Extension Package Programmer`s Manual

Extension Package Programmer`s Manual
Extension Package
Programmer's Manual
This manual shows how to create HALCON extension packages based on new operators written in C,
Version 11.0.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without prior written permission of the publisher.
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July 1997
November 1997
March 1998
April 1999
October 2000
July 2001
December 2002
May 2003
December 2003
July 2004
July 2005
June 2007
December 2008
October 2010
April 2011
May 2012
Copyright © 1997-2012
(HALCON 5.1)
(HALCON 5.2)
(HALCON 6.0)
(HALCON 6.0.1)
(HALCON 6.1.1)
(HALCON 6.1.2)
(HALCON 7.0)
(HALCON 7.0.1)
(HALCON 7.1)
(HALCON 8.0)
(HALCON 9.0)
(HALCON 10.0)
(HALCON 10.0.1)
(HALCON 11.0)
by MVTec Software GmbH, München, Germany
MVTec Software GmbH
Protected by the following patents: US 7,062,093, US 7,239,929, US 7,751,625, US 7,953,290, US
7,953,291. Further patents pending.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Microsoft .NET, Visual C++, Visual Basic, and ActiveX are either trademarks or registered
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds.
Sun and Solaris are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Oracle Corporation.
Silicon Graphics, SGI, IRIX, and OpenGL are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Silicon
Graphics, Inc.
Mac OS X and OpenCL are trademarks of Apple Inc.
All other nationally and internationally recognized trademarks and tradenames are hereby recognized.
More information about HALCON can be found at: http://www.halcon.com/
About This Manual
This manual describes how to extend HALCON by additional operators encapsulated in HALCON packages using the Extension Package Interface. Before starting to use the Extension Package Interface,
MVTec strongly recommends that the user should be familiar with the normal HALCON system.
This manual is written for the expert HALCON user who wants to extend the system for specific requirements. Thus, the reader should be familiar with the normal HALCON system. Furthermore, programming skills are required. Finally, the reader should know about his/her development environment (that is
how to invoke the compiler/linker etc.).
This manual is divided into the following parts:
• Introduction
This chapter provides a short overview of HALCON packages and their creation. Furthermore, an
example showing the integration of a simple operator is presented.
• Operator Description (def-file)
This chapter summarizes the minimum required operator description used by the HALCON compiler hcomp as well as the complete operator description which is needed to provide a full integration of new operators in HDevelop and to generate documentation files.
• Style Guide for Programming
This chapter introduces basic style guides for how to program HALCON operators. Especially, the
HALCON memory management is explained.
• HALCON Data Types
In this chapter the most important HALCON data structures to handle iconic data and control
parameters are presented.
• Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
This chapters contains a set of routines to facilitate the programming of the operator interface and
accessing the basic HALCON data structures.
• Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
This chapter describes a set of convenience routines for standard situations.
• Creating a New HALCON Package
The last chapter explains how to use the HALCON compiler hcomp to generate HALCON packages for different platforms.
Contents
1
2
Introduction
1.1 HALCON Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1.1 Using HALCON Operators in C, C++, and .NET languages
1.1.2 Internal Structure of HALCON Operators . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 HALCON Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.1 Packages and HALCON XL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.2 Directory Structure of a HALCON Package . . . . . . . . .
1.2.3 How to Create and Use a HALCON Package . . . . . . . .
1.3 Installing a HALCON Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.1 Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.2 Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 An Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Operator Description (def-File)
2.1 Short Operator Description . . . . . . . . .
2.2 Extended Operator Description . . . . . . .
2.2.1 Header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.2 short . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.3 warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.4 abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.5 module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.6 chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.7 functionality . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.8 keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.9 predecessor, successor, alternatives
2.2.10 see_also . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.11 attention . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.12 result_state . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.13 parallelization . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.14 complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.15 example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.16 references . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.17 Class Information . . . . . . . . . .
2.3 Describing the Parameters . . . . . . . . .
2.3.1 Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2.3.2 default_type . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.3 sem_type . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.4 modified . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.5 multivalue . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.6 costs_weight . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.7 postprocessing . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.8 description . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.9 type_list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.10 default_value . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.11 values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.12 value_list . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.13 value_min, value_max . . . . . . .
2.3.14 step_rec, step_min, value_function .
2.3.15 value_number . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.16 assertion . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.17 multichannel . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.18 file_ext, file_ext_descr . . . . . . .
Text in def-Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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34
35
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3 Style Guide for Programming
3.1 Basic Numeric Data Types . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1 Atributes of Iconic Parameters . . .
3.1.2 Local Variables / Temporary Results
3.1.3 Procedure Parameters . . . . . . . .
3.1.4 Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Memory Management . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1 Temporary Data . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2 Permanent Data . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.3 Debugging . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Structuring Programs . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Extension Package Initialization . . . . . .
3.5 Name Conventions for Procedures . . . . .
3.6 Input / Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7 Error Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8 Notes on Image Processing Operators . . .
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4 HALCON Data Types
4.1 Pixel Data (Himage) . .
4.2 Region Data (Hrlregion)
4.3 XLDs (Hcont, Hpoly) . .
4.4 Control Parameters . . .
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59
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5 Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
5.1 Basic Access to Iconic Input Objects . . . . . .
5.1.1 HGetObj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.2 HGetComp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.3 HGetRL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.4 HGetImage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2.4
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5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
6
5.1.5 HGetXLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Routines for Accessing Input Image Objects . . . .
5.2.1 HGetDRL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.2 HGetFDRL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.3 HGetURL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.4 HGetDImage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.5 HGetObjNum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loop Macros for Accessing Single Input Objects . . . . . . .
5.3.1 HAllObj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.2 HAllComp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Objects and Writing Output Object Parameters . . . .
5.4.1 HCrObj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.2 HCopyObj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.3 HPutDRL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.4 HPutImage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.5 HDefObj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.6 HPutDImage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.7 HCrImage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.8 HCrXLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading and Writing Control Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.1 HGetPElemX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.2 HGetPPar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3 HGetPElem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.4 HGetElemX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.5 HCopyElemX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.6 HGetCPar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.7 HGetSPar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.8 HGetCParNum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.9 HAllocStringMem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.10 HPutPElem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.11 HPutPPar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.12 HPutElem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.13 HPutCPar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auxiliary Extension Package Interface Macros and Procedures
5.6.1 HCkP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.2 HCkNoObj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.3 HRLDecomp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.4 HNumOfChannels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
6.1 Loop Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.1 HAllReg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.2 HAllSegm . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.3 HAllFilter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.1.4 HAllFilter2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 Object Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.1 HNewRegion . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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105
105
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111
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114
6.2.2
6.2.3
HPutRect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
HDupObj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
7 Creating a New HALCON Package
7.1 The HALCON Compiler ’hcomp’ . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.1 Selection of the Host Language . . . . . . .
7.1.2 Creating the Help Files . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.3 Creating HTML Reference Files . . . . . . .
7.1.4 Creating the PDF Reference Manuals . . . .
7.1.5 Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2 Generating HALCON Packages . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.1 Creating the Operator Libraries . . . . . . .
7.2.2 Creating the C Interface . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.3 Creating the C++ Interface . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.4 Creating the COM Interface . . . . . . . . .
7.2.5 Creating the .NET Interface . . . . . . . . .
7.2.6 Creating New Applications . . . . . . . . . .
7.2.7 Additional Information for Specific Platforms
7.3 HALCON Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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117
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127
A HALCON Error Codes
129
Index
163
Chapter 1
Introduction
HALCON can be extended by up to 99 additional operator packages. During the initialization of the system all packages indicated by the environment variable HALCONEXTENSIONS are automatically loaded.
A package typically contains libraries with the new operators, their prototypes, the operator information
needed by HDevelop, and the HTML online documentation. For the programming of such a package the
HALCON Extension Package Interface is used, e.g., to manipulate parameters of HALCON operators
and to read or write iconic data (images, regions, XLDs1 ) from the HALCON database of iconic objects.
Furthermore, the operators provided by HALCON itself are also based on the functionality of the Extension Package Interface. Thus, the Extension Package Interface is both the interface between application
programs and the operator layer of the the HALCON system and the interface between the operator layer
and the iconic object database.
A reason why to extend the capabilities of HALCON by using the Extension Package Interface might
be one of the following:
• Extension of the pool of image processing operators,
• Integration of special image processing hardware,
• Integration of a special graphics software package.
Once the user has extended HALCON by a package containing his/her own operators, they can be used
within all supported host-languages, and the interactive tool HDevelop.
This chapter gives a short introduction to HALCON packages and operators, including an example describing the integration of a simple operator. The following chapters present detailed information that
will allow you to write your own packages. As a common example, a package called halconuser will
be used (see %HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser on the HALCON CD).
Except in UNIX specific sections in this manual file paths and environment variables are printed in the
Windows convention, e.g.,
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser
1 eXtended
Line Description; i.e. subpixel contours and polygons.
9
Introduction
Introduction
10
Introduction
to denote the subdirectory halconuser containing an example package within the HALCON base directory referenced by the environment variable HALCONROOT. The same expression in UNIX convention
would look like
$HALCONEXAMPLES/extension_package/halconuser
1.1
HALCON Operators
This section describes the external interface of HALCON operators, i.e., how to use them in a programming language, and their internal structure.
1.1.1
Using HALCON Operators in C, C++, and .NET languages
There are two different modes of calling operators from HALCON/C: One way is to call operators for
simple applications with only one value per control parameter (simple mode). This is the easiest way
and sufficient for many applications. When using complex procedures that need more than one value
per parameter, data is transferred within tuples (Htuple). Iconic objects are represented with the type
Hobject, so that one object can contain several images, regions, or XLDs.
In contrast, the HALCON/C++ and the HALCON/.NET interface support a flexible management of
several types.
However, the defined class hierarchy has a fixed mapping between the HALCON operators and the
provided classes. This mapping follows predefined rules and is therefore partly generic. A user-defined
HALCON operator cannot be linked to an arbitrary position inside the class hierarchy. Thus, these
operators are integrated using the generic data type Hobject in order to pass arguments to and from the
operator. This kind of integration is also used, e.g., if you export your HDevelop program as C++ or C#
code.
For further information on using HALCON in programming language please refer to the Programmer’s
Guide.
1.1.2
Internal Structure of HALCON Operators
HALCON operators (like the new operators in halconuser) typically consist of two procedures: One
procedure – the supply procedure – receives the input data, tests its consistency, passes it to the processing
action procedure and returns the output data after the processing. If the input data contains any composed
iconic objects, e.g., image tuples, the supply procedure has to extract the single parts. An iconic object
key can represent an unlimited number of iconic objects and every image object may consist of several
components (one region and an unlimited number of gray value channels; see also figure 5.2 on page 71).
Generally, a user may assume that a HALCON operator is able to handle single iconic objects as well
as composed objects (i.e. multivalue is set to optional; see page 37) and that it can work on multichannel images (i.e. multichannel is set to optional; see page 42). So, the author of a new HALCON
operator should implement appropriate mechanisms for extracting the needed data from composed iconic
objects (or multi-channel images) within the supply procedure. The name of this procedure designates
1.1.2 Internal Structure of HALCON Operators
11
After preprocessing the input data, the action procedure is called within the supply procedure. This
procedure performs the specific image processing. In most cases the action procedure receives only
the already extracted single components (e.g., regions of type Hrlregion, channels of type Himage, or
pointers to the raw image data) and parameter values. The results are returned to the supply procedure
where they are passed to the generated interface that returns them to the calling system. Every supply
procedure returns an error code of type Herror. Thus, it is necessary to return an error code, which is
H_MSG_TRUE if no error occurred.
Only one parameter (a so called procedure handle) is passed to a supply procedure. All other input data
(iconic objects and control values) is read and written with the help of this identifier. Moreover, it allows
the unique identification of a HALCON operator call while running HALCON on parallel hardware.
Instead of further parameters, all in- and output to and from the supply procedure is done with the help
of several (internal) buffers, as illustrated in figure 1.1.
Application Programs
Output
Input
C / C++ / COM / .NET Interface
Buffer
Control
Parameter
HALCON
Database
Buffer
Iconic
Objects
Control
Parameter
Iconic
Objects
Supply Procedure
Action Procedure
Figure 1.1: Data flow within HALCON .
The buffer contains input data as well as output data. Control parameters (containing all kind of control
values like integers, floating-point values or strings) are stored directly in the buffers, whereas all iconic
data (including images, regions and XLDs) are stored in the database and represented by an iconic
object key. Iconic data can be accessed with the help of database procedures by using these keys. The
Extension Package Interface provides special procedures and macros for reading and writing elements of
the parameter buffer within the supply procedure. Every parameter belongs to one of the four classes
Introduction
the internal C-procedure name specified in the def-file (cf. section 2.1 on page 21 and section 2.2 on
page 23).
12
Introduction
• input iconic object
• output iconic object
• input control parameter
• output control parameter
that determines the name of the suitable procedures/macros (e.g.: HGetCPar is used to get an input
control value). To identify a specific parameter within a class, its number is passed to the procedure/macro. This is the number of the parameter within the parameter-list of a HALCON operator
counted for every parameter class (e.g.: to get the value of the second input control parameter, the number 2 must be passed to HGetCPar).
The read-/write access on the buffer is done automatically by the generated interface. The code of this
interface is generated by the HALCON compiler hcomp (see page 18 and section 7.1 on page 117)
from a so-called definition file (def-file). Any programmer of a new HALCON operator must provide
such a definition file, which contains all relevant information e.g., concerning in- and output parameters:
information about the parameter class (input-/output,iconic object/control), about the parameter type,
etc. The syntax and semantics of the definition file is explained in chapter 2 on page 21.
1.2
HALCON Packages
Similar to the standard HALCON system a programmer has to provide (at least) two libraries (DLLs
in Windows, shared libraries in UNIX environments) in order to extend HALCON by a new operator
package (see chapter 7 on page 117).
• A library containing the new operators (written in C). Most of this manual is about how to write
such operators based on internal data structures / procedures of the HALCON system. This library
has the same name as the package itself, in our example halconuser.
• Libraries encapsulating the generated interface code (for C, C++, .NET). These libraries (i.e., the
operator library and one of the interface libraries) have to be used in new applications in order to
provide the interface of the new operators to the host language of your choice. Most of the work
concerning these libraries is done by the HALCON compiler hcomp, see section 7.1 on page 117
for details. In the example package these libraries are called halconuserc, halconusercpp, and
halconuserdotnet.
The names of all these libraries are derived from the name of the package itself: A package package
contains the libraries2 package, packagec, packagecpp, and packagedotnet.
1.2.1
Packages and HALCON XL
Extension packages can also be used in HALCON XL. Similar to the HALCON libraries, which exist in
two versions (e.g., halcon.dll and halconxl.dll), you must provide separate versions of your package libraries to be used together with HALCON XL. The names of these libraries must have the suffix
2 This is true for the Windows version. For UNIX systems the prefix lib is added to the libraries resulting in libpackage,
libpackagec, and libpackagecpp.
xl; e.g., the HALCON XL version of the example package halconuser consists of the libraries halconuserxl.dll, halconusercxl.dll, halconusercppxl.dll, and halconuserxxl.dll (Windows), libhalconuserxl.so, libhalconusercxl.so, and libhalconusercppxl.so (UNIX), and
halconuserdotnetxl.dll (.NET).
The HALCON XL version of the libraries is created analogously to the standard HALCON version with
only small differences. See section 7.2 on page 121 for details.
1.2.2
Directory Structure of a HALCON Package
A HALCON package resides in a directory with the same name as the package itself. In our example
this is the directory halconuser in %HALCONEXAMPLES%\c_interface. This directory must at least
contain the following subdirectories
• bin\%HALCONARCH%: For Windows, this subdirectory has to contain the DLLs package.dll,
packagec.dll, and packagecpp.dll, corresponding to the above libraries (and their HALCON
XL versions). We also recommend to place compiled example programs or additional utilities of
a package in this subdirectory.
• lib\%HALCONARCH%: In this subdirectory the libraries encapsulating the new operators (package) and the corresponding C, C++, and COM language interfaces (packagec, packagecpp,
packagex) reside3 , together with their HALCON XL versions. Note, that neither the name of
these libraries nor their position within the package should be changed. Otherwise, the HALCON system cannot load the package. The environment variable HALCONARCH is set during the
installation of HALCON; it describes the platform HALCON is running on. See the Programmer’s
Guide, section 1.2 on page 14, for details.
• bin\dotnet: This subdirectory has to contain the extension package’s .NET assembly packagedotnet.dll (and its HALCON XL version, packagedotnetxl.dll).
• help: This subdirectory contains files with data for the online access to the knowledge base.
They must be generated and placed in this directory in order to use a package inside of HDevelop.
Without these files HDevelop cannot retrieve the information needed to access the operators of a
package.
We also recommend to provide additional subdirectories:
• def: In this directory the def-file(s) with the description of the operators of a package should be
placed.
• include: In this directory the generated include files containing the prototypes for the operators
of a package should be placed.
• doc: In this directory the documentation of the package should be placed (see also %HALCONROOT%\doc for comparison). Especially, it is necessary to put the generated HTML files in doc\
html\reference in order to enjoy the online help from the operator window of HDevelop.
3 For UNIX systems the prefix lib has to be added to the libraries resulting in libpackage, libpackagec, and libpackagecpp
13
Introduction
1.2.2 Directory Structure of a HALCON Package
14
Introduction
• examples: This directory might contain some typical example programs (e.g., HDevelop devfiles) demonstrating the use of the new operators.
• images: If the provided examples need specific images, they should be placed in this directory.
In that case we recommend to include the path to this subdirectory in the environment variable
HALCONIMAGES in order to allow access to these images without using an absolute file path in
the programs.
1.2.3
How to Create and Use a HALCON Package
In summary, the following steps are necessary to create a HALCON package with the name package
integrating new operators into the HALCON system. As noted in section 1.2.1, to create a HALCON
XL package, you must create a second version of the libraries. A detailed description of the steps can be
found in the referenced sections of this manual:
1. Description of the new operator(s) in one or more def-files (cf. chapter 2 on page 21). We
recommend to place these files in the package subdirectory def.
2. Creation of a library (called package) containing the supply procedures in C and the corresponding action procedures (cf. chapters 3 to 6). This library has to be placed in the package
subdirectory lib\%HALCONARCH% (UNIX) or bin\%HALCONARCH% (Windows).
3. Creation of a library containing the language-dependent operator interfaces (packagec, packagecpp, packagex, and packagedotnet) based on the def-files with the help of hcomp (cf. section 7.1 on page 117). These libraries have to be placed in the subdirectory lib\%HALCONARCH%
(C, C++ under UNIX) or bin\%HALCONARCH% (C, C++ under Windows) or bin\dotnet of the
package.
4. Generation of files for online access to the knowledge base with the help of hcomp. These files
are used, e.g., by HDevelop. They have to be placed in the subdirectory help of the package.
5. Generating the HTML reference files with the help of hcomp (optional). The generated files have
to be placed in the subdirectory doc\html\reference of the package.
6. Generating PDF manuals with the help of hcomp (optional).
7. Extension of the package list in the environment variable HALCONEXTENSIONS by the complete
file path of the new package, e.g.,
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser
For some platforms additional environment variables have to be modified, see section 1.3 and
section 7.2.7 on page 123.
8. Linking of the generated libraries together with the HALCON library to the image analysis application (cf. chapter 7 on page 117). For this, you have to modify additional environment variables,
depending on the operating system (see below). Please note, that HDevelop is able to access the
new operators dynamically without linkage.
1.3 Installing a HALCON Package
Installing a HALCON Package
Introduction
1.3
15
In order to install a HALCON package you have to copy the package to your hard disk and add the
complete path of the package to the environment variable HALCONEXTENSIONS, e.g.,
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser
Note, that the delimiter between paths in an environment variable is a semicolon on Windows systems
and a colon on UNIX systems.
Never change the name of a package or the corresponding names of the libraries or
DLLs contained in a package.
These names are encoded within the libraries/DLLs. If you change the names this information will not
match any longer. Thus, the loader of the operating system will fail to open the dynamic libraries. In
order to use the new package within HDevelop you have to restart the program. For generating a standalone application using the package you have to link the C or C++ interface library, or reference the
.NET assembly of the package in the application code, see section 7.2 on page 121.
If the package contains images used e.g., within example programs you might want to include the corresponding directory (e.g., images within the package) in the environment variable HALCONIMAGES to
access those images without specifying a complete path.
Furthermore, you must modify additional environment variables in order to use your new package (see
below).
1.3.1
Additional Information for Windows
To be able to link the package DLL to your application program, the complete DLL file path of the new
package, e.g.,
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser\bin\%HALCONARCH%
has to be added to the environment variable PATH, see section 7.2.7.1 on page 123.
Do not copy a package DLL into the Windows system directories, as it would be loaded twice in this
case!
Note that you must extend the variable PATH also for .NET applications, even if you do not explicitly
link the main package library (package.dll): The referenced .NET assembly automatically loads this
library.
!
16
Introduction
1.3.2
Additional Information for Linux
On UNIX PCs running Linux you have to include the package library subdirectory lib/$HALCONARCH
in the environment variable LD_LIBRARY_PATH in order to use a package.
This has to be done in any case – regardless whether you plan to use a package within HDevelop only or
you want to create stand-alone applications.
For .NET applications, an alternative to setting LD_LIBRARY_PATH is described in the Programmer’s
Guide in section 17.3.3 on page 151.
1.4
An Example
The following example illustrates the steps described in section 1.2 on page 12. Assume, one wants
to implement a new operator named user_thresh to extract all pixels with a gray value larger than a
threshold value specified in an input parameter. The use of user_thresh within a C program is illustrated in figure 1.2; a more detailed example is provided in %HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\
halconuser\source\testthreshold.c.
main()
{
Hobject
int
Image,Region;
Thresh;
read_image(&Image,"monkey");
Thresh = 100;
user_thresh(Image,&Region,Thresh);
}
Figure 1.2: Calling the operator user_thresh in C.
To use user_thresh in this way within C programs4 ,
• The new operator must be implemented.
• The corresponding HALCON interface code must be generated.
• The corresponding package must be created especially containing the operator and interface libraries.
• The application must be linked.
First of all one has to create a definition file (file extension .def), as illustrated in figures 1.3 and 1.4.
Figure 1.3 shows only the absolute minimum of information that a definition file must contain in order
to call a new operator within C programs. When using HDevelop, C++, or C#, an extended version is
necessary as described in section 2.2 on page 23. The minimal form of such an extended definition is
illustrated in figure 1.4. The definition file specifies:
4 To
use it within C++, C#, or Visual Basic basically the same steps are necessary, see chapter 7 on page 117.
1.4 An Example
17
Figure 1.3: Defining a new operator user_thresh.
user_thresh <- CIPUserThreshold[Image:Region:Threshold:]
short.german
Schwellwertoperator.;
short.english
Selection of gray values by thresholding.;
module
foundation;
chapter.german
BenutzerErweiterungen;
chapter.english
UserExtensions;
functionality
image;
parameter
Image:
sem_type:
input_object;
image;
parameter
Region:
sem_type:
output_object;
region;
parameter
Threshold:
default_type:
multivalue:
sem_type:
input_control;
integer;
false;
number;
Figure 1.4: An example for an extended def-file of the operator user_thresh (minimal form), cf.
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser\def\threshold.def.
• the name of the operator (user_thresh),
• the name of the supply procedure that has to be implemented in C (CIPUserThreshold),
• names and types of the operator’s parameter(s). The names of the parameters are only important
for the manuals and within HDevelop.
Introduction
user_thresh <- CIPUserThreshold[Image:Region:Threshold$i:];
18
Introduction
The minimal form of the extended operator def-file includes: A short description (short), the HALCON
module (module) the operator belongs to, the mapping to a chapter (chapter) of the manual, the mapping to an iconic object (functionality), and for every parameter its semantic type (sem_type). In
addition, the type (default_type) and number (multivalue) must be specified for control parameters.
Our operator user_thresh has got the following parameters:
•
•
•
•
one input iconic object parameter (Image),
one output iconic object parameter (Region),
one input control parameter (Threshold) of type int with exactly one value and
no output control parameter.
hcomp -u -H -phalconuser threshold.def
hcomp -u -C -phalconuser threshold.def
Figure 1.5: Calls of hcomp for HALCON/C.
The operator definition within the def-file now is used by hcomp to generate the appropriate interface
code. figure 1.5 shows the calls of hcomp. Note, that within this manual halconuser is used as name
of the HALCON package to be created. By calling hcomp with these options5 the files Hhalconuser.c
(HALCON interface code), HChalconuser.c (C-specific interface code) and HChalconuser.h (prototype of the new HALCON operator) are created.
In the next step one has to program the new HALCON operator. This is done by implementing the
supply and action procedure. This results in the typical structure of HALCON operators as illustrated in
figure 1.6.
Compiling the source code generates an object file (in the example cipuserthreshold.o) that should
be integrated into the user extension library (halconuser). Moreover, the generated interface code must
be converted to the corresponding language dependent interface library: In case of a C application, this is
halconuserc containing HChalconuser.o. The file makefile in the directory %HALCONEXAMPLES%\
extension_package\halconuser contains a makefile for generating the example package itself under
UNIX. makefile.win is the corresponding file to be used via nmake under Windows. The makefiles
makefile_testprog and makefile_testprog.win generate example applications using the new operators.
Now we can use our new operators within C programs. But they are not yet available within HDevelop,
because the online help files have not been generated so far. There is also still missing any kind of
documentation, such as the HTML manual pages.
The online help files (as they are used e.g., by HDevelop) can also be generated with the help of the
HALCON compiler hcomp, see figure 1.7. However, to do so an extended version of the def-file must
be available. The generated help files must be placed in the subdirectory help of the package.
The help files generated by now are used to access information about the new operators by calling specific
HALCON operators like get_operator_info. This important especially for constructing graphical
user interfaces like HDevelop. For the user a more convenient way to access information online is to
browse through HTML documents. The HTML documentation of HALCON operators can be generated
5 see
section 7.1 on page 117 for a complete description.
1.4 An Example
/* supply procedure - always with this parameter! */
Herror CIPUserThreshold(Hproc_handle proc_handle)
{
HGetCPar(..,&Threshold,..);
/* get control
/* parameter
HAllSegm(proc_handle,&region,&image,1,i) /* work on all
/* input images
{
HCkP(proc_handle,IPBThreshold(...));
/* call action
/* procedure
HNewRegion(proc_handle,region_out);
/* store (result)
/* region
}
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
}
Introduction
/* action procedure */
Herror IPBThreshold(proc_handle,region,image,
width,threshold,region_out)
{
...
}
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
Figure 1.6: Sample source code of supply CIPUserThreshold() and action IPBThreshold() procedure.
hcomp -u -M threshold.def
Figure 1.7: Calling the HALCON compiler hcomp to create the help files.
by hcomp as well, see figure 1.8. The HTML files have to be placed in the corresponding subdirectory
doc\html\reference of the package.
If you now add the package path to HALCONEXTENSIONS and start HDevelop the user extensions, e.g.
user_thresh, are automatically available in the specified menu (i.e., chapter). In our example this menu
DEF_SOURCES
HCOMP
= def/threshold.def
= $(HALCONROOT)/bin/$(HALCONARCH)/hcomp
all: html
html: $(DEF_SOURCES)
$(HCOMP) -R $(DEF_SOURCES)
mv *.html doc/html/reference
Figure 1.8: Makefile for generating HTML references.
19
20
Introduction
is called UserExtensions as specified in %HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser\
def\threshold.def.6 You can select and execute the user-defined operators like all the built-in operators of the HALCON system. The HTML documentation is available via the Help button within the
operator window.
Examples of how to use the user defined extensions in HDevelop can be found in the subdirectory examples of %HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser (*.dev). Furthermore, the *.dev
programs have been exported as C++ and C# programs. The *.cpp and *.cs files can be found in the
subdirectory source. You can compile them using the already mentioned makefiles. These *.cpp and
*.cs files also serve as an example for the integration of user defined operators into the host languages
C++ and C#. Note, that before compiling the exported C++ and C# code containing operators from
the package halconuser, the corresponding user extension libraries must have been created. This can
be done via the makefile in %HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser which will also
generate the needed user extension C++ library halconusercpp and .NET assembly halconuserdotnet.
Please note, that on some systems not all users have write permissions in the directories mentioned above.
To experiment with the example package we recommend to create a private copy in your working directory. In such a case you must of course use the actual path to your copy when modifying environment
variables.
6 UserExtensions
is integrated into the menu Operator of HDevelop.
Operator Description (def-File)
21
Operator Description (def-file)
The following chapters give a detailed description of the steps mentioned in chapter 1 on page 9. This is
done with respect to system-defined HALCON operators as well as to the examples within the directory
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser. We start with the generation of an operator
description.
2.1
Short Operator Description
Before implementing an operator the author should think about the task of the operator and what kind
of user interface is best for calling the operator. This specification is used to automatically generate the
interface code for the desired host language with the HALCON compiler hcomp.
To do this, it is necessary to describe at least the following features beside the operator name in a def-file:
• the name of the operator as used within the application programming language,
• the name of the C-procedure (supply procedure) called by HALCON in order to start the processing (this procedure must be implemented later on),
• all iconic objects and control parameters that are needed by the operator as input (input parameters),
• all iconic objects and control parameters that are returned by the operator as result (output parameters),
• the types of these parameters,
• the number of values per parameter (there is only a distinction between parameters that need or
can process exactly one value and those expecting more than one value).
There exist two kinds of parameters within HALCON: Iconic object parameters and parameters containing any other data – so called control parameters. By distinguishing input and output parameters we get
four parameter classes: Input iconic object parameters, output iconic object parameters, input control
parameters, and output control parameters. Basically, specifying the number of parameters per class
would suffice to describe the operator. The internal access (in particular within the supply procedure) on
Def-Files
Chapter 2
22
Operator Description (def-File)
individual parameters works this way by using the parameter’s position within its class. But to refer to
single parameters and add further information regarding a parameter, it is useful to give it a name.
The information specified up to now is already sufficient to integrate an operator within the HALCON/Extension Package Interface by using hcomp. It describes the operator properly and may be specified as a “one line short version” of the def-file according to the following syntax:
extern_operator_name <- InternCProcedure
[InputObjects:OutputObjects:InputCtrlParams:OuputCtrlParams];
Section 2.2 explains the meaning of the single identifiers and the name convention. Please note, that
in contrast to the header mentioned there, the short version header must be finished by a semicolon
(;) and that the default type and the number of values is specified together with the name of a control
parameter (InputCtrlParams and OuputCtrlParams). This is done by concatenating a dollar sign
and an additional character to the name encoding the type and number of values (cf. the example in
figure 2.1).
user_inside <- CIPUserSelect[Regions:RegionSelected:Row$i,Column$i:];
Figure 2.1: Short version of the definition of the operator user_inside (cf. %HALCONEXAMPLES%\
extension_package\halconuser\def\regionfeatures.def).
The following table shows how to code types and number of values into a character. Lower-case characters stand for exactly one value in the specified parameter. This corresponds to assigning multivalue:
false in the extended version. Capital letters specify parameters that contain more than one value
passed as a tuple (multivalue: true).
Type
C-type
Integer
Floating-point Value
String
long
double
char *
One Value
i
f
s
Code
Unlimited Number
I
F
S
The specification described so far is sufficient to integrate the operator into C applications. However, in
general the new operators should also be usable by HDevelop or within C++ or .NET applications. To
achieve this, an extended version of the operator description must be generated. This is described in the
following section.
2.2 Extended Operator Description
2.2
23
Extended Operator Description
An operator description within a def-file must start with a header. The following entries are variable
in their order. All of these slots begin with a determined keyword and are finished by a semicolon (;).
Semicolons within the text not defining the end of a slot must be quoted with a backslash (\;).
Note, that all slots specified within the operator description are accessible online within the HALCON
system using the operator get_operator_info, see the Reference Manuals for details. Describing the
single parameters completes the operator description. Section 2.3 on page 33 explains how to do this.
2.2.1
Header
The operator description starts with the header
extern_operator_name <- InternCProcedure
[InputObjects:OutputObjects:InputCtrlParams:OuputCtrlParams]
Note that in contrast to the short version described in section 2.1, the header doesn’t contain any information about the types of the control parameters (e.g. $f) and does not end with a semicolon (;).
The following example is a short version of the operator description for the dynamic threshold operator
dyn_threshold. For better legibility there should be a comment at the beginning of every operator
description, like
/***********************
dyn_threshold
*************************/
dyn_threshold <- CIPDynThreshold
[OrigImage,ThresholdImage:RegionDynThresh:Offset,LightDark:]
Comments within def-files are indicated according to the C syntax (/* ... */).
There are a couple of conventions/restrictions concerning the names of parameters: All word parts should
begin with a capital letter (e.g., RegionDynThresh). They are directly concatenated without any separating character. Especially, they must not contain any underscore (‘_’)! The external operator name
exclusively consists of lower-case characters with word parts separated by underscores. This operator
name is used within C programs, low-level calls1 of the operator in C++, or within HDevelop.
The four parameter classes (input-/output iconic object/control) are separated by colons (:). One class is
described by a list of all parameter names within the class separated by commas. If there is no member
of a class for an operator, the list remains empty. The example described above defines the following
mapping between parameters and parameter classes:
1 Within the HALCON/C++ and HALCON/.NET class hierarchy corresponding methods use slightly different conventions:
extern_operator_name is transformed into ExternOperatorName.
Def-Files
Some slots are language dependent: For example short.english contains a short description of the
operator in English, short.german the same description in German. The currently supported languages
are English and German. In order to allow an international usage of operators we strongly recommend
always to provide all .english slots.
24
Operator Description (def-File)
parameter class
input iconic objects
output iconic objects
input control parameters
output control parameters
keyword (cf. page 34)
input_object
output_object
input_ctrl
output_ctrl
parameter in the example
OrigImage, ThresholdImage
RegionDynThresh
Offset, LightDark
∅
It is helpful to follow certain conventions, when choosing names for parameters. They should be meaningful (i.e. one should avoid names like ‘Aac’) and consequently should be given in English. It is convention to denote parameters that specify a position within an image matrix by Row(s) (not Line!) and
Column(s) or Col(s). Parameters defining a dimension are called Width and Height.
2.2.2
short
The keyword short starts the short description of the operator, in our example
short.english
Segment an image using a local threshold.;
As all slots specified by the keyword .english, this slot contains purely textual information. Text can
be written in different languages and can contain LATEX-commands according to special syntactic rules
that are defined in section 2.4 on page 43.
2.2.3
warning
With the slot warning, you can show a warning text in bold at the beginning of an operator description,
for example
warning.english
This operator is obsolete.;
As all slots specified by the keyword .english, this slot contains purely textual information. Text can
be written in different languages and can contain LATEX-commands according to special syntactic rules
that are defined in section 2.4 on page 43.
2.2.4 abstract
2.2.4
25
abstract
abstract.english
\OpRef{dyn_threshold} selects from the input image those regions in which the
pixel fulfill a threshold condition. Let $g_{o} = g_{\ParRef{OrigImage}}$,
and $g_{m} = g_{\ParRef{ThresholdImage}}$. Then the condition for
\ParRef{LightDark} = \ValRef{'light'} is:
@a
g_o >= g_m + Offset
@l\[
g_{o} \ge g_{m} + \ParRef{Offset}
\]
@e
For \ParRef{LightDark} = \ValRef{'dark'} the condition is:
@a
g_o <= g_m - Offset
@l\[
g_{o} \le g_{m} - \ParRef{Offset}
\]
@e
Finally, for \ParRef{LightDark} = \ValRef{'equal'} it is:
@a
g_m - Offset <= g_o <= g_m + Offset
@l\[
g_{m} - \ParRef{Offset} \le g_{o} \le g_{m} + \ParRef{Offset}
\]
@e
This means that all points in \ParRef{OrigImage} for which the gray value is
larger or equal to the gray value in \ParRef{ThresholdImage} plus an offset
are aggregated into the resulting region.;
Again, refer to section 2.4 on page 43 for the special syntax of text.
2.2.5
module
module
foundation;
This slot denotes the module inside HALCON the operator should belong to. For user extensions the
module ‘foundation’ is recommended.
2.2.6
chapter
To achieve a useful structuring of HALCON operators, they are all arranged in a hierarchy of chapters
and sections. The assignment defined in the slot chapter is reflected in the reference manuals and in
Def-Files
A more detailed description of the operator is given within the slot abstract. The description of the
example is here shown as a shortened version:
26
Operator Description (def-File)
the menu Operator of HDevelop.
chapter.english
Segmentation;
The structuring can be refined by specifying a section: chapter[,section], e.g.,
chapter.english
Filter,Edges;
Note, that it is not allowed to insert operators and sections into the same chapter at the same level of
hierarchy. So if you decide to use sections within a chapter, all operators within this chapter must be
assigned to one of these sections.
2.2.7
functionality
functionality
image;
This slot denotes the class of which the operator should become a method within an object-oriented
programming language like C++ or C#2 . Generally this corresponds to the semantic type of the first
parameter, e.g., an image object (image). The specified name is only a symbolic one. The actual class
name depends on the programming language and is provided by the HALCON compiler hcomp. Possible
values for functionality in the current version are
any, window, image, region, object, xld_cont, xld_poly, xld_para, xld_mod_para,
and xld_ext_para.
2.2.8
keywords
Furthermore, one can assign a list of keywords to an operator. They are used e.g., by HDevelop to support
the search for the proper operators for a given problem.
keywords.english
threshold, gray-value threshold, dynamic threshold, local threshold;
2 User-defined
extensions are not inserted in the class hierarchy but considered as global methods.
2.2.9 predecessor, successor, alternatives
2.2.9
27
predecessor, successor, alternatives
The following slots also support interactive development of image processing application with HALCON. They are used to define potential, convenient or necessary predecessor (predecessor) and successor operators (successor) or to define alternatives (alternatives). All operators within these lists
are referenced by their name.
successor
connection,select_shape,reduce_domain,select_gray,rank_region,
dilation1,opening;
alternatives
highpass,threshold,background_seg;
2.2.10
see_also
The slot see_also contains a list of operators that are used for similar tasks or help to understand how
an operator works.
see_also
mean_image,smooth_image,gauss_image,connection,rank_region,dilation1;
2.2.11
attention
The slot attention contains hints for using the operator or specific limitations.
attention.english
If \ParRef{Offset} is chosen from @a -1 .. 1 @l$-1\dots1$@e
usually a very noisy region is generated, requiring large storage.
If \ParRef{Offset} is chosen too large ($>$ 60, say) it may happen
that no points fulfill the threshold condition (i.e.\ an empty
region is returned). If \ParRef{Offset} is chosen too small ($<$
-60, say) it may happen that all points fulfill the threshold
condition (i.e.\ a full region is returned).;
Def-Files
predecessor
mean_image,smooth_image,gauss_image;
28
Operator Description (def-File)
2.2.12
result_state
The slot result_state defines the result value of an operator and the corresponding exception handling.
The syntactical rules for the text are again the same as described in section 2.4 on page 43.
result_state.english
\OpRef{dyn_threshold} returns TRUE if all parameters are
correct. The behavior with respect to the input images and output
regions can be determined by setting the values of the flags
\ValRef{'no_object_result'}, \ValRef{'empty_region_result'}, and
\ValRef{'store_empty_region'} with \OpRef{set_system}.
If necessary, an exception is raised.;
2.2.13
parallelization
The slot parallelization contains information about the parallelization characteristics of an operator.
On the one hand, this regards the possibility of using the operator in a parallel, for example, multithreaded
application and on the other hand this regards the automatic parallelization which HALCON uses to
speed up the operator’s processing when working with multi-processor or multi-core hardware.
The slot parallelization consists of several sub-slots, each starting with a characteristic keyword
followed by a colon and finishing with a semicolon. The example below shows the slot for the operator
dyn_threshold, which is not “local”, needs neither complete nor mutual exclusion, and is parallelized
on tuple and domain level. The single subslots and their meaning will be described in the following
sections.
parallelization
process_exclusively:
process_locally:
process_mutual:
method:
region_postprocessing:
false;
false;
false;
split_tuple, split_domain;
domain_concat_si_inp;
process_exclusively: true, false, none;
This subslot of parallelization assigns whether an operator is processed completely exclusively (‘true’) by the main HALCON process/thread or not. An exclusive processing means that
no other operator will be processed by HALCON while the exclusive operator is running. If an
exclusive operator is started and other operators are still running, the processing of the exclusive
operator is delayed until all other (currently running) operators have completed.
An exclusively processed operator is always processed without any parallelization by the main
HALCON thread/process. Note that even if HALCON is reentrant for most of the operators, there
are still some operators that have to be processed exclusively due to reasons of their implementation.
If no subslot process_exclusively is filled in with an operator, it is assumed that the operator
needs no completely exclusive processing (“optimistic” assumption).
2.2.13 parallelization
29
If the subslot contains none, the operator is processed by HALCON independently of other operators, even exclusive ones. This value is only used internally by MVTec
process_mutual: true, false;
This subslot of parallelization assigns whether HALCON processes an operator under mutual
exclusion (‘true’) against itself or not. Here, a mutual exclusion means that the same operator
may not run twice or more at the same time; for example, there will only run one instance of
adapt_template at a time, whereas other operators may run concurrently to adapt_template.
If no subslot process_mutual is filled in with an operator, it is assumed that the operator needs
no mutual exclusion (“optimistic” assumption).
process_locally: true, false;
This subslot of parallelization assigns, whether an operator must be processed locally (‘true’)
by a program thread, or whether it may called by any (“external”) thread without problems. The
slot is mainly important when programming multithreaded applications under Windows. Here,
there exists a direct mapping between program threads and graphical elements, such as windows,
dialog boxes or button controls. In short, a graphical element only exists in the context of its
associated thread. This can cause severe problems, for example, hang the application, if another
thread tries to perform user interactions via graphical elements which belong to other threads. For
example, troubles might occur under Windows, if one thread opens a window via open_window
and another thread tries to get input from this window via draw_circle.
As it is not always obvious for all operators, whether they work with critical (graphical) elements
or not, the slot process_locally was introduced. If process_locally is set to ‘true’, this signals the programmer that the corresponding operator must be used carefully within multithreaded
Windows applications. The most simple way to avoid any problems with such operators is to
process them all under mutual exclusion within the main thread of the program.
As a side effect, HALCON processes an operator without parallelization regardless the settings
of the subslots method and domain_split, if process_locally is set to ‘true’. This avoids
problems with ‘local’ operators and multithreading and makes sense because ‘local’ operators
normally are responsible for graphical interaction and thus are not suitable for parallelization.
