Users Manual
®
6100A
Electrical Power Standard
Users Manual
PN 1887628
Version 6.0 December 2008
© 2006-2008 Fluke Corporation, All rights reserved. Printed in UK
All product names are trademarks of their respective companies.
LIMITED WARRANTY & LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
Each Fluke product is warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship under
normal use and service. The warranty period is one year and begins on the date of shipment.
Parts, product repairs and services are warranted for 90 days. This warranty extends only to the
original buyer or end-user customer of a Fluke authorized reseller, and does not apply to fuses,
disposable batteries or to any product which, in Fluke’s opinion, has been misused, altered,
neglected or damaged by accident or abnormal conditions of operation or handling. Fluke
warrants that software will operate substantially in accordance with its functional specifications for
90 days and that it has been properly recorded on non-defective media. Fluke does not warrant
that software will be error free or operate without interruption.
Fluke authorized resellers shall extend this warranty on new and unused products to end-user
customers only but have no authority to extend a greater or different warranty on behalf of Fluke.
Warranty support is available if product is purchased through a Fluke authorized sales outlet or
Buyer has paid the applicable international price. Fluke reserves the right to invoice Buyer for
importation of costs of repair/replacement parts when product purchased in one country is
submitted for repair in another country.
Fluke’s warranty obligation is limited, at Fluke’s option, to refund of the purchase price, free of
charge repair, or replacement of a defective product which is returned to a Fluke authorized
service center within the warranty period.
To obtain warranty service, contact your nearest Fluke authorized service center or send the
product, with a description of the difficulty, postage and insurance prepaid (FOB Destination), to
the nearest Fluke authorized service center. Fluke assumes no risk for damage in transit.
Following warranty repair, the product will be returned to Buyer, transportation prepaid (FOB
Destination). If Fluke determines that the failure was caused by misuse, alteration, accident or
abnormal condition of operation or handling, Fluke will provide an estimate of repair costs and
obtain authorization before commencing the work. Following repair, the product will be returned
to the Buyer transportation prepaid and the Buyer will be billed for the repair and return
transportation charges (FOB Shipping Point).
THIS WARRANTY IS BUYER’S SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY AN IS IN LIEU OF ALL
OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY
IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILTY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
FLUKE SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR LOSSES, INCLUDING LOSS OF DATA, WHETHER
ARISING FROM BREACH OF WARRANTY OR BASED ON CONTRACT, TORT, RELIANCE OR
ANY OTHER THEORY.
Since some countries or states do not allow limitation of the term of an implied warranty, or
exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, the limitations and exclusions of
this warranty may not apply to every buyer. If any provision of this Warranty is held invalid or
unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, such holding will not affect the validity or
enforceability of any other provision.
Fluke Corporation
Fluke Europe BV
P O Box 9090
Everett
WA 98206-9090
USA
P O Box 1186
5602 BD
Eindhoven
The Netherlands
Fluke Precision
Measurement Ltd
Hurricane way
Norwich
NR6 6JB
UK
Claims
Immediately upon arrival, purchaser shall check the packing container against the enclosed
packing list and shall, within thirty (30) days of arrival, give Fluke notice of shortages or any
nonconformity with the terms of the order. If purchaser fails to give notice, the delivery shall be
deemed to conform with the terms of the order.
The purchaser assumes all risk of loss or damage to instruments upon delivery by Fluke to the
carrier. If an instrument is damaged in transit, PURCHASER MUST FILE ALL CLAIMS FOR
DAMAGE WITH THE CARRIER to obtain compensation. Upon request by purchaser, Fluke will
submit an estimate of the cost to repair shipment damage.
Fluke will be happy to answer all questions to enhance the use of this instrument. Please address
your requests or correspondence to: Fluke Precision Measurement Ltd, Hurricane way, Norwich,
NR6 6JB, UK.
OPERATOR SAFETY
SUMMARY
WARNING
HIGH VOLTAGE
is used in the operation of this equipment
LETHAL VOLTAGE
may be present on the terminals, observe all safety precautions!
To avoid electrical shock hazard, the operator should not
electrically contact the output hi or sense hi binding posts or
any conductors connected to them, while the instrument is in
both standby and operate modes. During operation, lethal
voltages of up to 1430V Pk max may be present on these
terminals.
General Safety Summary
This instrument has been designed and type tested in accordance with the following standard
publications:
EN61010-1: 2001
UL61010A-1
CAN CSA 22.2 No 1010.1-92
and has been supplied in a safe condition.
This manual contains information and warnings that must be observed to keep the instrument in a
safe condition and ensure safe operation. Operation or service in conditions or in a manner other
than specified could compromise safety. For the correct and safe use of this instrument, it is
essential that both operating and service personnel follow generally accepted safety procedures in
addition to the safety precautions specified.
To avoid injury or fire hazard, the instrument must not be switched on if it is damaged or
suspected to be faulty. Do not operate the instrument in damp, wet, condensing, dusty, or
explosive gas conditions.
Whenever it is likely that safety protection has been impaired, the instrument must be made
inoperative and be secured against any unintended operation. Inform qualified maintenance or
repair personnel. Safety protection is likely to be impaired if, for example, the instrument shows
visible damage or fails to operate normally.
Explanation of safety-related symbols and terms
DANGER
Risk of Electric Shock
The product is marked with this symbol to
indicate that hazardous voltage (>33Vrms or
46.7V Pk or 70V DC may be present)
Caution
Refer to accompanying
documents
The product is marked with this symbol when
it is necessary for the user to refer to the
instruction manual
WARNING Warning statements identify conditions or practices that could result in injury
or loss of life.
Caution Caution statements identify conditions or practices that could result in damage to
this or other property.
Protective Earth (or Grounding)
Protection Class 1 - The instrument must be operated with a Protective Earth/Ground connection
via the Protective Earth/Grounding conductor of the AC line supply cable. The Protective
Earth/Ground connects before the AC line and neutral connections when the supply plug is
inserted into the instrument's rear panel AC line supply socket. If the final connection to the AC
line supply is made elsewhere, ensure that the Protective Earth/Ground connection is made before
AC line and neutral.
