5.
Click OK.
6.
A dialog will appear asking you if you would like to switch to your newly created database. Select Yes or No. If you select
Yes, ACDSee will restart and run with the new database.
To Switch from One Database to Another:
In Manage mode, do one of the following:
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Open File | Database |
Open...
In the Open Database dialog, browse to the database file (*.dbin) you want to use and click
Open.
Open File | Database |
Recent.
Select one of your recently used databases.
To Quickly Launch ACDSee Pro 7 in a Specific Database Using Command Line Switch:
1.
Create a shortcut to ACDSee. It is recommended that you name this shortcut something that corresponds to the name of the
database you want to open.
2.
In the shortcut properties, set the target to C:\Program Files\ACD Systems\ACDSee\<Version
#>\ACDSee<Version #>.exe" /db "C:\Users\<Your Name>\AppData\Local\ACD Systems\Catalogs\<Version
#>\<Name of Your Database>.dbin".
Converting an Older Database
You can use the ACD Database Convert Wizard to take database information from previous versions of ACDSee and add it to your
current database. This ensures that any information associated with your files using a previous version of ACDSee is referenced
properly in the current database.
If you have already added information to your current ACDSee database, it is recommended that you create a backup of
your database before converting an older ACDSee database.
To Convert an Older Database:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Convert Database.
2.
On the Welcome page, click Next to select your conversion options.
3.
On the Database Convert Options page, specify the version of the database files you want to convert, as well as the folder
where the database files are located on your hard drive. Click Next.
4.
To automatically rebuild image thumbnails, IPTC and EXIF information after the conversion process is complete, select the
Rebuild thumbnails, EXIF and IPTC data for local images checkbox.
5.
To automatically update your database after converting, select the Optimize database files after convert checkbox.
6.
Click Next.
7.
On the Summary page, review your selections, and then click Next to convert your database.
Importing Database Information
You can use the ACD Database Import Wizard to import archived database information, or to import database information that was
sent to you with images from another ACDSee user. After you import the information, ACDSee associates it with the appropriate
images.
If you have already added information to your current ACDSee database, it is recommended that you create a backup of
your database before converting an older ACDSee database.
To Use the ACD Database Import Wizard:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Import, and then select Database.
2.
Click Next to start the wizard.
3.
On the Import Options page, select the type of exported database information you want to import.
You can import image information from a compressed database version, or information from an XML-based text file.
4.
Click the Browse button to locate the database you want to import, and then click OK.
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5.
Select the Optimize database files after import checkbox to optimize the database after exiting the wizard, and then
click Next.
6.
On the Summary page, review your selections. Click Back to make changes, or click Next to begin importing the database
information.
7.
Click Finish to close the ACD Database Import Wizard.
If you are importing database information sent to you by another ACDSee user, ensure that the images to which the
information applies are in an identical location and folder structure on your hard drive.
Importing File Information From Other Sources
You can import file information into your database from other sources, including ACDSee Photo Discs and files from previous
versions of ACDSee.
Importing Photo Discs
Previous versions of ACDSee (versions 4.0 and 5.0) created separate database files with a .ddf file extension for Photo Discs. You
can import the Photo Disc database files into your ACDSee database.
To Import a Photo Disc:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Import, and then select Photo Disc.
2.
In the Open dialog box, locate and select the photo disc file you want to import.
3.
Click Open.
To import the information from Photo Discs created with ACDSee 6.0 or later, you must convert and import the entire
database.
Importing Albums
In previous versions of ACDSee, you could create albums in an .ais file format that consisted of organized shortcuts to your images.
Now you can use categories to create albums of images that do not require a separate file extension. You can, however, import your
albums from previous versions of ACDSee, and add the information from the albums to the database. ACDSee creates a new category
for each album you import.
To Import Album Information into the Database:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Import, and then select Album.
2.
In the Open dialog box, locate and select the .ais file you want to import.
3.
Click Open.
Working with Descript.ion Files
In previous versions of ACDSee, file descriptions were stored in a separate descript.ion file in each folder that contained images.
ACDSee now stores file descriptions as captions in the database, along with other file information such as notes and keywords.
You can use the Descript.ion tools to import your old descript.ion files and add the information to the database, or export your
existing file captions to a descript.ion file.
To Import a Descript.ion File:
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1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Import, and then select Descript.ion File.
2.
In the Open dialog box, locate and select the descript.ion file you want to import.
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3.
Click Open.
To Export Captions to a Descript.ion File:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Export, and then select Descript.ion File.
2.
In the Save As dialog box, type a name for the descript.ion file in the File name field.
3.
Click Save.
Exporting Database Information
You can use the ACD Database Export Wizard to save selected database information in a compressed format, and then store it as a
backup, or share it with other ACDSee users. You can also choose to export your category and keyword definitions to a text file.
Exporting your database information differs from creating a backup in that you can choose to export only the parts of your database
that you want to share or store with specific files, such as those on a CD. Other ACDSee users can import your information without
affecting their existing database.
To create a backup of your entire database, including image or media files, use the ACD Database Backup Wizard.
To back up the contents of a local folder to a remote location, such as a network drive, use the ACDSync Wizard.
To Use the ACD Database Export Wizard:
1.
If you want to export your database information for a specific group of images or media files, select the files in the File List
pane in Manage mode.
2.
Click Tools | Database | Export | Database.
3.
Click Next to begin using the wizard.
4.
On the Content and Format Options page, specify how you want to export your database information by selecting one of the
following options, and then clicking Next:
Export entire ACDSee database to a read-only, compressed version: Exports the entire contents of your
ACDSee database to a compressed version that can be shared with other ACDSee users.
Export database information for selected items to a read-only, compressed version: Exports all of your
database information for the images selected in the File List pane.
Export database information to a text file: Exports the selected information to an XML-based text file. Select
the checkboxes next to the information you want to include.
5.
On the Location Options page, specify a location for the exported information, and a name for the text file, if necessary, and
then click Next.
6.
On the Summary page, review your choices. You can click Back to make changes, or click Next to begin exporting your
database information.
7.
Click Finish to close the wizard and return to ACDSee.
Generating File Lists
You can generate a text file that lists all of the files in the folder currently displayed in the File List pane. The text file places the file
name, size, image file format, modified date, image properties, caption, and rating for all of the files in the folder into a table, and
creates a single text file.
To Generate a List of Your Files:
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Export, and then select Generate File Listing.
ACDSee automatically generates the file listing and opens it as a text file in your default text editor. You can then edit or save the
text file.
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Backing Up Your Database
You can use the ACDSee Backup Wizard to back up all of your database information, which you can then restore in the case of a
system failure or other event. You can also choose to back up your image, media, or archive files along with the relevant database
information.
The ACDSee Backup Wizard creates a series of files in a specified location that contain your entire database. The backup is
generated using your folder structure and is unique to your computer. To back up portions of your database, or to share database
information with another ACDSee user, use the ACD Database Export Wizard.
For some suggestions about managing your database backups, see Database backup tips and strategies .
To Back Up Your Database Information:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Back Up Database.
2.
On the Welcome page, select whether you would like to create a new backup, or update an existing backup. Click Next.
If you choose to update an existing backup, please go to step #5.
3.
On the New Backup page, select the information you would like to back up. Click Next.
4.
On the Backup Location page, click Browse and specify a location for your backup, and type a name for the backup file.
Click Next.
5.
On the Backup Summary page, review your settings. If you chose to update an existing backup, click the Backup to
update drop-down list, and then select the existing backup. Click Next.
Backup Information Options
Do not include thumbnails
Excludes thumbnails from the backup, saving a substantial amount of storage space on
your hard drive.
Include thumbnails for offline
files
Includes only thumbnails for files that do not reside on your hard drive, such as
PhotoDiscs.
Include thumbnails
Includes all thumbnails in the database. This will require more space on your hard drive
to store the backup.
Backup files of type
Backs up the specified file types with the database information. Select from the following
file types:
Image: Includes image files in the backup.
Media: Includes audio and video files in the backup.
Archive: Includes archive files in the backup.
All files of specified types on
your local hard drives
Backs up all specified files on your hard drive.
All files of specified types on
local and network hard drives
Backs up all specified files on your hard drive and network drives.
All files of specified types in a
folder (including subfolders)
Backs up all specified files in a specified folder. Click the Browse button and select the
folder to back up.
Database Backup Tips and Strategies
The ACDSee database stores information about your files, including EXIF information, file name and folder location, thumbnails,
categories, ratings, and any other information you add using the Properties pane. The more information you store in the database,
and the more time you spend entering that information, the more important it is to back up your database, and to have a good
strategy for managing your backups. Losing hours of work to a system crash or other uncontrollable event is something that should,
and can, be avoided.
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Backup Schedule
How often you need to back up depends on how often you add or change information in the database. A good rule to use would be to
back up your data as often as you want to avoid retyping it. You can use the backup reminder settings on the Database page of the
Options dialog box to set a regular reminder for yourself to back up your data as often as you think appropriate. Business
environments and professional users should back up every day.
It is also recommended that you back up your database before performing any major adjustments to it, such as importing
information from another ACDSee user, or converting a database from a previous version of ACDSee.
Backup Location
It's a good idea to consider where you back up your data, as well as how often. If you're backing up to your hard drive, ACDSee
creates a new folder for each day. This helps to avoid overwriting your backup, and gives you several increments from which you
can restore. Also helpful is a monthly backup that is stored in a different physical location than your computer, such as a network
drive.
Backup Size
To keep the size of the backup small, choose to back up database information only, and back up your images separately, also on a
regular basis.
Database Backup Tips and Strategies
The ACDSee database stores information about your files, including EXIF information, file name and folder location, thumbnails,
categories, ratings, and any other information you add using the Properties pane. The more information you store in the database,
and the more time you spend entering that information, the more important it is to back up your database, and to have a good
strategy for managing your backups. Losing hours of work to a system crash or other uncontrollable event is something that should,
and can, be avoided.
Backup Schedule
How often you need to back up depends on how often you add or change information in the database. A good rule to use would be to
back up your data as often as you want to avoid retyping it. You can use the backup reminder settings on the Database page of the
Options dialog box to set a regular reminder for yourself to back up your data as often as you think appropriate. Business
environments and professional users should back up every day.
It is also recommended that you back up your database before performing any major adjustments to it, such as importing
information from another ACDSee user, or converting a database from a previous version of ACDSee.
Backup Location
It's a good idea to consider where you back up your data, as well as how often. If you're backing up to your hard drive, ACDSee
creates a new folder for each day. This helps to avoid overwriting your backup, and gives you several increments from which you
can restore. Also helpful is a monthly backup that is stored in a different physical location than your computer, such as a network
drive.
Backup Size
To keep the size of the backup small, choose to back up database information only, and back up your images separately, also on a
regular basis.
Restoring Database Information From a Backup
You can use the ACD Database Restore Wizard to restore previously backed up database information.
To Restore Database Information:
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1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Restore Database.
2.
On the Welcome page, click Next to select the backup.
3.
On the Restore Options page, select the backup and date from which you want to restore, or browse to the location of your
backup and select a .bkup file.
4.
Click Next when you are ready to restore your database.
When restoring a backup from a series of backup files, ACDSee will only restore the information included in and prior to the
selected backup file. Therefore, unless required, it is recommended that you select the last file in the backup sequence.
Maintaining the Database
It is recommended that you regularly perform database maintenance and optimization to increase hard drive space, remove
redundant or extraneous information, and increase overall ACDSee performance.
You can use the tools in the Database Maintenance dialog box to update folders, or to identify folders whose thumbnails and
database information you would like to delete. The Database Maintenance dialog box displays a list of the folders on your system,
and uses icons to indicate the status of database information within specific folders.
Database Content Icons
Folder contains files with cached thumbnails stored in the database.
Folder contains files that were changed without a database update. For example, a folder or file was renamed or moved
outside of ACDSee.
To Perform Database Maintenance:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Database Maintenance.
2.
In the Database Maintenance dialog box, browse for folders marked with the database content icons. If there are no marked
folders, you do not need to perform database maintenance and can exit the Database Maintenance dialog box.
3.
Select a folder and click one of the following buttons to identify the maintenance you want to perform on that folder:
Remove Thumbnails: Removes all thumbnail information for the selected folder.
Remove All DB Info: Deletes all database and thumbnail information for the selected folder.
Remove Orphan Folders: Deletes any out-of-date or broken references to missing files or information for the
selected folder. It is only possible to check for orphans in folders located on your computer. This option will not be
visible if the folder is located on a network.
Change Binding: Changes all location references for the selected orphaned folder to another folder, and retains
all database information. The default binding folder is My Pictures.
4.
The Database Maintenance tool will delete records, creating unused space in your database. To reclaim the unused space,
click Optimize Database, and follow the instructions in the wizard.
5.
Click Close.
Optimizing the Database
You can use the Optimize Database Wizard to quickly remove redundant or outdated database records. Optimizing your database,
along with performing regular database maintenance, helps regain hard drive space and improves the overall performance of
ACDSee.
If you are cataloging large numbers of files regularly, it is helpful to optimize weekly, or after an extended cataloging
session. This is also a good time to backup the database.
To Optimize Your Database:
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1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Optimize Database.
2.
In the Database Optimization Wizard, click Next.
3.
Select one or both of the following:
Optimize the database tables and fields: Removes obsolete information from the database, reduces the space
used by database fields, and re-indexes the tables.
Remove orphans from database: Removes any orphan database entries, caused by files or folders deleted by
other programs.
4.
Click Next.
5.
When the wizard has finished, click Finish to return to ACDSee.
Rebuilding Thumbnails and Metadata
Situations can develop in which your images will be out of sync with the thumbnail images displayed in the File List pane and the
embedded metadata. You can use the Rebuild Thumbnails and Metadata tool to immediately regenerate the thumbnails for selected
images and rebuild the metadata.
To Rebuild Thumbnails:
1.
In Manage mode, do one of the following:
Select one or more thumbnails in the File List pane.
Select a folder in the Folders pane.
2.
Click Tools | Metadata | Rebuild Thumbnails and Metadata.
Quarantined Files
If ACDSee has trouble reading a corrupted or incomplete image or media file, or a file causes a plug-in to generate an error, ACDSee
will quarantine that file. You can view a list of quarantined files, and remove a file from the list.
To View Quarantined Files:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Database | Quarantine Files.
2.
To remove a file, select it in the list, and then click Remove.
3.
To disable the Quarantine feature, clear the Enable Quarantine checkbox.
4.
Click OK to close the Quarantine Files dialog box and return to ACDSee.
Working with Plug-ins
A plug-in is a software module that adds functionality to a larger program. ACDSee comes standard with many different plug-ins.
Types of Plug-ins
Image Decode: Converts a file from a binary format to the image displayed in ACDSee. Decode plug-ins allow ACDSee to
display images of many different file formats. The files that you can view with ACDSee depend on which decoding plug-ins
are installed on your computer.
Image Encode: Converts the image displayed in ACDSee to a binary file format. Encode plug-ins allow ACDSee to save (or
convert) images to many different file formats. The files that you can edit and save with ACDSee depend on which encoding
plug-ins are installed on your computer.
Archive: Allows ACDSee to display and save archives of many different file formats. The archives that you can view and
create with ACDSee depend on which archive plug-ins are installed on your computer.
Camera: Allows ACDSee to browse images on your digital camera and transfer them to a folder on your hard drive.
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Command Extension: Adds functionality to ACDSee. For example, there is a plug-in that you can use to share your images
over the Internet.
Pane Extension: Adds a pane to ACDSee where you can perform tasks like order prints of your digital images.
We cannot ensure the quality of plug-ins that are not certified by ACD Systems. As with any other piece of software, you
are trusting that the plug-in is free of viruses and that the company that produced the plug-in is trustworthy.
Managing Plug-ins
The Plug-in Settings dialog box displays a list of all the ACDSee plug-ins installed on your computer. You can also use the Plug-in
Settings dialog box to control which plug-ins ACDSee uses.
To Access the Plug-in Settings Dialog Box:
In Manage mode, click Tools | Plug-in Settings.
Disabling a Plug-in
You can disable a plug-in in the Plug-in Settings dialog box so that ACDSee no longer uses it.
To Disable a plug-in:
1.
In the Plug-in Settings dialog box, select one of the Plug-in tabs.
2.
Clear the checkbox beside the name of the plug-in that you do not want ACDSee to use.
3.
Click OK.
Changing the Plug-in Order
Some file formats can be supported by more than one plug-in. However, when this happens, you can control which plug-in is used
to read or write a file format. The order that plug-ins appear in the Plug-in Settings dialog box is the order that ACDSee uses the
plug-ins to read or write a file.
To Change the Plug-in Order:
1.
In the Plug-in Settings dialog box, select one of the Plug-in tabs.
2.
Select a plug-in in the Plug-ins list.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click the Move up button to move the plug-in higher in the list.
Click the Move down button to move the plug-in lower in the list.
4.
Click OK.
Susie plug-ins do not have the features and speed of ACDSee plug-ins. Therefore, it is recommended that you give Susie
plug-ins a low priority to prevent them from being used instead of an ACDSee plug-in. Also, you can disable Susie plug-ins
that overlap the file formats that ACDSee plug-ins support.
Viewing Plug-in Properties and Getting Help
You can view and set properties for certain plug-ins.
To View Plug-in Properties:
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1.
In the Plug-in Settings dialog box, select one of the Plug-in tabs.
2.
Select a plug-in in the Plug-ins list.
Chapter 3: Manage Mode
3.
Click the Properties button.
To View a Plug-in's Help File:
1.
In the Plug-in Settings dialog box, select one of the Plug-in tabs.
2.
Select a plug-in in the Plug-ins list.
3.
Click the Plug-in Help button.
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Chapter 4: View Mode
Chapter 4: View Mode
View mode is the main viewing component of the user interface.
In View mode, you can:
Click+hold+drag to pan around large images.
Press the keyboard shortcut F to toggle in and out of full screen view.
Zoom in or out on your images.
View images in a slideshow.
Play video and audio files, and add audio to your image files.
Add captions to your images.
Catalog files by tagging them, adding categories, keywords and other metadata.
Viewing Images with Auto Advance
You can use the Auto Advance feature to create a quick slideshow preview of a group of images, or all the images in a folder.
To Start Auto Advance:
1.
Open a group of images in View mode.
2.
Click View | Auto Advance | Options.
3.
In the Auto Advance dialog box, set the options as described below.
4.
Click Start.
5.
To advance to the next image, press Space.
6.
To return to the previous image, press Backspace.
7.
To stop or restart Auto Advance, press Pause.
Auto Advance Options
Sequence
Determines the order that you want to display your images. Select one of the following options:
Forward
Reverse
Random
Repeat
Automatically restarts the slideshow after the last image has been displayed.
Delay
Specifies how long to display each image. Drag the slider or type a value from 0 to 864000000 to set the
time (in milliseconds).
Sound
Select the Play audio clips checkbox to play any audio embedded in the selected images.
Displaying Text on Images in View Mode
You can use the Header/Footer tool to display text with your images in View mode. The text is displayed while you are viewing the
image, but does not modify the original image. You can also hide the headers and footers without changing the settings.
To add text directly to your photos and save it as part of the image, see Adding text to an image.
To Edit Image Headers and Footers:
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1.
In View mode, click View | Edit Header/Footer.
2.
Do one or both of the following:
Select the Header checkbox to add text at the top of the image.
Select the Footer checkbox to add text at the bottom of the image.
3.
Select or change the text options as described below.
4.
Click OK.
Text Options
Alignment
Specifies the justification of the captions.
Background
Adds a background color to the text. Click Color to specify a color.
Description
Displays the text you want to see on your images. Type the text you want to appear, or click inside the
field to set an insertion point for inserting metadata.
Insert Metadata
Inserts file-specific information into the text for each image.
Font
Sets the font, size, and color of the caption text.
To Insert Metadata in Image Text:
1.
Position the cursor in the Description text box where you want to display the file information and click Insert Metadata.
2.
In the Choose Properties dialog box, select the file information you want to include.
3.
Click OK.
The information you added is inserted as a placeholder that will be replaced by the specific text for each image.
Hiding Image Text
You can hide either the header or footer, or disable both at once without changing or deleting the information in the header and
footer fields.
To Hide the Image Text:
1.
In View mode, click View | Edit Header/Footer.
2.
Do one or both of the following:
Clear the Header checkbox to remove text from the top of the image.
Clear the Footer checkbox to remove text from the bottom of the image.
3.
Click OK.
To show or hide both headers and footers simultaneously, click View | Show Header/Footer.
Synchronizing View Mode to a Folder
You can use the Sync to Folder option to change the images being displayed in View mode.
To Synchronize to a Folder:
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1.
In View mode, click File | Sync To Folder.
2.
Type the path to the folder you want to synchronize, or click the Browse button to locate the folder.
3.
Select or change the New Images options as described below.
4.
Click OK.
Chapter 4: View Mode
New Images Options
Show new images
immediately
Displays images as soon as they appear in the folder. If this option is cleared, new images are added to
the end of the slideshow.
Ignore open files
Delays adding a new file to the slideshow until the transferring application has finished moving or
downloading the file.
Sort by name
Sorts the images displayed in the slideshow by their file name.
To Stop Synchronizing to a Folder:
In View mode, click File | Sync To Folder.
Viewing Offline Images
ACDSee stores thumbnails and database information for images contained on CDs or other removable media as Photo Discs. You can
then browse the thumbnails and view the information for those images even when the disc is not in your CD-ROM drive.
To Add a Photo Disc:
1.
Place a disc containing images into your CD-ROM drive.
2.
In Manage mode, click File | New | Photo Disc.
3.
In the New Disc dialog box, type a name for your disc in the Title field, and then click OK.
You can then browse the contents of the Photo Disc in the Offline Media section of the Folders pane.
If you add or remove images from a disc that you have already added to ACDSee as a Photo Disc, you can update the
information stored in the database. Insert the disc in your CD-ROM drive, and then right-click the name of the disc in the
Folders pane and select Update Photo Disc.
By default, ACDSee identifies Photo Discs by their serial numbers. This is the most reliable setting to use when working with Photo
Discs, particularly if you are importing or converting Photo Discs from previous versions of ACDSee.
However, if you are working with, or planning to work with, multi-session discs, the serial number may be regenerated or changed
each time you change the contents of a disc. Therefore, the volume label is the required method of identification for multi-session
Photo Discs.
Rebinding Photo Discs
Depending on the method used to identify Photo Discs, ACDSee may encounter a Photo Disc that it does not recognize. This is most
common when you are using the serial number method to identify Photo Discs and you insert a multi-session disc. ACDSee may not
recognize the disc, as serial numbers are likely to change when updating a multi-session disc.
You can use the Rebind option to update the identification information, and associate the correct database information with your
disc.
To Rebind a Photo Disc to its ACDSee Database Information:
1.
In the Rebind Photo Disc dialog box, carefully review the Current disc information to be sure that the correct disc is in the
drive.
2.
Select the Photo Disc record that you want to rebind to the current disc from the Photo Disc Name list.
3.
Click Rebind.
Using ACDSee Quick View
ACDSee Quick View is an image viewer that you can use to quickly view images without opening ACDSee. For example, imagine that
you want to view an image that someone sent to you in an email. If you double-click the image it will open in Quick View, which is like
a pared-down version of View mode in ACDSee.
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With Quick View you can quickly scroll through your images, temporarily rotate images, and zoom in and out. If you are viewing a
particularly appealing image in Quick View, you can also set the image as your desktop wallpaper or print the image.
You can easily switch from Quick View to ACDSee. You also have the option to open an image in Manage, View, or Edit mode.
If you are accustomed to using keyboard and mouse shortcuts in View mode you can use most of those shortcuts in Quick View as
well.
To Open an Image in Quick View:
1.
With ACDSee closed, double-click an image. For example, double-click the image in Windows Explorer or in an email
message.
2.
Use the viewing options described below to view the image.
ACDSee Quick View Viewing Options
Previous
View the previous image.
Next
View the next image.
Rotate Left
Rotate the image to the left.
Rotate Right
Rotate the image to the right.
Zoom In
View the image at a higher magnification.
Zoom Out
View the image at a lower magnification.
Delete
Move the image to the computer's Recycle Bin.
To Open the Image in ACDSee:
Click Manage, View, or Edit mode.
To Set an Image as Your Desktop Wallpaper:
1.
Click Previous or Next until the image that you want to make your desktop wallpaper displays in Quick View.
2.
Click Tools | Set Wallpaper and select one of the following:
Centered: Displays the image in the center of the desktop.
Tiled: Displays the image in one or more tiles until the desktop is covered. If the image is small it may appear in
several tiles on the desktop. If the image is large it may appear in only one or two tiles.
Stretched: Stretches the image proportionally to fill as much of the desktop as possible.
To Restore Your System to the Default Desktop Qallpaper:
Click Tools | Set Wallpaper | Restore.
To Print the Image:
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1.
Click File | Print.
2.
Under Format, choose a print size.
3.
On the Printer Options tab, specify the printer you want to use, the paper size, the number of copies you want, the range
of pages that you want to print, and image resolution.
4.
On the Page Settings tab, specify the image position on the paper and the margin widths, and specify the number of
prints of each photo.
5.
Add captions, headers, or footers.
6.
Click Print.
Chapter 4: View Mode
Viewing Images in Another Application
You can open a file in another program from within ACDSee. For example, you can open documents in the application used to create
them.
To Use the Shell Open and Edit Commands:
1.
In Manage mode, click File | Shell.
2.
Select one of the following options:
Open: Opens the file using the application that Windows associates with its file extension.
Edit: Opens the file using the default system application, or opens a dialog box where you can select an
application.
Setting an Image as the Desktop Wallpaper
You can select any image and set it as the Windows desktop wallpaper. You can also automatically stretch a wallpapered image to fill
the screen, or restore your previous wallpaper.
To Set an Image as the Desktop Wallpaper:
1.
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, select an image, and then click Tools | Set Wallpaper.
In View mode, click Tools | Set Wallpaper.
2.
Select one of the following:
Centered: Places the image in the center of the screen. If the image is larger than the screen, it is shrunk to fit.
Tiled: Places the image in a tiled pattern that fills the entire desktop.
Stretched: Stretches the image to fit the screen.
The selected image is saved as ACD Wallpaper.bmp in the Windows folder. ACDSee automatically changes the wallpaper settings in
the Control Panel Display properties to display the image.
To Automatically Stretch Wallpapered Images to Fit the Screen:
1.
Click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click General.
3.
On the General page, select the Automatically stretch wallpaper to fit screen checkbox.
4.
Click OK.
To Display the Previous Wallpaper:
Click Tools | Set Wallpaper | Restore.
Viewing and Using Brush Files
You can view brush files in Manage mode just like fonts or other files. This means that you can assign ratings or organize them just
like any other file in ACDSee. Because many .abr files are actually groups of images in one file, you need to open them in View mode
to see the individual images.
This icon indicates an .abr brush file in ACDSee.
To View Brush Files:
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In Manage mode, navigate to the folder containing your brush files.
To see just the top image in any .abr file, hover over the thumbnail to activate the pop-up, or click it to see the image in the
Preview pane.
To view the other images in the .abr file, double-click it to open it in View mode. The file opens in View mode showing the
individual images in a pane on the left-hand side.
To see the number of images, and select them by number, click the down-arrow at the top of the sidebar, and then select
the number of the image.
To scroll through the images, click the right and left arrows at the top of the sidebar, or on each image.
To Use Brush Files in Adobe Photoshop®:
With both Adobe Photoshop® and ACDSee open, drag the file from the File List (in Manage mode) onto the Photoshop® window.
Even though nothing appears to happen, the brush is loaded into the Photoshop® brush library. To view the new brushes, open the
library and scroll to the bottom of the pane.
To make it even easier to use brushes in Photoshop®, you can configure it to be your default editor. Then you can use
CTRL + ALT + X to open Photoshop® and use the brush right away.
Playing Video and Audio Files (for Windows Vista and XP® Users)
You can play video or audio files in many formats in ACDSee. You can control playback volume and appearance, select parts of a
media file to play or save, and create an image from a video frame.
The following topic applies to Windows Vista and XP® users only. If you are running Windows 7® or above, please see
Playing Video and Audio Files (for Windows 7® and Above Users).
To Play Video or Audio Files:
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, do one of the following:
Double-click a video or audio file.
Select one or more files and press Enter.
Select one or more files, right-click a selected file, and then select View.