If no subslot process_locally is filled in with an operator, it is assumed that the operator must
be processed “locally” (“pessimistic” assumption). However, this subslot should be filled in in any
case, because it contains a very useful information for programmers of multithreaded applications.
method: none, split_tuple, split_channel, split_domain, split_partial,
split_partial_domain;
This subslot of parallelization can contain one or more of the strings above and specifies,
which type of (automatic) parallelization the operator is suitable for:
• none: HALCON does not automatically parallelize the operator.
• split_tuple: HALCON parallelizes the operator by splitting every input image tuple into
several subsets of the tuple; the tuple subsets are then processed in parallel.
• split_channel: HALCON parallelizes by splitting every multichannel (input) image into
several subsets of the channels; the subsets are then processed in parallel.
Def-Files
An mutually processed operator is always processed without any parallelization by the main HALCON thread/process.
30
Operator Description (def-File)
• split_domain: HALCON parallelizes by splitting the domain of every input image into
several parts; the parts are then processed in parallel.
• split_partial, split_partial_domain: These methods are only used by MVTec to
indicate the internal parallelization of HALCON operators.
If method is set to anything other but ‘none’, the parameter slot costs_weight must be filled in
for every input control parameter and the parameter slot postprocessing must be filled in for
every output control parameter of the operator (see page 37)!
If method is set to ‘split_domain’, the slot region_postprocessing (see below) must also be
set correctly and may not be omitted!
If the slot process_locally is set to ‘true’, method should be set to ‘none’, because the operator
won’t be parallelized then (see description of process_locally above).
Note that the slot method may contain any combination of the strings ‘split_tuple’, ‘split_channel’,
and ‘split_domain’, because an operator may be parallelized by using any combination of those
three methods. However, if ‘none’ is specified with the slot method, no other string should be
specified with it in order to keep the description consistent.
If no slot method is filled in with an operator, it is assumed that the operator is not suitable for
being automatically parallelized (“pessimistic” assumption).
region_postprocessing: none, domain_concat_si_inp,domain_concat_mult_inp;
This subslot of parallelization must (only) be set for operators that are suitable for being parallelized by splitting the domain of input objects (i.e. slot method contains ‘split_domain’). For such
operators HALCON supports a simple postprocessing of output region components: After splitting the domain of input objects and processing the operator in parallel (within the subparts of the
original domain), HALCON creates the overall output iconic objects based on the output objects
of the parallel processing. At this, it supports three methods for determining the domain/region
components of overall output objects. Those three methods correspond to the three possible values
of region_postprocessing:
• none: no postprocessing of region/domain components. Here, HALCON directly adopts the
region components of input objects and re-uses them unchanged as the region components
of the corresponding overall output objects. This method is especially suitable for operators
which output solely image objects and where the domain is left unchanged, such as filter
operators (e.g. mean_image).
• domain_concat_si_inp: postprocess region components by concatenation for operators
which have only a single input iconic parameter. Here, HALCON creates the region components of overall output objects by concatenating the region components of the corresponding output objects of the parallel processing. At this, the latter regions must not overlap!
Therefore, domain_concat_si_inp can only be used for operators, for which the subslot
domain_split (see below) is set to ‘0’. This method is suitable, for example, for the operator threshold which outputs a region containing all pixels of a certain gray value range.
Here, HALCON splits the input domain into disjunctive parts, processes the threshold operator in parallel, and finally concatenates the single result regions to one overall result region.
• domain_concat_mult_inp: postprocess region components by concatenation for operators which have multiple input iconic parameter and which need a specific handling of the
input objects. This method is quite similar to that above, i.e., HALCON also creates the
region components of overall output objects by concatenating the region components of the
corresponding output objects of the parallel processing. Again, the latter regions must not
overlap! Therefore, domain_concat_mult_inp can only be used for operators, for which
the subslot domain_split (see below) is set to ‘0’. For domain_concat_mult_inp HALCON uses a specific handling of input objects. Normally, HALCON splits the domains of all
objects of all input iconic parameters in the same manner (e.g. by splitting into the first and
the second half of the chords, independent from the row index of the chords). This does not
mean any problem as long as all input image domains are the same — especially, if domains
of corresponding objects of different input parameters are the same. Because then also the
split domains will match each other. This is not the case, if we have to expect that domains
of objects of different input iconic parameters may differ. Here, it may happen that split
domain parts of the first parameter and that of the second parameter do not overlap because
of the simple splitting mechanism which does not take into account the row index of chords.
If so, and if an operator uses, for example, an intersection of the input domains of different
input parameters for defining the valid domain of the processed operation, it would get an
empty region — in contrast to the sequential processing of the same operator. Therefore, we
must assign domain_concat_mult_inp for such operators. This will force HALCON to
only split the domains of the objects of the first input iconic parameter. The domains of input
objects of all other input iconic parameters are left unchanged so that they fit to the domains
of the first input iconic parameter regardless of their position in the image.
This method is suitable, for example, for the operator add_image which adds two images
and sets the domain of the result image to the intersection of the domains of the two input
images. By defining domain_concat_mult_inp for add_image, HALCON only splits the
domain of the first image to add, then calculates the intersection of the split domain parts
with the unchanged domain of the second image in parallel, performs the addition of gray
values in parallel, and finally merges the resulting region components (domains) by concatenation into the region component of the overall output image which also contains the added
gray values.
Though, we recommend to specify the whole slot parallelization, it is also possible to completely
leave it out in an operator’s description. In this case, it is assumed that the operator is reentrant, i.e. it is
not processed under (complete or mutual) exclusion, and that it must be processed “locally”. The latter
also means that no parallelization is used when processing the operator. This assumption corresponds
exactly to those which are used in the case of missing single subslots (see descriptions above).
2.2.14
complexity
The slot complexity describes the complexity of the operation in terms of number of points along a
contour, the area of an image region etc.
complexity.english
Let $F$ be the area of the input region.
complexity is $O(F)$.;
Then the runtime
31
Def-Files
2.2.14 complexity
32
Operator Description (def-File)
2.2.15
example
It is possible to describe an example under the keyword example in order to illustrate the usage of an
operator. An extension of the keyword specifies the programming language of the example.
example.trias
/* Looking for regions with the diameter D: */
mean_image(Imaged,Mean,D*2,D*2)
dyn_threshold(Image,Mean,Seg,5,'light')
connection(Seg,Objects);
The extension .trias indicates a HDevelop example. Moreover, the extensions .c, .c++, and .c#
can be used. The text of the example is processed unmodified, so it must not contain any LATEX-special
characters. The only exception is the semicolon that needs a prefixed backslash, because it would signal
the end of the example text otherwise. This must be considered especially for C, C++, and C# examples.
2.2.16
references
The slot references (not specified in the dyn_threshold example) is used to insert references to literature into the documentation, e.g.,
references
R.M. Haralick, K.G. Shapiro: ``Computer and Robot Vision''\;
Vol. 1, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1992.;
2.2.17
Class Information
At the end of the def-file, i.e., after the parameter section described in the following section, information
about the classes generated for HALCON/.NET and HALCON/COM must be added, in particular the
COM class and library IDs in the subslots iid, clsid, and libid. The example below shows the
corresponding information in threshold.def.
2.3 Describing the Parameters
33
class halconuser <- user
short.english
Sample extension package.;
iid
{bf6a1001-0b95-11d4-b295-00e0293dc2ac};
library halconuser <- user_library
libid
{bf6a1000-0b95-11d4-b295-00e0293dc2ac};
2.3
Describing the Parameters
Please note that the number of parameters is limited for an extension package operators as listed in the
Quick Guide, section 2.5.4 on page 28.
Again, the definition of dyn_threshold is used as an example. Every description of a single parameter starts with the keyword parameter and contains several slots. A slot begins with a characteristic
keyword followed by a colon and is finished by a semicolon. All slots specified for the parameters of
an operator are accessible online within the HALCON system using the operator get_param_info, see
the Reference Manuals for details.
parameter
OrigImage:
description.english:
sem_type:
type_list:
multivalue:
input_object;
Image to be segmented.;
image;
byte,int2,int4,real;
optional;
parameter
ThresholdImage:
description.english:
sem_type:
type_list:
multivalue:
input_object;
Image containing the local thresholds.;
image;
byte,int2,int4,real;
optional;
parameter
RegionDynThresh:
description.english:
sem_type:
multivalue:
output_object;
Segmented regions.;
region;
optional;
Def-Files
clsid
{bf6a1002-0b95-11d4-b295-00e0293dc2ac};
34
Operator Description (def-File)
parameter
Offset:
description.english:
sem_type:
type_list:
default_type:
default_value:
values:
multivalue:
assertion:
costs_weight:
input_control;
Offset added to ThresholdImage.;
number;
integer,real;
real;
5.0;
1.0, 3.0, 5.0, 7.0, 10.0, 20.0, 30.0;
false;
-255 < Offset && Offset < 255;
0;
parameter
LightDark:
description.english:
sem_type:
type_list:
default_type:
default_value:
value_list:
multivalue:
costs_weight:
input_control;
Extract light, dark or similar areas?;
string;
string;
string;
light;
dark,light,equal,not_equal;
false;
0;
The minimum of information needed for every parameter is its name and type, its default type, its semantic type, the number of values allowed (multivalue), and, if the operator should be automatically
parallelized, the “costs weight” of input control parameters and the “postprocessing” of output control
parameters, see below.
2.3.1
Name
parameter
Name:
input_object,output_object,input_control,output_control;
This defines the name and the class of a parameter. The parameters must be described in the same order
as in their definition within the header of the operator description.
Note, that in order to create PDF hyperlinks referencing parameters (see section 2.4 on page 43 and
section 7.1.4 on page 120) a parameter name must consist of alphanumerical characters only!
2.3.2
default_type
default_type:
integer,real,string;
Only for control parameters! This slot specifies, what C-type to use in general. It must have exactly one
of the three above values.
2.3.3 sem_type
2.3.3
35
sem_type
sem_type:
class[.spec];
This slot determines the semantic type, i.e., it specifies the class of data passed as parameters, when using
an object-oriented language. Names of classes within the def-file are only symbolic. The mapping to
the actual class names is provided by the HALCON compiler hcomp.
HDevelop also uses the semantic types, e.g., in order to provide specific inspection routines.
• Iconic data (object parameters):
– object (any iconic object: images, regions, XLDs)
– image (images)
– region (regions)
– xld (any XLDs: lines in eXtended Line Description)
– xld_cont, xld_poly, xld_para, xld_mod_para, xld_ext_para
• Elementary data (control parameters):
– number (unspecific)
– integer, real, string
– channel (channel number)
• Handles (control parameters):
– window (HALCON graphics window)
• Arrays (control parameters):
– histogram.values (gray value histogram)
– distribution.values (distribution)
• Geometric data (control parameters):
– point.x, point.y (position; (column, row) except for 2D transformations to get mathematically positive rotation)
– extent.x, extent.y (dimensioning)
– angle.deg, angle.rad (angle given in degrees or radians, respectively)
– circle.center.y, circle.center.x, circle.radius (circle)
– line.begin.y, line.begin.x, line.end.y, line.end.x (line)
Def-Files
Below, the most important semantic types (classes) for developing an extension package are listed (omitting the types for HALCON handle classes like OCR, shape-based matching, etc.):
36
Operator Description (def-File)
– rectangle.origin.y, rectangle.origin.x (rectangle: upper left corner),
rectangle.corner.y, rectangle.corner.x (lower right corner) or
rectangle.extent.x rectangle.extent.y (expansion – as alternative to specifying the
2nd corner)
– rectangle2.center.y, rectangle2.center.x (rectangle with arbitrary orientation:
center),
rectangle2.angle.rad (orientation – in radians),
rectangle2.hwidth, rectangle2.hheigth (half the size)
– ellipse.center.y, ellipse.center.x (ellipse: centre),
ellipse.angle.rad (orientation – in radians),
ellipse.radius1, ellipse.radius2 (radii)
– arc.center.y, arc.center.x (circle: center),
arc.angle.rad (angle stretched by the circular arc – in radians),
arc.begin.y, arc.begin.x (starting point of circular arc).
– hom_mat2d (2D homogeneous transformation matrix)
hom_mat3d (3D homogeneous transformation matrix)
pose (3D pose)
• Numerical region descriptions (control parameters):
– coordinates.y, coordinates.x (coordinates)
– contour.y, contour.x (points of a contour)
– chord.y, chord.x1, chord.x2 (runlength code)
– polygon.y, polygon.x (polygoneal representation)
– chain.begin.y, chain.begin.x, chain.code (chain code)
• Miscellaneous (control parameters):
– filename (name of a file)
filename.read (name of an input file)
filename.write (name of an output file)
– attribute.name (name of a generic parameter)
attribute.value (value of a generic parameter)
Please note:
• y-coordinates correspond to rows, x-coordinates to columns in the image.
• Please use the above semantic types for characterizing parameters whenever they are applicable.
• For control parameters characterizing a composed object like a circle etc.: Please use the specific
order of parameters like indicated above.
2.3.4 modified
2.3.4
37
modified
modified:
false,true;
This slot indicates whether the (input) parameter is modified by the operator. Its default value is
’false’. Currently, this slot is only used by the operator get_param_info. It does not appear in
the reference documentation.
multivalue
multivalue:
true,false,optional;
This slot describes the number of values passed in a parameter: ‘true’ means that an array (tuple) of
values must be passed. If ‘false’ is specified, exactly one value must be passed. ‘optional’ allows both.
If a parameter may also return no values at all, multivalue must be set to ‘true’ or ‘optional’.
All slots mentioned so far must appear in any extended operator description. Moreover, the following
optional slots are recommended to provide further information about parameters:
2.3.6
costs_weight
costs_weight:
an unsigned integer value;
This slot must only be used for input control parameters of operators which are suitable for being automatically parallelized (i.e. for operators for that the parallelization subslot method does not contain
‘none’; see page 29). Here, it assigns, whether the time for processing the operator directly depends
on the content (value) of the corresponding input control parameter. If costs_weight is set to ‘0’, the
duration of the operator processing does not directly depend on the content of the corresponding input
control parameter. In this case, the parameter will not be taken into account when HALCON decides,
whether an operator should be parallelized for a given allocation of input parameters or not. This also
means, that this parameter will not be checked during the hardware training (compare the description
of optimize_aop in the Reference Manuals). This helps to speed up the training. If costs_weight
contains a value greater than ‘0’, this assigns that there is a direct dependency between the content of the
corresponding input control parameter and the computation time of the operator. In this case, HALCON
will take into account this parameter during its hardware check (optimize_aop) in order to determine
its influence on the operator’s processing time. Note that the slot costs_weight must be filled in for
every input control parameter, if the operator should be automatically parallelized, i.e. if the operator’s
slot method does not contain ‘none’ (see page 29).
2.3.7
postprocessing
postprocessing:
none,tuple_add,tuple_min,tuple_max,tuple_concat,
channel_add,channel_min,channel_max,channel_concat,
domain_add,domain_min,domain_max,domain_concat;
Def-Files
2.3.5
38
Operator Description (def-File)
This slot must only be used for output control parameters of operators which are suitable for being
automatically parallelized (i.e. for operators for that the parallelization subslot method does not
contain ‘none’; see page 29). Here, postprocessing specifies, which kind of postprocessing is used
with the single result values of a parallel processed operator. If, for example, an operator is parallelized
by splitting a tuple of iconic input objects and the single result values of the parallel processed operator must be put into one output control object again, the slot postprocessing should contain the
keyword ‘tuple_concat’ which means “concatenate result values”. Or if an operator is parallelized by
splitting the single channels of iconic input objects and the overall result value is the minimum of the
single result values of the parallel processed operator, postprocessing should contain the keyword
‘channel_minimum’. Obviously, the slot postprocessing can contain several strings in order to define different postprocessing steps for different levels of parallelization (tuple, channel, and domain); of
course, there should only be one string per level. If ‘none’ is specified (in this case, no other string should
be specified), no postprocessing is done on every parallelization level. This means, that the overall result
value of the corresponding output control parameter is directly determined by the result value of the first
parallelized operator instance (e.g. the instance which worked on the first tuple element).
Altogether, HALCON currently supports the following postprocessing steps:
• none: no postprocessing; adopt first value;
• tuple_add: overall result value is the sum of the single result values of the tuple parallelization;
• tuple_min: overall result value is the minimum of the single result values of the tuple parallelization;
• tuple_max: overall result value is the maximum of the single result values of the tuple parallelization;
• tuple_concat: overall result value is a tuple which contains all the result values of the tuple
parallelization (“concatenation”);
• channel_add: overall result value is the sum of the single result values of the channel parallelization;
• channel_min: overall result value is the minimum of the single result values of the channel parallelization;
• channel_max: overall result value is the maximum of the single result values of the channel
parallelization;
• channel_concat: overall result value is a tuple which contains all the result values of the channel
parallelization (“concatenation”);
• domain_add: overall result value is the sum of the single result values of the parallelization on
domain level;
• domain_min: overall result value is the minimum of the single result values of the parallelization
on domain level;
• domain_max: overall result value is the maximum of the single result values of the parallelization
on domain level;
2.3.8 description
39
• domain_concat: overall result value is a tuple which contains all the result values of the parallelization on domain level (“concatenation”);
parameter
Circularity:
description.english:
sem_type:
type_list:
default_type:
multivalue:
assertion:
postprocessing:
output_control;
Roundness of the input region(s).;
real;
real;
real;
optional;
0 <= Circularity && Circularity <= 1.0;
tuple_concat;
Note that the slot postprocessing must be filled in for every output control parameter, if the operator should be automatically parallelized, i.e. if the operator’s slot method does not contain ‘none’ (see
page 29).
2.3.8
description
description.english:
LATEX/Ascii-Text;
This slot contains a short description of the parameter. The extension .english refers to a English
description. In addition to that a German description might be given in description.german. For the
syntax of LATEX/Ascii-Text see section 2.4 on page 43.
2.3.9
type_list
The slot type_list is only used in connection with object parameters with sem_type = image and
for control parameters.
For images (sem_type = image):
type_list:
any,byte,int1,int2,int4,real,cyclic,direction,complex;
For images this slot contains an enumeration of all supported pixel types. Note, that in many cases there
will be more than one supported pixel type. Thus, type_list is a list separated by commas.
For control parameters:
type_list:
integer,real,string;
For control parameters this slot contains a list of all C-types allowed for the parameter.
Def-Files
The example below shows the definition of postprocessing for the operator circularity, which
calculates the shape factor for the circularity (similarity to a circle) of input regions. If circularity
is tuple parallelized the overall result is a tuple of values, of which the single elements contain the
“circularity” of the single input regions. Thus the postprocessing of the corresponding output control
parameter is assigned by ‘tuple_concat’.
40
Operator Description (def-File)
2.3.10
default_value
default_value:
Default Value;
This slot defines the default value e.g., used by HDevelop to initialize the parameter in the operator window. Suggesting default values can help the programmer to find suitable values of parameters. Generally,
strings are unquoted in the description (not 'theString', but theString); exceptions: empty string ('')
and strings with special characters ('the string').
2.3.11
values
values:
List of some typical values;
This slot contains a collection of possible values. This list does not have to be complete. It just suggests
some typical values the user might want to try.
2.3.12
value_list
value_list:
List of all values;
This slot contains a complete list of all allowed values. So, if a parameter can hold only a discrete number
of specific values, value_list should be specified, otherwise values might be used to provide some
typical values.
2.3.13
value_min, value_max
value_min:
value_max:
Number;
Number;
Instead of a list an interval may be used to specify a range of values for a parameter. The interval
may be unlimited in one direction. The slot value_min specifies the minimum of the allowed values,
value_max the maximum.
Please note that the range is not used to check the passed parameter values. The slots are provided for
applications that need the possible range of values to create sliders or other graphical elements to interact
with parameters.
To restrict the values of a parameter, please use the slot assertion further below.
2.3.14
step_rec, step_min, value_function
step_rec:
step_min:
value_function:
Number;
Number;
lin,log,quad, . . . ;
2.3.15 value_number
41
If a range of values is possible for a parameter it might be a useful information to specify a suitable step
width (step_rec) between distinct values to be tested. Based on this information a user interface might
generate a list of suggestions for parameter values. The corresponding minimum reasonable step width
can be provided by step_min. The step width can also be modified by specifying a function in the slot
value_function.
value_number
value_number:
boolean expression;
This slot contains a boolean expression that determines how the number of passed or returned values of
a parameter is absolutely or relatively connected to the number of values in other parameters or some
absolute values. The operators and functions listed in table 2.1 may appear within the expression.
Group
Unary Operators
Binary Operators
Functions
Symbol
!
&&
||
==
!=
>
>=
<
<=
+
*
/
%
odd
even
ld
length
number
width
height
meaning
logical NOT
negation
logical AND
logical OR
equal
not equal
greater
greater or equal
less
less or equal
sum
difference
multiplication
division (DIV)
rest of division (MOD)
true, if odd
true, if even
binary logarithm
length
number of values (only for assertion)
(image-)width
(image-)height
Table 2.1: Operators and functions used for the slots value_number and assertion.
Examples:
Param1 == Param2 && Param2 > 0
This means that the same number of values and at least one value must be passed with parameter
1 and parameter 2.
Def-Files
2.3.15
42
Operator Description (def-File)
Param2 == 3
This means that exactly three values must be passed with parameter 2.
For output parameters this can be seen as an assertion. This may also refer to input parameters, e.g.:
RegionOut <= RegionIn in connection with the HALCON operator select_shape expresses the
fact that the number of output regions does not exceed the number of input regions.
2.3.16
assertion
assertion:
boolean expression;
This slot contains a boolean expression that determines how the passed or returned values of parameters
are absolutely or relatively connected to the values of other parameters or some absolute values. The
same expressions may appear as described above for value_number, see table 2.1.
Examples:
Param1 == Param2 && Param2 > 0
This means that parameter 1 and 2 must have the same value and this value is greater than 0.
0 <= Param2 && Param2 <= 255
This means that parameter 2 must have a value between 0 and 255.
Param1 <= number(ImageIn)
This means that the value of parameter 1 must be less or equal the number of input images.
Param2 < width(ImageIn) && Param2 >= 0 && odd(Param2)
This means that the value of parameter 2 must be between 0 and the width of the input image and
must be an even number.
2.3.17
multichannel
multichannel:
true,false,optional;
This slot is only used in connections with image objects. It contains an assertion about the necessary
or supported number of channels of an image. If set to false, the processing is done only on the first
channel (all others are ignored), if set to true, a multichannel image must be passed. optional specifies
operators that can work on more than one channel but can also work on only one channel as well.
2.3.18
file_ext, file_ext_descr
file_ext:
file_ext_descr.english:
List of file extensions;
List of descriptions;
2.4 Text in def-Files
43
These slots are used for parameters of the semantic type filename (see page 36). In file_ext, you can
specify a list of possible file extensions. HDevelop, for example, uses this information when opening file
selectors.
In file_ext_descr.english (and file_ext_descr.german), you can add descriptions for the extensions. If file_ext contains a list of extensions, you can either pass a single description for all of
them or one for each extension. When passing a list of descriptions, you can insert a period to indicate
that the previous value should be used. If a description contains a space, you must enclose it in single
quotes. Note that HDevelop automatically appends the text Files to the descriptions.
Example 1:
file_ext:
file_ext_descr.english:
results in:
Image Files (*.tif; *.tiff; *.gif)
Example 2:
file_ext:
file_ext_descr.english:
results in:
TIFF Image Files (*.tif)
TIFF Image Files (*.tiff)
GIF Image Files (*.gif)
2.4
tif,tiff,gif;
'TIFF Image',.,'GIF Image';
Text in def-Files
Within a def-file the semicolon (;) is used to separate the single slots. So, when using a semicolon within
a text, it must be quoted with a backslash (\;).
def-files are not only used to create interface code, but also allow the generation of PDF reference
manuals, the HTML documentation, and the help files used to access operator knowledge via HALCON
operators like get_operator_info. For the online help and the HTML files an ASCII version of each
text is needed, whereas the reference manuals are produced compiling a LATEX-file generated from the
def-files. To avoid the necessity of writing two text blocks for one operator (ASCII and LATEX), both
versions are generated by using one text. Therefore, the following conventions must be observed:
Quotation marks: There are two kinds of quotation marks
’string’: This notation signals that the quoted text is a string as used within programming
languages. So hcomp treats 'string' as a string-parameter.
“Text”: This notation must be used in all other cases, particularly when quoting a word or text
segment because of its content. So hcomp treats ``Text'' as a quoted section of a text. Please
do not forget or permute the quotation marks (starting with `` and ending with '').
Underscores: Underscores can be used directly for both the ASCII and the LATEX output. The HALCON
compiler hcomp automatically prefixes them with the necessary backslashes for the LATEX output
(\_).
Please note that if you want to use an underscore in a LATEX part to create a subscript, you must
encase the subscript text in curly braces ({}) even if the subscript is only a single character. For
example, to create the output “Sx ” you must write $S_{x}$. If you leave out the braces, an
underscore is printed, e.g., $S_x$ results in “S_x”.
Def-Files
tif,tiff,gif;
Image;
44
Operator Description (def-File)
Backslash: All backslashes (\) within the text are ignored while generating the ASCII version. So the
LATEX-linefeed-symbol (\\) can be used without any problems.
Tilde: To use the tilde (e.g. as symbol for negation: set_check(::'~clear':)), the following special
notation must be used for the LATEX-text: set_check(::'\~{}clear':).
Formulas: Short formulas can be bracketed by dollar symbols ($) just as in LATEX. These symbols are
ignored for the ASCII version of the text.
To set an index of one character (e.g. Ab ) LATEX allows to simply write $A_b$. This is not possible
here, because of the special underscore handling. Therefore, any index must be written exactly as
any longer index within LATEX: A_{b}.
HALCON : The string HALCON is generated by \Halcon. Note, that in the PDF files derived from the
generated LATEX version of the def-files, no space is generated after the string HALCON. Thus, if
you do not want to start the next character/string without a blank, that is concatenated to the string
HALCON, you should use \Halcon\ instead. So “\Halcon XYZ” results in “HALCON XYZ”
and “\Halcon\ XYZ” results in “HALCON XYZ”. With the ASCII version all backslashes are
ignored (see above).
Names of parameters and operators: Any reference to HALCON operators or their parameters must
be written as \OpRef{operator_name}, respectively as \ParRef{parameter_name}. These keywords and the brackets are ignored, when generating the ASCII version so that only operator_name or parameter_name remains in the ASCII file. In the HTML and PDF documents,
hyperlinks are generated from these references.
Parameter values: A specific value for a parameter should be written as \ValRef{parameter_value}.
For example, the parameter \ParRef{LightDark} of the operator \OpRef{dyn_threshold} can
hold one of the values \ValRef{’light’}, \ValRef{’dark’}, or \ValRef{’equal’}. The keyword
ValRef and the brackets are ignored, when generating the ASCII version so that only parameter_value remains in the ASCII file.
Paragraphs: If you want to divide a longer text into paragraphs to increase the readability, all you need
to do is to insert an empty line between the paragraphs:
This is a paragraph ...
.. which ends here.
The next paragraph starts after an empty line ...
This corresponds to the standard LATEX way of separating paragraphs; in the HTML documents,
the paragraphs are enclosed with the tag <P>.
Formatted text: You can use the following LATEX commands to format text both in the LATEX and HTML
version:
• \emph{text}: results in text (HTML tag <E>)
• \texttt{text}: results in text (HTML tag <TT>)
• \textbf{text}: results in text (HTML tag <B>)
• \textit{text}: results in text (HTML tag <I>)
2.4 Text in def-Files
45
Please note that these commands cannot be nested!
Lists: You can use the following LATEX environments to format text in lists both in the LATEX and HTML
version:
description lists:
lists with bullet points:
\begin{itemize}
\item text ...
\item text ...
\end{itemize}
enumerated lists:
\begin{enumerate}
\item text ...
\item text ...
\end{enumerate}
Other LATEX commands: If you want to use additional LATEX command within a text segment, two
versions of this segment must be provided – one for ASCII (with @a signalling the start of the
ASCII section) and another as pure LATEX text (with @l starting the LATEX version and @e ending
the special section). In particular, this technique is necessary for tables and larger formulas.
Example:
@a
g_o >= g_m + \ParRef{Offset}
@l\[ g_{o} \ge g_{m} + \ParRef{Offset} \]@e
This parenthesis can also be used for only one of the two text types:
... text text @l \aSpecialLatexCommand @e text text ...
In fact, the ASCII mode has two sub-modes: If @a is immediately followed by a carriage return,
the following lines are enclosed with the HTML tag <PRE>. Thus, they appear “as they come”,
including all spaces and carriage returns. Otherwise, i.e., if @a is followed by any character (including a space!), carriage returns and spaces are not preserved in the HTML document.
Def-Files
\begin{description}
\item[title 1] text ...
\item[title 2] text ...
\end{description}
46
Operator Description (def-File)
Style Guide for Programming
47
Chapter 3
The following chapter contains some recommendations for implementing new HALCON operators.
They aim on portable code that should be easy to understand for other HALCON programmers. One
of the major topics is the memory management discussed in section 3.2 on page 49.
3.1
Basic Numeric Data Types
This section describes the usage of basic numeric data types. Since C makes no assumption about the
size of integers, the following types have been defined:
Type Name
INT1
HBYTE
UINT1
INT2
UINT2
INT4
UINT4
INT4_8
UINT4_8
INT
UINT
Size/Range of Values
one byte with sign
one byte, unsigned
the same as HBYTE
two bytes with sign (generally short)
two bytes, unsigned
four bytes with sign
four bytes, unsigned
four or eight bytes with sign
four or eight bytes, unsigned
At least two, maximal eight bytes with sign
At least two, maximal eight bytes, unsigned
Using these types ensures the portability of HALCON operators.
Style Guide
Style Guide for Programming
48
Style Guide for Programming
3.1.1
Atributes of Iconic Parameters
To use operators in HALCON and HALCON XL, the following types have been introduced. With a compiler define (see chapter 7 on page 117), they are mapped to the suitable basic types for the corresponding
image size.
#if !defined(HC_LARGE_IMAGES)
typedef INT4 HIMGDIM;
/* Image dimension, e.g., width and height */
typedef INT2 HIMGCOOR; /* Image coordinates, e.g, row and column */
typedef INT4 HLINCOOR; /* Linearized image coordinates */
typedef INT4 HIMGCNT;
/* Number of pixels, e.g., area or buffer size */
typedef INT4 HITEMCNT; /* Number of elements, e.g., contours or runlengths */
typedef float HSUBCOOR; /* Sub-pixel precise coordinates */
typedef float HSUBATTR; /* Sub-pixel precise attributes of contours */
#else
typedef INT4 HIMGDIM;
typedef INT4 HIMGCOOR;
typedef INT4_8 HLINCOOR;
typedef INT4_8 HIMGCNT;
typedef INT4_8 HITEMCNT;
typedef double HSUBCOOR;
typedef double HSUBATTR;
#endif
Examples for their use can be found in chapter 4 on page 59.
3.1.2
Local Variables / Temporary Results
Types and sizes for local variables (no arrays) should be handled as follows:
Type
Size
1 byte
2 byte
Integer
3 byte
4 byte
Floating-point Number
3.1.3
C-Data Type
INT or UINT
INT4_8 or UINT4_8
double
Procedure Parameters
Parameters of procedures should be of the following types within HALCON:
Type
Size
1 byte
2 byte
Integer
3 byte
4 byte
Floating-point Number
Structure
C-Data Type
INT
INT4_8
double
pointer
3.1.4 Arrays
3.1.4
49
Arrays
For arrays or structures (i.e. larger sets) always the smallest possible data type should be used.
Type
Integer
Floating-point Number
Structure
C-Data Type
INT1
INT2 or UINT2
INT4 or UINT4
float
double
pointer
Memory Management
HALCON provides a sophisticated memory management not only to handle iconic objects, but also to
allocate/deallocate arbitrary data. Please use the corresponding HALCON Extension Package Interface
routines exclusively. Do not create/destroy memory blocks on the heap with the standard routines of the
operating system (like malloc and free) since the HALCON routines provide a caching mechanism,
garbage collection for temporary data, and debugging facilities.
We strongly recommend not to use global variables within HALCON operators. If they are not avoidable at least make them static within the file of usage. If even this is undesirable group them into
structures to keep the number of global names small.
If you use static variables, be aware that they are shared between multiple threads. Please note, that
HALCON uses multithreading to exploit multi-processor or multi-core hardware. This means, that multiple instances of your code will actually share all the static variables! Furthermore, be aware that large
static arrays consume a lot of memory – keep in mind that HALCON is a very large system enfolding
hundreds of operators.
3.2.1
Temporary Data
Figure 3.1 shows HALCON routines to allocate/deallocate temporary memory blocks. Internally, those
blocks are stored within a stack. Therefore, the memory must be deallocated in reverse order of it’s
allocation. There are two major advantages of using these routines:
• The underlying stacks are initially allocated as large blocks of memory. Thus, the memory is not
fragmented and memory allocation is fast for subsequent calls.
• An automatic garbage collection deallocates all temporary data after a HALCON operator was
executed. This is especially of importance in case of an error during the execution of the operator
(otherwise, the data should have been deallocated anyway).
!
Style Guide
3.2
Size
1 byte
2 byte
3 byte
4 byte
4 byte
8 byte
50
Style Guide for Programming
Names
HAllocTmp, HFreeTmp, HFreeNTmp, HFreeUpToTmp, HFreeAllTmp,
HAllocRLTmp, HAllocRLNumTmp, HFreeRLTmp
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
Herror HAllocTmp(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
void
**pointer,
size_t
size)
Herror HFreeTmp(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
void
*pointer)
Herror HFreeUpToTmp(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
void
*pointer)
Herror HFreeAllTmp(
Hproc_handle proc_handle)
Herror HAllocRLTmp(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
**region)
Herror HAllocRLNumTmp(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
**region,
size_t
size)
Herror HFreeRLTmp(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
*region)
Figure 3.1: HALCON stack management for temporary data.
HAllocTmp is used for arbitrary data with the corresponding deallocation routine HFreeTmp.
HFreeUpToTmp deallocates all recently allocated blocks up to (and including) the specified block.
HFreeAllTmp deallocates all temporary blocks.
HAllocRLTmp and HAllocRLNumTmp are convenience routines that are based on HAllocTmp.
HAllocRLTmp allocates as much memory as is necessary for the largest region currently stored in
the HALCON database of iconic objects (the minimal size is DEF_RL_LENGTH = 50000 chords).
HAllocRLNumTmp allows to determine the size of memory to be allocated by specifying the number
of chords. Furthermore, HAllocRLTmp and HAllocRLNumTmp initialize the data structure Hrlregion
for the new region (see section 4.2 on page 61 for a description of Hrlregion). Note, that since these
routines are based on HAllocTmp the corresponding memory blocks are interleaved with the blocks allocated directly via HAllocTmp. This has to be considered while deallocating the corresponding memory.
Temporary data on arbitrary heap positions
The temporary data management routines described so far use a stack. This is of advantage concerning
3.2.1 Temporary Data
51
Names
HAllocLocal, HReallocLocal, HFreeLocal,
HAllocRLLocal, HAllocRLNumLocal, HReallocRLNumLocal, HFreeRLLocal
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
Herror HAllocLocal(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
size_t
size,
void
**pointer)
Herror HReallocLocal(
Hproc_handle
void
size_t
void
Herror HFreeLocal(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
void
*pointer)
Herror HAllocRLLocal(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
**region)
Herror HAllocRLNumLocal(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
**region,
size_t
num)
Herror HReallocRLNumLocal( Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
size_t
Hrlregion
Herror HFreeRLLocal(
proc_handle,
*region
num_new,
**new_region)
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
*region)
Figure 3.2: Temporary data on arbitrary heap positions.
runtime, but it lacks flexibility if you do not want to deallocate memory in a fixed order again. Therefore, HALCON also provides routines for allocating temporary memory on an arbitrary position of the
heap, see figure 3.2. Memory blocks allocated by HAllocLocal can be deallocated by HFreeLocal in
an arbitrary order. However, similar to the stack-based temporary data management, all these blocks are
automatically deallocated at the end of a HALCON operator. Again this mainly aims on preventing memory leaks in case of errors. As usual, the routine HReallocLocalis used to allocate a new memory block
with modified size while preserving the data of the original memory block. The latter is deallocated. So
never try to access pointer subsequent to HReallocLocal– use new_pointer exclusively.
The convenience routines HAllocRLLocal HAllocRLNumLocal HReallocRLNumLocal, and
HFreeRLLocal are used for handling temporary region data based on HAllocLocal. Otherwise their
Style Guide
proc_handle,
*pointer
size,
**new_pointer)
52
Style Guide for Programming
behaviour is similar to HAllocRLTmp etc., see above. However, note that it is possible to change the
size of regions (i.e., the number of chords) using this set of routines (HReallocRLNumLocal) since the
underlying memory blocks are not allocated within the internal stacks.
3.2.2
Permanent Data
The HALCON Extension Package Interface also provides routines for permanently allocating/deallocating memory (see figures 3.3 and 3.4). They work similar to the standard C procedures
malloc and free, but use a caching mechanism for small data blocks and provide additional debugging
information.
Note that in contrast to HAllocLocal, memory allocated by HAlloc is not deallocated automatically
after the execution of a HALCON operator. Thus, this routine should be used to allocate permanent data.
For example, all the iconic objects stored in the HALCON database of iconic objects are allocated with
this routine (see chapter 5 on page 69 and chapter 6 on page 105).
HNewImage allocates raw image data inside1 the data structure Himage (see section 4.1 on page 59) based
on HAlloc. Furthermore, image is initialized and the timestamp is set to the current time. The image
matrix itself is initialized with 0 if ’init_new_image’ has been set to ’true’ using the HALCON
operator set_system. This flag can be read inside HALCON using the Extension Package Interface
call HReadGV.
HReadGV(proc_handle, HGInitNewImage, &init_new_img);
with init_new_img of type HBOOL and set
HWriteGV(proc_handle, HGInitNewImage, {TRUE,FALSE});
Thus, it is possible to buffer the global setting of this flag, set the flag to FALSE prior to HNewImage, and
restore the old value afterwards, if you would like to prevent an initialization in any case.
HNewImagePtr does not allocate memory for the image data, but inserts the pointer data in the Himage
structure image instead. For this routine, the initialization of the image data is controlled via the parameter initImg. Note that you will encounter program crashes during deallocation of image objects, if you
insert a memory block that has not been allocated via HAlloc in the underlying Himage structure (see
e.g., HPutImage in section 5.4 on page 82).
For both HNewImage and HNewImagePtr the pixel type of the raw data within image is specified by the
parameter kind. Please see figure 4.2 on page 61 for the supported values.
HAllocXLDCont allocates an XLD contour2 of type Hcont (see section 4.3 on page 63) including memory for num_points contour points. Internally this routine is based on HAlloc. HFreeXLDCont is used
to deallocate a contour again (including all the points and all attributes defined for cont, see page 64).
1 So
HNewImage does not allocate memory for the Himage structure itself.
2 In contrast to HNewImage and HNewImagePtr HAllocXLDCont also allocates memory for the structure Hcont itself,
for the data inside that structure.
not only
3.2.2 Permanent Data
53
Names
HAlloc, HRealloc, HFree, HNewImage, HNewImagePtr,
HAllocXLDCont, HFreeXLDCont
Synopsis
Herror HAlloc(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
size_t
size,
void
**pointer)
Herror HRealloc(
Hproc_handle
void
size_t
void
proc_handle,
*pointer
size,
**new_pointer)
Herror HFree(
Hproc_handle
void
proc_handle,
*pointer)
Herror HNewImage(
Hproc_handle
Himage
INT
HIMGDIM
HIMGDIM
proc_handle,
*image,
kind,
width,
height)
Herror HNewImagePtr(
Hproc_handle
Himage
INT
HIMGDIM
HIMGDIM
void
HBOOL
proc_handle,
*image,
kind,
width,
height,
*data,
initImg)
Herror HAllocXLDCont( Hproc_handle
Hcont
HITEMCNT
proc_handle,
**cont,
num_points)
Herror HFreeXLDCont(
proc_handle,
*cont)
Hproc_handle
Hcont
Figure 3.3: General memory management within HALCON .
The convenience routines HAllocRL, HAllocRLNum, HReallocRLNum, and HFreeRL (see figure 3.4)
are used for handling permanent region data based on HAlloc. Otherwise, their behaviour is similar to
HAllocRLTmp etc., see page 50. Note that it is possible to change the size of regions (i.e., the number of
chords) using HReallocRLNum.
Style Guide
#include "Halcon.h"
54
Style Guide for Programming
Names
HAllocRL, HAllocRLNum, HReallocRLNum, HFreeRL
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
Herror HAllocRL(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
**region)
Herror HAllocRLNum(
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
**region,
size_t
len)
Herror HReallocRLNum( Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
size_t
Hrlregion
Herror HFreeRL(
proc_handle,
*region
len,
**new_region)
Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hrlregion
*region)
Figure 3.4: General memory management for region data.
3.2.3
Debugging
The HALCON memory management provides debugging mechanisms. The debugging is enabled with
set_check(’memory’), and can be switched off with set_check(’~memory’). Every time a memory
block is deallocated a couple of consistency checks are performed automatically. Moreover, the consistency of memory blocks can be checked for debugging reasons at any time using specific Extension
Package Interface routines, see figure 3.5.
HTestMem checks all the memory allocated with HAlloc or HAllocLocal, whereas HTestPtr checks
only the specified memory block, which must have been allocated with HAlloc. Similar to that,
HTestAllTmp checks all the memory allocated via HAllocTmp, and HTestTmp checks the specified
block. With any failure of the consistency check, the routines return an error code (H_ERR_ICM – inconsistent memory). Furthermore, if the global variable HDoLowError is set to TRUE, they display a
description of the error either on stderr (UNIX) or within an alert box (Windows). This variable can
be set in an application with the operator set_system("do_low_error","true"/"false") or used
directly inside the newly written operator.
3.3
Structuring Programs
HALCON operators are typically implemented by at least two routines: one procedure (supply procedure) receives/unpacks all input data and checks its consistency. Afterwards it calls the action procedure,
3.4 Extension Package Initialization
55
Names
HTestMem, HTestPtr, HTestAllTmp, HTestTmp
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
Herror HTestMem(
void)
Herror HTestPtr(
void
*pointer)
Herror HTestAllTmp( Hproc_handle
proc_handle)
Herror HTestTmp(
proc_handle,
*pointer)
Hproc_handle
void
which performs the image processing. In some cases it might be convenient to implement several action
procedures dependent on special parameter values or pixel types of image data. Generally, these steps are
performed within a loop over all input iconic objects that may include further loops over different parameter values and over all image channels. The results are collected and finally returned to the HALCON
interface to the application.
Supply procedures are of type Herror and have only one parameter (a handle of type Hproc_handle for
instances of HALCON operators or HALCON threads). Do not forget to return an appropriate value at
the end of every supply procedure (standard value: H_MSG_TRUE) and every action procedure (standard
value: H_MSG_OK).
