Triumph Renown Owner Handbook

Triumph Renown Owner Handbook
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FOREWORD
The object of this book is to paint a clear picture in your mind
of the" car and its needs, technical terms have been avoided as
far as possible.
Every effort has been <h1ade in the design to limit the attention
necessary, however there will be certain points which must be
attended to regularly.
By carefully reading the book, especially the lubrication section,
and keeping an eye on the car's mileage, you will be able to
ensure that your car receives all the service it needs and as a
result increase its life appreciably.
A section on decarbonising and valve grinding has been included
for the sake of the engineer owners who would prefer to do the
work themselves. However, for the not so experienced owner
we strongly recomm~d that these operations are carried out
by a competent mechanic or, preferably, a Triumph Agent.
It is worth noting that technical articles appear in the Standard
Car Review which is published monthly.
3
LICENCE DATA
Car number (Commission number)
Engine number
Plate on dash
On cylinder block
(Both numbers ar~ to be seen by lifting
the\bonnet)
. 127.6 cu. in. (2088 c.c.)
Cubic capacity
GENERAL SPECIFICAnON
Number of cylinders
Bore of cylinders
Stroke of crank .
Compression ratio
Firing order
Brake H.P. (Road Setting)
4
3.347 in. (85 mm.)
3.622 in. (92 mm.)
6.7
1, 3, 4, 2
68 at 4,200 R.P.M.
Oil Capacity.
Engine
Gearbox
Rear axle
Water Capacity of cooling system
......
Fuel Capacity ..
Dimensions
Wheelbase
Track-Front
Rear.....
Ground clearance (under axle)
Turning circle (between kerbs)
Tyre size
Overall Dimensions
Length
Width
Height (unladen)
12 pints
It pints
2 pints
18 pints
15 galls.
0"
(274 em.)
3"
(130 em.)
6"
(137 em.)
8"
(20 em.)
. 40' 0" (12.2 metres)
5.75"-16"
If)'
4'
4'
14' 10"
5' 4"
5' 5"
4
(6.8 litres)
(0.8 litres)
(1.1 litres)
(10.2 litres)
(68litres)
(452 em.)
(163 em.)
(166 em.)
GENERAL SPECIFICATION
Complete with
WEIGHTS. Excluding extra equipment. Tools and tank
. full of Petrol.
-------
Shipping
Weight
--_._--._----~
... - - - - - ~ . _ - - - -
I cwts. qrs. lb.
I 25 1 14
Saloon
VALVE TIMING.
(0.35 mm.)].
i!
(1243 Kg.)
cwts. qrs. lb.
22 3 14
(1160 Kg.)
[With valve-rocker. clearance set at 0.014"
Inlet valve opens 10° before top dead centre.
Inlet valve closes 5{JP after bottom dead centre.
Exhaust valve opens 50° before bottom dead centre.
Exhaust valve closes 10° after top dead centre.
(10 degrees before or after T.D.C. is equivalent to 0.035"
piston travel).
The equivalent distances
measured round the
flywheel adjacent to the
starter teeth:
10°. 1"
(2.54 cm.)
50° . 4*" (12.6 em.)
VALVE-RoCKER CLEARANCES
(measured with e~ine
cold).
.
-+--Inlet 0.010" (0.25 mm.)
Exhaust 0.012"(0.3mm.)
IGNITION TIMING
Set to fire at top dead
centre (distributor contact points just opening).
As the ad~ance is entirely
automatic, the setting is
at full retard.
Fig.
I
~~~--
Timing Diagram
Contact breaker gap should be set at 0.012" (0.3 mm.)
5
GENERAL SPECIFICATION-Road Speed Data
ROAD SPEED DATA
Top
2nd
1
1.67
Gearbox ratios
Overall ratios
1st
3.54
---'1'-----1-4.625
Engine speeds at 10
m.p.h. (16 km/hr.),
590
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7.71
990
Reverse
4.11
. 16.35--1 ... 18.99 _
1
2090
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I
2430
NOTE.-Engine speeds at other car spe~ds are, for all practical
purposes, directly proportional to thole given above.
DESIRABLE
ENGINE
SPEED
LIMITS
(Particularly in gears lower than top)
The engine is capable of " revving" very fast, yet the driver
should avoid continued "over-revving," which is most likely
to occur in the lower gears. We strongly recommend that the
driver shall not continually exceed the car speeds given below
which correspond to approximately 4,000 engine r.p.m.
ROAD SPEED IN M.P.H. AT
Top
65 m.p.h.
(105 km/hr.)
4,000
Second 'lit
40 m.p.h.
(65 km/hr.)
R.P.M.
First
20 m.p.h.
(30 km/hr.)
The above speeds are given in round figures so that the owner
can easily remember them.
See page 16 for running-in speeds recommended.
6
MANAGEMENT OF THE CAR
CONTROLS, SWITCHES AND INSTRUMENTS
The position of the controls, switches and instruments will
readily be understood by reference to Fig. 2.
Fig.
Controls, switches and instruments.
2.
FOOT OPERATED
i~ONTROLS
Accelerator. The pedal is connected by a short Bowden
cable to the carburettor throttle. , Do not depress pedal
when starting engine from cold.
Brake.
Operating four wheel hydraulic brakes.
Clutch. Press pedal to disengage drive from engine to
gearbox. Do not rest your foot on the pedal when
driving, or hold clutch out to free wheel, as this
will cause unnecessary wear to the carbon thrust
pad.
7
MANAGEMENT
OF CAR~Controls, Switches and
Instruments
HAND OPERATED CONTROLS
Choke Control (Carburettor easy start). Pull out when
starting engine from cold (see page 12 for full instructions).
Gear Lever.
I
For selecting the gears, see Figs. 3 or 3a.
The lever is spring loaded downwards between second
and top gear positions.
Ii
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ii
Always select neutral position before starting
the engine.
'1!'
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Handbrake. Pull to operate rear wheel brakes.
lever will be]held in any position by the ratchet.
release ratchet, first pull lever and press trigger.
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til
ill
Fig. 3.
Right-hand drive
Gear positions
8
The
To
I
MANAGEMENT OF CAR~Controls, Switches and
Instruments
SWITCHES
Brake Light. The switch is connected to the brake pedal
mechanism, but will operate the red rear lights only with
the ignition switched on.
Direction Indicator. This switch will automatically be
returned to " off" as the steering wheel is being brought
back to the straight ahead position. The indicator will
only operate with the ignition switched on.
Head, Tail and Parking Lamp. Pull knob to switch on
parking lights. Tum slightly clockwise and pull again
to switch on the head lights. Press foot operated switch
to dip head light, press again for "full on" position.
The switch" dips" the left-hand beam and switches off
the right-hand beam. On some export models, both
headlamp beams dip when the dip switch is operated.
Horn. Press button on steering wheel to operate horns.
Ignition. Turn clockwise to switch on. Do not leave the
switch "on" when engine is stationary, to avoid the battery
being discharged by the current flowing through the
coil windings.
Panel and Interior Lights. Pull Imob to switch on panel
light, turn slight1Yi~Jockwise and pull again to switch on
interior light. These lights will only operate when the;
parking lights are switched on.
Reversing Light. The switch is actuated by the gear lever
mechanism, and will operate when reverse gear is
engaged, with the ignition switched on.
Starter Motor. Press to operate engine starter (see page 12
for full instructions).
Windscreen Wiper. Pull to operate wipers, they will
only function when the ignition is switched on.
to stop when arms are in the desired parking position.
9
MANAGEMENT OF CAR-Controls, Switches and
Instruments
INSTRUMENTS
Clock. The clock is electrically operated and the hand
can be "set" by pressing upwards the small knurled
knob (situated below the instrument panel, above brake
lever) and turning in the desired direction. The action of
setting the hands to the correct time will restart the clock.
Fuel Gauge. Registers the amount of fuel in the tank.
It operates automatically when the ignition is switched
on.
Oil Pressure Gauge.
Indicates pressure of oil being
pumped to the bearings. It doell' not show the amount
of oil in the sump (excepting that if the oil level is very
low the pressure usually falls due to overheating).
A habit should be made of occasionally reading the oil
pressure during the course of a run, to see that the oil
pump is functioning correctly. The oil pressure gauge
should read between 40 and 60 lbs./sq. in. (2.8-4.2
Kg./sq. cm.) when the car is travelling at normal
speeds and the oil is hot. Of course, only a low oil
pressure will be registered when the engine is idling or
running at low speeds, this is quite normal.
Speedometer. Registers vehicle's speed and total distance
covered, and is firted with a trip which is cancelled by
pushing up the serrated knob (which is situated under
the dash) and turning anti-cloct<!Wise.
Warning Light. Glows red when ignition is switched on
with the engine idling or stopped. It is an indication that
current is being drawn from the battery for the ignition
circuit, or other purposes that are controlled by the
ignition switch.
Water Temperature Gauge. The gauge shows the temperature of the cooling water at the thermostat.
With
the engine warmed up the gauge should register a
temperature of between 60° and 70° during normal running. .
10
MANAGEMENT OF CAR-Regular Inspection
REGULAR INSPECTION
Maintain the oil level in the engine sump at the top mark
on the dipstick. Wipe the stick before taking a reading (see
Fig. 4). Dipstick on left side of engine, near distributor.
The water level in the radiator should occasionally be
examined, and if necessary replenished. It is advisable to use
clean rain water when replenishing the radiator as the use of
hard water results in a deposit on the inner side of the cooling
surfaces, thus reducing efficiency.
Tyre pressures should be checked weekly by application of
a gauge directly to the valve. The correct pressures are given
on page 36. It is usually a good plan to have the spare tyre
inflated to a slightly high"'\! pressure than that recommended for
the rears, i.e. approximately 32 lb./sq. in. (2.25 kg./sq. em.) It
will be a simple matter to release the pressure, should the tyre
be required for use.
The acid level in the battery should be examined fortnightly
and maintained so that it is just level with the top of the
separators. A mirror will be found useful when checking the
acid level. Use only distilled water when replenishing (obtainable from the local chemist or garage). Do not overfill or the
acid may splash out and do damage. Keep the filler plugs
screwed tight to prevent leakage of acid.
View under DonueI.
Fig. 4.
11
------....
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THE ENGINE
TO START THE ENGINE
Starting when Engine is cold
Place the gear lever in the neutral position and see that the
handbrake is on. Pull the carburettor choke control out
to the stop, switch on the ignition and press the starter
switch button. If the engine does not start on the first
application of the starter Do not re-operate until starter
motor has come to rest. This is to avoid damage to the
starter pinion. When the engine has become sufficiently
warmed up, push the choke control back to the
half-out position. Mter one or two minutes driving,
as the engine warms up, it willccw,be possible to push
the control right in without causing the engine to
run with undue hesitation. Difficulty is sometimes
experienced in starting if the atmosphere is very damp,
causing moisture to collect on the exposed porcelain
portions of the sparking plugs.
Caps are provided
on the Triumph plugs to minimise this trouble.
If the battery has been allowed to get into a rundown condition it is best to use the starting handle.
When the engine fails to start do not keep the choke control
out too long or the sparking plugs will become wet with
petrol and it will be necessary to remove and dry them.
It is important that the accelerator pedal should not
be depressed when starting the engine from cold as
the effect of the carburettor choke device is upset when the
throttle is open. It will usually be*found possible to reverse
out of the garage on the choke control alone, usually in the
intermediate position, without using the accelerator.
When. the car has been left standing for some considerable
time, the fuel level in the carburettor float chamber may
The hand
have become rather low due to evaporation.
primer on the fuel pump can be used under such
circumstances, before the starter is operated, to conserve the
electrical energy in the battery (see. page 54.)
Starting in very cold conditions
In very cold weather the oil in the engine and gearbox
becomes thick when the car has been standing for. some
hours. Thick oil causes'the engine to be "stiff" and an
12
MANAGEMENT OF CAR-The Engine
unusual effort is required to turn the crankshaft. This can be
reduced to a minimum by using the recommended oils. It is
advisable to free the engine, giving the crankshaft a few turns,
using the starting handle.
This relieves the load on the
starter. Under these conditions the clutch pedal may be
depressed when operating the starter, to relieve the motor
of the considerable drag in the gearbox. Intelligent use of
the starter, as described, will greatly prolong the life of the
battery.
It is also advisable to add l!% of engine oil to the fuel in
very cold weather. This is at the rate of quarter of a
However, this
pint of oil to each two gallons of fuel.
practice should not ~ continued excepting under these
very cold conditions. The addition of oil to the petrol will
improve the lubrication of the cylinder bores, which is
desirable when the engine is working in exceptionally cold
weather.
Starting with Engine warm or hot
When restarting the engine while it is still hot the accelerator
pedal should be depressed to about one third of its travel
before pressing the starter button. If difficulty is experienced
in starting, due to the use of the choke device when the
engine is hot, the mixture may be momentarily too rich,
in which case depress the accelerator to the full extent
whilst operating the starter with the choke control pushed
right in.
Warming up
In order to minimise cylinder wear the . engine should be
warmed up quickly, when starting from cold in winter, the
engine may be " idled" for a minute to let the oil circulate
but it should not be allowed to idle for long periods, neither
should the engine be raced up to high speeds.
To accomplish rapid warming up, the engine should not be
started from cold until it is desired to drive the car away.
After starting, the choke control should be pushed back
to the half-way position. A speed of approx. 30 m.p.h.
top gear may be regarded as a desirable warming up "l'~<;U'
13
..
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MANAGEMENT OF CAR-The Engine
iJ
if
Do not forget to push the control right in as soon as the
engine will allow, and do not give full throttle until the
engine has warmed up. An automatic thermostat is fitted
in the cooling system, incorporating a bye-pass, which
greatly assists in quick warming up.
COOLING SYSTEM
In frosty weather some steps must be taken to prevent the
cooling water freezing, as water expands when freezing thus
causing a great bursting pressure, with considerable risk of
a cracked cylinder block or radiator andtlconsequent leaks.
If the garage is not heated the water may be drained, but it is
desirable to use an anti-freeze mixture. As the cooling system
is fitted with a thermostat there is a risk of the radiator block
freezing while the engine is running during the warming
up period when the thermostat is shut. Even though the car
has been left in a warm garage and water is not frozen at the
start of the run.
Draining
For the purpose of draining, taps are provided in the
radiator bottom tank and at the rear of the cylinder block on
the right-hand side.
Anti-Freeze Mixtures
We recommend owners to use Smith's "Bluecol" noncorrosive anti-freeze (inhibited Glycol base compound) in
order to protect the cooling system during frosty weather
and reduce corrosion to a minimum.
Drain sufficient
water away and replace by " Bluecol."
If this is
attended to, particularly when the car is new, corrosion
will be checked and result in a clean cooling system.