Use the Media toolbar to adjust the volume, stop, pause or restart the file playback, and control the appearance of media
files.
Automatically Playing Audio and Video Files
You can configure your settings to play audio and video files automatically, as soon as you open them in View mode, or as you view
them in the Preview pane in Manage mode.
To Start Playing Media Files Automatically:
1.
In Manage mode or View mode, click Tools | Options | Preview.
2.
Select the Autoplay audio or video clips checkbox.
3.
Click OK.
The Media Toolbar
You can use the Media toolbar to quickly access common media viewing and editing tools.
Media Toolbar Buttons
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Play
Plays the media file or selection. Changes into the Pause button when a media file or selection is
playing.
Pause
Pauses the media file or selection.
Stop
Stops playback of the media file or selection.
Selection and Media Controls Toolbar Buttons
Show Selection
Toggles between showing and hiding the selection handles.
Play Selection
Plays only the selected portion of the media file.
Save As
Opens a dialog you can use to save the video with a new file name.
Extract Frames
Opens a menu you can use to copy, save, and extract video frames.
Loop
Continuously plays the media file or selection.
Rotate
Rotates a video clockwise in 90-degree increments.
Auto Levels Effect
Automatically adjusts the color and light levels in a video.
Gamma Effect
Opens the Gamma dialog box, which you can use to adjust the gamma of a video. Higher values
brighten the video, while lower values darken it. To reset the gamma level, click Default.
Playing Video and Audio Files (for Windows 7® and Above Users)
You can play video or audio files in many formats in ACDSee. You can control playback volume, and create an image from a video
frame.
The following topic only applies to users running Windows 7® or above. If you are a Windows Vista or XP® user, please
see Playing Video and Audio Files (for Windows Vista and XP® Users).
To Play Video or Audio Files:
In Manage mode, in the File List pane, do one of the following:
Double-click a video or audio file.
Select one or more files and press Enter.
Select one or more files, right-click a selected file, and then select View.
Use the Media toolbar to adjust the volume, pause, loop, or extract frames from playback.
Automatically Playing Audio and Video Files
You can configure your settings to play audio and video files automatically, as soon as you open them in View mode, or as you view
them in the Preview pane in Manage mode.
To Start Playing Media Files Automatically:
1.
In Manage mode or View mode, click Tools | Options | Preview.
2.
Select the Autoplay audio or video clips checkbox.
3.
Click OK.
The Media Toolbar
You can use the Media toolbar to quickly access common media viewing and editing tools.
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Media Toolbar Buttons
Play
Plays the media file or selection. Changes into the Pause button when a media file or selection
is playing.
Extract Frames
Opens a menu you can use to copy, save, and extract video frames.
Frames are extracted at the resolution you viewed them at, (your screen resolution).
Loop
Continuously plays the media file or selection.
Selecting Part of a Media File
You can select a segment of an audio or video file and play it.
This feature is only supported on Windows Vista® and XP®.
To Select Part of an Audio or Video File:
1.
Click the Show Selection button.
2.
Move the selection handles to specify the beginning and end of the selection.
3.
Click the Play Selection button.
4.
Click the Play button.
Saving Video Frames as Images (for Windows Vista and XP® Users)
You can extract an individual frame from a video and save it as a still image, or extract multiple frames and save each one as a single
image.
To Extract and Save a Single Video Frame as an Image:
1.
Do one of the following:
While the video is playing, click the Pause button at the frame you want to save.
On the progress slider, move the pointer to display the frame you want to save.
2.
On the Selection and media controls toolbar, click the Extract Frames button and select Extract Current Frame.
3.
In the Extract Current Frame dialog box, select a folder in which to save your file.
4.
In the File name field, type a filename.
5.
Click the Save as type drop-down list and select a file format. You can click the Options button to select or change any
options associated with the file format.
6.
Click Save.
To Extract and Save Multiple Video Frames as Images:
1.
Select part of the video.
2.
On the Selection and media controls toolbar, click the Extract Frames button, and then select one of the following options:
Extract Selected Frames: Extracts all the video frames contained in the selected portion of the video file.
Extract All Frames: Extracts all of the video frames in the video file.
3.
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In the Extracting Frames dialog box, click the Browse button, and then select the folder where you want to save your files.
Chapter 4: View Mode
4.
In the Filename field, type a filename to use when saving the images. Numbers are added to the filename for each frame.
5.
Click the Format drop-down list and select a file format. You can click the Options button to select or change any options
associated with the file format.
6.
Click OK.
Saving Video Frames as Images (for Windows 7® and Above Users)
You can extract an individual frame from a video and save it as a still image.
To Extract and Save a Single Video Frame as an Image:
1.
Do one of the following:
While the video is playing, click the Pause button at the frame you want to save.
Skip to step 2 as the exact frame you want to extract is playing.
2.
On the Selection and media controls toolbar, click the Extract Frames button.
3.
In the Extract Current Frame dialog box, select a folder in which to save your file.
4.
In the File name field, type a filename.
5.
Click the Save as type drop-down list and select a file format. You can click the Options button to select or change any
options associated with the file format.
6.
Click Save.
Adding or Editing Image Audio
ACDSee supports images with embedded audio and images with associated audio files.
Images with embedded audio are TIFF or JPEG images with audio saved inside the image file. You can embed audio inside an image
file by adding audio to the image.
Images with associated audio are image files paired with separate WAV audio files. Image files and their associated audio files
contain the same file name and are located in the same folder. You can associate any WAV file with an image file by giving them the
same name and placing them in the same folder, or by adding audio to the image.
If you move or rename either an image file or the audio file associated with it, both files must be renamed and in the same
folder or they will no longer be associated. This does not apply to images with embedded audio.
To Add Audio to an Image:
1.
Do one of the following:
Select an image in Manage mode.
Open an image in View mode.
2.
Click Tools | Image Audio | Edit.
3.
In the Edit Audio dialog box, click the Browse button.
4.
Select a WAV file and click Save.
5.
If you would like to truncate or clip the audio file, select the Use markers checkbox, and drag the Start marker and End
marker sliders. Do one of the following:
Click the Truncate button to remove the beginning and end of the audio file (the sections outside of the start and
end markers).
Click the Clip button to remove the section of the audio file inside the start and end markers.
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6.
To hear a preview of the file, click the Play button.
7.
Click OK.
Recording Audio to an Image
You can record your own audio files and add them to your images. When you add audio to a JPEG or TIFF image, the audio is
embedded in the image. With other file formats, the audio file is associated with the image; the audio file is saved in the same folder
and is played when the image is viewed.
To Record and Add an Audio File to an Image:
1.
Do one of the following:
Select an image in Manage mode.
Open an image in View mode.
2.
Click Tools | Image Audio | Edit.
3.
In the Edit Audio dialog box, select or change the Record sound settings options as described below.
4.
Click Record and do one of the following:
Use a microphone and record a sound.
Play audio from an audio player on your computer.
5.
Click Record to stop the recording.
6.
Click Save As to save the audio file.
7.
In the Save Sound File dialog box, type a name in the File name field, and then click Save.
8.
Click OK.
Record Sound Settings Options
Capture device
Specifies which of your computer's devices you want to record the audio.
Input format
Determines which sample rate and audio type are used to record the sound. The formats displayed
depend on the sound card you have installed on your computer.
Overwrite
Replaces the recorded audio from the Start marker slider location.
Mix
Combines the recording with the existing audio file.
Insert using start
marker
Inserts the recording at the start marker location. Drag the Start marker slider to select a position.
Append to sound
file
Adds the recording to the existing audio file.
Replace sound file
Replaces the entire audio file with the new recording.
Selecting Part of an Image
You can use the Select tool in View mode to select a rectangular area of an image. You can then zoom in on the selection, copy the
selection, save the selection as a new image, print the selection, and use the selection as the desktop wallpaper.
To Select Part of an Image:
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1.
Click the Select Tool icon.
2.
Drag the cursor across the image to create a marquee.
3.
Right-click inside the marquee and select one of the options described below.
4.
To cancel the selection, click an area of the image outside of the marquee.
Chapter 4: View Mode
Selection Options
Zoom To
Zooms in on the selected area.
Copy
Copies the selected area to the Clipboard.
Save Crop As
Saves the selected area as a new image.
Print
Prints the selected area.
Wallpaper
Centered
Creates desktop wallpaper using the selected area and centers it on your desktop, shrinking it to fit if
necessary.
Wallpaper Tiled
Creates a tiled desktop wallpaper pattern using the selected area.
Viewing File Properties in View Mode
You can view an image’s properties in View mode and edit the information in the Properties pane.
To View an Image’s Properties:
In View mode, click View | Properties.
For more information about the Properties pane, and adding or editing ACDSee metadata, see Using the Properties Pane.
Printing Images in View Mode
With the ACDSee print utility, you can print your images on any size of paper, in any orientation, and at any resolution your printer
can support. You can also use the print utility to create and print contact sheets, complete with headers, footers, and captions
specific to each image.
As you change the options in the Print dialog box, you can view a dynamically updated preview of the image and its position on the
page. You can adjust the output size, print multiple copies of each image, and change the orientation of the images on each page.
To Print a Single Image:
1.
In View mode, select the image you want to print.
2.
Click File | Print Image.
3.
Under Format, choose a print size.
4.
On the Printer Options tab, specify the printer you want to use, the paper size, the number of copies you want, the range
of pages that you want to print, and image resolution.
5.
On the Page Settings tab, specify the image position on the paper and the margin widths, and specify the number of
prints of each photo.
6.
Add captions, headers, or footers.
7.
Click Print.
To Print All Images:
1.
In View mode, click File | Print All Images.
2.
Under Print layout, do one of the following:
Select Full page and then choose a print size from the Format list.
Select Contact sheet and then set the Contact sheet format options to define the appearance of your contact
sheet.
Select Layout and then choose one of the available layout options.
3.
On the Printer Options tab, specify the printer you want to use, the paper size, the number of copies you want, the range
of pages that you want to print, and image resolution.
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4.
On the Page Settings tab, specify the image position on the paper and the margin widths.
5.
Specify the number of prints of each photo. If you are printing a Full page or a Contact sheet this option is available on
the Page Settings tab. If you are printing a Layout this option is available below the list of layouts.
6.
Add captions, headers, or footers. You can only add captions, headers, or footers if you are printing a Full page or a
Contact sheet.
7.
Click Print.
Showing Originals
When you make changes to your images, the original image is saved so that you can restore the image to its original settings.
To Show the Original Image:
1.
In View mode, select an image that has been edited.
2.
Click and hold the Show Original button in the bottom toolbar.
When you release the mouse button, the edited image is displayed.
Committing Changes
When you make changes to your images, the original image is saved so that you can restore the image to its original settings. If you
decide that you want to keep your edited image and save that as your original image, you can commit the changes to the image. This
deletes any sidecar files or originals that have been saved, and removes the E overlay icon that indicates the image has been edited.
To Commit Changes to an Image:
1.
In Manage mode or View mode, select an image that has been edited.
2.
Click Tools | Commit Changes.
Zooming an Image
In View mode you can use the Zoom tools to enlarge or reduce the size of the image you are viewing. When an image is zoomed to a
larger size than the View mode window, you can use the Scroll tool (hand icon) to pan or scroll the image.
To Zoom an Image In or Out:
Click once on the image to toggle between your default view and Actual Size view.
Click Tools | Zoom, and then select one of the Zoom menu options.
Zoom Menu Options
Zoom In
Increases the magnification of the image.
Zoom Out
Decreases the magnification of the image.
Actual Size
Displays the image at its original dimensions (100%).
Fit Image
Displays the image at the largest magnification that fits in View mode window.
Fit Width
Fits the image within the left and right sides of the View mode window.
Fit Height
Fits the image within the top and bottom of the View mode window.
Zoom Lock
Displays all images at the zoom option of the current image. If the zoom level is adjusted, the new
zoom level is applied to all images that you view.
Zoom To
Opens a dialog box where you can select a zoom level.
Pan Lock
Locks the panned area of an image.
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If you select Fit Image you can display the previous or next image by pressing the left and right arrow keys on your
keyboard.
To change your default image view, click Tools | Zoom and select Actual Size, Fit Image (standard), Fit Width, or Fit
Height.
Setting the Zoom Level
You can use the Set Zoom Level dialog box to set a specific zoom level in View mode.
To Set a Specific Zoom Level:
1.
Click Tools | Zoom | Zoom To.
2.
In the Zoom level area, select one of the following:
Fit whole image: Zooms the image to fit entirely within the window.
Fit width: Zooms the image to fit the width of the window.
Fit height: Zooms the image to fit the height of the window.
Specify: Specifies a zoom percentage. Type a number in the field or click the drop-down list and select a zoom
level.
3.
To use this setting as the default View mode zoom level, select the Lock at this zoom level checkbox. View mode displays
all images based on the specified zoom level.
4.
Click OK.
If you select Fit whole image you can display the previous or next image by pressing the left and right arrow keys on your
keyboard.
Automatically Shrinking or Enlarging Images
You can use the settings on the Display page of the Options dialog box to automatically enlarge or shrink images to fit the size of the
ACDSee window. For information about how the combination of the choices affects the display of images, see the Zoom mode and
Resize results table below.
To Automatically Shrink or Enlarge Images:
1.
In Manage mode or View mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click View mode | Display.
3.
In the Zoom options area, select one of the following options from the Default zoom mode drop-down list:
Actual Size: Keeps images at their original size.
Fit Width: Resizes images to fit the width of the View mode window.
Fit Height: Resizes images to fit the height of the View mode window.
Fit Image: Resizes images to fit the size of the View mode window.
4.
Select one of the following options from the Resize drop-down list:
Reduce Only: Reduces large images to fit the size of the View mode window.
Enlarge Only: Enlarges smaller images to fit the size of the View mode window.
Reduce or Enlarge: Reduces large images, and enlarges smaller images to fit the size of the View mode window.
5.
Click OK.
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Zoom Mode and Resize Results
Fit Image
Reduce
Only
Enlarge
Only
Reduce
and
Enlarge
Fit Width
Fit Height
Reduces large images to fit the size Reduces large images to fit
of the View mode window.
between the left and right sides of
the View mode window.
Images that are smaller than the
View mode window are displayed at Images that are smaller than the
their original size.
View mode window are displayed at
their original size.
Reduces large images to fit between the
top and bottom of the View mode window.
Enlarges small images to fit the size Enlarges small images to fit
of the Viewer.
between the left and right sides of
the View mode window.
Images that are larger than the
View mode window are displayed at Images that are larger than the
their original size.
View mode window are displayed at
their original size.
Enlarges small images to fit between the
top and bottom of the View mode window.
Images that are smaller than the View
mode window are displayed at their
original size.
Images that are larger than the View mode
window are displayed at their original size.
Reduces large images and enlarges Reduces large images and enlarges Reduces large images and enlarges small
small images to fit the size of the
small images to fit between the left images to fit between the top and bottom
View mode window.
and right sides of the View mode
of the View mode window.
window.
If you select Fit Image you can display the previous or next image by pressing the left- and right-arrow keys on your
keyboard.
Using the Navigator to View Select Areas of an Image
Use the Navigator pane to display a thumbnail overview of images that are larger than the View mode display area. In the Navigator,
a marquee indicates the area of the image that is visible.
To Display and Use the Navigator Pane:
1.
In View mode, click View | Navigator.
2.
Drag the slider to increase or decrease the magnification of the image in View mode.
3.
Drag the marquee to the area of the image you would like to display in View mode.
To Use the Quick Navigator Pane:
1.
In View mode, click and hold the Navigator button in the bottom toolbar.
2.
Drag the marquee to the area of the image you would like to display in View mode.
Panning a Magnified Image
In View mode, you can pan large images by moving them vertically, horizontally, and diagonally across the display area to view
specific areas of the image. When an image is larger than the ACDSee window and you use the Scroll tool, the cursor changes to a
hand.
To Pan an Image:
Do one of the following:
Drag the image to center the area you want to view.
Press an arrow key. You can hold the CTRL key to pan quickly, or hold the SHIFT key to pan more slowly.
Using Pan Lock
You can use the Pan Lock setting to automatically center the same area of a series of larger images in View mode.
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To Use Pan Lock:
1.
In View mode, pan over a large image to a specific area you want to view.
2.
Using the Zoom menu, zoom in on the image until you reach the magnification you want to use for all of your images.
3.
Click Tools | Zoom | Zoom Lock to keep the current zoom level.
4.
Click Tools | Zoom | Pan Lock.
As you move through your images, each one will be automatically zoomed and panned to the same area.
Magnifying Specific Areas of an Image
You can view specific areas of an image at a higher magnification in the Magnifying Glass pane.
To Use the Magnifying Glass Pane:
1.
In View mode, click View | Magnifying Glass.
2.
Move the cursor over an area of the image to view that area in the Magnifying Glass pane.
3.
Change the Magnifying Glass pane settings by doing any of the following:
Move the slider at the bottom of the Magnifying Glass pane to increase or decrease the magnification.
Select the Fixed checkbox to apply the slider setting to the original size of the image. Clear the Fixed checkbox to
apply the slider setting to the magnification of the zoomed image in View mode.
Select the Smooth checkbox to apply anti-aliasing to the magnified portion of the image, or clear the Smooth
checkbox to view the individual pixels.
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Chapter 5: Edit Mode
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
Make your final edits in Edit mode, where you can apply fine-tuned adjustments on the more limited RGB image data. Use the tools in
Edit mode for any touch-ups to specific areas of your images.
In Edit Mode You Can:
Use the Selection tool to select and apply edits to a specific part of the image.
Use the Edit Brush to paint an effect onto specific areas of your image.
Remove flaws, or red eye.
Add text, borders, vignettes, special effects, and drawing tools.
Crop, flip, resize, and rotate.
Adjust lighting using the exposure, levels, auto levels, tone curves, and lighting tools.
Adjust color using the White Balance, or Color Balance tool.
Add details to your image using Sharpen, Blur, Remove Noise, Add Noise or Clarity tools.
Using Edit Mode
In Edit mode, you can use the editing tools to fine tune your image, remove red eye, and apply special effects.
Editing an Image
To Edit an Image:
1.
Select Edit mode.
2.
In the Selections group, click Selections.
3.
In the Repair group, click Red Eye Reduction or Repair Tool.
4.
In the Add group, click Text, Borders, Vignette, Drawing tools, or click Special Effect and select an effect.
5.
In the Geometry group, click Rotate, Flip, Crop, or Resize.
6.
In the Exposure/Lighting group, click Exposure, Levels, Auto Levels, Tone Curves, or Lighting.
7.
In the Color group, click White Balance or Color Balance.
8.
In the Detail group, click Sharpen, Blur, Clarity, or click Noise to remove or add noise.
9.
You have several options in saving your images. See Saving images in Edit for more information.
Reverting to Original Settings
You can discard your Edit settings and revert to the original settings for your image. For steps to revert your image, see Restoring
originals.
Histogram and Image Viewing Controls
While editing an image, you can adjust the magnification with the zoom controls, located in the bottom right corner.
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Histogram
Displays the histogram preview for the current image. The histogram provides a graphical
representation of the intensity level of pixels within each color channel. Spikes at either end of the
graph indicate clipped colors. Keeping the histogram open is particularly useful when adjusting
exposure, as the histogram reflects all adjustments as you make them.
You can also display the Histogram as a separate window by selecting View, and then Histogram.
Undo/Redo
Undo to discard all changes made on the current tab. Redo to return to the options that you had
selected prior to clicking Undo. In Edit, Undo and Redo buttons display the changes you can undo or
redo.
Reset
Click on the reset button to reset the image to its default settings.
Display Full Screen
Displays the image on a full screen. Press F to view full screen and to return to Edit mode.
Actual Size
Returns the current image to its actual size.
Navigator Pane
The Navigator icon only appears when the image is magnified or if the Actual Size icon has been
clicked. Click the Navigator icon to display a small duplicate of your image. Then drag your cursor to
the section of the image you would like to see magnified. Release the cursor to settle on an area of the
image.
Fit Image
Reduces the image to fit within the Edit mode area.
Show Saved
Toggles the changes on or off, to compare the current image to the last saved version.
Zoom slider
Increases the size of the image if you drag it to the right, decreases the size if you drag to the left.
Zoom drop-down list
Displays a list of zoom sizes to select.
Using Presets in Edit
Many ACDSee editing tools and special effects allow you to save your settings as presets. This is convenient when you frequently
use the same settings for a particular tool or effect.
For most tools, ACDSee automatically saves the last option settings you applied to an image when you clicked Apply or Done. This
preset is called Last Used.
The Save Preset
and Delete
buttons are located at the top of an editing tool's panel.
To Save a Preset:
1.
In Edit mode, select a tool and specify its settings.
2.
Click the Save Preset button.
3.
In the New Preset dialog box, enter a name for your preset, and then click OK.
The new preset will appear in the tool's Presets drop-down list.
To Use a Previously Saved Preset:
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1.
In Edit mode, select the tool for which you created the preset.
2.
Click the Presets drop-down list and select the preset you want to apply.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
To Delete a Preset:
1.
In Edit mode, select the tool for which you created the preset.
2.
Click the Presets drop-down list and select the preset you want to delete.
3.
Click the Delete button.
4.
In the Confirm Delete dialog box, click Yes.
Using the Undo/Redo Button
You can undo and redo your changes when editing an image.
To Undo a Change:
In Edit mode do one of the following:
Click the Undo button found at the bottom of the left pane.
Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL + Z.
To Redo a Change:
In Edit mode do one of the following:
Click the Redo button found at the bottom of the left pane.
Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL + Y.
Restoring Originals
If you have committed changes to an image, you cannot restore the original.
You can discard all your changes and revert to the original image.
To Revert an Image Back to the Original in Edit:
In Edit mode, select File | Restore to Original.
To Revert an Image Back to the Original in Manage or View Mode:
1.
Select the image.
2.
Select Tools | Restore to Original.
Using the Edit Brush
The tools in Edit mode allow you to make a variety of global adjustments to your photos, but sometimes you may only want to adjust
specific areas of your photos. For example, instead of blurring an entire photo, you may want to blur certain areas, such as the
background. To do this, and other local adjustments, you can use the Edit Brush.
The Edit Brush allows you to selectively edit your photo by simply brushing on the effects. The Edit Brush is essentially creating a
mask that is used to determine which pixels will be affected by the current settings of the chosen operation.
Edit Brush
The Edit Brush button displays at the center of the top editing panel toolbar for all applicable Edit mode tools.
To Use the Edit Brush:
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1.
In Edit mode, select the tool you want to use.
2.
Click the Edit Brush to enter brushing mode and open the brush controls. Or, toggle the brush panel open and closed with
the B key.
3.
Specify the brush settings in the panel or on the fly as described in the table below.
4.
Start painting the effects on your photo.
5.
Adjust the sliders to get the effect you want.
6.
Press Done to apply your brush strokes.
Edit Brush Options
Add brush stroke
Brush while holding the left mouse button down.
Erase brush stroke
Brush while holding the right mouse button down.
Adjust brush size
Use the mouse wheel to adjust nib width or adjust the Nib Width slider.
Adjust feathering
Use SHIFT + mouse wheel to adjust the amount of feathering.
Alternating between
Brush mode and
cursor-applied tools
For filters that involve drawing or clicking on the image, such as Lighting and White Balance, hold
down the ALT key to switch from Brush mode to using the tool.
Clear all brush
strokes
Invert all brush
strokes
Removes all brush strokes from the image.
Toggle this option to invert brushed strokes. This makes brushed areas no longer brushed and
untouched areas brushed. This is useful if you want the majority of the image brushed and a small
section untouched. Simply brush only the small area you don't want affected and invert the brush
strokes.
Load last applied
brush strokes
Applies effects to the area most recently brushed and applied.
Show brush strokes
When this option is checked, your brush strokes will be displayed in the color shown. This is helpful
when brushing a complex area with a subtle effect as it can be difficult to tell if you have missed a
spot. Alternatively, hold down the S key to see your brush strokes on the image.
When you click the Edit brush and enter brushing mode, you need to apply brush strokes in order to see any of your
adjustments.
To exit brushing mode, toggle the Edit brush button.
The Edit Brush is enabled in many of the editing tools and special effects filters. When it does not make sense to have this option, it
is omitted. The Edit Brush is not available in the following tools: Crop, Resize, Rotate, Flip, Text, Red Eye Reduction, Repair Tool,
Selections.
Using the Gradient Tool
The tools in Edit mode allow you to make solid, global adjustments to your photos, but sometimes you want these effects to
gradually progress over your photo. For example, instead of applying a blur across an entire photo, you may want a blur that
advances across the image, or advances over a section of the image.
Gradient Tool
The Gradient Tool button displays at the center of the top editing panel toolbar for all applicable Edit mode tools.
To Use the Gradient Tool:
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Chapter 5: Edit Mode
1.
In Edit mode, select the tool you want to use.
2.
Click the Gradient Tool button
G key.
3.
Specify the gradient settings in the panel or on the fly as described in the table below.
4.
Position the guides on your photo. Inside the guide boxes, the gradient is transitioning. On either side of the boxes, the
effect being applied by the Gradient tool is at full strength or not applied at all. To make this clearer, check the Show
gradient mask checkbox. Move the boxes to define where the effect will begin or end. Hold down the SHIFT key while
positioning the effect to lock to the nearest 45° angle, for straightness.
5.
Adjust the sliders to get the effect you want.
6.
Press Apply or Done.
to enter Gradient mode. Or, toggle the Gradient panel open and closed with the
Gradient Tool Options
Invert gradient
Toggle this option to invert the gradient. By pressing the Invert button after applying a gradient
beginning at the top of the image, the gradient would now begin at the bottom, and vice versa.
Show gradient mask
When this option is checked, your gradient mask will be displayed in the color shown. Alternatively,
hold down the S key to see the mask on the image.
Alternating between
the Gradient Tool and
cursor-applied tools
For filters that involve drawing or clicking on the image, such as Lighting and White Balance, hold
down the ALT key to switch from Gradient mode to using the tool.
To exit Gradient mode, toggle the Gradient Tool button.
To maintain your gradient mask while switching to Edit Brush mode, hold down SHIFT and click the Edit Brush button.
This allows you to add to the gradient mask or erase parts of it that you don't want.
The Gradient Tool is enabled in many of the editing tools and special effects filters. When it does not make sense to have this option,
it is omitted. The Gradient Tool is not available in the following tools: Resize, Crop, Rotate, Drawing Tools, Vignette, Borders, Text,
Repair Tool, Red Eye Reduction, and Selections.
Using the Radial Gradient Tool
While the Edit tools allow you to make a variety of adjustments to your photos, sometimes you want these effects to draw attention to
a specific area of your photo. For example, instead of applying sharpening across an entire photo, you may want to only sharpen the
center subject.
Radial Gradient Tool
The Radial Gradient Tool button displays at the top of the editing panel toolbar for all applicable Edit mode tools.
To Use the Gradient Tool:
1.
In Edit mode, select the tool you want to use.
2.
Click the Radial Gradient Tool button
and closed with the R key.
3.
Specify the Radial Gradient settings in the panel or on the fly as described in the table below.
to enter Radial Gradient mode. Or, toggle the Radial Gradient panel open
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4.
Position the guides on your photo. Inside the circle, the image is unaltered. At the perimeter of the circle, the effect being
applied by the Radial Gradient is transitioning between not applied at all (inside), and full strength (outside). To make this
clearer, check the Show gradient mask checkbox. Hold down the SHIFT key while positioning the effect to change the
radial gradient to a perfect circle.
5.
Adjust the sliders to get the effect you want.
6.
Press Done.
Gradient Tool Options
Invert gradient
Toggle this option to invert the radial gradient. By pressing the Invert button, the effects will be
applied to the center of the image (inside the circular guides), and outside of the radial gradient will
be unaltered.
Show gradient mask
When this option is checked, your radial gradient mask will be displayed in the color shown.
Alternatively, hold down the S key to see the mask on the image.
Alternating between
the Radial Gradient
Tool and cursorapplied tools
For filters that involve drawing or clicking on the image, such as Lighting and White Balance, hold
down the ALT key to switch from Radial Gradient mode to using the tool.
To exit Radial Gradient mode, toggle the Gradient Tool button.
To maintain your radial gradient mask while switching to Edit Brush mode, hold down SHIFT and click the Edit Brush
button. This allows you to add to the gradient mask or erase parts of it that you don't want.