Typically, action procedures perform the image processing itself. They should return an error code of
type Herror as well. It is convenient to implement an action procedure for each pixel type of image
data.
3.4
Extension Package Initialization
To initialize an extension package, the following optional function may be defined:
extern HUserExport Herror HXPkgMain(Hproc_handle)
If defined, HALCON will call this function upon loading the extension package. For example, this
mechanism is useful to initialize synchronization objects (e.g., mutexes) that will be used in the extension
package.
Style Guide
Figure 3.5: HALCON memory management: Check of consistency.
56
Style Guide for Programming
3.5
Name Conventions for Procedures
To ease the interpretation of program code, HALCON introduces some conventions for procedure names.
The most important ones are summarized in the following section.
The names of action procedures typically begin with “IP” (image processing procedure), “IO”
(input/output procedure), or “DB” (data base procedure). The rest of the name describes the task performed by the procedure (in English language, beginning with a capital letter). In case of filters an
additional token might be inserted between these two parts of the name encoding the pixel type(s) of
images to be processed, e.g., “B” (HBYTE), “I4” (INT4) or “F” (float).
Examples:
IPBLowpas
IPI4Threshold
IODispRegion
DBGetTuple
Basic routines performing a small task that might be used by many other routines should start with “H”
(for Help). The leading “H” should be followed by a string encoding the data the routine works on, e.g.,
“RL” for an auxiliary routine processing region data, or “XLD” for routines working on XLDs.
Examples:
HRLUnion
HXLDContLen
HXLDContRegress
Names of supply procedures start with “C” (this stands for Core). The rest is determined by the name of
the underlying action procedure (if there is only one). If there are several action procedures with names
differing only by the symbols for different pixel types, the pixel type is left out in the name of the supply
procedure.
Examples:
CIPLowpas
CIPThreshold
CIOOpenWindow
3.6
Input / Output
Except explicit IO routines HALCON procedures should not contain any input/output commands, especially no print commands. Any interaction should be done either via parameters or via Extension
Package Interface in-/output procedures. Error messages should be encoded by proper error code returned by the procedure (see next section).
3.7
Error Handling
Error messages are represented by integer constants, the error codes of type Herror. If an error occurs,
the corresponding error code should be returned by the procedure.
3.7 Error Handling
57
The file %HALCONROOT%\include\HConst.h contains predefined error messages for all typical errors,
see also appendix A on page 129. But it may happen that none of them fits an error occurring in a new,
user-defined operator. So the user is allowed to define new numbers that should be greater than 10 000 to
avoid re-using an already allocated number or a number reserved for future extensions of the HALCON
system. If the user-defined operator returns a user-defined error, the error will be reported as
No error message available for this error code (<error code>) .
In order to provide user-defined errors with error messages, the function HSetErrText
Herror HSetErrText(char *error_text)
can be called immediately before the operator returns the error code with return H_ERR_*. In this
case the error message error_text will be displayed by the next3 call of the HALCON operator
get_error_text.
Examples:
H_ERR_WIPN1 /*
/*
H_ERR_WIPV3 /*
H_ERR_WIPT2 /*
H_ERR_WION1 /*
/*
H_ERR_WIT
/*
H_MSG_TRUE /*
H_MSG_OK
/*
wrong number of values in input control
parameter 1
wrong parameter value (control param. 3)
wrong type of values (control param. 2)
wrong number of objects in input object
parameter 1
wrong image type
no error (supply procedure)
no error (any other procedure)
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
All HALCON procedures return an error code. This code has to be checked after calling any HALCON
procedure, e.g., by encapsulating the procedure call in the macro HCkP. This macro checks the return
value and exits the current procedure if an error occurred (a detailed description of the macro is given
in the section 5.6.1 on page 101). Please note, that some of the Extension Package Interface macros
described in chapter 5 on page 69 and chapter 6 on page 105 (e.g. HGetCPar) implicitly use the macro
and therefore automatically return a proper error code.
3 Within this call the error text is reset to “No error message available ... ” again to ensure that the user-defined error text is up
to date.
Style Guide
Error numbers are specified via #define and are called H_ERR_XYZ.
58
Style Guide for Programming
3.8
Notes on Image Processing Operators
• HALCON images are variable in their size (format). Therefore, no constants should be used for
image formats (except MAX_FORMAT for the maximum format). The actual format of an image can
be extracted from the structure Himage (cf. figure 4.1 on page 60).
• Notice that more than one pixel type may occur, when performing gray value operations. An
operator should be able to work on all of them, see also the discussion in section 6.1.3 on page
109. If an operator can only process a reduced set of types, this can be specified in the def-file
with type_list (cf. page 39). An operator should reject all images that it can not process by
returning H_ERR_WIT – wrong image type.
• In many cases an operator might receive more than one iconic object as input, i.e. the supply procedure must contain a loop over all iconic objects (e.g., using HAllReg and HAllSegm described
in section 6.1 on page 105 or HAllObj in section 5.3.1 on page 80). This is true for regions as well
as images or XLDs. Furthermore, images may contain more than one channel. So a second loop
over all channels (components) within an image is needed (see HAllComp, section 5.3.2 on page
81).
• All procedures should only work within the image’s area of definition, especially when performing
feature extraction, filter or segmentation tasks.
HALCON Data Types
59
Chapter 4
HALCON Data Types
The HALCON Extension Package Interface provides special data types to handle iconic objects. All
iconic objects in the application layer are represented by a key referring to the HALCON database of
iconic objects. The internal structure is hidden from the HALCON user. However, using the Extension
Package Interface it is possible to work directly on the data structures for images, regions, and XLDs.
Special macros can be used to access the internal representation of such an iconic object. Furthermore,
data structures for control parameters are provided. All data types described in the following sections
are defined in the files %HALCONROOT%\include\IPType.h and %HALCONROOT%\include\HBase.h.
Pixel Data (Himage)
Gray value images are represented by a rectangular image matrix. Several matrices (called channels) can
be combined to a multi-channel image. Each channel can be accessed separately, i.e. the channels are not
interleaved. The structure Himage contains size, pixel type, and pixel data of one channel. Furthermore,
a time-stamp is included. Figure 4.1 shows the corresponding type declaration.
The maximum for width and height, which describe the image size, is determined with MAX_FORMAT
(HALCON: 32767, HALCON XL: 1073741823229). The origin of an image matrix is at position (0, 0).
Row coordinates range from 0 to height - 1, column coordinates from 0 to width - 1. The image
pointer (HPixelImage) refers to the first pixel of the matrix (index: 0,0). Different pixel types are
supported. They are distinguished by a selector (kind), see figure 4.2. The pixel types include basic
types like HBYTE, INT1, INT4, and float as well as composed types. Their definitions can be seen in
figure 4.3.
The pixel data is stored as a one-dimensional array (image vector) of one of the pixel types. The indices
of the array range from 0 to width*height-1. A linear coordinate L within an image is derived from
the row index R and column index C as follows:
L = R * image.width + C
This transformation is performed by the following macro HLinCoor:
Data Types
4.1
60
HALCON Data Types
typedef union {
HBYTE
HBYTE
HBYTE
INT1
INT4
HINT8
float
HVFPixel
HComplexPixel
HInt2Pixel
HUInt2Pixel
} HPixelImage;
*b;
*z;
*d;
*i;
*l;
*i8;
*f;
vf;
*c;
s;
u;
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
typedef struct {
INT
kind;
/*
HPixelImage pixel;
/*
HIMGDIM
width;
/*
HIMGDIM
height;
/*
HImageFreeProc free_proc; /*
HBOOL
free;
/*
/* time of creation of image
UINT2
msec;
/*
UINT1
sec;
/*
UINT1
min;
/*
UINT1
hour;
/*
UINT1
day;
/*
UINT2
yday;
/*
UINT1
mon;
/*
UINT2
year;
/*
} Himage;
0..255 (BYTE_IMAGE)
0..255 mod 256 (CYCLIC_IMAGE)
orientation 0..180 (DIR_IMAGE)
-128..127 (INT1_IMAGE)
4 byte integer (LONG_IMAGE)
8 byte integer (INT8_IMAGE)
4 byte real (FLOAT_IMAGE)
vector field (VF_IMAGE)
complex image (COMPLEX_IMAGE)
2 bytes with sign (INT2_IMAGE)
2 bytes without sign (UINT2_IMAGE)
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
pixel type
pixel data
image width
image height
function for deallocating image data
free image data when deleting image
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
milliseconds 0..999
seconds 0..59
minutes 0.59
0..23
1..31
1..366
1..12
19xx
Figure 4.1: Data type Himage for images.
L = HLinCoor(R,C,image.width);
There are two additional macros for computing rows (HRow) and columns (HCol):
R = HRow(L,image.width);
C = HCol(L,image.width);
Please see section 3.2.2 on page 52 for routines to allocate image data within Himage.
4.2 Region Data (Hrlregion)
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
#define
BYTE_IMAGE
INT4_IMAGE
LONG_IMAGE
FLOAT_IMAGE
DIR_IMAGE
CYCLIC_IMAGE
INT1_IMAGE
XY_IMAGE
COMPLEX_IMAGE
INT2_IMAGE
UINT2_IMAGE
(INT)1
(INT)2
(INT)2
(INT)4
(INT)8
(INT)16
(INT)32
(INT)64
(INT)128
(INT)512
(INT)1024
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
1 byte per pixel (0..255)
Type: 4 bytes per pixel (INT4)
4 byte per pixel (INT4)
4 byte per pixel (float)
edge orientation 0..180
0..255 cyclic
-128..127
2 byte images with sign
2 float images
2 bytes with sign
Type: 2 bytes (unsigned short)
61
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
Figure 4.2: Definitions of pixel types.
/* real image part
/* imaginary image part
*/
*/
typedef struct {
INT2
*p;
/* gray values
INT1
num_bits; /* number of used bits
} HInt2Pixel;
*/
*/
typedef struct {
UINT2 *p;
INT1 num_bits;
} HUInt2Pixel;
/* gray values
/* number of used bits
*/
*/
typedef struct {
float *row;
float *col;
} HVFPixel;
/* row direction
/* column direction
*/
*/
Figure 4.3: Data types for Himage.
4.2
Region Data (Hrlregion)
In HALCON region data is represented by a special variant of the runlength encoding – a chord encoding:
For every line (chord) of a region its row index (“y coordinate”,“line number”) and the column index
(“x coordinate”) of its start and end point is stored. Both the start point and the end point belong to the
region.
Chord data must fulfill the following conditions:
• a chord is limited to one row
• chords may not overlap
Data Types
typedef struct {
float
re;
float
im;
} HComplexPixel;
62
HALCON Data Types
• chords are sorted in ascending order
If a region is read from the HALCON database of iconic objects, its representation fulfills all the conditions above. When writing a region, condition 2 and 3 need not to be sufficed in all cases, as the
Extension Package Interface automatically modifies the data (at cost of computation time).
typedef struct {
HIMGCOOR l;
HIMGCOOR cb;
HIMGCOOR ce;
} Hrun;
/* line number (row) of run
/* column index of beginning of run
/* column index of ending of run
*/
*/
*/
typedef struct
HBOOL
HITEMCNT
HITEMCNT
HRegFeature
Hrun
} Hrlregion;
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
{
is_compl;
num;
num_max;
feature;
*rl;
region is complement
number of runs
maximum number of runs
already processed features
pointer on array of run lengths
Figure 4.4: Data type Hrlregion for region encoding.
Figure 4.4 shows the type declaration for chords. In the structure Hrlregion, all chords are stored in an
array of the type Hrun, where num is the current and num_max the maximum allowed number of chords
(depending on the size of the region specified at its creation, see also section 3.2 on page 49). The flag
is_compl allows an easy transformation of a region in its complement. Operators that work on regions
must consider this flag and react according to its value. The structure HRegFeature (see figure 4.5)
contains all region shape features extracted so far to avoid repeating a computation. HFeatureFlags
encodes, which features already have been extracted. Do not forget to reset these flags if you modify a
region.
Normally, a variable of type Hrlregion is allocated with the procedure HAllocRLTmp or
HAllocRLNumTmp, see section 3.2 on page 49. These routines initialize the data, especially num_max
that is needed for tests of overflow. When allocating a variable “by hand”, the programmer must provide
a suitable initialization by himself/herself.
Whereas all coordinates within runlength codes are stored as (row,column), linear coordinates are used
to address HALCON image matrices. Thus, the macros CB and CE are very helpful, especially when processing gray values (in linear coordinates) along a chord. The programs on page page 110 and page 113
illustrate how to use them. Their functionality can be seen in figure 4.6. The first parameter (rl) contains
a pointer to the chords as it is used within Hrlregion. index specifies the index of the chord to work
on and width contains the image width. CB returns the linear coordinate of the start point and CE that of
the end point of the chord.
4.3 XLDs (Hcont, Hpoly)
63
Figure 4.5: Data type HRegFeature for region shape features.
4.3
XLDs (Hcont, Hpoly)
XLDs (eXtended Line Descriptions) are specific iconic HALCON objects to represent subpixel accurate
contours and polygons. The corresponding data types Hcont and Hpoly are listed in figures 4.7 and 4.8.
HALCON contours of type Hcont contain an array of subpixel points along a contour. A contour might
be classified concerning to topological considerations (cont_class). Additionally, an arbitrary number
of additional contour attributes for each point along the contour can be included (attribs), e.g., the edge
amplitude of subpixel edge points or the orientation of the local gradient. Finally, an arbitrary number
of additional global attributes, i.e., attributes valid for the entire contour, can be included (global), e.g.,
the individual parameters of a regression line to the contour or the parameters of an ellipse segment fitted
to the contour.
Please see section 3.2.2 on page 52 for routines to allocate/deallocate contours. Two important auxiliary
routines to copy contours are listed in figure 4.9 on page 66.
HCopyXLDCont copies a complete
contour, whereas HCopyXLDContPart copies only a part of the original contours specified by two indices
min_index and max_index. They refer to the first and the last point along the contour to be copied
Data Types
typedef struct {
union {
HFeatureFlags single;
long
all;
/* if possible use 64 bits!
}
def;
UINT1
shape;
/* SHAPE_*
HBOOL
is_convex;
HBOOL
is_filled;
HBOOL
is_connected4;
HBOOL
is_connected8;
HBOOL
is_thin;
/* one pixel thin
double
circularity;
double
compactness;
double
contlength;
double
convexity;
double
phi;
double
ra, rb;
/* elliptic_axis
double
ra_, rb_;
/* elliptic_shape
double
anisometry, bulkiness, structure_factor;
double
m11, m20, m02, ia, ib;
double
row, col;
HIMGCNT
area;
HIMGCOOR
row1, col1, row2, col2;
double
row_rect, col_rect, phi_rect, length1, length2;
double
row_circle, col_circle, radius;
HIMGCOOR
min_chord, max_chord;
HIMGCOOR
min_chord_gap, max_chord_gap;
double
rectangularity;
} HRegFeature;
64
HALCON Data Types
Names
CB, CE
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HLINCOOR CB(Hrun
HITEMCNT
HIMGDIM
*rl,
index,
width)
HLINCOOR CE(Hrun
HITEMCNT
HIMGDIM
*rl,
index,
width)
Figure 4.6: Linear coordinates from Hrlregion.
(starting with index 0). For closed contours a negative value might be specified for min_index. This
will lead to a “wrap-around”, that is the part of the contour to be copied starts at cont_in->num +
min_index. Both HCopyXLDCont and HCopyXLDContPart allocate the output contour themselves. So
just pass a pointer to a pointer to Hcont without allocating any memory for cont_out. Both routines
provides two additional parameters, preserve_attribs and preserve_global_attribs, to control
whether the non-global and the global contour attributes should be copied.
The routines provided for handling contour attributes of contour points are summarized in figure 4.10
on page 67. HAddXLDContAttrib is used to add a new class of contour attributes to a given contour cont. Note, that this routine allocates memory for the attribute values, but it does not set
the values themselves. An arbitrary name for the attribute can be specified by the parameter name.
The index of the new attribute within the attribs array in cont is returned in index and can
be used to address the values by cont->attribs[index].val[xxx]. The same holds for global
attributes: HAddXLDContGlobalAttrib is used to add new global attributes, which can be accessed by cont->global[index].val. Note that these values can be accessed within the HALCON system (that is on the application layer) using the operators get_contour_attrib_xld and
get_contour_global_attrib_xld. See the Reference Manuals for details. Within HALCON, a
specific attribute of a contour can be accessed using HLookupXLDContAttrib, while a specific global
attribute can be accessed using HLookupXLDContGlobalAttrib. These routines return the index of the
desired attribute within attribs or global of cont, or the error code H_ERR_XLD_CAND as result of the
procedure call, if no attribute with the specified name is defined.
The XLD data type Hpoly, displayed in figure 4.8 on page 66, encodes subpixel accurate polygons.
Basically it contains an array of control points. In many applications such polygons are derived from
contours. Thus, the data structure can also hold a reference to the underlying part of a contour specified
by a HALCON database key.
4.4 Control Parameters
cont_start_junc,
cont_end_junc,
cont_both_junc,
cont_closed
} Hcont_class;
typedef struct cont_attrib {
char
*name;
HSUBATTR
*val;
} Hcont_attrib;
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
unknown
neither start nor end point points
are junctions
start point is a junction
end point is a junction
both start and end point are junctions
closed contour
/* name of the attribute
/* value of the attribute (per point)
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
typedef struct cont_global_attrib {
char
*name;
/* name of the global attribute
HSUBATTR
val;
/* value of the attribute (per contour)
} Hcont_global_attrib;
*/
*/
typedef struct cont_type {
HITEMCNT
num;
/*
HSUBCOOR
*row;
/*
HSUBCOOR
*col;
/*
Hcont_class cont_class;
/*
INT4
num_attrib;
/*
Hcont_attrib *attribs;
/*
INT4
num_global;
/*
Hcont_global_attrib *global;/*
INT4
h;
/*
} Hcont;
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
number of points along the contour
points / row indices (y coordinates)
points / column indices (x coord.)
contour class
number of additional attributes
additional attributes (for each point)
number of additional global attributes
additional attributes (per contour)
auxiliary (temporary)
Figure 4.7: The XLD data type Hcont for subpixel contours.
4.4
Control Parameters
HALCON’s basic and essential view on control data are arrays. These arrays are used to pass control
parameter values to supply procedures and can assume four different types, three basic or a mixed type,
see section 2.3 on page 33. Basic types are supported INT4_8 arrays, coded as LONG_PAR, double
arrays coded as DOUBLE_PAR, and string arrays. i.e., char* arrays, coded as STRING_PAR. In addition,
the structure Hcpar enables HALCON to pass a mixed type (MIXED_PAR), holding any of the three basic
types in the union Hpar, encoded by the specifyer type. Figure 4.11 shows the corresponding definitions.
Thus, it is possible to pass a native array type or to combine different types within an array of Hcpar
values. For it, the selector type must be set to one of the basic type codes LONG_PAR, DOUBLE_PAR, or
STRING_PAR.
The Extension Package Interface procedures described in section 5.5 on page 89 are used to access the
control parameters of HALCON operators and pass the control data arrays through the interface.
Data Types
typedef enum cont_class {
cont_unknown,
cont_no_junc,
65
66
HALCON Data Types
typedef struct lin_seg_type {
HSUBCOOR
row,col;
/*
/*
HSUBATTR
length;
/*
/*
HSUBATTR
phi;
/*
Hkey
ref;
/*
/*
HITEMCNT
first;
/*
/*
/*
HITEMCNT
last;
/*
} Hline_seg;
typedef struct poly_type {
HITEMCNT
num_line;
HITEMCNT
len_line;
Hline_seg
} Hpoly;
*lines;
/*
/*
/*
/*
a control point of the polygon:
*/
row (y) and column (x) coordinate */
length of the line from the
*/
current to the next point
*/
orientation (rad) of this line
*/
database key of the underlying
*/
contour
*/
index of the first point of the
*/
underlying contour belonging to
*/
current side of the polygon
*/
index of the last contour point
*/
number of lines
maximum number of lines (size
of the array lines)
control points of the polygon
Figure 4.8: The XLD data type Hpoly for subpixel polygons.
Names
HCopyXLDCont, HCopyXLDContPart
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
Herror HCopyXLDCont(
Hproc_handle
Hcont
HBOOL
HBOOL
Hcont
proc_handle,
*cont_in,
preserve_attribs,
preserve_global_attribs,
**cont_out)
Herror HCopyXLDContPart( Hproc_handle proc_handle,
Hcont
*cont_in,
INT4_8
min_index,
INT4_8
max_index,
HBOOL
preserve_attribs,
HBOOL
preserve_global_attribs,
Hcont
**cont_out)
Figure 4.9: Auxiliary routines for contours of type Hcont.
*/
*/
*/
*/
4.4 Control Parameters
67
Names
HAddXLDContAttrib, HLookupXLDContAttrib,
HAddXLDContGlobalAttrib, HLookupXLDContGlobalAttrib
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HAddXLDContAttrib(
Hproc_handle
Hcont
char
INT4
proc_handle,
*cont,
*name,
*index)
HLookupXLDContAttrib(
Hcont
char
INT4
*cont,
*name,
*index)
HAddXLDContGlobalAttrib(
Hproc_handle
Hcont
char
INT4
proc_handle,
*cont,
*name,
*indx);
HLookupXLDContGlobalAttrib( Hcont
char
INT4
*cont,
*name,
*indx);
Data Types
Figure 4.10: Handling contour attributes of contour pixels (within Hcont).
typedef union {
INT4_8 l;
double d;
char
*s;
} Hpar;
/* 4/8 byte integer */
/* 8 byte real */
/* string */
typedef struct {
Hpar par;
INT
type;
} Hcpar;
Figure 4.11: Data types Hpar and Hcpar for control parameters.
68
HALCON Data Types
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
69
Chapter 5
Handling Iconic Objects and
Control Parameters
The HALCON Extension Package Interface provides a large set of procedures and macros for handling
control parameters and iconic objects. It supports tasks like:
• Accessing iconic input objects in the HALCON database.
• Accessing single iconic objects within a tuple of objects.
• Accessing specific components (regions, gray value channels) of image objects.
• Accessing XLDs.
• Creating iconic output objects in the HALCON database based on the computed results.
• Reading input control parameters.
The routines of the Extension Package Interface described in this and the following chapter especially
facilitate the programming of support procedures (that is the access of the HALCON database and all the
parameter handling).
In this chapter the “low level” interface routines are introduced. They allow a straightforward access
to all parameters of an operator – to iconic objects (and their components) and to control parameters.
Moreover, some routines for creating iconic objects and writing output iconic parameters and control
parameters are introduced.
Based on these low level routines a set of convenience routines are presented in chapter 6 on page 105.
They are designed to further facilitate the programming of very typical support procedures.
Parameter Handling
• Writing output control parameters.
70
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Names
HGetObj, HGetComp, HGetRL, HGetImage, HGetXLD
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HGetObj(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT4_8
Hkey
proc_handle,
par_num,
obj_num
*obj_key)
HGetComp(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
INT
Hkey
proc_handle,
obj_key,
comp
*comp_key)
HGetRL(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
Hrlregion
proc_handle,
region_key,
*region)
HGetImage( Hproc_handle
Hkey
Himage
proc_handle,
image_key,
*image)
HGetXLD(
proc_handle,
obj_key,
xld_type,
**xld)
Hproc_handle
Hkey
INT
Hpoly|Hcont
Figure 5.1: Basic routines for accessing iconic input objects.
5.1
Basic Access to Iconic Input Objects
This section introduces some basic routines for accessing iconic objects (regions, gray value channels,
XLDs), see figure 5.1. They form a basic interface to the HALCON database of iconic objects. Figure 5.2
illustrates how they are used to read image and region data from input iconic parameters.
5.1.1 HGetObj
HGetObj (see figure 5.1) returns the database key (type: Hkey) of an iconic object corresponding to the
input object parameter with the index par_num of the HALCON operator.
!
Note that HGetObj automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetObj yourself.
5.1.1 HGetObj
71
operator call
1st input object parameter
2nd input object parameter
1st input object parameter
1st object
of 1st input object parameter
parameter number
Hkey
HGetObj
obj_key
HGetComp Hkey
region
channel1
comp_key
channel2
HGetImage
HGetRL
Himage
Hrlregion
image
region
INT1 inp_pars;
INT4 num_objs;
Hkey key;
...
/* get number of input iconic parameters:
*/
/* note: This number is known in general - it is specified by */
/* the operator header in the corresponding def-file of the
*/
/* operator
*/
HReadGV(proc_handle,HGinp_obj,&inp_pars);
for (p=1; p<=inp_pars; p++) {
/* get number of input iconic objects per input obj. parameter: */
HReadGVA(proc_handle,HGnum_obj,&num_objs,p);
for (o=1; o<=num_objs; o++) {
HGetObj(proc_handle,p,o,&key); /* get key of iconic object
*/
/* further processing ... */
}
}
Figure 5.3: Example for HGetObj: Database keys of all iconic objects of all input object parameters.
The iconic object can either be a region (iconic object that contains only a region component), an image
(iconic object that contains a region component and one or more image channels), or an XLD (iconic
object that contains a contour or a polygon).
Parameter Handling
Figure 5.2: Direct access to input image objects.
72
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
The parameters of a HALCON operator are numbered consecutively from 1 to n (not from 0 to n − 1)
for each parameter class (input/output iconic object/control). The parameter par_num of HGetObj refers
to this index, thus specifying the desired input iconic parameter. All objects passed within a single input
iconic parameter are numbered from 1 to m, with the first iconic object in the list having the index
1. The parameter obj_num of HGetObj denotes the index of a desired iconic object within this list
(1 ≤ obj_num ≤ m).
The total number of input iconic parameters for an operator is specified in the corresponding def-file 1 ,
but the number of objects within an input iconic parameter is dynamic. This value is accessible via the
Extension Package Interface routine HReadGVA:
HReadGVA(proc_handle,HGnum_obj,&num_objs,p);
where p denotes the parameter index and num_objs is the desired number of iconic objects. As an
alternative for reading the number of iconic objects of an input iconic parameter without the routine
HReadGVA, you can use the macro HGetObjNum (see section 5.2.5 on page 79).
Note that a loop over all iconic objects passed to an operator within an input iconic object parameter
is a very common task. Therefore, HALCON provides a macro for this problem: See HAllObj in
section 5.3.1 on page 80.
5.1.2 HGetComp
HGetComp (see figure 5.1 on page 70) returns the database key of an image component (image matrix,
i.e., channel: image_key or domain, i.e., area of definition: region_key) of an image object that is
stored under the key obj_key in the HALCON database of iconic objects.
!
Note that HGetComp automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetComp yourself.
All components of an iconic object are consecutively numbered from 0 to n, with 0 denoting the region
(domain) and 1 . . . n denoting the channels (image matrices). To get a better legibility of program code,
the constants REGION (= 0), IMAGE_INDEX (= 1), IMAGE1 (= 1), IMAGE2 (= 2), etc. have been defined
globally and may be used as parameter values.
The number of channels per image object obj_num of parameter par_num is accessible via
HPNumOfChannels, see figures 5.4 and 5.5:
HPNumOfChannels(proc_handle,par_num,obj_num,&obj_channels)
See also HNumOfChannels in section 5.6.4 on page 104 for a convenience version of this routine when
dealing with the first input iconic parameter. More examples of how to use HGetComp can be found in
figure 5.6 on page 74 and figure 5.7 on page 75.
1 So this number is actually known by the programmer. However, using HReadGV it can be read from the operator context as
well, see figure 5.3.
5.1.3 HGetRL
73
INT
obj_channels;
Hkey
obj_key;
Hkey
region_key;
Hkey
image_key;
...
/* get key of object: */
HGetObj(proc_handle,p,o,&obj_key);
/* get key of region: */
HGetComp(proc_handle,obj_key,REGION,&region_key);
/* get number of channels: */
HCkP(HPNumOfChannels(proc_handle,p,o,&obj_channels));
for (i=1; i<=obj_channels; i++) {
/* get image matrix key: */
HGetComp(proc_handle,obj_key,i,&image_key);
/* ...further processing */
}
Figure 5.4: Example for HGetComp: Database keys of all regions and channels within an input image
object.
Names
HPNumOfChannels
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
Herror HPNumOfChannels( Hproc_handle
INT
INT4_8
INT
proc_handle,
par_num,
obj_num,
*chn_num)
Parameter Handling
Figure 5.5: Auxiliary routine HPNumOfChannels .
5.1.3 HGetRL
HGetRL (see figure 5.1 on page 70) reads the runlength encoding of a region (type: Hrlregion, see
section 4.2 on page 61) denoted by the database key region_key (type Hkey) from the HALCON
database.
Note that HGetRL automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro HCkP
(see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetRL yourself.
Since the region data is copied to region, it might be overwritten with new values (in contrast to
HGetImage and HGetFDRL, cf. section 5.1.4 on page 75 and section 5.2.2 on page 78). However,
this means that enough memory for region must be allocated before calling HGetRL, see section 3.2.1
on page 49.
!
74
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Hrlregion *region;
Hkey
obj_key;
Hkey
region_key;
...
HCkP(HAllocRLTmp(proc_handle,&region));
HGetObj(proc_handle,p,o,&obj_key);
HGetComp(proc_handle,obj_key,REGION,&region_key);
HGetRL(proc_handle,region_key,region);
/* processing (in general this should be done calling an action proc.) */
area = 0;
for (i=0; i<region->num; i++)
area += region->rl[i].ce - region->rl[i].cb + 1;
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,region));
Figure 5.6: Example for HGetRL: Calculate the area of a region.
Figures 5.6 and 5.7 show example applications of HGetRL.
5.1.4 HGetImage
75
5.1.4 HGetImage
HGetImage (see figure 5.1 on page 70) reads the image data (type: Himage, see section 4.1 on page 59)
of a specific gray value component (i.e., channel) of an image object referenced by its database key (type
Hkey) in the HALCON database.
Note that HGetImage automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetImage yourself.
!
Hkey
obj_key;
Hkey
image_key;
Hkey
region_key;
Himage
image;
Hrlregion *region;
...
HGetComp(proc_handle,obj_key,IMAGE_INDEX,&image_key);
HGetComp(proc_handle,obj_key,REGION,&region_key);
HGetImage(proc_handle,image_key,&image);
HGetRL(proc_handle,region_key,region);
switch (image.kind) {
case BYTE_IMAGE:
/* processing (in general this should
*/
/* be done calling an action procedure) */
area = sum = 0;
for (c=0; c<region->num; c++) {
for (i=CB(region->rl,c,image.width);
i<=CE(region->rl,c,image.width); i++, area++)
sum += image.pixel.b[i];
}
average = sum / area;
break;
default: return(H_ERR_WIT);
/* wrong image type */
}
The data structure Himage contains the gray values, the gray value type, and the size of the image matrix.
Instead of copying the image matrix, HGetImage only returns a pointer to the raw data in image.pixel.
This is much more efficient, but means that only read access to the image matrix is recommended (otherwise you will encounter unpredictable side effects). Figure 5.7 shows an application of HGetImage.
5.1.5 HGetXLD
HGetXLD (see figure 5.1 on page 70) is used to access XLD objects in the HALCON database of iconic
objects. The object of interest is specified by the database key obj_key. The parameter xld_type
allows to specify the kind of XLD data to be accessed: It has to be set to XLD_CONTOUR_ID in case of
a contour and to XLD_POLYGON_ID in case of a polygon. Corresponding to the selected type, HGetXLD
expects a pointer to Hcont or a pointer to Hpoly in the parameter xld. In both cases not the underlying
!
Parameter Handling
Figure 5.7: Example for HGetImage: Average gray value of first channel.
76
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
!
!
data within the structures Hcont or Hpoly but only the pointers to the data are copied from the database.
Thus, please avoid any write access to this data. Otherwise you will encounter unpredictable side
effects (changing other iconic objects). Figure 5.8 shows a simple example for how to use HGetXLD.
Note that HGetXLD automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetXLD yourself.
Hkey
Hcpar
Hcont
obj_key;
num_points;
*cont;
HGetObj(proc_handle,par_num,obj_num,&obj_key);
HGetXLD(proc_handle,obj_key,XLD_CONTOUR_ID,(VOIDP)&cont);
/* processing (in general this should be done calling an action proc.) */
num_points.type = LONG_PAR;
num_points.par.l = cont->num;
HPutCPar(proc_handle,1,&num_points,1);
Figure 5.8: Example for HGetXLD: Return the number of points of the contour with the index obj_num within
input iconic parameter par_num.
5.2
Additional Routines for Accessing Input Image Objects
This section introduces some routines that ease the programming of supply procedures in many applications, see figure 5.9. Basically they are combinations of the routines described in the previous section.
These additional routines only require the database keys of the input iconic objects that can be extracted
by using the routines HGetObj (see section 5.1.1 on page 70) or HAllObj (see section 5.3.1 on page 80).
For HGetURL, even this step can be omitted.
5.2.1 HGetDRL
HGetDRL (see figure 5.9) combines HGetComp (section 5.1.2 on page 72) and HGetRL (section 5.1.3 on
page 73). It reads the runlength encoding of a region (type: Hrlregion, see section 4.2 on page 61)
specified by the database key obj_key of an image object. The region data is copied to region, which
must have been allocated before with a suitable size (e.g., by using HAllocRLTmp, see section 3.2.1
on page 49). Therefore, this region data can be overwritten without side effects. On the other hand, the
memory must be deallocated at the end of the supply procedure (e.g., by using HFreeRLTmp). Figure 5.10
shows an example application of HGetDRL.
!
Note that HGetDRL automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetDRL yourself.
5.2.1 HGetDRL
77
Names
HGetDRL, HGetFDRL, HGetURL, HGetDImage, HGetObjNum
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HGetDRL(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
Hrlregion
proc_handle,
obj_key,
*region)
HGetFDRL(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
Hrlregion
proc_handle,
obj_key,
**region)
HGetURL(
Hproc_handle
INT
Hrlregion
proc_handle,
par_num,
*region)
HGetDImage(Hproc_handle
Hkey
INT
Himage
proc_handle,
obj_key,
channel,
*image)
HGetObjNum(Hproc_handle
INT
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par_num,
*num)
Hrlregion *region;
Hkey
obj_key;
...
HCkP(HAllocRLTmp(proc_handle,&region));
HGetObj(proc_handle,par_num,obj_num,&obj_key);
HGetDRL(proc_handle,obj_key,region);
/* processing (in general this should be done calling an action proc.) */
area = 0;
for (i=0; i<region->num; i++)
area += region->rl[i].ce - region->rl[i].cb + 1;
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,region));
Figure 5.10: Application of HGetDRL.
Parameter Handling
Figure 5.9: Additional routines for accessing input image objects.
78
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Hkey
obj_key;
Hrlregion *region;
...
HGetFDRL(proc_handle,obj_key,&region);
/* processing (in general this should be done calling an action proc.) */
area = 0;
for (i=0; i<region->num; i++)
area += region->rl[i].ce - region->rl[i].cb + 1;
Figure 5.11: Application of HGetFDRL.
5.2.2 HGetFDRL
In contrast to HGetDRL, only a pointer to the region data is returned by HGetFDRL (see figure 5.9). So
there is no need to allocate memory for the data. On the other hand, only read access to the data is
allowed. An example application of HGetFDRL can be seen in figure 5.11.
!
Note that HGetFDRL automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetFDRL yourself.
5.2.3 HGetURL
HGetURL (see figure 5.9 on page 77) reads all regions passed in the input iconic parameter with the
index par_num, computes the union of all these regions, and returns the resulting region in region.
The Hrlregion data referenced by region must have been allocated before with a suitable size (e.g.,
by using HAllocRLTmp, see section 3.2.1 on page 49). Therefore, this region data can be overwritten
without side effects. On the other hand, the memory must be deallocated at the end of the supply
procedure (e.g., by using HFreeRLTmp). Figure 5.12 shows an application of HGetURL. Note that the
area calculated in the example may differ from the sum of the areas of all single regions, because the
single regions may overlap.
!
Note that HGetURL automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetURL yourself.
Hrlregion *region;
...
HCkP(HAllocRLTmp(proc_handle,&region));
HGetURL(proc_handle,par_num,region);
/* processing (in general this should be done calling an action proc.) */
area = 0;
for (i=0; i<region->num; i++)
area += region->rl[i].ce - region->rl[i].cb + 1;
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,region));
Figure 5.12: Application of HGetURL.
5.2.4 HGetDImage
79
5.2.4 HGetDImage
HGetDImage (see figure 5.9 on page 77) combines HGetComp (section 5.1.2 on page 72) and HGetImage
(section 5.1.4 on page 75). It reads the data of the gray value component channel of the image object
specified by the database key obj_key and returns it in the Himage structure (image).
Note that HGetDImage automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetDImage yourself.
!
Himage image;
Hcpar
row,col,gray;
...
HGetSPar(proc_handle,1,LONG_PAR,&row,1);
/* row
*/
HGetSPar(proc_handle,2,LONG_PAR,&col,1);
/* column */
coord = HLinCoor(row.par.l,col.par.l,image.width);
HGetDImage(proc_handle,obj_key,IMAGE_INDEX,&image);
/* processing (in general this should be done calling an action proc.) */
switch (image.kind) {
case BYTE_IMAGE:
gray.par.l = image.pixel.b[coord];
gray.type = LONG_PAR;
break;
case FLOAT_IMAGE:
gray.par.d = image.pixel.f[coord];
gray.type = DOUBLE_PAR;
break;
default:
return(H_ERR_WIT);
/* wrong image type */
}
HPutCPar(proc_handle,1,&gray,1);
Figure 5.13: Application of HGetDImage: Return the gray value at position (row,col) in the first channel of
the input iconic object obj_key.
Parameter Handling
For the sake of efficiency, only a pointer to the image matrix is copied to image, instead of copying the
data itself. So, only read access to the image data is recommended in order to avoid unpredictable side
effects. Figure 5.13 shows an application of HGetDImage.
5.2.5 HGetObjNum
HGetObjNum (see figure 5.9 on page 77) returns the number of iconic objects which are stored in the
input iconic parameter denoted by its index par_num (from 1 to n). It is an alternative to the usage of
HReadGVA (compare page 72). By using HGetObjNum, the example of figure 5.3 on page 71 looks as
follows (see figure 5.14).
Note that HGetObjNum automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetObjNum yourself.
!
80
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
INT
inp_pars;
INT4_8 num_objs;
Hkey
key;
INT
p,o;
...
/* get number of input iconic parameters:
*/
/* note: This number is known in general - it is specified by */
/* the operator header in the corresponding def-file of the
*/
/* operator
*/
HReadGV(proc_handle,HGinp_obj,&inp_pars);
for (p=1; p<=inp_pars; p++) {
/* get number of iconic objects per input iconic parameter: */
HGetObjNum(proc_handle,p,&num_objs);
for (o=1; o<=num_objs; o++) {
HGetObj(proc_handle,p,o,&key); /* get key of iconic object
/* further processing ... */
}
}
*/
Figure 5.14: Application of HGetObjNum: Access the number of iconic objects of an input iconic parameter.
5.3
Loop Macros for Accessing Single Input Objects
This section describes two macros that ease the access of all iconic objects and image components within
an input iconic parameter, see figure 5.15. Please see also the additional loop macros in section 6.1 on
page 105 that further facilitate the programming of typical supply procedure.
5.3.1 HAllObj
HAllObj (see figure 5.15) performs a loop over all iconic objects of a specified input iconic parameter
and returns their database key.
Within the loop, all iconic objects contained in the input iconic parameter with the index2 par_num are
accessed one by one. index is set to the index of the current iconic object to be processed and obj_key
is set to the corresponding database key. Thus, using HAllObj is equivalent to programming an explicit
loop over all iconic objects contained in a parameter and determining the database keys via HGetObj,
see also figure 5.3 on page 71. Figure 5.16 shows an application of HAllObj.
2 So in contrast to the routines described in section 6.1 on page 105, HAllObj allows to specify the desired parameter by its
index.
5.3.2 HAllComp
81
Names
HAllObj, HAllComp
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HAllObj( Hproc_handle
INT
Hkey
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par_num,
&obj_key,
&index)
HAllComp(Hproc_handle
Hkey
Hkey
Himage
INT4_8
proc_handle,
obj_key,
&image_in_key,
&image_in,
&index)
Figure 5.15: Basic loop macros to access iconic objects. “&” denotes output parameters of the macros.
This is only a special notation to make clear that these parameters are changed by the
macros. So do not pass pointers to variables but the variables itself to the macro.
Hkey
obj_key;
Hrlregion *region;
Himage
image;
INT4_8
index;
...
HAllObj(proc_handle,1,obj_key,index) {
HGetFDRL(proc_handle,obj_key,&region);
HGetDImage(proc_handle,obj_key,IMAGE_INDEX,&image);
}
Parameter Handling
Figure 5.16: Application of HAllObj: Access the domain (area of definition) and the first gray value channel
of all iconic objects of the first input iconic parameter.
5.3.2 HAllComp
HAllComp performs a loop over all gray value channels (components) of the image object denoted by the
database key obj_key. Within the loop, image_in_key is set to the database key of the current image
object and the corresponding image data is delivered in image_in. Using HAllComp is equivalent to
programming an explicit loop over all channels of an image object using HGetDImage. This also implies
that the raw image data, i.e., the image matrix itself, is not copied. Instead, only a pointer to this data is
inserted in image_in. So please restrict yourself to reading this data. Any write access to the image
matrix will cause unpredictable side effects.
Note that HAllComp does not check, whether the image object contains at least one channel. Note further,
that any region processing should be performed outside the loop (otherwise you will process the same
region again and again for each channel).
!
!
82
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Hkey
obj_in;
Hkey
obj_out;
Hkey
image_in_key;
INT4_8
comp_index;
Himage
image_in,image_out;
...
HAllObj(proc_handle,1,obj_in,j) {
HCrObj(proc_handle,1,&obj_out);
HAllComp(proc_handle,obj_in,image_in_key,image_in,comp_index) {
HCkP(HCrImage(proc_handle,image_in_key,1,BYTE_IMAGE,
image_in.height,image_in.width,
&im_out_key,&image_out));
HCkP(IPBRot90(image_in.pixel.b,image_in.width,region_in,
image_out.pixel.b,width,height));
HDefObj(proc_handle,obj_out,im_out_key,comp_index);
}
}
Figure 5.17: Application of HAllComp: Rotate all channels of all image objects of the first input iconic
parameter.