If for any reason there is a possibility the protective earth/ground connection might not be
made before the AC line and neutral connections, or the output terminals are connected to
a potentially hazardous live circuit, the separate protective earth/ground connection stud
on the rear panel of the instrument must be connected to a suitable Protective
Earth/Ground.
WWARNING
Any interruption of the protective ground conductor inside or
outside the instrument is likely to make the instrument
dangerous. Intentional interruption is prohibited.
The Power Cord and Power Supply Disconnection
The front panel power switch is a remote on/off switch and does not directly disconnect line
power. The power supply disconnect device is the ON / OFF switch on the rear panel of the
instrument. The ON / OFF switch should be readily accessible whilst the instrument is in
operation. If this operating condition cannot be satisfied, it is essential that either the power cord
plug or a separate power disconnecting device be readily reached and accessible to the operator.
To avoid electric shock and fire hazard, ensure that the power cord is not damaged and is
adequately rated against power supply network fusing. If the power plug is to be the accessible
disconnecting device, the cord must not be longer than 3 meters.
Signal connection
To avoid electric shock hazard, signal connections to the instrument must be made after the
Protective Earth/Ground connection is made and disconnected before the Protective Earth/Ground
connection is removed; i.e. the AC line supply lead must be connected whenever signal leads are
connected.
WWARNING
To avoid injury or loss of life, do not connect or disconnect
signal leads while they are connected, or suspected of being
connected, to any hazardous voltage or current source.
WWARNING
Safety protection is likely to be impaired if unauthorized signal
connector leads are used. Do not use signal connector leads if
they are damaged. Voltage and current signal connector leads
are provided with each instrument but they must only be used
for the correct purpose. The Current signal connector lead must
never be connected to the 6100A/6101A voltage terminals.
Do Not Operate Without Covers
To avoid electric shock or fire hazard, the instrument must not be operated with covers removed.
The covers protect the user from live parts and (unless otherwise stated) should be removed only
by suitably qualified personnel for maintenance and repair purposes.
WWARNING
Removing the covers may expose voltages in excess of 2kV pk;
these voltages may be present for up to one minute after the
instrument has been disconnected from the power source, or
longer under fault conditions.
Safe Operating Conditions
The unit must be operated only within the manufacturer's specified operating conditions.
Examples of specification that must be considered are:
For indoor use only
Ambient temperature
Ambient humidity
Power supply voltage and frequency
Maximum terminal voltages or currents
Altitude
Ambient pollution level
Exposure to shock and vibration
To avoid electric shock or fire hazard, do not apply to or subject the instrument to any condition
that is outside specified range. See section one of this manual for detailed specification of the
instrument and its operating conditions.
WCaution
Direct sunlight, radiators and other heat sources should be
taken into account when assessing the ambient temperature.
Fuse Requirements
The 6100A and 6101A require a special fuse with rated current of 15A and rated breaking
capacity of 750A. The fuse must be rated for a voltage of 250V AC.
To access the fuse and ensure the line power is disconnected and follow the procedure described
in Chapter 6. The approved fuse is shown below
Fluke part number and description:
1998159
T15AH 250V 32mm
Fuse manufacturer and part number:
Bussmann
MDA-15
Measurement Category I
Measurement terminals are designed for connection at Measurement (Overvoltage) Category I.
To avoid electric shock or fire hazard, do not connect the instrument's terminals directly to the
AC line power supply or any other source of voltage or current that might temporarily exceed the
peak ratings of the instrument.
Maintenance and Repair
Always observe local or national safety regulations and rules for the prevention of accidents and
hazard while performing any work. Always disconnect the instrument from all signal sources and
then the AC line power supply before removing any covers. Any adjustment, parts replacement,
maintenance or repair should be carried out only by Fluke authorized technical personnel.
WWARNING
For continued protection against injury and fire hazard it is
essential that only manufacturer supplied parts be used to
replace parts relevant to safety. Safety tests must be performed
after the replacement of parts relevant to safety.
Ventilation and Dust
The instrument relies on forced air cooling via ventilation slots in the sides of the instrument.
Adequate ventilation can usually be achieved by positioning on a level surface and by leaving a
100mm (4" gap) around the instrument. Care should be taken to avoid restricting the airflow at
the sides of the instrument, as damage may result from overheating. The instrument is designed
to IP4X and is specified for use in a Pollution Category II environment, which is normally non–
conductive with temporary light condensation. Do not operate the instrument while condensation
is present. Do not use the instrument in more hostile, dusty or wet conditions.
Cleaning
Ensure the instrument signal and then power leads are disconnected prior to cleaning. Use only a
damp, lint-free cloth to clean fascia and case parts. See Chapter 6 for details of air filter cleaning.
Observe any additional safety warnings or instructions that appear in this manual.
Table of Contents
Chapter
1
Title
Page
Introduction and Specifications......................................................... 1-1
1-1.
1-2.
1-3.
1-4.
1-5.
1-6.
1-7.
1-8.
1-9.
1-10.
1-11.
1-12.
1-13.
1-14.
1-15.
1-16.
1-17.
1-18.
1-19.
1-20.
1-21.
1-22.
1-23.
1-24.
1-25.
1-26.
1-27.
1-28.
1-29.
1-30.
1-31.
1-32.
1-33.
1-34.
Introduction...........................................................................................
Features.................................................................................................
About this manual.................................................................................
How to use this Manual ........................................................................
Contacting Fluke...................................................................................
Specifications........................................................................................
Input Power ......................................................................................
Dimensions .......................................................................................
Environment .....................................................................................
Safety................................................................................................
EMC .................................................................................................
Electrical Specifications .......................................................................
General Parametric Specifications....................................................
Amplitude/Frequency Limits............................................................
Open and Closed Loop Operation ....................................................
Voltage Specifications......................................................................
Voltage Range Limits and Burden ...................................................
Voltage Sine Amplitude Specifications............................................
Voltage DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications .....................