The Radial Gradient Tool is enabled in many of the editing tools and special effects filters. When it does not make sense to have this
option, it is omitted. The Radial Gradient Tool is not available in the following tools: Resize, Crop, Rotate, Drawing Tools, Vignette,
Borders, Text, Repair Tool, Red Eye Reduction, and Selections.
Using Blend Modes and Opacity
When using a tool in Edit, at the top there is a blend mode and opacity tools. These tools give you creative control and let you
combine the two to create a new image. You can apply blend modes and opacity to an entire image or to a selected part of an image.
Opacity
The Opacity slider changes the opacity of the edited image. It gives you control of how much of the edit should be visible on the
image.
Blend Modes
The ability to control how the edits and the image merge, means that other blend modes besides opacity can be used to affect the
final image.
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Normal
Pixels in the edited image are combined with those in the original. Only opacity affects this blend.
Screen
Combines the edited image color with the inverse of the original photo color, resulting in a color that is the
same or lighter.
Multiply
Combines the edited image color with the original photo to produce a darker color. Multiplying any color with
black produces black; multiplying any color with white leaves the color unchanged.
Dodge
Combines the edited image color with the original pixels in the photo to produce a lighter color.
Burn
Combines the edited image color with the original pixels in the photo to produce a darker color.
Overlay
Preserves the shadows and highlights of the lower layers while applying either Multiply or Screen blend mode
based on the original image area's color values.
Difference
Subtracts the edited image color from the color of the original photo. Any white in the edited image produces a
true negative of the color in the image, while black produces no effect.
Darken
Applies pixels in the edited image that are darker than the original image. Pixels in the edited image that are
lighter than the original image disappear (based on RGB values).
Lighten
Applies pixels in the edited image that are lighter than the original image. Pixels in the edited image that are
darker than the original image disappear (based on RGB values).
Hard Light
Adds strong highlights or shadows by applying Multiply or Screen based on the original image area's color
values.
Soft Light
Adds soft highlights or shadows by darkening or lightening based on the original image area's color values.
Hue
Applies the hue value of colors in the edited image to the color of the original image areas.
Saturation
Applies the saturation value of colors in the edited image to the color of the original image areas.
Color
Applies the hue and saturation of the edited image to the image. This blend does not affect the luminance of
the original image.
Luminosity
Applies the lightness value of colors in the edited image to the color of the original image areas.
Dissolve
Applies some pixels from the edited image layer onto the original image, resulting in specks of color. The
Opacity slider controls the amount of speckling.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint an effect onto specific areas of your image, and then set the blend mode
and opacity slider to change the way the effect is applied.
The blend mode and opacity controls apply to many of the editing tools and special effects filters. When it does not make sense to
have these controls, they are omitted. The blend mode and opacity controls are not on the following tools: Crop, Resize, Rotate, Flip,
Text, Red Eye Reduction, Repair Tool, Selections.
Saving Images in Edit Mode
Saving Images
When you have finished editing an image, you can choose from one of the many options for saving your image, depending on what
you want to do next.
To Save the Image and Return to the Mode You Were in Previously:
1.
Click Done.
2.
Select one of the following:
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Save
Save your changes.
Save as
Save a copy of your edited image with a new name or format.
Depending on your file type, any of the following checkboxes appear in the bottom left corner of the Save as
dialog box:
Preserve Metadata: Retains metadata with the new image.
Preserve database information: Maintains your catalog information, such as ratings.
Embed Color Profile in Image: Retains color profile selected in Color Management with your new image.
Discard
Discard your changes.
Cancel
Remain on the same image in with your changes intact, without saving the image.
To Save the Image and Continue Processing Other Images:
1.
Click Save.
2.
Select one of the following:
Save: Save your changes.
Save As: Save a version of your edited image with a new name or format and switch to the updated image.
Save a Copy: Save a copy of your edited image with a new name or format, and continue to work on the original
file.
Save a Copy is useful for making multiple versions of an image while continuing to work from the original file instead of a
new processed copy. For example, if you take a RAW image and save a copy of it as a JPG, instead of switching to this lossy
JPG image, you remain on the RAW file with the settings still intact.
Save is not available for RAW file formats because you cannot directly save changes to a RAW file.
To Discard Changes to the Image and Return to the Mode You Were in Previously:
Click Cancel or use the keyboard shortcut ESC.
Using Selections
Use Selections to isolate an area of a photo to apply edits or filters to only that area, rather than the whole photo. There are three
different selection tools and each selects an area of a photo in a unique way. The controls available change depending on which tool
you select.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Selections Tool:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Selections group, click Selections.
2.
Select one of the tools: Freehand Lasso, Magic Wand, Marquee. See below for more detailed steps for using these tools.
You can also quickly access the Selections tool by clicking on the Create Selection button at the top when using some of
the tools in Edit. Once you make your selection and click Done to return to the Edit tool, you can modify your selection by
clicking Modify Selection.
You can use Selections with the following Edit tools:
Add: Vignette, Special Effect
Exposure/Lighting: Exposure, Levels, Auto Levels, Tone Curves, Lighting
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Color: White Balance, Color Balance
Detail: Sharpen, Blur, Noise, Clarity
The Selection Tools
Freehand Lasso: Click the left mouse button and drag the cursor to draw around the area that you wish to select. As you
draw, a line appears showing where you have drawn. When you release the mouse, the end of the line joins to the start
automatically to complete the selection. The whole selection animates and looks like marching ants.
Magic Wand: Click on any area of the image and all the pixels the same color are included in the selection. You can choose
whether to select only the same color pixels that are actually touching the one you clicked, or all the pixels in the photo that
are similar. You can increase the threshold to include more pixels in the selection. The lower the threshold, the more similar
a pixel has to be to the one clicked to be included. The greater the threshold, the more different a pixel can be and still be in
the selection.
Marquee: Click and drag either a rectangle or an ellipse that begins where you first click and ends when you release the
mouse.
Combining the Tools
You can use the Selection tools separately or in combination. For example, you can use the Magic Wand to select most of a particular
color, then switch to the Freehand Lasso to add to, or subtract from, the selection. Or you could use the Marquee to select a large
general area, then refine it using the Freehand Lasso.
To Use the Freehand Lasso:
1.
Select Freehand Lasso.
2.
On the image, click and hold down the left mouse button as you draw around the area you want to select.
3.
Release the mouse button to complete the selection.
4.
To clear the selection, click anywhere on the image (for the Freehand Lasso or Marquee) or click Clear.
5.
To add to an existing selection, hold down SHIFT and draw a shape that includes any part of the original selection line.
When you release the mouse, the original selection expands to include the outer edge of your addition.
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6.
To add multiple areas into your selection, hold down SHIFT and draw around any part of the image.
As long as you do not touch the line of any other selection, you can add several separate areas to a selection.
7.
To subtract from a selection, hold down CTRL and draw a shape that includes part of the original selection, or encircles it
completely.
8.
If you wish to apply edits or effects to the outside areas of the image, you need to click Invert to reverse the selected area.
Now the selection includes all the outside areas of the image with the central area outside the selection.
9.
Click Done.
You return to the Edit mode menu, where you can select an editing tool or a special effect to apply to the selection.
To Use the Magic Wand:
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1.
Select Magic Wand.
2.
Click any color in the image.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
3.
Do any of the following:
Slide the Threshold slider to adjust the number of pixels to be included or excluded. The Threshold slider sets how
similar a pixel needs to be to the one you clicked in order to be included in the selection.
Click the Connected radio button if you want to include only pixels that are touching the one you clicked.
Click the Not connected radio button if you want to include all the pixels that are similar to the one you clicked.
Hold down SHIFT and click around the selection to include more pixels.
Hold down CTRL and click around the selection to remove pixels from the selection.
Click Invert to swap your selection to the opposite area from the original, usually the outer part of the image.
4.
From the Wand Type drop-down list, select one of the following:
Brightness: Selects pixels similar in brightness to the area of the image you clicked.
Color: Selects pixels similar in hue to the area of the image you clicked.
RGB: Selects pixels with red, green and blue combination similar to the area of the image you clicked.
5.
Click Done.
You return to the Edit mode menu, where you can select an editing tool or a special effect to apply to the selection.
To Use the Marquee:
1.
Select Marquee.
2.
Select either Rectangle or Ellipse as the shape for your marquee.
3.
Click and drag to draw the selection on the image.
4.
Do any of the following:
To add to an existing marquee, hold down SHIFT and drag another marquee that includes any part of the original
selection line. Release the mouse and the selection now includes the additional area.
To add multiple marquees to your selection, hold down SHIFT and drag as many as you want. As long as none of the
edges touch, you can continue adding areas to the selection.
To subtract from an existing marquee, hold down CTRL and drag another marquee that intersects with the one you
want to reduce. Release the mouse and any part that was inside the new marquee is removed.
5.
Click Done.
You return to the Edit mode menu, where you can select an editing tool or a special effect to apply to the selection.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Applying Edits or Effects to Selections
You can use the Selections tool to isolate an area of an image. Once selected, you can apply many of the editing tools such as color
and exposure, or any of the special effects filters, to the selected area. An active selection in an image looks like a line of marching
ants.
To Apply an Edit or Effect to a Selection:
1.
Use the Selections tool to create a selection, then click Done to return to the Edit mode menu. The selection remains active.
2.
Select a tool to use from any of the following groups:
Exposure/Lighting
Color
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Detail
Add (Special Effects)
3.
Use the tool to edit the image.
Use Any of These Special Selections Options:
Show/Hide
Selection
Click to show or hide the marching ants around the selection. Hiding the selection line makes it easier
to judge the effect of various effects.
Use Selection
Click to use the selection or apply the edit or effect to the whole image. This control means you can edit
just the selection, then deselect Use Selection and apply another edit to the whole image without
clearing the selection.
Invert Selection
Click to invert the selection.
Modify Selection
Click to return to Selections to modify your selection on the image. When you make a new selection and
click Done, you return back to the editing tool you were using previously.
Feathering
Drag to increase or decrease the blurring between the edge of the selection and the edit or effect.
Feathering prevents an unnatural or sharp transition between the selection and the rest of the image
as it blends the edges. This control also makes it unnecessary for your selection to be perfectly on the
edge of the area you want to select.
Reducing Red Eye
You can use the Red Eye Reduction tool in Edit mode to correct red eye in digital photographs.
To Correct Red Eye:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Repair group, click Red Eye Reduction.
2.
Use the Zoom tools in the bottom right corner to enlarge and center the eye you want to correct.
3.
Click within the red portion of the eye.
4.
In the Red Eye Reduction group, adjust the sliders as described below.
Red Eye Reduction Options
Size
Drag the slider to the right to increase the size of the area being darkened, or to the left to decrease.
Darkening
Drag the slider to the right to intensify the fill color, or to the left to lighten.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Scroll with your mouse to adjust the size of the area you would like to darken at anytime.
You can show or hide the outline of the darkened area by toggling the Show Outline checkbox.
Use the Delete key to remove the currently selected red eye adjustment.
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Removing Flaws
You can use the Repair Tool to remove flaws, such as:
Skin blemishes
Telephone wires and other unwanted objects
Flash flares from snowflakes or windows
Lens scratches and water drops
There are two options available for the Repair Tool: the Healing Brush and the Cloning Brush.
When you select the Healing Brush, the Repair Tool copies pixels from one area of a photo to another, but it analyzes the pixels in the
source area before copying them. It also analyzes the pixels in the target area, and then blends the pixels of both source and target,
to match the surrounding area. This ensures that the lighting and color of the replacement pixels integrate with the surrounding
area. The Healing Brush works particularly well with photos that involve complicated textures like skin or fur.
When you select the Cloning Brush, the Repair Tool copies the exact pixels from one area of a photo to another, creating an identical
image area. The Cloning Brush is more effective for photos that have strong, simple textures or uniform colors, as it is more difficult
to identify the copied pixels in the finished photo.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Remove Flaws from a Photo:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Repair group, click Repair Tool.
2.
Select one of the following:
Heal: Copies the pixels from the source area to the target area, and blends pixels into the surrounding image area.
Clone: Copies the pixels from the source area to the target area.
3.
Drag the Nib Width and Feathering sliders as described in the table below.
4.
Right-click the image to set a source location. Pixels will be copied from this location and used in the target location.
5.
Click and drag over the area that you want to cover. If you selected the healing brush, ACDSee analyzes and replaces the
pixels when you release the mouse button.
6.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Scroll with your mouse to adjust the brush size on the fly, or press the SHIFT key while you scroll to adjust feathering.
Repair Tool Options
Nib Width
Sets the width of the brush. The maximum brush width is relative to the size of your image.
Feathering
Sets the amount to feather on the edge of the brush to prevent sharp transitions between the original and
healed part of the photo.
Feathering is set as a percentage of the nib width, not as a specific number of pixels. This means that you
do not have to adjust the feathering when you reset the Nib Width, as it automatically adjusts to a
percentage of the new nib width.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
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Adding Text to an Image
You can use the Add Text tool in Edit to add formatted text to a photo, or add talk and thought bubbles to create a comic-book effect.
You can also adjust the opacity of the text to create a watermark effect, which is useful for putting copyright information onto your
photos.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Add Text to an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Text.
2.
Type the text you want to add in the Text field.
3.
In the Font area, specify the font you want to use, the formatting options such as italics or justification, and the color of the
text. Drag the Size slider to specify a point size, and then drag the Opacity slider to specify the transparency of the text.
4.
Click and drag the text marquee to reposition it anywhere on your image, or drag the marquee's handles to resize it.
5.
Select an option from the Blend Mode drop-down list to specify how you want the text to blend into the underlying image.
6.
Do one of the following:
Select the Bubble Text checkbox, and set the Bubble Text settings as explained in the table below. Note that other
text effects cannot be applied to bubble text.
Select one or more of the Effects, Drop Shadow, and Bevel checkboxes to customize your text. Click the
Settings button to adjust the settings for each of these options as explained in the table below.
7.
Do one of the following:
Click Apply to add the text to your image, and keep the Text tool open so you can add more text. The Text tool
creates a new, empty marquee, and you can return to step 3 in the list above.
Click Done to add the text to your image, and leave the tool. If you still have an empty marquee open, it will be
discarded.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and leave the tool.
Add Text Options
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Bubble Text Settings
Talk
Encloses your text in a comic-book text bubble with a pointed stem.
Thought
Encloses your text in a comic-book text bubble with a dotted stem.
Stem Angle
Specifies the direction of the text bubble stem. Drag the arrow to adjust
the angle.
Thickness
Specifies the thickness of the text bubble border.
Length
Specifies the length of the text bubble stem.
Fill
Specifies the background color of the text bubble. Click the arrow to
select a color.
Border
Specifies the color of the text bubble border. Click the arrow to select a
color.
Effect Settings
Effect
Specifies the effect you want to apply to your text. Each effect has
different options that control its appearance. Drag the sliders to adjust
the appearance of the text.
Drop Shadow Settings
Distance
Specifies the distance between the drop shadow and the text. The
higher the value, the farther the shadow and the higher the text
appears.
If a drop shadow is cut off, or has a noticeably sharp edge, you may
need to increase the size of the text rectangle.
Bevel Settings
Blur
Specifies the amount of blur applied to the drop shadow. Sharp
shadows tend to seem less realistic than those with a slight blur.
Opacity
Specifies the darkness of the drop shadow where it falls on the image.
Angle
Specifies the direction of the imaginary light source that creates the
drop shadow. Drag the arrow to adjust the angle — note that this also
adjusts the shading of the text bevel.
Bevel
Specifies how much of each letter's edge is bevelled. Higher values give
the text a more rounded, smoother look.
Strength
Specifies the difference between the highest and lowest points on the
text. Higher values heighten the difference between the flat portions of
the text and the bevelled edges.
Elevation
Specifies the height of the imaginary light source that creates the
bevel's shadowed effect. Lower values produce longer shadows on the
text, while a higher value produces a more direct lighting effect and
shorter shadows.
Angle
Specifies the direction of the imaginary light source that creates the
bevel effect. Drag the arrow to adjust the angle — note that this also
adjusts the angle of the drop shadow.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Adding Drawings to Your Image
You can use the Drawing Tools in Edit mode to add lines and shapes, such as squares, circles and arrows to your image. You can
also adjust the width, feathering and blending of your brush, which is useful for creating subtle and dramatic drawings.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Draw on Your Image:
1.
In Edit mode, select Drawing Tools found under the Add group.
2.
Select from the following tools:
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3.
Tool
Instructions
Pencil
Drag over the image to draw a free-flowing line. Scroll with your mouse wheel to adjust the brush
size, or press the SHIFT key as you scroll to adjust feathering.
Rectangle
Drag over the image to create rectangle. Press the SHIFT key as you draw to create a square.
Ellipse
Drag over the image to create an ellipse. Press the SHIFT key as you draw to create a circle.
Line
Drag over the image to draw a straight line. Press the SHIFT key as you draw to create a vertical
or horizontal line.
Arrow
Drag over the image to create an arrow. Press the SHIFT key as you draw to create a vertical or
horizontal arrow.
Curve
Drag over the image then release. Next, move your mouse to create the curve and click to set.
Polygon
Click to set the corner points of a polygon, then double-click to connect the start and end points
to complete the polygon.
Select from one or more of the following options (Note: options vary depending on the tool selected):
Option
Instructions
Color
Select a color by clicking the drop-down arrow to display gradients of colors, or click the color
box to display a dialog of swatches to choose from.
Fill
Select the Fill checkbox and select a color by clicking the drop-down arrow to display gradients
of colors, or click the color box to display a dialog of swatches to choose from.
Nib Width
Drag the Nib Width slider to set the diameter of the brush measured in pixels.
Feathering
Drag the Feathering slider to set the blurring radius of the brush.
Select a blending option from the Blending drop-down menu to affect how your brush strokes blend with your
image as you draw.
4.
Drag over the image to draw.
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to add the drawing to your image, and leave the tool.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and leave the tool.
Scroll with your mouse to adjust the size of the nib width at anytime.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Adding Borders
You can use the Borders tool to add one or more borders and edge effects to your images. You can set the size of each side of the
border, change the color and texture of the border or pick up a color from within the image by clicking on that color in the image.
There are libraries of edges and textures to get you started, but you can save your own textures or edges to the ACDSee folder so
that they appear in the library for you to use.
You can also use Edge blur to soften the edges or blend the image into the background texture. You can also add a third dimension
to your images using the Drop Shadow and Raised edge effects.
Using combinations of multiple borders and edge effects can add to the mood and atmosphere of a photo, emphasize contrast, and
enhance color.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Add a Border to an Image:
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1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Borders.
2.
Create the border by selecting its size, color, texture, edge, or edge effects as described in the Borders options below.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the Border tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
4.
To add another border, restart the border tool and repeat these steps.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Border Options
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Eyedropper
Picks up the color beneath the cursor when you click on the image. The border
changes to the clicked color, which also appears in the Color box on the Borders
pane so that you can adjust it if you open the Color dialog box.
The eyedropper is not available when you are using a texture.
Border
Size
Sets the size of all the sides of the border simultaneously. Drag the
slider left and right to adjust the width of the border. You can also
type in a different number or use the up and down arrows to
change the size of the border.
The text below the Size field shows the final size of your image with
the border added. The final size changes dynamically as you adjust
the size of the border.
Advanced
size
controls
Opens a fly-out of advanced size controls. Use the sliders, up- and
down-arrow keys, or type in a number, to set the size of each side
of the border individually. For example, you can set the bottom
border to be larger to include a space for copyright information.
Click on the arrow beside the Size slider to open the advanced size
controls menu.
Color box
Activates when you select the Color radio button.
Do any of the following:
Click on a color in the image to make the border that color.
The clicked color appears in the Color box.
Click on the color in the middle of the Color box to open the
Colors dialog, where you can adjust the color in multiple
ways.
Click the down-arrow beside the box and hover over the
quick-color box until you find a color you like. When you
click inside the quick color box, the picked color appears in
the Color box and the border changes to the selected color.
Texture
box
Activates when you select the Texture radio button.
Do any of the following:
Click the side arrow to open the texture library and view
thumbnails of textures to select.
Click the forward and back arrows to browse through the
textures one at a time, without opening the library.
Edge
Straight
Sets the edge of the border to be a straight line.
Irregular
Activates when you select the Irregular radio button.
Do any of the following:
Click the side arrow beside the edge box to open the edge
library and view thumbnails of edges to select.
Click the forward and back arrows to browse through the
edges one at a time, without opening the library.
Edge blur
134
Blurs the edges of the edge of the image into the border. Drag the
slider to the right to increase the blur, or to the left to decrease the
blur.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
Edge effects
Drop
shadow
Adds a drop shadow to the image that appears to lift it off the page.
The drop shadow appears behind the image, between it and the
border. You can adjust the depth of the blur on the edge of the
shadow, and the transparency of the shadow, which affects how
much of the border shows through the shadow. You can also
change the direction of the imaginary source of light by dragging
the glow on the Light Source ball.
Blur: Adjusts the blur on the edge of the shadow when you
drag the slider.
Opacity: Adjusts the transparency of the drop shadow
when you drag the slider.
Raised
Adds a raised edge to the image that appears to raise it above the
border, giving it a 3D look. The raised effect is applied to the image,
between it and the border. You can change the direction of the
imaginary source of light of the raised edge by dragging the glow
on the Light Source ball. You can also adjust the size, strength, and
color of the raised edge in the following ways:
Size: Drag the slider to the right to increase the size of the
raised edge so that it appears higher. The greater the size
the more rounded the effect.
Strength: Drag the slider to the right to increase the 3D
effect of the raised edge.
Colored: Select this option to apply the border color to the
raised edge.
Light Source
Activates when you click either the Drop shadow or Raised checkboxes. Click and
drag the glow on the ball to reposition the imaginary light source for the 3D effect
of the Drop shadow or Raised edge effects.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Adding Your Own Textures or Edges
It is possible to add custom textures and edges to the libraries in the Borders tool. If you make your own edges or textures, or own a
collection from the Internet, you can add them to the texture and edge libraries. You can also delete existing files from the libraries
to make room for others.
The textures or edges have to be in the following file formats with these extensions:
BMP
EMF
GIF
JPG
GIF
PNG
TIF
Textures
As the textures are tiled, it is important to use an image that can be seamlessly repeated. The files are used at their full resolution,
not scaled up or down. For example, if your texture image is 100 x 100 pixels and you are creating a bordered image that is 1000 x
1000 pixels, then your texture file will be tiled 10 times. If you use a texture file that is 1000 x 1000 pixels, then there would just be
the one texture tile for the whole border.
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To Add Your Own Textures to the Texture Library:
1.
In ACDSee , close the Borders tool if it is open.
2.
In Manage mode, copy and paste your texture files into this folder:
C:\Program Files\Common Files\ACD Systems\borders\textures
3.
In Manage mode, select the image you want to use and then click Tools | Edit.
4.
In the Add group, click Borders.
5.
Select the Texture radio button and then click the arrow on the right side of the texture box to open the texture library.
Thumbnails of the textures display for you to select.
Edges
Edge files are grayscale images that are resized to fit the image. The image file shows through any areas in the edge file that are
white, and does not show through any black areas. Pixels that are tones of gray in the edge file show through with relative opacity
depending on how close the pixels are to black or white (in other words, the darker the gray pixel, the less it shows through).
To Add Your Own Edges to the Edges Library:
1.
In ACDSee , close the Borders tool if it is open.
2.
In Manage mode, copy and paste your edge files into this folder:
C:\Program Files\Common Files\ACD Systems\borders\edges
3.
In Manage mode, select the image you want to use and then click Tools | Edit.
4.
In the Add group, click Borders.
5.
Select the Irregular radio button and then click the arrow on the right side of the edge box to open the edge library.
Thumbnails of the edges display for you to select.
If you open an image with borders already applied, another border will be applied to the image.
Adding a Vignette
You can use the Vignette effect to add a frame around a subject, such as a person or a bouquet of flowers. You can change the focal
point in the portrait. You can also control the appearance of the border.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Vignette Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Vignette.
2.
Set the options as described below.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the tab.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tab.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Vignette Options
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Horizontal
Specifies the focal point of the portrait on the horizontal axis. A value of 500 places the center in the
middle of the photo.
Vertical
Specifies the focal point of the portrait on the vertical axis. A value of 500 places the center in the
middle of the photo.
Clear zone
Specifies the size of the clear area around the focal point in the portrait. Drag the slider to the left to
reduce the size of the clear area. Drag the slider to the right to increase the size of the clear area.
Transition zone
Specifies the width of the transition area between the clear zone and the frame. Drag the slider to the
left to narrow the transition area. Drag the slider to the right to widen the transition area.
Stretch
Stretches the vignette horizontally to make the shape elliptical rather than round.
Shape
Specifies the shape of the frame:
Round: Select Round if you want the frame to be round.
Rectangular: Select Rectangular if you want the frame to be square.
Show outline
Select Show outline if you want to display an outline that shows the outside edge of the clear zone
and the inside edge of the frame.
Frame
Applies the following special effects to the vignette frame area around the focal point:
Color: Changes the color of the frame area to the color you select in the color picker.
Saturation: Removes color from the people or objects in the vignette frame so they are gray
scale.
Blur: Blurs the vignette frame area.
Clouds: Applies a Clouds effect to the frame area.
Edges: Applies an Edges effect by tracing the lines and details of people or objects with neon
colors.
Radial Waves: Creates the appearance of waves radiating from the focal point into the frame
area.
Radial Blur: Creates a Radial Blur that rotates and stretches the frame area.
Zoom Blur: Applies a Zoom Blur to the frame area.
Crayon Edges: Applies the Crayon Edges effect by tracing the lines and details around people
or objects with crayon.
Dauber: Creates the impression that the people or objects around the focal point were painted
with a brush.
Pixelate: Applies a pixel effect to the frame.
Old: Applies an aging effect to the frame to make it look like an old photo.
Glowing Edges: Applies glowing edges to all the strong lines in the frame area.
Ripple: Adds ripples to the frame so that it looks like liquid ripples moving outwards from the
focal area.
Frame settings
The settings that display below the Frame drop-down list change depending on the frame you select.
For example, if you select Color in the Frame drop-down list, a color picker displays so that you can
select the color for the vignette. Similarly, if you select Blur in the Frame drop-down list, a slider
appears that you can use to change the amount of blur surrounding the photo. For some choices, like
Edges, there are no settings to apply.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
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Adding a Tilt-Shift Effect
You can use the Tilt-Shift effect to create emphasis on specific subjects in your photos, or make your photos look like miniature
landscapes.
To Use the Tilt-Shift Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Tilt-Shift.
2.
On the Tilt-Shift panel, set the options as described below.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Tilt-Shift Options
Use the guides on the image to place the effect. The inside boxes represent the points where the focus is transitioning to blur.
Complete blur occurs at the outside boxes. Move the boxes to define where the effect will begin or end. Hold down the Shift key
while positioning the effect to lock to the nearest 45° angle, for straightness.
Blurring
Select the type of blur you want from the Blur drop-down menu.
Lens Blur
Gaussian Blur
See Blur Types for more information.
Saturation
You can use the Edit Brush
Amount
Specifies the amount of blur applied.
Bokeh Frequency
Specifies how often the bokeh shapes
occur.
Bokeh Brightness
Specifies how bright the bokeh shapes
appear.
Bokeh Sides
Defines the number of sides the bokeh
shape will have.
Drag the slider to the right to intensify the effect.
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
About Special Effect Filters
You can use filters to add unique effects to your images. ACDSee includes more than 40 special effect filters, such as Crosshatch,
Pencil Drawing, and Solarize.
To Access the Special Effects Filters:
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
For more information about each effect, click the Help button to view a Help file page specific to that effect.
Applying a Bathroom Window Effect
The Bathroom Window effect divides your images into bars, transforming them so they resemble the view through privacy glass
often found in bathrooms. You can select or change the Bathroom Window options to apply this effect to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
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To Apply a Bathroom Window Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Bathroom Window.
3.
Drag the Bar width slider to set the thickness of the bars. Thinner bars result in a more distorted image.
4.
In the Bar direction area, select one of the following to specify the orientation of the bars in your image:
Vertical
Horizontal
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Blinds Effect
Use the Blinds effect to divide your image into bars that look like venetian or vertical window blinds. You can customize the
characteristics of the blinds you would like added to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Blinds Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Blinds.
3.
On the Blinds panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Blinds Options
Width
Specifies the width of the blinds. Type a number from 1 to 1000 or drag the slider to adjust the width
of each blind. As the value increases, the width of the blind also increases.