If the anti-freeze is added when the weather has
already become cold, then it is advisable to drain all the
water away and mix the anti-freeze with water in a
14
~"".14licpalllllllllllllllll.IlI£M&£2IIIII-;M£! •
MANAGEMENT OF CAR-The Engine
waterifig can. If the anti-freeze is put directly into the
radiator' it may take some time to mix with the cylinder jacket
water, ,due to the thermostat preventing circulation until
the jGcket water is l1<:'t.
The: recommended " EluewJ " proportions for your car are
givel1 below. With this anti-freeze in the cooling water it is
unnecessary to drain the system, even in the coldest weather,
and one filling lasts the whole winter. "Bluecol" does not
evaporate; therefore it is only necessary to top up with
water in the usual manner.
Recommended "Bluecol" proportions for protection
from various degrees 01' frost.
Degrees of Frost, of
Proportion
Amount of " Eluecol "
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..... \
15
25
10%
15%
2 pints
3 pints
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II
35
20%
4 pints
NOTE.-We recommend that you provide for the cooling
system, ample protection against sudden fall in temperature, by using in your car the 20% proportion of
" Blueco!."
Caution
I'~
Before adding the anti-freeze preparation make sure that
the water hose clips are securely fitted and the cylinder
head nuts are tight.
If the solution is able to escape
through a leaking gasket into the cylinders it may be burnt
into a tacky substance capable of doing harm to the engine.
However, this could only happen in the rare event of a
faulty gasket.
If the car is taken to a garage. for any repair which involves
draining the radiator it is advisable to state that the
radiator contains an anti-freeze, so that the cooling water
can be preserved and used again.
15
MANAGEMENT OF CAR-The Engine
NEW ENGINES
When the car is new, the engine may seem to bf: somewhat
lacking in power due to the working surface~ 1lOt having become
fully bedded down. This will continue' tor the first 200 or 300
miles (320-480 kIn.) during which time the engine will become
gradually" run-in" (with proper use). The power ,"vill then
improve as the car is used for the first 1,000 miles (1,600 kIn.),
and this will be accompanied by a corresponding improvement
in petrol consumption. The engine sump should be drained
and refilled with new oil at the completion of the first 1,000
miles (see page 20).
At approximately 5,000 miles much benefit is gained by having
the valves ground in as described on page 56. Although this
involves some slight inconvenience in givingl'attention to a new
engine, the trouble is well repaid by the results obtained.
It is inadvisable to drive a new car fast or to run the engine at
high 'speed in the low gears. The good and lasting bearing
surfaces obtainable by careful running~in are well worth the
patience required to drive the car at only moderate speeds for
at least the first 500 miles (800 km.).
We do not recommend that the engine should be religiously
driven at the specified speeds for the first 500 miles (800 km.),
but suggest that" mnning-in " should be progressive and that
no harm is done if the engine is allowed to " rev" fairly fast
so long as it is thorQughly warm, providing it is not pulling
hard. Also do not let the engine pull hard at low speeds, always
select a lower gear.
The followil:lg table gives the permissible speeds in top gear :During the first 250 miles (400 kill.)
140 M.P;H. (64 kill/hr.)
During the following 150 miles (240 kill.) 145 M.P.H. (72 kIn/hr.)
During the following 100 miles (160 kIn.) 150 M.P.H. (80 kIn/hr.)
During the first 500 miles (800 kIn.) it is inadvisable to exceed the
following speeds in the gears :In first gear
In second gear
.1 15 M.P.H.
(24 kIn/hr.)
30 M.P.H.
(48 kIn/hr.)
1
16
MANAGEMENT OF CAR-The Engine
When new cars leave the works 3% of engine oil! is added ro
the fuel. The owner could with advantage continue to add
l!% of engine oil (i pint to 2 gallons of fuel) during the
running-in period. (First 500 miles.)
Alternatively, we have found the use of an upper cylinder
lubricant to be of advantage, particularly in new engines, and
recommend the use of such a lubricant, particularly until the
engine is thoroughly" run-in." The lubricant should be mixed
with the fuel in the proportions given on the container. Such
lubricants may be used with advantage throughout the life of
the car particularly during wintry weather.
Running-in compounds cont~i\ning Acheson's colloidal
are available. They are prepared in a form suitable for
to the oil in the engine sump. These should only
during the running-in period for new or reconditioned
rFirst 500 miles (800 bn.)].
graphite
addition
be used
engines.
DRIVING THE CAR
To obtain a minimum of clutch wear, always start away in
first gear unless facing downhill, in which case second gear may
be engaged. If the driver engages a higher gear in order to save
a gear change the clutch will have to be slipped unduly, resulting
m uunecessary wear.
Gear Changing
The gear lever, situate~ o~ ~e steering colu~, operates
through the system of a· slIding rod, connectmg rods and
levers to the gearbox, and a minimum of effort is required
to change from one gear to another. The position of the
lever for selection of the various gears is given on page 8.
When in the neutral position, the gear lever is spring loaded
downwards and rests between top and second gears. The
synchromesh gearbox provides a synchronised easy gear
change for the three forward gears.
When changing into a synchronised gear the movement
should be slow and deliberate. DO NOT HURRY.
Upon its first movement the gear lever will encounter a
slight resistance from the synchronising cones. The
17
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MANd~MENT
OF CAR-The Engine
continuan;ce of a steady pressure will synchronise the gears
and the resistance will be overcome as the driving dogs
slide into engagement.
The gear lever must always be moved right home to secure
full engagement.
Do not attempt to engage reverse gear whilst the car is
travelling forward.
Using the Brakes
The four wheel hydraulic brakes are very powerful and require only a small effort to slow down the car. Do not
apply the brakes harshly except il1f:;,emergency as this only
causes undue tyre wear and discomfort to passengers.
Engine as a Brake
When travelling downhill using the engine as a brake, i.e.,
with gear engaged, do not switch off the ignition. This
would allow unburnt mixture to accumulate in the exhaust
system, and when switching on again, there is a likelihood
of an explosion with consequent damage to the system.
18
GENERAL UPKEEP
LUBRICATION
This is one of the most important subjects in connection
with the upkeep of a car and careful attention to the following
instruction will be amply repaid by the results obtained.
For the recommended periods· of lubrication see the
lubrication chart folded inside rear cover of this book.
The correct lubricants to be used are given on pages
95 and 96.
Grease Gun
One grease gun IS supplied in the tool kit and should
be filled with tht! grease recommended for wheel
hubs. This grease can be used for general chassis lubrication
as well as 'for hub bearings. We also specifY an alternative
grease which is recommended as being superior for general
chassis lubrication but is unsuitable for wheel hub lubrication, because, due to its oily nature, it may escape from the
hub bearing on to the brake linings. Thus any car owner
desiring to use this type of lubricant would require an
additional grease gun for general chassis lubrication, retaining the other gun for wheel hub lubrication only.
Whilst the above applies to the owner desiring to attend to
the lubrication of his car personally, most owners will prefer
to have these operations carried out by a Triumph Agent.
THE NECESSITY F~R HIGH QUALITY OIL
There are many reputable oils on the market and many
more" cheap" oils of indifferent quality. The use of high
quality lubricant is an essential safeguard.
It has to be
sufficiently fluid to give inImediate lubrication when starting
from cold and to maintain sufficient body during a fast run
on a hot day. A first class oil can withstand the combustion
flames playing on the cylinder walls and it will not form
an undue amount of carbon in the combustion heads. It
will keep down the rate of cylinder and bearing wear so
that the engine will maintain its performance over many
years. In this way, the money spent on high quality oil
represents 'a valuable insurance against premature old
19
GENERAL UPKEEP-Engine Lubrication
age and unnecessary breakdowns. The lubricants which
we recommend are obtainable everywhere and have
maintained a uniform high standard of quality over many
years. They can be trusted to withstand all demands
made upon them and possess a margin of safety which is
completely adequate.
Obtaining the correct Grade
In ordering your oil be careful to state the make as well as
the grade. For example, never ask for XL, A, " Double"
or " 30," but always use the correct wording as given in the
columns on page 95 or 96 according to the brand chosen
and see that the oil is drawn from a container bearing
the well known trade mark.
Draining
To drain the engine, gearbox or rear axle, remove the plug
provided beneath each unit, this process is assisted by opening
the filler to allow ingress of air, and by draining when the oil
is warm after a run of at least 10 miles (16 km.) Under these
conditions impurities in the oil will be well mixed and will
flow away with the oil during the draining process.
Flushing Oils (see recommended Lubricants, page 95 or 96).
We advocate the occasional use of flushing oil during the
draining and refilling operation of the engine sump. The
normal procedure is as follows:
Drain the sump while the engine is hot, screw in the drain
plug and pour four pints of flushing'Yoil into the oil filler.
Start the engine and adjust the throttle so that a fairly fast
idling speed is obtained.
Occasional short bursts of acceleration should be given to
distribute the oil throughout the engine and then after ten
minutes running drain the sump and repeat the operation
with a fresh charge.
With very dirty engines, it may be necessary to lengthen the
period somewhat or even to use a third charge of flushing
oil.
Refill the sump with new engine oil, the small quantity of
flushing oil left in the filter will not be harmful.
20
i
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GENERAL UPKEEP-Engine Lubrication
ENGINE
We recommend low viscosity oils for use in the engine sump.
These oils, whilst maintaining sufficient body when hot, also
are fluid enough to give early lubrication to cylinder walls, etc.,
when starting the engine from" cold," a quality not possessed by
the" heavier" oils in sufficient degree for use in modern engines.
They are each of the correct viscosity and character to afford
complete lubrication protection. Additives which dilute the
oil or otherwise impair this protection must NOT be used.
We therefore stress the value of using only the recommended
oils. After many thousands of miles running the rate of oil
consumption will increase. When the rate becomes higher than
one gallon per 1,000 miles (1 itre per 400 km.), it will be desirable
to use the next heavier grade of the brand of oil you normally
employ.
The working parts of the engine are lubricated by oil
contained in the sump, drawn through a filter by the gear type
pump and delivered under pressure to the crankshaft journals,
crankpins, connecting rod little ends, camshaft bearings and
rocker shaft. Oil returning from the rocker gear lubricates
the tappets and cams. The jets of oil from connecting rod
bearings lubricate the pistons and the timing chain is fed with
oil ftom the camshaft bearing. Suitable oil seals are embodied at
the front and rear ends of the crankshaft which effectively
prevent oil leaking along the shaft.
Every 200 miles (320 km.) the oil level should be checked and
.topped up if necessary. Withdraw dipstick and wipe dean, then
insert and push fully home before withdrawing for reading (see
Fig. 4). Should the level be at the lower mark on the dipstick
4 pints (2.2 litres). ~f oil w,~. be required for .topping up.
The regular addItlon of oil not only mamtams the correct
level, but also tends to keep up the quality of the lubricant.
However, gradual deterioration takes place until it becomes
advisable occasionally to drain the sump and refill with fresh
oil. If the engine is found to require very little oil for replenishment, then it is desirable to drain the oil every 2,500
miles (4,000 km.) and refill with fresh oil.
Once every year, if flushing oils have not been used, it is advisable to remove the sump and thoroughly clean out with petrol.
Dry off with a smooth rag or good quality brush, taking care not
to let any fluff or hairs remain, and leave for a quarter of an hour
whilst the remaining film evaporates before replacing the sump.
In the meantime, brush with fuel the gauze mtake filter.
Do not forget to refill with clean oil when the sump is replaced.
21
.,
GENERAL
UPKEEP~Lubrication
Caution
Do not attempt to
clean out the sump
with paraffin or petrol unless it is removed from the engine, as any remaining liquid will tend
to dilute the oil.
The Oil Cleaner
CARTRIDGE
The Oil Cleaner has
been designed to
filter the oil to a very
fine degree and the
only attention it requires is to see that
the filtering cartridge
is removed and that a
new replacement,
cartridge of the correct type is fitted at
periods not exceeding
10,000
miles
(16,000 km.).
It is essential that this
operation be carried
Oil cleaner.
Fig. 5.
out at the specified
periods to ensure the full filtration of the oil.
The cleaner manufacturer's name and cartridge number,
which are clearly marked on the top of the cleaner body,
must be quoted when obtaining a replacement cartridge.
To renew the cartridge, unscrew the securing bolt and remove
the container, the cartridge can th\1p be withdrawn. Wipe
out the container to remove foreigtl matter trapped by the
filter, using a non-fluffy cloth and inspect afterwards to
make certain that no cloth fibres remain.
It is desirable to discard the old container and cartridge
washers, replacing them with new ones, every time the
cartridge is renewed. When reassembling the container
ensure that the washers and spring are correctly positioned
(see Fig. 5). Do not tighten the bolt more than is necessary
to obtain an oil tight joint.
Approximately one pint of oil will be lost due to the removal
of the container and the sump should be topped up with
new oil after assembly. However, as this operation should
be done when the engine oil is being drained the refilling
of the sump by the specified amount will automatically
allow for this loss.
22
tt
£
2
2£i
uS)
,
~
,
7
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
The container should not be disturbed until cartridge renewal
is required; to do so invites the hazard that the accumulated
dirt on the outside of the container may be allowed to
contaminate the inside and thus be carried into the bearings
when the engine is re-started.
If at any time the cleaner body is removed from the crankcase, take great care to fit the joint washer correctly, otherwise
damage will be caused when next the engine is started, through
the "blanking-off" of the oil passages. It is advisable to fit
the washer to the crankcase and ensure that the holes in the
washer match those in the crankcase before attaching the body.
Ignition Distributor see (Fig. 6)
Every 5,000 miles (8,000 km.), the cam should be smeared
lightly with engine oil. A pronounced squeak occurs when
the cam is quite dry. Withdraw the moulded rotor arm
from the top of the Spindle (care should be taken because this
part is made of a brittle material) but do not remove the
screw exposed to view. Apply, by means of oil-can, a
few drops of thin machine oil around the edge of the screw
and down the hole provided, to lubricate the cam bearings and distributor spindle respectively. At the same time,
place a single drop of clean engine oil on the contact breaker
arm pivot.
On earlier models the distributor spindle was lubricated via the
hole in the screw.
Ignition distributor.
Fig. 6.
When replacing the rotor arm make sure that it is pushed
on as far as possible.
The moving parts of the automatic advance mechanism
should be lubricated with winter grade engine oil. This can
23
J
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
When replacing the rotor arm make sure that it is pushed
on as far as possible.
The moving parts of the automatic advance mechanism
should be lubricated with winter grade engine oil. This can
be squirted through the gap between the cam and the base
plate. Take great care not to allow any oil to get on or near
the contacts.
Fig. 7.
Water Pump Bearing.
Water Pump and Fan
There is one nipple provided (see Fig. 7) to which the
grease gun should be applied every 1,000 miles. Give two
strokes only with the gun.