Maximum Capacitive Loading for Output Stability.........................
Voltage Distortion and Noise ...........................................................
Current Specifications ......................................................................
Current Range Limits .......................................................................
Load Regulation Specification ‘adder’.............................................
Current Sine Amplitude Specifications ............................................
Current DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications ......................
Current Distortion and Noise............................................................
Maximum Inductive Loading for Output Stability...........................
Voltage from the Current Terminals ................................................
Range Limits and Impedances .....................................................
Sine Specifications .......................................................................
DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications ...................................
Voltage from Current Terminals, Distortion and Noise...............
Current to Voltage Phase Specifications ..........................................
i
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-9
1-10
1-10
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-13
1-13
1-13
1-13
1-14
1-14
1-15
1-15
6100A
Users Manual
1-35.
1-36.
1-37.
1-38.
1-39.
1-40.
1-41.
1-42.
1-43.
1-44.
1-45.
1-46.
1-47.
1-48.
1-49.
1-50.
2
1-19
1-19
1-20
1-20
1-20
1-21
1-21
1-22
1-22
1-23
1-24
1-25
Introduction...........................................................................................
Unpacking and Inspection ....................................................................
Reshipping the 6100A ..........................................................................
Placement and Rack Mounting .............................................................
Cooling Considerations.........................................................................
Line Voltage .........................................................................................
Connecting to Line Power ....................................................................
Connecting 6101A Auxiliary units .......................................................
Allocation of phases..............................................................................
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-5
Features ............................................................................................... 3-1
3-1.
3-2.
3-3.
3-4.
3-5.
3-6.
3-7.
3-8.
3-9.
4
1-16
1-16
1-16
1-18
Installation ........................................................................................... 2-1
2-1.
2-2.
2-3.
2-4.
2-5.
2-6.
2-7.
2-8.
2-9.
3
Power Specifications ........................................................................
Sinusoidal VA Specifications ......................................................
Sinusoidal Power Specifications ..................................................
Flicker Specifications .......................................................................
Voltage and Current Sinusoidal and Rectangular
Modulation Flicker Specification ................................................
Fluctuating Harmonic Specifications ...............................................
Interharmonic Specifications............................................................
Dip/Swell Specifications ..................................................................
Multi-Phase Operation......................................................................
Determining Non-sinusoidal Waveform Amplitude Specifications.
Non-sinusoidal Voltage Example.....................................................
Apparent Power (S) Accuracy Calculations.....................................
Apparent Power Example.................................................................
Power (P) Accuracy Calculations.....................................................
Power Example.................................................................................
References ........................................................................................
Introduction...........................................................................................
Front Panel Features .............................................................................
Windows™ User Interface ...................................................................
The main graphical user interface areas ...........................................
Data entry from the front panel ........................................................
Data entry from an external keyboard and mouse ............................
Output channel selection ..................................................................
Output control...................................................................................
Rear Panel Features ..............................................................................
3-3
3-3
3-6
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-9
3-10
Front Panel Operation......................................................................... 4-1
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
4-8.
4-9.
4-10.
4-11.
4-12.
Introduction...........................................................................................
Power up ...............................................................................................
Warm up ...............................................................................................
Basic Setup Procedures.........................................................................
Global settings ......................................................................................
Frequency .........................................................................................
Line locking......................................................................................
Harmonic edit mode .........................................................................
Reactive power calculation...............................................................
Phase units........................................................................................
Voltage output 4-wire or 2-wire connection.....................................
Soft Start...........................................................................................
ii
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-7
Contents (continued)
4-13.
4-14.
4-15.
4-16.
4-17.
4-18.
4-19.
4-20.
4-21.
4-22.
4-23.
4-24.
4-25.
4-26.
4-27.
4-28.
4-29.
4-30.
4-31.
4-32.
4-33.
4-34.
4-35.
4-36.
4-37.
4-38.
4-39.
4-40.
4-41.
4-42.
4-43.
4-44.
4-45.
4-46.
4-47.
4-48.
4-49.
4-50.
4-51.
4-52.
4-53.
4-54.
5
Reference Clock Out ........................................................................
More Settings ...................................................................................
Edit mode..............................................................................................
Direct Mode......................................................................................
Deferred mode ..................................................................................
Changes that are not deferred ...........................................................
Setting up voltage and current waveforms............................................
Harmonics, DC and Sine ......................................................................
Definition..........................................................................................
Access to this function......................................................................
6100A Specification .........................................................................
Sine/harmonic mode.........................................................................
Setting up harmonics and DC...........................................................
Interharmonics ......................................................................................
Definition..........................................................................................
Access to this function......................................................................
6100A Specification .........................................................................
Setting up Interharmonics.................................................................
Fluctuating harmonics...........................................................................
Definition..........................................................................................
Access to this function......................................................................
6100A Specification .........................................................................
Setting up Fluctuating Harmonics ....................................................
Dips and Swells ....................................................................................
Definition..........................................................................................
Access to this function......................................................................
6100A Specification .........................................................................
Setting up Dips/swells ......................................................................
Flicker ...................................................................................................
Definition..........................................................................................
Access to this function......................................................................
6100A Specification .........................................................................
Setting up Basic Flicker....................................................................
Setting up Flicker Extended Functions.............................................
Periodic Frequency Changes ............................................................
Distorted Voltage with Multiple Zero Crossings .............................
Harmonics with Side bands ..............................................................
Phase Jumps .................................................................................
Rectangular Voltage Changes with 20% Duty Cycle ..................
Copy and Paste......................................................................................
Copy .................................................................................................
Paste..................................................................................................
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-9
4-9
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-15
4-15
4-15
4-15
4-16
4-16
4-16
4-17
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-19
4-19
4-20
4-21
4-22
4-22
4-23
4-24
4-25
4-25
4-26
4-26
4-26
Remote Operation ............................................................................... 5-1
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
5-8.
5-9.
5-10.
Introduction...........................................................................................
Using the IEEE-488 Port for Remote Control ......................................
Programming Options...........................................................................
Capability Codes...................................................................................