Figure 5.17 shows an example of how to use HAllComp. Within the HAllObj loop for each input image
object, an output image object is created and added to the iconic object list of the first output iconic
parameter (HCrObj, see section 5.4.1 on page 83). After that, a loop over all gray value channels of the
current image object is performed (HAllComp). Within this loop, for every gray value channel a new
image matrix is created (HCrImage, see section 5.4.7 on page 87) and filled with the rotated input matrix
(IPBRot90). Finally, this matrix is installed as a new gray value channel of the output image object
(HDefObj, see section 5.4.5 on page 86). The corresponding region transformation (rotating the region
and defining the rotated region as new domain, i.e., area of definition, of the output image object via
HDefObj) is omitted in this example.
5.4
Creating Objects and Writing Output Object Parameters
This section describes routines for creating new iconic objects in the HALCON database of iconic objects
and for writing output iconic parameters of a HALCON operator, see figure 5.18. Note that regions, gray
value channels, and XLDs are all stored as individual iconic objects within the database. Thus, for
example different image objects can share the same gray value channels (image matrices) or domains
(areas of definition). Therefore, in order to return iconic objects as the result of a HALCON operator
you have to
• store the computed regions, channels, and XLDs in the HALCON database of iconic objects,
• combine regions and channels to image objects,
• and add the appropriate iconic objects to the corresponding output iconic parameters.
5.4.1 HCrObj
83
Names
HCrObj, HCopyObj, HPutDRL, HPutImage
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HCrObj(
Hproc_handle
INT
Hkey
proc_handle,
par_num,
*obj_key)
HCopyObj(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
INT
Hkey
proc_handle,
obj_key,
par_num,
*obj_key)
HPutDRL(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
Hrlregion
Hkey
proc_handle,
obj_key,
*region,
*rl_key)
HPutImage(
Hproc_handle
Himage
HBOOL
Hkey
proc_handle,
*image,
copy,
*obj_key)
Figure 5.18: Basic routines for creating new iconic objects and writing output iconic parameters (to be
continued).
HCrObj (see figure 5.18) creates a new image object in the HALCON database of iconic objects and adds
it to the list of iconic objects in the output iconic parameter with the index par_num. Note that more
than one image object can be returned in the same output parameter by iterating calls of HCrObj using
the same par_num: Each call appends the database key of the new iconic object at the end of the iconic
object list for the parameter.
The new image object contains the following default image components:
• The region component specifying the area of definition, i.e., the domain of the image, is set to the
empty region. This component can be changed using HPutDRL (see section 5.4.3 on page 85) or
HPutRect (see section 6.2.2 on page 115).
• All channels are marked as undefined, i.e., the new image object contains no gray value components. Channels can be added to the iconic object using HPutImage (see section 5.4.4 on page 85)
and HDefObj (see section 5.4.5 on page 86) or HPutDImage (see section 5.4.6 on page 86).
Figure 5.17 on page 82 and figure 5.21 on page 86 show examples how to use HCrObj.
Parameter Handling
5.4.1 HCrObj
84
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Names
HDefObj, HPutDImage, HCrImage, HCrXLD
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HDefObj(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
Hkey
INT
proc_handle,
obj_key,
comp_key,
comp)
HPutDImage(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
INT
Himage
HBOOL
Hkey
proc_handle,
obj_key,
comp,
*image,
copy,
*image_key)
Herror HCrImage( Hproc_handle
Hkey
INT
INT
HIMGDIM
Hkey
Himage
proc_handle,
image_key_in,
index,
type,
width,height,
*image_key_out,
*image_out)
HCrXLD(
proc_handle,
par_num,
*xld,
xld_type,
*used_xlds,
num_used_xlds,
free_proc,
*obj_key)
Hproc_handle
INT
XLD
INT
Hkey
INT
DBFreeProc
Hkey
Figure 5.19: Basic routines for creating new iconic objects and writing output iconic parameters (continued).
!
Note that HCrObj automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro HCkP,
(see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HCrObj yourself.
5.4.2 HCopyObj
HCopyObj (see figure 5.18 on page 83) creates a new iconic object (image, region, or XLD) that contains
the same components as an already existing iconic object specified by its database key obj_key. The
new iconic object is stored in the HALCON database of iconic objects and appended to the list of iconic
5.4.3 HPutDRL
85
objects in the output iconic parameter with the index par_num. The database key of the new image
object is returned in obj_key.
Note that HCopyObj automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HCopyObj yourself.
!
Hkey
obj_key_in,obj_key_out,reg_key_out;
Hrlregion *region_in;
Hrlregion *region_out;
INT4_8
num_objs;
...
par_in = 1; /* index of input parameter */
par_out = 1; /* index of output parameter */
HReadGVA(proc_handle,HGnum_obj,&num_objs,par_in);
for (o=1; o<=num_objs; o++) {
HGetObj(proc_handle,par_in,o,&obj_key_in);
HGetFDRL(proc_handle,obj_key_in,&region_in);
/* compute some region transormation ... */
transform(region_in,region_out);
HCopyObj(proc_handle,obj_key_in,par_out,&obj_key_out);
HPutDRL(proc_handle,obj_key_out,region_out,&reg_key_out);
}
Figure 5.20: Create an image object with HCopyObj and insert a region component.
Similar to HCrObj, the components of a new image object can be reassigned using HDefObj etc.
HCopyObj is especially useful, when output iconic objects hardly differ from the corresponding input
objects.
HPutDRL (see figure 5.18 on page 83) stores region data encoded in the Hrlregion structure region
in the HALCON database of iconic objects and returns the database key of the new iconic object. Note
that HPutDRL actually copies the data itself, not only a pointer to the data. In addition to that, the region
object is assigned to the image object specified by the database key obj_key as the region component.
The latter might have been created before by using HCrObj or HCopyObj, see figures 5.20 and 5.21.
Note that HPutDRL automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HPutDRL yourself.
5.4.4 HPutImage
HPutImage (see figure 5.19 on page 84) stores the gray value channel (image matrix) image in the
database of iconic objects and returns the corresponding database key in the parameter obj_key. This
key can be used to insert the gray value channel (now encapsulated in a database object) as a component
of an arbitrary number of image objects (see HDefObj in section 5.4.5). The parameter copy (FALSE or
TRUE) specifies, whether the pixel data is copied to the HALCON database3 or only the address of the
3 This
is necessary if the original data is stored in temporary memory or if the data will be modified later on.
!
Parameter Handling
5.4.3 HPutDRL
86
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
data is passed to the database object. Figure 5.21 shows a typical example for how to use HPutImage.
!
Note that HPutImage automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HPutImage yourself.
Himage
image;
Hrlregion *region;
Hkey
image_key,obj_key;
...
/* processed image data: image */
/* processed region data: region */
par_num = 1;
HPutImage(proc_handle,&image,TRUE,&image_key);
HCrObj(proc_handle,par_num,&obj_key);
HDefObj(proc_handle,obj_key,image_key,IMAGE_INDEX);
HPutDRL(proc_handle,obj_key,region,&region_key);
Figure 5.21: Creating a new image object using basic Extension Package Interface routines.
5.4.5 HDefObj
HDefObj (see figure 5.19 on page 84) reassigns the component comp (0 . . . n) of an image object given
by its database key comp_key. A typical application of this routine is shown in figure 5.21: Image data
is stored in a database object using HPutImage. Furthermore, a new image object is created by HCrObj.
This new object does not contain any gray value channels, see section 5.4.1 on page 83. Using HDefObj,
the previously stored image data is assigned as default gray value component 1 (IMAGE_INDEX) of the
new image object.
!
Note that HDefObj automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HDefObj yourself.
5.4.6 HPutDImage
HPutDImage (see figure 5.19 on page 84) combines HPutImage and HDefObj. It stores the gray value
channel (image matrix) image in the HALCON database of iconic objects and returns the corresponding
database key in image_key. The parameter copy (FALSE or TRUE) is used as in HPutImage and specifies, whether the pixel data is copied4 or only a pointer to the data is passed to the database. Moreover, the
gray value channel is inserted into the image object obj_key as component comp (1 . . . n). Figure 5.22
shows a typical application of this routine.
!
Note that HPutDImage automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HPutDImage yourself.
4 This
is necessary, if the pixel data was stored in temporary memory or if it will be modified later on.
5.4.7 HCrImage
87
Hkey
obj_key,k;
Himage
image;
Hrlregion *region;
...
/* image: processed gray value data */
/* region: region data
*/
HCrObj(proc_handle,par_num,&obj_key);
HPutDImage(proc_handle,obj_key,IMAGE_INDEX,&image,FALSE,&k);
HPutDRL(proc_handle,obj_key,region,&k);
Figure 5.22: Creating a new image object using HPutDImage and HPutDRL.
5.4.7 HCrImage
HCrImage (see figure 5.19 on page 84) is used for creating output images especially in the context of
filter5 operations. As you know, HALCON image objects can share the underlying image matrices (gray
value channels). Thus, input image objects of a filter operation might only differ in their domain (i.e.,
in their region component), but not in their gray values. Such objects have different database keys and
different regions, but contain references to the same gray value channels. Obviously, it is very desirable
to propagate this relation to the resulting output image objects as well.
HCrImage allocates memory for the image matrix within the Himage structure image_out (similar to HNewImage in section 3.2.2 on page 52). The parameters type (BYTE_IMAGE, LONG_IMAGE,
FLOAT_IMAGE, etc.; see figure 4.2 on page 61, width and height allow to specify the pixel type and the
size of the new matrix. Note that new matrices are by default initialized with 0. However, this can be
suppressed from outside or inside of the operator, see the discussion of HNewImage in section 3.2.2 on
page 52 for details.
Furthermore, HCrImage creates a new database object encapsulating this image data and returns the
corresponding database key in image_key_out (similar to HPutImage in section 5.4.4 on page 85).
Parameter Handling
Finally, HCrImage establishes a link between the original input image data (referenced by the database
key image_key_in) and this new iconic object to avoid the allocation of multiple output matrices per
input matrix. HCrImage checks, whether there already exists an output matrix with the specified index
index (see below) for a given input image image_key_in. If there is any, only a reference to it is
returned in image_out and image_key_out instead of creating a new matrix. Without this mechanism,
a new matrix would be created again and again within the loop over all input iconic objects (HAllObj).
The parameter index is only of importance, if more than one output matrix per input matrix is needed:
This is necessary for example, if an edge filter is performed in x- and y-direction independently. In
this case, HCrImage must be called several times for every input component – one time for each output
matrix to be created. Assign increasing indices (1, 2, 3, . . . ) to the parameter index to indicate a new
output matrix. If there is only one matrix to create for the output image, set index to 1.
Figure 5.23 shows an exemplary application of HCrImage.
Note that HCrImage is no macro, i.e., it does not check the result state of the underlying procedure using
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must call HCkP on HCrImage yourself as shown in the
example.
5 This
is due to the fact, that filtering only modifies the gray values but not the regions of image objects.
!
88
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Hkey
Hrlregion
Himage
obj_key,image_key_in,image_key_out,key_out;
*region;
image_in,image_out;
...
HGetSPar(proc_handle,1,LONG_PAR,&Rows,1); /* height: filter mask */
HGetSPar(proc_handle,2,LONG_PAR,&Cols,1); /* width: filter mask */
HAllObj(proc_handle,1,obj_key,i) {
/* all imput images
*/
HGetFDRL(proc_handle,obj_key,&region);
/* get region data
*/
HGetComp(proc_handle,obj_key,IMAGE1,&image_key_in);
if (image_key_in == UNDEFINED)
return(H_ERR_UNDI);
/* 'undefined image' */
HGetImage(proc_handle,image_key_in,&image_in); /*get image data*/
HCkP(HCrImage(proc_handle,image_key_in,1,image_in.kind,
image_in.width,image_in.height,
&image_key_out,&image_out));
HCkP(IPFilterOperation(&image_in,region,Rows,Cols,&image_out));
HCopyObj(proc_handle,obj_key,1,&key_out); /* create result obj.*/
HDefObj(proc_handle,key_out,image_key_out,IMAGE1);
/* insert the result image in output object */
}
Figure 5.23: A typical example for using HCrImage: Providing an empty image matrix for a filter operation.
5.4.8 HCrXLD
!
HCrXLD (see figure 5.19 on page 84) is used for creating XLD objects in the HALCON database of iconic
objects. The parameter xld_type allows to specify the kind of XLD to be created: It has to be set to
XLD_CONTOUR_ID in case of a contour and to XLD_POLYGON_ID in case of a polygon. Corresponding to
the selected type, HCrXLD expects a pointer to Hcont or a pointer to Hpoly in the parameter xld. In both
cases, not the underlying XLD data but only the pointers to the data are copied to the database. Thus,
you must not deallocate or overwrite the XLD structures after calling HCrXLD.
!
Note that HCrXLD automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro HCkP
(see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HCrXLD yourself.
HCrXLD expects an appropriate deallocation routine for the XLD data in the parameter free_proc. For
XLD contours, please use
(DBFreeProc) HXLDFreeContour
For XLD polygons allocated based on HAlloc use
(DBFreeProc) HXLDFreePolygon
5.5 Reading and Writing Control Parameters
Hcpar
INT4_8
Hkey
Hcont
89
rows[99], cols[99];
i,num_points;
key_out;
*cont;
...
HGetCPar(proc_handle,1,DOUBLE_PAR,rows,1,99,&num_points);
HGetCPar(proc_handle,2,DOUBLE_PAR,cols,1,99,&num_points);
/* create a contour (in general, this should be done */
/* calling an appropriate action procedure)
*/
HCkP(HAllocXLDCont(proc_handle,&cont,num_points));
for (i=0; i < num_points; i++ {
cont->row[i] = rows[i].par.d;
cont->col[i] = cols[i].par.d;
}
cont->num = num_points;
HCrXLD(proc_id,1,cont,XLD_CONTOUR_ID,NULL,0,
(DBFreeProc)HXLDFreeContour,&key_out);
Figure 5.24: A typical example for using HCrXLD: Create an XLD contour from a list of points.
Finally, HCrXLD not only creates a new database object, but also appends this object to the output iconic
parameter with index par_num. Figures 5.24 shows a typical application of HCrXLD.
5.5
Reading and Writing Control Parameters
Control parameters can be passed through the HALCON interface in two different ways: by reference
or by value. The former is more efficient but does not allow to modify the values. It is supported by
the routines HGetPElemL, HGetPElemD, HGetPElemS, and HGetPPar for reading, depending on the
expected type of the input array. HGetPElem provides a general, type independent read access. In
case of writing output control parameters, HPutPPar and HPutPElem are provided. In contrast, the
routines HGetElemL, HGetElemD, HGetElemS, and HGetCPar return a copy of the input array, whereas
HPutElem, HPutCPar copy an array to an output control parameter.
5.5.1 HGetPElemL, HGetPElemD, HGetPElemS
HGetPElemL, HGetPElemD, and HGetPElemS (see figure 5.25) return a reference in elem to the value
array of the input control parameter at the position par (1 . . . n). According to the expected type of the
array, HGetPElemL is used to get LONG_PAR arrays, HGetPElemD for DOUBLE_PAR, and HGetPElemS for
Parameter Handling
This section describes routines for reading and writing in-/output control parameters, see figure 5.25,
figure 5.28, figure 5.29, and figure 5.34. Interchanging control data with the host language is done via
arrays of the data type INT4_8 for LONG_PAR, double for DOUBLE_PAR, char* for STRING_PAR, or
Hcpar for MIXED_PAR array types (see section 4.4 on page 65).
90
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Names
HGetPElemL, HGetPElemD, HGetPElemS, HGetPPar, HGetPElem
Conversion Flags
CONV_NONE
CONV_CAST
CONV_IDNT
CONV_RND
/*
/*
/*
/*
no conversion; do only consider original element types
<INT4_8>=(INT4_8)<double>; <double>=(double)<INT4_8>
convert double to INT4_8, if double has no fraction
<INT4_8>=(INT4_8)(<double>+0.5)
*/
*/
*/
*/
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HGetPElemL(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
INT4_8 const*restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
*elem,
*num)
HGetPElemD(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
double const*restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
*elem,
*num)
HGetPElemS(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
char const* const*restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
*elem,
*num)
HGetPPar(
Hproc_handle
INT
Hcpar
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
**val,
*num)
HGetPElem(
Hproc_handle
INT
void const*restrict
INT4_8
INT
proc_handle,
par,
*elem,
*num,
*type)
Figure 5.25: Routines for reading control input parameters by reference.
STRING_PAR arrays. The behavior of the routines in case of passing array types different to the expected
can be specified by the convert parameter. Following values are supported:
CONV_NONE supports no conversion and accepts only the requested element type. Otherwise, the error
5.5.2 HGetPPar
91
’wrong type of input parameter x’ (H_ERR_WIPTx) will be returned.
CONV_CAST provides conversion of LONG_PAR and DOUBLE_PAR values to the requested type by a cast.
In case of conversion, the array is copied to an ad hoc allocated memory buffer. This buffer is freed
automatically when the operator returns. LONG_PAR and DOUBLE_PAR value types can not be casted
to type STRING_PAR and vice versa. In this case, error ’wrong type of input parameter x’
(H_ERR_WIPTx) will be returned.
CONV_IDNT converts DOUBLE_PAR values of a DOUBLE_PAR or MIXED_PAR array to type LONG_PAR
when passed to HGetPElemL. This conversion is performed only if all double values of the input
array have no fraction, i.e., the cast is reversible. When passed to HGetPElemD, values of type
LONG_PAR are casted to type DOUBLE_PAR. Any other conversion is not supported and in this case
the error ’wrong type of input parameter x’ (H_ERR_WIPTx) is returned. In case of conversion, the array is copied to an ad hoc allocated memory buffer. This buffer is freed automatically
when the operator returns.
CONV_RND provides conversion by rounding when DOUBLE_PAR values have to be converted to
LONG_PAR type (HGetPElemD). LONG_PAR values are casted to DOUBLE_PAR if passed to
HGetPElemD. Otherwise, the error ’wrong type of input parameter x’ (H_ERR_WIPTx)
will be returned. In case of conversion, the array is copied to an ad hoc allocated memory buffer.
This buffer is freed automatically when the operator returns.
Any conversion of input array types will be paid for by performance and memory consumption. Refer
to HGetPElem (see section 5.5.3) if efficient support of different array types is important. The current
number of parameter values is returned in num.
Note that HGetPElemL, HGetPElemD, and HGetPElemS automatically check the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use
HCkP on HGetCPar yourself.
!
Figure 5.26 shows the usage of HGetPElemL andHGetPElemS together with HGetPPar (compare section 5.5.2).
5.5.2 HGetPPar
Note that HGetPPar automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetPPar yourself.
Figure 5.26 shows the usage of HGetPPar together with HGetPElemL and HGetPElemS (compare section 5.5.1 on page 89).
Parameter Handling
HGetPPar (see figure 5.25 on page 90) returns the reference to a MIXED_PAR array of Hcpar structures,
which contain the parameter values of the input control parameter at the position par (1 . . . n). Contrary
to HGetCPar (see section 5.5.6 on page 96), HGetPPar is much more efficient in terms of memory
overhead, because it just returns pointers to the values instead of copying them. On the other hand, the
parameter values may only be read and must not be modified. Note that for every parameter value, its
type (LONG_PAR, DOUBLE_PAR, STRING_PAR) is also stored within the Hcpar structure. Therefore, the
same control parameter may contain values of different control data types. In case the input array is of
different type to MIXED_PAR, the array is copied and converted to an ad hoc allocated memory buffer of
Hcpar structures. This buffer is freed automatically when the operator returns. The current number of
parameter values is returned in num.
!
92
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
INT4_8 const
char const*const
Hcpar
INT4_8
*ctrl1;
*ctrl2;
*ctrl3;
num;
/*
/*
/*
/*
LONG_PAR array
STRING_PAR array
MIXED_PAR array of Hcpar structures
length of an input array
/* Read all values of parameter number 1. Say, we expect a
/* LONG_PAR array but also tolerate double values.
HGetPElemL(proc_handle,2,CONV_CAST,&ctrl1,&num);
/* now ctrl1[0] == 5; ctrl2[1] == 6;
/* Read a string in parameter number 2. Say, we expect a
/* STRING_PAR array.
HGetPElemS(proc_handle,2,CONV_NONE,&ctrl2,&num);
/* now ctrl2[0] == "Text"
/* Read a tuple of float values in parameter number 3.
/* At this parameter we handle any value type
HGetPPar(proc_handle,3,&ctrl_val3,&num);
/* now ctrl3[0].type == DOUBLE_PAR, ctrl3[0].par.d == 1.7
/*
ctrl3[1].type == LONG_PAR,
ctrl3[1].par.l == 4
/*
ctrl3[2].type == STRING_PAR, ctrl3[2].par.s == "ctrl"
...
Figure
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
5.26:
Read
the
control
parameter
values
of
the
operator
call
demo([5,6.8],’Text’,[1.7,4,’ctrl’]) using HGetPElemL, HGetPElemS, and HGetPPar.
5.5.3 HGetPElem
A general access on input control parameter without any implicite conversion is provided by the routine
HGetPElem (see figure 5.25). HGetPElem returns in elem a reference to the input array of arbitrary
type of the input control parameter with the index par (1 . . . n). The length of the array is returned in
num. type holds the array type of the returned array and can take the values LONG_PAR, DOUBLE_PAR,
STRING_PAR, and MIXED_PAR, coding arrays of type INT4_8, double, char*, and Hcpar, respectively.
Figure 5.27 shows the usage of HGetPElem.
5.5.4 HGetElemL, HGetElemD, HGetElemS
HGetElemL, HGetElemD, and HGetElemS (see figure 5.28) return a copy of the input control parameter
array with the index par (1 . . . n). According to the expected type of the array, HGetElemL is used to get
LONG_PAR arrays, HGetElemD for DOUBLE_PAR, and HGetElemS for STRING_PAR arrays. In contrast to
HGetPElemL, HGetPElemD, and HGetPElemS, the input arrays will be allocated and the values copied
in any case. Therefore, the resulting array can be modified with the drawback of memory overhead and
loss of performance. The kind of memory allocation (compare section 3.2 on page 49) can be specified
by the parameter memtype. It supports the values HMEMglobal, HMEMlocal, and HMEMtemp, specifiying
the allocation function HAlloc, HAllocLocal, or HAllocTmp that is used internally. The specified
function is used by the routines to allocate the array, respectively. But note that this array must be freed
explicitly with the according function HFree, HFreeLocal or HFreeTmp after usage. The behavior of
the routines in case of passing array types different to the expected can be specified by the convert
parameter according to the description in section 5.5.1 on page 89.
5.5.5 HCopyElemX
93
const void *restrict ctrl1;
INT4_8
n1;
INT
t1;
/* Read all values of parameter number 1
*/
HGetPElem(proc_handle, 1, &e1, &n1, &t1);
switch( t1)
{
case LONG_PAR:
{
INT4_8 const *l = (INT4_8 const *)e1;
...
break;
}
case DOUBLE_PAR:
{
double const *d = (double const *)e1;
...
break;
}
case STRING_PAR:
{
char const *const *s = (char const *const *)e1;
...
break;
}
case MIXED_PAR:
{
Hcpar const *cpar = (Hcpar const *)e1;
...
break;
}
default:
return H_ERR_WIPT1;
}
Figure 5.27: Read the control parameter values of the first control parameter of an operator using
HGetPElem.
Note that HGetPPar automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetPPar yourself.
5.5.5 HCopyElemL, HCopyElemD
HCopyElemL and HCopyElemD (see figure 5.28) read the parameter values of the input control parameter
with the index par (1 . . . n) and write them to the array elem that must have been allocated before with
a suitable size (see HGetCParNum for information on getting the actual array length). According to the
!
Parameter Handling
...
94
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Names
HGetElemL, HGetElemD, HGetElemS
Conversion Flags
CONV_NONE
CONV_CAST
CONV_IDNT
CONV_RND
/*
/*
/*
/*
no conversion; do only consider original element types
<INT4_8>=(INT4_8)<double>; <double>=(double)<INT4_8>
convert double to INT4_8, if double has no fraction
<INT4_8>=(INT4_8)(<double>+0.5)
*/
*/
*/
*/
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HGetElemL(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
INT
INT4_8 *restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
memtype,
*elem,
*num)
HGetElemD(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
INT
double *restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
memtype,
*elem,
*num)
HGetElemS(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
INT
char *restrict*restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
memtype,
*elem,
*num)
Figure 5.28: Routines for reading control input parameters by copy.
routine’s suffix, HCopyElemL expects LONG_PAR, HCopyElemD DOUBLE_PAR arrays. The behavior of
the routines in case of passing array types different to the expected can be specified by the convert
parameter according to the description in section 5.5.1 on page 89. The number of elements that have
been allocated for elem must be passed to num. In return, num will hold the number of actually copied
array indices.
!
Note that HCopyElemL and HCopyElemD automatically check the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on
HCopyElemL and HCopyElemD yourself.
5.5.5 HCopyElemX
95
Names
HCopyElemL, HCopyElemD, HGetCPar
Conversion Flags
CONV_NONE
CONV_CAST
CONV_IDNT
CONV_RND
/*
/*
/*
/*
no conversion; do only consider original element types
<INT4_8>=(INT4_8)<double>; <double>=(double)<INT4_8>
convert double to INT4_8, if double has no fraction
<INT4_8>=(INT4_8)(<double>+0.5)
*/
*/
*/
*/
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HCopyElemL(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
INT4_8 *restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
elem,
*num);
HCopyElemD(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
double *restrict
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
convert,
elem,
*num);
HGetCPar(
Hproc_handle
INT
INT
Hcpar
INT4_8
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
type,
*val,
min,max,
*num)
INT4_8
INT4_8
l[10]; /* maximum array length of 10 */
num = 10;
/* read a short/int/long value in parameter 1 */
HCopyElemL(proc_handle,1,CONV_RND,l,&num);
/* now l == [2,4], num = 2
*/
...
Figure 5.30: Read the parameter values [1.7,4] of control parameter 1 using HCopyElemL.
Parameter Handling
Figure 5.29: Routines for reading control input parameters by copy to a preallocated array.
96
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
5.5.6 HGetCPar
HGetCPar (see figure 5.28) reads the parameter values of the input control parameter with the index par
(1 . . . n) and writes them to the array val of Hcpar structures that must have been allocated before with
a suitable size.
!
Note that HGetCPar automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetCPar yourself.
Hcpar
Hcpar
par1,par2;
par3[10];
/* allocate memory for strings */
HAllocStringMem(proc_handle,1000);
/* read a short/int/long value in parameter 1 */
HGetCPar(proc_handle,1,LONG_PAR,&par1,1,1,&num);
/* now par1.par.l == 5
*/
/* read a string in parameter 2 */
HGetCPar(proc_handle,2,STRING_PAR,&par2,1,1,&num);
/* now par2.par.s == "Text"
/* read a tuple of float values in parameter 3 */
/* (max. 10 values)
HGetCPar(proc_handle,3,DOUBLE_PAR,par3,1,10,&num);
for (i=0; i<num; i++) {
/* par3[i].par.d == 0.5,1.7,4.4 */
...
*/
*/
Figure 5.31: Read the control parameter values of the operator call demo(5,’Text’,[0.5,1.7,4.4])
using HGetCPar.
For every input value, its type (LONG_PAR, DOUBLE_PAR, STRING_PAR) is also stored within the Hcpar
structure. Thus, it is possible to pass different control data types within one control parameter of a
HALCON operator. The current number of values is returned in num. HGetCPar allows to restrict the
parameter access in two respects:
• The expected type can be specified by type. This also includes type combinations such as
LONG_PAR | DOUBLE_PAR.
• The expected number of values can be specified by the interval (min,max), whereas max should not
exceed the number of allocated Hcpar elements within the array val.
If the specified number or types of values are violated, HGetCPar exits the supply procedure with an
appropriate error message. Figure 5.31 shows an application of HGetCPar.
Note that in case of string parameters, memory has to be allocated for val[i].par.s. The easiest way
to do this is to use HAllocStringMem specifying the expected number of characters for all input strings,
see section 5.5.9.
5.5.7 HGetSPar
97
5.5.7 HGetSPar
HGetSPar is a simplified version of HGetCPar. In contrast to the latter, a fixed number of parameter
values is read, see figure 5.32. Therefore, the routine does not return the actual number6 of values.
Note that HGetSPar automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetSPar yourself.
Hcpar
Hcpar
!
par1,par2;
par3[3];
/* allocate memory for strings */
HAllocStringMem(proc_handle,1000);
/* read a short/int/long value in parameter 1 */
HGetSPar(proc_handle,1,LONG_PAR,&par1,1);
/* now par1.par.l == 5
*/
/* read a string in parameter 2 */
HGetSPar(proc_handle,2,STRING_PAR,&par2,1);
/* now par2.par.s == "Text"
/* read a tuple of 3 float values in parameter 3
HGetSPar(proc_handle,3,DOUBLE_PAR,par3,3);
for (i=0; i<num; i++) {
/* par3[i].par.d == 0.5,1.7,4.4 */
...
*/
*/
Figure 5.32: Read the control parameter values of the operator call demo(5,’Text’,[0.5,1.7,4.4])
using HGetSPar.
HGetCParNum returns the length of input control arrays of the input control parameter with the index
par (1 . . . n). This makes it possible to allocate exactly as much memory for parameter values as needed
for reading them, for example, via HCopyElemL, HCopyElemD, or HGetCPar. As an alternative, you can
use the reference passing routines as HGetPElem or HGetPPar, or routines as HGetElemL that allocate
memory implicitely.
Note that HGetCParNum automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HGetCParNum yourself.
5.5.9 HAllocStringMem
In case of string parameters, additional memory for the parameter values has to be allocated, because the
Hcpar structure only contains a pointer to char. The easiest way to do this is to use HAllocStringMem
specifying the expected number of characters for all input strings (parameter size) at the begin of a
6 This number is fixed. If more or less values are passed to the HALCON operator, HGetSPar exits the supply procedure with
an error.
!
Parameter Handling
5.5.8 HGetCParNum
98
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
Hcpar
Hcpar
INT4_8
par1,par2;
*par3;
num;
/* allocate memory for strings */
HAllocStringMem(proc_handle,1000);
/* read a short/int/long value in parameter 1 */
HGetSPar(proc_handle,1,LONG_PAR,&par1,1);
/* now par1.par.l == 5
*/
/* read a string in parameter 2 */
HGetSPar(proc_handle,2,STRING_PAR,&par2,1);
/* now par2.par.s == "Text"
*/
/* read a tuple of float values in parameter 3;
*/
/* first, get the number of values
*/
HGetCParNum(proc_handle,3,&num);
/* now num == 3
*/
/* second, allocate memory for the values and read them */
HCkP(HAllocTmp(proc_handle,(void**)&par3,(size_t)(num*sizeof(Hcpar))));
HGetSPar(proc_handle,3,DOUBLE_PAR,par3,num);
for (i=0; i<num; i++) {
/* par3[i].par.d == 0.5,1.7,4.4 */
...
Figure 5.33: Use HGetCParNum to get the number of control values before reading the control parameter
values of the operator call demo(5,’Text’,[0.5,1.7,4.4]).
supply procedure, see figure 5.31 on page 96 and figure 5.32. It is not necessary to free this memory
explicitly — this is done automatically at the end of the supply procedure.
!
Note that HAllocStringMem automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure using
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HAllocStringMem yourself.
5.5.10 HPutPElem
HPutPElem (see figure 5.34) writes a native array to the output control parameter with the index par.
val holds the reference to the array of the according type, coded in type (LONG_PAR for arrays of type
INT4_8, DOUBLE_PAR, for double, and STRING_PAR for char* arrays). The length of the array is
passed in num. Instead of copying the array like HPutElem does, HPutPElem directly stores the pointer
to the output control parameter and, thus, causes less overhead. Therefore, this array has to be allocated
“permanently”, i.e. it must be allocated by using HAlloc (see section 3.2.2 on page 52). Furthermore,
the array must not be freed after passing it to HPutPElem. Figure 5.35 shows how to write output control
data with HPutPElem.
!
Note that HPutPElem automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HPutPElem yourself.
5.5.10 HPutPElem
99
Names
HPutPElem, HPutPPar
HPutCPar
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
/* --- writing output parameters by reference */
HPutPElem(
Hproc_handle
proc_handle,
INT
par,
void
*val,
INT4_8
num,
INT
type)
HPutPPar(
Hproc_handle
INT
Hcpar
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
*val,
num)
/* --- writing output parameters by copy */
HPutElem(
Hproc_handle
proc_handle,
INT
parnr,
void const
*val,
INT4_8
num,
INT
type)
HPutCPar(
Hproc_handle
INT
Hcpar
INT4_8
proc_handle,
par,
*val,
num)
double
*d;
HCkP(HAlloc(proc_handle,sizeof(*d)*2,&d));
d[0] = 1.2;
d[1] = 4.4;
HPutPElem(proc_handle,1,d,2,DOUBLE_PAR);
Figure 5.35: Write the control parameter values [1.2,4.4] using HPutPElem.
Parameter Handling
Figure 5.34: Routines for writing control output parameters.
100
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
5.5.11 HPutPPar
HPutPPar (see figure 5.34) is an alternative to HPutCPar and writes control data to the output control parameter with the index par. However, instead of copying the num values like HPutCPar does,
HPutPPar directly stores the pointer to the array of Hcpar structures (val). Thus, it causes less overhead. As HPutPPar directly uses the passed Hcpar array without copying, this array has to be allocated
“permanently”, i.e. it must be allocated by using HAlloc (see section 3.2.2 on page 52). Furthermore,
the array must not be freed after passing it to HPutPPar. Figure 5.36 shows how to write output control
data with HPutPPar.
!
Note that HPutPPar automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HPutPPar yourself.
As already mentioned, every data element may use a different type, because the types of the parameter
values (LONG_PAR, DOUBLE_PAR, STRING_PAR) are stored with each Hcpar structure.
Hcpar
*par;
HCkP(HAlloc(proc_handle,(size_t)(sizeof(Hcpar)*2),(VOIDP*)&par));
par[0].par.l = 6;
par[0].type = LONG_PAR;
par[1].par.d = 4.4;
par[1].type = DOUBLE_PAR;
HPutPPar(proc_handle,1,par,2);
Figure 5.36: Write the control parameter values [6,4.4] using HPutPPar.
5.5.12 HPutElem
HPutElem (see figure 5.34 on page 99) writes a native array to the output control parameter with the index
par of a HALCON operator. The type of the array passed in val is coded by type, with LONG_PAR
for arrays of type INT4_8, DOUBLE_PAR, for double, STRING_PAR for char* arrays. In contrast to
HPutPElem, the values are copied by this routine.
5.5.13 HPutCPar
HPutCPar (see figure 5.34 on page 99) writes control data to the output control parameter with the index
par of a HALCON operator. The num values in the Hcpar structure val are copied by this routine.
Because the types of the parameter values (LONG_PAR, DOUBLE_PAR, STRING_PAR) are stored with each
Hcpar structure, you can use a different type for every data element, see figure 5.37.
!
Note that HPutCPar automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure similarly to the
macro HCkP (see section 5.6.1). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HPutCPar yourself.
5.6 Auxiliary Extension Package Interface Macros and Procedures
Hcpar
101
par[2];
par[0].par.l = 6;
par[0].type = LONG_PAR;
par[1].par.d = 4.4;
par[1].type = DOUBLE_PAR;
HPutCPar(proc_handle,1,par,2);
Figure 5.37: Write the control parameter values [6,4.4] using HPutCPar.
5.6
Auxiliary Extension Package Interface Macros and Procedures
In this section, a couple of auxiliary routines are described that facilitate the programming of supply or
action procedures, see figure 5.38.
Names
HCkP, HCkNoObj, HRLDecomp, HNumOfChannels
Synopsis
HCkP(
Hproc_handle
Herror
proc_handle,
(*proc))
HCkNoObj(
Hproc_handle
proc_handle)
Herror HRLDecomp( Hrlregion
INT
Hrlregion
Hrlregion
*reg_in,
r1,c1,r2,c2,
*reg_inner,
*reg_outer)
HNumOfChannels(
proc_handle,
obj_index,
*num_channels)
Hproc_handle
INT4_8
INT
Figure 5.38: Auxiliary Extension Package Interface Macros and Procedures.
5.6.1 HCkP
The macro HCkP (see figure 5.38) checks the result state of a procedure call. Most of the HALCON
procedures are of the type Herror. For internal HALCON procedures, the result code H_MSG_OK is
returned if no error occurred, see also section 3.7 on page 56. HCkP exits the current procedure if the
Parameter Handling
#include "Halcon.h"
102
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
encapsulated procedure returns any other error code. Moreover, this error code is returned to the caller
of the current procedure.
The macro is used to make source code more compact, but still safe with respect to error handling, see
figure 5.39: Here, the call of the procedure HRLDecomp is encapsulated within the macro. If any error
occurs, the procedure exits with an appropriate error code. Otherwise the processing is continued.
Note that most of the interface routines described in this chapter internally call HCkP, i.e. they exit the
current procedure returning an appropriate error code in case of an error.
!
Be aware that all memory permanently allocated within a procedure will not be deallocated in case
of an error if you exit the procedure using HCkP. This will lead to memory leaks.
Herror
err;
/* without HCkP: */
err = HRLDecomp(reg_in,r1,c1,r2,c2,
reg_inner,reg_outer);
if (err != H_MSG_OK) return err;
/* with HCkP: */
HCkP(HRLDecomp(reg_in,r1,c1,r2,c2,
reg_inner,reg_outer));
Figure 5.39: Error handling with HCkP.
5.6.2 HCkNoObj
The macro HCkNoObj (see figure 5.38 on page 101) is used to check whether all iconic input parameters of an operator contain at least one iconic object. Otherwise, the supply procedure is exited with
a return code depending on the current setting of no_object_result accessible by the HALCON operators set_system and get_system (see the Reference Manuals for details). The default setting for
no_object_result is H_MSG_TRUE, that means HCkNoObj reports “no error” in case of empty iconic
input parameters. Note that in this case all output parameters are also empty.
We recommend to call
HCkNoObj(proc_handle);
at the beginning of the supply procedure for every operator with iconic input objects to guarantee the
existence of iconic data to be processed within the operator.
5.6.3 HRLDecomp
HRLDecomp (see figure 5.38 on page 101) is an auxiliary procedure to ease border treatment within the
action procedures of filter operators based on filter masks. It’s prototype is included in hlib\HRLClip.h.
5.6.3 HRLDecomp
Herror IPBFilter(HBYTE
Hrlregion
INT
HBYTE
{
...
Hrlregion *inner,*outer;
*in,
*region,
width,height,
*out)
/*
/*
/*
/*
103
input image
*/
domain (area of def.) */
image size
*/
output image
*/
HCkP(HAllocRLNumTmp(proc_handle,&inner,region->num));
HCkP(HAllocRLNumTmp(proc_handle,&outer,region->num*2));
HCkP(HRLDecomp(region,1,1,height-2,width-2,&inner,&outer));
/* filtering without border treatment */
for (i=0; i<inner->num; i++)
for (k=CB(inner->rl,i,width); k<=CE(inner->rl,i,width); k++)
out[k] = ...
/* filtering with border treatment */
for (i=0; i<outer->num; i++)
for (k=CB(outer->rl,i,width); k<=CE(outer->rl,i,width); k++)
out[k] = ...
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,outer));
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,inner));
}
Figure 5.40: Border treatment for a 3 × 3 filter.
The region (respectively domain or area of definition) reg_in of the image to be processed is split into
two parts: reg_inner and reg_outer. Note that both new regions must have been allocated before, see
section 3.2.1 on page 49.
reg_out is set to all remaining pixels within reg_in. For those pixels an appropriate (and time consuming) border treatment has to be performed. Figure 5.40 shows an application of HRLDecomp.
Note that HRLDecomp is no macro, i.e., it does not check the result state of the underlying procedure
using HCkP. Thus, you must call HCkP on HRLDecomp yourself as shown in the example.
Note that the distinction of “inner” and “outer” area only refers to the image border, but not to the border
of the regions specifying the domain (area of definition). So, it is only ensured that no memory access to
positions outside the image matrix can happen, but there is no guarantee that all pixel values covered by
the filter mask when placed on pixels within reg_inner are defined, if they do not belong to reg_in.
This means, a filter might use undefined gray values along the border of the domain of the input images.
The HALCON user should keep that in mind, when applying a sequence of filters to restricted regions
of interest.
7 r1
and r2 denote row coordinates, c1 and c2 column coordinates.
!
Parameter Handling
reg_inner is the original region reg_in minus the pixels around the image border. It contains all pixels
within the rectangle specified by the upper left corner7 (r1,c1) and the lower right corner (r2,c2). These
coordinates should be selected that way, that the filter mask is completely within the image when placed
on any pixel inside of the rectangle. Thus, no border treatment is necessary within reg_in.
104
Handling Iconic Objects and Control Parameters
5.6.4 HNumOfChannels
HNumOfChannels (see figure 5.38 on page 101) returns for the first input iconic parameter of a HALCON
operator the number of channels of the image object with the index obj_index. Thus, this routine is
just a shortcut for using HPNumOfChannels as defined in figure 5.5 on page 73 with par_num = 1.
!
Note that HNumOfChannels automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the
macro HCkP. Thus, you must not use HCkP on HNumOfChannels yourself.
Chapter 6
Special Routines for Typical
Supply Procedures
In the previous chapter, the basic routines for handling iconic objects, iconic object parameters, and
control parameters of a HALCON operator have been introduced. Based on these, this chapter describes
a set of convenience routines that facilitate the programming of supply procedures in typical situations.
6.1
Loop Macros
A frequently needed task is to process all image objects (images or regions) passed to an operator by
one or two input iconic object parameters. This is true for most filter and many segmentation operators.
Loop macros provide a framework for this problem, see also section 5.3 on page 80.
The following table contains an overview of all loop macros, their areas of application, and the provided
image data. Their syntax is defined in figure 6.1.
Macro
HAllReg
HAllSegm
HAllFilter
HAllFilter2
Application
region shape features,
region transformation,
binary morphology
gray value features,
segmentation
filter,
image transformations
filter,
segmentation,
arithmetics with two input images
105
Special Routines
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
Image Data Provided
region data (Hrlregion) of input image
object
region and image data (Hrlregion and
Himage) of input image object
region and image data (Hrlregion and
Himage) of input image object, image data
structure (Himage) for image output object
intersection of the regions of both input image objects (Hrlregion), the image data
of both objects, and a image data structure
(Himage) for the image output object
106
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
Names
HAllReg, HAllSegm, HAllFilter, HAllFilter2
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HAllReg(
Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
INT4_8
proc_handle,
**region,
&obj_index)
HAllSegm(
Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
Himage
INT
INT4_8
proc_handle,
**region,
*image,
max_channels,
&obj_index)
HAllFilter(
Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
Himage
Himage
INT
INT4_8
proc_handle,
**region,
*image_in,
*image_out,
max_channels,
&obj_index)
HAllFilter2( Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
Himage
Himage
Himage
INT
INT4_8
proc_handle,
*region,
*image_in1,
*image_in2,
*image_out,
max_channels,
&obj_index)
Figure 6.1: Convenience loop macros to access iconic objects. “&” denotes output parameters of the
macros. This is only a special notation to make clear that these parameters are changed by
the macros. So do not pass pointers to variables but the variables itself to the macro.