Opacity
Specifies the opacity of the blinds. Type a number from 1 to 99 or drag the slider to adjust the opacity
of the blinds. The higher the opacity, the more the image is obscured.
Angle
Specifies the angle of the blinds. Type a number from 1 to 360 or drag the arrow to adjust the angle.
Blind color
Specifies the color of the blinds.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
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You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Bulge Effect
Use the Bulge effect to stretch or shrink areas of your images horizontally and vertically. You can customize the strength, radius
and position of the distortion.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Bulge Effect:
Bulge and Shrink Options
Horizontal position
Specifies the center of the distortion along the horizontal axis. A lower value moves the distortion
towards the left side of the image, while a higher value moves it towards the right side of the image.
Vertical position
Specifies the center of the distortion along the vertical axis. A lower value moves the distortion towards
the bottom of the image, while a higher value moves it towards the top of the image.
Radius
Specifies the radius of the distorted area. A lower value decreases the radius of the distortion, while a
higher value increases the radius of the distortion.
Strength
Specifies the strength of the distortion. A negative value shrinks the center of the distortion, while a
higher value bulges the distortion.
Background color
Specifies the background color for the filtered image.
Select the Image checkbox to use the original image color, or click the color picker to select a different
color.
Bulge direction
Specifies the direction of the distortion. Select one or both of the following options:
Horizontal: Moves the distortion horizontally.
Vertical: Moves the distortion vertically.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Collage Effect
You can use the Collage effect to creatively break up a photo into a number of photos.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Collage Effect:
140
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Collage.
3.
Drag the sliders to set the Number and Size of the photos.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
4.
Select a background color by clicking the drop-down arrow to display gradients of colors, or click the color box to display a
dialog of swatches to choose from.
5.
If you would like to reshuffle the photos, click Randomize.
6.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
7.
Click Exit to leave Special Effects, and return to the Edit mode menu.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Colored Edges Effect
You can use the Colored Edges effect to trace the lines and details of people or objects in your images.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Colored Edges Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Colored Edges.
3.
On the Colored Edges panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Colored Edges Options
Intensity
Specifies the amount of color added to the edges within the image. The higher the setting, the thicker
the color that is applied to the image.
Edge color
Specifies the color of the edges.
Edge detection
Specifies the edge detection algorithm. The algorithm controls the formula used to detect the edges
and the direction of the edge indicators.
Blurring
Blurs the edges in the image. Select the Use blurring checkbox, and then select a blur setting to
determine how much blur is applied.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
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Applying a Contours Effect
You can use the Contours effect to draw contour lines on your image to create a cartoon effect. Select or change the rounding, line
frequency, color and strength setting to apply to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Contours Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Contours.
3.
On the Contours panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Contours Options
Rounding
Specifies the amount of curve in the contour lines. The higher the value, the rounder the lines.
Line frequency
Specifies the amount of space between the contour lines. The higher the value, the closer the lines
move together.
Strength
Specifies the strength of the line. The higher the value, the darker the line.
Line color
Specifies the color of the contour lines.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Crayon Drawing Effect
You can use the Crayon Drawing effect to give your photos the appearance of a crayon drawing.
To Use the Crayon Drawing Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Crayon Drawing.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
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to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
Applying a Crosshatch Effect
You can use the Crosshatch effect to add crosshatching to an image.
To Use the Crosshatch Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Crosshatch .
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Dauber Effect
You can use the Dauber effect to make your images look like they were painted with a paint dauber. Select or change the settings of
the effect you want applied to your image, such as intensity, frequency and more.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Dauber Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Dauber.
3.
On the Dauber panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Dauber Options
Intensity
Specifies the amount of color applied with each daub.
Frequency
Specifies the number of daubs added to the image.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image.
Select the Image checkbox to use the original image colors or click the color picker to select a different
color.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of the paint daubs.
When you apply the Dauber effect to an image, ACDSee places the daubs randomly. This makes the
paint daubs different every time you apply the filter. You can define a specific random seed to generate
identical daubs.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
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You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying an Edge Detect Effect
You can use the Edge Detect effect to create a highlighted outline of your image. After creating a black image, the effect uses
colored lines to outline the detail of an image where significant color differences exist. Greater differences between colors in the
original image produce brighter outline colors. (The Sobel effect is similar to the Edge Detect effect, but produces sharper and
brighter outlines.)
To Use the Edge Detect Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Edge Detect.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying an Emboss Effect
You can use the Emboss effect to add a grayscale relief to an image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Emboss an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Emboss.
3.
On the Emboss panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Emboss Options
Elevation
Specifies the light source's elevation on the image. Lower values produce more shadows and a darker
image. Higher values produce fewer shadows and a lighter image.
Weight
Specifies the amount of relief added to the image. Higher values increase the relief depth.
Azimuth
Specifies the angle of shadows that extend from the edges of image details. A value of 0 adds shadows
to the left side, while a value of 180 adds shadows to the right side.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
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to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Furry Edges Effect
You can use the Furry Edges effect to add fur and bristles to the lines and details of people or objects in your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Furry Edges Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Furry Edges.
3.
On the Furry Edges panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Furry Edges Options
Frequency
Specifies how much fur is added to the image. The higher the setting, the more dense the fur that is
applied to the image.
Threshold
Specifies how sharp an edge must be before fur is applied to it. As the value decreases, the area of the
image that fur is added to increases.
Fur length
Specifies the length of each strand of fur. As the value increases, the length of each fur strand also
increases.
Variance
Specifies how much of the fur grows in the direction indicated by the Hair direction setting. The higher
the value, the more random the fur direction will be.
Hair direction
Specifies the general direction in which fur appears to grow.
Edge detection
Specifies the edge detection algorithm. The algorithm controls the formula used to detect the edges
and the direction of the edge indicators.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image. Select the Image checkbox to use the original
image colors, or click the color picker to select a different color.
Fur color
Specifies the color of the fur. Select the Image checkbox to use the original image colors, or click the
color picker to select a different color.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of the fur strands.
When you apply the Furry Edges effect to an image, ACDSee places the fur randomly. This makes the
fur strands different every time you apply the filter. You can define a specific random seed to generate
identical fur patterns.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
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Applying a Glowing Edges Effect
You can use the Glowing Edges effect to add color to the lines and details of people or objects in your images. The colored lines and
details appear to glow.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Glowing Edges Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Glowing Edges.
3.
On the Glowing Edges panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Glowing Edges Options
Intensity
Specifies the amount of color added to the edges within the image. The higher the setting, the more
intense the color that is applied to the image.
Color
Specifies the color of the edges.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Granite Effect
You can use the Granite effect to give your images the appearance of being painted on a rock wall.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Granite Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Granite.
3.
On the Granite panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Granite Options
Light Angle
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Specifies the direction from which an imaginary light source is shining on the image. Drag the arrow to
adjust the angle. Different light angles will change the highlights and shadows in the peaks and
valleys on the rock.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Lomo Effect
Simulate the retro-effects of a lomo camera. Photos taken with a lomo camera are high contrast, with a golden hue and a noticeable
vignette.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Lomo Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Lomo.
3.
Drag the Color Distortion slider to the right to increase the color distortion.
4.
Drag the Vignette Strength slider to the right to increase the vignette strength.
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
6.
Click Exit to leave Special Effects, and return to the Edit mode menu.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Mirror Effect
You can use the Mirror effect to reflect an image along the horizontal or vertical axis. Select or change the Mirror options to apply
mirroring to your image, including mirror axis and direction.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Mirror Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Mirror.
3.
On the Mirror panel, in the Mirror direction area, select one of the following options to indicate which direction you want to
mirror the image:
Horizontal
Vertical
4.
Drag the Mirror axis slider to adjust the position of the mirror. A value of 500 places the mirror in the center of the image.
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5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Negative Effect
You can use the Negative effect to create a negative of your image. You can also apply the Negative filter to a negative scanned from
a roll of film to produce a positive image.
To Create an Image Negative:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Negative.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying an Oil Paint Effect
You can use the Oil Paint effect to give your images a painted appearance.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Create an Oil Painting from a Photo:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Oil Paint.
3.
On the Oil Paint panel, drag the Brush width slider to specify the width of the brush strokes in the effect. The higher the
value, the wider the brush stroke.
4.
Drag the Variance slider to specify the color variance in each brush stroke. Higher values increase the number of colors
used in each stroke.
5.
Drag the Vibrance slider to adjust the intensity of the colors in the image.
6.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
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You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying the Old Effect
You can use the Old effect to give your images an antique look. (The Old effect is similar to the Sepia effect, but produces a more
realistic appearance of age.)
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply the Old Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Old.
3.
On the Old panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Old Options
Age
Specifies the intensity or degree of the effect. (The numbers do not correspond to how old the photo
should appear.)
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying the Orton Effect
Create beautiful impressionistic images with the Orton effect. The Orton effect mimics a darkroom technique created by
sandwiching two images together, one of which is slightly out of focus, and both of which are slightly overexposed.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Orton Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Orton.
3.
Drag the Blur, Contrast, and Brightness sliders to adjust each effect.
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4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
5.
Click Exit to leave Special Effects, and return to the Edit mode menu.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying an Outline Effect
The Outline effect is similar to the Edge Detect effect. You can use the Outline effect to create a highlighted outline of your image.
However, with the Outline effect you can control the thickness of the outline, whether an edge is outlined or not, and the color that
displays behind the outlined image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Outline Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Outline.
3.
On the Outline panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Outline Options
Line width
Specifies the width of the outline in the effect. The higher the value, the wider the outline.
Threshold
Specifies how sharp an edge must be in order to be outlined. If you specify a higher value, more edges
in the photo will be outlined.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image. Click the color picker to select a different color.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Pencil Drawing Effect
You can use the Pencil Drawing effect to create a pencil drawing from your images.
To Create a Pencil Drawing from an Image:
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1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Pencil Drawing.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Pixel Explosion Effect
You can use the Pixel Explosion effect to explode pixels from a center point in your images. Select or change the Pixel Explosion
settings, such as intensity and direction, to apply this effect to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Use the Pixel Explosion Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Pixel Explosion.
3.
On the Pixel Explosion panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Pixel Explosion Options
Horizontal center
Specifies the center point of the explosion on the horizontal axis. A value of 500 places the explosion at
the middle of the image.
Vertical center
Specifies the center point of the explosion on the vertical axis. A value of 500 places the explosion at
the middle of the image.
Intensity
Specifies the intensity of the explosion. A higher value creates a larger, more brilliant spread of the
pixels in the image.
Explosion direction
Specifies the direction of the explosion. Select one or both of the following:
Explode horizontally: Explodes the pixels towards the right and left sides of the image.
Explode vertically: Explodes the pixels towards the top and bottom of the image.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of the pixels.
When you apply the Pixel Explosion effect to an image, ACDSee places the pixels randomly. This makes
the pixels different every time you apply the filter. You can define a specific random seed to generate
identical pixel patterns.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
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You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Pixelate Effect
A pixel is the smallest piece of a digital image, arranged in rows and columns. When you reduce the resolution of your image, the
size of the pixel increases and produces blurring. You can use the Pixelate effect to increase the size of the pixels in your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Pixelate Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Pixelate.
3.
On the Pixelate panel, drag the Width and Height sliders to set the size of the pixels in your image. Select the Square
checkbox to make the width and height equal.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Posterize Effect
You can use the Posterize effect to reduce the number of brightness levels in your image. Select or change the Posterize options to
apply this effect to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Posterize Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Posterize.
3.
On the Posterize panel, drag the Brightness levels slider to adjust the variance of colors in the image. The lower the value,
the fewer colors used in the image.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
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to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Radial Waves Effect
You can use the Radial Waves effect to display waves radiating from a center point in the photo. You can change the center point in
the photo and you can also control the appearance of the waves.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Radial Waves Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Radial Waves.
3.
On the Radial waves panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Radial Waves Options
Horizontal position
Specifies the center of the waves on the horizontal axis. A value of 500 places the waves in the middle
of the image.
Vertical position
Specifies the center of the waves on the vertical axis. A value of 500 places the waves in the middle of
the image.
Amplitude
Specifies the depth and height of each wave.
Wavelength
Specifies the amount of space between waves.
Light strength
Specifies the amount of light contrast between the top and bottom of each wave.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image. Select the Image checkbox to use the original
image colors, or click the color picker to select a different color.
Wave direction
Specifies the direction of the waves. Select one, or both, of the following:
Wave horizontally: Makes the waves move towards the right and left sides of the image.
Wave vertically: Makes the waves move towards the top and bottom of the image.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Rain Effect
You can use the Rain effect to make it look like it was raining when you took a photo. Control the amount, the angle, strength and
other characteristics of the rain.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply Rain to a Photo:
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1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Rain.
3.
On the Rain panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Rain Options
Strength
Specifies the length of the rain drops. Drag the slider to the right to increase the length.
Opacity
Specifies the opacity of the rain drops. Type a number from 0 to 100 or drag the slider to adjust the
opacity of the rain drops. The higher the opacity, the more the image is obscured.
Amount
Specifies the number of rain drops.
Angle variance
Specifies the angle of the rain drops. Type a number from 0 to 50 or drag the arrow to adjust the
angle.
Strength variance
Specifies how much variety there should be in the length of the rain drops. Drag the slider to the left if
you want rain drops to have a similar length. Drag the slider to the right if you want to vary the length
of rain drops. If you vary the length of rain drops they look natural.
Background blur
Specifies the amount of blur in the photo. Heavy rain will block your vision. Use this option to blur the
photo so the rain effect looks natural.
Angle
Specifies the angle at which the rain drops are falling.
Color
Specifies the color of the rain drops.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Ripple Effect
You can use the Ripple effect to divide your images into concentric circles that resembles what you see when you drop a pebble into
water. Select or change the Ripple settings to apply to your image, such as position, strength and more.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Ripple Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Ripple.
3.
On the Ripple panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Ripple Options
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Horizontal position
Specifies the center of the ripples on the horizontal axis. A value of 500 places the ripples in the middle
of the image.
Vertical position
Specifies the center of the ripples on the vertical axis. A value of 500 places the ripples in the middle of
the image.
Amplitude
Specifies the depth and height of each ripple.
Wavelength
Specifies the amount of space between ripples.
Light strength
Specifies the amount of light contrast between the top and bottom of each ripple.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image. Select the Image checkbox to use the original
image colors, or click the color picker to select a different color.
Ripple direction
Specifies the direction of the ripples. Select one or both of the following:
Ripple vertically: Makes the ripples move towards the top and bottom of the image.
Ripple horizontally: Makes the ripples move towards the right and left sides of the image.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Scattered Tiles Effect
You can use the Scattered Tiles effect to divide your images into rectangular tiles, and scatter and stack the tiles. Select or change
the Scattered Tiles options to apply this effect to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Scattered Tiles Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Scattered Tiles.
3.
On the Scattered Tiles panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Scattered Tiles Options
Tile size
Specifies the size of the tiles.
Scatter amount
Specifies how much the tiles will move from their original positions.
Background color
Specifies the color of the background. Click the color picker to select a different color.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of the tiles.
When you apply the Scattered Tiles effect to an image, ACDSee places the tiles randomly. This makes
the effect different every time you apply the filter. You can define a specific random seed to generate
identical tile patterns.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
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You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Sepia Effect
You can use the Sepia effect to give your images an antique look. (The Old effect is similar to the Sepia effect, but produces a more
realistic appearance of age.)
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Add a Sepia Tone to an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Sepia.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Sheet Metal Effect
You can use the Sheet Metal effect to turn your images into sheet metal impressions.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Sheet Metal Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Sheet Metal.
3.
On the Sheet Metal panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Sheet Metal Options
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Rounding
Specifies the amount of curve in the edges of the impressions.
Detail
Specifies the amount of detail in the impression.
Angle
Specifies the angle of the grain in the sheet metal.
Metal color
Specifies the color of the sheet metal.
Direction
Specifies the direction in which the sheet metal was manipulated. Select one of the following:
Indented: Stamps the metal from the top side of the image.
Pushed out: Stamps the metal from underneath the image.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Shift Effect
You can use the Shift effect to divide your images into bars and shift them in random directions.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Shift Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Shift.
3.
On the Shift panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Shift Options
Strength
Specifies the amount of shift between the bars.
Width
Specifies the width of each bar.
Angle
Specifies the angle of the bars.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image. Select the Image checkbox to use the original
image colors, or click the color picker to select a different color.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Slant Effect
You can use the Slant effect to make a photo appear slanted. For example, you could use the Slant effect to distort a photo by
pushing the top of the photo to the left and the bottom of the photo to the right. Similarly, you could use the slant effect to push the
left side of the photo upwards and the right side of the photo downwards.
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You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Slant Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Slant.
3.
On the Slant panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Slant Options
Amount
Specifies the degree of the slant.
Fulcrum
Specifies the center of the slant. Drag the slider to the left to place the center of the slant near the
bottom of the photo. Drag the slider to the right to place the center of the slant near the top of the
photo.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image. Click the color picker to select a different color.
Slant Direction
Specifies the angle of the slant:
Horizontal: Select Horizontal to push the top or bottom of the photo to the left or right.
Vertical: Select Vertical to push the left or right side of the photo up or down.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Sobel Effect
You can use the Sobel effect to create a highlighted outline of your image. After creating a black image, the effect uses colored lines
to outline the detail of an image where significant color differences exist. Greater differences between colors in the original image
produce brighter outline colors. (The Sobel effect is similar to the Edge Detect effect, but produces sharper and brighter outlines.)
To Use the Sobel Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Sobel.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
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to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
Applying a Solarize Effect
You can use the Solarize effect to simulate the effect of overexposing an image, as though the film was exposed to light before
developing. Select or change the Solarize options to apply this effect to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Solarize Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Solarize.
3.
On the Solarize panel, drag the Threshold slider to specify the brightness threshold of the image.
4.
In the Effect area, specify which pixels you want to adjust by selecting one of the following options:
Solarize: adjusts pixels located above the specified threshold option. The effect takes any pixels above the
threshold and replaces them with their negative value. When you solarize an image, a higher threshold value sets a
brighter threshold, and colors need to be brighter to be overexposed.
Lunarize: adjusts pixels located below the specified threshold option. The effect takes any pixels below the
threshold and replaces them with their negative value. When you lunarize an image, a higher threshold value sets a
darker threshold, and colors do not have to be as bright to be overexposed.
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Stained Glass Effect
You can use the Stained Glass effect to divide your image into fragments of a random size and shape, to give the photo the
appearance of a stained glass window. Control the size and position of the fragments using the effect settings.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Stained Glass Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Stained Glass.
3.
On the Stained Glass panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Stained Glass Options
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Fragment size
Specifies the size of the fragments.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of the fragments.
When you apply the Stained Glass effect to an image, ACDSee places the fragments randomly. This
makes the effect different every time you apply the filter. You can define a specific random seed to
generate identical fragment patterns.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Sunspot Effect
You can use the Sunspot effect to add a bright spot in your images.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Sunspot Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Sunspot.
3.
On the Sunspot panel, drag the Horizontal Position and Vertical Position sliders or click the image to set the location of
the sunspot.
4.
Drag the Brightness slider to set the intensity of the sunspot.
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Applying a Swirl Effect
You can use the Swirl effect to rotate and stretch people and objects in your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Swirl Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Swirl.
3.
On the Swirl panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Swirl Options
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Horizontal position
Specifies the center of the swirl on the horizontal axis. A value of 500 places the swirl in the middle of
the image.
Vertical position
Specifies the center of the swirl on the vertical axis. A value of 500 places the swirl in the middle of the
image.
Radius
Specifies the size of the swirl effect.
Strength
Specifies the strength and direction of the swirl. Higher values create a clockwise swirl, while negative
values create a counter-clockwise swirl.
Focus
Specifies the concentration of the swirl. Higher values concentrate the effect on the center of the swirl,
while lower values spread the swirl across the image.
Background color
Specifies the background color of the filtered image. Select the Image checkbox to use the original
image colors, or click the color picker to select a different color.
Swirl direction
Specifies the direction of the swirl. Select one or both of the following:
Swirl horizontally: Moves the swirl towards the top and bottom of the image.
Swirl vertically: Moves the swirl towards the right and left sides of the image.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying the Threshold Effect
You can use the Threshold effect to create a black and white image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply the Threshold Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Threshold.
3.
On the Threshold panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Threshold Options
Threshold
This slider determines which pixels become black and which ones become white in the black and white
image. Any pixels that are brighter than the selected threshold will become white and any pixels that
are darker than the threshold will become black.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
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You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Topography Effect
You can use the Topography effect to change the details of your images into contour lines.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Topography Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Topography.
3.
On the Topographic Map panel, drag the Rounding slider to adjust the amount of curve in the contour lines.
4.
Drag the Number of lines slider to specify how many contour lines you want to add.
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Water Effect
You can use the Water effect to insert an expanse of water below the subject of a photo and to display a reflection of the subject in
the water. You can control the position of the water below the subject. For example, you can position the water below a person's
chin, or below their waist. You can also control the appearance of ripples in the water and how dark or light the water appears.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Water Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Water.
3.
On the Water panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Water Options
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Position
Specifies the position of the water below the subject of the photo.
Amplitude
Specifies the height of the ripples in the water. Drag the slider to the left to reduce the height of the
ripples and the distortion caused by the ripples. Drag the slider to the right to increase the height of
the ripples and the distortion caused by the ripples.
Wavelength
Specifies the distance between ripples. Drag the slider to the left to reduce the distance between
ripples and increase the distortion caused by the ripples. Drag the slider to the right to increase the
distance between ripples and reduce the distortion caused by the ripples.
Perspective
Changes the size of the waves as they get farther from the subject. Drag the slider to the left to
increase the size of the waves farthest from the subject and to increase the illusion of distance.
Lighting
Specifies the amount of light in the water.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Water Drops Effect
You can use the Water Drops effect to display water drops on the surface of the photo. You can control the number and size of water
drops, and their position on the photo.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply Water Drops to a Photo:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Water Drops.
3.
On the Water Drops panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Water Drops Options
Density
Specifies the number of water drops on the photo. Drag the slider to the left to remove water drops.
Drag the slider to the right to add water drops.
Radius
Specifies the size of the water drops. Drag the slider to the left to make the water drops smaller. Drag
the slider to the right to make the water drops larger.
Height
Specifies the height of the water drops above the photo surface. Drag the slider to the left to reduce
the height of the water drops and the distortion caused by the water drops. Drag the slider to the right
to increase the height of the water drops and the distortion caused by the water drops.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of the water drops.
When you apply the Water Drops effect to an image, ACDSee places the water drops randomly. This
makes the effect different every time you apply the filter. You can define a specific random seed to
generate identical water drop patterns.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
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You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Waves Effect
You can use the Waves effect to display waves across the photo. You can change the distance between waves. This distance is
called wavelength. You can also change the height of the waves, and the angle at which the waves cross the photo.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Waves Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Waves.
3.
On the Waves panel, select or change the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Waves Options
Wavelength
Specifies the distance between waves. Drag the slider to the left to reduce the distance between waves
and increase the distortion caused by the waves. Drag the slider to the right to increase the distance
between waves and reduce the distortion caused by the waves.
Amplitude
Specifies the height of the waves. Drag the slider to the left to reduce the height of the waves and the
distortion caused by the waves. Drag the slider to the right to increase the height of the waves and the
distortion caused by the waves.
Angle
Specifies the angle of the waves. Type a number from 1 to 360 or drag the arrow to adjust the angle.
Background color
Specifies the background color. Select the Image checkbox to use the original image colors, or click
the color picker to select a different color.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Weave Effect
You can use the Weave effect to give a photo the appearance of being woven into a tapestry or basket. You can control the width of
the vertical and horizontal strips, the width of the gap between the strips, and the background color that displays through the gap.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Weave Effect:
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1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Weave.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
3.
On the Weave panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Weave Options
Strip width
Specifies the width of the vertical and horizontal strips.
Gap width
Specifies the width of the gap between the strips.
Background color
Specifies the color of the background. Click the color picker to select a different color.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Applying a Wind Effect
You can use the Wind effect to add wind lines that make stationary objects in your image look like they are moving. Select or change
the settings to control the effect of the wind added to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Apply a Wind Effect:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click Wind.
3.
On the Wind panel, select or change the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Wind Options
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Strength
Determines how strong the wind lines are in the image. The higher the value, the stronger the wind
lines.
Threshold
Determines how sharp an edge must be before the filter will apply wind. The higher the value, the
sharper the edge needs to be.
Chance of wind
Determines the amount of wind lines to place in the image.
Edge detection
Specifies the edge detection algorithm. The algorithm controls the formula used to detect the edges
and the direction of the edge indicators.
Background color
Specifies the background color. Select the Image checkbox to use the original image colors, or click
the color picker to select a different color.
Wind color
Specifies the color of the wind lines. Select the Image checkbox to use the original image colors, or
click the color picker to select a different color.
Wind angle
Specifies the angle of the wind lines.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of the wind lines.
When you apply the Wind effect to an image, ACDSee places the wind lines randomly. This makes the
wind lines different every time you apply the filter. You can define a specific random seed to generate
identical wind lines.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Creating a Custom Special Effect Filter (Convolution Effect)
You can use the Convolution filter to create your own special effects and apply them to your image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Create a Custom Effect Filter:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Add group, click Special Effect.
2.
Click User Defined Convolution.
3.
On the User Defined Convolution panel, set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
User Defined Convolution Options
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Convolution Matrix
Specifies the formula to use when altering the image.
Type numbers in the matrix fields to change the pixels in the image. Using a mathematical formula, the
color value of each pixel in an image is multiplied by the numbers in the matrix to produce an effect.
Division
Specifies the fractional coefficient of the matrix.
Type a number into the Division field to use fractional coefficients in the matrix. The product of the
convolution matrix is divided by the division factor before being applied to a pixel.
Bias
Specifies the brightness of the image.
Type a number into the Bias field to change the brightness of the image. The bias number is added to
the RGB values of each pixel. A positive number brightens the image, while a negative number darkens
the image.
Clear Matrix
Resets the matrix.
Sample Filters
Drop-Down Menu
Loads a sample effect to use as a starting point for creating your own effect.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Rotating an Image
You can rotate an image at preset or custom angles in Edit mode.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Rotate an Image at a Custom Angle:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Geometry group, click Rotate.
2.
Select one or more of the following:
Select one of the default orientation options.
Drag the Straightening slider to the left or right until the image appears straightened.
Click the Horizontal or Vertical button, and use the tools as described below.
Select Crop straightened image if you want to crop the image after it is straightened.
Select Preserve straightened image if you do not want to crop the straightened image. Select the color that you
would like to display behind the straightened image from the Fill color drop-down.
Select Show grid overlay to display a grid over the image. You may find that the grid helps you straighten the
image and understand how the image will be cropped.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Rotate Icons
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Horizontal
Click on the horizontal icon, and then use the cursor to draw a line on the image that you want to set as the
horizontal line.
Vertical
Click on the vertical icon, and then use the cursor to draw a line on the image that you want to set as the
vertical line.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Flipping an Image
You can flip an image both vertically and horizontally in Edit mode.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Flip an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Geometry group, click Flip.
2.
Do one or both of the following:
Select the Horizontal Flip checkbox.
Select the Vertical Flip checkbox.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Cropping an Image
You can use the Crop tool to remove unwanted parts of your images, or to reduce the image canvas to a particular size.
You can also save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Crop an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Geometry group, click Crop.
2.
Resize the crop window, and position it over the area of the image you want to keep.
3.
To darken the parts of the image outside the crop window, drag the Darken outside crop area slider to the left. Drag the
slider to the right to lighten the area outside the crop window.
4.
Click Estimate new file size to view how big your image file is after cropping.
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to crop the image and close the tool.
Click Cancel to exit the tool without cropping the image.
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You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
Resizing the Crop Window
You can resize the crop window in three ways:
Drag the edges of the crop window to the desired size.
Specify an exact size for the crop window in pixels, inches, centimeters, or millimeters.
Apply a ratio to constrain the crop window proportions.
To Resize the Crop Window by Dragging:
1.
Position your cursor over the edge or corner of the crop window until it changes into a double-pointed arrow.
2.
Drag the crop window's border to the desired size.
To Specify an Exact Size for the Crop Window:
1.
Type the desired crop window proportions into the Width and Height spin boxes.
2.
In the Units drop-down list, select a unit of measurement.
3.
Use the Dots per inch spin box to specify a resolution.