Bus Addresses.......................................................................................
Default bus address...........................................................................
Limited Access .....................................................................................
Interconnections....................................................................................
Operation via the IEEE 488 Interface...................................................
General .............................................................................................
iii
5-3
5-3
5-3
5-4
5-4
5-5
5-5
5-5
5-5
5-5
6100A
Users Manual
5-11.
5-12.
5-13.
5-14.
5-15.
5-16.
5-17.
5-18.
5-19.
5-20.
5-21.
5-22.
5-23.
5-24.
5-25.
5-26.
5-27.
5-28.
5-29.
5-30.
5-31.
5-32.
5-33.
5-34.
5-35.
5-36.
5-37.
5-38.
5-39.
5-40.
5-41.
5-42.
5-43.
5-44.
5-45.
5-46.
5-47.
5-48.
5-49.
5-50.
5-51.
5-52.
5-53.
5-54.
5-55.
5-56.
5-57.
5-58.
5-59.
5-60.
5-61.
5-62.
5-63.
5-64.
5-65.
Operating Conditions........................................................................
Programmed Transfer to Local Control (GTL or REN False) .........
‘Device Clear’ ..................................................................................
Levels of Reset .................................................................................
Message Exchange................................................................................
IEEE 488.2 Model ............................................................................
Instrument STATUS Subsystem ......................................................
Incoming Commands and Queries ...................................................
Instrument Functions and Facilities..................................................
Outgoing Responses .........................................................................
‘Query Error’ ....................................................................................
Request Service (RQS).....................................................................
Reasons for Requesting Service...................................................
RQS in the IEEE 488.2 Model.....................................................
Retrieval of Device Status Information ................................................
General .............................................................................................
IEEE 488 and SCPI Standard defined Features................................
Status Summary Information and SRQ........................................
Event Register Conditions............................................................
Access via the Application Program ............................................
Instrument Status Reporting IEEE 488.2 Basics .................................
IEEE 488.2 Model ............................................................................
Instrument Model Structure..............................................................
Status Byte Register .........................................................................
Reading the Status Byte Register .................................................
Service Request Enable Register .................................................
Reading the Service Request Enable Register .............................
IEEE 488.2 defined Event Status Register .......................................
Standard Event Status Enable Register ........................................
Reading the Standard Event Enable Register...............................
The Error Queue...........................................................................
Instrument Status Reporting — SCPI Elements ...................................
General .............................................................................................
SCPI Status Registers .......................................................................
Reportable SCPI States.....................................................................
SCPI Programming Language. .............................................................
SCPI Commands and Syntax ................................................................
SCPI Command Summary ...............................................................
Calibration Subsystem Command Details........................................
Output Subsystem Command Details...............................................
Input Subsystem Command Details .................................................
Source Subsystem Command Details...............................................
General Commands......................................................................
Power Values ...............................................................................
Voltage Setup ...............................................................................
DC and Harmonics Phenomenon .................................................
Fluctuating Harmonics Phenomenon ...........................................
Interharmonics Phenomenon........................................................
Dip Phenomenon..........................................................................
Flicker Phenomenon.....................................................................
Extended flicker sub-system.............................................................
Extended flicker state...................................................................
Configure signal ...........................................................................
Select sideband harmonic.............................................................
Select phase jump angle ...............................................................
iv
5-5
5-6
5-6
5-6
5-7
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-8
5-8
5-9
5-9
5-9
5-9
5-9
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-11
5-11
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-13
5-13
5-13
5-13
5-15
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-17
5-18
5-18
5-24
5-26
5-27
5-28
5-28
5-28
5-30
5-31
5-32
5-33
5-34
5-35
5-36
5-36
5-36
5-37
5-37
Contents (continued)
5-66.
5-67.
5-68.
5-69.
5-70.
5-71.
5-72.
5-73.
5-74.
5-75.
5-76.
5-77.
5-78.
5-79.
5-80.
5-81.
5-82.
5-83.
5-84.
5-85.
5-86.
5-87.
5-88.
5-89.
5-90.
5-91.
5-92.
5-93.
5-94.
5-95.
5-96.
5-97.
5-98.
5-99.
5-100.
5-101.
5-102.
6
5-37
5-37
5-38
5-38
5-39
5-40
5-41
5-42
5-43
5-44
5-46
5-46
5-48
5-48
5-48
5-49
5-49
5-50
5-50
5-51
5-51
5-52
5-52
5-53
5-53
5-54
5-54
5-55
5-55
5-56
5-56
5-57
5-57
5-57
5-58
5-59
5-61
Operator Maintenance ........................................................................ 6-1
6-1.
6-2.
6-3.
6-4.
6-5.
6-6.
6-7.
7
Select phase jump settle period ....................................................
Report phase jump stage ..............................................................
Report phase jump elapsed time ..................................................
Current Setup ...............................................................................
Harmonics Phenomenon ..............................................................
Fluctuating Harmonics Phenomenon ...........................................
Interharmonics Phenomenon........................................................
Dip Phenomenon..........................................................................
Flicker Phenomenon.....................................................................
Status Subsystem Command Details ................................................
System Subsystem Command Details ..............................................
Unit Subsystem Command Details...................................................
Common Commands and Queries ........................................................
Clear Status.......................................................................................
Event Status Enable..........................................................................
Recall Event Status Enable...............................................................
Read Event Status Register ..............................................................
*IDN? (Instrument Identification)....................................................
Operation Complete..........................................................................
Operation Complete?........................................................................
Recall the instrument Hardware Fitment..........................................
Power-On Status Clear .....................................................................
Recall Power On Status Clear Flag ..................................................
Reset .................................................................................................
Service Request Enable ....................................................................
Recall Service Request Enable .........................................................
Read Service Request Register.........................................................
Test Operations — Full Selftest .......................................................
Wait ..................................................................................................
Device settings after *RST ...................................................................
Introduction ......................................................................................
Device Settings at POWER ON............................................................
General .............................................................................................
Power-On Settings Related to Common IEEE 488.2 Commands....