All macros described in this section have in common that they implement a loop over all image objects
within the first input iconic parameter. HAllFilter2 also includes a parallel loop over all objects within
the second input object parameter. It is assumed that the operator does not have any more input iconic
parameters. The macros provide users with the region (domain) and the pixel data of each image object
so that they can work on the data within the loop. Some also create output image objects.
The macros return the index of the current object obj_index (1 . . . n) within the input iconic object
parameter. Thus, obj_index can be seen as a reference parameter of the macro and therefore is notated1
with ’&obj_index’.
The macros return all regions as pointers to the original region data within the HALCON database. So
the programmer is only allowed to read them. The only exception is again HAllFilter2 that computes
1 Note,
that this is a specific notation only - do not pass pointers to the macros!
6.1.1 HAllReg
107
6.1.1 HAllReg
HAllReg (see figure 6.1) implements a loop over all iconic objects of the first input image parameter.
For every object within this parameter, it returns the region of the iconic object (domain) in region2 .
All gray value channels are ignored.
HAllReg is a combination of HAllObj (see section 5.3.1 on page 80) and HGetFDRL (see section 5.2.2
on page 78). It is typically used within feature extraction operators: A list of input regions have to be
examined concerning special features. Some HALCON operators of this kind are e.g., circularity,
area_center, or contlength. Moreover, it is possible to return new region(s) by using the interface
macro HNewRegion (see section 6.2.1 on page 114) as it is done e.g., by erosion_rectangle1 or
shape_trans.
Herror CIPCenter(Hproc_handle
{
Hcpar
*Row,*Col;
INT4_8
num;
double
row,col;
INT4_8
area;
INT4_8
i;
Hrlregion *region;
proc_handle)
/* allocate memory corresponding to the number of regions. */
HGetObjNum(proc_handle,1,&num);
HCkP(HAlloc(proc_handle,sizeof(*Row)*num,&Row);
HCkP(HAlloc(proc_handle,sizeof(*Col)*num,&Col);
/* get the regions of all input iconic objects in the first param.
HAllReg(proc_handle,&region,i)
{
HCkP(HRLArea(proc_handle,region,&area,&row,&col));
Row[i-1].type = DOUBLE_PAR;
/* par. type is float
*/
Row[i-1].par.d = row;
/* resulting row
*/
Col[i-1].type = DOUBLE_PAR;
/* par. type is float
*/
Col[i-1].par.d = col;
/* resulting column
*/
}
HPutPPar(proc_handle,1,Row,i);
/* return result */
HPutPPar(proc_handle,2,Col,i);
/* return result */
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
*/
}
Figure 6.2: An application of HAllReg: Compute the center of gravity for all input regions in the first input
iconic object parameter.
Figure 6.2 illustrates the application of HAllReg showing a complete supply procedure for a hypothetical
operator center that computes the center of gravity of all input regions. The operator has one input
2 Remember: HALCON image objects consist of one region specifying the domain (area of definition) and an arbitrary number
of gray value channels containing the pixel data
Special Routines
the intersection of the region data of both input images and stores it in a new region.
108
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
iconic object parameter that exclusively contains regions and two output control parameters for returning
the results as tuples of floating-point numbers (the coordinates of the centers of gravity of all regions).
The corresponding def-file (short version) might look like this:
center <- CIPCenter[Regions:::Rows$F,Columns$F];
center may be called with one or more regions as input. HAllReg implements a loop over all of them,
sets the loop index i to the current index of the region (1 . . . n), and passes a pointer to the region to
the action procedure that performs the center of gravity. In our case the action procedure is the internal
HALCON procedure HRLArea. The result values are written into two arrays of the type Hcpar and
returned by HPutCPar (see section 5.5.13 on page 100).
6.1.2 HAllSegm
HAllSegm (see figure 6.1 on page 106) extends HAllReg: Not only the region but also all gray value
channels of an object within the first input image object parameter are accessed within a loop. Thus,
HAllSegm is a combination/modification of HAllObj (see section 5.3.1 on page 80), HGetFDRL (see
section 5.2.2 on page 78), and HAllComp (see section 5.3.2 on page 81). It is especially useful for segmentation operators (transition of gray value channels to regions). Some typical HALCON operators that
make use of HAllSegm are threshold, regiongrowing, auto_threshold, or label_to_region.
A HALCON image object (in short a HALCON image) consists of one region (domain) that specifies its
area of definition and of one or more channels (gray value components) containing the pixel data. All
channels of an image are of the same size, but may have different pixel types. The data contained in a
channel (pixel type, the image matrix, etc.) is stored in a structure of type Himage (see section 4.1 on
page 59). If the image has only one channel, the address of a variable of the type Himage is passed to
HAllSegm. For multi-channel images an array of the type Himage[max_channels] must be passed. The
maximal number of channels to be accessed by HAllSegm is specified by the parameter max_channels,
see figure 6.3.
Himage
images[3];
HAllSegm(proc_handle,region,images,3,i) {
...
Himage
image;
HAllSegm(proc_handle,region,&image,1,i) {
...
Figure 6.3: The parameters image and max_channels of HAllSegm.
The parameter max_channels only specifies the maximum number of channels. If an image contains
less channels, the corresponding Himage elements in the image array are undefined. The actual number
of channels can be accessed e.g., using HNumOfChannels (see section 5.6.4 on page 104). An image
must contain at least one channel. Otherwise, HAllSegm returns an error. If the number of channels
exceeds max_channels, the remaining channels are ignored. Furthermore, the size of all channels is
checked for equality3 .
3 Remember:
The sizes must be equal, whereas the pixel types of different channels may vary
Herror IPSegm(Hproc_handle proc_handle, /*
Hrlregion
*region,
/*
Himage
*image,
/*
Hrlregion
*out)
/*
{
/* compute region "out" from "region" and
return(H_MSG_OK);
}
HALCON proc. handle
domain (area of definition)
input image
segmentation result
*/
*/
*/
*/
"image" */
Herror CIPSegm(Hproc_handle proc_handle)
{
INT4_8
i;
Hrlregion *region, *new_region;
Himage
image;
HCkP(HAllocRLTmp(proc_handle,&new_region));
HAllSegm(proc_handle,&region,&image,1,i) {
HCkP(IPSegm(region,&image,new_region));
HNewRegion(proc_handle,new_region);
}
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,new_region));
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
/* allocate memory*/
/* all inp. images*/
/* allocate new
/* region
/* free memory
*/
*/
*/
}
Figure 6.4: A typical application of HAllSegm: A segmentation operator.
Figure 6.4 shows a framework for a supply procedure for a segmentation operator using HAllSegm. The
corresponding hypothetical operator segm has one input object parameter for input images containing at
least one channel. The def-file (short version) might look like
segm <- CIPSegm[Image:Region::];
The macro HAllSegm used in CIPSegm performs a loop over all image objects within the first input
object parameter Image of segm. With every pass of the loop it returns the image data of the current
input object in the variables region (domain) and image (first gray value channel). The results of the
segmentation (new_region) are stored via the macro HNewRegion (see section 6.2.1 on page 114) as
new objects of the HALCON database and returned in the (first) output object parameter (Region). Note,
that this simple operator has no control parameters.
A new region is allocated for the action procedure via HAllocRLTmp (see section 3.2.1 on page 49)
before entering the loop. This region is used as temporary memory for the computation result and must
be deallocated (via HFreeRLTmp) before exiting the supply procedure.
6.1.3 HAllFilter
HAllFilter (see figure 6.1 on page 106) further extends the loop macros introduced so far: For every
input image object a new output image object is created (and added to the first output object parameter)
with
109
Special Routines
6.1.3 HAllFilter
110
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
• the same number of channels (components),
• the same pixel type (of the corresponding channels),
• the same image size and
• the same area of definition (region, domain).
Thus, HAllFilter is a combination/modification of HAllObj (see section 5.3.1 on page 80), HGetFDRL
(see section 5.2.2 on page 78), HAllComp (see section 5.3.2 on page 81), HCopyObj (see section 5.4.2
on page 84), and HPutDImage (see section 5.4.6 on page 86). It has been designed for filter operators that typically create a modified result image for every input image. The region remains unmodified. Typical examples for this functionality are the HALCON operators sobel_amp, mean_image,
scale_image_max, or texture_laws.
Herror IPScaleNew(Hrlregion
Himage
Himage
{
INT4_8 i,l,end;
double h;
*region,
*image_in,
*image_out,
for (i=0; i<region->num; i++) {
end = CE(region->rl,i,image_in->width);
for (l=CB(region->rl,i,image_in->width); l<=end; l++) {
HDFImage(h,image_in,l);
HImageFD(image_out,h*mult,l);
} }
return(H_MSG_OK);
}
Herror CIPScaleNew(Hproc_handle proc_handle)
{
Hcpar
mult;
Hrlregion
*region;
Himage
image_in,image_out;
INT4_8
i;
HGetSPar(proc_handle,1,DOUBLE_PAR,&mult,1);
HAllFilter(proc_handle,&region,&image_in,&image_out,1,i) {
HCkP(IPScaleNew(region,&image_in,mult.par.f,&image_out));
}
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
}
Figure 6.5: A typical application of HAllFilter: A filter operator.
Figure 6.5 shows a typical application of HAllFilter – a hypothetical operator scale_new that multiplies all gray values of the input objects within the first input object parameter with a constant. The
corresponding def-file (short version) might look like
6.1.4 HAllFilter2
111
The operator has one input object parameter (Image) that contains one or more input image objects (each
consisting of one or more gray value channels and one region as domain, i.e., area of definition). With
every pass of the loop an image object is accessed and its components are transferred to region and
image_in, see also HAllSegm in section 6.1.2 on page 108. These components are passed to the action
procedure IPScaleNew. In this example only the first channel of each input object is used.
HAllFilter also creates output objects (in the HALCON database) to return the modified data. Furthermore, these objects are added to the list of objects for the first output object parameter (here
ImageScaled). Their underlying image matrices are accessible via image_out. Those are also passed
to the action procedure IPScaleNew within the loop. IPScaleNew calculates the new gray values for
all pixels within the domain of the input image and writes them into the provided image components
image_out4 . The regions of the image objects remain unmodified so that all pixels of output objects
lying outside the region are undefined.
Note, that HAllFilter creates all necessary image matrices, combines them with the input regions to
new image objects, and returns those in the first output object parameter. So the programmer of the
supply procedure needs not to bother about the handling of image objects etc. To access the input control
parameter, HGetSPar (see section 5.5.7 on page 97) is used in the example.
The structure image_in may contain different pixel types. There are several ways to handle this within
an operator:
1. The simplest method is to implement the operator just for the most common pixel type
BYTE_IMAGE and return an error message (H_ERR_WIT) for any other pixel type.
2. Another way is to provide several action procedures – one for every pixel type – and call the
appropriate procedure via switch(image_in.kind).
3. The third (generic) method makes use of the macros HDFImage and HImageFD, see figure 6.6.
They encapsulate the access to gray values by buffering them in a double variable.
By writing pixel values via HImageFD, the double value val is converted into the current pixel
type of image_in (and therefore may be clipped) and stored in the pixel specified by the linear
coordinate lin_coord, see section 4.1 on page 59.
The other way around, the specified pixel value is converted to double and returned in val when
using HDFImage to read image data.
The third method has been used in our example, as it allows a very compact source code. But this variant
naturally shows drawbacks in terms of computation time: Two type conversions have to be computed
with every pixel access and all pixel arithmetic has to be done in double.
6.1.4 HAllFilter2
The macro HAllFilter2 (see figure 6.1 on page 106) is a variation of HAllFilter introduced in the
previous section. It facilitates the implementation of filters with two input object parameters. Examples
for this technique are the HALCON operators add_image, mult_image, bit_and, and max_image.
4 Note,
that image_out contains a pointer to a pixel matrix with the same size and pixel type as image_in.
Special Routines
scale_new <- CIPScaleNew[Image:ImageScaled:Mult$f:];
112
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
Names
HDFImage, HImageFD
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HDFImage( double
Himage
INT4_8
&val,
*image,
lin_coord)
HImageFD( Himage
double
INT4_8
*image,
val,
lin_coord)
Figure 6.6: Auxiliary macros for generic access to pixel data. “&” denotes an output parameter of
HDFImage. This is only a special notation to make clear that this parameter is changed by
the macro. So do not pass a pointer to double but the double variable itself to the macro.
HAllFilter2 extends HAllFiter so that with every image object of the first input object parameter
also the corresponding image object (with the same object index obj_index) of the second input object
parameter is provided. Moreover, it checks the image sizes of both image objects for equality. If the
sizes are equal, the images are provided in the loop variables image_in1 and image_in2, otherwise an
error is returned.
Moreover, HAllFilter2 computes a new input region (region) by intersecting the domains (areas of
definition) of both input images. Note, that memory for this region must have been allocated before
(e.g. with HAllocRLTmp). Furthermore, region must be deallocated at the end of the supply procedure
(HFreeRLTmp).
Output image objects are created and returned in the first output object parameter in the same way as
described for HAllFilter in section 6.1.3 on page 109.
Figure 6.7 shows a typical application of HAllFilter2 – the implementation of an operator that adds
the gray values of two input images. As in procedure IPScaleNew in figure 6.5 on page 110, the macros
HDFImage and HImageFD are used to read and write pixel values. This example exhibits the additional
advantage that the operator can even add the gray values of two images with different pixel types.
Herror IPAddNew(Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
Himage
{
INT4_8 i,l,end;
double h1,h2;
proc_handle,
*region,
*image_in1,*image_in2,*image_out)
for (i=0; i<region->num; i++) {
end = CE(region->rl,i,image_in->width);
for (l=CB(region->rl,i,image_in->width); l<=end; l++) {
HDFImage(h1,image_in1,l);
HDFImage(h2,image_in2,l);
HImageFD(image_out,h1+h2,l);
} }
return(H_MSG_OK);
}
Herror CIPAddNew(Hproc_handle proc_handle)
{
Hrlregion
*region;
Himage
image_in1,image_in2,image_out;
INT4_8
i;
HCkP(HAllocRLTmp(proc_handle,&region));
HAllFilter2(proc_handle,region,&image_in1,
&image_in2,&image_out,1,i) {
HCkP(IPAddNew(proc_handle,region,&image_in1,
&image_in2,&image_out));
}
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,region));
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
}
Figure 6.7: A typical application of HAllFilter2.
113
Special Routines
6.1.4 HAllFilter2
114
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
6.2
Object Generation
This section describes the convenience routines HNewRegion, HPutRect, and HDupObj for creating new
image objects, see figure 6.8.
HNewRegion creates a new image object in the HALCON database encapsulating the specified region
and adds this object to the first output object parameter. HPutRect inserts a rectangular region (as
domain, i.e., area of definition) into an already existing output image object. Finally, HDupObj adds an
iconic input object to the object list of the first output object parameter.
Names
HNewRegion, HPutRect, HDupObj
Synopsis
#include "Halcon.h"
HNewRegion(Hproc_handle
Hrlregion
proc_handle,
*region)
HPutRect(
Hproc_handle
Hkey
HIMGDIM
proc_handle,
obj_key,
width,height)
HDupObj(
Hproc_handle
INT4_8
proc_handle,
obj_index)
Figure 6.8: Convenience routines for creating output objects.
6.2.1 HNewRegion
HNewRegion (see figure 6.8) is used to create a new image object in the HALCON database which is
also added to the first output object parameter. It contains a copy of region. It is common to call an
image object region, when only its region component is used.
!
Note that HNewRegion automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HNewRegion yourself.
Typically, HNewRegion is used within segmentation procedures (see figure 6.4 on page 109) and region
transformation procedures such as the procedure CIPConvex shown in figure 6.9. CIPConvex corresponds to a hypothetical operator trans_convex which might be defined as
trans_convex <- CIPConvex[Region:RegionConvex::];
In the example, all regions within Region are provided in region by HAllReg (see section 6.1.1 on page
107) one after the other. The internal HALCON procedure HRLConvex2 computes the convex hull for
6.2.2 HPutRect
proc_handle)
HCkP(HAllocRLTmp(proc_handle,&region_new) /* allocate memory
HAllReg(proc_handle,&region,i) {
/* all regions
HCkP(HRLConvex2(proc_handle,region,region_new));
/* create an output region object (first output param.)
HNewRegion(proc_handle,region_new);
}
HCkP(HFreeRLTmp(proc_handle,region_new)); /* free memory
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
Special Routines
Herror CIPConvex(Hproc_handle
{
Hrlregion *region;
Hrlregion *region_new;
115
*/
*/
*/
*/
}
Figure 6.9: A typical application of HNewRegion: The region transformation “convex hull”.
each region and writes it to region_new. Furthermore, a new region object in the HALCON database is
created and added to the output object parameter RegionConvex.
Note, that HNewRegion was also used in the example in figure 6.4 on page 109.
6.2.2 HPutRect
HPutRect (see figure 6.8 on page 114) inserts a rectangular region in an already existing output object
with database key obj_key. It is mostly used in connection with operators that create new image objects
like in the example in figure 6.10.
Note that HPutRect automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HPutRect yourself.
Herror CIOGrabImage(Hproc_handle
{
Hkey
obj_key,image_key;
Himage image;
proc_handle)
HCrObj(proc_handle,1,&obj_key);
HCkP(HNewImage(proc_handle,&image,BYTE_IMAGE,640,480));
/* grab an NTSC image 640 x 480 pixel, 8 bit */
HCkP(IOBGrabImage(&image));
HPutDImage(proc_handle,obj_key,1,&image,FALSE,&image_key);
HPutRect(proc_id,obj_key,image.width,image.height);
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
}
Figure 6.10: A typical application of HPutRect: Grabbing an image.
!
116
Special Routines for Typical Supply Procedures
Note, that HCrObj (see section 5.4.1 on page 83) creates an object with empty region. In many situations the default domain (area of definition) for a new image will be the full image domain, which is a
rectangle. In this situation the use of HPutRect is very convenient.
6.2.3 HDupObj
HDupObj (see figure 6.8 on page 114) is a combination/simplification of HGetObj (see section 5.1.1
on page 70) and HCopyObj (see section 5.4.2 on page 84). It duplicates iconic input objects (images,
regions, XLD) in order to pass them directly to the first output object parameter. The objects to be
duplicated are specified by their index obj_index within the first input object parameter. Note, that
this index corresponds to obj_index as defined for the loop macros (HAll*) in section 6.1 on page 105.
HDupObj is typically used for operators that examine objects and select them by a given criterion. Some
HALCON operators of this kind are select_shape or select_gray.
!
Note that HDupObj automatically checks the result state of the underlying procedure with the macro
HCkP (see section 5.6.1 on page 101). Thus, you must not use HCkP on HDupObj yourself.
Figure 6.11 shows an application of HDupObj: CIPUserSelect computes the length of the contour of
each input region (in parameter 1). All regions with a contour of at least the minimal length min are
passed to the output.
Herror CIPUserSelect(Hproc_handle
{
Hrlregion *region;
Hrlregion *region_new;
double
length;
Hcpar
min;
INT4_8
i;
proc_handle)
HGetSPar(proc_handle,1,DOUBLE_PAR,&min,1); /* get min. length */
HAllReg(proc_handle,&region,i) {
/* all regions
*/
HCkP(HRLContLength(proc_handle,region,&length)); /* length */
if (length >= min.par.f)
/* length o.k. ?
*/
HDupObj(proc_handle,i);
/* duplicate object*/
}
return(H_MSG_TRUE);
}
Figure 6.11: A typical application of HDupObj: Duplicate input regions that fulfill a specific criteria (length
of contour).
Since HDupObj only increases the number of references to a database object instead of copying it physically, its memory costs and computational costs are neglectable. In contrast, e.g., HNewRegion and
HAllFilter always allocate new memory for the output objects. So whenever possible, HDupObj should
be used.
Creating a New HALCON Package
117
Creating a New HALCON Package
This chapter explains step by step how to create a new package. Note that the description often references
the environment variable HALCONARCH, which is set during the installation. For more details about this
variable please refer to the Programmer’s Guide, section 1.2 on page 14.
7.1
The HALCON Compiler hcomp
The HALCON compiler hcomp is the most important tool for creating a new HALCON package. It
automatically generates the interface code for the desired host language, the help files, and the documentation files. hcomp processes def-files that contain descriptions of all operators as a basic resource,
see chapter 2 on page 21. The HALCON compiler uses the same mechanism for generating the original
system operators and user-defined operators.
The syntax of the hcomp command is as follows:
hcomp <options> <files>
Example:
hcomp -u -H -ppackage MyUserOps.def
The parameter “-u” signals that an interface for user-defined operators should be generated. This parameter can be omitted as it is the default1 . The option -H generates the main package interface code
(Hpackage.c). One or more definition files that are separated by blanks must be specified as files argument. The extension .def may be omitted:
hcomp -C -ppackage MyUserOps1 MyUserOps2 MyUserOps3
You either call hcomp in the directory of the def-files (typically the package subdirectory def) or specify
the path to the def-files.
1 Note,
that hcomp also is used by MVTec to generate the interface code for the normal HALCON system.
Package Creation
Chapter 7
118
Creating a New HALCON Package
To use the package in a programming language, you must also generate the appropriate interface code.
In the example above, the corresponding C files (HCpackage.c and HCpackage.h) are created with the
option -C. Their names depend on the host language and the specified package, not on the names of the
input def-files.
7.1.1
Selection of the Host Language
One call of hcomp can always create only one interface, i.e, the options described as follows can only be
switched on under mutual exclusion. Use
hcomp -H [-ppackage] def-files
to create the main interface code (Hpackage.c), which is necessary independent whether you want to
use the package in HDevelop or in a programming language.
Use
hcomp -C [-ppackage] def-files
to create interface code for C (HCpackage.c and HCpackage.h).
To create interface code for C++, use
hcomp -D [-ppackage] def-files
which creates the files HCPPpackage.cpp and HCPPpackage.h.
To create interface code for COM, use
hcomp -X [-ppackage] def-files
which creates quite a lot of files: the IDL file packageX.idl, the header HpackageX.h, the definition
file packagex.def (and its analogon for HALCON XL), and the source and resource definition files
HpackageX.cpp, packageX.cpp, and packageX.rc.
To create interface code for .NET applications, use
hcomp -N [-ppackage] def-files
creating HDOTNETpackage.cs, providing the .NET interface to the new operators.
The generated source files are the basis for the interface libraries, see section 7.2 on page 121.
7.1.2
Creating the Help Files
Help files are necessary for the online access to the operator knowledge base via HALCON operators
like get_operator_info. For example, HDevelop uses their information to build up the menu tree
’Operator’ (chapter and section structuring) and ’Suggestions’ (alternatives, cross references, predecessor, successor, and keywords). The help files are generated for the language selected with the
(optional) -l option. The default language is English.
7.1.3 Creating HTML Reference Files
119
hcomp -M [-llanguage] def-files
creates files with the stem operators_, followed by the language (default: en_US), and the following
extensions:
.ref
.idx
.key
.num
.sta
Description
The operator description (text, value lists, . . . ).
Index for every operator specifying the start address of its entry within the *.ref file.
List of keywords (index entries) with the associated operators.
Specification of the number of parameters per parameter class for every operator.
Specification of the parameter names and the chapter names for every operator.
In addition to the option -M
-cTAGS-FILE
can be set in order to insert the source file and the line number of the supply procedure of the operator
into the *.ref file. To do this, a TAGS-File (usually TAGS) must have been generated by the etags
command before.
7.1.3
Creating HTML Reference Files
hcomp can generate HTML reference files. Thus, its easy to provide an online documentation of new
operators that can be accessed with an HTML browser. Use
hcomp -R [-ppackage] [-llang] [-aauthor-info] [-fcopyright-footer] def-files
to create HTML files. Note that the created HTML files contain the information for all programming
language interfaces.
With the (optional) parameters -a and -f you can customize the created manual: The author information
passed with the parameter -a appears on the main HTML page; the string passed with the parameter -f
appears at the bottom of every generated HTML page.
The following files are generated:
Package Creation
Extension
120
Creating a New HALCON Package
File
table_of_contents.html
index_by_name.html
index_classes.html
toc_chapter_subchapter.html
operator.html
class.html
7.1.4
Description
Home page containing the chapter structure and links to the different
(sub-)chapters (toc_chapter_subchapter.html).
Alphabetic list of all operators with links to the corresponding operator
description pages (files operator.html).
List of all classes (for COM and .NET) with links to the corresponding
description pages (files class.html).
For every (sub-)chapter: A list of all operators within the chapter
with links to the corresponding operator description pages (files operator.html).
A description page for each operator.
A description page for each class (for COM and .NET).
Creating the PDF Reference Manuals
hcomp can also generate LATEX files containing the complete reference manuals adapted to the different
supported programming languages, i.e. the description of the operators is provided in a specific syntax.
Use
hcomp -Rlatex:plang [-ppackage] [-llang] [-aauthor-info] [-fcopyright-footer] def-files
to create LATEX files. plang can be set to c, c++, com, dotnet, and hdevelop (HDevelop syntax).
hdevelop is default and may therefore be omitted. The package name specified with [-p] is used for
the title page of the manual.
The information passed with the parameter -a appears in the PDF version of the manual (see below)
in the field “Author” of the dialog describing the document. With the parameter -f you can pass a
string, which then appears on the back side of the title page. A typical use of this parameter is to print a
copyright notice.
The generated LATEX files use the package halcon_reference_en_US.sty (or similar for other languages). This package resides in the directory $HALCONROOT/doc/macros (UNIX notation). You
must include this directory in the environment variable TEXINPUTS. If the variable is empty, set it to:
:$HALCONROOT/doc/macros
Otherwise LATEX will be unable to find
‘halcon_reference_en_US.sty’ not found.
it
(typical
error
message:
File
The LATEX file(s) can be transformed into PDF files by using pdflatex and makeindex. Note, that
pdflatex must be called several times to get the references right; to get a correct table of context and
index the sequence of calls is pdflatex - pdflatex - makeindex - pdflatex - pdflatex.
You can create interactive PDF documents containing bookmarks and hyperlinks similar to the
HTML version (and the author information passed with the parameter -a) by modifying the file
7.1.5 Miscellaneous
121
table_of_contents.tex before starting to pdflatex: Replace the line (possibly with different language key)
\usepackage{halcon_reference_en_US}
by
Note, that this functionality requires that your LATEX distribution includes the package hyperref; if this
package exists but is too old, a warning will be issued, as this can result in errors during the LATEX process
or in suboptimal PDFs.
If you want to create both documents with and without PDF links, please use different directories or remember to delete all auxiliary LATEX files before starting to pdflatex the modified
table_of_contents.tex, because the two versions are not compatible.
7.1.5
Miscellaneous
Here are some more options supported by hcomp:
Option
Description
hcomp -i filename def-files
hcomp -x filename def-files
Consider only the operators listed in filename.
Do not consider the operators listed in filename.
7.2
Generating HALCON Packages
Once the new operators have been described in def-files and implemented (supply and action procedures) a couple of dynamic objects (DLLs in Windows, shared libraries in UNIX environments) must
be created. Never change the name of a package or the corresponding names of the libraries/DLLs
contained in a package. These names are encoded within the libraries. If you change the names this
information will not match any longer. Thus, the loader of the operating system will fail to open the
dynamic libraries. If you want to rename a package, you must create the libraries/DLLs again.
To activate a package, its complete path must be added to the environment variable HALCONEXTENSIONS,
e.g.,
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser
Please note, that the package paths in HALCONEXTENSIONS are separated by semicolons (Windows) or
colons (UNIX), see also section 1.3 on page 15.
Package Creation
\usepackage[pdflinks]{halcon_reference_en_US}
122
Creating a New HALCON Package
7.2.1
Creating the Operator Libraries
The supply and action procedures must be encapsulated in a DLL (Windows) or shared library (UNIX).
The name of this shared object must be consitent with the package name (plus file extension). For the
use by HALCON XL, a second version of the library must be created, with the additional suffix xl
to the name. Please refer to section 7.2.7 on page 123 and the documentation of your programming
environment for more details (also about the following sections).
Under Windows the generated DLLs must be placed in the subdirectory bin\%HALCONARCH%, the libraries in the subdirectory lib\%HALCONARCH%. Under UNIX, the generated shared libraries must be
placed in the subdirectory lib/$HALCONARCH, binaries in the subdirectory bin/$HALCONARCH of the
package. .NET assemblies must be placed in the subdirectory bin\dotnet.
Independent of whether you want to use the package in HDevelop or in a programming language, you
must create the main interface library package. This library is based on a single C file Hpackage.c,
which is generated via
hcomp -H -ppackage def-file(s)
7.2.2
Creating the C Interface
To access new HALCON operators inside a package within C programs, you must create a C interface
library packagec residing in the subdirectory lib\%HALCONARCH% of the package. This library is based
on a single C file HCpackage.c, which is generated via
hcomp -C -ppackage def-file(s)
from the def-files of your new operators. Note, that hcomp simultaneously generates the file
HCpackage.h containing the C prototypes of your new operators. Include this file in your C programs
using these operators.
7.2.3
Creating the C++ Interface
To access new HALCON operators inside a package within C++ programs you must create a C++ interface library packagecpp residing in the subdirectory lib\%HALCONARCH% of the package. This library
is based on the file HCPPpackage.cpp generated via
hcomp -D -ppackage def-file(s)
from the def-files of your self developed operators. Note, that hcomp simultaneously generates the file
HCPPpackage.h containing the C++ prototypes of your new operators. Include this file in your C++
programs using these operators.
7.2.4 Creating the COM Interface
7.2.4
123
Creating the COM Interface
To access new HALCON operators inside a package within Visual Basic programs you must create
a COM interface library packagex residing in the subdirectory lib\%HALCONARCH% of the package.
This library is based on the files packageX.idl, packagex.def (and its analogon for HALCON XL),
HpackageX.cpp, packageX.cpp, and packageX.rc generated via
from the def-files of your self developed operators. Note, that hcomp simultaneously generates the file
HpackageX.h containing the COM prototypes of your new operators.
7.2.5
Creating the .NET Interface
To access new HALCON operators inside a package within .NET programs, you must create the interface
assembly packagedotnet residing in the subdirectory lib\dotnet of the package. This assembly is
based on the C# source file HDOTNETpackage.cs, which is generated via
hcomp -N -ppackage def-file(s)
from the def-files of your new operators.
7.2.6
Creating New Applications
In order to create new application programs (written in C, C++, Visual Basic, or .NET languages)
based on your own HALCON operators, you must link the corresponding language interface libraries
packagec or packagecpp to your objects, or reference the corresponding COM library packagex or
the .NET assembly packagedotnet. For C, C++, or Visual Basic applications, you furthermore need
the HALCON library itself and the HALCON/C, HALCON/C++, or HALCON/COM library (as for any
HALCON application). For .NET applications, you need the HALCON/.NET assembly.
7.2.7
Additional Information for Specific Platforms
The previous sections summarized the generation of HALCON extensions in general. This section contains additional information for specific platforms. The main differences concern the name handling and
the generation of shared libraries / DLLs.
7.2.7.1
Generating Packages Under Windows
In order to activate a package, its complete path, e.g.
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser
must be included in the environment variable HALCONEXTENSIONS. In the Windows version the package
paths in HALCONEXTENSIONS are separated by semicolons.
Package Creation
hcomp -X -ppackage def-file(s)
124
Creating a New HALCON Package
Note, that DLLs must be stored in the subdirectory bin\%HALCONARCH% of the package, the corresponding libraries in the subdirectory lib\%HALCONARCH%.
• Creating object files for the HALCON XL version:
If you want to create a HALCON XL version of your package, a second set of object files must
be created from the source code files, using the compiler define /DHC_LARGE_IMAGES. We recommend to place these object files into a separate directory to prevent confusing them with the object
files created for the normal HALCON version.
• Creating the operator DLL package.dll and the library package.lib:
To create the operator DLL package.dll containing new HALCON operators and the corresponding library package.lib, the object files containing the corresponding supply and action
procedures and the HALCON library halcon.lib must be linked.
To create the libraries packagexl.dll and packagexl.lib for HALCON XL, the corresponding
object files compiled with the define /DHC_LARGE_IMAGES must be linked to the HALCON XL
library halconxl.lib instead of halcon.lib.
• Creating the C interface DLL packagec.dll and the library packagec.lib:
To create the libraries packagec.dll and packagec.lib, which provide the C interface to new
HALCON operators, the object file HCpackage.obj, the new operator library package.lib, the
HALCON C library halconc.lib, and the HALCON library halcon.lib must be linked.
To create the libraries packagecxl.dll and packagecxl.lib for HALCON XL, the corresponding object file compiled with the define /DHC_LARGE_IMAGES must be linked to the HALCON XL
version of the libraries, i.e., packagexl.lib, halconcxl.lib, and halconxl.lib.
• Creating the C++ interface DLL packagecpp.dll and the library packagecpp.lib:
To create the DLL packagecpp.dll providing the C++ interface to new HALCON operators and
the corresponding library packagecpp.lib, the object file HCPPpackage.obj, the new operator library package.lib, the HALCON C++ library halconcpp.lib and the HALCON library
halcon.lib must be linked.
To create the libraries packagecppxl.dll and packagecppxl.lib for HALCON XL, the corresponding object files compiled with the define /DHC_LARGE_IMAGES must be linked to the HALCON XL version of the libraries, i.e., packagexl.lib, halconcppxl.lib, and halconxl.lib.
• Creating the COM interface DLL packagex.dll and the library packagex.lib:
To create the libraries packagex.dll and packagex.lib, which provide the COM interface to
new HALCON operators, first additional files must be generated from the IDL file packageX.idl
and the resource file packageX.rc using the Microsoft Interface Definition Language compiler
midl and the resource compiler rc. Then, based on the definition file packagex.def, the object
files HpackageX.obj and packageX.obj and the created resource file packageX.res must be
linked with the new operator library package.lib, the HALCON/COM library halconx.lib,
and the HALCON library halcon.lib.
To create the libraries packagexxl.dll and packagexxl.lib for HALCON XL, the corresponding object files compiled with the define /DHC_LARGE_IMAGES must be linked to the HALCON
XL version of the libraries, i.e., packagexl.lib, halconxxl.lib, and halconxl.lib, based on
the defiition file packagexxl.def.
7.2.7 Additional Information for Specific Platforms
125
• Creating the .NET interface assembly packagedotnet.dll:
The assembly packagedotnet.dll providing the .NET interface to new HALCON operators
is created directly from the source file HDOTNETpackage.cs, together with the XML file that
documents the content of the assembly
• Creating new applications:
In order to create new application programs written in C or C++, you must link packagec.lib or
packagecpp.lib to your objects. Furthermore, you will need halconc.lib or halconcpp.lib
(as for any HALCON application). For Visual Basic or .NET applications, you reference
the libraries packagex.lib and halconx.lib or the assemblies packagedotnet.dll and
halcondotnet.dll, respectively.
To create a HALCON XL version of your application, just use the HALCON XL version of the
libraries (e.g., packagecxl.lib and halconcxl.lib in case of a C application).
To be able to link the package DLL to your application program, the complete DLL file path of the
new package, e.g.,
%HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser\bin\%HALCONARCH%
has to be added to the environment variable PATH. This is also true for .NET applications.
Do not copy a package DLL into the Windows system directories, as it would be loaded twice
in this case!
If you encounter program crashes, check the stack size allocated by your application. A stack size
of 6 - 8 MB is recommended.
The directory %HALCONEXAMPLES%\extension_package\halconuser contains two example makefiles: makefile.win creates the example package halconuser, both for standard HALCON and for
HALCON XL. makefile_testprog.win creates the example applications based on the package halconuser, again for both HALCON versions. You start the making process by calling
nmake -f makefile.win
and
nmake -f makefile_testprog.win
from the root directory of the package. Both makefiles include the file make.%HALCONARCH%, which sets
platform-dependent variables.
Both makefiles include the file make.dotnet, which sets variables for the C# compiler.
Note that you can create a debug version by calling the makefile as follows:
nmake -f makefile.win STATE=debug
By default, a release version is created, which would correspond to calling nmake with STATE=release.
Package Creation
To create the assembly packagedotnetxl.dll for HALCON XL, the source file
HDOTNETpackage.cs must be compiled with the compiler flag /define:HC_LARGE_IMAGES.
126
Creating a New HALCON Package
7.2.7.2
Generating Packages Under Linux
In order to activate a package, its complete path, e.g.
$HALCONEXAMPLES/extension_package/halconuser
must be included in the environment variable HALCONEXTENSIONS. In the UNIX version the package
paths in HALCONEXTENSIONS are separated by colons. Please see also the comments on installing a
HALCON package on a Linux system in section 1.3.2 on page 16.
• Compiling the source code:
In order to generate shared libraries you must produce position independent code. For the gcc/g++
compiler this is done using the option -fPIC. For the gcc we also recommend the options
-march=pentium -mcpu=pentiumpro -ansi -fno-strict-prototype.
• Creating object files for the HALCON XL version:
If you want to create a HALCON XL version of your package, a second set of object files must
be created from the source code files, using the compiler define -DHC_LARGE_IMAGES. We recommend to place these object files into a separate directory to prevent confusing them with the object
files created for the standard HALCON version.
• Creating the operator library libpackage.so:
To create the operator library libpackage.so containing new HALCON operators, the object files
containing the corresponding supply and action procedures must be linked. The linkage of shared
libraries is done with ld -shared. Specify the desired name libpackage.so and location of the
library with the ld option -o.
To create the library libpackagexl.so for HALCON XL, the corresponding object files compiled
with the define -DHC_LARGE_IMAGES must be linked.
• Creating the C interface library libpackagec.so:
To create the C interface library libpackagec.so providing the interface to new HALCON operators, the object file HCpackage.o and the new operator library libpackage.so must be linked.
To create the library libpackagecxl.so for HALCON XL, the corresponding object file compiled with the define -DHC_LARGE_IMAGES must be linked to the HALCON XL version of the
operator library, i.e., libpackagexl.so.
• Creating the C++ interface library libpackagecpp.so:
To create the C++ interface library libpackagecpp.so providing the interface to new HALCON
operators, the object files HCPPpackage.o and HCPPpackageGlobal.o, and the new operator lib
libpackage.so must be linked.
To create the library libpackagecppxl.so for HALCON XL, the corresponding object files compiled with the define -DHC_LARGE_IMAGES must be linked to the HALCON XL version of the
operator library, i.e., libpackage.so.
• Creating the .NET interface assembly packagedotnet.dll:
The assembly packagedotnet.dll providing the .NET interface to new HALCON operators
is created directly from the source file HDOTNETpackage.cs, together with the XML file that
documents the content of the assembly. Note that you need a successfully installed and configured
version of Mono to create the assembly.
7.3 HALCON Directories
127
To create the assembly packagedotnetxl.dll for HALCON XL, the source file
HDOTNETpackage.cs must be compiled with the compiler flag /define:HC_LARGE_IMAGES.
• Creating new applications:
In order to create new application programs written in C or C++, you must link libpackage.so
and libpackagec.so or libpackagecpp.so to your objects (besides libhalcon.so and
libhalconc.so or libhalconcpp.so as for any HALCON application). For .NET applications, you reference the assemblies packagedotnet.dll and halcondotnet.dll.
Package Creation
Furthermore, you must add the package library subdirectory lib/$HALCONARCH to the environment variable LD_LIBRARY_PATH.
To create a HALCON XL version of your application, just use the HALCON XL version of the libraries (e.g., libpackagexl.so, libpackagecxl.so, libhalconxl.so, and
libhalconcxl.so in case of a C application).
The directory $HALCONEXAMPLES/extension_package/halconuser contains two example makefiles: makefile creates the example package halconuser, both for standard HALCON and for HALCON
XL. makefile_testprog creates the example applications based on the package halconuser, again for
both HALCON versions. Please note that the makefiles only work correctly with gmake! You must
call gmake it from the root directory of the package.
Both makefiles include the file make.$HALCONARCH, which sets platform-dependent variables.
Note that the .NET assemblies are not automatically created by the makefiles. To create them, add
dotnet to your call to make, e.g.,
gmake -f makefile dotnet
Both makefiles include the file make.dotnet, which sets variables for the C# compiler.
Note that you can create a debug version by calling the makefile as follows:
gmake -f makefile STATE=debug
By default, a release version is created, which would correspond to calling gmake with STATE=release.
7.3
HALCON Directories
HALCON always presumes that the environment variable HALCONROOT contains the path of the HALCON installation directory. The following subdirectories are important for creating a new system:
include: HALCON include files for compiling.
lib\%HALCONARCH%: HALCON libraries.
dotnet20,dotnet35: HALCON/.NET assemblies for the different versions of the .NET Framework
(see the Programmer’s Guide, table 16.1 on page 124, for details).
!
128
Creating a New HALCON Package
bin\%HALCONARCH%: HALCON compiler hcomp, under Windows also the HALCON DLLs.
doc\macros: LATEX files for generating PDF reference files or manuals.
The environment variable HALCONEXAMPLES contains the path of the HALCON programming examples.
The following subdirectory is useful for creating a new system:
extension_package\halconuser: Example for a HALCON extension package.
HALCON Error Codes
129
Appendix A
HALCON Error Codes
Error Name
H_ERR_WIPT1
Code
1201
Description
Wrong type of control parameter: 1
H_ERR_WIPT2
1202
Wrong type of control parameter: 2
H_ERR_WIPT3
1203
Wrong type of control parameter: 3
H_ERR_WIPT4
1204
Wrong type of control parameter: 4
H_ERR_WIPT5
1205
Wrong type of control parameter: 5
H_ERR_WIPT6
1206
Wrong type of control parameter: 6
H_ERR_WIPT7
1207
Wrong type of control parameter: 7
H_ERR_WIPT8
1208
Wrong type of control parameter: 8
H_ERR_WIPT9
1209
Wrong type of control parameter: 9
H_ERR_WIPT10
1210
Wrong type of control parameter: 10
H_ERR_WIPT11
1211
Wrong type of control parameter: 11
H_ERR_WIPT12
1212
Wrong type of control parameter: 12
H_ERR_WIPT13
1213
Wrong type of control parameter: 13
H_ERR_WIPT14
1214
Wrong type of control parameter: 14
H_ERR_WIPT15
1215
Wrong type of control parameter: 15
H_ERR_WIPT16
1216
Wrong type of control parameter: 16
H_ERR_WIPT17
1217
Wrong type of control parameter: 17
H_ERR_WIPT18
1218
Wrong type of control parameter: 18
H_ERR_WIPT19
1219
Wrong type of control parameter: 19
H_ERR_WIPT20
1220
Wrong type of control parameter: 20
H_ERR_WIPV1
1301
Wrong value of control parameter: 1
H_ERR_WIPV2
1302
Wrong value of control parameter: 2
H_ERR_WIPV3
1303
Wrong value of control parameter: 3
H_ERR_WIPV4
1304
Wrong value of control parameter: 4
H_ERR_WIPV5
1305
Wrong value of control parameter: 5
H_ERR_WIPV6
1306
Wrong value of control parameter: 6
H_ERR_WIPV7
1307
Wrong value of control parameter: 7
Error Codes
In this section all HALCON error codes are summarized, see also section 3.7 on page 56.