Dynamo and Starter
Once every 10,000 miles unscrew tllae cap of the lubricator
at the commutator end. If the lubricating wick is dry, the
cap should be filled with petroleum jelly.
The bearing at the driving end of the dynamo is packed
with grease before leaving the works and after a considerable
mileage the dynamo should be removed for cleaning, adjustment and repacking of the bearings with grease.
This
should be done preferably by the nearest Triumph or
Lucas Service depot.
.
The starter is fitted with special bearings which reqnire no
lubrication.
24
~I
....
24
2
£
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
Air Cleaner and Silencer. Home Use. The air cleaner
gauze should be re-oiled with engine oil in order to
ensure effective filtering of the air. Every 5,000 miles
(8,000 km.) it is advisable to remove the air cleaner and
wash in petrol, particularly the gauze, after which soak
the gauze in oil and allow to drain before finally wiping
over and re-fitting.
CLUTCH SHAFT BEARINGS
The oil can should occasionally be applied to the clutch
bearings (one at each side of the clutch housing), the oil holes
are accessible from u~>1erneath the car. This operation
requires a pump type of oil can.
CLUTCH AND BRAKE PEDAL BEARINGS
Grease nipples are
provided (see Fig.
8), they are accessible from underneath the car.
Fig. 8. Pedal Bearings-
GEARBOX
The correct oil only should be used in the gearbox as the use
of very thick oil or grease will spoil the operation of gear
changing.
Every 2,500 miles (4,000 km.) the oil level should be checked
and topped up .if necessary.
To check the oil level, raise the carpet and remove the
rubber plug from the gearbox domed cover plate, thus exThe plug is on the leftposing the dipstick (see Fig. 9).
hand side for right-hand drive cars and vice versa.
25
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
Withdraw dipstick
and wipe clean,
then insert stick
and. push it fully
home before withdrawing for reading. The correct
level is to the top
mark. The dipstick orifice is also
the gearbox oil
filler.
Every 10,000 miles
(16,000 km.) the
gearbox should be
drained and refilled with new oil
(see page 95 or 96).
Gearbox, oil filler and dipstick.
Fig. 9.
REAR AXLE
It is essential to drain and replenish the axle with
" Hypoid " oil every 5,000 miles (8,000 km.).
The hypoid bevel gears fitted in the rear axle require a special
lubricant to ensure efficient operation and long life.
This type of gear incorporates a sliding action between the
exceptionally sturdy gear teeth, resulting in silent operation.
However, the rubbing· action is too'-? severe for normal axle
oils, so special "Hypoid" oils have been developed which
contain additives that make the oil capable of withstanding
pressures many times heavier than normal oils can cope with.
A further feature of " nypoid " oils is that they are" lighter,"
that is to say more fluid than normal axle oils. However, the
special additives begin to lose their properties in the course of
use, and the oil tends to revert to a light gear oil.
Thus it is advisable to completely drain and replenish
with new "Hypoid" oil every 5,000 miles (8,000 km.)
and in any event do not exceed a period of 10,000 miles
(16,000 km.).
It is desirable to have the oil level checked during this period,
26
•
2
&
•
"9
I
l
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
and if the oil level is below the bottom mark on the dipstick
do not" top up " but drain the oil and refill with new oil, this will
overcome the danger of mixing the various grades of oil.
The filler is accessible from underneath the car or by removing
the c;over below the rear seat cushion. Clean away mud before
unscrewing the filler plug to avoid grit falling into the axle.
Rear of chassis.
Fig. ro.
A dipstick is provided to indicate the oil level (see Fig. 10)
and should not be screwed in when testing the oil level, but
rested on top of the threads. The correct level is to the top
mark on the dipstick.
I~.
It is important
that the filler cap
on the brake fluid
reservoir, integral
with the master
cylinder (see Fig.
11) should be removed every 5,000
miles (8,000 km.),
the fluid level
checked and
Fig.
BRAKES
Brake master cylinder filler.
II.
27
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
topped up if necessary. Always clean the area around the plug
before removing it, this will lessen the risk of grit falling into
the chamber after removal of the plug. The reservoir should
be filled to within half-an-inch of the top, and never less than
half full (see page 95 or 96 for the correct fluid). As the cups in the
master and all wheel cylinders are pure rubber it is imperative
to use only the recommended fluid. Mineral oils would, in a very
short time, distort and ruin them.
Handbrake Cables and Conduits
To ensure free, efficient action, it is essential that the handbrake cables be kept well lubricated, particularly where they
are enclosed by the conduit.
Grease nipples are fitted in the conduits, one located under
the bonnet and the other on the right-hand side of chassis to
the front of the rear axle, to which the grease gun should be
applied every 5,000 miles (8,000 km.). This operation should
be carried out with the handbrake applied.
During the winter months it is very important to keep the
bottom cable regularly lubricated as this prevents the entry of
water which on cold nights will freeze, thus locking the brake
cable.
When lubricating the cables, grease is forced both ways and the
gun should be pumped until grease exudes at the end of the
conduit.
Fig.
12.
Handbrake compensator.
28
4
till
Si;
II.
J
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
Brake Pedal Bearing (page 25).
Handbrake Compensator
A grease nipple is provided on the compensator which
situated on the rear axle casing (see Fig 12).
IS
WHEEL HUBS
The front and rear hubs require a small but regular supply of
grease as specified on page 95 or 96, every 5,000 lniles (8,000 km.).
It is essential that the correct type of grease be used, this has a
high melting point. Five strokes of the" hand" grease gun will
normally be sufficient~as it is inadvisable to overload the hubs
with grease. The grease should not be used from a machine
unless it is certain that the machine reservoir contains
the correct grade of grease.
Front Hubs
To grease the hub bearings, jack up and remove the front
wheel, when the grease nipple will be exposed (see Fig. 13a).
Fig. 13a. Front hub lubricator.
Fig. 13b.
Rear hub lubricator.
Rear Hubs
These bearings are lubricated via nipples (see Fig. 13b)
accessible on removal of the nave plate.
29
I
t'"'
s.;
~
~
!
;....
....
a....
~
Fig. '4.
From suspension lubrication.
(The numerals indicate the attention periods in thousands of miles.)
~
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
wish-bone shackle (see Fig. 14). Do not lubricate the inner
bushes of the shackles as . they contain rubber.
It is an advantage when greasing the king pin bushes to jack up
the front of the car so that the suspension hangs free. This
will allow grease to cover the thrust washer faces as it exudes
from the lower bush as the grease gun is applied.
To maintain the best riding qualities of the independent
suspension it is essential that it is properly and regularly
lubricated. The distance of 1,000 miles (1,600 km.) between
lubrication of the suspension pivots should be regarded as a
maXImum.
REAR ROAD SPRINGS
The spring blades should not be aii%~ed to get rusty as this
will prevent the correct working of the springs and provide a
hard suspension.
Service stations are often equipped to spray the springs with
penetrating oil, but this is not lasting in effect, and it is
advisable afterwards to paint over with rear axle or engine oil.
It is the area around the tips of the blades which most requires
the lubricant, as it is at these points that one blade presses upon
the next. The blade clips should also be oiled.
Rubber bushes are fitted in all the rear spring eyes and must
not be lubricated.
Fig. 17.
Steering box oil filler.
32
4Q
22
ZS,iUSi :
L
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
STEERING
To lubricate the steering unit, remove the screwed plug and
top~up with oil to the level of the orifice (see Fig. 17), this
should'be carried out every 5,000 miles (8,000 km.).
Grease nipples are provided on all steering balI joints and the
"slave" steering drop arm pivot (see Fig. 14). These nipples
should receive attention with the grease gun every 1,000 miles
(1,600 km.) as their duty is high.
HYDRAULIC DAMPERS
The piston type dampers fitted should not require any attention
such as " topping up." If'they leak they should be serviced by
the makers. Your car may be fitted with either Armstrong or
Girling Hydraulic dampers, the fluids used in each are given on
page 95 or 96.
GEAR CHANGE MECHANISM
The only attention necessary is to ensure that the mechanism
is regularIylubricated at the dog clutch, the adjacent control
column bushes (see Fig. 18), and the two selector rod bushes
on the frame side member (see lubrication chart).
Gear change mechanism
Fig. 18.
(Right-hand drive model)
33
'5'
STEERiNG BOX
"?:!. OL Fl!..LER .
CD
..
51AVE STEERiNG coop
ARM P,lVOT NIPPLES
I
~
~
~
~..,..,...
a'
.ag..
Fig.
'4.
From suspension lubrication.
(The numerals indicate the attention per£ods in thousands of miles.)
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
Nave Plate Removal
and Refitting
Engage the special lever
provided in kit, in one of the
wheel depressions (see Fig.
15), and lever off the Nave
Plate.
To refit plate, place its edge
over the securing studs or
clips as far as possible and
give a sharp tap with the
hand on the plate, to ~pring
it into the correct position. Fig. IS.
Nave plate removal.
PROPELLER SHAFT
The universal joints are of the needle roller bearing type
and each is fitted with a nipple for greasing. A nipple is also
fitted to the front end of the shaft for lubrication of the sliding
splines (see Fig. 16). The three nipples should receive attention
with the grease gun every 5,000 miles (8,000 kIn.), using grease
recommended on page 95 or 96.
NIPPLE FOR SPLINES
Fig. 16.
Propeller shaft lubrication.
FRONT SUSPENSION
Nipples are provided for the lubrication of the swivel pin
bearings, suspension pivots, ball joints and outer bush of each
31
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
wish-bone shackle (see Fig. 14). Do not lubricate the inner
bushes of the shackles as they contain rubber.
It is an advantage when greasing the king pin bushes to jack ~p
the front of the car so that the suspension hangs free. This
will allow grease to cover the thrust washer faces as it exudes
from the lower bush as the grease gun is applied.
To maintain the best riding qualities of the independent
suspension it is essential that it is properly and regularly
lubricated. The distance of 1,000 miles (1,600 km.) between
lubrication of the suspension pivots should be regarded as a
maXImum.
REAR ROAD SPRINGS
::W:,1
The spring blades should not be allowed to get rusty as this
will prevent the correct working of the springs and provide a
hard suspension.
Service stations are often equipped to spray the springs with
penetrating oil, but this is not lasting in effect, and it is
advisable afterwards to paint over with rear axle or engine oil.
It is the area around the tips of the blades which most requires
the lubricant, as it is at these points that one blade presses upon
the next. The blade clips should also be oiled.
Rubber bushes are fitted in all the rear spring eyes and must
not be lubricated.
Fig. 17.
Steering box oil fIller.
32
.,..,.U£ 2
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
STEERING
To lubricate the steering unit, remove the screwed plug and
top~up with oil to the level of the orifice (see Fig. 17), this
should be carried out every 5,000 miles (8,000 km.).
Grease nipples are provided on all steering ball joints and the
"slave" steering drop arm pivot (see Fig. 14). These nipples
should receive attention with the grease gun every 1,000 miles
(1,600 km.) as their duty is high.
HYDRAULIC DAMPERS
The piston type dampers fitted should not require any attention
such as " topping up." If <~hey leak they should be serviced by
the makers. Your car may be fitted with either Armstrong or
Girling Hydraulic dampers, the fluids used in each are given on
page 95 or 96.
GEAR CHANGE MECHANISM
The only attention necessary is to ensure that the mechanism
is regularly lubricated at the dog clutch, the adjacent control
column bushes (see Fig. 18), and the two selector rod bushes
on the frame side member (see lubrication chart).
Gear change mechanism
Fig. 18.
(Right-hand drive model)
33
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
HINGES, CONTROLS, DOOR LOCKS, ETC.
There are several small control joints which should be given
occasional attention with the oil can. Bonnet catches, hinges
and door locks should be smeared with oil occasionally.
The connections on the handbrake and ratchet mechanism,
the clutch operating links, etc., all require attention to allow the
controls to work freely and prevent unnecessary wear.
ACCELERATOR CONTROLS
. "::.1,
Apply oil to cable at each end of the casing and work the pedal
to spread the oil inside casing.
DIRECTION INDICATORS
A little thin oil should be applied by means of a small brush
to the catch pin between the arm and the operating mechanism.
This can be done when the indicator is switched up.
Fig. 19.
Lubrication of direction indicator mechanism.
34
GENERAL UPKEEP-Lubrication
Also withdraw the screw on the underside of the arm end and
.slide off the arm cover. Place the connecting wire to the bulb on
one side and apply a drop of thin machine oil to the lubricating
pad at the top of the arm. To replace the arm cover, slide it in
an upward direction so that the side plates engage with the slots
on the underside of the spindle bearing and secure with the
screw.
WINDSCREEN WIPER
The windscreen wiper motor is adjusted and packed with grease
before leaving the works and therefore requires no additional
attention.
35
GENERAL UPKEEP-Care of Tyres
CARE OF TYRES.
Maintain the correct inflation pressure by weekly tests
with a gauge applied directly to the valve.
The
maintenance of correct tyre pressure is a large factor in tyre
life and the steering of the car.
Tyres lose their pressure due to diffusion, even though
there is no porosity or leakage due to a puncture or faulty
valve. The loss varies from 1 to 3 lb. per sq. in. per week and
must be made up if the tyre is to give proper service.
Examine the tyres occasionally for flints or other road
matter which may have become embedded in the tread. If
the car is driven where tacks or sh~ nails may be picked
.
up, these also may be found
buried in the tread. If these
are left in they may eventually work through the cover
and puncture the tube. Fill
up any large holes with a suitable compound, obtainable
for the purpose.
Oil should not be allowed to
get on the tyres.
If any
should accidentally do so,
clean off by using petrol
sparingly.
Do not drive over sharp
edged kerbs or "bump"
them with the side of the
tyre, as this is liable to
fracture the cotton tyre
casing, and in the latter
case upset the front wheel Fig. zo.
alignment or even bend the
wheel " out of truth."
Tyre tread examination.
CORRECT TYRE PRESSURES (Fully-laden condition)
Front-22 lb./sq. in (1.6 kg./sq. em.)
Rear-26 lb./sq. in. (1.85 kg./sq. em.)
36
GENERAL UPKEEP-Care of Tyres
It is assumed that the above pressures are maintained by weekly
attention. If the owner is able to check the pressure only
every two or three weeks, then it is advisable to inflate the tyres
by an additional 2 lbs./sq. in. On the. other hand, it is
permissible for a more comfortable ride, when' carrying only
two persons, to run with pressures 2Ibs./sq. in. below those
recommended, provided they are checked weekly or some
convenient time when purchasing fuel.
WHY TYRE RESULTS VARY
Speed. Car oWners vary greatly in the speed at which they
habitually drive. The rate of tread wear at 50 m.p.h. is
double that at 30 m.p.h.
.('$
Rapid Acceleration and Cornering. During wheel slippage
caused by rapid acceleration or severe cornering, excessive
tread wear takes place due !o the abrasion of the tyre
against the road surface.