To Constrain the Crop Window to a Ratio:
1.
Select the Constrain cropping proportion checkbox.
2.
Select a ratio from the drop-down list and select or clear the Landscape checkbox to toggle the crop window between
landscape and portrait orientation.
3.
Do one of the following:
Position your cursor over the edge of the crop window until it changes into a double-pointed arrow, and then drag
the edge of the crop window to the desired size.
Use the Width or Height spin box to specify a dimension for one side of the crop window. ACDSee automatically
resizes the other dimension based on the ratio you selected.
Resizing an Image
You can resize an image by adjusting its dimensions in pixels, percentage, or actual/print size. While resizing, you can also choose
an aspect ratio and a resampling filter to adjust the resized image's appearance.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Resize an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Geometry group, click Resize.
2.
Select one of the following resize options:
Pixels: resizes the image to specific dimensions in pixels.
Percent: Resizes the image to a percentage of the original.
Actual/Print size in: Resizes the image to match a specific output size. Click the drop-down list to specify a unit
of measurement.
3.
If you want to maintain a specific width to height ratio, select the Preserve aspect ratio checkbox, and then select one of
the following options from the drop-down list:
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Original: Maintains the original image's width to height ratio.
1 x 1: Forces the width and height to be equal.
2 x 3: Forces a width to height ratio of 2:3.
3 x 2: Forces a width to height ratio of 3:2.
3 x 5: Forces a width to height ratio of 3:5.
5 x 3: Forces a width to height ratio of 5:3.
Custom: Applies a custom ratio. Enter a width to height ratio in the Custom Aspect Ratio dialog box.
4.
Select a resizing filter from the Resizing Filter drop-down list.
5.
Under the resize option you selected in step #3, type the image's new dimensions into the Width and Height spin boxes. If
you selected Actual/Print size in, click the Resolution drop-down list, and then select a resolution (in dots per inch) for
your output image.
6.
To estimate the size of the output image, click Estimate new file size.
7.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the Resize tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Resizing Tips:
Maintain image quality by reducing images only by 33%, 50%, or 66%. Other percentages can distort the aspect ratio.
Avoid resizing an image repeatedly. Each resizing places image pixels using a slightly different orientation. As a result,
multiple resizes can change the overall color and appearance of the image. If your first resize attempt does not produce the
desired result, click the Undo button.
Avoid increasing the size of an image. Increasing image size makes the image's pixels more apparent, causing a grainy
effect.
Pixel Resize Options and Resulting Action
You can reduce and enlarge the size of one or more images from Manage mode by entering a new dimension in pixels. For more
information on how to resize an image using pixel dimensions, please see Resizing an image or Resizing multiple images.
Enlarging an image tends to pixelate the image, reducing image quality. It is best to avoid enlarging images.
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Resize Options
Fit within Options
Action
Enlarge only
Width only
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are larger than the
image's original dimensions. The width is increased to the
specified value and the height is increased to maintain the aspect
ratio.
Height only
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are larger than the
image's original dimensions. The height is increased to the
specified value and the width is increased to maintain the aspect
ratio.
Width and height
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are larger than the
image's original dimensions. The width and height are increased
as close to the specified value as possible, while maintaining the
aspect ratio.
Width or height (largest
image)
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are larger than the
image's original dimensions. The width or height is increased as
close to the specified value as possible to maximize the size of the
image, while maintaining the aspect ratio.
Width only
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are smaller than the
image's original dimensions. The width is decreased to the
specified value and the height is decreased to maintain the aspect
ratio.
Height only
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are smaller than the
image's original dimensions. The height is decreased to the
specified value and the width is decreased to maintain the aspect
ratio.
Width and height
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are smaller than the
image's original dimensions. The width and height are decreased
as close to the specified value as possible, while maintaining the
aspect ratio.
Width or height (largest
image)
Resizes the image if the specified dimensions are smaller than the
image's original dimensions. The width or height is decreased as
close to the specified value as possible to minimize the size of the
image, while maintaining the aspect ratio.
Width only
Resizes the width to the specified value and resizes the height to
whatever value is necessary to maintain the aspect ratio.
Height only
Resizes the height to the specified value and resizes the width to
whatever value is necessary to maintain the aspect ratio.
Width and height
Resizes the image within the specified width and height. The
width and height are resized as close to the specified value as
possible while maintaining the aspect ratio.
Width or height (largest
image)
Resizes the image within the specified width and height. The
width or height is resized as close to the specified value as
possible to maximize (or minimize) the size of the image, while
maintaining the aspect ratio.
Reduce only
Enlarge or reduce
Adjusting Image Exposure
You can use the Exposure tool to adjust an image's exposure, contrast, and fill light.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Adjust the Image Exposure:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Exposure/Lighting group, click Exposure.
2.
Set the options as described below.
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3.
Do one of the following:
Click Apply to apply your changes and set options on another tab.
Click Done to apply your changes and close the tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Image Exposure Options
Exposure
Drag the slider to the right to increase the exposure, or drag to the left to decrease exposure.
Auto
Click the Auto button to automatically adjust the exposure level.
Contrast
Drag the slider to the right to increase contrast, or drag to the left to decrease contrast.
Fill Light
Drag slider to the right to increase the amount of light in the darkest areas of the image, or drag to the left to
decrease fill light. Fill light brightens dark areas of the image.
Exposure
warning
Highlights overexposed and underexposed areas of the image. Overexposed pixels turn red, underexposed pixels
turn green. The icon is gray when disabled, and turns yellow if enabled.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Adjusting Image Levels
You can use the Levels tool to precisely adjust the contrast and light levels in your images.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Adjust Image levels:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Exposure/Lighting group, click Levels.
2.
Do one of the following:
Set the options as described below to adjust the contrast and light levels manually.
Click Auto and select a menu option to automatically adjust image properties.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Apply to apply your changes.
Click Done to apply your changes and close the Levels tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Levels Options
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Channel
Specifies the brightness or color channel you want to adjust.
Shadows
Specifies the black point of an image.
Move the slider or type a number from 0 to 255 into the spin box to define the blackest area of an
image. As the value increases, the dark colored areas of the image become darker. You can also click
on the arrow to automatically set it to where the black point start in the image.
Midtones
Specifies the midtones in an image.
Move the slider or type a number into the spin box to set the midtone. Higher values make the image
appear brighter, while lower values make the image appear darker. You can also click on the arrow to
automatically set it to the midtone of the image.
Highlights
Specifies the white point of an image.
Move the slider or type a number from 0 to 255 into the spin box to define the whitest area of an image.
As the value increases, the light colored areas of the image become lighter. You can also click on the
arrow to automatically set it to where the highlights start in the image.
Auto
Select one of the following options:
Adjust Contrast : Automatically analyzes and adjusts image contrast.
Adjust Color and Contrast: Automatically analyzes and adjusts each color channel
independently, and then adjusts the contrast.
Adjust Color and Brightness: Automatically analyzes and adjusts image color and
brightness.
Tolerance: Opens the Tolerance settings dialog box. Specify the maximum clipping
percentage for black and white levels, and click OK. ACDSee adjusts the image levels
automatically.
Black Point picker
Click the Black Point picker, and then click the image area you want to set as the black point.
Mid Point picker
Click the Mid Point picker, and then click the image area you want to set as the mid point.
White Point picker
Click the White Point picker, and then click the image area you want to set as the white point.
When you click around the image with a selected eye dropper you will see the RGB numbers changing to reflect the RGB
values of the pixel under the eye dropper. The RGB values represent the source pixel (unprocessed) and the current pixel
as it appears on the screen.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Adjusting Levels Automatically
You can use the Auto Levels tool to automatically correct the exposure levels of your images. Auto Levels makes the darkest image
pixels darker, and the brightest pixels brighter.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Automatically Correct an Image's Levels:
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1.
In Edit mode, in the Exposure/Lighting group, click Auto Levels.
2.
Select one of the following options:
Auto Contrast and Color: Adjusts color differences, brightness, and balances RGB channels.
Auto Contrast: Adjusts the color differences and brightness only.
Auto Color: Balances the RGB channels in the image, without changing the brightness or contrast.
3.
Use the Strength slider to fine tune the amount of exposure you want to apply.
4.
Click Exposure Warning to make overexposed and underexposed pixels visible. Overexposed pixels turn red,
underexposed pixels turn green.
5.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to accept your changes and close the panel.
Click Cancel to discard your changes and close the panel.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Adjusting Tone Curves
In Edit, you can use the Curves tool to change the tonal range of an image. Select the RGB color channel to adjust the entire range of
the image, or select a specific color.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Adjust the Brightness Curves in an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Exposure/Lighting group, click Tone Curves.
2.
Set the options as described below.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Apply to apply your changes.
Click Done to apply your changes and close the Curves tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Curves Options
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Channel
Specifies the color channels to adjust.
Show Histogram
Toggles the histogram display on and off.
Histogram
Displays a graphic of the color information levels in the image, based on the selected channel. Click
and drag the line to manipulate the curve. Each time you click the curve, a new node is added. You can
drag the nodes up and down the curve. To remove a node, drag the node up and out of the graph, or
down and out of the graph.
Exposure warning
Highlights overexposed and underexposed areas of the image. Overexposed pixels turn red,
underexposed pixels turn green.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Adjusting Lighting
You can use the Lighting tool to adjust areas in an image that are too dark or too light, without affecting other areas of the photo.
You can also simultaneously lighten dark areas that are too dark, and darken areas that are too bright. Examples would be a photo of
a person silhouetted against a bright background like the sea, or a window. In fact, most photos taken on a dull day, or with a flash,
can be improved in various ways with fine adjustments.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
The Lighting tool lets you make quick and easy adjustments using three sliders. ACDSee analyzes the photo and varies the
adjustment throughout the image automatically. For example, darker images are brightened more. By clicking the Auto button, you
can have ACDSee fully analyze the photo and set the slider positions automatically. You can also click directly on an area of the image
to generate automatic settings optimal for that area, (usually the subject of the photo).
To Open the Lighting Tool:
In Edit mode, in the Exposure/Lighting group, click Lighting.
To Add Light to Dark Areas:
1.
Drag the Highlights slider to the right to add light to the dark parts of the photo.
2.
Adjust the settings using any of the controls in the table below.
To Darken Areas That Are Too Bright:
1.
Drag the Shadows slider to the right to lighten and return detail to areas that are too dark.
2.
Adjust the settings using any of the controls in the table below.
To Adjust Midtones That Are Too Light or Dark:
1.
Drag the Midtones slider to the right to lighten and return detail to areas that are too dark.
2.
Adjust the settings using any of the controls in the table below.
Lighting Controls
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Rightclick on
a slider
Right-click on a slider to reset it.
Exposur
e
Warning
Click the Exposure Warning to make any overexposed or underexposed areas visible. Overexposed pixels turn red,
underexposed pixels turn green. You can also toggle Exposure Warning on and off momentarily by holding down the
E key.
Auto
Click to allow the software to analyze the photo and apply optimal settings based on the amount of light and dark
pixels in the photo. Darker photos are brightened more than photos that are already bright.
Done
Click to apply your changes and close the tool.
Cancel
Click to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Adjusting White Balance
You can use the White Balance tool to remove unwanted hue from an image. For example, if you take a photo at sunset and the
resulting image has a reddish hue, you can use the White Balance tool to remove it.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Remove a Color Cast from an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Color group, click White Balance.
2.
Click an image area that should be white or gray. The color square shows the color of the original pixel on the left, and the
modified pixel on the right.
3.
To specify the strength of the white balance adjustment, move the slider. Higher settings remove more of the unwanted
color.
4.
Click Done to save your changes, or click Cancel to discard your changes and leave the tool.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
If you are having difficulties achieving the desired effect, try clicking an image area that is a different shade of white or
gray.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
You can use the Gradient Tool
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to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
Adjusting Color Balance
You can adjust an image's color values using the Color Balance tool.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Adjust an Image's Color:
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Color Balance Options
Saturation
Adjusts the saturation of the image. Drag the slider to the right to increase or drag to the left to decrease
saturation.
Hue
Adjusts the hue of the image. Drag the slider to the right to increase or drag to the left to decrease hue.
Lightness
Adjusts the image brightness. Drag the slider to the right to increase or drag to the left to decrease the
image's brightness.
Red
Adjusts the red channel in the image. Drag the slider to the right to increase or drag to the left to decrease
the red tone in your image.
Green
Adjusts the green channel in the image. Drag the slider to the right to increase or drag to the left to
decrease the green tone in your image.
Blue
Adjusts the blue channel in the image. Drag the slider to the right to increase or drag to the left to
decrease the blue tone in your image.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Using the Histogram
The Histogram displays a graphical representation of the distribution of intensity levels of pixels for each color channel in an image.
To Display and Use the Histogram:
1.
In View mode, click View | Histogram.
2.
On the Histogram, select or clear the following checkboxes:
R: Shows or hides the red color channel.
G: Shows or hides the green color channel.
B: Shows or hides the blue color channel.
L: Shows or hides the lightness of the image.
Changing Image Color Depth
You can modify an image's color depth in View mode. Color depth refers to the range of colors an image contains.
To Change the Color Depth of an Image:
In View mode, click Tools | Modify | Change Color Depth, and select one of the options described below.
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Color Depth Options
Black and White
Two-color black and white palette
16 Grays
16-color grayscale palette
256 Grays
256-color grayscale palette
16 Colors
16-color palette
256 Colors
256-color palette (GIF format uses 256 colors by default)
Hicolor
32,768-color palette
Truecolor
16,777,216-color palette of all colors visible to humans
You can use ACDSee to convert an image to any of these color depths. However, to use certain image enhancement tools, filters,
blends, and adjustment options, the image must be Hicolor or Truecolor. To edit an image that is not originally Hicolor or Truecolor,
you can convert it, edit the image, and then convert it back to its original color depth.
Using the Color Dialog Box
The Colors dialog box appears in several places in Edit when you select or apply a color. You can use the Color dialog box to select a
color in multiple ways and to adjust a color using several different tools.
The Color Grids
In the top left corner there is a fixed grid of Basic colors to choose from, including gray, black, and white in the last three boxes.
Below it is a grid of Custom colors that you can fill in by creating a custom color, and then clicking the Add to Custom Colors
button.
The Color Palette and Slider
Beside the Basic colors is a color palette. It contains all the colors of the spectrum from red through yellow, green, turquoise, blue,
purple, pink, to red again. The colors at the top of the palette are pure primary colors with increasing amounts of gray added until
along the bottom, the colors are mostly gray. If you want a color to have a smoky look, select it from the bottom end of this palette.
Similarly, you will find colors like browns at the lower end of the red/orange in this palette.
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On the far right is a color slider. In the slider, the actual color selected is where the small black arrow appears. You can then adjust
the color to add white or black to it by moving the slider up to add white (for pastels) until it is completely white or move the slider
down to add black (for a richer color) until it is completely black.
Selecting and Adjusting Colors
To select a color, click on a square in either grid, or on the color palette. You can also drag over the color palette. When you click a
color, or lift your finger off the mouse after dragging, that color appears in the large Color/Solid square and all its numerical
values; Hue, Saturation, Luminosity, as well as Red, Green, Blue, appear in the boxes.
You can also adjust a color by changing the Hue Saturation, and Luminosity numbers. To select a precise color, type in the values
for that color. You can do the same using the Red, Green, Blue values.
Sharpening an Image
You can use the Sharpen tool to sharpen an image by enhancing medium and high contrast edges.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Sharpen an Image Using Sharpen Tool:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Detail group, select Sharpen.
2.
Drag the sliders to enhance or fix your image as described below.
3.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Sharpen Options
Amount
Specifies the amount of sharpening applied by increasing contrast around the edges.
Radius
Controls the number of pixels to adjust around each edge. Higher values increase the number of
sharpened pixels and tend to bring out coarser detail, while lower values reduce the number of
sharpened pixels and tend to bring out finer detail.
Mask
Allows the targeting of edges, while suppressing the sharpening of noise and texture. To view the
areas the mask affects, press the ALT key when moving the mask slider. Areas affected by sharpening
appear white.
Detail
Suppresses the halo, (the light border that forms around edges with extreme sharpening), by reducing
its intensity. The higher the value, the stronger the reduction.
Specifies how different the pixel lightness values within an edge must be before the pixels within the
edge are sharpened. Higher values sharpen only stronger edges but minimize the appearance of noise.
Lower values sharpen both strong and weaker edges, but can increase the appearance of noise. We
recommend you set the threshold to enhance edges while keeping background noise to a minimum.
Threshold
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
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Blurring an Image
You can use the Blur tool to apply different kinds of blur to an image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Blur an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Detail group, select Blur.
2.
In the Blur type drop-down list, select the type of blur to apply.
3.
Set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the Blur tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Blur Types
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Gaussia Produces an even, smooth blur.
n
Amount
Linear
Radial
Spread
Specifies the amount of blur. Move the slider to the right to
intensify the effect.
Produces a blurring effect that gives the illusion of movement.
Amount
Specifies the amount of blur. Move the slider to the right to
intensify the effect.
Angle
Specifies the direction of the blur effect.
Produces blur around a center point. Click the image to set the center point.
Amount
Specifies the amount of blur. Move the slider to the right to
intensify the effect.
Clockwise
Specifies clockwise blur.
Counter-clockwise
Specifies counter-clockwise blur.
Horizontal position
Specifies the blur's center point on the horizontal axis.
Vertical position
Specifies the blur's center point on the vertical axis.
Produces a smeared or frosted blur.
Amount
Zoom
Smart
Blur
Lens
Specifies the amount of blur. Move the slider to the right to
intensify the effect.
Produces inward or outward blur to or from a center point.
Amount
Specifies the amount of blur. Move the slider to the right to
intensify the effect.
Zoom in
Creates a blur that zooms in to the image's center.
Zoom out
Creates a blur that zooms out from the image's center.
Horizontal position
Specifies the blur's center point on the horizontal axis.
Vertical position
Specifies the blur's center point on the vertical axis.
Produces blur by detecting and avoiding edges, and preserves detail based on the threshold setting. This effect is
usually used to smooth out skin.
Amount
Specifies the amount of blur. Move the slider to the right to
intensify the effect.
Threshold
Specifies how little detail an area must have before the blur
will apply to it.
Produces a blur that mimics the blurring effect of a camera aperture.
Select a bokeh shape from the options on the Blur panel. These shapes concentrate in highlights.
Amount
Specifies the strength of the blur. Move the slider to the right
to intensify the effect.
Bokeh Frequency
Specifies how often the bokeh shapes show up.
Bokeh Brightness
Specifies how much the bokeh shapes stand out.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
You can use the Gradient Tool
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
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About Noise and Noise Reduction
Image noise looks like random black, white, or colored pixels in an area of a photo where there should be solid color, such as a dark
night sky. In digital photography, noise is typically more visible in the dark areas of a photo.
There are many causes of image noise. You will increase image noise if you use a high ISO setting (such as ISO 800) to capture a
photo, or if you extend the exposure time. (You would typically use a high ISO setting and extend exposure time to take a photo in
low light.) However, image noise can be caused by dead or stuck pixels in a digital camera's image sensor. Similarly, dust on a
camera lens or scanner bed can cause noise by blocking or reflecting light.
Images generally have two types of noise: luminance and color. Luminance noise is random variations of brightness, and
particularly in gray areas, may appear spotted when there should be a solid color in the area of the image.
Color noise is random variations of color in the image.
Noise is visually distracting, so in most cases you will want to reduce noise in your photos. However, if you reduce noise too much
you may unintentionally reduce image sharpness.You can use the Noise Removal tool to remove both luminance and color noise in
your images.
Removing Noise
You can use the Remove Noise tool to remove noise from your images while preserving details that you want to retain.
You can use the Remove Noise tool to remove hot image pixels caused by digital cameras with malfunctioning CCD array
sensors, or the extra pixels caused by a dusty scanner or camera lens.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Remove Noise from an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Detail group, click Noise.
2.
Select the Remove Noise tab.
3.
Set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the Remove Noise tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Noise Removal Options
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Despeckle
Removes noise.
Square
Removes noise using a 3 x 3 pixel square.
X
Removes noise using a 3 x 3 pixel X shape. Use this option when you want to preserve an image's thin
and diagonal lines.
Plus
Removes noise using a 3 x 3 pixel plus (+) shape. Use this option when you want to preserve an
image's thin, vertical, and horizontal lines.
Hybrid
Removes digital camera noise. Adjust the following sliders to further remove noise:
Luminance: Reduces the random variations of brightness in the noise.
Color: Reduces the random variations of color in the noise.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Adding Noise
You can use the Add Noise tool to add a grainy texture to an image. Adding small amounts of noise can reduce the appearance of
minor imperfections in the original image.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Add Noise to an Image:
1.
In Edit mode, in the Detail group, click Noise.
2.
Select the Add Noise tab.
3.
Set the options as described below.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the Add Noise tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
Click Reset to clear your changes and reset to default settings. If you saved your changes, you cannot reset your settings.
Add Noise Options
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Intensity
Specifies the amount of noise to add to the image. A higher intensity increases the chance that a noise
pixel will replace a pixel in the original image.
Color proximity
Specifies the color of noise pixels to add to the image. A lower value gives each noise pixel a color
similar to the pixel it replaces. Higher values result in a random selection of the noise pixel color.
Noise color
Select one of the following options to specify noise pixel color:
Random: Randomly selects the color.
Monochrome: Produces black and white noise pixels.
Adjustable: Randomly selects the color of each noise pixel, but more pixels match a defined
color. To define a color, click the color picker and select a color.
Noise placement
Adds noise to image areas that closely match a defined color. Select the Set color checkbox to enable
noise placement, and click the color picker to specify a color.
Randomize
Indicates the random placement of noise in an image.
When you use Add Noise tool, ACDSee places the noise pixels based on a random seed. This makes the
image noise different each time you use the Add Noise tool. You can define a specific random seed to
generate identical image noise.
To generate a new random seed, click Randomize.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
Adjusting Clarity
The Clarity tool adds subtle definition to the details in your image. Use the Clarity tool to enhance the contrast of midtones in your
images, without overpowering the shadows and highlights.
You can save your settings as a preset for future use.
To Adjust the Clarity of Your Image:
1.
In Edit mode, open the Detail group.
2.
Select Clarity.
3.
Drag the Strength slider to the right for greater clarity, or to the left for reverse clarity.
4.
Do one of the following:
Click Done to apply your changes and close the tool.
Click Cancel to discard all changes and close the tool.
You can also type a number into the number box and incrementally make precise adjustments.
You can right-click a slider to reset to the default value.
You can use the Edit Brush
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to paint this effect onto specific areas of your image.
Chapter 5: Edit Mode
You can use the Gradient Tool
to transition this effect across specific areas of your image.
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Chapter 6: 365 Mode
Chapter 6: 365 Mode
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
You can use 365 mode to upload your images to 365.acdsee.com, an image sharing and storage service available to ACDSee users.
With 365 mode and 365.acdsee.com, you can upload and browse through your online images without having to launch an Internet
browser. You need to create a 365.acdsee.com account first, before uploading your photos.
With 365.acdsee.com, you can:
Create Your 365.acdsee.com Account
Upload Images
Set Privacy Settings for Your Image Folders
Working in 365 Mode
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
You can use 365 mode to upload your images to 365.acdsee.com, an image sharing and storage service available to ACDSee users.
With 365 mode and 365.acdsee.com, you can upload and browse through your online images without having to launch an Internet
browser. Or you can access 365.acdsee.com at any time directly from an Internet browser.
365 Mode Has Two Parts: 365.acdsee.com and Transfer
To enable the 365.acdsee.com and Transfer tabs, you need to create a 365.acdsee.com account.
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365.acdsee.com
Clicking the 365.acdsee.com tab takes you to 365.acdsee.com, where you can browse through
images you have uploaded to your online account, see other users' images, or upgrade your
membership level. 365.acdsee.com has the following menus:
Manage: Organize your images into folders.
Upload: Click Upload to switch to Transfer for uploading images.
Profile: Modify your profile and set specific information to public or private.
Support: See the Help or FAQs for assistance with 365.acdsee.com.
Transfer
Transfer allows you to upload images to your 365.acdsee.com account. In Transfer, the screen
splits into two. The bottom of the screen displays the available images in your computer, and the
top of the screen displays your 365.acdsee.com account.
You cannot take an image from 365 mode and open it in Edit mode for editing. To edit an image, select an image in Manage
or View mode and open it in Edit mode for editing.
Creating a 365.acdsee.com Account
Before you can upload your images to 365.acdsee.com, you need to create an account.
To Create an 365.acdsee.com Account:
1.
Click the 365 tab to enter ACDSee 365 mode.
2.
Press the Sign Up Now button.
3.
Enter your information into the fields and click Create your account.
If you already have an account, click the Login button.
Uploading Images to 365.acdsee.com
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
365.acdsee.com is an image sharing and storage service for ACDSee users. You need to create a 365.acdsee.com account first,
before uploading your photos. There is no size limit for uploading images to your 365.acdsee.com account.
Depending on your ACDSee 365 account level, you can also upload videos.
To Upload Your Images:
1.
In 365 mode, click Login.
2.
Login to your account.
3.
Click Upload to switch to Transfer.
Your screen splits in two, with the bottom part of the screen displaying images on your computer, and the top part of the
screen representing your images online.
4.
Use the drop-down list in the top right corner to select one of the following:
Upload Original with associated data: Upload images in current file format, including any associated files such
as those containing metadata. This option is the best for images you want to archive.
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Upload Original (as JPG ): Uploads image as a JPG in it's original size.
Upload 1920 x 1440 JPG: Converts the image to JPG and sets the size to 1920 x 1440. This option is the best
for high quality JPGs.
Upload 1024 x 768 JPG: Converts the image to JPG and sets the size to 1024 x 768. This option is the best for
images you want to view on a Netbook, and results in the fastest upload.
5.
Do one of the following to select an image to upload:
Click and drag an image into the top part of the screen to upload it to your 365.acdsee.com account. To select
multiple images, press the SHIFT or the CTRL key and click on the images to select them. You can also click and
drag your cursor to select multiple images.
Drag a folder of your images to the top part of the screen.
Select images and click the up arrow icon beside Transfer Manager, or click Sync to Web to upload all the images in
the Sync to Web folders.
When upload is complete, images are displayed in the order they were uploaded. Overlay icons indicate the file type and if
the image has been developed or edited.
You can upload a folder with sub-folders. 365 mode respects folder hierarchy when uploading a folder to your
365.acdsee.com account.
Setting Folders to Automatically Sync to Web
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
If you want to upload all the images from a folder on your computer to 365.acdsee.com and keep the folder synced as you add new
images, you can set your folder to automatically Sync to Web. The sync works in one direction; images from your computer are
uploaded to your 365.acdsee.com account. Set selected folders to Sync to Web, and have all files in these folders upload to
your365.acdsee.com pages whenever you click Sync to Web.
To Set a Folder to Automatically Sync to Web:
1.
In 365 mode, click Login.
2.
Login to your account.
3.
Click the Transfer tab.
4.
In the Folders pane in the bottom half of the screen, right-click a folder and select Set as Sync to Web Folder.
5.
In the Set up Sync to Web folder dialog box, set the options as described below.
6.
Click OK.
You can also set Sync to Web folders by clicking File | Manage Sync to Web Folders.
To Run Sync to Web:
1.
In Transfer, on the right side along the screen split, click Sync to Web.
2.
Click OK.
To Edit a Folder's Sync to Web Settings:
1.
In Transfer, in the Folders pane in the bottom half of the screen, right-click a Sync to Web folder, and select Edit Sync to
Web Folder.
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2.
In the Edit Sync to Web Folder dialog box, set the options as described below.
3.
Click OK.
Sync to Web Folder Options
Upload Type
Use the drop-down list to select one of the following:
Upload Original with associated data: Uploads images in their current file format,
including any associated files such as those containing metadata. This option is the best for
images you want to archive.
Upload Original (as JPG): Converts the image to JPEG in it's original size.
Upload 1920 x 1440 JPG: Converts the image to JPEG and sets the resolution to 1920 x
1440. This option is the best for high quality JPEGs.
Upload 1024 x 768 JPG: Converts the image to JPEG and sets the resolution to 1024 x
768. This option is the best for images you want to view on a Netbook, and results in the
fastest upload.
Local Folder
Displays the path to the folder you selected. Click the Browse button to select a different folder.
Online Folder
Enter a name for the online folder. By default this is set to the same name as the folder on your
computer that you want to sync to Web.