130
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_WIPV8
1308
Wrong value of control parameter: 8
H_ERR_WIPV9
1309
Wrong value of control parameter: 9
H_ERR_WIPV10
1310
Wrong value of control parameter: 10
H_ERR_WIPV11
1311
Wrong value of control parameter: 11
H_ERR_WIPV12
1312
Wrong value of control parameter: 12
H_ERR_WIPV13
1313
Wrong value of control parameter: 13
H_ERR_WIPV14
1314
Wrong value of control parameter: 14
H_ERR_WIPV15
1315
Wrong value of control parameter: 15
H_ERR_WIPV16
1316
Wrong value of control parameter: 16
H_ERR_WIPV17
1317
Wrong value of control parameter: 17
H_ERR_WIPV18
1318
Wrong value of control parameter: 18
H_ERR_WIPV19
1319
Wrong value of control parameter: 19
H_ERR_WIPV20
1320
Wrong value of control parameter: 20
H_ERR_WCOMP
1350
Wrong value of component (see reset_obj_db())
H_ERR_WGCOMP
1351
Wrong value of gray value component (see reset_obj_db())
H_ERR_WIPN1
1401
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 1
H_ERR_WIPN2
1402
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 2
H_ERR_WIPN3
1403
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 3
H_ERR_WIPN4
1404
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 4
H_ERR_WIPN5
1405
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 5
H_ERR_WIPN6
1406
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 6
H_ERR_WIPN7
1407
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 7
H_ERR_WIPN8
1408
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 8
H_ERR_WIPN9
1409
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 9
H_ERR_WIPN10
1410
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 10
H_ERR_WIPN11
1411
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 11
H_ERR_WIPN12
1412
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 12
H_ERR_WIPN13
1413
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 13
H_ERR_WIPN14
1414
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 14
H_ERR_WIPN15
1415
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 15
H_ERR_WIPN16
1416
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 16
H_ERR_WIPN17
1417
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 17
H_ERR_WIPN18
1418
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 18
H_ERR_WIPN19
1419
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 19
H_ERR_WIPN20
1420
Wrong number of values of control parameter: 20
H_ERR_IONTB
1500
Number of input objects too big
H_ERR_WION1
1501
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 1
H_ERR_WION2
1502
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 2
H_ERR_WION3
1503
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 3
H_ERR_WION4
1504
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 4
H_ERR_WION5
1505
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 5
H_ERR_WION6
1506
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 6
H_ERR_WION7
1507
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 7
H_ERR_WION8
1508
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 8
H_ERR_WION9
1509
Wrong number of values of object parameter: 9
H_ERR_OONTB
1510
Number of output objects too big
H_ERR_WNP
2000
Wrong specification of parameter (error in file: xxx.def)
H_ERR_HONI
2001
Initialize Halcon: reset_obj_db(Width,Height,Components)
H_ERR_WRKNN
2002
Used number of symbolic object names too big
H_ERR_NO_LICENSE
2003
No license found
H_ERR_NO_LS_SERVER
2004
Lost connection to license server
H_ERR_NO_MODULES
2005
No modules in license (no VENDOR_STRING)
H_ERR_NO_LIC_OPER
2006
No license for this operator
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BAD_TZ
2007
Time zone offset from GMT is > 24 hours
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADPLATFORM
2008
Vendor keys do not support this platform
H_ERR_LM_BADKEYDATA
2009
Bad vendor keys
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADVENDORDATA
2010
Unknown vendor key type
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTMALLOC
2011
malloc() call failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_EXPIREDKEYS
2012
Vendor keys have expired
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FUNCNOTAVAIL
2013
Second call to lc_init() (multiple jobs), and vendor keys do not support
multiple jobs
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOKEYDATA
2014
Vendor key data not supplied
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_LIBRARYMISMATCH
2015
lmclient.h/liblmgr.a version mismatch
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NONETWORK
2016
Networking software not available on this machine
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_OLDVENDORDATA
2017
Old vendor keys supplied
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE
2018
License key in license file does not match other data in file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADHANDSHAKE
2019
Encryption handshake with daemon failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADPARAM
2020
’key’ structure is incorrect type, or feature == NULL, or num_licenses
== 0
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADSYSDATE
2021
System clock has been set back. This error can only occur when the
FEATURE line contains an expiration date
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BAD_VERSION
2022
Version argument is invalid floating point format
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BUSYNEWSERV
2023
License server busy starting another copy of itself - retry
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTCONNECT
2024
Cannot establish a connection with a license server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FEATQUEUE
2025
Feature is queued. lc_status will determine when it is available
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FUNC_NOT_AVAIL
2026
Vendor keys do not support this function
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_LOCALFILTER
2027
Checkout request filtered by the vendor-defined filter routine
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_MAXLIMIT
2028
Checkout exceeds MAX specified in options file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_MAXUSERS
2029
All licenses in use
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NO_SERVER_IN_FILE
2030
No license server specified for counted license
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOFEATURE
2031
Can not find feature in the license file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOSERVSUPP
2032
Server has different license file than client - client’s license has feature,
but server’s does not
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_OLDVER
2033
License file does not support a version this new
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_PLATNOTLIC
2034
This platform not authorized by license - running on platform not included in PLATFORMS list
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SERVBUSY
2035
License server busy - the request should be retried. (This is a rare
occourence.)
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOCONFFILE
2036
could not find license.dat
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADFILE
2037
Invalid license file syntax
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOSERVER
2038
Cannot connect to a license server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOSERVICE
2039
No TCP license service exists
Error Codes
131
132
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOSOCKET
2040
No socket connection to license manager server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOTTHISHOST
2041
Invalid host
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_LONGGONE
2042
Feature has expired
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADDATE
2043
Invalid date format in license file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCOMM
2044
Invalid returned data from license server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADHOST
2045
Cannot find SERVER hostname in network database
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTREAD
2046
Cannot read data from license server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTWRITE
2047
Cannot write data to license server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SELECTERR
2048
Error in select system call
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CHECKINBAD
2049
Feature checkin failure detected at license
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_USERSQUEUED
2050
Users are queued for this feature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SERVLONGGONE
2051
License server does not support this version of this feature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TOOMANY
2052
Request for more licenses than this feature supports
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTREADKMEM
2053
Cannot read /dev/kmem
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTREADVMUNIX
2054
Cannot read /vmunix
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTFINDETHER
2055
Cannot find ethernet device
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOREADLIC
2056
Cannot read license file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TOOEARLY
2057
Feature not yet available (wrong time/date set?)
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOSUCHATTR
2058
No such attribute
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CLOCKBAD
2059
Clock differecen too large between client and server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FEATCORRUPT
2060
Feature database corrupted in daemon
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADFEATPARAM
2061
Duplicate selection mismatch for this feature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FEATEXCLUDE
2062
User/host on EXCLUDE list for feature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FEATNOTINCLUDE
2063
User/host not on INCLUDE list for feature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NEVERCHECKOUT
2064
Feature was never checked out
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADKEYDATA
2065
Invalid FLEXlm key data supplied
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOCLOCKCHECK
2066
Clock setting check not available in daemon
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_DATE_TOOBIG
2067
Date too late for binary format
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOFLEXLMINIT
2068
FLEXlm not initialized
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOSERVRESP
2069
Server did not respond to message
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CHECKOUTFILTERED
2070
Request rejected by vendor-defined filter
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOFEATSET
2071
No FEATURESET line present in license file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADFEATSET
2072
Incorrect FEATURESET line in license file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTCOMPUTEFEATSET
2073
Cannot compute FEATURESET line
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SOCKETFAIL
2074
socket() call failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SETSOCKFAIL
2075
setsockopt() failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCHECKSUM
2076
Message checksum failure
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SERVNOREADLIC
2077
Cannot read license file from server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOTLICADMIN
2078
Not a license administrator
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_REMOVETOOSOON
2079
lmremove request too soon
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ENDPATH
2080
Attempt to read beyond the end of LF path
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_VMS_SETIMR_FAILED
2081
SYS$SETIMR call failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_INTERNAL_ERROR
2082
Internal FLEXlm Error - Please report to Globetrotter Software
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOADMINAPI
2083
FLEXadmin API functions not avilable
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADPKG
2084
Invalid PACKAGE line in license file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SERVOLDVER
2085
Server FLEXlm version older than client’s
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_USER_BASED
2086
Incorrect number of USERS/HOSTS INCLUDED in options file – see
server log
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOSERVCAP
2087
Server doesn’t support this request
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_OBJECTUSED
2088
This license object already in use
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FUTURE_FILE
2089
Future license file format or misspelling in license file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SERVER_REMOVED
2090
Feature removed during lmreread or wrong SERVER line hostid
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_POOL
2091
This feature is available in a different license pool
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOT_THIS_HOST
2092
Network connect to THIS_HOST failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_HOSTDOWN
2093
Server node is down or not responding
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_VENDOR_DOWN
2094
The desired vendor daemon is down
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADDECFILE
2095
The decimal format license is typed incorrectly
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_RESVFOROTHERS
2096
All licenses are reserved for others
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TSOK_ERR
2097
Terminal Server remote client not allowed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BORROW_TOOLONG
2098
Cannot borrow that long
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SERVER_MAXED_OUT
2099
License server out of network connections
H_ERR_WOOPI
2100
Wrong index for output object parameter
H_ERR_WIOPI
2101
Wrong index for input object parameter
H_ERR_WOI
2102
Wrong index for image object (too big or too small)
H_ERR_WRCN
2103
Wrong number region/image component (see: HGetComp)
H_ERR_WRRN
2104
Wrong relation name
H_ERR_AUDI
2105
Access to undefined gray value component
H_ERR_WIWI
2106
Wrong image width
H_ERR_WIHE
2107
Wrong image height
H_ERR_ICUNDEF
2108
Undefined gray value component
H_ERR_IDBD
2200
Inconsistent data of data base (typing)
H_ERR_WICPI
2201
Wrong index for input control parameter
H_ERR_DBDU
2202
Data of data base not defined (internal error)
H_ERR_PNTL
2203
Number of operators too big
H_ERR_UEXTNI
2205
User extension not properly installed
H_ERR_NPTL
2206
Number of packages too large
H_ERR_NSP
2207
No such package installed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NODONGLE
2300
Dongle not attached, or can’t read dongle
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NODONGLEDRIVER
2301
Missing Dongle Driver
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FLEXLOCK2CKOUT
2302
FLEXlock checkouts attempted
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SIGN_REQ
2303
SIGN= attribute required
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOCROSUPPORT
2304
CRO not supported for this platform
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BORROW_LINGER_ERR
2305
BORROW failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BORROW_EXPIRED
2306
BORROW period has expired
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_FLOATOK_ONEHOSTID
2307
FLOAT_OK license must have exactly one dongle hostid
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BORROW_DELETE_ERR
2308
Unable to delete local borrow info
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BORROW_RETURN_EARLY_ERR
2309
Support for returning aborrowed license early is not enabled
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BORROW_RETURN_SERVER_ERR
2310
Error returning borrowed license on server
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANT_CHECKOUT_JUST_PACKAGE
2311
Error when trying to checkout just a PACKAGE(BUNDLE)
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_COMPOSITEID_INIT_ERR
2312
Composite Hostid not initialized
Error Codes
133
134
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_COMPOSITEID_ITEM_ERR
2313
An item needed for Composite Hostid missing or invalid
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BORROW_MATCH_ERR
2314
Borrowed license doesn’t match any known server license
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_EVENTLOG_INIT_ERR
2315
Error enabling event log
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_EVENTLOG_DISABLED
2316
Event logging is disabled
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_EVENTLOG_WRITE_ERR
2317
Error writing to event log
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TIMEOUT
2318
Timeout
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCOMMAND
2319
Bad message command
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SOCKET_BROKEN_PIPE
2320
Error writing to socket, peer has closed socket
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_INVALID_SIGNATURE
2321
Attempting to generate version specific license tied to a single hostid,
which is composite
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_UNCOUNTED_NOT_SUPPORTED
2322
Version-specific signatures are not supported for uncounted licenses
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_REDUNDANT_SIGNATURES
2323
License template contains redundant signature specifiers
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V71_LK
2324
Invalid V71_LK signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V71_SIGN
2325
Invalid V71_SIGN signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V80_LK
2326
Invalid V80_LK signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V80_SIGN
2327
Invalid V80_SIGN signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V81_LK
2328
Invalid V81_LK signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V81_SIGN
2329
Invalid V81_SIGN signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V81_SIGN2
2330
Invalid V81_SIGN2 signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V84_LK
2331
Invalid V84_LK signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V84_SIGN
2332
Invalid V84_SIGN signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCODE_V84_SIGN2
2333
Invalid V84_SIGN2 signatur
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_LK_REQ
2334
License key required but missing from the license certificate
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADAUTH
2335
Bad AUTH= signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_REPAIR_NEEDED
2336
TS record invalid
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TS_OPEN
2337
Cannot open TS
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BAD_FULFILLMENT
2338
Invalid Fulfillment record
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BAD_ACTREQ
2339
Invalid activation request received
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TS_NO_FULFILL_MATCH
2340
No fulfillment exists in trusted storage which matches the request
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BAD_ACT_RESP
2341
Invalid activation response received
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_CANTRETURN
2342
Can’t return the fulfillment
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_RETURNEXCEEDSMAX
2343
Return would exceed max count(s)
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NO_REPAIRS_LEFT
2344
No repair count left
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_NOT_ALLOWED
2345
Specified operation is not allowed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ENTLEXCLUDE
2346
User/host on EXCLUDE list for entitlement
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ENTLNOTINCLUDE
2347
User/host not in INCLUDE list for entitlement
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ACTIVATION
2348
Activation error
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TS_BADDATE
2349
Invalid date format in trusted storage
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ENCRYPTION_FAILED
2350
Message encryption failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_DECRYPTION_FAILED
2351
Message decryption failed
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BADCONTEXT
2352
Bad filter context
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SUPERSEDE_CONFLICT
2353
SUPERSEDE feature conflict
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_INVALID_SUPERSEDE_SIGN
2354
Invalid SUPERSEDE_SIGN syntax
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SUPERSEDE_SIGN_EMPTYSTRING
2355
SUPERSEDE_SIGN does not contain a feature name and license
signature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ONE_TSOK_PLATFORM_ERR
2356
ONE_TS_OK is not supported in this Windows Platform
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ONE_TSOK_MTX_ERR
2357
Internal error -178
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_ONE_TSOK_ERR
2358
Only one terminal server remote client checkout is allowed for this
feature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SSIDNULL
2359
Internal error -180
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_SMTXNOTREL
2360
Internal error -181
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_MTXNOPERM
2361
Internal error -182
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_COMPOSITEID_ETHER_ERR
2362
More than one ethernet hostid not supported in composite hostid
definition
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_LIC_FILE_CHAR_EXCEED
2363
The number of characters in the license file paths exceeds the permissible limit
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TZ_INVALID_SYNTAX
2364
Invalid TZ keyword syntax
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TZ_INVALID_TZONE_SPEC
2365
Invalid time zone override specification in the client
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TZ_INVALID_TZONE_INFO
2366
The time zone information could not be obtained
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_TZ_UNAUTHORIZED
2367
License client time zone not authorized for license rights
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_INVALID_VM_PLATFORMS
2368
Invalid syntax for VM_PLATFORMS keyword
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_VM_PHYSICAL_ONLY
2369
Feature can be checked out from physical machine only
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_VM_VIRTUAL_ONLY
2370
Feature can be checked out from virtual machine only
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_VM_BAD_KEY
2371
Vendor keys do not support Virtualization feature
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_MAXLIMIT_EXCEED
2372
Checkout request denied as it exceeds the MAX limit specified in the
options file
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BA_API_INTERNAL_ERROR
2373
Binding agent API - Internal error
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_BA_COMM_ERROR
2374
Binding agent communication error
H_ERR_FLEX_LM_INVALID_BA_VERSION
2375
Invalid Binding agent version
H_ERR_IDOOR
2452
HALCON id out of range
H_ERR_HW_WFF
2800
Wrong hardware knowledge file format
H_ERR_HW_WFV
2801
Wrong hardware knowledge file version
H_ERR_HW_RF
2802
Error while reading the hardware knowledge
H_ERR_HW_WF
2803
Error while writing the hardware knowledge
H_ERR_HW_TF
2804
Tag in hardware knowledge file not found
H_ERR_HW_CPU
2805
No cpu information in hardware knowledge file found
H_ERR_HW_AOP
2806
No aop information in hardware knowledge file found
H_ERR_HW_HVAR
2807
No aop information for this HALCON variant found
H_ERR_HW_HARCH
2808
No aop information for this HALCON architecture found
H_ERR_HW_HOP
2809
No aop information for specified Operator found
H_ERR_HW_WAOPM
2810
Unknown aop model
H_ERR_HW_WTD
2811
Wrong tag derivate in hardware knowledge file
H_ERR_HW_IE
2812
Internal error while processing hardware knowledge
H_ERR_HW_CANCEL
2813
Optimizing aop was canceled
H_ERR_GV_WA
2830
Wrong access to global variable
H_ERR_GV_NC
2831
Used global variable does not exist
H_ERR_GV_NG
2832
Used global variable not accessible via GLOBAL_ID
H_ERR_HM_NT
2835
Halcon server to terminate is still working on a job
H_ERR_HM_NA
2837
No such HALCON software agent
H_ERR_AG_CN
2838
Hardware check for parallelization not possible on a single-processor
machine
H_ERR_AG_NC
2839
Sequential HALCON does not support parallel hardware check (use
Parallel HALCON instead)
Error Codes
135
136
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_AG_IN
2840
Initialization of agent failed
H_ERR_AG_NT
2841
Termination of agent failed
H_ERR_AG_HW
2842
Inconsistent hardware description file
H_ERR_AG_II
2843
Inconsistent agent information file
H_ERR_AG_IK
2844
Inconsistent agent knowledge file
H_ERR_AG_WV
2845
The file with the parallelization information does not match to the currently HALCON version/revision
H_ERR_AG_WH
2846
The file with the parallelization information does not match to the currently used machine
H_ERR_AG_KC
2847
Inconsistent knowledge base of HALCON software agent
H_ERR_AG_CT
2848
Unknown communication type
H_ERR_AG_MT
2849
Unknown message type for HALCON software agent
H_ERR_AG_WK
2850
Error while saving the parallelization knowledge
H_ERR_AG_WW
2851
Wrong type of work information
H_ERR_AG_WA
2852
Wrong type of application information
H_ERR_AG_WE
2853
Wrong type of experience information
H_ERR_AG_NU
2854
Unknown name of HALCON software agent
H_ERR_AG_NE
2855
Unknown name and communication address of HALCON software
agent
H_ERR_AG_RR
2856
cpu representative (HALCON software agent) not reachable
H_ERR_AG_CR
2857
cpu refuses work
H_ERR_AG_RN
2858
Description of scheduling resource not found
H_ERR_AG_TILT
2859
Not accessible function of HALCON software agent
H_ERR_WRT
2860
Wrong type: HALCON scheduling resource
H_ERR_WRS
2861
Wrong state: HALCON scheduling resource
H_ERR_UNKPT
2862
Unknown parameter type: HALCON scheduling resource
H_ERR_UNKPARVAL
2863
Unknown parameter value: HALCON scheduling resource
H_ERR_CTRL_WPP
2864
Wrong post processing of control parameter
H_ERR_GETTI
2867
Error while trying to get time (time query)
H_ERR_GETCPUNUM
2868
Error while trying to get the number of processors
H_ERR_TMPFNF
2869
Error while accessing temporary file
H_ERR_PTHRD_SCHED
2900
Error while forcing a context switch
H_ERR_SCHED_GAFF
2901
Error while accessing the cpu affinity
H_ERR_SCHED_SAFF
2902
Error while setting the cpu affinity
H_ERR_CO_WSO
2950
Wrong synchronization object
H_ERR_CO_WOCO
2952
Wrong thread object
H_ERR_CO_IOPNI
2953
Input Object was not initialized
H_ERR_CO_ICPNI
2954
Input control parameter is not initialized
H_ERR_CO_OOPNI
2955
Output Object parameter is not initialized
H_ERR_CO_OCPNI
2956
Output control parameter is not initialized
H_ERR_PTHRD_CR
2970
creation of pthread failed
H_ERR_PTHRD_DT
2971
pthread-detach failed
H_ERR_PTHRD_JO
2972
pthread-join failed
H_ERR_PTHRD_MI
2973
Initialization of mutex variable failed
H_ERR_PTHRD_MD
2974
Deletion of mutex variable failed
H_ERR_PTHRD_ML
2975
Lock of mutex variable failed
H_ERR_PTHRD_MU
2976
Unlock of mutex variable failed
H_ERR_PTHRD_CS
2977
failed to signal pthread condition variable
H_ERR_PTHRD_CW
2978
failed to wait for pthread condition variable
H_ERR_PTHRD_CI
2979
failed to init pthread condition variable
H_ERR_PTHRD_CD
2980
failed to destroy pthread condition variable
H_ERR_PTHRD_ES
2981
failed to signal event
H_ERR_PTHRD_EW
2982
failed to wait for an event
H_ERR_PTHRD_EI
2983
failed to init an event
H_ERR_PTHRD_ED
2984
failed to destroy an event
H_ERR_PTHRD_TSDC
2985
failed to create a tsd key
H_ERR_PTHRD_TSDS
2986
failed to set a tsd key
H_ERR_PTHRD_TSDG
2987
failed to get a tsd key
H_ERR_PTHRD_TSDF
2988
failed to free a tsd key
H_ERR_PTHRD_BA
2989
aborted waiting at a barrier
H_ERR_DCDG_FLE
2990
’Free list’ is empty while scheduling
H_ERR_MSG_PNCI
2991
Communication partner not checked in
H_ERR_MSG_CSAI
2992
you can not start the communication system while running it
H_ERR_MSG_CSNI
2993
Communication partner not checked in
H_ERR_RCOIMA
3010
Region completely outside of the image domain
H_ERR_ROOIMA
3011
Region (partially) outside of the definition range of the image
H_ERR_RIEI
3012
Intersected definition range region / image empty
H_ERR_EDEF
3013
Image with empty definition range (=> no gray values)
H_ERR_IIEI
3014
No common image point of two images
H_ERR_FLTS
3015
Wrong region for image (first row < 0)
H_ERR_LLTB
3016
Wrong region for image (column in last row >= image width)
H_ERR_UENOI
3017
Number of images unequal in input parameters
H_ERR_HTS
3018
Image height too small
H_ERR_WTS
3019
Image width too small
H_ERR_CHSEG
3020
Internal error: multiple call of HRLInitSeg()
H_ERR_RLSEG1
3021
Internal error: HRLSeg() not initialized
H_ERR_WGAUSSM
3022
Wrong size of filter for Gauss
H_ERR_FSEIS
3033
Filter size exceeds image size
H_ERR_FSEVAN
3034
Filter size have to be odd
H_ERR_FSTOBIG
3035
Filter is too big
H_ERR_EMPTREG
3036
Input region is empty
H_ERR_ROWTB
3040
Row value of a coordinate > 2ˆ15-1
H_ERR_ROWTS
3041
Row value of a coordinate < -2ˆ15
H_ERR_COLTB
3042
Column value of a coordinate > 2ˆ15-1
H_ERR_COLTS
3043
Column value of a coordinate < -2ˆ15
H_ERR_WRTHR
3100
Wrong segmentation threshold
H_ERR_UNKF
3101
Unknown feature
H_ERR_UNKG
3102
Unknown gray value feature
H_ERR_EINCC
3103
Internal error in HContCut
H_ERR_EINCP1
3104
Error in HContToPol: distance of points too big
H_ERR_EINCP2
3105
Error in HContToPol: contour too long
Error Codes
137
138
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_TMR
3106
Too many rows (IPImageTransform)
H_ERR_SFZ
3107
Scaling factor = 0.0 (IPImageScale)
H_ERR_OOR
3108
Wrong range in transformation matrix
H_ERR_NEF
3109
Internal error in IPvvf: no element free
H_ERR_NOOB
3110
Number of input objects is zero
H_ERR_EMPOB
3111
At least one input object has an empty region
H_ERR_NPOT
3112
Operation allowed for rectangular images 2**n only
H_ERR_TMEP
3113
Too many relevant points (IPHysterese)
H_ERR_LTB
3114
Number of labels in image too big
H_ERR_NNLA
3115
No labels with negative values allowed
H_ERR_WFS
3116
Wrong filter size (too small ?)
H_ERR_IWDS
3117
Images with different image size
H_ERR_IWTL
3118
Target image too wide or too far on the right
H_ERR_IWTS
3119
Target image too narrow or too far on the left
H_ERR_IHTL
3120
Target image too high or too far down
H_ERR_IHTS
3121
Target image too low or too far up
H_ERR_DNOC
3122
Number of channels in the input parameters are different
H_ERR_WRCFAFLT
3123
Wrong color filter array type
H_ERR_WRCFAINT
3124
Wrong color filter array interpolation
H_ERR_NO_AFFTRANS
3125
Homogeneous matrix does not represent an affine transformation
H_ERR_INPNOBDRY
3126
Inpainting region too close to the image border
H_ERR_DSIZESD
3127
Source and destination differ in size
H_ERR_TMFEAT
3128
To many Features
H_ERR_AXIS_UNDEF
3129
Reflection axis undefined
H_ERR_COWTS
3131
Coocurrence Matrix: too little columns for quantisation
H_ERR_COHTS
3132
Coocurrence Matrix: too little rows for quantisation
H_ERR_NUM_COLMN
3133
Wrong number of columns
H_ERR_NUM_LINES
3134
Wrong number of rows
H_ERR_OVL
3135
Number has too many digits
H_ERR_NOT_SYM
3136
Matrix is not symmetric
H_ERR_NUM_COLS
3137
Matrix is too big
H_ERR_SYNTAX
3138
Wrong structure of file
H_ERR_MISSING
3139
Lesser than 2 matrices
H_ERR_COOC_MEM
3140
Not enough memory
H_ERR_NO_FILE
3141
Can not read the file
H_ERR_FILE_WR
3142
Can not open file for writing
H_ERR_NUM_LUCOLS
3143
Too many lookup table colors
H_ERR_WNOLI
3145
Too many Hough points (lines)
H_ERR_DITS
3146
Target image has got wrong height (not big enough)
H_ERR_WINTM
3147
Wrong interpolation mode
H_ERR_THICK_NK
3148
Region not compact or not connected
H_ERR_WIND3
3170
Wrong filter index for filter size 3
H_ERR_WIND5
3171
Wrong filter index for filter size 5
H_ERR_WIND7
3172
Wrong filter index for filter size 7
H_ERR_WLAWSS
3173
Wrong filter size; only 3/5/7
H_ERR_NE_NPTS
3175
Number of suitable pixels too small to reliably estimate the noise
H_ERR_WNEE
3200
Different number of entries/exits in HContCut
H_ERR_XLDWT
3250
Wrong XLD type
H_ERR_XLD_RPF
3252
Internal error: border point is set to FG
H_ERR_XLD_MCL
3253
Internal error: maximum contour length exceeded
H_ERR_XLD_MCN
3254
Internal error: maximum number of contours exceeded
H_ERR_XLD_CTS
3255
Contour too short for fetch_angle_xld
H_ERR_XLD_CRD
3256
Regression parameters of contours already computed
H_ERR_XLD_CRND
3257
Regression parameters of contours not yet entered! Please compute
them by calling regress_cont_xld
H_ERR_DBXC
3258
Data base: XLD object has been deleted
H_ERR_DBWXID
3259
Data base: object has no XLD-ID
H_ERR_XLD_WNP
3260
Internal error: wrong number of contour points allocated
H_ERR_XLD_CAND
3261
Contour attribute not defined
H_ERR_FIT_ELLIPSE
3262
Ellipse fitting failed
H_ERR_FIT_CIRCLE
3263
Circle fitting failed
H_ERR_FIT_CLIP
3264
All points classified as outliers (ClippingFactor too small)
H_ERR_FIT_QUADRANGLE
3265
Quadrangle fitting failed
H_ERR_INCOMPL_RECT
3266
No points found for at least one side of the rectangle
H_ERR_XLD_COI
3267
A contour point lies outside of the image
H_ERR_FIT_NOT_ENOUGH_POINTS
3274
Not enough valid points for fitting the model
H_ERR_NWF
3275
No ARC/INFO world file
H_ERR_NAIGF
3276
No ARC/INFO generate file
H_ERR_DXF_UEOF
3278
Unexpected end of file while reading DXF file
H_ERR_DXF_CRGC
3279
Cannot read DXF-group code from file
H_ERR_DXF_INAPP
3280
Inconsistent number of attributes per point in DXF file
H_ERR_DXF_INAPPN
3281
Inconsistent number of attributes and names in DXF file
H_ERR_DXF_INAPCN
3282
Inconsistent number of global attributes and names in DXF file
H_ERR_DXF_CRAPP
3283
Cannot read attributes from DXF file
H_ERR_DXF_CRAPC
3284
Cannot read global attributes from DXF file
H_ERR_DXF_CRAN
3285
Cannot read attribute names from DXF file
H_ERR_DXF_WPN
3286
Wrong generic parameter name
H_ERR_DXF_IEDT
3289
Internal DXF I/O error: Wrong data type
H_ERR_XLD_ISOL_POINT
3290
Isolated point while contour merging
H_ERR_NURBS_CCBF
3291
Constraints (MaxError/MaxDistance) cannot be fulfilled
H_ERR_SESF
3300
Syntax error in file for training
H_ERR_TMFE
3301
Maximum number of attributes per example exceeded
H_ERR_OPSF
3302
Not possible to open file for training
H_ERR_TMSS
3303
Too many data sets for training
H_ERR_WSKEY
3304
Wrong key for data for training
H_ERR_TMSAM
3305
Too many examples for one data set for training
H_ERR_TMCLS
3306
Too many classes
H_ERR_TMBOX
3307
Maximum number of cuboids exceeded
H_ERR_OPCF
3308
Not possible to open classificator’s file
H_ERR_SCLA
3309
Error while saving the classificator
Error Codes
139
140
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_OPF
3310
Not possible to open protocol file
H_ERR_CLEX
3311
Classificator with this name is already existent
H_ERR_TMCLA
3312
Maximum number of classificators exceeded
H_ERR_CNTL
3313
Name of classificator is too long, >= 20
H_ERR_CLNNF
3314
Classificator with this name is not existent
H_ERR_NCCLA
3315
Current classificator is not defined
H_ERR_CLASS2_ID
3316
Wrong id in classification file
H_ERR_CLASS2_VERS
3317
The version of the classifier is not supported
H_ERR_CLASS_NOSITEM
3318
Serialized item does not contain a valid classifier
H_ERR_GMM_TRAIN_WRONGINIT
3330
Wrong covariance initialization
H_ERR_GMM_WRTRAINVERS
3331
The version of the GMM training samples is not supported
H_ERR_GMM_WRSMPFORMAT
3332
Wrong training sample format
H_ERR_GMM_NOCLASSFILE
3333
Invalid file format for Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM)
H_ERR_GMM_WRCLASSVERS
3334
The version of the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) is not supported
H_ERR_GMM_TRAIN_UNKERR
3335
Internal error while training the GMM
H_ERR_GMM_TRAIN_COLLAPSED
3336
Singular covariance matrix
H_ERR_GMM_TRAIN_NOSAMPLE
3337
No samples for at least one class
H_ERR_GMM_TRAIN_FEWSAMPLES
3338
Too few samples for at least one class
H_ERR_GMM_NOTTRAINED
3340
GMM has not been trained yet
H_ERR_GMM_NOTRAINDATA
3341
No training samples stored in the classifier
H_ERR_GMM_NOSITEM
3342
Serialized item does not contain a valid Gaussian Mixture Model
(GMM)
H_ERR_MLP_UNKOUTFUNC
3350
Unknown output function
H_ERR_MLP_NOT01ENC
3351
Target vector not in 0-1 encoding
H_ERR_MLP_NOTRAINDATA
3352
No training samples stored in the classifier
H_ERR_MLP_NOTRAINFILE
3353
Invalid file format for MLP training samples
H_ERR_MLP_WRTRAINVERS
3354
The version of the MLP training samples is not supported
H_ERR_MLP_WRSMPFORMAT
3355
Wrong training sample format
H_ERR_MLP_NOCLASSIF
3356
MLP is not a classifier;
create_class_mlp
H_ERR_MLP_NOCLASSFILE
3357
Invalid file format for multilayer perceptron (MLP)
H_ERR_MLP_WRCLASSVERS
3358
The version of the multilayer perceptron (MLP) is not supported
H_ERR_MLP_WRNUMCHAN
3359
Wrong number of image channels
H_ERR_MLP_WRNUMPARAM
3360
Number of MLP parameters too large
H_ERR_MLP_NOSITEM
3361
Serialized item does not contain a valid multilayer perceptron (MLP)
H_ERR_LUT_WRNUMCHAN
3370
Wrong number of image channels
H_ERR_LUT_NRCHANLARGE
3371
A look-up table can be build only for a 2 or 3 channel classifier
H_ERR_LUT_CANNOTCREAT
3372
Cannot create a look-up table. Please choose a larger ’bit_depth’ or
select ’fast’ for ’class_selection’.
H_ERR_SVM_NOTRAINDATA
3380
No training samples stored in the classifier
H_ERR_SVM_NOTRAINFILE
3381
Invalid file format for SVM training samples
H_ERR_SVM_WRTRAINVERS
3382
The version of the SVM training samples is not supported
H_ERR_SVM_WRSMPFORMAT
3383
Wrong training sample format
H_ERR_SVM_NOCLASSFILE
3384
Invalid file format for support vector machine (SVM)
H_ERR_SVM_WRCLASSVERS
3385
The version of the support vector machine (SVM) is not supported
H_ERR_SVM_WRNRCLASS
3386
Wrong class
use OutputFunction = ’softmax’ in
H_ERR_SVM_NU_TOO_BIG
3387
Nu was chosen too big
H_ERR_SVM_TRAIN_FAIL
3388
SVM training failed
H_ERR_SVM_DO_NOT_FIT
3389
Old SVM and new SVM do not match
H_ERR_SVM_NO_TRAIN_ADD
3390
SVM contains no trained support vectors
H_ERR_SVM_KERNELNOTRBF
3391
Kernel is not an RBF kernel
H_ERR_SVM_NO_TRAIND_FOR_CLASS
3392
Train data does not contain all classes
H_ERR_SVM_NOT_TRAINED
3393
SVM not trained
H_ERR_NOT_TRAINED
3394
Classifier not trained
H_ERR_SVM_NOSITEM
3395
Serialized item does not contain a valid support vector machine (SVM)
H_ERR_ROTNR
3401
Wrong rotation number
H_ERR_GOL
3402
Wrong letter for Golay element
H_ERR_BEZ
3403
Wrong reference point
H_ERR_ITER
3404
Wrong number of iterations
H_ERR_MOSYS
3405
Mophology: system error
H_ERR_ART
3406
Wrong type of boundary
H_ERR_OBJI
3407
Morphology: wrong number of input objects
H_ERR_OBJO
3408
Morphology: wrong number of output objects
H_ERR_PARI
3409
Morphology: wrong number of input control parameter
H_ERR_PARO
3410
Morphology: wrong number of output control parameter
H_ERR_SELC
3411
Morphology: structuring element is infinite
H_ERR_WRNSE
3412
Morphology: wrong name for structuring element
H_ERR_WRRLN1
3500
Wrong number of run length rows (chords): smaller than 0
H_ERR_WRRLN2
3501
Number of chords too big. Increase ’current_runlength_number’ using
set_system!
H_ERR_WRRLL
3502
Run length row with negative length
H_ERR_RLLTB
3503
Run length row >= image height
H_ERR_RLLTS
3504
Run length row < 0
H_ERR_RLCTB
3505
Run length column >= image width
H_ERR_RLCTS
3506
Run length column < 0
H_ERR_CHLTB
3507
For CHORD_TYPE: Number of row too big
H_ERR_CHLTS
3508
For CHORD_TYPE: Number of row too small
H_ERR_CHCTB
3509
For CHORD_TYPE: Number of column too big
H_ERR_MRLE
3510
Exceeding the maximum number of run lengths while automatical
expansion
H_ERR_ICCOMPL
3511
Internal error: Region->compl neither TRUE/FALSE
H_ERR_RLEMAX
3512
Internal error: Region->max_num < Region->num
H_ERR_WRRLN3
3513
Internal error: number of chords too big for num_max
H_ERR_OPNOCOMPL
3514
Operator cannot be implemented for complemented "
H_ERR_WIMAW1
3520
Image width < 0
H_ERR_WIMAW2
3521
Image width > MAX_FORMAT
H_ERR_WIMAH1
3522
Image height < 0
H_ERR_WIMAH2
3523
Image height > MAX_FORMAT
H_ERR_WIMAW3
3524
Image width <= 0
H_ERR_WIMAH3
3525
Image height <= 0
H_ERR_TMS
3550
Too many segments
H_ERR_NO_INT8_IMAGE
3551
’int8’ images are available on 64 bit systems only
Error Codes
141
142
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_POINT_AT_INFINITY
3600
Point at infinity cannot be converted to a Euclidean point
H_ERR_ML_NO_COVARIANCE
3601
Covariance matrix could not be determined
H_ERR_RANSAC_PRNG
3602
RANSAC algorithm didn’t find enough point correspondences
H_ERR_RANSAC_TOO_DIFFERENT
3603
RANSAC algorithm didn’t find enough point correspondences
H_ERR_PTI_FALLBACK
3604
Internal diagnosis: fallback method had to be used
H_ERR_PTI_TRAFO_SING
3605
Projective transformation is singular
H_ERR_PTI_MOSAIC_UNDERDET
3606
Mosaic is under-determined
H_ERR_COV_NPD
3607
Input covariance matrix is not positive definite
H_ERR_INPC
3620
Inconsistent number of point correspondences
H_ERR_NOPA
3621
At least one image cannot be reached from the reference image
H_ERR_IINE
3622
The image with specified index does not exist
H_ERR_NOCM
3623
Matrix is not a camera matrix
H_ERR_SKNZ
3624
Skew is not zero
H_ERR_ILFL
3625
Illegal focal length
H_ERR_KANZ
3626
Distortion is not zero
H_ERR_VARA
3627
It is not possible to determine all parameters for variable camera
parameters
H_ERR_LVDE
3628
No valid implementation selected
H_ERR_KPAR
3629
Kappa can only be determined with the gold-standard method
H_ERR_IMOD
3630
Conflicting number of images and projection mode
H_ERR_PNIC
3631
Error in projection: Point not in any cube map
H_ERR_NO_SOL
3632
No solution found
H_ERR_ILMD
3640
Illegal combination of estimation method and parameters to be
determined
H_ERR_NOFFTOPT
3650
Invalid file format for FFT optimization data
H_ERR_WRFFTOPTVERS
3651
The version of the FFT optimization data is not supported
H_ERR_WRHALCONVERS
3652
Optimization data was created with a different HALCON variant (Sequential HALCON / Parallel HALCON)
H_ERR_OPTFAIL
3653
Storing of the optimization data failed
H_ERR_FFTOPT_NOSITEM
3654
Serialized item does not contain valid FFT optimization data
H_ERR_RDS_NSC
3660
No contours suitable for self-calibration found
H_ERR_RDS_NSS
3661
No stable solution found: please change the inlier threshold or select
contours manually
H_ERR_RDS_ISS
3662
Instable solution: please choose more or different contours
H_ERR_RDS_NEC
3663
Not enough contours for calibration: please select contours manually
H_ERR_EPIINIM
3700
Epipoles are within the image domain: no rectification possible.
H_ERR_EPI_FOV
3701
Fields of view of both cameras do not intersect each other.