*RST Settings Related to Common IEEE 488.2 Commands ...........
*RST Settings Related to SCPI Commands .....................................
Worked examples .................................................................................
Introduction...........................................................................................
Confidence Test ....................................................................................
Setting up and running the Confidence Test ....................................
Changing the user password .................................................................
Accessing the Fuse................................................................................
Cleaning the Air Filter ..........................................................................
Lithium Battery Replacement ...............................................................
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-4
6-4
6-6
6-8
Calibration............................................................................................ 7-1
7-1.
7-2.
7-3.
7-4.
7-5.
7-6.
Calibration methods..............................................................................
Amplitude measurements .................................................................
Phase measurement ..........................................................................
The effect of phase uncertainty on power accuracy .........................
Calibration uncertainties for full accuracy............................................
Voltage amplitude calibration uncertainty required .........................
v
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-4
7-4
6100A
Users Manual
7-7.
7-8.
7-9.
7-10.
7-11.
7-12.
7-13.
7-14.
7-15.
7-16.
7-17.
7-18.
7-19.
7-20.
7-21.
7-22.
7-23.
7-24.
7-25.
7-26.
7-27.
7-28.
7-29.
7-30.
7-31.
8
Current amplitude calibration uncertainty required..........................
Phase calibration uncertainty required .............................................
Equipment required...............................................................................
Overview of 6100A signal generation ..................................................
Independence of 6100A and 6101A .................................................
The Fluke service center calibration system .........................................
Characteristics of the calibration system ..........................................
Transducers ..................................................................................
DMM amplitude error contributions ............................................
DMM amplitude phase contributions...........................................
Voltage to voltage phase uncertainty ...........................................
Current to voltage phase uncertainty............................................
Overview of adjustment........................................................................
Calibration adjustment process .............................................................
Entering calibration mode ................................................................
Select instrument configuration ...................................................
Determine the 6100A/6101A error ..............................................
Initiate the adjustment ..................................................................
Return Calibration switch to Normal ...........................................
Verification ..................................................................................
Calibration adjustment verification record ...........................................
Voltage adjustment points ................................................................
Current adjustment points.................................................................
Current adjustment points for 80A option (if fitted) ........................
Voltage from current terminals adjustment points ...........................
7-4
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-6
7-8
7-10
7-10
7-10
7-11
7-11
7-11
7-11
7-12
7-12
7-13
7-13
7-14
7-14
7-14
7-15
7-15
7-16
7-17
7-17
The ‘Energy’ Option ............................................................................ 8-1
8-1.
8-2.
8-3.
8-4.
8-5.
8-6.
8-7.
8-8.
8-9.
8-10.
8-11.
8-12.
8-13.
8-14.
8-15.
8-16.
8-17.
8-18.
8-19.
8-20.
8-21.
8-22.
8-23.
8-24.
8-25.
8-26.
8-27.
Introduction...........................................................................................
Overview of functionality .....................................................................
Principle of operation............................................................................
Limitations ............................................................................................
Energy specifications............................................................................
Pulse Inputs ......................................................................................
Pulse and Gate Inputs .......................................................................
Pulse Output .....................................................................................
Gate Output ......................................................................................
Accuracy...........................................................................................
Test Duration ....................................................................................
Preparing to use the energy option........................................................
Input channel configuration and meter constants .................................
Connect MUT and reference meters.................................................
‘Type’ of energy ...............................................................................
Internal Pull-ups ...............................................................................
Energy Pulse Output meter constant and pull-up .............................
Conduct the test ................................................................................
Test modes ............................................................................................
Free Run mode .................................................................................
Counted/Timed mode .......................................................................
Gated mode.......................................................................................
Packet mode .....................................................................................
Remote operation of the Energy option ................................................
SCPI command set................................................................................
Operating mode ................................................................................
Energy Maintain Voltage .................................................................
vi
8-3
8-3
8-3
8-3
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-5
8-5
8-6
8-6
8-6
8-7
8-7
8-7
8-7
8-8
8-8
8-9
8-10
8-10
8-10
8-11
8-11
Contents (continued)
8-28.
8-29.
8-30.
8-31.
8-32.
8-33.
8-34.
8-35.
8-36.
8-37.
8-38.
8-39.
8-40.
8-41.
8-42.
8-43.
8-44.
8-45.
8-46.
8-47.
8-48.
8-49.
8-50.
8-51.
8-52.
8-53.
8-54.
8-55.
8-56.
8-57.
8-58.
8-59.
8-60.
8-61.
Energy units......................................................................................
Result presentation ...........................................................................
Results ..............................................................................................
Output gating ....................................................................................
Input gating.......................................................................................
Warm-up sequence tree ....................................................................
Warm-up duration ............................................................................
Warm-up pulse source......................................................................
Test sequence tree.............................................................................
Test duration.....................................................................................
Test pulse source ..............................................................................
MUT tree ..........................................................................................
MUT meter constant.........................................................................
Input Debounce ................................................................................
MUT source......................................................................................
MUT pull-up.....................................................................................
Reference tree...................................................................................
Input Debounce ................................................................................
Reference meter constant .................................................................
Reference source ..............................................................................
Reference pull-up .............................................................................
Output tree........................................................................................
Output meter constant.......................................................................
Output pull-up ..................................................................................
Status subsystem...............................................................................
Status operational Tree .....................................................................
Operation event ................................................................................
Operational enable............................................................................
Operation condition ..........................................................................
Energy Command Summary ............................................................
Action on receiving *RST ................................................................
Calibration of the Energy option ..........................................................
By direct measurement with a frequency meter: ..............................
Using an external reference frequency: ............................................
8-11
8-12
8-12
8-13
8-13
8-13
8-14
8-14
8-14
8-15
8-15
8-15
8-15
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-17
8-17
8-17
8-17
8-17
8-18
8-18
8-18
8-18
8-19
8-20
8-21
8-22
8-22
8-22
Appendices
A Glossary....................................................................................................... A-1
vii
6100A
Users Manual
viii
List of Tables
Table
3-1.
3-2.