.
Braking. Some owners "drive on the brakes." It is
established that where this practice is adopted, and
especially if stops are frequent, the rate of tyre wear
increases considerably.
TYRE FITTING AND REMOVAL
. To remove tyre.
Remove all valve parts and push both
cover edges into the base of the rim at the part diametrically
opposite the valve, th~n lever the cover edge near the valve
over the rim edge. When this operation is correctly carried
out the cover edge comes easily over the rim.
Inextensible wires are incorporated in the edges of wired
type tyres. Therefore do not attempt to stretch over the
rim the wire edges of the tyre cover.
To fit tyre. Push one edge of the cover over the edge of the
rim. It will go quite easily if the part first put on is pushed
right down into the rim base.
Very slightly infl(jte the inner tube-do not distend it-place
it in the cover with the valve through the hole in the rim.
37
GENERAL UPKEEP-Care of Tyres
(Take care that the valve which is fitted in the side of
the tube. is on the correct side of the rim.)
Fit the second edge of the cover, commencing at a point
diametrically opposite the valve, and push the edge down
into the base of the rim.
Small levers may be gently used to ease the last few inches
over the rim edge. Be careful not to nip the tube.
Whilst inflating, see that the edges of the cover are seated
evenly round the rim; check by the line on the cover.
FRONT WHEEL ALIGNMENT
The alignment of the front wheels "iSlymost important in its
effect on tyre wear and good steering. Excessive toe-in will
lead to severe tyre wear particularly on the " kerb side" front
ryre.
" Toe-in" or "toe-out" is the amount by which the front
wheels are inclined from parallel.
The outer tie-rod tubes are threaded at both ends, and
revolving tllese tubes will, therefore, either shorten or increase
me ball joint centres, thus altering the wheel alignment.
Each tie-rod tube is prevented from rotation by a bolted clamp
at each end.
Correct Wheel Alignment
The wheels should Toe-in
V.
To Check and Adjust Wheel Alignment
Jack up each front wheel in turn until just clear of "ground."
Spin wheel to test for run-out. Set whe~l so that maximum
run-out is at me top. Lower and remove"'the jack.
This operation will tend to correct for errors which might
otherwise occur due to wheel run-out.
Set me steering in me "straight Mead" position and measure
the distance between the two front wheel rims at a height
above me ground approximately equal to that of me wheel
hubs. Take tills measurement both in front. of and behind _
38
GENERAL UPKEEP-Care of Tyres
the hub centres. The amount by which the front measurement is' more than the rear is termed "toe-out." When
the wheels are parallel, the measurements are' equal.
If adjustment is found necessary proceed as follows:
Slacken the clamp bolts at each end of the left hand tie-rod.
Revolve the tie-rod tube anti-clockwise to toe-out or
clockwise to toe-in the wheels, the direction of rotation
being viewed from the left-hand road wheel. One complete
turn of the tie-rod tube will alter alignment by approximately
or' measured at the wheel rims.
When adjustment is complete ensure. that the ball joints
are in the centre of "swing" before securely tightening
tie-rod tube clamps. 'JeThe clamps must, of course, be
positioned as shown in J:<ig. 14 (page 30).
THE JACK
A screw jack is provided
which is adapted to lift
any wheel of the car as
required.
Fit the jack in position as
shown, making sure that it
is right home in its socket,
and that it stands firm with
its legs apart before operating the handle.
Apply
the handbrake or chock the
wheels which will remailt..
on the ground, before using
the jack.
Rear Wheel Jackiu.g.
A jack socket is provided
under the body, immediately forward of the rear
wheel.
Fig.
21.
Jacking the car.
If a jack is used under the rear axle case, take great care to
ensure that the jack pad does not touch the rear cover plate when
lifting, otherwise there isa risk ofdamage and consequent oil leak.
To remove nave plate and road wheel, see page 31.
39
BODYWORK
CARE OF BODYWORK
The "finish" used for coachwork is remarkably durable
but in order to retain the lustre of the finish, it is necessary
to take a little trouble in cleaning and polishing it occasionally.
Although dust may be removed with a duster, yet if it has
been wet, it is advisable to clean off with a sponge and water.
Always use water when removing mud, and when the car is clean
finally wipe over with an almost dry chamois leather.
All
chromium parts should be cleaned frequently with a little soap
and water, finished off with a damp chamois leather, and then
be polished with a soft dry rag. If, due to neglect, the plate
becomes spotted it is necessary to use a chromium plate cleaner.
The radiator grilles should be kept snwrt in appearance in the
~ame manner.
Washing alone will not keep up the brilliance of the paintwork and polishing with a suitable polish, specially prepared for
this purpose, such as Duckham's DA Liquid Wax Polish
No. 13, is advisable. Oc.casional removal of the "traffic
film" which accumulates over the finish is well worth while,
and special cleaners for the purpose are available. The finish
will improve in appearance if properly looked after.
Tar is best removed before it has had time to set. This may
be done by the aid of a little paraffin or petrol. However, it
often happens that tar becomes firmly attached, and attempts
to remove it are made when the car is being cle;med. Special
tar removers are available for this purpose which are designed to
dissolve tar without damage to the parts.
For parts requiring lubrication see p~~e 34.
If, for example, the door hinges are left unlubricated they will
eventually wear and cause the door to fall out of proper location
with the door catch and dovetail. This leads to door rattles which
can be avoided by careful attention to proper lubrication.
interior of the body should be dusted occasionally, and
the carpets taken out, shaken and brushed. Grime may be
removed from the leather upholstery by the application of a
little soap and a damp cloth, followed by a final wipe down
with an almost dry sponge or wash-leather. When a vacuum
cleaner is available it can be used with advantage to help clean
the interior of the car.
40
GENERAL UPKEEP-Bodywork
DOOR ADJUSTMENT
The doors are provided with spring loaded dovetails for the
purpose of preventing rattle and governing the pressure on
the lock bolt when the door is closed.
The lock pl2tes and dCHtails are adjustable so that when
wear eventually takes place they can be re-positioned.
This
adjustment should preferably be carried out by a coach
fitter.
FRONT SEAT ADJUSTMENT
Th(front seat is adjustable for " leg length" by operating the
handle which is situated under the front of the seat.
<,\~
SPARE WHEEL AND TOOL COMPARTMENT
Saloon
The spare wheel and tools are located inside boot lid.
The tool roll and starting handle are kept in the engine
compartment.
7
Fig.
22.
Triumph Saloon tool kit layout.
41
GENERAL UPKEEP-Bodywork
Boot Lock
The boot can be locked in the down position as shown in
Fig. 22a.
Fig.
223.
Locking boot in down position.
42
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS
Various adjustments are necessary from time to time in order
to keep the mechanism in efficient running order. The periods
between depend largely upon the manner in which the car is
used and no definite time can be given here for carrying out
these corrections. The car should be examined, however, every
5,000 miles (8,000 km.) and any adjustments which appear
necessary can then be made (see page 69).
ENGINE
CyHnder Head Nuts <11
After the first 1,000 miles (1,600 km.) the cylinder head
nuts should be checked, with engine warm, for tightness
in the order shown in Fig. 23.
Fig. 23·
Order of tightening cylinder head nuts,
Valve-Rocker Clearances
A clearance between the valve stem and the valve cap is
necessary to ensure correct closing of the valves and efficient
running of the engine.
The correct running clearance is 0.010 (0.25" mm.) for the
'inlet valves and 0.012 (0.3" mm.) for the exhaust valves
measured with engine 'cold. Two gauges are provided in
the tool kit for the purpose of setting these clearances.
43
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
If a rocker becomes noisy, it may be silenced by adjusting
the clearauce to the correct amount. Do not set the valve
clearances too small or the engine will not maintain good.
tune.
Fig. 24.
Valve-rocker clearance.
Adjustment of Valve-Rocker Clearance
Remove the air silencer and the rocker cover and turn the
crankshaft with the starting handle for half a revolution
after the valve to be adjusted has closed.
.~
l
Rotate valve cap until the clearance measuring slot is in a
convenient position and insert the correct feeler (see Fig. 24).
Slacken the lock nut and adjust the rocker screw with a
screwdriver until the gauge is a sliding fit between the top
of the valve stem and the inside of the varve cap.
Now tighten the lock nut and check that the clearance has
not altered.
44
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
Ignition Timing
The ignition is automatically advanced to suit the ever
changing needs of the engine.
When fully retarded,
i.e., engine at rest, the ignition should be set to fire at
top dead centre.
The ignition is correctly set at the works and should not
normally be adjusted, excepting as described on page 56. If
the ignition setting has been disturbed it may be re-set as
described below. We would emphasise the advantage of
setting the distributor correctly, so that the automatic
range can function as designed.
Fig. 25.
Ignition Timing (firing order).
The setting recommended above should be regarded as a
srarting point, as individual engines may require more or
less advanc~ than this. Maximum power is obtained by
giving the greatest possible advance without causing pinking.
Minor adjustments i~n readily be made on the road.
To advance igrtition turn the distributor body clockwise,
and vice ver~a. Do not alter the ignition more than I ° at a
time (2° on flywheel).
To obtain top dead centre position turn the crankshaft
until the small drilled hole in the belt pulley is in line with
the pointer att~ched to the timing cover.
The firing m'ders are given in Fig. 25. The distributor is
shown marked corresponding to the cylind~r numbers to
The cylinder
.which the high tension cables should go.
. numbers are counted in sequence, No. I being the cylinder
nearest to the radiator.
45
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
Valve Timing
See page 5 for correct valve tlnung.
centre see Ignition Timing, page 45.
To obtain top dead
Sparking Plugs
The sparking plugs were adopted for original equipment
after lengthy tests as sparking plug types vary in
suitability for different engines, it is important that the
correct type of plug be fitted when making replacements.
This is Champion No. LIO-f' reach.
The gaps (i.e., the width between th~v firing point of the
centre electrode and the earth point) are originally set and
should be maintained at thirty-two thousandths of an
inch (0.8 mm.) to ensure even running of the engine.
Misfiring, especially at high speeds and under heavy pulling .
at low speeds, invariably indicates that the gap setting of
the plugs is too wide, whilst erratic slow running can be
accounted for by too narrow a gap setting. If the porcelain
insulation is cracked, either inside or outside, the plug will
behave erratically and should be replaced. Care should be
taken when removing plugs for examination not to
damage the porcelain.
Faulty high tension cables from the distributor to the
sparking plug terminals, and the distriButor points being out
of adjustment can also account for the sparking plugs
misfiring.
CLEANLINESS. The portion of the insulator projecting
above. the body of the .sparking plugs and the special caps
should be kept clean by means of regular attention with a
dry, clean rag. The special cap is provided to prevent
moisture collecting on the plug· porcelain when the engine
has been left stationary in a damp atmosphere, which
normally results in difficult starting.
46
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
In the rare event of the plugs' becoming damp, starting
may be made impossible for the following reasons:-
Due to continuous use of the electric starter without the
engine firing, the interior of the combustion chamber
will become very wet with fuel. This will wet the
interior portion of the sparking plug insulator and so
prevent a spark occurring at the plug points. In this
case remove the plug and dry it.
If the battery hlilPpens to be in a low state of charge it
will not give a sufficient current to the ignition circuit
during the period when the starter is operated, in
which case the starting handle should be used.
PLUG CLEANING. Current practice is to clean plugs
in a machine which directs a jet of fine abrasive material
on to the lower part of the insulator and shell, effectively
removing in a few seconds all carbon or other deposit. This
should be done at 5,000 miles (8,000 km.) intervals,
preferably by a Triumph agent.
New, clean, efficient
plugs-a quick
starting, respollsive
engine.
Oily,dil'ty, worn out
plugs - a sluggish,
wasteful, hard starting engine.
Fig. 26.
Plug before and after cleaning.
47
50
Fig. 29.
Engine cross section.
• 51
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
Carburettor
The correct sizes of choke and jets are fitted to the carburettor and it is inadvisable to alter them as they are the
result of exhaustive bench and road tests.
Slow running adjustments are provided and these are the
only points that may require attention after the engine
has become run-in.
Two adjusting screws are shown in
Fig. 30, one for limiting the closing of the throttle and thus
the idling speed. The other screw regulates the strength
of the idling mixture. There is also a screw which sets the
full open position. Don't interfere with this.
CHOKE AND JET SIZES
Component
Choke tube
I
......
Size of Jet
......
25
Main jet
......
......
135
Air correction jet
......
......
190
Pilot jet (slow running)
......
Starter jet
......
......
......
I
55
130
'tV;
SLOW RUNNING ADJUSTMENT. We recommend that
the carburettor be adjusted to run at a fairly fast idling
speed, because an engine which is regulateq to a minimum
speed when hot, is apt to stall when cold.
Commence with. the regulator screw screwed out I!
complete turns and the throttle screw set to the lowest
possible idle, and under these circumstances the engine
should have a tendency to "hunt."
Now screw in the
regulator screw until the engine runs evenly. This may cause
the engine speed to increase, in which case the throttle screw
should again be rotated until the engine idles slowly.
52
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
CLEANING THE JETS· AND FILTER. It may happen
that foreign matter enters the float chamber and is sucked
into the jets, so preventing the flow of fuel and causing
the engine to falter. Fig. 30 shows the jets which may. be
removed for cleaning purposes. Care should be taken not
to enlarge the jet orifice. The filter incorporated in the
fuel pipe union can be removed for cleaning after the union
bolt has been removed.
MAIN JET HOLDER
40Za
Fig. 30.
Carburettor.
i~.
NOTE.-A fully comprehensive booklet on each type of
Solex carburettor can be obtained post paid on remittance
of 1/- to Solex Ltd., 223/231, Marylebone Road, London,
N.W.!.
Besides giving full instructions on tuning the carburettor,
the booklet contains a helpful chart on engine and carburettor
fault diagnosis, many useful general hints and tips, a complete
price list of spare parts, a list of Solex Service Stations
throughout the country, and a non-technical survey of the
importance of good carburation and how to maintain it.
53
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
Fuel Pump
The
fuel
pump IS mounted on the lefthand side of the
crankcase and
provides a constant pressure
of fuel to the
carburettor float
chamber when
the engine IS
runmng.
A hand primer
is fitted to the
Fuel pump.
pump whi ch can Fig. 31 •
be used to pump
fuel to the carburettor if the float chamber is not already
full, under which condition a slight pumping resistance is
felt before the lever reaches the stop. When the float chamber
is full the lever can be pulled up to its stop, without any
resistance being felt along its travel. This is also the case
if the engine has come to rest in such a position that the
pump diaphragm is fully depressed; in which case give the
crankshaft one complete turn with the starting handle then
operate the hand primer.