H_ERR_SOL_INVALID_HANDLE
3750
Invalid sheet-of-light handle
H_ERR_SOL_EMPTY_MODEL_LIST
3751
No sheet-of-light model available
H_ERR_SOL_WNIW
3752
Wrong input image size (width)
H_ERR_SOL_WNIH
3753
Wrong input image size (height)
H_ERR_SOL_WPROF_REG
3754
The bounding-box around the profile region does not fit the domain of
definition of the input image
H_ERR_SOL_CAL_NONE
3755
Calibration extend not set
H_ERR_SOL_UNDEF_DISPARITY
3756
Undefined disparity image
H_ERR_SOL_UNDEF_DISPDOMAIN
3757
Undefined domain for disparity image
H_ERR_SOL_UNDEF_CAMPAR
3758
Undefined camera parameter
H_ERR_SOL_UNDEF_LPCS
3759
Undefined pose of the lightplane
H_ERR_SOL_UNDEF_CCS
3760
Undefined pose of the camera coordinate system
H_ERR_SOL_UNDEF_CCS_2_LPCS
3761
Undefined transformation from the coordinate system of the camera to
the coordinate system of the lightplane
H_ERR_SOL_UNDEF_MOV_POSE
3762
Undefined movement pose for xyz calibration
H_ERR_SOL_WV_SCALE
3763
Wrong value of scale parameter
H_ERR_SOL_WV_PAR_NAME
3764
Wrong parameter name
H_ERR_SOL_WT_METHOD
3765
Wrong type of parameter method
H_ERR_SOL_WT_AMBIGUITY
3766
Wrong type of parameter ambiguity
H_ERR_SOL_WT_SCORE_TYPE
3767
Wrong type of parameter score
H_ERR_SOL_WT_CALIBRATION
3768
Wrong type of parameter calibration
H_ERR_SOL_WT_NUM_PROF
3769
Wrong type of parameter number_profiles
H_ERR_SOL_WT_CAM_PAR
3770
Wrong type of element in parameter camera_parameter
H_ERR_SOL_WT_PAR_POSE
3771
Wrong type of element in pose
H_ERR_SOL_WV_METHOD
3772
Wrong value of parameter method
H_ERR_SOL_WT_THRES
3773
Wrong type of parameter min_gray
H_ERR_SOL_WV_AMBIGUITY
3774
Wrong value of parameter ambiguity
H_ERR_SOL_WV_SCORE_TYPE
3775
Wrong value of parameter score_type
H_ERR_SOL_WV_CALIBRATION
3776
Wrong value of parameter calibration
H_ERR_SOL_WV_NUM_PROF
3777
Wrong value of parameter number_profiles
H_ERR_SOL_WV_CAMERA_TYPE
3778
Wrong type of camera
H_ERR_SOL_WN_POSE
3780
Wrong number of values of pose
H_ERR_SING
3850
The light source positions are linearly dependent
H_ERR_FEWIM
3851
No sufficient image indication
H_ERR_ZBR_NOS
3852
Internal error: Function has equal signs in HZBrent
H_ERR_DIMK
3900
Kalman: Dimension n,m or p has got a undefined value
H_ERR_NOFILE
3901
Kalman: File does not exist
H_ERR_FF1
3902
Kalman: Error in file (row of dimension)
H_ERR_FF2
3903
Kalman: Error in file (row of marking)
H_ERR_FF3
3904
Kalman: Error in file (value is no float)
H_ERR_NO_A
3905
Kalman: Matrix A is missing in file
H_ERR_NO_C
3906
Kalman: Matrix C is missing in file
H_ERR_NO_Q
3907
Kalman: Matrix Q is missing in file
H_ERR_NO_R
3908
Kalman: Matrix R is missing in file
H_ERR_NO_GU
3909
Kalman: G or u is missing in file
H_ERR_NOTSYMM
3910
Kalman: Covariant matrix is not symmetric
H_ERR_SINGU
3911
Kalman: Equation system is singular
H_ERR_DBOIT
4050
Image data management: object is a object tupel
H_ERR_DBOC
4051
Image data management: object has been deleted already
H_ERR_DBWOID
4052
Image data management: wrong object-ID
H_ERR_DBTC
4053
Image data management: object tupel has been deleted already
H_ERR_DBWTID
4054
Image data management: wrong object tupel-ID
H_ERR_DBTIO
4055
Image data management: object tupel is a object
H_ERR_DBIDNULL
4056
Image data management: object-ID is NULL (0)
Error Codes
143
144
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_WDBID
4057
Image data management: object-ID outside the valid range
H_ERR_DBIC
4058
Image data management: access to deleted image
H_ERR_DBWIID
4059
Image data management: access to image with wrong key
H_ERR_DBRC
4060
Image data management: access to deleted region
H_ERR_DBWRID
4061
Image data management: access to region with wrong key
H_ERR_WCHAN
4062
Image data management: wrong value for image channel
H_ERR_DBITL
4063
Image data management: index too big
H_ERR_DBIUNDEF
4064
Image data management: index not defined
H_ERR_NO_OPENCL
4100
No OpenCL available
H_ERR_OPENCL_ERROR
4101
OpenCL Error occured
H_ERR_NO_COMPUTE_DEVICES
4102
No compute device available
H_ERR_OUT_OF_DEVICE_MEM
4104
Out of compute device memory
H_ERR_INVALID_SHAPE
4105
Invalid work group shape
H_ERR_INVALID_DEVICE
4106
Invalid compute device
H_ERR_WSCN
5100
Wrong (logical) window number
H_ERR_DSCO
5101
Error while opening the window
H_ERR_WWC
5102
Wrong window coordinates
H_ERR_NWA
5103
It is not possible to open another window
H_ERR_DNA
5104
Device resp. operator not available
H_ERR_UCOL
5105
Unknown color
H_ERR_NWO
5106
No window has been opened for desired action
H_ERR_WFM
5107
Wrong filling mode for regions (fill or margin)
H_ERR_WGV
5108
Wrong gray value (0..255)
H_ERR_WPV
5109
Wrong pixel value (use value of get_pixel(P) only)
H_ERR_WLW
5110
Wrong line width (see: query_line_width(Min,Max))
H_ERR_WCUR
5111
Wrong name of cursor
H_ERR_WLUT
5112
Wrong color table (see: query_lut(Name)
H_ERR_WDM
5113
Wrong representation mode (see: query_insert(Mode))
H_ERR_WRCO
5114
Wrong representation color (see: query_color(List))
H_ERR_WRDM
5115
Wrong dither matrix (binary image representation)
H_ERR_WRIT
5116
Wrong image transformation (name or image size)
H_ERR_IPIT
5117
Unsuitable image type for image transformation
H_ERR_WRZS
5118
Wrong zooming factor for image transformation
H_ERR_WRDS
5119
Wrong representation mode
H_ERR_WRDV
5120
Wrong code of device
H_ERR_WWINF
5121
Wrong number for father window
H_ERR_WDEXT
5122
Wrong window size
H_ERR_WWT
5123
Wrong window type
H_ERR_WND
5124
No current window has been set
H_ERR_WRGB
5125
Wrong color combination or range (RGB)
H_ERR_WPNS
5126
Wrong number of pixels set
H_ERR_WCM
5127
Wrong value for comprise (object or image)
H_ERR_FNA
5128
set_fix with 1/4 image levels and static not valid
H_ERR_LNFS
5129
set_lut not valid in child windows
H_ERR_LOFL
5130
Number of concurrent used color tables is too big
H_ERR_WIDT
5131
Wrong device for window dump
H_ERR_WWDS
5132
Wrong window size for window dump
H_ERR_NDVS
5133
System variable DISPLAY (setenv) not defined
H_ERR_WBW
5134
Wrong thickness for window margin
H_ERR_WDVS
5135
System variable DISPLAY has been set wrong (<host>:0.0)
H_ERR_TMF
5136
Too many fonts loaded
H_ERR_WFN
5137
Wrong font name
H_ERR_WCP
5138
No valid cursor position
H_ERR_NTW
5139
Window is not a textual window
H_ERR_NPW
5140
Window is not a image window
H_ERR_STL
5141
String too long or too high
H_ERR_NSS
5142
Too little space in the window rightwards
H_ERR_NMS
5143
Window is not suitable for the mouse
H_ERR_DWNA
5144
Here Windows on a equal machine is permitted only
H_ERR_WOM
5145
Wrong mode while opening a window
H_ERR_WWM
5146
Wrong window mode for operation
H_ERR_LUTF
5147
Operation not possible with fixed pixel
H_ERR_LUTN8
5148
Color tables for 8 image levels only
H_ERR_WTCM
5149
Wrong mode for pseudo real colors
H_ERR_WIFTL
5150
Wrong pixel value for LUT
H_ERR_WSOI
5151
Wrong image size for pseudo real colors
H_ERR_HRLUT
5152
Error in procedure HRLUT
H_ERR_WPFSL
5153
Wrong number of entries in color table for set_lut
H_ERR_WPVS
5154
Wrong values for image area
H_ERR_WLPN
5155
Wrong line pattern
H_ERR_WLPL
5156
Wrong number of parameters for line pattern
H_ERR_WNOC
5157
Wrong number of colors
H_ERR_WPST
5158
Wrong value for mode of area creation (0,1,2)
H_ERR_SWNA
5159
Spy window is not set (set_spy)
H_ERR_NSFO
5160
No file for spy has been set (set_spy)
H_ERR_WSPN
5161
Wrong parameter output depth (set_spy)
H_ERR_WIFFD
5162
Wrong window size for window dump
H_ERR_WLUTF
5163
Wrong color table: wrong file name or query_lut()
H_ERR_WLUTE
5164
Wrong color table: empty string ?
H_ERR_WLUTD
5165
Using this hardware set_lut(’default’) is allowed only
H_ERR_CNDP
5166
Error while calling online help
H_ERR_LNPR
5167
Row can not be projected
H_ERR_NFSC
5168
Operation is unsuitable using a computer with fixed color table
H_ERR_NACD
5169
Computer represents gray scales only (no colors)
H_ERR_LUTO
5170
LUT of this display is full
H_ERR_WCC
5171
Internal error: wrong color code
H_ERR_WWATTRT
5172
Wrong type for window attribute
H_ERR_WWATTRN
5173
Wrong name for window attribute
H_ERR_WRSPART
5174
Negative height of area (or 0)
H_ERR_WCSPART
5175
Negative width of area (or 0)
Error Codes
145
146
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_WNCV
5176
Window not completely visible
H_ERR_FONT_NA
5177
Font not allowed for this operation
H_ERR_WDIFFTH
5178
Operation not possible (window was created in different thread)
H_ERR_DEPTH_NOT_STORED
5179
Depth was not stored with window
H_ERR_CHA3
5180
Internal error: only RGB-Mode
H_ERR_NMWA
5181
No more (image-)windows available
H_ERR_INDEX_NOT_STORED
5182
Object index was not stored with window
H_ERR_PRIM_NO_POINTS
5183
Operator does not support primitives without point coordinates
H_ERR_REMOTE_DESKTOP
5184
Operator not available with Windows Remote Desktop
H_ERR_NOGL
5185
No OpenGL support available
H_ERR_NODEPTH
5186
No depth information available
H_ERR_OGL_ERROR
5187
OpenGL error occurred
H_ERR_UNSUPPORTED_FBO
5188
Required framebuffer object is unsupported
H_ERR_OGL_HSR_NOT_SUPPORTED
5189
OpenGL accelerated hidden surface removal not supported on this
machine
H_ERR_WP_IWP
5190
Invalid window parameter
H_ERR_WP_IWPV
5191
Invalid value for window parameter
H_ERR_UMOD
5192
Unknown mode
H_ERR_NVG_WM
5195
Invalid value for navigation mode
H_ERR_FINTERN
5196
Internal file error
H_ERR_FS
5197
Error while file synchronization
H_ERR_FISR
5198
Insufficient rights on file
H_ERR_BFD
5199
Bad file descriptor
H_ERR_FNF
5200
File not found
H_ERR_DWI
5201
Error while writing image data (sufficient memory ?)
H_ERR_DWID
5202
Error while writing image descriptor (sufficient memory ?)
H_ERR_DRI1
5203
Error while reading image data (format of image too small ?)
H_ERR_DRI2
5204
Error while reading image data (format of image too big ?)
H_ERR_DRID1
5205
Error while reading image descriptor: file too small
H_ERR_DIMMAT
5206
Image matrices are different
H_ERR_HNF
5207
Help file not
Homedirectory>)
H_ERR_XNF
5208
Help index not
Homedirectory>)
H_ERR_CNCSI
5209
File <standard_input> can not be closed
found
(setenv
found
(setenv
HALCONROOT
<Halcon-
HALCONROOT
<Halcon-
H_ERR_CNCSO
5210
<standard_output/error> can not be closed
H_ERR_CNCF
5211
File can not be closed
H_ERR_EDWF
5212
Error while writing to file
H_ERR_NFA
5213
Exceeding of maximum number of files
H_ERR_WFIN
5214
Wrong file name
H_ERR_CNOF
5215
Error while opening the file
H_ERR_WFMO
5216
Wrong file mode
H_ERR_WPTY
5217
Wrong type for pixel (e.g. byte)
H_ERR_WIW
5218
Wrong image width (too big ?)
H_ERR_WIH
5219
Wrong image height (too big ?)
H_ERR_FTS1
5220
File already exhausted before reading an image
H_ERR_FTS2
5221
File exhausted before terminating the image
H_ERR_WDPI
5222
Wrong value for resolution (dpi)
H_ERR_WNOW
5223
Wrong output image size (width)
H_ERR_WNOH
5224
Wrong output image size (height)
H_ERR_WNFP
5225
Wrong number of parameter values: format description
H_ERR_WPNA
5226
Wrong parameter name for operator
H_ERR_WSNA
5227
Wrong slot name for parameter
H_ERR_NPCF
5228
Operator class is missing in help file
H_ERR_WHIF
5229
Wrong or inconsistent help/*.idx or help/*.sta
H_ERR_HINF
5230
File help/*.idx not found (setenv HALCONROOT <HalconHomedirectory>)
H_ERR_HSNF
5231
File help/*.sta not found (setenv HALCONROOT <HalconHomedirectory>)
H_ERR_ICSF
5232
Inconsistent file help/*.sta
H_ERR_EFNF
5233
No explication file (.exp) found
H_ERR_NFWKEF
5234
No file found in known graphic format
H_ERR_WIFT
5235
Wrong graphic format
H_ERR_ICNF
5236
Inconsistent file halcon.num
H_ERR_WTIFF
5237
File not a TIFF file
H_ERR_WFF
5238
Wrong file format
H_ERR_NOGPPROC
5239
gnuplot could not be started
H_ERR_NOGPFILE
5240
Output file for gnuplot could not be opened
H_ERR_NOGPOUT
5241
Not a valid gnuplot output stream
H_ERR_NOPNM
5242
No PNM format
H_ERR_ICODB
5243
Inconsistent or old help file ($HALCONROOT/help)
H_ERR_WFID
5244
Wrong file handle
H_ERR_FNO
5245
File not open
H_ERR_NO_FILES
5246
No files in use so far (none opened)
H_ERR_NORFILE
5247
Invalid file format for regions
H_ERR_RDTB
5248
Error while reading region data: Format of region too big.
H_ERR_WSID
5250
Invalid handle for a serial connection
H_ERR_SNO
5251
Serial port not open
H_ERR_NSA
5252
No serial port available
H_ERR_CNOS
5253
Could not open serial port
H_ERR_CNCS
5254
Could not close serial port
H_ERR_CNGSA
5255
Could not get serial port attributes
H_ERR_CNSSA
5256
Could not set serial port attributes
H_ERR_WRSBR
5257
Wrong baud rate for serial connection
H_ERR_WRSDB
5258
Wrong number of data bits for serial connection
H_ERR_WRSFC
5259
Wrong flow control for serial connection
H_ERR_CNFS
5260
Could not flush serial port
H_ERR_EDWS
5261
Error during write to serial port
H_ERR_EDRS
5262
Error during read from serial port
H_ERR_REG_NOSITEM
5270
Serialized item does not contain valid regions
H_ERR_REG_WRVERS
5271
The version of the regions is not supported
H_ERR_IMG_NOSITEM
5272
Serialized item does not contain valid images
Error Codes
147
148
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_IMG_WRVERS
5273
The version of the images is not supported
H_ERR_XLD_NOSITEM
5274
Serialized item does not contain valid XLD objects
H_ERR_XLD_WRVERS
5275
The version of the XLD objects is not supported
H_ERR_OBJ_NOSITEM
5276
Serialized item does not contain valid objects
H_ERR_OBJ_WRVERS
5277
The version of the objects is not supported
H_ERR_FNOTF
5280
File has not been opened in text format
H_ERR_FNOBF
5281
File has not been opened in binary file format
H_ERR_DIRCR
5282
Cannot create directory
H_ERR_DIRRM
5283
Cannot remove directory
H_ERR_NFS
5300
No image acquisition device opened
H_ERR_FGWC
5301
Image acquisition: wrong color depth
H_ERR_FGWD
5302
Image acquisition: wrong device
H_ERR_FGVF
5303
Image acquisition: determination of video format not possible
H_ERR_FGNV
5304
Image acquisition: no video signal
H_ERR_UFG
5305
Unknown image acquisition device
H_ERR_FGF
5306
Image acquisition: failed grabbing of an image
H_ERR_FGWR
5307
Image acquisition: wrong resolution chosen
H_ERR_FGWP
5308
Image acquisition: wrong image part chosen
H_ERR_FGWPR
5309
Image acquisition: wrong pixel ratio chosen
H_ERR_FGWH
5310
Image acquisition: handle not valid
H_ERR_FGCL
5311
Image acquisition: instance not valid (already closed?)
H_ERR_FGNI
5312
Image acquisition: device cannot be initialized
H_ERR_FGET
5313
Image acquisition: external triggering not supported
H_ERR_FGLI
5314
Image acquisition: wrong camera input line (multiplex)
H_ERR_FGCS
5315
Image acquisition: wrong color space
H_ERR_FGPT
5316
Image acquisition: wrong port
H_ERR_FGCT
5317
Image acquisition: wrong camera type
H_ERR_FGTM
5318
Image acquisition: maximum number of acquisition device classes
exceeded
H_ERR_FGDV
5319
Image acquisition: device busy
H_ERR_FGASYNC
5320
Image acquisition: asynchronous grab not supported
H_ERR_FGPARAM
5321
Image acquisition: unsupported parameter
H_ERR_FGTIMEOUT
5322
Image acquisition: timeout
H_ERR_FGGAIN
5323
Image acquisition: invalid gain
H_ERR_FGFIELD
5324
Image acquisition: invalid field
H_ERR_FGPART
5325
Image acquisition: invalid parameter type
H_ERR_FGPARV
5326
Image acquisition: invalid parameter value
H_ERR_FGFNS
5327
Image acquisition: function not supported
H_ERR_FGIVERS
5328
Image acquisition: incompatible interface version
H_ERR_FGSETPAR
5329
Image acquisition: could not set parameter value
H_ERR_FGGETPAR
5330
Image acquisition: could not query parameter setting
H_ERR_FGPARNA
5331
Image acquisition: parameter not available in current configuration
H_ERR_FGCLOSE
5332
Image acquisition: device could not be closed properly
H_ERR_FGCAMFILE
5333
Image acquisition: camera configuration file could not be opened
H_ERR_FGCALLBACK
5334
Image acquisition: callback type not supported
H_ERR_FGDEVLOST
5335
Image acquisition: device lost
H_ERR_JXR_UNSUPPORTED_FORMAT
5400
Image type is not supported
H_ERR_JXR_INVALID_PIXEL_FORMAT
5401
Invalid pixel format
H_ERR_JXR_INTERNAL_ERROR
5402
Internal JPEG-XR error
H_ERR_JXR_FORMAT_SYNTAX_ERROR
5403
Invalid format string
H_ERR_JXR_TOO_MANY_CHANNELS
5404
Maximum number of channels exceeded
H_ERR_JXR_EC_ERROR
5405
Unspecified error in JPEG-XR library
H_ERR_JXR_EC_BADMAGIC
5406
Bad magic number in JPEG-XR library
H_ERR_JXR_EC_FEATURE_NOT_IMPLEMENTED
5407
Feature not implemented in JPEG-XR library
H_ERR_JXR_EC_IO
5408
File read/write error in JPEG-XR library
H_ERR_JXR_EC_BADFORMAT
5409
Invalid file format in JPEG-XR library
H_ERR_LIB_FILE_CLOSE
5500
Error while closing the image file
H_ERR_LIB_FILE_OPEN
5501
Error while opening the image file
H_ERR_LIB_UNEXPECTED_EOF
5502
Premature end of the image file
H_ERR_IDTL
5503
Image dimensions too large for this file format
H_ERR_ITLHV
5504
Image too large for this HALCON version
H_ERR_TMIO
5505
Too many iconic objects for this file format
H_ERR_PCX_NO_PCX_FILE
5510
File is no PCX-File
H_ERR_PCX_UNKNOWN_ENCODING
5511
PCX: unknown encoding
H_ERR_PCX_MORE_THAN_4_PLANES
5512
PCX: More than 4 image plains
H_ERR_PCX_COLORMAP_SIGNATURE
5513
PCX: Wrong magic in color table
H_ERR_PCX_REPEAT_COUNT_SPANS
5514
PCX: Wrong number of bytes in span
H_ERR_PCX_TOO_MUCH_BITS_PIXEL
5515
PCX: Wrong number of bits/pixels
H_ERR_PCX_PACKED_PIXELS
5516
PCX: Wrong number of plains
H_ERR_GIF_NO_GIF_PICTURE
5520
File is no GIF-File
H_ERR_GIF_BAD_VERSION
5521
GIF: Wrong version (not 87a/89a)
H_ERR_GIF_SCREEN_DESCRIPTOR
5522
GIF: Wrong descriptor
H_ERR_GIF_COLORMAP
5523
GIF: Wrong color table
H_ERR_GIF_READ_ERROR_EOF
5524
GIF: Premature end of file
H_ERR_GIF_NOT_ENOUGH_IMAGES
5525
GIF: Wrong number of images ’;’
H_ERR_GIF_ERROR_ON_EXTENSION
5526
GIF: Wrong image extension ’!’
H_ERR_GIF_LEFT_TOP_WIDTH
5527
GIF: Wrong left top width
H_ERR_GIF_CIRCULAR_TABL_ENTRY
5528
GIF: Cyclic index of table
H_ERR_GIF_BAD_IMAGE_DATA
5529
GIF: Wrong image data
H_ERR_SUN_RASTERFILE_TYPE
5530
File is no Sun-Raster-File
H_ERR_SUN_RASTERFILE_HEADER
5531
SUN-Raster: Wrong header
H_ERR_SUN_COLS
5532
SUN-Raster: Wrong image width
H_ERR_SUN_ROWS
5533
SUN-Raster: Wrong image height
H_ERR_SUN_COLORMAP
5534
SUN-Raster: Wrong color map
H_ERR_SUN_RASTERFILE_IMAGE
5535
SUN-Raster: Wrong image data
H_ERR_SUN_IMPOSSIBLE_DATA
5536
SUN-Raster: Wrong type of pixel
H_ERR_XWD_IMPOSSIBLE_DATA
5540
XWD: Wrong type of pixel
H_ERR_XWD_VISUAL_CLASS
5541
XWD: Wrong visual class
H_ERR_XWD_X10_HEADER
5542
XWD: Wrong X10 header
H_ERR_XWD_X11_HEADER
5543
XWD: Wrong X11 header
Error Codes
149
150
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_XWD_X10_COLORMAP
5544
XWD: Wrong X10 colormap
H_ERR_XWD_X11_COLORMAP
5545
XWD: Wrong X11 colormap
H_ERR_XWD_X11_PIXMAP
5546
XWD: Wrong pixmap
H_ERR_XWD_UNKNOWN_VERSION
5547
XWD: unknown version
H_ERR_XWD_READING_IMAGE
5548
XWD: Error while reading an image
H_ERR_TIF_BAD_INPUTDATA
5550
TIFF: Error while reading a file
H_ERR_TIF_COLORMAP
5551
TIFF: Wrong colormap
H_ERR_TIF_TOO_MANY_COLORS
5552
TIFF: Too many colors
H_ERR_TIF_BAD_PHOTOMETRIC
5553
TIFF: Wrong photometric interpretation
H_ERR_TIF_PHOTOMETRIC_DEPTH
5554
TIFF: Wrong photometric depth
H_ERR_TIF_NO_REGION
5555
TIFF: Image is no binary file
H_ERR_TIF_UNSUPPORTED_FORMAT
5556
TIFF: Image format not supported by HALCON
H_ERR_TIF_BAD_SPECIFICATION
5557
TIFF: Wrong specification of the TIFF file format
H_ERR_TIF_FILE_CORRUPT
5558
TIFF: TIFF file is corrupt
H_ERR_TIF_TAG_UNDEFINED
5559
TIFF: A required TIFF tag is missing the the TIFF file
H_ERR_BMP_NO_BMP_PICTURE
5560
File is no BMP-File
H_ERR_BMP_READ_ERROR_EOF
5561
BMP: Premature end of file
H_ERR_BMP_INCOMPLETE_HEADER
5562
BMP: Incomplete header
H_ERR_BMP_UNKNOWN_FORMAT
5563
BMP: Unknown bitmap format
H_ERR_BMP_UNKNOWN_COMPRESSION
5564
BMP: Unknown compression format
H_ERR_BMP_COLORMAP
5565
BMP: Wrong color table
H_ERR_BMP_WRITE_ERROR
5566
BMP: Write error on output
H_ERR_BMP_NO_REGION
5567
BMP: File does not contain a binary image
H_ERR_JPG_COMP_NUM
5570
JPEG: wrong number of components in image
H_ERR_JPGLIB_UNKNOWN
5571
JPEG: unknown error from libjpeg
H_ERR_JPGLIB_NOTIMPL
5572
JPEG: no implementet feature in libjpeg
H_ERR_JPGLIB_FILE
5573
JPEG: file access error in libjpeg
H_ERR_JPGLIB_TMPFILE
5574
JPEG: tmp file access error in libjpeg
H_ERR_JPGLIB_MEMORY
5575
JPEG: memory error in libjpeg
H_ERR_JPGLIB_INFORMAT
5576
JPEG: Error in input image
H_ERR_PNG_NO_PNG_FILE
5580
PNG: File is not a PNG file
H_ERR_PNG_UNKNOWN_INTERLACE_TYPE
5581
PNG: Unknown interlace type
H_ERR_PNG_UNSUPPORTED_COLOR_TYPE
5582
PNG: Unsupported color type
H_ERR_PNG_NO_REGION
5583
PNG: Image is no binary file
H_ERR_JP2_CORRUPT
5590
JPEG-2000: File corrupt
H_ERR_JP2_PREC_TOO_HIGH
5591
JPEG-2000: Image has more than 28 significant bits
H_ERR_JP2_ENCODING_ERROR
5592
JPEG-2000: Error while encoding
H_ERR_SOCKET_BLOCK
5600
Socket can not be set to block
H_ERR_SOCKET_UNBLOCK
5601
Socket can not be set to unblock
H_ERR_SOCKET_NO_CPAR
5602
Received data is no tuple
H_ERR_SOCKET_NO_IMAGE
5603
Received data is no image
H_ERR_SOCKET_NO_RL
5604
Received data is no region
H_ERR_SOCKET_NO_XLD
5605
Received data is no xld object
H_ERR_SOCKET_READ_DATA_FAILED
5606
Error while reading from socket
H_ERR_SOCKET_WRITE_DATA_FAILED
5607
Error while writing to socket
H_ERR_SOCKET_WRONG_BYTE_NUMBER
5608
Illegal number of bytes with get_rl
H_ERR_SOCKET_BUFFER_OVERFLOW
5609
Buffer overflow in read_data
H_ERR_SOCKET_CANT_ASSIGN_FD
5610
Socket can not be created
H_ERR_SOCKET_CANT_BIND
5611
Bind on socket failed
H_ERR_SOCKET_CANT_GET_PORTNUMBER
5612
Socket information is not available
H_ERR_SOCKET_CANT_LISTEN
5613
Socket cannot listen for incoming connections
H_ERR_SOCKET_CANT_ACCEPT
5614
Connection could not be accepted
H_ERR_SOCKET_CANT_CONNECT
5615
Connection request failed
H_ERR_SOCKET_GETHOSTBYNAME
5616
Hostname could not be resolved
H_ERR_SOCKET_RECV_IS_NEG
5617
No data on socket
H_ERR_SOCKET_ILLEGAL_TUPLE_TYPE
5618
Unknown tuple type on socket
H_ERR_SOCKET_TIMEOUT
5619
Timeout occured on socket
H_ERR_SOCKET_NA
5620
No more sockets available
H_ERR_SOCKET_NI
5621
Socket is not initialized
H_ERR_SOCKET_OOR
5622
Invalid socket
H_ERR_SOCKET_IS
5623
Socket is NULL
H_ERR_SOCKET_DATA_TOO_LARGE
5624
Received data type is too large
H_ERR_SOCKET_WRONG_TYPE
5625
Wrong socket protocol
H_ERR_SOCKET_NO_PACKED_DATA
5626
Received data does not contain packed data
H_ERR_SOCKET_PARAM_FAILED
5627
Error when handling the parameter
H_ERR_SOCKET_FORMAT_MISMATCH
5628
Format specification does not match the data
H_ERR_SOCKET_INVALID_FORMAT
5629
Invalid format specification
H_ERR_SOCKET_NO_SERIALIZED_ITEM
5630
Received data is no serialized item
H_ERR_XLD_DATA_TOO_LARGE
5678
XLD object data can only be read by HALCON XL
H_ERR_ARCINFO_TOO_MANY_XLDS
5700
Too many contours/polygons for this file format
H_ERR_QUAT_WRONG_VERSION
5750
The version of the quaternion is not supported
H_ERR_QUAT_NOSITEM
5751
Serialized item does not contain a valid quaternion
H_ERR_HOM_MAT2D_WRONG_VERSION
5752
The version of the homogeneous matrix is not supported
H_ERR_HOM_MAT2D_NOSITEM
5753
Serialized item does not contain a valid homogeneous matrix
H_ERR_HOM_MAT3D_WRONG_VERSION
5754
The version of the homogeneous 3D matrix is not supported
H_ERR_HOM_MAT3D_NOSITEM
5755
Serialized item does not contain a valid homogeneous 3D matrix
H_ERR_TUPLE_WRONG_VERSION
5756
The version of the tuple is not supported
H_ERR_TUPLE_NOSITEM
5757
Serialized item does not contain a valid tuple
H_ERR_TUPLE_DTLFTHV
5758
Tuple data can only be read on 64-bit systems
H_ERR_POSE_WRONG_VERSION
5759
The version of the camera parameters (pose) is not supported
H_ERR_POSE_NOSITEM
5760
Serialized item does not contain valid camera parameters (pose)
H_ERR_CAM_PAR_WRONG_VERSION
5761
The version of the internal camera parameters is not supported
H_ERR_CAM_PAR_NOSITEM
5762
Serialized item does not contain valid internal camera parameters
H_ERR_NP
6000
Access to undefined memory area
H_ERR_MEM
6001
Not enough memory available
H_ERR_ICM
6002
Memory partition on heap has been overwritten
H_ERR_WMS
6003
HAlloc: 0 bytes requested
H_ERR_NOTMP
6004
Tmp-memory management: Call freeing memory although nothing had
been allocated
H_ERR_TMPNULL
6005
Tmp-memory management: Null pointer while freeing
Error Codes
151
152
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_CNFMEM
6006
Tmp-memory management: could not find memory element
H_ERR_WMT
6007
Memory management: wrong memory type allocated
H_ERR_MEM_VID
6021
Not enough video memory available
H_ERR_IAD
6040
System parameter for memory-allocation inconsistent
H_ERR_NRA
6041
No memory block allocated at last
H_ERR_CP_FAILED
6500
Process creation failed
H_ERR_WOCPI
7000
Wrong index for output control parameter
H_ERR_WOCPVN
7001
Wrong number of values: output control parameter (see: HPut*Par
H_ERR_WOCPT
7002
Wrong type: output control parameter (see: HPut*Par)
H_ERR_WKT
7003
Wrong data type for object key (input objects)
H_ERR_IOOR
7004
Range for integer had been passed
H_ERR_IHV
7005
Inconsistent Halcon version
H_ERR_NISS
7006
Not enough memory for strings allocated
H_ERR_PROC_NULL
7007
Internal error: Proc is NULL
H_ERR_WLST
7100
Wrong list structure using input objects
H_ERR_WIOP
7101
Wrong input object parameter (not bound)
H_ERR_WICP
7102
Wrong input control parameter (not bound)
H_ERR_WOOP
7103
Wrong output object parameter (already bound)
H_ERR_WOCP
7104
Wrong output control parameter (already bound)
H_ERR_UNKN
7105
Unknown symbolic object key (input objects)
H_ERR_WOON
7200
Wrong number of output object parameter
H_ERR_WNOIP
7300
Wrong number of input parameter
H_ERR_OTSE
7400
System error: output type <string> expected
H_ERR_OTLE
7401
System error: output type <long> expected
H_ERR_OTFE
7402
System error: output type <float> expected
H_ERR_OPINP
7403
Object parameter is a zero pointer (’_’ not allowed)
H_ERR_TWC
7404
Tupel had been deleted; values are not valid any more
H_ERR_CPPWOM
7430
CPP-interface internal error: wrong object mode
H_ERR_CPPWNOR
7431
Wrong number of regions (> 1) for type HRegion
H_ERR_CPPWNOI
7432
Wrong number of images (> 1) for type HImage
H_ERR_TNOVAL
7433
Tupel with undefined values
H_ERR_RPCS
7500
No contact to RPC server
H_ERR_RPC
7501
Error in remote procedure call
H_ERR_SWI_NOLIST
7600
Parameter value is neither a list nor a atom
H_ERR_WPRN
8000
Unknown operator name
H_ERR_RCNA
8001
register_comp_used is not activated (see set_system)
H_ERR_WPC
8002
Unknown operator class
H_ERR_ORMF
8101
convol/mask: error while opening the file
H_ERR_EOFRMF
8102
convol/mask: premature end of file
H_ERR_CVTRMF
8103
convol/mask: conversion error
H_ERR_LCNRMF
8104
convol/mask: wrong row-/column number
H_ERR_WCOVRMF
8105
convol/mask: mask size overflow
H_ERR_NEOFRMF
8106
convol/mask: too many elements entered
H_ERR_WRRA
8107
convol: wrong margin type
H_ERR_MCN0
8108
convol: no mask object has got empty region
H_ERR_WF0
8110
convol: Weight factor is 0
H_ERR_NWC
8111
convol: inconsistent number of weights
H_ERR_WRRV
8112
rank: wrong rank value
H_ERR_ROVFL
8113
convol/rank: error while handling margin
H_ERR_EWPMF
8114
Error while parsing filter mask file
H_ERR_WNUMM
8120
Wrong number of coefficients for convolution (sigma too big?)
H_ERR_WBEDN
8200
No valid ID for data set
H_ERR_NBEDA
8201
No data set active (set_bg_esti)
H_ERR_BEDNAU
8202
ID already used for data set (is not poosible)
H_ERR_NBEDC
8204
No data set created (create_bg_esti)
H_ERR_NTM
8205
Not possible to pass an object list
H_ERR_WISBE
8206
Image has other size than the background image in data set
H_ERR_UDNSSBE
8207
Up-date-region is bigger than background image
H_ERR_SNBETS
8208
Number of statistic data sets is too small
H_ERR_WAMBE
8209
Wrong value for adapt mode
H_ERR_WFMBE
8210
Wrong value for frame mode
H_ERR_OCR_MEM1
8300
Maximum number of fonts exceeded
H_ERR_OCR_WID
8301
Wrong ID (Number) for font
H_ERR_OCR1
8302
OCR internal error: wrong ID
H_ERR_OCR_NNI
8303
OCR not initialised: no font was read in
H_ERR_OCR_NAI
8304
No font activated
H_ERR_OCR_WTP
8305
OCR internal error: wrong threshold in angle determination
H_ERR_OCR_WF
8306
OCR internal error: wrong attribute
H_ERR_OCR_READ
8307
The version of the OCR classifier is not supported
H_ERR_OCR_NODES
8308
OCR File: inconsistent number of nodes
H_ERR_OCR_EOF
8309
OCR File: File too short
H_ERR_OCR_INC1
8310
OCR: internal error 1
H_ERR_OCR_INC2
8311
OCR: internal error 2
H_ERR_WOCRTYPE
8312
Wrong type of OCR tool (no ’box’ or ’net’)
H_ERR_OCR_TRF
8313
The version of the OCR training characters is not supported
H_ERR_TRF_ITL
8314
Image too large for training file
H_ERR_TRF_RTL
8315
Region too large for training file
H_ERR_TRF_PT
8316
Protected training file
H_ERR_TRF_WPW
8317
Wrong password for protected training file
H_ERR_OCR_NOSITEM
8318
Serialized item does not contain a valid OCR classifier
H_ERR_OCR_MLP_NOCLASSFILE
8320
Invalid file format for MLP classifier
H_ERR_OCR_MLP_WRCLASSVERS
8321
The version of the MLP classifier is not supported
H_ERR_OCR_MLP_NOSITEM
8322
Serialized item does not contain a valid MLP classifier
H_ERR_OCR_SVM_NOCLASSFILE
8330
Invalid file format for SVM classifier
H_ERR_OCR_SVM_WRCLASSVERS
8331
The version of the SVM classifier is not supported
H_ERR_OCR_KNN_NOSITEM
8332
Serialized item does not contain a valid k-NN classifier
H_ERR_OCR_KNN_NOCLASSFILE
8333
Invalid file format for k-NN classifier
H_ERR_INVALID_TEXT_MODEL_ID
8340
Invalid text model
H_ERR_INVALID_TEXT_RESULT_ID
8341
Invalid text result
H_ERR_OCV_NI
8350
OCV system not initialized
Error Codes
153
154
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_WOCVTYPE
8351
The version of the OCV tool is not supported
H_ERR_OCV_WNAME
8353
Wrong name for an OCV object
H_ERR_OCV_II
8354
Training has already been applied
H_ERR_OCV_NOTTR
8355
No training has been applied to the character
H_ERR_OCV_NOSITEM
8356
Serialized item does not contain a valid OCV tool
H_ERR_WLENGTH
8370
Wrong number of function points
H_ERR_NO_FUNCTION
8371
List of values is not a function
H_ERR_NOT_ASCENDING
8372
Wrong ordering of values (not ascending)
H_ERR_ILLEGAL_DIST
8373
Illegal distance of function points
H_ERR_NOT_MONOTONIC
8374
Function is not monotonic
H_ERR_WFUNCTION
8375
Wrong function type
H_ERR_CAL_LCALP
8400
You have to indicate at least 3 calibration points
H_ERR_CAL_NCPF
8402
No calibration table found
H_ERR_CAL_RECPF
8403
Error while reading calibration table description file
H_ERR_CAL_LTMTH
8404
Minimum threshold while searching for ellipses
H_ERR_CAL_FRCP
8405
Read error / format error in calibration table description file
H_ERR_CAL_PROJ
8406
Error in projection: s_x = 0 or s_y = 0 or z = 0
H_ERR_CAL_UNPRO
8407
Error in inverse projection
H_ERR_CAL_RICPF
8408
Not possible to open camera parameter file
H_ERR_CAL_FICP1
8409
Format error in file: no colon
H_ERR_CAL_FICP2
8410
Format error in file: 2. colon is missing
H_ERR_CAL_FICP3
8411
Format error in file: semicolon is missing
H_ERR_CAL_REPOS
8412
Not possible to open camera parameter (pose) file
H_ERR_CAL_FOPOS
8413
Format error in camera parameter (pose) file
H_ERR_CAL_OCPDF
8414
Not possible to open calibration target description file
H_ERR_CAL_OCPPS
8415
Not possible to open postscript file of calibration target
H_ERR_CAL_EVECN
8416
Error while norming the vector
H_ERR_CAL_NPLAN
8417
Fitting of calibration target failed
H_ERR_CAL_NNMAR
8418
No next mark found
H_ERR_CAL_NNEQU
8419
Normal equation system is not solvable
H_ERR_CAL_QETHM
8420
Average quadratic error is too big for 3D position of mark
H_ERR_CAL_NOELL
8421
Non elliptic contour
H_ERR_CAL_WPARV
8422
Wrong parameter value slvand()
H_ERR_CAL_WFRES
8423
Wrong function results slvand()
H_ERR_CAL_ECPDI
8424
Distance of marks in calibration target description file is not possible
H_ERR_CAL_WEFLA
8425
Specified flag for degree of freedom not valid
H_ERR_CAL_NOMER
8426
Minimum error did not fall below
H_ERR_CAL_WPTYP
8427
Wrong type in Pose (rotation / translation)
H_ERR_CAL_WIMSZ
8428
Image size does not match the measurement in camera parameters
H_ERR_CAL_NPILS
8429
Point could not be projected into linescan image
H_ERR_CAL_DIACM
8430
Diameter of calibration marks could not be determined
H_ERR_CAL_ORICP
8431
Orientation of calibration plate could not be determined
H_ERR_CAL_CPNII
8432
Calibration plate does not lie completely inside the image
H_ERR_CAL_WNCME
8433
Wrong number of calibration marks extracted
H_ERR_CAL_UNKPG
8434
Unknown name of parameter group
H_ERR_CAL_NEGFL
8435
Focal length must be non-negative
H_ERR_CAL_TELNA
8436
Function not available for cameras with telecentric lenses
H_ERR_CAL_LSCNA
8437
Function not available for line scan cameras
H_ERR_CAL_ELLDP
8438
Ellipse is degenerated to a point
H_ERR_CAL_NOMF
8439
No orientation mark found
H_ERR_CAL_NCONV
8440
Camera calibration did not converge
H_ERR_CAL_EICD
8441
Error in calibration data, try to recalibrate with improved input data!
H_ERR_CAL_DISTORT
8442
Point cannot be distorted
H_ERR_CM_NOT_OPTIMIZED
8451
Model not optimized yet - no results can be queried
H_ERR_CM_NOT_POSTPROCC
8452
Model not postprocessed yet - no auxiliary results can be queried
H_ERR_CM_NOT_INTERCONN
8453
Calibration setup: fields of view do not intersect
H_ERR_CM_CAMPAR_MISMCH
8454
Camera type and camera parameters incompatible
H_ERR_CM_CAMTYP_MISMCH
8455
Calibration setup: incompatible camera types
H_ERR_CM_CAMTYP_UNSUPD
8456
Camera type not supported
H_ERR_CM_INVALD_CAMIDX
8457
Invalid camera index
H_ERR_CM_INVALD_DESCID
8458
Invalid calibration object index
H_ERR_CM_INVALD_COBJID
8459
Invalid calibration object pose index
H_ERR_CM_UNDEFINED_CAM
8460
Undefined camera
H_ERR_CM_REPEATD_INDEX
8461
Indices: ambiguous observation index
H_ERR_CM_UNDEFI_CADESC
8462
Undefined calibration object
H_ERR_CM_NO_DESCR_FILE
8463
Invalid file format for calibration data model
H_ERR_CM_WR_DESCR_VERS
8464
The version of the calibration data model is not supported
H_ERR_CM_ZERO_MOTION
8465
Zero-motion in line scan camera parameters
H_ERR_CM_MULTICAM_UNSP
8466
Calibration setup: multiple cameras and/or calibration objects not supported for camera type
H_ERR_CM_INCMPLTE_DATA
8467
Incomplete observation data
H_ERR_CSM_NO_DESCR_FIL
8468
Invalid file format for camera setup model
H_ERR_CSM_WR_DESCR_VER
8469
The version of the camera setup model is not supported
H_ERR_CM_CALTAB_NOT_AV
8470
Full HALCON calibration plate description required
H_ERR_CM_INVAL_OBSERID
8471
Invalid observation index
H_ERR_CSM_NOSITEM
8472
Serialized item does not contain a valid camera setup model
H_ERR_CM_NOSITEM
8473
Serialized item does not contain a valid calibration data model
H_ERR_CM_INV_TOOLPOSID
8474
Invalid tool pose index
H_ERR_CM_UNDEFINED_TOO
8475
Undefined tool pose
H_ERR_CM_INVLD_MODL_TY
8476
Feature or operation not supported for current calibration data model
type
H_ERR_SM_INVLD_MODL_TY
8490
Feature or operation not supported for current stereo model type
H_ERR_SM_NOT_PERSISTEN
8491
Feature or operation available only in ’persistent’ mode
H_ERR_SM_INVLD_BOU_BOX
8492
Invalid bounding box
H_ERR_SR_INVLD_IMG_SIZ
8493
Image sizes must be identical with the corresponding camera parameters from the camera setup
H_ERR_SR_BBOX_BHND_CAM
8494
Bounding box lies partially or completely behind the base line of at least
one camera pair
H_ERR_CAL_AMBIGIOUS
8495
Ambigious calibration: Please, recalibrate with improved input data!