7-1.
7-2.
7-3.
7-4.
Title
Front Panel Features...............................................................................................
Rear Panel Features................................................................................................
The contribution of phase uncertainty to power accuracy .....................................
Calibration methods ...............................................................................................
Samples per cycle...................................................................................................
DMM phase error uncertainty (degrees) ................................................................
ix
Page
3-4
3-11
7-4
7-5
7-10
7-11
6100A
Users Manual
x
List of Figures
Figure
3-1.
3-2.
3-3.
3-3.
3-4.
3-5.
3-6.
3-7.
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
4-8.
4-9.
4-10.
4-11.
4-12.
4-13.
4-14.
4-15.
4-16.
4-17.
4-18.
4-19.
4-20.
4-21.
4-22.
4-23.
4-24.
4-25.
4-26.
4-27.
Title
6100A Front Panel .................................................................................................
Graphical user interface .........................................................................................
Direct Mode key.....................................................................................................
Output Menu frame ................................................................................................
The Output Menu ...................................................................................................
Output Menu softkeys ............................................................................................
Rear Panel Features................................................................................................
Rear Panel Connections .........................................................................................
Main Setup Page ....................................................................................................
Global menu Softkeys ............................................................................................
Frequency, Line Locking .......................................................................................
Reactive power calculation ....................................................................................
Global Settings Menu.............................................................................................
4-wire/2-wire selection...........................................................................................
Channel selection ...................................................................................................
Waveform top level................................................................................................
Harmonics with time domain graph .......................................................................
Harmonics with frequency domain graph ..............................................................
Softkeys for Harmonics top level...........................................................................
Softkeys for Harmonics second level.....................................................................
Waveform Menu Menu for Interharmonics ...........................................................
Softkeys for Interharmonics ...................................................................................
Waveform Menu for Fluctuating Harmonics .........................................................
Softkeys for Fluctuating Harmonics ......................................................................
Waveshape Softkeys ..............................................................................................
Waveform Menu for Dip........................................................................................
Top level Dip Softkeys...........................................................................................
Dip Waveshape Softkeys .......................................................................................
Dip Trigger Softkeys..............................................................................................
Flicker Softkeys .....................................................................................................
Flicker Menu (Frequency)......................................................................................
Flicker Menu (changes per minute) .......................................................................
Basic Flicker Softkeys............................................................................................
Extended Flicker softkeys ......................................................................................
Combined frequency and voltage changes.............................................................
xi
Page
3-3
3-6
3-7
3-9
3-9
3-9
3-10
3-12
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-7
4-10
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-14
4-15
4-16
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-18
4-18
4-19
4-21
4-21
4-22
4-22
4-22
6100A
Users Manual
4-28.
4-29.
4-30.
4-31.
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
5-8.
5-9.
5-10.
5-11.
5-12.
5-13.
5-14.
5-15.
5-16.
5-17.
5-18.
5-19.
6-1.
6-2.
6-3.
7-1.
7-2.
7-3.
7-4.
7-5.
7-6.
7-7.
8-1.
8-2.
8-3.
8-4.
8-5.
8-6.
8-7.
Distorted Voltage with Multiple Zero Crossings ...................................................
Harmonics with Side Bands ...................................................................................
Phase Jumps ...........................................................................................................
Rectangular Voltage Changes with 20 % Duty Cycle ...........................................
IEEE 488 Compatibility Codes ..............................................................................
IEEE 488 Message Exchange Model .....................................................................
IEEE-488 and SCPI Standard Defined Features ....................................................
Clear Status ............................................................................................................
Event Status Enable................................................................................................
Event Status Enable Query.....................................................................................
Event Status Register Query ..................................................................................
Instrument Identification ........................................................................................
Operation Complete ...............................................................................................
Operation Complete Query ....................................................................................
Option Query..........................................................................................................
Power On Status Clear ...........................................................................................
Power On Status Clear Query ................................................................................
Reset.......................................................................................................................
Service Request Enable..........................................................................................
Service Request Enable Query...............................................................................
Status Byte Query ..................................................................................................
Test Query..............................................................................................................
Wait ........................................................................................................................
Waveform menu top level softkeys........................................................................
Rear Panel Showing Fuse.......................................................................................
Air Filter Access ....................................................................................................
Signal generation....................................................................................................
After phase adjustment...........................................................................................
Phase Measurement Connections...........................................................................
Waveforms .............................................................................................................
Waveform menu Softkeys......................................................................................
Password Prompt....................................................................................................
Adjust Instrument Screen .......................................................................................
Waveform menu top level softkeys........................................................................
Energy mode ..........................................................................................................
Input channel configuration and meter constants...................................................
Energy top level softkeys .......................................................................................
Counted/Timed Mode Configuration .....................................................................
Gated Mode Configuration.....................................................................................
Packet Mode Configuration ...................................................................................
xii
4-23
4-24
4-25
4-25
5-4
5-7
5-10
5-48
5-48
5-49
5-49
5-50
5-50
5-51
5-51
5-52
5-52
5-53
5-53
5-54
5-54
5-55
5-55
6-4
6-5
6-7
7-7
7-7
7-8
7-9
7-12
7-12
7-13
8-5
8-6
8-6
8-8
8-8
8-9
8-10
Chapter 1
Introduction and Specifications
Title
1-1.
1-2.
1-3.
1-4.
1-5.
1-6.
1-7.
1-8.
1-9.
1-10.
1-11.
1-12.
1-13.
1-14.
1-15.
1-16.
1-17.
1-18.
1-19.
1-20.
1-21.
1-22.
1-23.
1-24.
1-25.
1-26.
1-27.
1-28.
1-29.
1-30.
1-31.
1-32.
1-33.
1-34.
1-35.
Introduction .......................................................................................................
Features..............................................................................................................
About this manual..............................................................................................
How to use this Manual .....................................................................................
Contacting Fluke................................................................................................
Specifications.....................................................................................................
Input Power...................................................................................................
Dimensions ...................................................................................................
Environment..................................................................................................
Safety ............................................................................................................