PUMP FAILURE. If the pump is siispected of not delivering
fuel to the carburettor, slacken the carburettor union, then
turn the crankshaft with the' starting handle. It is not
sufficient to test by operating the hand primer. If the pump
is''delivering, fuel will leak at this slack connection. If the
pump fails to supply fuel to the carburettor, attend
to the following points.
<
1.
Ensure that there is fuel in the tarue'
2.
Clean the filter.
Remove the filter cover and gauze, clean out the sediment
chamber, swill the gauze in fuel and replace.
Make
54
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
certain that the cork washer lies flat on its seat and
makes an air-tight joint, and that the fibre washer is
under the head of the cover screw. Tighten the screw
just sufficiently to ensure a fuel-tight joint.
Overtightening will either destroy the cork or fibre washers,
crack the cover, or fracture the main casting.
3.
Inspect Joints.
Examine the pipes and connections for possible leakage.
If fuel leal,s at the diaphragm, tighten the screws
alternatively to ensure a good joint.
4.
Fuel pipe blocked.
Remove the pipe from the pump inlet and, with the
aid of a tyre pump, blow. through the pipe, this
should remove any foreign matter which may be
restricting the flow of fuel.
If the pump should fail to work after attending to the
above points, it should be renewed and the old pump
sent to the nearest A.C. Service Station or Triumph
Service Depot.
NOTE
TO
SERVICE
STATIONS
AND
GARAGES
After removal of the valve chamber of any type of A.C. Fuel
Pump, it is important that the chamber should only be replaced
whilst the pump diaphragm is at the top of its stroke. This is to
ensure sufficient flexing:rof the0iaphragm to allow for its normal
working movement.
.
Cylinder Sleeves
If it is found necessary at any time to remove the cylinder
sleeves, they can be qUite easily lifted out. The,joint washer
should always be renewed to avoid the risk of consequent
water leak as it is most unlikely that the sleeves can be raised
without tearing the washer which surrounds each pair of
sleeves.
No jointing compound is necessary on assembly.
55
. . . . . ' r vr
;
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
Decarbonising and Valve Grinding
It is recommended that the cylinder head be removed for
decarbonising and valve grinding after the first 5,000 miles.
This is chiefly to give attention to the valve seats, the metal of
which becomes stabilised during this period.
Thereafter it
will be found that decarbonisation will be required only after a
period of about 20,000 miles (32,000 km.). Providing that
the engine is runuing satisfactorily after this period and that each
cylinder gives a normal compression, showing that the valves
are seating reasonably well, it is much better to leave it alone
and delay decarbonising for as long as the engine continues to
run satisfactorily.
After the car has covered a consideratjJ,e mileage it may be
necessary, due to the increased carbon' deposit, to set back
slightly the ignition (see page 45), to prevent a metallic sounding
noise termed "pinlcing." It is evident when pulling hard
up-hill or when accelerating from low speed in top gear. In
spite of all precautions the time will come when the cylinder
head must be removed for decarbonising and attention to the
valve seats. This is necessary when there is a lack of compression
in one or more cylinders or through loss of power resulting
from the need for excessive retarding of the ignition to prevent
" pinking."
The grinding of the valves becomes necessary in order not only
to increase the efficiency of the engine, but to prevent a badly
seating valve becoming worse and getting burnt.
PROCEDURE
Many owners would prefer to have the&;y operations carried out
by a competent mechanic and we recommend that the work
should be done by your Triumph Agent; but for those desiring to
do this work themselves, the method is outlined below:Dismantling
I. Remove one terminal from battery to prevent the
possibility of a " short" (see page 70).
2. Drain the cooling system (see page 14). If antifreeze solution is present it may be preserved and used
again on assembly.
3. Remove air silencer from carburettor and rocker cover.
4. Disconnect top water hose and the bye-pass pipe at
the thermostat.
56
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
5.
Remove thermometer bulb from thermostat after
unscrewing gland nut. Flats may be provided on bulb
e,xtension ,so that a spanner may be used to prevent
tWisting of the pipe when gland nut is being turned.
6. Remove heater hoses (if fitted).
7. Disconnect carburettor controls, fuel pipe and pipe
joining ignition distributor.
8. Disconnect inlet manifold drain pipe.
9. Remove sparking plug leads.
10. Remove rocker cover and withdraw its securing studs.
11. Remove rocker shaft complete with standards, each
standard being secured by a single nut to the cylinder
head.
12. Remove outer,.yalve springs, valve caps and push rods.
13. Disconnect exhaust manifold from exhaust pipe.
14. Remove cylinder head.
Do not insert any tool such as a screwdriver between
the cylinder head and cylinder face, as this would
damage the gasket and head surfaces. If any water
should find its way into the bores, wipe it away
immediately.
If the gasket is il,l good condition, preserve it carefully
for refitting.
NOTE. The procedure of turning the cranl,shaft
in order that the compression will " break" the
seal of the cylinder head should not be practised
with this design of engine.
Once the cylinder head has been removed it is
important that the crankshaft is not rotated unless
the cylillder sleeves are firmly clamped down
against rl1eir seatings. This can be accomplished
by using two tubes and washers as shown in
Fig. 33. If this precaution is not observed the
sleeves may rise, tearing the joint washer, with
consequent risk 'of water leaking into the cranl,case after assembly.
15. Remove inlet and exhaust manifold as a unit from
cylinder head.
16. Remove valves. The inner valve spring exerts only a
light load and it can be compressed by hand, for collar
removal.
Care should be taken not to mix the valves and to
ensure this they are numbered accordingly.
57
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
Decarbonising
Before starting to clean off the carbon from the piston crowns,
first tum the crankshaft until any two pistons are near the
top dead centre position, then fill the remaining cylinder
bores and the push rod chambers with clean rag to prevent any
chips ofcarbon falling into the cylinders (see note on page 57).
Valve spring removal.
Fig. 32.
We recommend that the carbon inside the top edge of the
cylinder be left intact, together with a f' (3 mm.) wide
band at the edge of the piston, otherwise its removal may
adversely affect oil consumption.
Cylinder sleeves clamped down.
Fig. 33.
58
"'IIIIIIIlC,....IIiIL
.tJiiWiiiFlII_IIIII". .I\IIIIJI!I!II:::.;[2II-UIII.SIIUSI/lIllIlllll-
..
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
Scrape the piston crown and the carboned portions of the
cylinder face, using an old screwdriver or similar blunt tool
. in a " chiselling" manner. Care should be taken to avoid
carbon chips dropping between the sleeves into the cylinder
block.
Then give the starting handle a part turn and treat the two
other pistons in the same way.
The cylinder head should now be scraped, but first remove
the sparking plugs, and when the operation is complete
wipe the chambers clean. Scrape clean the valve ports,
but be careful not to scratch the valve seats, and when completed, wipe clean with a <\?etrol-damped rag. Do not polish
the parts with emery cloth or other abrasive, for the particles
may, on assembly, get into the cylinder bores and do serious
harm.
The sparking plugs should then be cleaned and
the points reset (see page 46) before replacing them in the
cylinder head.
When finally cleaning the head see that the stud holes are
also clean to avoid particles of loose carbon dropping on to
the gasket when refitting the head.
Clean the carbon off the underside of the valve heads as well
as off the top, using a blunt knife and finishing with a fueldamped rag. Carefully remove carbon from both sides of
cylinder head gasket.
Valve Grinding
i~
In order that the valves snall be gas tight, it is necessary for
the bevelled surfaces of the valve and cylinder seat to make
perfect contact when fitted together. This i~ achieved by
grinding the two surfaces together, but each valve must be
ground into the correct seat as indicated by the numbers
stamped on the valves (No.1 valve is nearest to the radiator).
A small tin of special grinding paste may be obtained
containing both fine and coarse grades.
The grinding process consists in coating the bevelled face
of the valve with. grinding paste and refitting the valve in
its guide.
59
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
A small spring may, with advantage, be fitted under the
valve head for the purpose of lifting dle valve from its seating
during the grinding operation. Turn the valve to and fro
and after each movement, allow the spring to lift the valve,
then press down into another position before giving the
next turn. This will keep the grinding· even.
Continue these operations until the surfaces assume an even
matt appearance, then wipe away all traces of paste rrom the
valve seats and ports as any paste finding its way into the
cylinder bores or valve guides would do serious harm.
If the valve seats are in fairly good condition it will only be
necessary to use the fine paste, but if this is insufficient to
Fig. 34.
Showing badly pitted valve.
produce a clean surface, a little coarse paste must be used,
finishing off with fine grade. Whell the valves are badly
pitted (see Fig. 34) they should either be renewed or refaced.
Do not attempt to grind them in, or you will remove an
undue amount of metal from the cylinder head seats. It
should be remembered that the steel valves are much harder
than the cast iron seats with which they engage.
When refacing valves remove the least amount necessary to
give a clean face, and reject those valves whose head thickness above seat edge is less than .'2" (1 mm.). If the head is
too thin the edges are apt to curl when the valve becomes
hot. The valve face has an included angle of 90°.
60
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
If the seats are badly worn or pitted they should be recut
with a valve seat cutter.
Should a valve be found to have embedded itself by wear,
into the cylinder head face, leaving a step, a shallow cutter of
approximately 15° should be used prior to using the 89°
cutter (i.e. 1 less than the valve face).
0
The cutter pilot must be a good fit in the valve guide to
ensure a concentric seat. The normal width of seat is ,'6",
Before replacing the gasket
on the cylinder face it is
advisable to smear it with
clean grease, which will
prevent the gasket sticking when the head is next
removed.
If the gasket has been
damaged do not risk the
possibility of a water l~,
but fit a new one.
There are two types of
gasket and it is essential
that they are fitted
correctly, one has ONE
oil feed hole, the other
has TWO.
Figs. 35 & 35 a .
Cylinder Head Gasket.
The gasket shown in Fig. 35 MUST be fitted with the
plain side uppermost. The gasket shown in Fig. 35a should
be fitted with the plain side downwards against the cylinder
block.
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Engine
When replacing the cylinder head nuts tighten them
gradually in the sequence shown on page 43. This will
produce an even pressure on the gasket and prevent undue
strain in the cylinder head casting. If a new gasket has been
fitted it will be necessary later to go over the nuts again and
give them a further tightening. This should be done when
the engine has been thoroughly warmed through.
Before refitting the complete rocker shaft, slacken the
lock nuts and screw back the adjusting screws. This
will facilitate assembly. The outer valve springs are c1osecoiled at one end and when fitting, the close-coiled end
should be against the cylinder hea~"
When tightening down the rocker pedestals ensure that the
valve caps are locating properly on the valve stems.
Failure to attend to these items may result in damage to the
push rods.
Adjust the valve-rocker clearances as described on page 44.
Smother the rocker gear with oil, particularly where the
rockers bear on to the valve caps, before fitting the rocker
cover.
When replacing the rocker cover ensure that the cork washer
is undamaged and shellaced to the cover, otherwise oil may
leak through the joint.
Fit the rubber collar to half its length into the air cleaner
orifice when positioning the c1eanerAon the carburettor, this
will ensure that the rubber is in the correct position when
the air cleaner is bolted down.
Gaskets which may require renewal when Decarbonising.
Detail No.
No. off
Description
61312
1
Cylinder Head Gasket.
60535
60574
2
Carburettor Gaskets.
57924
I
Exhaust Pipe Gasket.
60256
2
Manifold Gaskets.
56286
2
Cylinder Bottom Gasket
(only required ifsleeves are
to be withdrawn).
62
I}
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS
CLUTCH
A Borg & Beck single dry plate clutch is fitted, having a sixspring flexible centre. This carries friction facings and is gripped
between the flywheel and clutch pressure plate by the action of
helical springs. By this means the drive is transmitted from the
flywheel to the gearbox primary shaft on which the clutch plate
is mounted. Three toggles are incorporated with the clutch
cover and when the clutch pedal is depressed these toggles lift
the pressure plate away from the clutch plate and so release the
drive between the engine and gearbox. This type of clutch is
particularly sweet in action and takes up the drive in a smootli
manner. The clutch is correctly set before leaving the works and
it will be some considerable time before it requires re-adjustment.
<,1
Adjustment
Indication that adjustment is required is given when;1. The free pedal movement is reduced to about i" (6 mm.)
or
2. The free pedal movement increases until the clutch will
not be fully released when the pedal is fully depressed.
It is then necessary to adjust the clearance until there is
backlash or free movement of about !" (13 mm.) measured at
the pedal pad: This will provide the A" (1.5 mm.)
clearance required at the toggle ring.
It is unnecessary to remove the floor pan to carry out
this adjustment as the nuts are accessible from beneath (see
Fig. 36).
Clutch adjustment.
Fig. 36.
63
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS
BRAKES
Lockheed hydraulic brakes are fitted to all four wheels. Two
leading shoe type being used on front wheels, leading and
trailing shoe type on rear wheels.
Fig. 37.
Fig. 38.
Brake shoe assembly, front.
Brake shoe assembly, rear.
64
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Brakes
The pedal operates the brakes on all four wheels hydraulically,
whilst the handbrake control operates the brakes on the rear
wheels, by means of cable and rods.
It must be remembered that the presence of oil, grease or
similar foreign matter on a brake shoe will seriously affect the
coefficient of friction and in consequence the retarding effect of
that particular brake, in spite of the fact that it is being applied
with the same force as the others. In such cases, the brake drum
should be thoroughly cleaned with fuel and the brake shoes
replaced by new replacement shoes. Cleaning the brake shoe
is not satisfactory.
See page 27 for checking level ~f fluid in reservoir. If it is found
to be particularly low it is an indication that a leak has developed
somewhere in the system and it should be traced and rectified
without delay.
Do not reline the shoes, but fit genuine Lockheed replacement
shoes. These shoes have the right type of lining machined to
.
the correct radii.
Should the shoes be removed, care must be exercised to
ensure that the pull-offsprings are located behind the shoes
and hooked through the correct poles as shown in Figs. 37
and 38.
.
Adjustment of Brake Shoes
After a corisiderljple mileage it may be found necessary
to adjust the brakes. This is evident wh~n the brake pedal h!l~
to be depressed to withi4c)" of the fl60r before the brakes
operate. There are TWO adjusters to each front wheel and
ONE to each rear wheel (see Figs. 37 and 38).
Thef~ilowing procedure.should be f~llowed to correctly
adjust the brakes.
*
1. Apply the 'brakes hard with the car stationary, to
position the shoes in the drum.
2. Jack up·.The caF;(and remove the'nave plates.
3. . Rotate wheel~ntil hole in brak~ drum coincides with
screwdriver slot iIi miqam adjuster (see Fig. 39).
4. Insert a screwdriv~r and turn the adjuster clockwise
until the shoe conta<;ts the brake drum, ·then turn
65
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Brakes
adjuster back one notch. There is a constant drag on the
rear wheels due to the action of the differential and the
axle oil, don't confuse this with the brake drag.