Sync to Web right
away
Select to upload the images in the selected folder immediately. If you do not select this checkbox, you
can click Sync to Web to upload all the images in all the folders you have chosen to sync.
Creating Folders and Setting Privacy
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
In 365.acdsee.com and Transfer, you can create folders and make them private or public. When you make a folder public, anyone
can find and see the images in that folder. You can also copy the URL for your public folders and share it with family and friends.
When you create a new folder, it is set to private by default.
To Create a Folder and Make it Private or Public in Transfer:
1.
In 365 mode, click Transfer.
2.
In the Folders pane on the top left, right-click your user name, and select New Online Folder...
3.
In the New Online Folder dialog box, enter a name for the new folder.
4.
Click OK.
By default the new folder is Private.
To change the folder to Public
, right-click on the folder, and then click Make Public.
To Share the URL for a Public Folder:
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1.
In 365 mode, click Transfer.
2.
In the Folders pane on the top left, right-click on a public folder.
3.
Click Copy URL.
4.
Paste the URL into an email, instant message, or other application to share it.
Chapter 6: 365 Mode
Right-click a public folder and select Share folder to share in an email, post on a social networking site, or to create a
widget.
Changing the Rating System
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
Photos that you have rated in Manage mode are rated with a star rating system in 365 mode. You can select how to use stars to rate
your photos.
To Change Your Rating System:
1.
Click Tools and then select Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, select ACDSee 365.
3.
In Ratings, select Convert 'Rating 1' to 5 stars or Convert 'Rating 1' to 1 star.
4.
Click OK.
Downloading Images
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
365.acdsee.com is also a storage service for ACDSee users. You can download your images from your 365.acdsee.com account to
your computer at any time.
To Download Your Images:
1.
In 365 mode, click Login.
2.
Login to your account.
3.
Click the Transfer tab.
Your screen splits in two, with the bottom part of the screen displaying images on your computer, and the top part of the
screen representing your images online.
4.
In the top part of the screen, in the Folders pane in the top left, navigate through your 365.acdsee.com folders to the
images you want to download.
5.
In the bottom part of the screen, in the Local Computer pane, select a folder that you want to download your image to.
6.
Do one of the following to select an image to download:
Click and drag an image into the bottom part of the screen to download it to your computer. To select multiple
images, press the SHIFT or the CTRL key and click on the images to select them. You can also click and drag your
cursor to select multiple images.
Drag a folder of your images to the bottom part of the screen.
Select images and click the down arrow icon beside Transfer Manager.
Using Transfer Manager
For help with 365.acdsee.com, click the Web tab, then click Support.
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The Transfer Manager lets you monitor the progress of your uploads and downloads on your 365.acdsee.com account, and also lets
you cancel or pause image transfers. The Transfer Manager has two tabs: Uploads and Downloads. These two tabs list images that
are being uploaded, downloaded, paused, or canceled.
To Open the Transfer Manager:
Click Tools | Transfer Manager.
You can do the following in Transfer Manager:
Cancel an upload or download.
Retry the image upload or download.
Pause an upload or a download.
Continue the image upload or download.
Selects all images in the list.
Clear uploaded, downloaded or canceled images from the list.
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Chapter 7: Options and Configuration
Setting the General Options
You can adjust settings in the Options dialog box to display helpful tips, set the format for date displays, set automatic rotate
options, and control the display of certain image types.
To Access the General Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click General.
3.
On the General page, set or change any of the options described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
General Options
Enable gamma correction
Applies the specified amount of gamma correction when viewing or previewing images.
Show screen capture help
tips
Displays the Help Tips dialog box when using the screen capture tool.
Automatically stretch
wallpaper to fit screen
Stretches small images to fit the entire desktop when you set them as your wallpaper.
Disable image animation
Displays only the first frame of an animated image in Manage mode's Preview pane and in View
mode.
Automatically rotate JPEG
and TIFF images based on
EXIF orientation
Automatically corrects the orientation of TIFF and JPEG images (based on their EXIF data) when
displayed in ACDSee.
Status bar date
Specifies the date to display in the status bar for a selected file.
Date/Time output format
Select one of the following:
Default system format: Uses the default system format when displaying the date
and time in information overlays.
Custom format: Uses the specified format to display the date and time in all
information overlays. Select a format for both Date and Time from the drop-down lists.
Setting the Manage Mode Options
You can use the Options dialog box to set various options for Manage mode, including the default start folder.
To Set Manage Mode Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Manage Mode.
3.
On the Manage mode page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Manage Mode Options
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Default start folder
Taskbar Notification
area
Remember from
previous session
Opens Manage mode in the same folder that was open the last time you used
ACDSee, and automatically applies any browsing criteria you were using.
Home folder
Always opens Manage mode to the specified Home folder. Click the Browse
button to locate a starting folder on your hard drive.
Show icon in
Taskbar
Notification area
Displays the ACDSee icon in the Taskbar Notification area.
Continue running
in Taskbar
Notification area
on exit
Continues to run ACDSee in the background after you exit the application.
You can restart ACDSee by clicking the icon in the Taskbar Notification area.
Run ACDSee in
Taskbar
Notification area
when system
starts
Starts ACDSee in the background when you turn on your computer. You can
open ACDSee by clicking the icon in the Taskbar Notification area.
Display theme
Specifies the color scheme to use in ACDSee.
Clear path history on
exit
Clears the list of recently-accessed folders whenever you exit ACDSee.
Show full path in title
bar
Displays the full path of an image in the ACDSee title bar.
Show database
filename in title bar
Displays the name of the database that ACDSee is currently running in the title bar.
Error Reporting
Select this option if you do not want to see a system error report if there is an error in ACDSee.
Setting the Quick Search Options
You can use the Quick Search options to refine your search.
To Set Quick Search Options:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Manage Mode | Quick Search.
3.
On the Quick Search page, set or change any of the Quick Search options described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Quick Search Options
Include file names
Searches for file and folder names that begin with the search term.
Include categories
Searches for categories that match the search term, and returns any files assigned to those
categories. Subcategories are not included.
Include contents of
folders
Searches for folder names that begin with the search term and returns the contents of those folders.
Subfolders are not included.
Setting the File List Pane Options
You can use the Options dialog box to set options for the File List pane to suit your preferences, such as grouping archive files with
subfolders, or highlighting image types with different background colors. You can also customize your thumbnails, the file types
ACDSee displays, and adjust how ACDSee handles files and thumbnails in the File List pane.
To Adjust the File List Pane Options:
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1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click File List.
3.
On the File List page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
File List Options
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File List
Configure Filters
Automatically select
new files
Automatically selects new files when they are added to the folder
displayed in the File List pane.
Group archives with
folders
Treats archive files as folders when sorting items in the File List pane.
Use embedded
thumbnails
Displays the RAW files embedded thumbnail if the RAW file has them.
Generate high quality
thumbnails
Creates a high-quality thumbnail of the RAW file in the background while
the embedded thumbnail is displayed, then replaces the poorer quality
thumbnail once it is ready.
Show thumbnails on
folders
Displays thumbnails of a folder's contents on the folder icon in the File
List pane.
Remember each
folder's sort settings
Select this option if you want ACDSee to remember the sort settings that
you used in specific folders.
<CTRL> key activates
hot-tracking
Activates hot-tracking when holding the CTRL key. When selected, you
can hot-track (update the contents of the Preview and Properties panes
without changing your file selection) by holding the CTRL key and moving
your cursor over the File List pane.
Use animations
Activates or deactivates animation for some features as they close or
open. For example, group headers.
Show all files
Shows image files, folders, media files and archive files in the File List.
Apply filtering
criteria
Shows any of the following that you select, and hides any that are not
selected.
Show image files
Show folders
Show media files
Show archive files
Highlight image files
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Show hidden files
and folders
Shows system and other files and that are normally hidden for safety.
Show THM files
Shows Canon THM files in the File Fist.
Show XMP files
Shows XMP sidecar files in the File List.
Don't highlight image
files
Does not highlight image files in Details and Thumbs+Details views.
Use a single color to
highlight image files
Uses a single color to highlight all image file types in Details and
Thumbs+Details views.
Use multiple colors to
highlight image files
Uses a different color to highlight each image type in Details and
Thumbs+Details views.
Chapter 7: Options and Configuration
Pop-ups
Mouse cursor hover
activates pop-ups
Activates or deactivates the animated pop-up preview that displays when
you hover over thumbnails in the File List.
Settings below allow you to include text and/or an image in the pop-up,
or if you turn this option off, to activate the pop-up only when you hold
down the SHIFT key.
<SHIFT> key
activates pop-ups
Activates the pop-up only if you hold down the SHIFT key while hovering
over a thumbnail in the File List. You can turn this option off if it
interferes with SHIFT selection.
Auto hide pop-ups
Hides pop-ups after 5 seconds, even if you are still hovering over the
image.
Show thumbnail in
pop-ups
Shows a pop-up preview of images in the File List when you hover over
them with a mouse
Show file information
in pop-ups
Includes text file information in the mouse-over pop-up. You can select
the information to display by clicking Configure Pop-ups and clicking on
the type of information.
Configure file
information
Opens the Choose Pop-up Information dialog where you can select what information to display in the
pop-up when you hover over a thumbnail in the File List. The default is file name, location, size,
modified date, and image dimension, but you can select other ACDSee Metadata, EXIF, file, image,
IPTC, or multimedia attributes.
Show the Windows
Explorer shell context
menu as the default
right-click menu
Displays the default Windows Explorer context menu instead of the ACDSee context menu.
Setting the Thumbnail Info Options
You can use the Options dialog box to change what information to display with thumbnails of images in the File List pane. These
options are set under File List | Thumbnail Info.
To Adjust the Thumbnail Info Options:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click File List | Thumbnail Info.
3.
On the Thumbnail Info page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Thumbnail Info Options
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Information
Overlay icons
To view the
overlay icons, go
to Browsing Files
in the File List
Pane.
File name
Displays the name of each file on the thumbnail in the File List pane.
Choose Thumbnail
Info
Opens a dialog box where you can select the information to display on
each thumbnail in the File List pane.
Choose Tiles Info
Opens a dialog box where you can select the information to display on
each tile in Tiles view mode.
Show unrated,
untagged, and
unlabeled overlay
icons on hover
Shows unrated, untagged, and unlabeled overlay icons on hover.
Rating
Displays a rating overlay icon on thumbnails if the file has been rated in
the ACDSee database.
Embed Pending
Displays a database overlay icon on the thumbnails of files that have had
metadata information added and stored in the ACDSee database, but have
not yet been written to the files. This icon indicates that a file and the
database are out of sync.
Icon
Displays a file format overlay icon on thumbnails in the File List pane.
Category
Displays a category overlay icon on thumbnails if the file has been
categorized.
Shortcut
Displays a shortcut overlay icon on thumbnails if the item is a shortcut to
another file.
Offline
Displays an offline overlay icon on thumbnails if the file is stored on an
offline device.
Excluded items
Displays an excluded file icon on thumbnails if the file is excluded from
the ACDSee database.
Tagged items
Displays a tagging overlay icon on thumbnails. If the file is tagged, a
checkmark displays in the icon.
Untagged items
If selected, an empty tagging overlay icon displays on the thumbnails of
untagged images.
Auto-rotate
Displays an auto-rotate overlay icon on thumbnails if the file was
automatically rotated.
Sound
Displays a sound overlay icon on thumbnails if the image contains
embedded or associated audio.
Edited
Displays an Edit overlay icon on thumbnails if the file has been edited.
Geotagged
Displays a marker overlay icon on thumbnails if the file has been pinned
on the map.
Label
Displays a color label overlay icon on thumbnails if the file has been
labeled.
Setting the Thumbnail Style Options
You can use the Options dialog box to change how the thumbnails of images display in the File List pane. These options are set
under File List | Thumbnail Style.
To Adjust the Thumbnail Style Options:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click File List | Thumbnail Style.
3.
On the Thumbnail Style page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Thumbnail Style Options
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Thumbnail frame
Show drop shadow
Shows thumbnails with a 3D drop shadow.
Show slide
background
Displays a shaded background behind the thumbnail and its information.
XP style folder
Displays folders as an XP-style image.
3D style folder
Displays folders as a 3D folder with transparency.
Custom
Specifies a custom height-to-width ratio for the shape of the thumbnails
in the File List pane. Drag the slider under the preview to set the ratio.
The preview shows you the shape as you move the slider.
Portrait
Specifies a standard 3:4 portrait ratio for the shape of the thumbnails in
the File List pane.
Landscape
Specifies a standard 4:3 landscape ratio for the shape of the thumbnails
in the File List pane.
Thumbnail spacing
Slider
Increases or decreases the space between each thumbnail.
High-quality scaling
Uses high-quality thumbnail scaling in the File List pane.
Folder style
Thumbnail ratio
Setting the Details View Options
You can use the Options dialog box to change how thumbnails display in the File List pane.
To Adjust the Details View Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click File List | Details View.
3.
On the Details View page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Details View Options
Show grid lines
Separates each row and column in Details view mode with a grid line.
Full row select
Selects the entire row when you click a column entry in that row.
Column auto-width
Automatically resizes each column to fit its contents.
Highlight sort column
Highlights the column used to sort files when you click on the column's title.
Choose Details
Specifies the columns you want to use to sort files in Details view mode.
Setting the Preview Pane Options
You can specify how ACDSee displays previews of your images, and configure settings to play audio and video files automatically, as
soon as you view them in the Preview pane.
To Set the Preview Options:
1.
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, click Tools | Options | Preview.
In Manage mode, right-click in the Preview pane and select Preview Options.
2.
On the Preview options page, set or change the options as described below.
3.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Preview Options
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Delay
Specifies how quickly the Preview pane displays an image after you select it in the File List pane.
Size
Specifies the size of the previewed image in relation to the selected image.
Preview audio and
video clips
Previews media files as you select them in the File List pane.
Autoplay audio and
video clips
Automatically starts playing audio and video files in the Preview pane.
Instant image
preview
Displays an instant preview that improves in quality as the image is decoded.
Image and
Information
Select one of the following:
Show image: Displays a preview of the selected image in the Preview pane.
Show information: Displays information about the selected image in the Preview pane.
Setting the Folders Pane Options
You can customize the Folders pane by showing or hiding the Easy-Select bar, displaying archives, and identifying excluded
folders.
To Customize the Folders Pane:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Folders.
3.
On the Folders page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Folders Pane Options
Easy-Select
Folder display
Show Easy-Select
Displays the Easy-Select bar in the Folders pane, which you can use to
select multiple folders.
Enable Easy-Select
tooltip
Displays a tool-tip when you place your cursor over the Easy-Select bar.
Show archives in
Folder Pane
Lists archive files in the Folders pane.
Confirm drag & drop
move within folder
views
Prompts you for confirmation of folder movements within the Folders
pane.
Show overlay for
excluded folders
Displays an overlay icon on folders that are excluded from the ACDSee
database.
Setting the Catalog Pane Options
You can customize the Catalog pane to specify which confirmations you want to be prompted for while working with categories, and
choose whether to show the Easy-Select bar.
To Set the Catalog Pane Options:
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1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Catalog.
3.
On the Catalog page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK.
Chapter 7: Options and Configuration
Catalog Options
Category deletion
Confirm if category
has assigned files
Prompts you for confirmation when deleting a category with assigned
files.
Confirm if category
has sub-categories
Prompts you for confirmation when deleting a category containing subcategories.
File removal
Confirm file removal
from category
Prompts you for confirmation when un-assigning files from a category.
Easy-select
Show Easy-Select
Displays an Easy-Select bar in the Catalog pane, which you can use to
select multiple categories, special items, and ratings.
Enable Easy-Select
tooltip
Displays a tool-tip when you place your cursor over the Easy-Select bar.
Show icons for
categories, ratings,
color labels, and
special items
Displays icons so you can easily identify categories, ratings, color labels,
and special items.
Enable setting
categories, keywords,
ratings, and color
labels
Allows you to set categories, ratings, and color labels in the Catalog pane.
Icons
Setting the Calendar Pane Options
You can customize the ACDSee Calendar to start each week on a specific day, to use a 12- or 24-hour clock format, and to use one of
four date types when sorting files.
To Set the Calendar Pane Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Calendar.
3.
On the Calendar page, set or change any of the options described below.
4.
Click OK to accept your changes and return to ACDSee.
Calendar Pane Options
Date types
Filters
Database date
Sorts files in the Calendar pane based on the date stored in the ACDSee
database.
Date taken
Sorts files in the Calendar pane based on the EXIF date of each item.
File modified
date
Sorts files in the Calendar pane based on the last-modified date of each item.
File created date
Sorts files in the Calendar pane based on the date each file was created on your
computer.
Apply Advanced
File List Filters
(excluding
folders)
Filters the items displayed in the Calendar pane based on the current File List
pane filter settings.
Show image and
media files only
Displays only image, audio, and video files in the Calendar pane.
Start of week
Specifies the first day of each week in the Calendar pane.
Clock formats
12 hour
Uses a 12-hour clock in the Calendar pane.
24 hour
Uses a 24-hour clock in the Calendar pane.
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Setting the CD/DVD Management Options
You can use the Options dialog box to change the folder where Burn Basket files are stored and to set the preferred method for
identifying Photo Discs.
To Change the Burn Basket or Photo Disc Identification Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click CD/DVD Management.
3.
On the CD/DVD Management page, set or change any of the options described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
CD/DVD Management Options
Burn Basket
Photo Disc
Identification
Show Burn
Basket
Wizard
welcome
step
Displays the Welcome step in the Burn Basket Wizard.
Browse
Opens the Browse For Folder dialog box where you can change the folder where
Burn Basket files are stored.
Use disc
volume label
Attempts to identify a Photo Disc by its volume label. This setting is recommended
if you are working with multi-session Photo Discs.
Use disc
serial
number
Attempts to identify a Photo Disc by its serial number. This setting is preferred
when working with single-session Photo Discs, or importing or converting Photo
Discs from a previous version of ACDSee.
Setting the Properties Pane Options
You can use the Options dialog box to customize the information available on the Metadata tab in the Properties pane.
To Customize the Metadata Tab in the Properties Pane:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Properties Pane.
3.
On the Properties Pane page, hide the Tagged, Rating, and Color Labels, by deselecting the corresponding checkbox.
4.
Hide the Categories by deselecting the checkbox.
5.
Click Manage Metadata Views to open the Choose Metadata to Display dialog box.
6.
Click the plus signs to expand the tree and select your preferences.
7.
Click OK.
8.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
You can also click the Metadata View drop-down list in the Properties pane Metadata tab and select Manage Metadata
Views.
Setting the File Management Options
You can specify how ACDSee handles renaming and deleting files and folders, and whether ACDSee sends deleted files to the
desktop Recycle Bin by default.
To Set the File Management Options:
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1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click File Management.
3.
On the File Management page, set or change any of the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to accept your changes and return to ACDSee.
File Management Options
Overwriting duplicate
files
Save Originals
Ask
Prompts you for confirmation when overwriting duplicate files.
Rename
Automatically resolves any naming conflicts when moving or copying
files by renaming the source files. In the Separator character field,
type a character to use to separate file names in the automatic renaming
system.
Replace
Automatically overwrites files in the target folder without prompting for
confirmation.
Skip
Does not move, copy, or overwrite any files that result in naming
conflicts.
Saves a copy of the original file when it is edited using one of the batch editing tools. This makes it
possible to restore the original file later. Turning this option off means that originals are not saved
during batch editing, and so cannot be restored.
In Edit mode, a copy of the original file is always saved, whether or not this option is selected.
Other
Click to edit file
name
Specifies that file names can be edited by clicking the file name in the
File List pane.
Use Recycle Bin
Sends files to the Desktop Recycle Bin. If not selected, deleted files are
permanently removed from your hard drive.
Preserve ACDSee
metadata when files
are copied
Copies ACDSee metadata with files when you copy them to another
location.
Control confirmations for folder delete, file delete, and read-only rename and delete actions in your operating system
settings.
Setting the Database Options
You can adjust settings in the Options dialog box to display reminders, control database information, and specify a location on your
hard drive where you want to store your database files and cached thumbnails.
To Set the Database Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog, click Database.
3.
On the Database page, set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Database Options
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Database location
Specifies the location on your hard drive to store the ACDSee database. Click the Browse button to
locate a folder.
Display backup
reminder
Automatically reminds you to back up your ACDSee database. Click the Every drop-down list and
select how often you would like to be reminded.
Manage excluded
folders
Opens the Excluded Folders List dialog box, where you can specify which folders you want to
exclude from the ACDSee database.
Display embed
ACDSee Metadata
reminder
Displays a reminder to embed ACDSee Metadata.
Set database date to
EXIF date
Automatically adds the EXIF date to the ACDSee database when you catalog the contents of a folder.
Note: If the database date is changed, the Embed Pending flag does not show up.
Import EXIF and
IPTC metadata from
cataloged files
Automatically imports EXIF and IPTC information into the ACDSee database whenever you catalog the
contents of a folder.
Set "Embed Pending"
when tagging files
Displays a database overlay icon on thumbnails if the file has been tagged, but this metadata has not
yet been written to the file. This icon indicates that the file and the database are out of sync. When
this option is disabled, tagged images will not show up under Embed Pending in the Special Items
section of the Catalog pane.
Show separator
conflict dialog for
IPTC keywords
Displays the IPTC Keywords dialog box when a separator conflict occurs. You can specify a method
of handling conflicts within the dialog and select not to display it again. Select this option to change
or adjust those settings the next time a separator conflict occurs.
Show separator
conflict dialog for
IPTC supplemental
categories
Displays the IPTC Supplemental Categories dialog box when a separator conflict occurs. You can
specify a method of handling conflicts within the dialog and elect not to display it again. Select this
option to change or adjust those settings the next time a separator conflict occurs.
If this option is not selected, ACDSee does not import the EXIF and IPTC information, but does set
aside space within the database records. To remove the empty records, be sure to optimize your
database frequently.
Setting the View Mode Options
You can use the Options dialog box to adjust the behavior of View mode to suit your preferences, and increase the speed with which
images are displayed.
To Set the View Mode Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click View Mode.
3.
On the View mode options page, set or change any of the View mode options described below.
4.
Click OK to accept your changes and return to ACDSee.
View Mode Options
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Decoding and caching
Startup files
Decode next image in
advance
Automatically decodes the next image in sequence in View mode,
resulting in shorter load times.
Keep previous image
in memory
Keeps the previously decoded image in memory for quick display in View
mode.
Replace images in list
Does not open a new View mode window if an image is opened from
another application.
Images in new
window
Opens a new View mode window to display images opened from another
application.
Show pixels when
zoomed past 100%
Resampling is not applied to images zoomed past 100%. When the box is unchecked, images zoomed
past 100% are resampled to produce smooth transitions, but this may result in excessive blurring.
Dropped files
Replace images in list
Replaces the list of images open in View mode with images dropped into
View mode from another application.
Add images to list
Adds any images dropped into View mode by another application to the
list of images already open.
Always on top
Keeps the ACDSee window as the top window in a stack of windows.
Full-screen
Opens images in View mode in full-screen mode. (Press F to exit full-screen mode.)
Hide mouse cursor in
full-screen
Hides the cursor in full-screen mode.
Instant image preview
Displays an instant preview in View mode that improves in quality as the image is decoded.
Use ACDSee Quick
View
If selected, ACDSee Quick View is set as the default viewer for images when ACDSee is closed.
Exit after delete/move
Automatically returns to Manage mode after moving or deleting an image in View mode.
View all images in
folder
Adds all images in a folder to the current image list when viewing any file from that folder.
Show full image file
path
Displays the image's full file path in View mode title and status bars.
Sharpen subsampled
images
Automatically sharpens the view for images zoomed in at less than 100%.
Setting the Display Options
You can use the Options dialog box to change the window background and specify how images are zoomed.
To Set the Display Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click View Mode | Display.
3.
On the Display options page, set or change the options described below.
4.
Click OK to accept your changes and return to ACDSee.
Display Options
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Zoom options
Default zoom mode
Specifies the default zoom level for images in View mode.
Reset zoom mode to
default on every
image change
Resets the zoom mode to the selected default when the displayed image
changes.
Resize
Resizes the image based on the selected option. For more information
about how these choices affect the Viewer, see Automatically shrinking or
enlarging images.
Pan tool
Enable click-zooming
Deselect to turn off the one click image toggle between Default view and
Actual Size view.
Pan speed
Slow - Fast
Specifies the speed when panning an image.
Background
Default color
Uses the default ACDSee color for the background in View and Edit mode.
Custom color
Specifies a color to use as the background in View and Edit mode.
Tiled image
Uses a tiled image as the background for Develop and Edit mode. Click
Browse to locate an image on your hard drive.
The background color and tiled image options do not affect full screen mode.
To change the background color in ACDSee Quick View, open an image in Quick View, and then click Tools | Options.
Setting the Edit Mode Options
You can use the Options dialog box to show icons in Edit mode.
To Show Icons in the Edit Pane:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Edit Mode.
3.
On the Edit Mode page, select Show icons in Edit pane.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Setting the ACDSee 365 Options
You can use the Options dialog box to set options for ACDSee 365, such as the temporary folder location and what to do with uploads
and downloads when you close ACDSee.
To Set the ACDSee 365 Options:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click ACDSee 365.
3.
On the ACDSee 365 page, set or change any of the options described below.
4.
Click OK to accept your changes and return to ACDSee.
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Folder locations
Temporary folder
Click the Browse button to change the folder where ACDSee temporarily
keeps files during uploads and downloads.
Uploads/Downloads
On shutdown, always
pause all transfers
Pauses all transfers when you close ACDSee.
On startup, always
automatically resume
all paused transfers
Resumes all transfers when you reopen ACDSee.
Number of concurrent
uploads (1-10)
Select the number of files to be uploaded at the same time.
Number of concurrent
downloads (1-10)
Select the number of files to be downloaded at the same time.
Convert 'Rating 1' to
5 stars
Converts a numeric rating of 1 to five stars.
Convert 'Rating 1' to
1 star
Converts a numeric rating of 1 to one star.
Ratings
Setting the ACDSee Showroom Options
You can customize the ACDSee Showroom desktop slideshow in a number of ways, including changing the slide duration, order, and
transition or changing the frame opacity, size, and frame style.
To Customize the ACDSee Showroom Desktop Slideshow:
1.
Start ACDSee Showroom by doing one of the following:
In any mode, click Tools | Create | ACDSee Showroom.
Click Start | Programs | ACD Systems | ACDSee Showroom.
2.
Right-click anywhere in the ACDSee Showroom window and select Options.
3.
Set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click Set As Default to use the currently selected options as the default for new Showroom windows.
5.
Click OK to apply your changes.
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Picture Folder
Slide
Showroom Window
Run at startup
Include subfolders
Select this option if you want to include photos from subfolders in the
slideshow.
Skip hidden folders
Select this option to skip hidden folders such as the [Originals] folders
that are created when you process images.
Duration
Drag the slider to the left to decrease the display time for each photo and
to the right to increase the display time for each photo.
Order
From the Order drop-down list select Sequential to display photos in
order or Random to display photos randomly.
Transition
From the Transition drop-down list select None if you do not want any
special transition effects, Slide if you want photos to enter the window
from the right and exit to the left, and Fade if you want to reduce photo
opacity during the transition from one photo to another.
Apply to all
Select Apply to all if you want to apply these changes to all slideshows.
Opacity
Drag the Opacity slider to the left to reduce the opacity of the Showroom
window and to the right to increase opacity.
Size
From the Size drop-down list select either a Small, Medium, or Large
Showroom window frame.
Frame
From the Frame drop-down list select a frame style.
Always on top
Select Always on top if you want the Showroom window to display on
top of all other application windows.
Apply to all
Select Apply to all if you want to apply these changes to all Showroom
windows.
Select Run at startup if you want to start ACDSee Showroom automatically when you start your
computer.
Setting the ACDSee Quick View Options
You can customize ACDSee Quick View in a number of ways, including displaying Quick View on top of any open windows, displaying
Quick view at full screen, or even changing the background color in the Quick View window.
To Customize ACDSee Quick View:
1.
Double-click on an image. For example, double-click on the image in Windows Explorer or in an email message.
2.
Click Tools | Options.
3.
Set or change the options as described below.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes.
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Use ACDSee Quick
View
If selected, ACDSee Quick View is set as the default viewer for images when ACDSee is closed.