EMC..............................................................................................................
Electrical Specifications ....................................................................................
General Parametric Specifications ................................................................
Amplitude/Frequency Limits ........................................................................
Open and Closed Loop Operation.................................................................
Voltage Specifications ..................................................................................
Voltage Range Limits and Burden................................................................
Voltage Sine Amplitude Specifications ........................................................
Voltage DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications ..................................
Maximum Capacitive Loading for Output Stability .....................................
Voltage Distortion and Noise........................................................................
Current Specifications...................................................................................
Current Range Limits....................................................................................
Load Regulation Specification ‘adder’ .........................................................
Current Sine Amplitude Specifications.........................................................
Current DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications ..................................
Current Distortion and Noise ........................................................................
Maximum Inductive Loading for Output Stability .......................................
Voltage from the Current Terminals .............................................................
Range Limits and Impedances .................................................................
Sine Specifications ...................................................................................
DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications................................................
Voltage from Current Terminals, Distortion and Noise...........................
Current to Voltage Phase Specifications.......................................................
Power Specifications.....................................................................................
Page
1-3
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-8
1-9
1-9
1-10
1-10
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-13
1-13
1-13
1-13
1-14
1-14
1-15
1-15
1-16
1-1
6100A
Users Manual
1-36.
1-37.
1-38.
1-39.
1-40.
1-41.
1-42.
1-43.
1-44.
1-45.
1-46.
1-47.
1-48.
1-49.
1-50.
1-2
Sinusoidal VA Specifications ..................................................................
Sinusoidal Power Specifications ..............................................................
Flicker Specifications....................................................................................
Voltage and Current Sinusoidal and Rectangular Modulation
Flicker Specification .................................................................................
Fluctuating Harmonic Specifications............................................................
Interharmonic Specifications ........................................................................
Dip/Swell Specifications...............................................................................
Multi-Phase Operation ..................................................................................
Determining Non-sinusoidal Waveform Amplitude Specifications .............
Non-sinusoidal Voltage Example .................................................................
Apparent Power (S) Accuracy Calculations .................................................
Apparent Power Example .............................................................................
Power (P) Accuracy Calculations .................................................................
Power Example .............................................................................................
References.....................................................................................................
1-16
1-16
1-18
1-19
1-19
1-20
1-20
1-20
1-21
1-21
1-22
1-22
1-23
1-24
1-25
Introduction and Specifications
Introduction
1
1-1. Introduction
The Fluke 6100A Electrical Power Standard is a precise instrument for the calibration of
measuring devices used to determine the magnitude and quality of power supplied to consumers.
With the 6100A instrument, you can synthesize irregular power supplies with phenomena of
voltage harmonics, interharmonics, fluctuating harmonics, flicker, dips and swells.
The optional Fluke 6101A Auxiliary Power Standard extends the functionality to a second phase.
It is possible to add additional phases as required to build up to a fully configured four phase (3
phase plus neutral) system.
Specifications are provided at the end of this chapter.
1-2. Features
Traceable Power Measurement
Configurable from 1 to 4 independent phases
Fully independent control of Voltage and Current on each phase
1kV and 21 Amps available (80A with option 6100A/80A) on each phase. By default, the ‘N’
phase is limited to 33V RMS. This can be overridden by the user as described in Chapter 4,
Setting up voltage and current waveforms.
Up to 100 harmonics at any one time
Fluctuating harmonics and interharmonics to IEC 61000-4-7
Flicker to IEC 61000-3-4 and 61000-4-15
Simultaneous Power Quality Phenomena to IEC61000-4-30 & IEEE P1159.1 (draft)
User definable test signals
User selectable reactive power calculation method
>13 V peak compliance on all current outputs
1-3. About this manual
This manual provides complete information for installing the Electrical Power Standard and
operating it from the front panel and remotely. It also provides a glossary of terms as well as
detailed specifications. The following topics are covered in this manual:
Installation
Operating controls and features
Front panel operation
Remote operation (IEEE-488.2)
Data transfer via external storage
Operator maintenance, including calibration
1-3
6100A
Users Manual
1-4. How to use this Manual
You should first read the safety section at the front of this manual.
Use the following list to find the location of specific information.
Instrument specifications: The end of this Chapter
Unpacking and setup: Chapter 2.
Installation and rack mounting: Chapter 2
AC line power and interface cabling: Chapter 2
Connecting 6101A Auxiliary Units: Chapter 2
Controls, indicators, and displays: Chapter 3
Basic setup procedure: Chapter 4
Front panel operation: Chapter 4
Output Voltage and Current connection: Chapter 4
Remote operation (IEEE-488.2): Chapter 5
Operator maintenance: Chapter 6
Calibration: Chapter 7
1-5. Contacting Fluke
To contact Fluke for product information, operating assistance, service, or to get the location of
the nearest Fluke distributor or Service Center, call:
1-888-99FLUKE (1-888-993-5853) in U.S.A.
1-800-36-FLUKE (1-800-363-5853) in Canada
+31-402-678-200 in Europe
+81-3-3434-0181 Japan
+65-738-5655 Singapore
+1-425-446-5500 from other countries
Visit Fluke's web site at: www.fluke.com.
1-4
Introduction and Specifications
Specifications
1
1-6. Specifications
1-7.
Input Power
Voltage
Transient overvoltages
Frequency
Max. Consumption
1-8.
100 V - 240 V with up to ±10 % fluctuations
Impulse withstand (overvoltage) category II of IEC 60364-4-443
47 Hz - 63 Hz
1000 VA max from 100 - 130 V, 1250 VA max from 130 V - 260 V
Dimensions
6100A and 6101A
Height
Height (without feet)
Width
Depth
Weight
1-9.