5.
Replace nave plates and remove jack.
Left-hand
Front
Right-hand
Left-hand
Rear
Right-hand
Position of brake adjusters.
Fig. 39.
Handbrake Adjustment
Adjustment of the brake shoes as previously described
automatically readjusts the handbrake mechanism.
The
rods are correctly set before leaving ~he works and only
maladjustment will result from tampering with the
mechanism.
66
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS~Brakes
Bleeding the System
Except for periodical inspection of the fluid level in the
reservoir chamber and lubrication of the handbrake cables
and connections (see page 27) no attention should be necessary. If, however, a pipe joint is uncoupled at any time, or
the wheel cylinder cups are inspected or replaced, the
system must be bled in order to expel any air which may have
been admitted.
Air is compressible, and its presence in the system will effect
the working of the brakes.
Bleeding the brakes.
Fig. 40.
Whilst the majority of owners will prefer to have these
operations carried out by a Triumph Agent, for the benefit
of those desiring to carry out their own running adjustments,
the procedure is as follows
1.
Remove the front road
cylinder reservoir.
67
to allow access to master'
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Brakes
2.
Wipe clean the bleeder nipple of the brake concerned
and fit a piece of rubber tube over it, allowing the tube .
to hang in a clean container partially filled with fluid,
so that the end of the pipe is below the level of the
fluid (see Fig. 40).
3.
Unscrew the bleeder nipple one complete turn with a
suitable spanner. There is only one bleeder nipple
to each wheel.
4.
The fluid reservoir of the master cylinder must be topped
up before commencing the bleeding operation, and must
be kept at least half-filled during the whole operation,
otherwise more air will be dra~n into the system via the
master cylinder. Always clean the area around the
plug before removing it, this will lessen the risk of
grit falling into the chamber after removal of the plug.
Seven to eight strokes of the pedal will reduce the fluid
level from full to half-full.
5.
Depress the brake pedal quickly and allow it to return without assistance.
Repeat this pumping operation with a slight pause
between each depression of the pedal. Observe the
flow of fluid being discharged into the glass jar and
when all air bubbles cease to appear, hold the pedal
firmly down and securely tighten the bleeder nipple.
NOTE. Depending upon the position at which a pipe joint
has been uncoupled it will be necessary to bleed the system
at either both the front or both the back wheels. If the
pipe was uncoupled at the master cylinder then the system
must be bled at all four wheels.
PROPELLER SHAFT
If the propeller shaft has been removed it is essential when
re-assembling the front end splines to see that the arrows on the
universal joint and propeller shaft end are in line (see Fig. 16,
page 31) so that the propeller shaft will transmit uniform motion.
68
RUNNING ADJUSTMENTS-Brakes
A single universal joint does not transmit vniform motion when
the driving and driven shafts are inclined to one another, but
when two joints are used, one at each end of the propeller shaft,
and set in correct relation one to the other, the errors of one are
corrected by the errors of the other and uniform motion ensues.
Hence the importance of re-engaging the splines correctly when
they have been taken apart.
HYDRAULIC DAMPERS
If these are removed, or for some reason new ones are fitted, it
is advisable to hold the hydraulic damper right way up in a vice,
check level of fluid and replenish if necessary. Pump the
pistons to each end of the stroke by moving the lever to its full
extent. . This will dispel any air which may have entered the
chamber. After this oIferation, re-check the fluid level and
keep the hydraulic damper the right way up until it is fitted
in place.
LOOSE BOLTS OR NUTS
All the vital nuts are locked in position by split pins, locking
wire, or by an additional lock nut or lock washer. It is, however,
desirable that the car should be examined every 5,000 miles
(8,000 kIn.) so that if any nut is found to be loose it may be
tightened. The wheel nuts can periodically be checked by the
owner himself and occasionally removed, oiled and refitted.
The general examination of the chassis is a mechanic's job.
69
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
A 12 volt earth return (or one wire) lighting and starting set
is fitted.
As the frame parts are not insulated, one cable should
be disconnected from the battery terminal before removing any electrical unit, otherwise there is risk of a serious
" short."
IGNITION
See page 10 for the function of the red warning lamp bulb.
Although the failure of this bulb will not affect the ignition,
the bulb should be replaced at the earliest opportunity by one
of the same size and type, i.e., Lucas No. 987, 12 volt, 2.2 watt
(see page 79).
.
Misfiring, etc.
""I:I
If misfiring occurs, check that the fault is not due to a defect
in the carburettor, fuel supply, sparking plugs, etc.
The engine will run erratically in the rare occurrence of a
wire having broken inside its insulated casing. The trouble
is then difficult to trace.
Examine the high tension leads. If they are cracked and
_perished, replace with 7 mm. rubber covered ignition cable.
To fit new Cables to Coil and Distributor
Thread the knurled moulded nut over the lead, bare the
cable for about i" (6 mm.), thread the wire through the brass
washer provided, and bend back the strands as shown in
Fig. 41.
Cleaning and Adjustment of
Distributor Contacts. Every
5,000 miles (8,000 km.) wipe the
inside and outside of the moulded
distributor cover with a soft dry
cloth, paying particular attention
to the space between the terminals.
See that the small carbon brush
on the inside of the moulding
works freely on its holder.
MOULDED
Examine the contact breaker. The
contacts must be free from e:rease
or oil. Ifthey are burned or black70
'T(.RMINAL
CABLE
51RANOS
41. Fitting high tension
coil and distributor.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Battery
ened clean them with a fine carborundum stone or with very
fine emery cloth. Afterwards wipe away any trace of dirt
or metal dust with a cloth moistened in petrol.
After cleaning check the contact breaker gap. To do
this turn the crankshaft with the starting handle until
the contacts are fully opened and insert the gauge [0.012"
(0.3 mm.)· provided on the ignition screwdriver, between
the contacts.
If the setting is correct the gauge will be a sliding fit, but if the
gap varies appreciably from the gauge the setting should be
adjusted. Keep the engine in the position to give maximum
opening of the contacts and slacken the two screws securing
the plate carrying tl¥;. fixed contact. Move the plate until
the gap is set to the thickness of the gauge, tighten the two
screws and re-check the setting.
,~
THE BATTERY
Lucas GTW9A. 12v. 51 amp. hr.
About once every fortnight (more frequently in hot climates),
top up each cell with distilled water to bring the acid solution
(electrolyte) level with the top of the separators. Do not use
tap water and do not use a naked light when examining the
condition of the cells.
Keep the terminals clean
HOLD 'rUBE
and well covered with petroVERTICALLY
leum jelly.
If they are
DO NOT DRAW
corroded,scrape them clean,
IN TOO MUCH
ELECTROLYTE
assemble and cover with
petroleum jelly. Wipe J~ay
fLOAT MUST
all dirt and moisture from
BE FREE
the top of the battery, and
make sure that the connections and fixing bolts are
clean. Occasionally check
the condition of the battery
by taking hydrometer readings of the specific gravity
of the electrolyte in each of
the cells. Readings should
not be taken
after topping up the cells. Specific
gravity
indications
follows:71
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Dynamo
1.280-1.300
About 1.210 .
Below 1.150 .
Battery fully charged.
Battery about half discharged.
Battery fully discharged.
These readings are given assuming the temperature of the
solution is about 60°F. If the electrolyte temperature exceeds
this 0.002 must be added to the hydrometer reading for each 50
rise from 60°F, to give the true specific gravity at the normal
temperature of 60°F. Similarly 0.002 must be deducted from
the hydrometer reading for every 5°F below 60°F.
The readings of all cells should be approximately the same.
If one cell gives a reading very different'~pm the rest, it may be
that acid has been spilled or has leaked from this particular cell,
or there may be a short circuit between the plates. In the latter
case the battery should be examined by a Triumph or Lucas
Service Agent or Depot.
Never leave the battery in a discharged condition for any length
of time. Have it fully charged, and every fortnight give it a
short refreshing charge.
THE DYNAMO
The dynamo is of the compensated voltage control and operates
in conjunction with the regulator unit which is housed alongside
the cut-out in the control box.
The regulator unit ensures that the dynliJ,lIlo charges the battery
at the rate best suited to its condition. It automatically provides
a large charging current for a discharged battery and a low
trickle charge for a battery in a fully charged state.
When the engine is at rest, or running slowly, the dynamo
does not develop sufficient current to charge the battery, and
under these circumstances, the battery would discharge itself
through the dynamo if the cut-out were not fitted. The cut-out
is operated by the dynamo voltage, and when, due to increasing
speed, the dynamo develops sufficient voltage to actuate the
cut-out, the points make contact and so allow current to flow
.from the dynamo to the battery. In this systeJ;l1, current cannot
flow in the reverse direction. The cut-out requires no attention,
72
L
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Starter Motor
It IS correctly adjusted by the manufacturers and the sealed
unit must not be tampered with.
The brush gear and commutator on the dynamo will not
normally require any attention. After 50,000 miles (80,000 km.)
however, it is advisable to have the unit serviced at a Lucas
depot.
Belt Tightness
See, that the belt is sufficiently tight to drive the dynamo. It
can be adjusted by slackening the securing nuts and swinging
the dynamo in the desired direction.
Retighten the
nuts whilst holding the dynamo in tlle adjusted position.
Don't over-tighte!J" the belt as this would put an undue
load on the dynanio and the water pump bearings.
THE STARTER MOTOR
To obtain the longest life from the starter and battery, the following points should be observed when starting:I.
2.
3.
4.
See that the controls are properly set.
Press the starter button, and, of course, release it as
soon as the engine fires.
Never operate the starter while the engine is still running.
If the engine will not fire at once, allow it to come to rest
before pressing the button again.
Do not run the battery down by keeping the starter on,
when the en~e will not start.
Cleaning and Lubrication
The starter brush gear and commutator will not normally
require attention. After 50,000 miles (80,000 km.) however,
it is advisable to have the unit serviced at a Triumph or
Lucas Service depot.
Should the starter pinion become jammed in mesh with the
flywheel, then it can be released by turning the crankshaft
with the starting handle in the normal manner, or select
top gear and rock the car backwards and forwards nntil the
pinion releases itself.
73
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Control Box and F4ses
Starter Motor only turns Crankshaft slowly
The battery may be run down due to leaving the ignition
switch on, or leaving the car standing with the head lamps on.
The grade of oil in the engine sump may be too heavy.
Starter Motor will not turn Crankshaft
This may be due to a broken connection between the
starter and battery or a bad contact.
If the red warning light goes out when the starter button
is pressed, then the battery is in a run down condition and
the engine should be started by hand. .
~ii
If the motor hums but does not engage with the flywheel
when the starter buttoR is pressed, then:(a)
The battery may be in a run down condition.
(b)
The brushes are sticking or the commutator requires.
cleaning.
(c) Battery terminals are not clean or secure.
CONTROL BOX AND FUSES
The control box, mounted on the wing vall1nce, in front of the
battery, houses the voltage regulator and cut-out. These units
are carefully and accurately set before leaving the works and
must not be tampered with.
Fuses
The fuse holders are clearly marked (see Fig. 43), to show
the circuits which the fuses protect. Spare fuses are clipped
to the side of the control box. When replacing a fuse, it
is important to use the correct replacement (Lucas No.
188216, 35 amperes capacity). The fusing value is marked
on a coloured paper slip inside the tube.
74
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Lamps
DIRECTION INDICATORS
FUSE.
WINDSCREEN WIPER MOTOR
BRAKE LIGHT
PROTECTS { REVERSE LIGHT
PETROL GAUGE
FUSE PROTECTS THE HORNS AND ROOF LIGHT
Fig. 43.
Control box and fuses.
A blown fuse will be indicated by the failure of all the units
protected by it, and is confirmed by examinatioll of the fuse.
If it has blown, the broken ends of the wire Will be visible
inside the glass tube. Before replacing a blown fuse, inspect
the wiring of the units that have failed, for evidence of a
short circuit or other fault which may have caused the fuse
to blow and remedy the cause of the trouble. If it is not
possibl~ to 19s;.ate the cause of. the trouble and the new ~se
blows Immeorately, the eqUIpment should be exammed
by a Triumph or Lucas Agent or Service Depot.
LAMPS
Head Lamps
Bulbs Fitted
Home:
Left-hand Lamp
Right-hand Lamp
Export: Left-hand drive
Both Lamps
Right-hand drive
Both Lamps
75
.....•
Lucas No.
Voltage
302
185
12
12
48/48
48
303
12
48/48
302
12
48/48
Wattage
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Lamps
The lamps fitted to the Triumph have the reflector
and glass sealed as a unit. The bulb has a " pre-focus" cap
accurately located and correctly positioned relative to the
reflector, thus no adjustment to focusing is required when a
replacement bulb is fitted.
Should it be desired to travel in countries where the " rule
of the road" is changed, it may be an advantage to fit
alternative headlamp bulbs in order to alter the direction of
the" dipped" beam. The bulbs, Lucas No. 302, should be
replaced by Lucas No. 303 and vice versa.
Alignment
The lamp must be set to ensure that the beam is projected
below the horizontal, taking into account that the lamp must
be dipped slightly more to compensatq;lor road inequalities
and heavy loads which may be carried in the rear of the
vehicle.
To Check and Adjust Alignment
Park the car in front of a garage door or wall and square to
it. The car must stand on level ground and the front of the
lamps should be approximately 25 ft. from the "screen."
The car must be unladen and the tyres at the correct pressures.
Fig. 44.
Head lamps correctly aligned.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Lamps
.A point should be marked on the screen in line with the
centre of the bonnet. Two crosses should be drawn on
the "screen" 33" above the ground level and 26" apart,
measured equally about the centre point (see Fig. 44).
Switch on the headlamps and adjust the lamps if necessary,
until the centre of each circle of light coincides with the
centre of its respective cross.
NOTE-Headlamps Fitted to Home Models
It will be noticed when aligning lamps that the beam
images from the two lamps differ somewhat in shape.
This is because the design of the double filament bulb
varies slightly from that of the single filament type.
Removal of Lamp Front
To remove the lamp front for cleaning or bulb replacement,
place first and second finger around the securing clip at
the bottom of the lamp, pull it towards you and swing it
down out of engagement with the
rim. Ease the rim
from the bottom of
the lamp first before
completely liemoving. When replacing, locate the top
of the rim first
before pushing the
bottom home.
Headlamp (front remoVal)
Fig 45
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Lamps
Bulb Replacement
Rotate the back shell anti-clockwise and pull off, then
the headlamp bulb can be removed. Care should be taken
to see that the bulb does not drop out.
Fig. 46.
Headlamp light unit with backshell removed..
Side l-amps
(Lucas No. 207, 12 volt 6 watt single IlPntact bulbs fitted.)
To replace bulb,
release the fixing
screw at the back
of the lamp and
pull the front complete with bulbholder away from
the lamp body.