Enable gamma
correction
Applies the specified amount of gamma correction when viewing images.
Disable animation
Displays only the first frame of an animated image.
Always on top
Keeps the Quick View window as the top window in a stack of windows.
Full screen
Opens images in the Quick View window in full screen mode.
Hide mouse cursor in
full screen
Hides the cursor in full screen mode.
Default zoom mode
Fit image: Displays the image at the largest magnification that fits in the Quick View window.
Images that are smaller than the Quick View window display at their original size.
Actual size: Displays the image at its actual size in the Quick View window.
Background
Default color: Uses the ACDSee background color in Quick View.
Custom color: Specifies a color to use as the background in the Quick View window. Click the color
swatch to select a different color.
Setting JPEG Options
You can change the settings in the Options dialog box to control the quality of the JPEG image, encoding method, color subsampling
method, and whether to update or create embedded thumbnails in the JPEG image.
JPEG Options
Image quality
Drag the slider to determine the quality of the JPEG image.
Progressive: Select to enable progressive encoding.
Encoding
Optimize Huffman codes: Select to optimize Huffman codes to increase compression.
2:1 Horizontal: Select to subsample color channels on the horizontal axis by a factor of 2:1.
Color component
sampling
2:1 Vertical: Select to subsample color channels on the vertical axis by a factor of 2:1.
Only update existing thumbnails: Select to update any existing embedded thumbnails.
Embedded thumbnails
Always add/update thumbnails: Select to update any existing embedded thumbnails, or
create embedded thumbnails.
Never add/update thumbnails: Select if you do not want to update any existing embedded
thumbnails, or if you do not want to create embedded thumbnails.
Generate DCF compatible thumbnails: Select to generate thumbnails that meet the
Digital Camera Format (DCF) specification and are compatible with the thumbnail view on the
LCD of a digital camera. This option forces a fixed resolution of 160 x 120 and pads any extra
space with black.
Save these settings
as the defaults
Select this option to use these JPEG settings by default for all JPEGs.
Setting the Media Options
You can change what application handles your audio and video files when launched from ACDSee.
To Customize the Default Media Player for Files Launched from ACDSee:
1.
In any mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Media.
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3.
To launch audio and video files in your system's default media player, check the Use default media player to open
audio and video files checkbox.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes.
Auto-hiding Panes and Panels
You can use the Auto Hide button to automatically hide some panes and panels in ACDSee. When a pane is set to auto-hide, it rolls
away when you click outside of it, leaving a tab displayed. You can access the pane by moving the cursor over the tab. When a pane
or panel is floating, the auto-hide feature is not available. You cannot move the pane to a new location if it is set to auto-hide.
The Auto Hide button's appearance on the pane’s title bar reflects its current setting:
A horizontal pushpin indicates that the pane is set to automatically hide when you click outside of it.
A vertical pushpin indicates that the pane is fixed and will remain visible even if you click outside of it.
To Set or Remove Auto-Hide:
Click the Auto Hide button on the title bar so that it displays a slanted or horizontal pushpin.
Using the Task Pane
The Task Pane displays groups of often-used tasks from the menus and toolbars based on your current location and selections in
ACDSee. By default, the Task Pane opens on the right side of the Manage mode window.
To Open or Close the Task Pane:
In Manage mode, click View | Task Pane.
The menus in the Task Pane change depending on what area of the Manage mode window you are working in and what items you
select. For example, if you select more than a folder in the File List pane, the Task Pane displays different menus than it does if
you select a photo or media file.
The options on the Task Pane menus also change dynamically. For example, if you select multiple images in the File List, the
options in the Fix and Enhance Photos menu change to list options that you can use with multiple images.
Customizing Toolbars
You can customize the appearance and organization of toolbars in Manage mode and View mode by selecting which toolbars to
display, and specifying each toolbar’s buttons or commands. You can also discard your changes and reset the toolbars to their
default layout at any time.
Displaying and Hiding Toolbars
You can choose to display or hide the specific toolbars in Manage mode and View mode.
To Display or Hide a Toolbar:
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, click View | Toolbars, and then select the toolbar you want to display or hide.
In View mode, click View, and then select the toolbar you want to display or hide.
Customizing Toolbar Contents
You can customize the following toolbars:
In Manage mode: The Main toolbar and the File List toolbar.
In View mode: The Bottom toolbar.
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You can add, remove, and rearrange buttons on these toolbars. You can also display or hide text labels and tool tips for the buttons
on these toolbars, and change button size. All toolbar customization options are on the Customize dialog box.
To Display the Customize Dialog Box:
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, click View | Toolbars and then select Customize.
In Manage mode, click the drop-down arrow, located to the right of the Main toolbar or File List toolbar, and select
Customize.
In View mode, click the drop-down arrow, located to the right of the Bottom toolbar, select Add or Remove Buttons, and
then select Customize.
To Display or Hide Text Labels Below Toolbar Buttons:
1.
Display the Customize dialog box.
2.
Click the Toolbars tab.
3.
Select File List Toolbar or Main Toolbar.
4.
Select the Show text labels checkbox to display text labels, or clear the Show text labels checkbox to hide text labels.
5.
Click Close.
To Display or Hide Tool Tips for Toolbar Buttons:
1.
Display the Customize dialog box.
2.
Click the Options tab.
3.
Select Show ScreenTips on toolbars to display tool-tips, or clear Show ScreenTips on toolbars to hide tool-tips. If you
select this option, you can also select Show shortcut keys in ScreenTips to show keyboard shortcuts in the tool-tips.
4.
Click Close.
To Change the Toolbar Button Size:
1.
Display the Customize dialog box.
2.
Click the Options tab.
3.
Select Large Icons to display larger toolbar buttons, or clear Large Icons to display smaller toolbar buttons.
4.
Click Close.
Resetting Toolbars
You can discard all of your changes, and return the toolbars and buttons to their default states.
To Reset the Toolbars:
1.
Display the Customize dialog box.
2.
Click the Toolbars tab, and then click Reset All.
3.
Click Yes to reset the toolbars.
4.
Click Close.
Customizing the Editing Tools Pane
You can resize, move, and dock the Editing Tools pane in Edit mode to suit your preferences.
To Customize the Editing Tools Pane:
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1.
In Edit mode, drag the Editing Tools pane's title bar to a new location. If you drag the Editing Tools pane to either the left or
right side of the window, it will dock against that side.
2.
To resize the Editing Tools pane, drag one of its edges.
Configuring External Editors
You can configure ACDSee to work with a variety of image editors, such as Canvas, and specify which image editor ACDSee uses by
default. You can then open images in any of your external editing applications from within ACDSee.
You must configure an external editor before you can assign a shortcut key to it or place it as a button on the toolbar.
To Configure an External Editor in ACDSee:
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | External Editors | Configure Editors.
2.
In the Configure Photo Editors dialog box, click Add.
3.
Browse to the folder on your hard drive that contains an image editing application.
4.
Select the executable file of the editing application. For example, Canvas14.exe.
5.
Click Open.
6.
In the Name field, type a name for the editor, and then click OK.
To Create a Shortcut to an External Editor:
1.
Click the Toolbar drop-down arrow (to the right of the External Editors menu item) and select Add or Remove Buttons |
Customize.
2.
In the Customize dialog box, click the Keyboard tab and select External Editors from the Category list.
3.
Enter a shortcut key into the Press New Shortcut Key field.
4.
Click Assign and close the dialog box.
Your new keyboard shortcut has been set.
To Add an External Editor to the FileList Toolbar in Manage Mode:
1.
Click the Toolbar drop-down arrow (to the right of the External Editors menu option) and select Add or Remove Buttons
| Customize.
2.
In the Customize dialog box, in the Commands tab, select External Editors from the Category list.
3.
Click and drag an External Editor from the list onto the FileList toolbar.
4.
Close the dialog box.
The External Editor is added to the FileList toolbar.
To Add an External Editor Button to the Toolbar in View Mode:
1.
Click the Toolbar drop-down arrow next to the tools and select Add or Remove Buttons | Customize.
2.
In the Customize dialog box, in the Commands tab, select External Editors from the Category list.
3.
Click and drag an External Editor from the list onto the toolbar.
4.
Close the dialog box.
The External Editor is added to the toolbar.
To Manage Your Image Editors:
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1.
In the Configure Photo Editors dialog box, in the Editors list, select the application you want to change.
2.
Do any of the following:
To change the location of the executable file or the name of the application displayed in the Editors list, click Edit.
Set the location and name of the application, and then click OK.
To set the application as the default external editor for ACDSee, click Set As Default.
To specify whether the application can handle multiple images at the same time, select or clear the checkbox in the
Supports Multiple Images column.
To remove the application from the list, click Remove.
3.
Click OK to accept your changes and return to ACDSee.
To Open an Image in an External Image Editor:
1.
In Manage or View mode, select the image you want to open in the external editor.
2.
Do one of the following:
Click Tools | External Editors | Default External Editor or the name of an editor.
Press CTRL + ALT + X to open the image in the default external editor.
Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts
There are pre-defined keyboard shortcuts for commands that you use frequently in Manage mode and View mode. You can change
pre-defined shortcuts, or create keyboard shortcuts for commands that do not currently have shortcuts.
Some commands, such as Open and Copy, are available in both Manage mode and View mode. You can use the same keyboard
shortcut for these commands in Manage mode and the View mode, or you can define different shortcuts for these commands in
Manage mode and View mode. To define a shortcut for a command in a specific mode, open the Customize dialog from that mode.
To Customize Keyboard Shortcuts:
1.
Do one of the following:
In Manage mode, click View | Toolbars, and then select Customize.
In Manage mode, click the drop-down arrow, located to the right of the Main toolbar or File List toolbar, and then
select Customize.
In View mode, click the drop-down arrow, located to the right of the Bottom toolbar, select Add or Remove
Buttons, and then select Customize.
2.
3.
4.
In the Customize dialog box, click the Keyboard tab.
From the Category drop-down, select a top-level menu, such as File, Edit, or View. The commands available from that menu
display in the Commands list box.
Select a command in the Commands list box.
If a keyboard shortcut has been defined for that command, it displays in the Current Keys box.
If a keyboard shortcut has not been defined for that command, the Current Keys box will be empty.
5.
To remove an existing keyboard shortcut, select the keyboard shortcut in the Current Keys box, and then click Remove.
To Define a New Keyboard Shortcut:
1.
Click in the Press New Shortcut Key text box.
2.
Press the keys on your keyboard that you want to use for the keyboard shortcut.
The keys display in the Press New Shortcut Key text box.
3.
Click Assign.
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The new keyboard shortcut displays in the Current Keys box.
4.
To remove all custom keyboard shortcuts and restore the default keyboard shortcuts, click Reset All .
5.
Click Close.
Changing the Display Theme
In ACDSee you can change the display theme to change the background color of the panes and toolbars.
To Change the Display Theme:
214
1.
In Manage mode, click Tools | Options.
2.
In the Options dialog box, click Manage Mode.
3.
In the Display theme drop-down list, select a theme.
4.
Click OK to apply your changes and return to ACDSee.
Chapter 8: Shortcuts
Chapter 8: Shortcuts
Manage Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
You can use the following keyboard shortcuts while working in Manage mode. There are also shortcuts that can be used specifically
in the Calendar pane.
To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
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This Shortcut
Has This Result
\ (backslash)
Tags or untags the image.
` (grave accent)
Toggles image audio on or off.
ALT + LEFT ARROW
Returns to the previous folder you browsed in the File List pane.
ALT + RIGHT ARROW
Returns to the folder you last moved back from in the File List pane.
ALT + 0 to 5
Assigns a color label to the currently selected item. Press ALT + 0 to remove a color label.
ALT + B
Adds the selected items to the Burn Basket.
ALT + C
Copies one or more selected files to a folder you specify.
ALT + COMMA
Opens the previous tab in the Properties pane.
ALT + ENTER
Opens or closes the Properties pane.
ALT + F4
Closes ACDSee.
ALT + G
Opens the Import dialog box.
ALT + I
Opens the Filters dialog box where you can specify the types of files displayed in the File List
pane.
ALT + K
Places the cursor in the Keyword section of the IPTC group in the Metadata tab of the Properties
pane.
ALT + M
Moves one or more selected files to a folder you specify.
ALT + O
Opens the Options dialog box.
ALT + PERIOD
Opens the next tab in the Properties pane.
ALT + Q
Removes currently displayed item from the Burn Basket.
ALT + SHIFT + F
Maximizes the File List pane.
ALT + W
Restores your desktop wallpaper to the settings you were using before you applied an ACDSee
wallpaper.
ALT + X
Removes currently displayed item from the Image Basket.
BACKSPACE
Moves up one level in the current drive's folder structure.
CTRL + 0 to 5
Assigns a rating to the currently selected item. Press CTRL + 0 to remove a rating.
CTRL + \ (backslash)
Selects the tagged images.
CTRL + A
Selects the entire contents of the current folder.
CTRL + B
Adds the selected items to the Image Basket.
CTRL + C
Copies the selected items to the Clipboard.
CTRL + E
Opens the currently selected image in Edit mode.
CTRL + F
Opens the Batch Convert File Format dialog box.
CTRL + G
Generates a file listing as a text document.
CTRL + I
Selects all images in the current folder.
CTRL + INSERT
Copies selected items to the Clipboard.
CTRL + J
Opens the Batch Rotate/Flip Images dialog box.
CTRL + K
Places the cursor in the Keywords field of the Organize tab in the Properties pane.
CTRL + L
Opens the Batch Adjust Exposure dialog box.
CTRL + N
Creates a new folder in the File List pane.
CTRL + O
Opens the Open Files dialog box, in which you can select one or more images to open in View
mode.
CTRL + P
Opens the currently selected image or images in the ACDSee Print utility.
CTRL + R
Opens the Batch Resize Images dialog box.
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CTRL + S
Creates a slideshow from the currently selected images.
CTRL + T
Opens the Batch Adjust Time Stamp dialog box.
CTRL + TAB
Moves the focus of the Manage mode window between the currently displayed panes.
CTRL + V
Pastes the contents of the Clipboard.
CTRL + W
Closes ACDSee.
CTRL + X
Cuts the currently selected items to the Clipboard.
CTRL + ALT + R
Opens the selected images in the Compare Images viewer.
CTRL + ALT + W
Sets the selected image as a stretched desktop wallpaper.
CTRL + ALT + X
Opens the current image in the default external editor.
CTRL + RIGHT CLICK
Opens Windows Explorer context menu.
CTRL + SHIFT + 1
Opens or closes the Folders pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + 2
Opens or closes the Catalog pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + 3
Opens or closes the Search pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + 4
Opens or closes the Calendar pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + 5
Opens or closes the Image Basket.
CTRL + SHIFT + A
Selects all files in the current folder.
CTRL + SHIFT + B
Shows or hides the status bar.
CTRL + SHIFT + C
Copies the currently selected image to the Clipboard.
CTRL + SHIFT + D
Clears your current selection.
CTRL + SHIFT + E
Opens the current file in the default system application or opens a dialog box where you can
select an application.
CTRL + SHIFT + F
Toggles the full-screen view for the File List pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + I
Inverts your current selection.
CTRL + SHIFT + L
Opens or closes the Selective Browsing pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + M
Opens or closes the Map pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + N
Opens a second instance of the ACDSee program.
CTRL + SHIFT + O
Opens the file using the system application associated with its file extension.
CTRL + SHIFT + P
Opens or closes the Preview pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + T
Displays or hides the Manage mode Main toolbar.
CTRL + SHIFT + TAB
Moves the focus of the Manage mode window between the currently displayed panes.
CTRL + SHIFT + W
Sets the selected image as a tiled desktop wallpaper.
CTRL + SHIFT + ALT + W
Sets the selected image as a centered desktop wallpaper.
DELETE
Deletes the selected items to the Recycle Bin.
ENTER
Opens the selected item in View mode.
F1
Opens the ACDSee Help file.
F2
Renames one or more selected files.
F3
Opens the Search pane.
F4
Displays the Contents bar drop-down list.
F5
Refreshes Manage mode.
F6
Changes the File List to Thumbs+Details view.
F7
Changes the File List to Filmstrip view.
F8
Changes the File List to Thumbnails view.
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F9
Changes the File List to Tiles view.
F10
Changes the File List to Icons view.
F11
Changes the File List to List view.
F12
Changes the File List to Details view.
SHIFT + DELETE
Removes the selected item from your hard drive.
SHIFT + F5
Refreshes the File List pane.
SHIFT + INSERT
Pastes the contents of the Clipboard.
SHIFT + TAB
Moves the focus of the Manage mode window to the previous pane or tool in sequence.
TAB
Moves the focus of the Manage mode window to the next pane or tool in sequence.
Manage Mode Mouse Shortcuts
You can use the following mouse shortcuts in Manage mode.
To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
Shortcut
Resulting Action
Double-click
Opens the selected image in View mode.
Right-click
Opens the Manage mode context menu.
SHIFT + click
Selects a group of images.
Click + drag
Selects a group of images. Be sure to click on a blank area of the screen, not on an image or
folder, before you drag, so you can draw a selection box around the group of images.
CTRL + click
Selects images you click on.
CTRL + right click
Opens the Windows Explorer context menu.
CTRL + Wheel up
Increases the magnification of the image (zooms in).
CTRL + Wheel down
Decreases the magnification of the image (zooms out).
View Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
You can use the following keyboard shortcuts while working in View mode.
To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
If you would like to define your own keyboard shortcuts, see Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts .
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Chapter 8: Shortcuts
Shortcut
Resulting Action
\ (backslash)
Tags or untags the image.
= (equal sign)
Increases the magnification of the current image (zooms in).
` (grave accent)
Toggles image audio on or off.
ALT + ENTER
Opens or closes the Properties pane.
ALT + DOWN ARROW
Zooms the image to fit the height within View mode window. Does not enlarge,
only reduces.
ALT + RIGHT ARROW
Zooms the image to fit the width within View mode Window. Does not enlarge,
only reduces.
ALT + \
Toggles the zoom lock on and off.
ALT + 0 to 5
Assigns a color label to the currently selected item. Press ALT + 0 to remove a
color label.
ALT + B
Adds the selected items to the Burn Basket in Manage mode.
ALT + C
Copies the current item to a folder you specify.
ALT + COMMA
Moves the focus in the Properties pane to the previous tab.
ALT + D
Opens the Edit Caption dialog box.
ALT + F4
Closes ACDSee.
ALT + M
Moves the current item to a folder you specify.
ALT + O
Opens the ACDSee Options dialog box.
ALT + PERIOD
Moves the focus in the Properties pane to the next tab.
ALT + Q
Removes currently displayed item from the Burn Basket in Manage mode.
ALT + R
Opens the Rename File dialog box.
ALT + S
Starts or stops the Auto Advance slideshow.
ALT + W
Restores your desktop wallpaper to the settings you were using before you
applied an ACDSee wallpaper.
ALT + X
Removes currently displayed item from the Image Basket in Manage mode.
B
Displays or hides the status bar.
BACKSPACE
Displays the previous item in the slideshow, Auto Advance, or View sequence.
CTRL + LEFT ARROW
Displays the previous image.
CTRL + RIGHT ARROW
Displays the next image.
CTRL + 0 to 5
Assigns a rating to the currently selected item. Use only the numeric keypad for
these shortcuts. Press CTRL + 0 to remove a rating.
CTRL + A
Displays or hides headers and footers.
CTRL + B
Adds currently displayed item to the Image Basket in Manage mode.
CTRL + C
Copies the currently displayed file to the Clipboard.
CTRL + E
Opens the currently selected image in Edit mode.
CTRL + F
Opens the Batch Convert File Format dialog box.
CTRL + F4
Closes the current item.
CTRL + INSERT
Copies the selected portion of an image to the Clipboard.
CTRL + J
Opens the Batch Rotate/Flip Images dialog box.
CTRL + MINUS
Reduces the magnification of the area inside the Magnifying Glass pane.
CTRL + O
Opens the Open files dialog box, in which you can select one or more images to
open in View mode.
CTRL + P
Opens the current image in the ACDSee Print utility.
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Shortcut
Resulting Action
CTRL + PLUS
Increases the magnification of the area inside the Magnifying Glass pane.
CTRL + Q
Clears the current selection.
CTRL + S
Opens the Save Image As dialog box, in which you can save your image with a
different name or file format.
CTRL + T
Opens the Batch Adjust Time Stamp dialog box.
CTRL + V
Pastes the contents of the Clipboard.
CTRL + W
Closes ACDSee.
CTRL + X
Cuts the current item to the Clipboard.
CTRL + ALT + LEFT ARROW
Rotates the current image 90° counterclockwise.
CTRL + ALT + RIGHT ARROW
Rotates the current image 90° clockwise.
CTRL + ALT + L
Opens the previous image.
CTRL + ALT + W
Sets the selected image as a stretched desktop wallpaper.
CTRL + ALT + X
Opens the current image in the default external editor.
CTRL + Right-click
Opens the Windows Explorer context menu.
CTRL + SHIFT + A
Opens or closes the Magnifying Glass.
CTRL + SHIFT + B
Displays or hides the status bar.
CTRL + SHIFT + C
Copies the currently displayed image to the Clipboard.
CTRL + SHIFT + F
Toggles full screen mode.
CTRL + SHIFT + F4
Closes all images.
CTRL + SHIFT + H
Opens or closes the Histogram pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + P
Prints all currently selected images, or all images in the current folder.
CTRL + SHIFT + Q
Opens the Edit Header/Footer dialog box, in which you can specify the text to
display on your images in View mode.
CTRL + SHIFT + S
Opens or closes the Navigator pane.
CTRL + SHIFT + T
Displays or hides the Bottom toolbar.
CTRL + SHIFT + W
Sets the selected image as a tiled desktop wallpaper.
CTRL + SHIFT + ALT + W
Sets the selected image as a centered desktop wallpaper.
CTRL + SHIFT + 1
Changes the image color depth to Black and White.
CTRL + SHIFT + 2
Changes the image color depth to 16 grays.
CTRL + SHIFT + 3
Changes the image color depth to 256 grays.
CTRL + SHIFT + 4
Changes the image color depth to 16 colors.
CTRL + SHIFT + 5
Changes the image color depth to 256 colors.
CTRL + SHIFT + 6
Changes the image color depth to Hicolor.
CTRL + SHIFT + 7
Changes the image color depth to Truecolor.
DELETE
Deletes the current image to your Recycle Bin.
E
Toggles the exposure warning on and off.
END
Displays the last of your selected items, or the last item in the current folder
ENTER
Closes View mode and returns to the previous mode.
ESC
Closes current dialog box, or closes View mode and returns to the previous
mode.
F
Toggles full screen mode.
F1
Opens the ACDSee Help file.
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Shortcut
Resulting Action
F2
Opens the Rename File dialog box.
F5
Refreshes the View mode window and reloads the current image.
HOME
Displays the first of your selected items, or the first item in the current folder.
INSERT
Opens the Open files dialog box, in which you can select one or more images to
open in View mode.
L
Toggles the pan lock.
PAGE DOWN
Displays the next item.
PAGE UP
Displays the previous item.
PAUSE
Stops or starts the Auto Advance slideshow.
SHIFT + BACKSPACE
Displays the previous page in a multiple-page image.
SHIFT + DELETE
Removes the current item from your hard drive.
SHIFT + E
Opens the current file in the default system application or opens a dialog box
where you can select an application.
SHIFT + END
Displays the last page of the current multiple- page image.
SHIFT + ENTER
Closes View mode and returns to Manage mode.
SHIFT + F1
Activates the image scrolling tool.
SHIFT + F2
Activates the selection tool.
SHIFT + F3
Activates the zoom tool.
SHIFT + HOME
Displays the first page of the current multiple-page image.
SHIFT + INSERT
Pastes the contents of the Clipboard.
SHIFT + L
Opens the file using the system application associated with its file extension.
SHIFT + PAGE DOWN
Displays the next page in a multiple-page image.
SHIFT + PAGE UP
Displays the previous page in a multiple-page image.
SHIFT + SPACEBAR
Displays the next page in a multiple-page image.
SHIFT + Z
Activates the Select tool, and zooms into the selected area.
SPACEBAR
Displays the next item in the slideshow, Auto Advance, or View sequence.
T
Displays or hides the Bottom toolbar.
TAB
Moves the focus of the Properties pane to the next field.
Z
Opens the Set Zoom Level dialog box.
Note: Use the numeric keypad for the following View mode keyboard shortcuts.
* (asterisk)
Automatically zooms the image to fit within View mode window.
- (minus)
Decreases the magnification of the image (zooms out).
+ (plus)
Increases the magnification of the image (zooms in).
/ (forward slash)
Zooms the image to its actual size.
1
Displays the last item in the current folder.
3
Displays the next item.
7
Displays the previous item.
9
Displays the last item in the current folder.
View Mode Mouse Shortcuts
You can use the following mouse shortcuts while working in View mode.
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To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
Shortcut
Resulting Action
Double-click
Closes View mode and returns to the previous mode.
Right-click
Opens the View mode context menu.
Middle click
Toggles full screen mode (on 3-button mouse).
Wheel click
Toggles full screen mode.
Wheel up
Displays the previous item.
Wheel down
Displays the next item.
CTRL + Right-click
Opens the Windows Explorer context menu.
CTRL + Wheel up
Increases the magnification of the image (zooms in).
CTRL + Wheel down
Decreases the magnification of the image (zooms out).
SHIFT + Wheel up
Displays the previous page of a multiple-page image.
SHIFT + Wheel down
Displays the next page of a multiple-page image.
Calendar Pane Shortcuts
Once you are familiar with the basic calendar pane options, consider using the following shortcuts:
Click the title bar on a year, month, or day table to display all available images for that year, month, or day.
Right-click the title bar on a year, month, or day table to scroll through and select from adjacent years, months, or days.
In Year view double-click any month to switch to Month view. Or, in Month view, double-click any date to switch to Day view.
In Month view click the letter indicating a day of the week to display all available images for that day of the week. For
example, click F to select all Fridays in that month.
In Day view click AM or PM to select the first or second half of a day.
In Event view press and hold the CTRL key and click any month or day to display all available images for those months or
days.
Click on the title of any month calendar, to select all the photos in that month.
Click the name of the week, to select all the photos in those weeks of the month.
Drag and select any days in the calendar to select all the photos in those days.
Edit Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
Use the following keyboard shortcuts in Edit mode.
To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
If you would like to define your own keyboard shortcuts, see Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts .
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Shortcut
Resulting Action
ALT + ENTER
Opens or closes the Properties pane.
B
Toggles the Edit Brush on and off in Edit mode.
S
Shows brush strokes.
CTRL + Y
Redo.
CTRL + Z
Undo.
ALT
After making adjustments to Noise Reduction sliders, hold down ALT key to display residual
noise within the image.
CTRL + E
Opens the image in Edit mode.
CTRL + SHIFT + H
Toggles the histogram to open and close in Edit mode.
PAGE UP
Opens previous image.
PAGE DOWN
Opens the next image.
Edit Mode Mouse Shortcuts
Use the following mouse shortcuts in Edit mode to make quick image adjustments.
To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
Shortcut
Resulting Action
SHIFT + click
Turns off the auto-collapse feature in the pane as you open groups.
SHIFT + mouse wheel
Makes large adjustments to the sliders.
Right-click
Resets any slider to its default value.
Mouse wheel over slider
Makes fine adjustments to a slider. Place your cursor over the slider and scroll up or down.
Mouse wheel over image
Adjusts brush size. Place your cursor over the image and scroll up or down to adjust nib width.
SHIFT + mouse wheel
Adjusts feathering. Place your cursor over the image and scroll up or down to adjust
feathering.
365 Mode Keyboard Shortcuts
Use the following keyboard shortcuts in the Transfer mode.
To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
If you would like to define your own keyboard shortcuts, see Customizing Keyboard Shortcuts .
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Shortcut
Resulting Action
ALT + A
Sets selected folder as an Upsync folder.
ALT + D
Downloads selected files and folders.
ALT + ENTER
Displays Properties pane in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
ALT + Num +
Group forward files and folders in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
ALT + Num -
Group backward files and folders in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
ALT + O
Displays Options dialog.
ALT + U
Uploads selected files and folders.
ALT + X
Removes files from the image basket.
ALT + SHIFT + U
Upsyncs all files.
CTRL + \
Selects tagged files.
CTRL + A
Selects all files and folders.
CTRL + F8
Changes the view in the upper screen in Transfer mode to thumbnail view of images in your
account.