H_ERR_CAL_PCPND
8496
Pose of calibration plate could not be determined!
H_ERR_NOAP
8500
Invalid file format for template
Error Codes
155
156
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_WPFV
8501
The version of the template is not supported
H_ERR_MATCH_MODE
8502
Error during changing the file mode (t/b)
H_ERR_MATCH_OOR
8503
Inconsistent match file: coordinates out of range
H_ERR_NOTAP
8505
The image(s) is not a pyramid (wrong zooming factor?)
H_ERR_NGTPTS
8506
Number of template points too small
H_ERR_PDTL
8507
Template data can only be read by HALCON XL
H_ERR_NCC_NOSITEM
8508
Serialized item does not contain a valid NCC model
H_ERR_MATCH_NOSITEM
8509
Serialized item does not contain a valid template
H_ERR_NTPTS
8510
Number of shape model points too small
H_ERR_CGSMM
8511
Gray-value-based and color-based shape models cannot be searched
simultaneously
H_ERR_SMTL
8512
Shape model data can only be read by HALCON XL
H_ERR_SMNXLD
8513
Shape model was not created from XLDs
H_ERR_SM_NOSITEM
8514
Serialized item does not contain a valid shape model
H_ERR_COMP_DRT
8530
Initial components have different region types
H_ERR_COMP_SAMF
8531
Solution of ambiguous matches failed
H_ERR_IGF_NC
8532
Computation of the incomplete gamma function not converged
H_ERR_MSA_TMN
8533
Too many nodes while computing the minimum spanning arborescence
H_ERR_CTTL
8534
Component training data can only be read by HALCON XL
H_ERR_CMTL
8535
Component model data can only be read by HALCON XL
H_ERR_COMP_NOSITEM
8536
Serialized item does not contain a valid component model
H_ERR_TRAIN_COMP_NOSITEM
8537
Serialized item does not contain a valid component training result
H_ERR_VARIATION_WS
8540
Size of the training image and the variation model differ
H_ERR_VARIATION_PREP
8541
Variation model has not been prepared for segmentation
H_ERR_VARIATION_WRMD
8542
Invalid variation model training mode
H_ERR_VARIATION_NOVF
8543
Invalid file format for variation model
H_ERR_VARIATION_WVFV
8544
The version of the variation model is not supported
H_ERR_VARIATION_TRDC
8545
Training data has already been cleared
H_ERR_VARIATION_NOSITEM
8546
Serialized item does not contain a valid variation model
H_ERR_MEASURE_NA
8550
No more measure objects available
H_ERR_MEASURE_NI
8551
Measure object is not initialized
H_ERR_MEASURE_OOR
8552
Invalid measure object
H_ERR_MEASURE_IS
8553
Measure object is NULL
H_ERR_MEASURE_WS
8554
Measure object has wrong image size
H_ERR_MEASURE_NO_MODEL_FILE
8555
Invalid file format for measure object
H_ERR_MEASURE_WRONG_VERSION
8556
The version of the measure object is not supported
H_ERR_MEASURE_TL
8557
Measure object data can only be read by HALCON XL
H_ERR_MEASURE_NOSITEM
8558
Serialized item does not contain a valid measure object
H_ERR_METROLOGY_MODEL_NI
8570
Metrology model is not initialized
H_ERR_METROLOGY_MODEL_INVALID
8571
Invalid metrology model
H_ERR_METROLOGY_OBJECT_INVALID
8572
Invalid metrology object
H_ERR_METROLOGY_FIT_NOT_ENOUGH_MEASURES
8573
Not enough valid measures for fitting the metrology object
H_ERR_METROLOGY_NO_MODEL_FILE
8575
Invalid file format for metrology model
H_ERR_METROLOGY_WRONG_VERSION
8576
The version of the metrology model is not supported
H_ERR_METROLOGY_NO_FUZZY_FUNC
8577
Fuzzy function is not set
H_ERR_METROLOGY_NOSITEM
8578
Serialized item does not contain a valid metrology model
H_ERR_DLOPEN
8600
Dynamic library could not be opened
H_ERR_DLCLOSE
8601
Dynamic library could not be closed
H_ERR_DLLOOKUP
8602
Symbol not found in dynamic library
H_ERR_EAD_CAL_NII
8650
Not enough information for radiometric calibration
H_ERR_BAR_UNKNOWN
8700
Unknown bar code
H_ERR_BAR_WNOM
8701
Wrong number of modules
H_ERR_BAR_WNOE
8702
Wrong number of elements
H_ERR_BAR_UNCHAR
8703
Unknown character (for this code)
H_ERR_BAR_WRONGDESCR
8705
wrong name for attribute in barcode descriptor
H_ERR_BAR_EL_LENGTH
8706
Wrong thickness of element
H_ERR_BAR_NO_REG
8707
No region found
H_ERR_BAR_WRONGCODE
8708
Wrong type of bar code
H_ERR_BC_INVALID_HANDLE
8720
Invalid bar code handle
H_ERR_BC_EMPTY_MODEL_LIST
8721
List of bar code models is empty
H_ERR_BC_TRAIN_ONLY_SINGLE
8722
Training cannot be done for multiple bar code types
H_ERR_BC_GET_SPECIFIC
8723
Cannot get bar code type specific parameter with get_bar_code_param.
Use get_bar_code_param_specific
H_ERR_BC_GET_OBJ_MULTI
8724
Cannot get this object for multiple bar code types. Try again with single
bar code type
H_ERR_BC_WR_FILE_FORMAT
8725
Invalid file format for bar code model
H_ERR_BC_WR_FILE_VERS
8726
The version of the bar code model is not supported
H_ERR_BAR2D_UNKNOWN_TYPE
8800
Specified code type is not supported
H_ERR_BAR2D_WRONG_FOREGROUND
8801
Wrong foreground specified
H_ERR_BAR2D_WRONG_SIZE
8802
Wrong matrix size specified
H_ERR_BAR2D_WRONG_SHAPE
8803
Wrong symbol shape specified
H_ERR_BAR2D_WRONG_PARAM_NAME
8804
Wrong generic parameter name
H_ERR_BAR2D_WRONG_PARAM_VAL
8805
Wrong generic parameter value
H_ERR_BAR2D_WRONG_MODE
8806
Wrong symbol printing mode
H_ERR_BAR2D_SYMBOL_ON_BORDER
8807
Symbol region too near to image border
H_ERR_BAR2D_MODULE_CONT_NUM
8808
No rectangular modul boundings found
H_ERR_BAR2D_SYMBOL_FINDER
8809
Couldn’t identify symbol finder
H_ERR_BAR2D_SYMBOL_DIMENSION
8810
Symbol region with wrong dimension
H_ERR_BAR2D_CLASSIF_FAILED
8811
Classification failed
H_ERR_BAR2D_DECODING_FAILED
8812
Decoding failed
H_ERR_BAR2D_DECODING_READER
8813
Reader programing not supported
H_ERR_DC2D_GENERAL
8820
General 2d data code error
H_ERR_DC2D_BROKEN_SIGN
8821
Corrupt signature of 2d data code handle
H_ERR_DC2D_INVALID_HANDLE
8822
Invalid 2d data code handle
H_ERR_DC2D_EMPTY_MODEL_LIST
8823
List of 2d data code models is empty
H_ERR_DC2D_INVALID_CANDIDATE
8825
Invalid ’Candidate’ parameter
H_ERR_DC2D_INTERNAL_UNEXPECTED
8829
Unexpected 2d data code error
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_PARAM_VALUE
8830
Invalid parameter value
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_PARAM_NAME
8831
Unknown parameter name
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_POLARITY
8832
Invalid value for ’polarity’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_SYMBOL_SHAPE
8833
Invalid value for ’symbol_shape’
Error Codes
157
158
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_SYMBOL_SIZE
8834
Invalid symbol size
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MODULE_SIZE
8835
Invalid module size
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MODULE_SHAPE
8836
Invalid value for ’module_shape’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_ORIENTATION
8837
Invalid value for ’orientation’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_CONTRAST
8838
Invalid value for ’contrast_min’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MEAS_THRESH
8839
Invalid value for ’measure_thresh’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_ALT_MEAS_RED
8840
Invalid value for ’alt_measure_red’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_SLANT
8841
Invalid value for ’slant_max’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_L_DIST
8842
Invalid value for ’L_dist_max’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_L_LENGTH
8843
Invalid value for ’L_length_min’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_GAP
8844
Invalid module gap
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_DEF_SET
8845
Invalid value for ’default_parameters’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_TEXTURED
8846
Invalid value for ’back_texture’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MIRRORED
8847
Invalid value for ’mirrored’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_CLASSIFICATOR
8848
Invalid value for ’classificator’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_PERSISTENCE
8849
Invalid value for ’persistence’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MODEL_TYPE
8850
Invalid model type
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MOD_ROI_PART
8851
Invalid value for ’module_roi_part’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_FP_TOLERANCE
8852
Invalid value for ’finder_pattern_tolerance’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MOD_ASPECT
8853
Invalid value for ’mod_aspect_max’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_SM_ROBUSTNESS
8854
Invalid value for ’small_modules_robustness’
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_MODULE_ASPECT
8863
Invalid module aspect ratio
H_ERR_DC2D_WRONG_LAYER_NUM
8864
Invalid layer num
H_ERR_DCD_READ_WRONG_VERSION
8865
Wrong data code model file version
H_ERR_DC2D_NOSITEM
8866
Serialized item does not contain a valid 2D data code model
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_PARAM_NAME
8900
Unknown parameter name
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_NUM_LEVELS
8901
Invalid value for ’num_levels’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_OPTIMIZATION
8902
Invalid value for ’optimization’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_METRIC
8903
Invalid value for ’metric’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_MIN_FACE_ANGLE
8904
Invalid value for ’min_face_angle’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_MIN_SIZE
8905
Invalid value for ’min_size’
H_ERR_SM3D_PROJECTION_TOO_LARGE
8910
The projected model is too large "
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_LON_MIN
8920
Invalid value for ’longitude_min’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_LON_MAX
8921
Invalid value for ’longitude_max’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_LAT_MIN
8922
Invalid value for ’latitude_min’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_LAT_MAX
8923
Invalid value for ’latitude_max’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_ROL_MIN
8924
Invalid value for ’cam_roll_min’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_ROL_MAX
8925
Invalid value for ’cam_roll_max’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_DIST_MIN
8926
Invalid value for ’dist_min’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_DIST_MAX
8927
Invalid value for ’dist_max’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_NUM_MATCHES
8928
Invalid value for ’num_matches’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_MAX_OVERLAP
8929
Invalid value for ’max_overlap’
H_ERR_SM3D_WRONG_BORDER_MODEL
8933
Invalid value for ’border_model’
H_ERR_SM3D_UNDEFINED_POSE
8940
Pose is not well-defined
H_ERR_SM3D_NO_SM3D_FILE
8941
Invalid file format for 3D shape model
H_ERR_DESCR_NODESCRFILE
8960
Invalid file format for descriptor model
H_ERR_DESCR_WRDESCRVERS
8961
The version of the descriptor model is not supported
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_CIRC_RADIUS
8962
Invalid value for ’radius’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_CHECK_NEIGH
8963
Invalid value for ’check_neighbor’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MIN_CHECK_NEIGH
8964
Invalid value for ’min_check_neighbor_diff’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MIN_SCORE
8965
Invalid value for ’min_score’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_SIGMAGRAD
8966
Invalid value for ’sigma_grad’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_SIGMAINT
8967
Invalid value for ’sigma_smooth’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_ALPHA
8968
Invalid value for ’alpha’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_THRESHOLD
8969
Invalid value for ’threshold’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_DEPTH
8970
Invalid value for ’depth’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_TREES
8971
Invalid value for ’number_trees’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MIN_SCORE_DESCR
8972
Invalid value for ’min_score_descr’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_PATCH_SIZE
8973
Invalid value for ’patch_size’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_TILT
8974
Invalid value for ’tilt’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_PAR_GUIDE
8975
Invalid value for ’guided_matching’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_PAR_SUBPIX
8976
Invalid value for ’subpix’
H_ERR_DM_TOO_FEW_POINTS
8977
Too few feature points can be found
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MINROT
8978
Invalid value for ’min_rot’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MAXROT
8979
Invalid value for ’max_rot’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MINSCALE
8980
Invalid value for ’min_scale’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MAXSCALE
8981
Invalid value for ’max_scale’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MASKSIZEGRD
8982
Invalid value for ’mask_size_grd’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_NUM_MASKSIZESMOOTH
8983
Invalid value for ’mask_size_smooth’
H_ERR_BROKEN_MODEL
8984
Model broken
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_DESCR_TYPE
8985
Invalid value for ’descriptor_type’
H_ERR_DM_WRONG_PAR_MATCHER
8986
Invalid value for ’matcher’
H_ERR_DM_TOO_MANY_CLASSES
8987
Too many point classes - model storing in a file is not possible
H_ERR_DESCR_NOSITEM
8988
Serialized item does not contain a valid descriptor model
H_ERR_NOT_IMPL
9000
Function not implemented on this machine
H_ERR_WIT
9001
Image to process has wrong gray value type
H_ERR_WIC
9002
Wrong image component (see: get_system(obj_images,H))
H_ERR_UNDI
9003
Undefined gray values
H_ERR_WIS
9004
Wrong image format for operation (too big or too small)
H_ERR_WCN
9005
Wrong number of image components for image output
H_ERR_STRTL
9006
String is too long (max. 1024 characters)
H_ERR_WITFO
9007
Wrong pixel type for this operation
H_ERR_NIIT
9008
Operation not realized yet for this pixel type
H_ERR_NOCIMA
9009
Image is no color image with three channels
H_ERR_DEMO_NOFG
9010
Image acquisition devices are not supported in the demo version
H_ERR_DEMO_NOPA
9011
Packages are not supported in the demo version
H_ERR_IEUNKV
9020
Internal error: Unknown value
H_ERR_WPFO
9021
Image domain too small.
H_ERR_IDTS
9022
Input dimension too small
H_ERR_CNCLDRW
9023
Draw operator has been canceled
Error Codes
159
160
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_STUD_OPNA
9050
Operator is not available in this restricted version of HALCON
H_ERR_STUD_PANA
9051
Packages are not available in this restricted version of HALCON
H_ERR_STUD_FGNA
9052
The selected image acquisition interface is not available in this restricted
version of HALCON
H_ERR_TMU
9100
Too many unknown variables in linear equation
H_ERR_NUS
9101
No (unique) solution for the linear equation
H_ERR_NEE
9102
Too little equations in linear equation
H_ERR_MNI
9200
Matrix is not invertible
H_ERR_SVD_CNVRG
9201
Singular value decomposition did not converge
H_ERR_SVD_FEWROW
9202
Matrix has too few rows for singular value partition
H_ERR_TQLI_CNVRG
9203
Eigenvalue computation did not converge
H_ERR_JACOBI_CNVRG
9204
Eigenvalue computation did not converge
H_ERR_MATRIX_SING
9205
Matrix is singular
H_ERR_MATCH_CNVRG
9206
Function matching did not converge
H_ERR_MAT_UNDEF
9207
Input matrix undefined
H_ERR_MAT_WDIM
9208
Input matrix with wrong dimension
H_ERR_MAT_NSQR
9209
Input matrix is not quadratic
H_ERR_MAT_FAIL
9210
Matrix operation failed
H_ERR_MAT_NPD
9211
Matrix is not positive definite
H_ERR_MAT_DBZ
9212
One element of the matrix is zero: Division by zero
H_ERR_MAT_NUT
9213
Matrix is not an upper triangular matrix
H_ERR_MAT_NLT
9214
Matrix is not a lower triangular matrix
H_ERR_MAT_NEG
9215
One element of the matrix is negative
H_ERR_MAT_UNCHAR
9216
Matrix file: Invalid character
H_ERR_MAT_NOT_COMPLETE
9217
Matrix file: Matrix incomplete
H_ERR_MAT_READ
9218
Invalid file format for matrix
H_ERR_MAT_COMPLEX
9219
Resulting matrix has complex values
H_ERR_WMATEXP
9220
Wrong value in matrix of exponents
H_ERR_MAT_WRONG_VERSION
9221
The version of the matrix is not supported
H_ERR_MAT_NOSITEM
9222
Serialized item does not contain a valid matrix
H_ERR_WNODE
9230
Internal error: wrong Node
H_ERR_CMP_INCONSISTENT
9231
Inconsistent red black tree
H_ERR_LAPACK_PAR
9250
Internal error: Wrong LAPACK parameter
H_ERR_STRI_NPNT
9260
Number of points too small for spherical triangulation
H_ERR_STRI_COLL
9261
First three points are collinear in spherical triangulation
H_ERR_STRI_IDPNT
9262
Spherical triangulation contains identical input points
H_ERR_STRI_NALLOC
9263
Internal error:
triangulation
H_ERR_STRI_DEGEN
9264
Spherical Voronoi diagram contains degenerate triangle
H_ERR_STRI_ITRI
9265
Internal error: inconsistent spherical triangulation
H_ERR_STRI_SELFINT
9266
Spherical Voronoi diagram contains self-intersecting polygon
H_ERR_STRI_INCONS
9267
Internal error: inconsistent spherical polygon data
H_ERR_STRI_AMBINT
9268
Internal error: Ambiguous great circle arc intersection
H_ERR_STRI_AMBARC
9269
Internal error: Ambiguous great circle arc
H_ERR_STRI_ILLPAR
9270
Internal error: Illegal parameter
H_ERR_TRI_NPNT
9280
Not enough points for planar triangular meshing
array not allocated large enough for spherical
H_ERR_TRI_COLL
9281
The first three points of the triangular meshing are collinear
H_ERR_TRI_IDPNT
9282
Planar triangular meshing contains identical input points
H_ERR_TRI_IDPNTIN
9283
Invalid points for planar triangular meshing
H_ERR_TRI_NALLOC
9284
Internal error: allocated array too small for planar triangular meshing
H_ERR_TRI_ITRI
9285
Internal error: planar triangular meshing inconsistent
H_ERR_WSPVP
9300
Eye point and reference point coincide
H_ERR_TIMEOUT
9400
Timeout occurred
H_ERR_WRONG_TIMEOUT
9401
Invalid value for timeout
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_NUM_CLUSTER
9450
Invalid value for ’sub_object_size’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_NUM_MIN_SIZE
9451
Invalid value for ’min_size’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_NUM_LSQ
9452
Invalid number of least-squares iterations
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_ANGLE_STEP
9453
Invalid value for ’angle_step’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_SCALE_R_STEP
9454
Invalid value for ’scale_r_step’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_SCALE_C_STEP
9455
Invalid value for ’scale_c_step’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_MAX_ANGLE
9456
Invalid value for ’max_angle_distortion’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_MAX_ANISO
9457
Invalid value for ’max_aniso_scale_distortion’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_MIN_SIZE
9458
Invalid value for ’min_size’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_COV_POSE_MODE
9459
Invalid value for ’cov_pose_mode’
H_ERR_DEFORM_NO_CALIBRATION_INFO
9460
Model contains no calibration information
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_PARAM_NAME
9461
Generic parameter name does not exist
H_ERR_DEFORM_IMAGE_TO_CAMERA_DIFF
9462
Provided camera parameters have different resolution than image
H_ERR_DEFORM_NO_MODEL_IN_FILE
9463
Invalid file format for deformable model
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_VERSION
9464
The version of the deformable model is not supported
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_SMOOTH_DEFORM
9465
Invalid ’deformation_smoothness’
H_ERR_DEFORM_WRONG_EXPAND_BORDER
9466
Invalid ’expand_border’
H_ERR_DEFORM_ORIGIN_OUTSIDE_TEMPLATE
9467
Model origin outside of axis-aligned bounding rectangle of template
region
H_ERR_DEFORM_NOSITEM
9468
Serialized item does not contain a valid deformable model
H_ERR_SFM_NO_POINTS
9500
3D Object Model has no points
H_ERR_SFM_NO_FACES
9501
3D Object Model has no faces
H_ERR_SFM_NO_NORMALS
9502
3D Object Model has no normals
H_ERR_SFM_NO_SFM_FILE
9506
Invalid file format for 3D surface model
H_ERR_SFM_WRONG_FILE_VERSION
9507
The version of the 3D surface model is not supported
H_ERR_SFM_NOSITEM
9508
Serialized item does not contain a valid 3D surface model
H_ERR_OM3D_INVALID_FILE
9510
Invalid 3D file
H_ERR_OM3D_INVALID_MODEL
9511
Invalid 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_UNKNOWN_FILE_TYPE
9512
Unknown file type
H_ERR_OM3D_WRONG_FILE_VERSION
9513
The version of the 3D object model is not supported
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB
9514
Required attribute missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_V_COORD
9515
Required points missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_V_NORMALS
9516
Required normals missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_F_TRIANGLES
9517
Required triangulation missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_F_LINES
9518
Required polylines missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_F_TRINEIGB
9519
Required triangle neighborhood missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_F_POLYGONS
9520
Required polygons missing in 3D object model
Error Codes
161
162
HALCON Error Codes
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_V_2DMAP
9521
Required 2D mapping missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_O_PRIMITIVE
9522
Required primitive missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_SHAPE_MODEL
9523
Required 3D shape model missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_ATTRIB_EXTENDED
9524
Required extended attribute missing in 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_NOSITEM
9525
Serialized item does not contain a valid 3D object model
H_ERR_OM3D_MISSING_O_PRIMITIVE_EXTENSION
9526
Primitive in 3D object model has no extended data
H_ERR_OM3D_CONTAIN_ATTRIB_F_TRIANGLES
9527
Operation invalid, 3D object model already contains triangles
H_ERR_OM3D_CONTAIN_ATTRIB_F_LINES
9528
Operation invalid, 3D object model already contains lines
H_ERR_OM3D_CONTAIN_ATTRIB_F_POLYGONS
9529
Operation invalid, 3D object model already contains faces or polygons
H_ERR_OM3D_ISOLATED_OBJECT
9530
For at least one input 3D object model no neighbor with sufficient surface overlap is available.
H_ERR_OM3D_SET_ALL_COORD
9531
All components of points must be set at once
H_ERR_OM3D_SET_ALL_NORMALS
9532
All components of normals must be set at once
H_ERR_OM3D_NUM_NOT_FIT_COORD
9533
Number of values doesn’t correspond to number of already existing
points
H_ERR_OM3D_NUM_NOT_FIT_NORMALS
9534
Number of values doesn’t correspond to number of already existing
normals
H_ERR_OM3D_NUM_NOT_FIT_TRIANGLES
9535
Number of values doesn’t correspond to already existing triangulation
H_ERR_OM3D_NUM_NOT_FIT_POLYGONS
9536
Number of values doesn’t correspond to length of already existing
polygons
H_ERR_OM3D_NUM_NOT_FIT_LINES
9537
Number of values doesn’t correspond to length of already existing
polylines
H_ERR_OM3D_NUM_NOT_FIT_2DMAP
9538
Number of values doesn’t correspond to already existing 2D mapping
H_ERR_OM3D_NUM_NOT_FIT_EXTENDED
9539
Number of values doesn’t correspond to already existing extended
attribute
H_ERR_SF_OM3D_TRIANGLES_NOT_SUITABLE
9550
Triangles of the 3D object model are not suitable for this operator
H_ERR_SF_OM3D_FEW_POINTS
9551
Too few suitable 3D points in the 3D object model
H_ERR_NO_SERIALIZED_ITEM
9580
Invalid file format for serialized items
H_ERR_END_OF_FILE
9581
Serialized item: premature end of file
H_ERR_SID_WRONG_RESIZE_METHOD
9600
Invalid value for ’image_resize_method’
H_ERR_SID_WRONG_RESIZE_VALUE
9601
Invalid value for ’image_resize_value’
H_ERR_SID_WRONG_RATING_METHOD
9602
Invalid value for ’rating_method’
H_ERR_SID_NO_IMAGE_INFO_TYPE
9603
At least one type of image information must be added
H_ERR_SID_MODEL_NO_COLOR
9604
Sample identifier does not contain color information
H_ERR_SID_MODEL_NO_TEXTURE
9605
Sample identifier does not contain texture information
H_ERR_SID_NO_IMAGE_INFO
9606
Sample image does not contain enough information
H_ERR_SID_NO_UNPREPARED_DATA
9607
Sample identifier does not contain
add_sample_identifier_preparation_data)
H_ERR_SID_MODEL_NOT_PREPARED
9608
Sample
identifier
has
prepare_sample_identifier)
H_ERR_SID_NO_UNTRAINED_DATA
unprepared
data
(use
been
prepared
yet
(use
9609
Sample identifier does not contain
add_sample_identifier_training_data)
untrained
data
(use
H_ERR_SID_MODEL_NOT_TRAINED
9610
Sample identifier has not been trained yet (use train_sample_identifier)
H_ERR_SID_NO_RESULT_DATA
9611
Sample identifier does not contain result data
H_ERR_SID_NUM_TRAIN_OBJ
9612
Sample identifier must contain at least two training objects (use
add_sample_identifier_training_data)
not
Index
163
Index
abstract, 25
accessing iconic objects, 70, 76
action procedure, 14, 19, 54
alternatives, 27
area of definition, 58
arrays, 49
assertion, 40, 42
attention, 27
border treatment, 102
buffer, 11
BYTE_IMAGE, 61, 87, 111
C, 16, 23, 32, 47, 118
C++, 16, 23, 26, 32, 118
C#, 16, 26, 32
CB, 64, 103, 110, 113
CE, 64, 103, 110, 113
center of gravity, 107
channel, 75, 108
channels, 72, 108, 110
chapter, 25
chord, 61, 62
class of a parameter, 34
COM, 118
comments, 23
COMPLEX_IMAGE, 61
complexity, 31
constants
BYTE_IMAGE, 61, 87, 111
COMPLEX_IMAGE, 61
CYCLIC_IMAGE, 61
DIR_IMAGE, 61
FLOAT_IMAGE, 61, 87
IMAGE1, 72
IMAGE2, 72
IMAGE_INDEX, 72, 86
INT1_IMAGE, 61
INT2_IMAGE, 61
INT4_IMAGE, 61
LONG_IMAGE, 61, 87
LONG_PAR, 65, 89, 91, 92, 94, 96, 98, 100
MAX_FORMAT, 58, 59
REGION, 72
STRING_PAR, 65, 89–92, 96, 98, 100
UINT2_IMAGE, 61
XLD_CONTOUR_ID, 75, 88
XLD_POLYGON_ID, 75, 88
XY_IMAGE, 61
contour attributes, 63, 64, 67
control parameters, 89
costs_weight, 37
CYCLIC_IMAGE, 61
data types, 59
HComplexPixel, 61
Hcont, 52, 65, 66, 67, 75, 88
Hcpar, 67, 89, 91, 96, 97, 100, 108
Herror (C), 55, 56, 101
Himage, 52, 58, 60, 75, 79, 87, 105, 108
HInt2Pixel, 61
Hkey, 70, 73, 75
Hobject (C), 10
Hpar, 67
HPixelImage, 60
Hpoly, 66, 75, 88
HRegFeature, 63
Hrlregion, 50, 62, 62, 64, 73, 76, 78, 85,
105
Htuple (C), 10
HUInt2Pixel, 61
numeric types, 47
database key, 64, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 79–81, 83–
87
database of iconic objects, 9, 50, 52, 59, 62, 70,
75, 82–86, 88
Index
.NET, 118
164
Index
default_type, 18, 34
default_value, 40
definition file (def-file), 16
description, 39
DIR_IMAGE, 61
directories
bin, 13
def, 13
doc, 13, 14
examples, 14
help, 13, 14
images, 14
include, 13
lib, 13
domain, 72, 81, 83, 106–108, 110
domain_concat_mult_inp, 30
domain_concat_si_inp, 30
DOUBLE_PAR, 65, 89, 91, 92, 94, 96, 98, 100
environment variables
HALCONEXAMPLES, 128
HALCONEXTENSIONS, 9, 14, 15, 121, 123,
126
HALCONROOT, 127
LD_LIBRARY_PATH, 16, 127
error codes, 56
error handling (HALCON)
error codes
H_ERR_ICM, 54
H_ERR_WIT, 58, 111
H_ERR_XLD_CAND, 64
H_MSG_OK, 55, 101
H_MSG_TRUE, 11, 55
etags, 119
example, 32
feature extraction, 58, 107
file_ext, 42
file_ext_descr, 42
files
HCpackage.c, 118, 122
HCpackage.h, 118, 122
HCpackage.obj, 124
HCPPpackage.cpp, 118, 122
HCPPpackage.h, 118, 122
filter, 58, 87, 102, 105, 110
FLOAT_IMAGE, 61, 87
functionality, 26
global variables, 49
graphics software, 9
H_ERR_ICM, 54
H_ERR_WIT, 58, 111
H_ERR_XLD_CAND, 64
H_MSG_OK, 55, 101
H_MSG_TRUE, 11, 55
HAddXLDContAttrib, 67
HAddXLDContGlobalAttrib, 67
HALCON, 49
HALCON XL, 12
HALCON/.NET, 10
HALCON/C++, 10
HALCONEXAMPLES, 128
HALCONEXTENSIONS, 9, 14, 15, 121, 123, 126
HALCONROOT, 127
HAllComp, 81, 81, 108, 110
HAllFilter, 105, 106, 109, 112, 116
HAllFilter2, 105, 106, 111
HAllObj, 72, 76, 80, 81, 82, 87, 88, 107, 108,
110
HAlloc, 52, 53, 53, 54, 88, 92, 98–100
HAllocLocal, 51, 52, 54, 92
HAllocRL, 54
HAllocRLLocal, 51
HAllocRLNum, 54
HAllocRLNumLocal, 51
HAllocRLNumTmp, 50, 62, 103
HAllocRLTmp, 50, 62, 74, 76–78, 109, 112,
113, 115
HAllocStringMem, 96, 97, 97, 98
HAllocTmp, 50, 54, 92, 98
HAllocXLDCont, 53, 89
HAllReg, 105, 106, 107, 108, 115, 116
HAllSegm, 19, 105, 106, 108, 111
HBase.h, 59
HCkNoObj, 101, 102
HCkP, 19, 57, 70, 72–79, 82, 84–89, 91, 93, 94,
96–101, 101, 103, 104, 107, 109, 110,
113–116
HCol, 60
hcomp, 18, 117
HComplexPixel, 61
HConst.h, 57
Hcont, 52, 65, 66, 67, 75, 88
HCopyElemD, 93, 95, 97
HCopyElemL, 93, 95, 97
HCopyObj, 83, 84, 85, 88, 110, 116
HCopyXLDCont, 66
HCopyXLDContPart, 66
Hcpar, 67, 89, 91, 96, 97, 100, 108
HCrImage, 82, 84, 87
HCrObj, 82, 83, 83, 85–87, 115, 116
HCrXLD, 84, 88
HDefObj, 82–86, 86, 88
HDevelop, 16–18, 26, 118
HDFImage, 110, 112, 112, 113
HDoLowError, 54
HDOTNETpackage.cs, 118, 123, 125–127
HDupObj, 114, 116
help files, 19, 43, 118
Herror, 55, 56, 101
HFree, 53, 92
HFreeAllTmp, 50
HFreeLocal, 51, 92
HFreeNTmp, 50
HFreeRL, 54
HFreeRLLocal, 51
HFreeRLTmp, 50, 74, 76–78, 103, 109, 112,
113, 115
HFreeTmp, 50, 92
HFreeUpToTmp, 50
HFreeXLDCont, 53
HGetComp, 70, 72, 74–76, 79, 88
HGetCPar, 19, 89, 89, 91, 95, 96, 97
HGetCParNum, 97
HGetDImage, 77, 79, 79, 81
HGetDRL, 76, 77
HGetElemD, 89, 94
HGetElemL, 89, 94, 97
HGetElemL, HGetElemD, HGetElemS, 92
HGetElemS, 89, 94
HGetFDRL, 73, 77, 78, 81, 85, 88, 107, 108, 110
HGetImage, 70, 73, 75, 79, 88
HGetObj, 70, 70, 73, 74, 76, 77, 80, 85, 116
HGetObjNum, 72, 77, 79, 80
HGetPElem, 89, 90, 91, 92, 97
HGetPElemD, 89, 90
HGetPElemL, 89, 90
HGetPElemS, 89, 90
HGetPPar, 89, 90, 91, 97
HGetRL, 70, 73, 75, 76
HGetSPar, 79, 88, 97, 98, 110, 111, 116
HGetURL, 76, 77, 78
HGetXLD, 70, 75
Himage, 52, 58, 60, 75, 79, 87, 105, 108
HImageFD, 110, 112, 112, 113
HInt2Pixel, 61
Hkey, 70, 73, 75
HLinCoor, 59, 75, 79
HLookupXLDContAttrib, 67
HLookupXLDContGlobalAttrib, 67
HMEMglobal, 92
HMEMlocal, 92
HMEMtemp, 92
HNewImage, 53, 115
HNewImagePtr, 53
HNewRegion, 19, 107, 109, 114, 114, 116
HNumOfChannels, 72, 101, 104, 108
Hobject, 10
Hpackage.c, 118, 122
HpackageX.cpp, 118, 123
HpackageX.h, 118, 123
HpackageX.obj, 124
Hpar, 67
HPixelImage, 60
HPNumOfChannels, 72, 73, 104
Hpoly, 66, 75, 88
HPutCPar, 76, 79, 89, 99, 100, 100, 107, 108
HPutDImage, 83, 84, 86, 110, 115
HPutDRL, 83, 85, 85, 86, 87
HPutElem, 89, 99, 100
HPutImage, 52, 83, 85, 86
HPutPElem, 89, 98, 99
HPutPPar, 89, 99, 100
HPutRect, 83, 114, 115
HReadGV, 52, 72
HReadGVA, 72, 72, 79, 80, 85
HRealloc, 53
HReallocLocal, 51
HReallocRLNum, 54
HReallocRLNumLocal, 51
HRegFeature, 63
HRLArea, 108
HRLDecomp, 101, 102, 102
Hrlregion, 50, 62, 62, 64, 73, 76, 78, 85, 105
HRow, 60
HSetErrText, 57
HTestAllTmp, 55
HTestMem, 55
165
Index
Index
166
Index
HTestPtr, 55
HTestTmp, 55
HTML reference, 14
Htuple, 10
HUInt2Pixel, 61
HVFPixel, 61
HWriteGV, 52
HXLDFreeContour, 88
HXLDFreePolygon, 88
iconic object key, 11
image component, 72
image components, 83
image matrix, 59, 72, 85, 86
image processing hardware, 9
image size, 59, 110
image vector, 59
IMAGE1, 72
IMAGE2, 72
IMAGE_INDEX, 72, 86
images, 59
include files (HALCON)
HBase.h, 59
HConst.h, 57
IPType.h, 59
index, 72, 106
input control parameter, 89, 92, 93, 96, 111
INT1_IMAGE, 61
INT2_IMAGE, 61
INT4_IMAGE, 61
IPType.h, 59
keywords, 26
LD_LIBRARY_PATH, 16, 127
linear coordinate, 59
Linux, 16, 126
local variables, 48
LONG_IMAGE, 61, 87
LONG_PAR, 65, 89, 91, 92, 94, 96, 98, 100
MAX_FORMAT, 58, 59
memory costs, 116
memory management, 49
method, 29
MIXED_PAR, 89, 92
modified, 37
module, 25
multi-channel image, 59
multichannel, 10, 42
multivalue, 10, 37
Name, 34
operator description, 21
abstract, 25
alternatives, 27
assertion, 40, 42
attention, 27
chapter, 25
complexity, 31
costs_weight, 37
default_type, 18, 34
default_value, 40
description, 39
example, 32
file_ext, 42
file_ext_descr, 42
functionality, 26
keywords, 26
languages, 23
method, 29
module, 25
multichannel, 10, 42
multivalue, 10, 37
Name, 34
parallelization, 28
postprocessing, 37
predecessor, 27
process_exclusively, 28
process_locally, 29
process_mutual, 29
references, 32
region_postprocessing, 30
result_state, 28
see_also, 27
sem_type, 18, 35, 39
short, 24
step_min, 40
step_rec, 40
successor, 27
type_list, 39
value_function, 40
value_list, 40
value_max, 40
value_min, 40
value_number, 41
values, 40
operators_en_US.idx, 119
operators_en_US.key, 119
operators_en_US.num, 119
operators_en_US.ref, 119
operators_en_US.sta, 119
OpRef, 44
origin of an image, 59
output iconic parameter, 83
output image, 109
package, 12
action procedure, 14, 19, 54
directories
bin, 13
def, 13
doc, 13, 14
examples, 14
help, 13, 14
images, 14
include, 13
lib, 13
files
definition file, 16
HCpackage.c, 118, 122
HCpackage.h, 118, 122
HCpackage.obj, 124
HCPPpackage.cpp, 118, 122
HCPPpackage.h, 118, 122
help files, 19, 43, 118
reference manual
HTML, 119
OpRef, 44
ParRef, 44
PDF, 120
ValRef, 44
supply procedure, 14, 17, 19, 54, 105, 109,
119
packageX.cpp, 118, 123
packagex.def, 118, 123, 124
packageX.idl, 118, 123, 124
packageX.obj, 124
packageX.rc, 118, 123, 124
packageX.res, 124
packagexxl.def, 124
parallelization, 28
parameter classes, 21, 23
Parameters, 48
ParRef, 44
pixel data, 59, 106
pixel type, 58, 59, 87, 110
pixel types, 59, 108
postprocessing, 37
predecessor, 27
procedure handle, 11
procedure names, 56
procedures/macros
accessing control parameters
HAllocStringMem, 96, 97, 97, 98
HGetCPar, 19, 89, 89, 91, 95, 96, 97
HGetCParNum, 97
HGetPPar, 89, 90, 91, 97
HGetSPar, 79, 88, 97, 98, 110, 111, 116
HPutCPar, 76, 79, 89, 99, 100, 100,
107, 108
HPutPPar, 89, 99, 100
accessing iconic objects
CB, 64, 103, 110, 113
CE, 64, 103, 110, 113
HAddXLDContAttrib, 67
HAddXLDContGlobalAttrib, 67
HCkNoObj, 101, 102
HCol, 60
HCopyObj, 83, 84, 85, 88, 110, 116
HCopyXLDCont, 66
HCopyXLDContPart, 66
HCrImage, 82, 84, 87
HCrObj, 82, 83, 83, 85–87, 115, 116
HCrXLD, 84, 88
HDefObj, 82–86, 86, 88
HDFImage, 110, 112, 112, 113
HDupObj, 114, 116
HGetComp, 70, 72, 74–76, 79, 88
HGetDImage, 77, 79, 79, 81
HGetDRL, 76, 77
HGetFDRL, 73, 77, 78, 81, 85, 88, 107,
108, 110
HGetImage, 70, 73, 75, 79, 88
HGetObj, 70, 70, 73, 74, 76, 77, 80, 85,
116
HGetObjNum, 72, 77, 79, 80
HGetRL, 70, 73, 75, 76
HGetURL, 76, 77, 78
167
Index
Index
168
Index
HGetXLD, 70, 75
HImageFD, 110, 112, 112, 113
HLinCoor, 59, 75, 79
HLookupXLDContAttrib, 67
HLookupXLDContGlobalAttrib, 67
HNewRegion, 19, 107, 109, 114, 114,
116
HNumOfChannels, 72, 101, 104, 108
HPNumOfChannels, 72, 73, 104
HPutDImage, 83, 84, 86, 110, 115
HPutDRL, 83, 85, 85, 86, 87
HPutImage, 52, 83, 85, 86
HPutRect, 83, 114, 115
HRow, 60
basic
HCkP, 19, 57, 70, 72–79, 82, 84–89, 91,
93, 94, 96–101, 101, 103, 104, 107,
109, 110, 113–116
HDoLowError, 54
HReadGV, 52, 72
HReadGVA, 72, 72, 79, 80, 85
HRLDecomp, 101, 102, 102
HSetErrText, 57
HWriteGV, 52
loop macros
HAllComp, 81, 81, 108, 110
HAllFilter, 105, 106, 109, 112, 116
HAllFilter2, 105, 106, 111
HAllObj, 72, 76, 80, 81, 82, 87, 88,
107, 108, 110
HAllReg, 105, 106, 107, 108, 115, 116
HAllSegm, 19, 105, 106, 108, 111
memory management
HAlloc, 52, 53, 53, 54, 88, 92, 98–100
HAllocLocal, 51, 52, 54, 92
HAllocRL, 54
HAllocRLLocal, 51
HAllocRLNum, 54
HAllocRLNumLocal, 51
HAllocRLNumTmp, 50, 62, 103
HAllocRLTmp, 50, 62, 74, 76–78, 109,
112, 113, 115
HAllocTmp, 50, 54, 92, 98
HAllocXLDCont, 53, 89
HFree, 53, 92
HFreeAllTmp, 50
HFreeLocal, 51, 92
HFreeNTmp, 50
HFreeRL, 54
HFreeRLLocal, 51
HFreeRLTmp, 50, 74, 76–78, 103, 109,
112, 113, 115
HFreeTmp, 50, 92
HFreeUpToTmp, 50
HFreeXLDCont, 53
HNewImage, 53, 115
HNewImagePtr, 53
HRealloc, 53
HReallocLocal, 51
HReallocRLNum, 54
HReallocRLNumLocal, 51
HTestAllTmp, 55
HTestMem, 55
HTestPtr, 55
HTestTmp, 55
HXLDFreeContour, 88
HXLDFreePolygon, 88
process_exclusively, 28
process_locally, 29
process_mutual, 29
reference manual
HTML, 119
OpRef, 44
ParRef, 44
PDF, 120
ValRef, 44
references, 32
REGION, 72
region, 76
region data, 61
region shape features, 62, 63
region transformation, 114
region_postprocessing, 30
result_state, 28
runlength encoding, 73, 76
see_also, 27
segmentation, 58, 105, 108, 109, 114
sem_type, 18, 35, 39
semantic type, 35
short, 24
size, 87, 108
split_channel, 29
split_domain, 30
Index
169
split_partial, 30
split_partial_domain, 30
split_tuple, 29
static, 49
step_min, 40
step_rec, 40
STRING_PAR, 65, 89–92, 96, 98, 100
successor, 27
supply procedure, 14, 17, 19, 54, 105, 109, 119
tuples, 108
type_list, 39
UINT2_IMAGE, 61
union, 78
UNIX, 12
user_thresh, 16, 17
ValRef, 44
value_function, 40
value_list, 40
value_max, 40
value_min, 40
value_number, 41
values, 40
XLD, 71, 84, 88, 116
XLD_CONTOUR_ID, 75, 88
XLD_POLYGON_ID, 75, 88
XLDs, 9, 35, 63
XY_IMAGE, 61
Index
warning, 24
Windows, 12, 15, 29, 123
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