The bulb can then
be withdrawn (see
Fig. 47).
Fig. 47.
Side lamp bulb removal.
78
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Lamps
Tail and Brake Lamps (Lucas No. 207 12 volt 6 watt
single contact
bulbs fitted).
To obtain
access to the
bulbs for replacement,
unscrew the
knurled screw
at the edge of
each glass
co ve r. The
covers can then
be swung
open (see Figs.
48 and 49).
Reversing lamp
(Lucas No.1,
12 volt 24 watt
single
contact
bulb fitted).
Fig. 49.
Fig. 48.
Tail lamp.
Tail and reversing lamp.
Roof Lamp
(Lucas No. 207, 12 volt 6 watt single contact bulb fitted).
To gain access to the bUlb, release clip and remove" glass."
Ensure that tongue on one end of " glass" is inside holder
before clipping it back into position.
79
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Horn and Fuel Gauge
Ignition Warning L i g h t " i
(Lucas No. 987, 12 volt 2.2 watt screw cap type bulb fitted).
For access to ignition warning light and instrument panel
lights unscrew the two wing nuts at the back of facia panel
and remove as a whole.
Direction Indicators
(Lucas No. 256, 12 volt 3 watt festoon type bulbs fitted).
To replace bulb withdraw the cover as explained on page 34,
fit new bulb and replace cover.
PLATE MUST
I/ENGAGE WITH SLOT;
LUBRICATE"
HERE->
",.
Fig. 50.
Removal of bulb from indicator arm.
Instrument Panel Lights
(Lucas No. 987, 12 volt 2.2 watt screw cap type bulb fitted).
See " Ignition Warning Light" for replacement of bulbs.
WINDSCREEN WIPER
for 2peration, see page 9, for lubrication, see page 35.
WINDTONE HORNs
Each electric horn, before being passed out of the works, is
adjusted to give its best performance, and will give long periods of
service without any attention. No adjustment is required in
service.
If for any reason the note is unsatisfactory do not attempt to
dismantle the horn, but return it to a Lucas Service Depot for
examination.
FUEL GAUGE
AIl;, electrical gauge fitted on the instrument panel indicates
the ,amount of fuel in the tank and is brought into operation when
the ignition is switched on. A rheostat incorporated in the tank
unit, is fitted in the top of the fuel tank and connected by an
arm to the float which indicates the fuel level by setting th,e
80
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM-Fuel Gauge
''ffi~ostat
resistance in a corresponding manner.
Thus each
fuel level has a different electrical resistance which is suitably
indicated on the gauge.
Important
1. On no account should the float arm be bent other than
as supplied.
The float arm provides both top and
bottom stops which prevent the contact arm overtravelling the resistance.
2. Please give the following details in all communications
with the makers dealing with fuel gauge units ;Year and model of car.
Code numbers of meter and tank unit.
Localisation of Faults
Symptom
ii'
Cause
Remedy
Meter reads full.
(1) Tank unit cable Re-connect.
disconnected or
broken.
(2) Tank unit not Clean body of tank
" earthed."
unit and fixing ring.
Meter reads empty. (I) Meter supply dis- Re-connect.
connected.
(2) Case of meter not Make connection
" earthed."
with case of fixing
stud to "earth."
(3) Faulty meter.
Return for repair.
(4) Tank unit cable Replace cable.
" earthed."
(5) Terminal on tank Return for repair.
unit " earthed."
ELECTRICAL COMPONENT SPECIFICAnON
!:~--.
SPECIFICATION OF EQUIPMENT
I
Model
Service
No.
Battery
GTW9A
-
Control Box
RF 95(2
37065
Coil
B12
45012
Dynamo
C39PV
22250
Dis~ributor
DVX4A
40144
Starter
M418G
BULBS
Lucas Volt- .Watt.
No.
age
I
Fuses
I
188216
Head Lamps.
Main.
Home: Left-hand lamp
Right-hand lamp
Export: Left-hand drive
Both lamps
Right-hand drive
Both lamps
Side lamps
Tail and bralce lamps .
302
185
12
12
48(48
48
303
12
48/48
302
207
207
12
12
12
48/48:
6
6
1
256
12
12
24
3
g
/.2
25526
35
amperes
capacity
Reverse lamp
Trafficators
:~~~!~~~:i~~::and
81
:. .
~~i
.....
,
SERVICE
Any Triumph owner who experiences any doubt or difficulty
with the performance of his car is invited to communicate>with
his agent, and it is particularly desirable to seek the advice
of one of our agents in the locality, preferably the supplier
of the vehicle, who, being thoroughly conversant with all
our models, will rapidly diagnose the symptoms of any
peculiarity and be able to advise a remedy.
Considerable car is exercised in the choice of all Triumph
Agents, particularly to ensure that they a,re suitably equipped to
give after-sales service.
~
MAINTENANCE
All our principal Agents hold comprehensive stocks of spares
for current models.
Every TRIUMPH chassis has a distinguishing number. This is known as the car commission number, and
should always be quoted, together with the engine number
'WI.
when spares or renewals are ordered.
When ordering spare parts it is always advisable to give, in
"
addition to the car commission number, a brief description of
the part required.
82
..\ .
NOTES
!
I
!
I
I
1
83
,
i
[
I
/"
INDEX
Page
25
Air Cleaner
Anti-free~e
14
71
73
40
mixtures
Battery
Belt tightness
Bodywork
Bolts and nuts (loose)
Brakes
Brake Adjusttnent
. Brake Cable lubrication
Brake reservoir fluid level
Brake Shoe replacement
Bulb replacements
Brake light
Direction indicators
Ignition warning light
Interior ligbt
Head light
Number plate illuminator
Panel light
Parking light
Reversing light .
Tail lamps
Carburettor
Choke control
Clock
Clutch
Clutch adjusttnent
Clutch shaft lubrication
Cooling system
Controls
Control box
69
64
65
28
27
65
79
80
80
79
78
79
80
78
79
79
52
8
10
63
63
25
14
7&8
74
72
43
55
58
4
80
Cut-out
Cylinder head nut tightening
Cylinder Sleeves
Decarbonising and valve grinding
Dimensions of car
Direction indicators
Direction indicator lubrication
Door adjustment
Don'ts for beginners...
Draining the cooling system
Draining the engine, gearbox and rear axle oil
Driving the car
Dynamo
Dynamo lubrication
Electrical component specification ,....
Electrical system
Battery
Control box and fuses .
Dynamo and cut-out
Fuel gauge
Horn
Ignition and distributor
......
Lamps
Misfiring
Starter motor
34
41
Bacl' of oiling chart
14
20
17
72
24
81
70
71
74
72
80
80
70
\
75
70
73
90
INDE X-continued
Electrical System-coni.
Wiring diagram
Engine lubrication
Engines~ncw
Engine oil pressure
Engine oil level
Engine, desirable speed limits
Fan bearing lubrication
Firing order
Flushing oils
Foreword
Fuel capacity
Fuel gauge
Fuel pump
Fuses
Gearbox oille"el
Gear changing
Gear change mechanism, lubrication
Gear positions
General upkeep
~'j~ ,.
Grease gun
Head lamps
Aligning
Bulb replacement
Heater
High tension cables
Horns
Hydraulic dampers, lubrication
Hydraulic .dampers, fitting
Ignition
Ignition distributor
Ignition timing
Instruments
Instrument panel lights
Interior Lamp
Jack
Licence data
Lubrication
Accelerator controls
Air cleaner
Brake cables (hand)
Brake compensator
Brake reservoir
Chart
Clutch shaft
Controls
Direction indicators
Door locks
Draining
Dynamo
Engine
Fan
Page
Back of oiling chart
21
16
10
II
6
24
46
20
3
4
80
54
74
25
17
33
8
19
19
75
76
78
84
70
80
33
69
70
70
45
10
80
79
39
4
19
34
25
28
29
27
..... 95, 96 & insert
25
34
34
34
20
24
21
Front suspension
24
Gearbox
Gear change mechanism
31
Grease gun
Hinges
Hydraulic dampers
25
33
19
34
33
INDE X-continued
Page
Lubrication-com.
Ignition distributor
Oil cleaner
Pedal bearing
Propeller shaft
Rear axle
Road springs
Starter motor
Steering ..
Water Pump
Wheel hubs
Windscreen wiper motor
Maintenance ..
Management of car
Misfiring
Nave plate removal
Oil capacities
Oil cleaner
Parking lights (front)
Pedal bearing lubrication
Propeller shaft lubrication
Propeller shaft dismantling ...
Rear axle lubrication
Regular inspection
Reversing lighr
Road speed data
Running adjustments
Brakes
Clutch
Engine
Hydraulic dampers
Loose bolts and nuts
Propeller shaft .
Seat adjustment (front)
Service
Spare wheel
Sparking plugs
Specification
Springs-road
Starter motor
,....
Starter motor lubrication
Starting the engine
Steering lubrication . .
Suspension lubrication
Tail and brake lamps
Tools
Tyres-care of
Tyre pressures
, Tyre removal
Valve grinding
Valve-rocker clearances
Valve timing .
Water Pump Lubrication
Water capacity of cooling system
Weight of car
Wheel alignment (track)
Wheel hub lubrication
Windscreen wiper switch
Windscreen wiper lubrication
23
22
25
31
26
32
24
33
24
29
35
82
7
70
31
4
22
78
25
31
68
26
11
79
6
43
64
63
43
69
69
68
41
82
41
46
4
32
:fl...
73
24
12
33
31
79
41
36
36
37
59
43
5
24
4
5
38
29
9
35
92
INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS
Fig.
Brakes
Bleeding the brakes
Hand brake compensator
Master cylinder
Position of adjusters
Shoe assembly-Front .
Rear
Battery specific gravity test
Bonnet, view under
Boot, locking in down position
Carburettor
Chassis
Chassis-rear view
Clutch adjustment
Controls, switches and instrtijnents
Control box and fuses
Cylinder head nut tightening
Cylinder sleeves clamped down
Cyliuder head gaskets
Direction indicators-Bulb removal
Lubrication ......
40
12
II
39
37
38
42
4
22a
Page
67
28
27
66
64
64
71
II
42
30
53
50 Chart
10
27
36
63
2
7
43
75
43
23
33
58
35 & 35a
61
50
19
80
34
Engine-cross section
Longitudinal sections
29
51
2748&49
Front suspension
14
31
30
54
9
18
..... 3 & 3a
26
33
8
Fuel pump
Gearbox uil filler
Gear change mechanism
Gear positions
Head lamps
Correctly aligned
i~;:
Light unit
High tension cable, fittiug to coil and distributor
Hub lubrication-front
rear
45
44
46
41
13a
13b
76
78
70
29
29
Ignition distributor
Ignition timing
6
25
23
45
Jacking the car
21
39
Front removal .
Lubrication chart
Nave plate removal
Oil cleaner
77
...... 50 End of book
15
31
5
22
INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS-continued
Fig.
Page
8
16
25
31
Rear of chassis
28
10
50
27
Side lamp bulb removal
Sparking plug, before and after cleaning
Steering box oil filler
47
26
17
78
47
32
Tail lamp and reversing lamp
Tail lamp
Timing diagram
Tool kit layout
Triumph Saloon
49
48
79
79
5
41
2
36
Pedal bearing
Propeller shaft lubrication
Rear axle section
I
22
Tyre tread examination
20
Valve timing diagram
Valve badly pitted
Valve-rocker clearance
I
34
24
32
Valve spring removal
Water Pump Lubrication
5
60
44
58
7
24
51 Back of
Wiring diagram
oiling char.t
94
W~IEL.D
VACUUM
COMPONENT
ENGINE
Air Temp. 0p.
10
0
,to'
40°
Energol
Auto 200
Shell. X 7 IOO, S.A.E.
40 or Double Extra
Mobiloil A
Castrol XL
Energol
Auto ISO
Shell XwIOO, S.A.E.
30 or Double Shell
Essolube 30
DU~~~jP.
Energol
Auto us
Shell X-lOO, S.A.E.
20 or Single Shell
Essolube 20
Duckham'g N.P.
" Twenty"
Shell X-lOO, S.A.E.
10 or Silver: Shell
Essolube 10
Duckham's N.p.
"Ten"
Mobiloil Arctic
·
I
Castrolite
--Upper Cylinder
Lubricant
...
I
Flushing Oils
Mobil
Upperlube
Mobiloil Arctic
Special
Mobilube CW
Over 10"
Duc::KE.I\..M.'s
E~o
Castrol XXL
Over 70°
40° to 70 0
Smu,
ENERGOL
Mobiloil A
Castrollo
EnergOl
Wakefield
Flushing Oil
Energol
Flushing Oil
Castrol XXL
_
Shill
Donax U
U .......L.
Enexgol
~~ell
Duckham's N.P.
" Fony"
Esso Upper Motor
Lubricant
Duckham's
Adcoids
Esso
Flushing Oil
Duckham's N.P.
"Ten"
Shell X-IOO, S.A.E.
Essolube 50
Duckham's N.P.
Sh'U
Spirax;0:JEP
E~o XP
Compound 90
Duokh=',
Hypoid 90
Donax F
!
Essolube 40
T"'-'=-,:c=c'c~cicon,-,3:oCo__ fc5=O-=°C'cTCnC'PC1C'CS=:hC'="c,-~--=-:-c----+_-=-,c"CFCifty~c'c'~-­
GEARBOX =-::_-:_------:_;_:~:_=:_--_;c-_;_:=_Below 10°
Mobilube CW
Castrol XL
Energol
Sbell X-100, S.A.E.
Essolube 30
Duclcham's N.P.
Special
Transmission 200
30 or Double Shell
" Thirty"
'I
~,
Over roO
REAR AXLE
Below 10 0
'0
V1
STEERING BOX
WHEEL HlJBS
ENGINE
WATER PUMP
C~trol
Mobil"'"
GX .§b
.
Mobilube
GX 80
En",ol T,=,mission 300jEP
Hypoy
Castrol
Hypoy 80
Mobilube
GX 140
Energol Transmission 200/EP
Shell
Spira..'l: 80EP
Esso XP
Compound 80
Duckham's
Hypoid 80
Castr..,l
HiwPress
Eoergol Transmission 700jEP
Shell
Spirax 140EP
Esso XP
Compound 140
Duckham's
XS Press 140
(Hand Gun)
Mobilgrease
NO.5
Ciistrolease
Heavy
Energrease Cbassis
Pressure No.2
Shell
Retinax RB
Esso
Bearing Grease
Duckham's
H.B.B.
CHASSIS. Grease Nipples
(Hand or Pressure Gun)
Mobilgrease
NO.4
Castrolease
Medium
Ene.rgrease Chassis
Pressure No. 2
Shell
Retinax C
Esso
Cbassis Grease
Duckham's
Lamirioid Sofr
Mobiloil
Arctic
Oilit
Oil Points (Oil Can)
Body and Chassis
Mobilgrease
No.2
REAR ROAD SPRINGS
Castro!