CTRL + F12
Changes the view in the upper screen in Transfer mode to a detailed view of images in your
account.
CTRL + SHIFT + D
Clears image selection.
CTRL + SHIFT + I
Inverts image selection.
CTRL + SHIFT + 1
Displays Folders pane in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
CTRL + SHIFT + 2
Displays Catalog pane in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
CTRL + SHIFT + 3
Displays Search pane in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
CTRL + SHIFT + 4
Displays Calendar pane in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
CTRL + SHIFT + 5
Displays the image basket.
CTRL + W
Closes ACDSee.
DELETE
Deletes files or folders.
ENTER
Opens the selected item in View mode.
F2
Renames files and folders.
F5
Refreshes the view.
F6
Displays thumbnails and details of folders and files in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
F7
Displays filmstrip view of folders and files in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
F8
Displays thumbnails of folders and files in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
F9
Displays tile view of folders and files in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
F10
Displays icon view of folders and file types in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
F11
Displays a list of folder and file types in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
F12
Displays a detailed view of folders and files in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
Num +
Sort forward files and folders in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
Num -
Sort backward files and folders in the lower screen of Transfer mode.
SHIFT + ALT + A
Displays 365.acdsee.com mode.
SHIFT + ALT + C
Copies URL.
SHIFT + ALT + T
Displays Transfer mode.
365 Mode Mouse Shortcuts
Use the following mouse shortcuts in Transfer mode.
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To print this page for easy reference, right-click and select Print...
Shortcut
Resulting Action
Click + drag
Selects a group of images.
CTRL + click
Selects images you click on.
SHIFT + click
Selects a group of images.
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Chapter 9: File Formats
Chapter 9: File Formats
About RAW Files
A RAW file is like a negative. RAW files contain all of the data that was collected by your digital camera's sensor when you took a
photo. If you tried to view a RAW file without processing, it would appear almost completely black. It is therefore necessary to
process your RAW files to produce a photo.
In ACDSee, you can view RAW files using the embedded thumbnail image created by your camera. If you want to process RAW
images, you must use a photo editing program such as ACDSee, which includes tools for developing RAW images.
ACDSee will automatically apply geometry corrections to DNG files that include geometric distortion correction tags. DNG
files created from the Adobe DNG Converter© will often generate geometric distortion tags for micro 4/3rds cameras.
Registering and Associating Files
ACDSee can work with a large number of file formats. If you are running Microsoft XP® then you can set ACDSee to be the default
application to open certain file types. This process is called associating files.
With Microsoft Windows Vista®, Windows 7® and Windows 8®, you need to register file types (or extensions) as well as associate
them. When you register file types, you tell the Windows Vista® or Windows 7 or 8® that these file types are used with ACDSee.
When you associate file types, you set ACDSee as the default program to open these kinds of files when you double-click them.
For Microsoft XP®
To Associate Files with ACDSee:
1.
Click Tools | File Associations.
2.
Select each of the following:
Select the Image Files tab and then select the checkboxes next to the image file formats that you want to associate
with ACDSee.
Select the Archives tab and then select the checkboxes next to the archive file formats that you want to associate
with ACDSee.
3.
Click OK.
For Microsoft Windows Vista® or Windows 7®
To Set File Association Options in ACDSee:
1.
Click Tools | File Associations | Set File Associations.
2.
Select one of the following options:
All image file types: Sets ACDSee as the default application to open all image file types.
Image file types not currently associated with ACDSee or another program: Retains any file types already
associated with ACDSee and adds any file types that are not yet associated with a program.
Choose the image file types myself: Opens a dialog where you can select the files you want to associate with
ACDSee .
3.
Click OK.
To Register New File Extensions with Microsoft Windows Vista® or Windows 7®:
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When you add a plug-in to ACDSee that allows it to recognize and use new file types, you need to register the new file formats with
the operating system as being used by ACDSee. You can then use the same dialog to associate these files with ACDSee.
1.
Click Tools | File Associations | Register New Extensions.
2.
To only register the new file formats in the list, click OK.
3.
To associate the new file formats with ACDSee so that it opens these file formats in the future, check each file type by
clicking in the white square.
4.
Click OK to register and/or associate the new files.
You can change file associations directly in Microsoft Windows Vista® or Windows 7® by going to your desktop and
clicking Start | Default Programs.
For Microsoft Windows 8®
With ACDSee on Windows 8®, you are not prompted to associate your files on installation. Instead, when you launch a given file
type, Windows 8® will ask you how you would like to associate the file. This only occurs the first time you launch the file type after
installing a new program, (such as ACDSee), which is capable of associating itself to that type of file.
To Set File Association to ACDSee:
1.
In Windows 8®, open the Control Panel.
2.
Search for Default Programs.
3.
Choose Set your default programs.
4.
Select ACDSee from the list of programs. Then choose:
Set this program as default to set all available file types to ACDSee.
or
Choose defaults for this program to pick and choose by file type.
5.
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Click OK.
Glossary
Glossary
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A
Absolute Colorimetric
Rendering intent, generally used for proofing. Based on a device-independent color space, reproducing colors within the
available gamut perfectly, and reducing colors outside of the gamut to the nearest reproducible hue (at the expense of
saturation).
acquire
Often used term to describe the process of locating images on peripheral devices (such as scanners and digital cameras) and
adding the images to your hard drive. Can also refer to taking screen captures. See import.
album
Collection of images, often organized by theme or event. In ACDSee, albums contain shortcuts to where the images are stored on
your hard drive.
aliasing
Jagged edges caused by pixels. Occurs most often in low resolution images or images that have been enlarged. See jaggies.
anchor
Method of fixing an object such as a selection to a screen, page, or image location.
antialiasing, anti-aliasing
Software technique for reducing jagged lines, or ‘jaggies’. Uses shades of gray and color to smooth out the contrast between
adjacent pixels.
aspect ratio
An image’s width-to-height ratio. For example, an image with an aspect ratio of 3:1 has a width 3 times larger than its height.
archive
Collection of files saved as a single file for storage. Archive files usually use compression to reduce their size. You can use
archiving software such as ACDSee and ACDZip to create and view archives.
azimuth
Angle of shadows that extend from the edges of image details. In ACDSee you can control azimuth when applying the Emboss
effect to an image.
B
background processing
Tasks or programs that function without user interaction.
bandwidth
Amount of data that can be sent through a network connection in a fixed amount of time. Bandwidth is measured in kilobits per
second (Kbps).
barrel distortion
In barrel distortion the photo appears to bulge outwards from the center.
batch editing
Any operation or tool, such as resizing, converting, or renaming, that can be used to adjust multiple images or files
simultaneously.
bit
Bits are small units of computer memory. The color depth of your image is constrained by the number of bits available to store
color information. For example, it is possible to store 256 different color values per color channel in 8-bit RGB images. Similarly,
it is possible to store 65,536 different color values per color channel in 18-bit images.
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Glossary
blackpoint
An image’s darkest area. You can control the intensity of the black in an image by adjusting its blackpoint.
blend modes
Filters that change the effect of a tool or the appearance of a selected object.
brightness
Light intensity of an image. You can make an image appear brighter or darker by adjusting its brightness.
C
cache
High-speed storage mechanism. The ACDSee Database is a cache.
caption
Text associated with a file, or a comment or description added to a printed image.
cataloging
Adding file information to the ACDSee database.
category
Assign categories to photos to help sort and manage them more easily.
chromatic aberration
A lens artifact that can result in fringes in high contrast areas of some photos.
CMYK
Color model that uses cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (key) as its primary colors.
color cast
Changes the hue of an image while keeping the saturation and brightness intact. For example, many digital cameras produce
pictures with a slightly blue color cast. ACDSee includes a tool that removes an unwanted color cast.
color channel value
Contains all pixel information for a single color. A grayscale image has one channel, while an RGB image has three channels. You
can adjust RGB values when editing a color.
color gamut
Range of colors that a device such as a printer or monitor can produce or display.
color management
Process of adjusting your computer settings so that the color output from your printer matches the colors you see on your
monitor.
color space
There are two types of color spaces: device-independent or device-dependent. A device-independent color space, such as RGB,
describes all possible colors. A device-dependent color space describes the subset of colors (from the device-independent color
space) that a particular device can reproduce. Device-dependent color spaces are used to map colors between devices (for
example, from a monitor to a printer) to ensure that colors are reproduced accurately.
compression
Process that converts data to a storage format requiring less space than the original data.
contact sheet
Physical or digital page that contains a series of small images, usually in a grid format.
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contrast
Measure of an image’s color and brightness differences.
convert
Change a file from one format to another. For example, you might convert a file from a bitmap (.bmp) to a JPEG (.jpg) to reduce
the file size.
cropping
Removing unwanted image areas.
D
database
Electronic filing system that provides fast access to stored data. The ACDSee Database contains two parts: a cached thumbnail
file and an information file. The cached thumbnail file contains small copies (thumbnails) of the images on your system. The
information file contains details about the files on your system, such as descriptions, dates, authors, notes, keywords, and
categories.
database date
Date that you apply to the properties of a file and save in the ACDSee Database.
descriptions
ACDSee stores descriptions in a hidden file named descript.ion. Descriptions such as file name and captions for an image will be
included in the descript.ion files.
dock
Attaching a toolbar, window, or pane to different screen areas.
DPI (dots per inch)
Measurement of an image’s resolution. For example, 92 DPI means 92 dots horizontally and 92 dots vertically, which equals
8,464 dots per square inch. More dots per inch result in higher resolution and image quality.
dynamic range
The dynamic range of an image is directly related to the dynamic range of your digital camera's sensor. If your digital camera's
sensor has a large dynamic range it can capture the darkest shadows and brightest highlights at the same time, without clipping
the shadows or highlights. (RAW images preserve the dynamic range of your digital camera's sensor.) Adjusting the tonal range
of the image changes how the dynamic range of the image is represented on a monitor or in a photo.
E
elevation
Height of an imaginary light source over an image. The elevation of the light source works in conjunction with azimuth to
generate a three-dimensional emboss effect.
encode
Writing (or saving) a file format.
encryption
Method of converting data into a secure format. You need a digital password or key to read an encrypted file.
EXIF (Exchangeable Image File)
Standard for storing information, primarily with images that use JPEG compression. Most digital cameras create EXIF information
and embed it in the image file. For example, EXIF information can include details about shutter speed and whether a flash was
used.
export
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Glossary
Moving data from one application to another. The exporting application places the data in a format that the other application
understands.
exposure
Exposure is the amount of time that your digital camera's sensor is exposed to light.
F
feather
Softening image edges to blend them into the background.
file listing
In ACDSee, a report of the files currently displayed in Manage mode.
file format
Medium for encoding information in a file. Each type of file has a different file format that specifies how it organizes the
information it contains.
filter
Program that can apply an effect to an image, such as an embossed appearance or a sepia tone.
fisheye distortion
In fisheye distortion, the photo appears to bulge outwards from the center, as if the photo were wrapped around a sphere.
G
gamma
Range of color values a monitor, scanner, or printer can display. Adjusting this value increases or decreases the intensity of the
light spectrum.
grayscale image
Image composed of different shades of gray.
H
highlights
Highlights are the brightest or whitest parts of an image.
histogram
A histogram is a graph that displays the dynamic range of shadows and highlights in an image.
HSL
An acronym for hue, saturation, and lightness.
hue
Predominant color in an image.
I
image editor
Program that you can use to create and edit images. ACDSee is an image editor.
image resolution
Quality of image details and colors. Also used to describe the quality of monitors and printer output.
image viewer
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Program that displays images. ACDSee is an image viewer.
import
Bringing data into an application from another using a format that the receiving application understands.
interpolation
Process that uses nearby pixels to estimate the color of new pixels added to the larger image. For example, interpolation might be
used when enlarging a digital image.
IPTC
Standard method of encoding information within image files so that items such as descriptive comments and copyright
information can be transmitted with the image.
J-K
jaggies
Individual pixels displayed in an image with low resolution. The appearance of pixels in an image causes lines and curves to
appear jagged.
L
lens vignetting
Unusual darkness in the corners of images as a result of an inability of the lens to distribute light into the corners of the image.
lossless compression
Form of compression that retains all image data and quality.
lossless rotation and flipping
Rotation of a JPEG image without loss of image quality. This works best on images with dimensions that are a multiple of 8 or 16.
lossy compression
Form of compression that attempts to remove unnecessary data. This data loss can affect image quality.
M
marquee
Dashed-line frame that identifies a selected portion of an image. Depending on the tool, you can resize or move a marquee with
or without changing the underlying image.
metadata
Information about an image and how it was taken. For example, the metadata of digital camera images can contain the date and
time the picture was taken, the shutter speed, the exposure settings of the camera, and whether a flash was used.
monochrome image
Image containing a single color.
N
noise
Effect produced when a variety of pixel colors are used in the same color region. Noise often occurs in images with high ISO
setting or slow shutter speed.
O
opacity
234
Glossary
Determines how visible an effect is when applied to an image or a selection. High opacity produces a more solid effect, while low
opacity results in a nearly invisible effect.
overexposed
Images that are overexposed have too many highlights, and tend to look faded. You typically overexpose images by exposing
your digital camera's sensor to light for too long.
P-Q
panning
Moving zoomed images vertically, horizontally, and diagonally across the display area to view specific areas of the image.
PDF
An acronym for Portable Document Format. You can view PDFs on any computer using the free Adobe Reader® software.
Perceptual
Rendering intent that scales all of the colors within one gamut to fit within another gamut. Best used for photographic images, as
it maintains the relationship between the colors more accurately than the colors themselves.
photo album
See album.
photo editor
See image editor.
pincushion distortion
In pincushion distortion the photo appears to shrink inwards toward the center.
pixel (PICture ELement)
Smallest visible portion of a digital image, arranged in rows and columns.
plug-in
Software module that adds functionality to a larger program.
PPI (pixels per inch)
Measurement of how an image is displayed. More pixels per inch result in higher image quality.
presets
A preset contains image correction settings. You can create and use presets to ensure that settings you apply are the same and
consistent across all images.
primary colors
Colors that can produce other colors when blended. For example, in the RGB color model, red, green, and blue are primary
colors.
R
raster image
Image composed of a rectangular grid of pixels. Each pixel contains a defined value about its color, size, and location in the
image. As a result, resizing the image can affect its quality.
rating
Assign ratings (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) to photos to help sort and manage them more easily.
RAW
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ACDSee 17 User Guide
An image file format. RAW files contain all of the image data that was captured by your digital camera's sensor. RAW files are not
processed by your camera; instead, you must process RAW images using a photo editing program such ACDSee .
recursive
Program or task that can repeat itself indefinitely, such as a slideshow.
red eye
Red eye occurs when the light from your digital camera's flash reflects off the retinas in the subject's eyes. The subject's eyes
look red instead of their normal color.
Relative Colorimetric
Rendering intent that maps the colors that fall exactly within the color gamuts of both the input and output devices. Best used for
single- or limited-color images as colors outside of both gamuts may be mapped to a single color.
render
Drawing images to your screen.
rendering intent
Approach used to map colors from one color gamut to another. There are four rendering intents available: Perceptual, Relative
Colorimetric, Saturation, and Absolute Colorimetric.
resolution
Quality and clarity of an image, measured in pixels, dots per inch, or pixels per inch.
RGB
Color model that uses red, green, and blue as its primary colors.
ringing artifacts
Distortion around the edges of image subjects, caused by compressing or resizing an image.
S
saturation
Purity of a color. Higher color saturation results in more gray.
Saturation (rendering intent)
Rendering intent that maintains color saturation from one gamut to another. Best suited for images in which the actual color
represented is less important than the color’s vividness.
selection
Portion of an image that you define with a selection tool. A marquee surrounds a selection. ACDSee and ACD Photo Editor include
selection tools.
sepia
Sepia-toned images are composed of shades of brown. Many old photographs have a sepia tone.
sharpen
The sharpen tool is for sharpening images. The original image is blurred slightly. This blurred version of the image is subtracted
from the original image, revealing the edges in the original image. These edges can then be sharpened by increasing contrast.
sharpness
The sharpness in an image is determined, primarily, by your digital camera's lens and sensor. You can also create the illusion of
sharpness by increasing the contrast between edges within an image.
shortcut menu
Menu that appears when you right-click within a program. Sometimes referred to as a context menu.
236
Glossary
slideshow
Automated sequential display of images. You can use slideshow software such as ACDSee to display slideshows of your images.
soft proofing
Using your computer's monitor as a proofing device. The monitor displays a simulation of how colors will appear when rendered
by the printer.
T
tagging
Tagging, like categories and ratings, is a great way to organize and group your photos without moving the files into different
folders. You can tag a photo with one click. Similarly, you can display all tagged photos with one click.
thumbnails
Small preview of a full-sized image.
timestamp
Date and time associated with a file.
transitions
Special effects used between images or video segments in slideshows, screensavers, and videos.
U
underexposed
Images that are underexposed have too many shadows. Images typically become underexposed if you don't expose your digital
camera's sensor to light long enough.
V
vector image
Image consisting of individual objects rather than pixels. Mathematical equations define the objects. You can adjust the size of a
vector image and the image will retain its clarity and quality.
W
watermark
Background text or graphics added to an image, usually to provide copyright protection.
white balance
Removes color cast to create a photo that is correctly lit. You can use your camera settings to apply the correct white balance
before taking an image, or correct the white balance in ACDSee.
whitepoint
Lightest image area. You can control the intensity of the white in an image by adjusting its whitepoint.
X-Z
XML (Extensible Markup Language)
Standard language for Web documents.
zoom
In ACDSee, zoom refers to the process of increasing or decreasing the display scale for an image. Increase the display scale to
view a portion of an image or a specific image detail. Decrease the display scale to view more or all of the image.
237
Index
Index
239
ACDSee 17 User Guide
3
365 mode
creating an account
8, 187
8, 188
creating folders
190
making folder public or private
190
privacy settings
190
rating system
191
uploading images
8
A
ACDSee
database
87
importing photos
11
user interface
1
acquiring
importing
11
acquiring photos
11
Adjusting Clarity
184
archiving files
76
assigning categories and color labels
40
assigning categories and ratings
38
associating files with ACDSee
227
audio
adding to images
109
playing
106
recording to images
110
auto advance
101
B
backing up
database
tips and strategies
94
94-95
batch editing
about
81
exposure
84
flipping
82
renaming
86
resizing
83
rotating
82
black and white
178
blurring
180
border
132
240
Index
brightness
Burn Basket
171
73
C
Calendar pane
23
Catalog pane
customizing
200
cataloging
assigning ratings
38
files
34
cataloging files
90
categories
assigning
38
finding unassigned images
63
managing
37
creating
73
getting photos
17
CD
Photo discs
103
setting CD/DVD management options
202
clarity
184
color
changing color depth
color labels
color scheme
committing changes
comparing images
177
40
194, 214
112
32
contact sheets
creating
75
printing
80
converting
databases
91
descript.ion files
92
images to another file format
81
to grayscale
177
copying
files
48
images
49
Crayon Drawing effect
142
cropping
168
Crosshatch effect
143
241
ACDSee 17 User Guide
customizing
Calendar pane
201
Catalog pane
200
Database
203
Editing Tools pane
212
File List pane
194
File management
202
Folders pane
200
keyboard shortcuts
213
moving panes
4
Preview pane
199
toolbars
210
View mode
204
D
database
about
87
adding information to
53
backing up
94
cataloging files
90
converting
91
descript.ion files
92
excluding folders
89
exporting
93
importing
91
keywords
47
maintaining
96
optimizing
96
options
203
quarantining files
97
rebuilding thumbnails
97
restoring
tips and strategies
95
94-95
date
changing in multiple files
Dauber effect
55
143
descript.ion files
92
Details view
26
Details View options
199
digital camera
getting photos
242
12
Index
plug-ins
display theme
12
194, 214
downloading
photos from a CD
17
photos from a digital camera
12
photos from a mobile phone
18
photos from a scanner
17
photos in ACDSee
11
dual monitors
moving the panes
Duplicate Finder
4
62
DVD
creating
setting CD/DVD management options
73
202
E
E icon
21, 198
Edge Detect effect
144
Edit
117
Add Noise
183
Auto Levels
173
Blur
180
Border
132
Clarity
184
Color Balance
177
Crop
168
Flip
168
presets
118
Red Eye Reduction
128
Remove Noise
182
Repair tool
129
Resize
169
Rotate
167
Selections
124
Sharpen
179
Text
130-131
Tone Curve
174
Vignette
136
Edit mode
customizing the Editing Tools pane
7
212
243
ACDSee 17 User Guide
Edited State
group by
28
editing
adding noise
adding text
183
130-131
blurring
180
brightness
171
clarity
184
cloning
129
configuring editors
212
correcting shadows and highlights
175
cropping
168
exposure
173
flipping
168
light levels
172
presets
118
removing noise
182
removing red eye
128
repairing
129
resizing
169
RGB values
177
rotating
167
sharpen
179
special effects
138
tone curve
174
toolbars
210
effects
244
about
138
Bathroom Window
138
Blinds
139
Blur
149
Bulge
140
collage
140
Colored Edges
141
Contours
142
Crayon Drawing
142
Crosshatch
143
Dauber
143
Edge Detect
144
Emboss
144
Index
Furry Edges
145
Glowing Edges
146
golden hue
147
Granite
146
Mirror
147
Negative
148
Oil Paint
148
Old
149
Outline
150
Pencil Drawing
150
Pixel Explosion
151
Pixelate
152
Posterize
152
Radial Waves
153
Rain
153
Ripple
154
Scattered Tiles
155
Sepia
156
Sheet Metal
156
Shift
157
Slant
157
Sobel
158
Solarize
159
Stained Glass
159
Sunspot
160
Swirl
160
Threshold
161
Topography
162
user defined
166
Vignette
136
Water
162
Water Drops
163
Waves
164
Weave
164
Wind
165
emailing images
Emboss effect
excluding folders from database
65
144
89
EXIF
adding EXIF information
53
245
ACDSee 17 User Guide
viewing
exporting database information
44
93
exposure
adjusting automatically
adjusting for multiple images
173
84
F
Favorites pane
25
File List pane
customizing
194
filtering files
27
full screen
22
setting Details View options
199
setting File List options
194
setting thumbnail display options
197
using
19
views
26
files
archiving
associating with ACDSee
76
227
cataloging
34
cataloging in the database
90
changing dates
55
copying and moving
48
details
26
finding duplicates
62
listing
93
management options
202
map coordinates
45
pasting
49
playing audio and video
106
properties
43
quarantining
97
renaming
50
replacing
49
selecting
30
sorting
29
synchronizing between folders
56
filtering files
27
flipping
in Edit
246
168
Index
multiple photos
82
folders
browsing
22
excluding from database
89
mobile phone
18
pasting
49
renaming
50
synchronizing files
56
synchronizing in View mode
102
Folders pane
options
using
200
22
footer
in View mode
printing on pages
fullscreen mode
Furry Edges effect
101
80
6
145
G
getting photos
renaming templates
18
Glowing Edges effect
146
Granite effect
146
grayscale
178
Group by
Edited State
28
H
header
in View mode
printing on pages
101
80
Heal tool
129
hicolor
178
highlights
175
histogram
177
home folder
194
HTML album
74
I
Image Basket
34
Image Well
63
images
adding audio
109
247
ACDSee 17 User Guide
comparing
32
converting to another format
81
copying
49
downloading
11
emailing
65
extracting from video files
108-109
finding quickly
63
import
12
importing
11
panning
114
uploading
189
viewing
6
import
photos
12
importing
images
importing database information
11
91
importing photos
from a CD
17
from a digital camera
12
from a disk
17
from a mobile phone
18
from a scanner
17
IPTC
adding IPTC information
53
removing IPTC keywords auto categories
54
viewing
44
J
JPEG options
209
K
keyboard shortcuts
customizing
213
Manage mode
215
View mode
218
L
labels
assigning
40
light levels
172
listing files
93
local contrast enhancement
248
175
Index
M
magnifying glass
115
Manage mode
Burn Basket
customizing toolbars
73
210
Favorites pane
25
File List pane
19
Folders pane
22
Image Basket
34
keyboard shortcuts
Map pane
options
215
45
193
Properties pane
43
Quick Search bar
57
Search pane
58
Selective Browsing pane
60
using
2
views
26
Map pane
using
Mirror effect
mobile phone
45
147
18
modes
switching
mouse shortcuts
2
221
moving
files
Manage mode panes
48
2
multiple images
adjusting exposure
84
renaming
86
resizing
83
N
navigator
114
Negative effect
148
noise
about
182
adding to an image
183
removing from an image
182
249
ACDSee 17 User Guide
O
Oilpaint effect
148
Old effect
149
optimizing the database
96
options
ACDSee Quick View
103
Calendar pane
201
Catalog pane
200
contact sheet
80
database
203
file management
202
Folders
200
general
193
Manage mode
193
Preview pane
199
View mode
204
organizing
assigning categories
38
assigning color labels
40
finding images quickly
63
managing categories
37
originals
showing
112
Orton effect
149
Outline effect
150
overwriting files
49
P
panes
auto-hiding
moving
resetting to default layout
PDF
210
3
2
72
Pencil Drawing effect
150
photo discs
103
Photo Repair tool
129
photos
140
Pixel Explosion effect
151
pixel resize options
170
Pixelate effect
152
250
Index
plug-ins
about
97
managing
98
viewing properties
98
polaroid
140
Posterize effect
152
Preview pane
customizing
using
199
30
printing
contact sheet options
80
setting size and positioning
79
text on pages
80
Properties pane
options
using
202
43
Q
quarantining files
97
R
Radial Waves effect
153
Rain effect
153
ratings
assigning
38
recording image audio
110
red eye reduction
128
removeable devices
12
renaming
file or folder
50
multiple files
86
while getting photos
18
replacing files
49
resizing
multiple images
one image
restoring database information
83
169
95
restoring originals
119
retro effect
147
RGB
177
Ripple effect
154
251
ACDSee 17 User Guide
rotating
in Edit
167
in Manage and View mode
32
multiple photos
82
S
scanner
Scattered Tiles effect
screen capture
17
155
64
screensavers
creating
66
sharing
70
Search pane
58
searching
file name patterns
60
for duplicate files
62
Image Well
63
Quick Search bar
57
setting Quick Search options
194
wildcards
60
with ACDSee
57
with the Search pane
58
second monitor
moving the panes
4
selecting
files
30
part of a media file
108
part of an image
110
Selections tool
Selective Browsing
124
60
Sepia effect
156
sharing
175
archives
76
contact sheets
75
emailing images
65
HTML albums
74
PDFs
72
screensavers
70
slideshows
70
with ACDSee
63
sharpen
252
179
Index
Sheet Metal effect
156
Shift effect
157
shortcuts
Manage mode
215
mouse
221
View mode
218
Slant effect
157
slideshows
auto advance
101
configuring
68
sharing
70
Sobel effect
158
Solarize effect
159
sorting files
29
sound
adding to images
109
recording
110
Stained Glass effect
159
start folder
default
194
Sunspot effect
160
Swirl effect
160
switching
modes
2
sync
uploading images
sync to web
189
189
synchronizing
files between folders
56
View mode to a folder
102
T
tagging images
52
text
adding to an image
adding to pages (printing)
displaying on images in View mode
lists of files
130-131
80
101
93
theme
color
Threshold effect
194, 214
161
253
ACDSee 17 User Guide
thumbnails
rebuilding
97
setting display options
197
setting ratio options
198
views
26
timestamp
55
timestamps
55
toolbars
210
Topography effect
162
truecolor
178
TWAIN
about
12
importing photos
17
U
undo/redo
119
USB mass storage device
about
user interface
12
1
V
video files
extracting frames
playing
108-109
106
View mode
auto advance
101
automatic zooming
113
customizing
204
displaying text
101
fullscreen mode
histogram
177
keyboard shortcuts
218
magnifying glass
115
mouse shortcuts
221
navigator
114
panning
114
setting display options
205
setting zoom level
113
synchronizing to a folder
103
using
zooming an image
254
6
5
112
Index
viewing
file properties
file types in the File List
111
27
fullscreen
6
images
5
images in another application
105
text on images in View mode
101
Vignette effect
136
W
wallpaper
105
Water Drops effect
163
Water effect
162
Waves effect
164
Weave effect
164
White Balance
176
wildcards
Wind effect
60
165
Z
zooming
automatically
113
setting level
113
255
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