Penetrating Oil
I
Energol
Auto I25
Shell X-100, S.A.E.
20 or Single Shell
Energol
Penetrating Oil
Shill
Donax P
Esso Handy
Oil
Esso
Penetrating Oil
Duckham's N.P.
" Twenty."
Duckham's
Laminoid Liquid
ALTERNATIVELY USE REAR AXLE OR ENGINE OIL
BRAKE CABLES
Mobilgrease
NO.4
BRAKE RESERVOm
HYDRAULIC
DAMPERS
LOCKHEED
Girling
Ar!xulttong
ORANGE BRAKE FLUID
WAKEFIELD
Armstrong.
Energrease
Graphited No. I
OR
'I
i
Shell
Retinax C
Esso
Graphite Grease
Duckham's
Keenel KG.I6
LOCKHEED NO.5 BRAKE FLUID
LOCKHEED AMERICAN BRAKE FLUID No. 21
GIRLING DAi\1PER,.OIL (THIN)
ARMSTRONG SUPER THIN SHOCK, ABSORBER OIL
Girling
Alternative' OOs
Castrolease Brake
Cable Grease
Esso Shock
Absorber Oil
_..I
Esso Hydraulic
III
.~
,.
Duckham's
S.A.P.
if
RECOMMENDED
LUBRICANTS
BRITISH IS L.B S
COMPONENT
ENGINE
Smnmer
Mobiloil
Arctic
Winter
Upper Cylinder
Lubricant
Castrelite
Energol
S.A.E.20
Double
Shell
Essolube
30
Single
Shell
Essolube
20
Essomix
..
,
l)uCKHAM'S
Duckham's N.P.
" Thirty "
Ii
I
Duckham's N.P.
" Twenty"
Mobil
Upperlube
Castrollo
Buergol
U.C.L.
Shell
Donax U
Mobil Engine
Flushing Oil
Wakefield
Flushing Oil
Price's
Flushing Oil
Shell Flushing
Oil
Esso Flushing
Oil
Duckham's
N.P.·" Ten"
Mobiloil
B.B.
Castrol
XXL
Energol
S.A.E.60
Triple
Shell
Essolube
50
Duckbam's N.P.
" Fifty"
REAR AXLE ..
Mobilube
G.X. 90
Castrol
Hypoy
STEERING BOX
Mobilube
E.P.
Castrol
Hi-Press
Euergol
E.P. S.A.E. 140
Mobil Hub
Grease
Castrolease
Heavy
Belmoline
C
Flushing Oils
GEARBOX
'"
Esse
SHELL
I
Euergol
E.P. S.A.E. 90
0>
WHEEL HUBS
ENGINE
WATER PUMP
(Hand Gun)1
CHASSIS. Grease Nipples
(Hand or Pressure Gun)
Oil Points (Oil can)
Body and Chassis
~:
Mobilgrease
No.4
Mobil Handy
Oil
Mobil Spring
Oil
Belmoline
C
Castrolease
Medium
Oill,
Castrol
j Penetrating Oil
I
Energol
S.A.E. 20
I'
Price's
pe~~~~ting Oil
1
Shell Spirax
90 E.P.
f
Shell Spirax
140 E.P..
'1
Esso Expee
Compound 90
Duckham's
Hypoid 90
Esso Expee
Duckharn's X.S.
Compound 140!
Press 140
I
Duckham's
H.B.B.
Shell
Retinax RB
Esso
Grease
Shell
Retinax C
Esso
Grease
Duckham's
Laminoid Soft
Single
Shell
Essolube
20
Duckh2m's
N.P. "Twenty"
1 Shell Donax
,
Duckham's
Adcoids
Esso
Duckbam's
Penetrating Oil I Laminoid Liquid
I
P
""~
REAR ROAD SPRINGS
"-'"'
BRAKE RESERVOIR
LOCKHEED ORANGE BRAKE FLUID
f
q
Girling
HYDRAULIC DAMPERS
Armstrong ..
WAKEFIELD GIRLING DAMPER OIL (THIN)
ALTERNATIVELY USE REAR AXLE OR ENGINE OIL
BRAKE CABLES
o·
Mobil Graphited I CastIolease Brake I
_,__9"r~~~~
-,--~ Cabl~ Gre~__.
Belmoline
~.G.
I
Shell
~etin~_g
I
Esso Graphite
·_ _9!eas~
ARMSTRONG SUPER (THIN) SHOCK ABSORBER OIL
I
Duckhant',s
L_~_~~.~!Z_q ~6
JON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
DON'T
A FEW DON'TS FOR BEGINNERS
neglect to read this Handbook and if any point is not
clear ask for further instructions from
Agent.
ron yom engine for any considerable time whilst
enclosed space, such as a garage with the doors closed.
The dangers of carbon-monoxide poisoning from the
exhaust gases are very real under such circumstances.
neglect to pay regular attention to lubrication and
always use a good lubricant as recommended.
rev. the engine immediately after starting up, but give
the oil time to circulate (see page 12).
continue to run the engine if the oil pressure gauge
indicates an abnormally low pressure or if the needle
flue-1:uates unduly, but examine the engine to find the
cause. This ma.¥ be lack of oil.
run the engine with too little water in the radiator.
allow the engine to run too fast during the first 500
miles (see page 16).
forget to make full use of the gearbox when climbing
lrills. Don't change "up" too soon.
apply your brakes suddenly except in emergency, it is
bad for the passengers, the tyres, the car as a whole
and the driver behind who may not be able to pull up
as quickly as you.
forget that rapid cornering not only is uncomfortable
for your passengers, but abo causes great strains on
the chassis and high loads on the wheel bearings, in
addition to excessive tyre wear.
continue to nm the car if you feel that there is some
slight defect or falling off in power. Investigate this
and if you cannot trace the trouble get in touch with
our Agent. t
neglect your t1re pressures and examine the covers for
flints as well--this will save you money (see page 36).
omit to readjust the alignment of your head lamps if
they have become incorrectly adjusted. You will get
more pleasure when driving at night and will not
inconvenience other road users (see page 76).
forget to switch off the ignition and put the hand brake
on when the car is at rest.
neglect the level of the acid in the battery~which is
quite accessible by raising the bonnet.
.
forget to engage a lower gear when about to descend a
very steep hill.
omit to read "The Highway Code," a copy of which
can be obtained from the Ip~ licensing authority.
LUBRICl~nON ....O-""A.I.-·l'oJld Out.
.
lAJ., IN
;ANDS_
WATER ENGINE
WATER PUMP
OIL
®
GEAR CHANGE BRAKE
MECHANISM RESERVOIR
HANDBRAKE
CABLES
'
HANDBRAKE
COMPENSATOR
DRAIN &
REFIt:L
DISTRIBUTOR
®
OIL CLEANER
CAM BEARINGS
HUBS
AUTOMATIC ADVANCE
o
PROPELLER SHAFT
@
RENEW
CARTRIDGE
DRAIN &
REFILL
SPLINES &
UNIVERSAL JOINTS
HUBS
CHASSIS
The Chart is laid out to simplifY lubrication, the items requiring similar attention being grouped in distinctive colours. If in doubt,
turn to the page referred to in the respective column. The coloured numerals indicate the attention periods in thousancls of miles.
!IXLE rlLLFR
AND DiPSf/CK
REAI< AXLE fILLER
PLUG AND DiPSTKK
REAR OF CHASSIS
NIPPLE FOJl SPliNES
I
OII;J:~(;'1101:;r J."l:-~DICACl'ORS
1
NAVE PLATE REMOVAL
IGNfI'XON DISTRIBUTOR
. Front Axle Swivet Pins ..,...
31
31
----~~---------\
Upper.....~ (2 nipples)
Wishbone Shackle Pins - - - - - - - - \
Lower ...... (2 nipples)
Tie-rods
(8 nipples)
Steering
, Slave' DropAifu ......(2mpples)
Propeller Shaft
31
33
33
Splines
(1 nipple)
Universal Joints
(2 nipples)
~---~-~----I
THREE
OR
FOUR
STROKES
31
31
28
(2 nipples)
Cable
Hand Brake-.- - - - - - - - - - - - 1
Compensator
(l nipple-)
Pedal Bearings
29
25
(2 nipples)
J - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - I ..-~- ....-
Engine Water Pump and Fan
."".
·.~TWO
24
;::f·\lROKES
FIVE
STROKES
~
_
.
_
-
Wheel Hubs
(4 nipples)
29
33
23
Gear Change Mechanism
~~-
Cam and Spindle Bearings
Ignition Distributor
Automatic Advance Mechanism
Accelerator and Handbrake Lever
Clutch Shaft Bearing
OIL
AS
RECOMMENDED
I~:
25
. 34
Controls (Clutch, etc.)
I_~_~_:r_~_:o_:_o:_:_~_:~_at_i:_;_es_a_n_d_B_o~n_n_et_C_at_ch_e_s~ .~. I~ ~111 i
Engine Sump
Gearbox
Rear Axle
Steering Box
Road Springs
Air Cleaner
Dynamo Wick
TOP UP OIL
LEVEL
DRAIN & REFILL
WITH NEW OIL
TOP UP OIL
LEVEL
Ifr
91
G
DRAIN AND
REFILL WITH
NEW OIL
TOP UP OIL
LEVEL
CLEAN
AND OIL
OIL AS
...... RECOMMENDED
APPLY PETROLEUM JELLY
Hydraulic Brake Reservoir
TOP UP OIL
LEVEL
Oil Cleaner
RENEW
CARTRIDGE
24
2.11
"':It
27
22
10
IMPORTANT
TO 0 NERS
*
THE MODERN iNDEPENDENTLY SPRUNG CAR PERMITS FAST
CORNERING SPEEDS AND HIGH AVERAGE SPEEDS.
YOUR TYRES ARE THE FINAl MEDIUM THROUGH WHICH THIS
IS ATTAINED.
TO OBTAIN THE BEST MILEAGE FROM YOUR TYRES, IT is
NECESSARY TO iNTERCHANGE THE TYRES AND WHEElS AT
FREQUENT iNTERVALS PREFERABLYi"'EVERY 2,000 MILES.
THE FOllOWING METHODS ARE RECOMMENDED. THE
CHOICE win DEPEND ON THE JACKING SYSTEM ON THE CAR
AND WHETHER IT is DESIRED TO INTRODUCE THE SPARE
WHEEL iNTO THE SEQUENCE.
o~RONT 0
[
~
o
2
REAR
0
~ ~RONT
FRONTO
REAR
0
5
fi1
O·d:U
OREAR
0
Change wheels without removi ng tyres.
DUNLOP RUBBER CO. LTD.
FORT DUNLOP. BIRMINGHAM. 14
lP'j'13(S) Reprinted April, 1950
J.C.100
------~~~~~-----------------------------------
\1/11h
a
2hO'1..111,j
be taisccl yvith
fitted in the sodzct in
the manner slwv,'n m
2LZI,
'1"1"l-c 1001 kii
\vitb the
1)j'
.the
{m to fu]]
j~El
on
nJ'
hC(lc!
.:;U1'\'
'I,':
cd' ii' rods j,;:U( :'cssaI'V
tbe
i:·,: f2TCllU::';1
he
----.---------~---~~-
LUCAS
TRIUMPH .. RENOWN" CARS
(1950)
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
HOME AND EXPORT MODELS
BOOT
f
R[VERSE LAMP
SWITCH
"
"
REAR VIEW
l'
or
~ (~
PETROL TANK
UNIT
BOOT
LIGHT
lIGHT SWITCH
"
....m>/"
@
"""'''
INSTRUMENT PANEL
'-';?
SOLENOIO
STARTER
SWITCH
/"";
'of '
", ,
";''''--,
'-J
SPEEDOMETER
J
. .. . . !1
12 VOLT BATTERY
IGNI~
(NTERIOR
WARNING
LIGHT
UGHT
r-0iJ
SOLENOIO/
46'- 57
STARTER
PUSH
_. 57
TRAfflCATOR
TRAFFICATOR
(LEFT 'HANq)
(RIGHT -HAND)
IlL
"
~"
DYNAMO
9
r
'0'
COIL
'.11
."
CONNECTOR~
JUNCTION
SW.
~
o
0
DISTRIBUTOR
.SCREENWIPER
. " ,"
~
SNAP CONNECTOflS_
MAIN
. fiLAMENT
WINDTON£
"'~,
HEADl ...""P
(RIGHT -HAND)
KEY
I BLUE
1 BLUE with RED
3 BLUE with YELLOW
.oJ BLUE with WHITE
5 BLUE with GREEN
6 BLUE with PURPLE
7 BLUE with BROWN
8 BLUE with BLACK
9 WHITE
10 WHITE wIth RED
II WHiTE with YELLOW
12 WHITE with BLUE
1'3 WHITE with GREEN
TO
14WHITE with PURPLE
15 WHITE with BROWN
16 WHITE with BLACK
17 GREEN
IB GREEN with RED
19 GREEN with YELLOW
20 GREEN wIth BLUE
21 GREEN with WHITE
22 GREEN with PURPLE
23 GREEN wlt_h BROWN
24 GREEN with BLACK
25 YELLOW
26 YELLOW with RED
CABLE
H£ADI.....MP
':"
DIP
57
4j
SIDELAMP
FILAMENT
W.nB20.
(lEFT-HAND)
COLOURS
27 YELLOW with BLUE
28 YELLOW with WHITE
29 YELLOW with GREEN
30 YELLOW with PURPLE
31 YELLOW with BROWN
32 YELLOW with BLACK
33 BROWN
34 BROWN with RED
3S BROWN with YELLOW
36 BROWN with BLUE
37 BROWN with WHITE
38 BROWN with GREEN
39 BROWN with PURPLE
"'0 BROWN with BLACK
41 RED
42 RED with YELLOW
43 RED with BLUE
44 RED with WHITE
45 RED with GREEN
46 RED with PURPLE
47 RED with BROWN
48 RED with BLACK
49 PURPLE
50 PURPLE with RED
51 PURPLE with YELLOW
52 PURPLE wIth BLUE
53 PURPLE wrth WHITE
54 PURPLE with GREEN
55 PURPLE with BROWN
56 PURPLE with BLACK
57 BLACK
58 BLACK with RED
59 BLACK with YELLOW
60 BLACK with BLUE
61 BLACK with WHITE
62 BLACK with GREEN
63 BLACK with PURPLE
64 BLACK with BROWN
WIRING DIAGRAM
No. W77820
11 VOLT
ISSUED
JANUARY
F!ISO/L
1950
NUMBERS INDICATE CABLE IDENTIFICATION COLOURS, SEE KEY ABOVE.
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