6100A/80A and 6101A/80A
233 mm (9.17 inches)
219 mm (8.6 inches)
432 mm (17 inches)
630 mm (24.8 inches)
23 kg (51 lb)
324 mm (12.8 inches)
310 mm (12.2 inches)
432 mm (17 inches)
630 mm (24.8 inches)
30 kg (66 lb)
Environment
Operating temperature
5 °C - 35 °C
Calibration temperature (tcal) range
16 °C - 30 °C
Storage temperature
0 °C - 50 °C
Transit temperature
-20 °C - 60 °C <100 hours
1 hour
Warm up time
Safe Operating Max. Relative Humidity (non-condensing)
Storage Max Relative Humidity (non-condensing)
Operating altitude
Non-operating altitude
Shock
Vibration
Enclosure
<80 % 5 °C - 31 °C ramping linearly down to 50 % at 35 °C
<95 % 0 °C - 50 °C
0 m - 2,000 m
0 m - 12,000 m
MIL-PRF-28800F class 3
MIL-PRF-28800F class 3
MIL-PRF-28800F class 3
1-10. Safety
•
Designed to EN61010-1: 2001, CAN/CSA 22.2 No 1010.1-92, UL61010A-1
•
Indoor use only, pollution degree 2; installation category II
•
CE marked and ETL listed
1-11. EMC
EN61326: 2002, class A, FCC rules part 15, sub-part B, class A (Class A equipment is suitable for use in establishments
other than domestic, and those directly connected to a low voltage power supply network which supplies buildings used
for domestic purposes).
1-5
6100A
Users Manual
1-12. Electrical Specifications
The accuracies stated include the calibration uncertainty provided by Fluke Service Centers. In the following
specifications uncertainties are stated at coverage factor k=2, equivalent to 95 % confidence level, in accordance
with accepted metrology practices.
1-13. General Parametric Specifications
Voltage/Current amplitude setting resolution
Range of fundamental frequencies
Line frequency locking
Frequency accuracy
Frequency setting resolution
Warm up time to full accuracy
Settling time following change to the output
Nominal angle between voltage phases
6 digits
16 Hz - 850 Hz
45 Hz - 65.9 Hz at users discretion
50 ppm
0.1 Hz
1 hour or twice the time since last warmed up
[2][3]
1.4 second
Nominal angle between voltage and current of a phase
0°
Phase angle setting
±180 °, ± π radians
Phase angle setting resolution
0.001 °, 0.00001 radians
st
100 including the 1 (fundamental frequency)
st
100 including the 1 (fundamental frequency)
120 °
[1]
Maximum number of voltage harmonics
Maximum number of current harmonics
[1]
[1]
Switching between phase set in degrees, phase set in radians and back may not be consistent because of calculation rounding
errors.
[2]
Settling time (TS) of 21 A and 80 A ranges depends on rms output as a proportion of full range and can be calculated from:
TS = % FR2 x 80 seconds.
[3]
3 seconds with Soft Start enabled.
1-14. Amplitude/Frequency Limits
Percentage of Maximum Output with Frequency
120 %
16 Hz
100 %
% of Full Range
850 Hz
2850 Hz
Sinewaves
(850Hz maximum)
and harmonics
6 kHz
80 %
9 kHz
60 %
Modulation
products
40 %
20 %
0%
1
10
100
Frequency
1-6
1000
10000
Interharmonics
only
•
If the option is fitted, the 80 Amp range minimum settable fundamental frequency is 40 Hz and the maximum harmonic
frequency is 3 kHz.
•
Although the minimum settable fundamental frequency is 16 Hz, modulated waveforms may generate frequency components
below that, including DC.
•
A DC component of up to 50 % of range may be added to all voltage and current ranges except 80 A.
•
If the bandwidth limit is enabled, maximum frequency is 1.5 kHz.
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
1-15. Open and Closed Loop Operation
Full accuracy for pure sine or sine plus harmonics is achieved by using analog and digital feedback systems (closed
loop). When any of: Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are applied, the digital system is
automatically uncoupled (open loop). Initial performance is as described in the 1-year accuracy column but
performance degrades with time as described by the stability column. Full accuracy can be restored by momentarily
disabling whichever of Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are enabled, or by changing the
value of the sine wave or any harmonic for that channel.
1-16. Voltage Specifications
1-17. Voltage Range Limits and Burden
Full Range (FR)
[1][2]
Max peak
[3]
Maximum Burden (peak current)
16 V
22.6 V
1.13 A
33 V
46.6 V
1.13 A
78 V
110 V
707 mA
168 V
237 V
311 mA
336 V
475 V
141 mA
1008 V
1425 V
71 mA
[1]
These values apply to sinusoidal, distorted and modulated wave-shapes.
[2]
Voltage harmonic phase angle significantly affects the peak value of a non-sinusoidal waveform.
[3]
To achieve specifications in 4-wire sense, resistance in the sense lead must be less than 1 Ω and resistance in the
power leads less than 1.5 Ω.
1-18. Voltage Sine Amplitude Specifications
Range
Frequency
16 Hz - 450 Hz
1.0 V - 16 V
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
2.3 V - 33 V
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
5.6 V - 78 V
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
11 V - 168 V
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
23 V - 336 V
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
70 V - 1008 V
450 Hz - 850 Hz
[1]
Voltage
[5]
1.0 V - 6.4 V
6.4 V - 16 V
1.0 V - 6.4 V
6.4 V - 16 V
2.3 V - 13.2 V
13.2 V - 33 V
2.3 V - 13.2 V
13.2 V - 33 V
5.6 V - 31 V
31 V - 78 V
5.6 V - 31 V
31 V - 78 V
11 V - 67 V
67 V - 168 V
11 V - 67 V
67 V - 168 V
23 V - 134 V
134 V - 336 V
23 V - 134 V
134 V - 336 V
70 V - 330 V
330 V - 1008 V
70 V - 330 V
330 V - 1008 V
1-Year Accuracy,
[4]
tcal ±5 °C
± (ppm of output
[1][6]
+ mV)
Closed Loop
Stability ± (ppm of
output + mV) per
[2]
Hour
122
112
164
150
122
112
164
150
122
112
164
150
122
112
164
150
122
112
164
150
166
158
190
175
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
100
100
100
100
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.5
2.0
1.5
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.4
4.4
4.4
4.4
8.8
8.8
8.8
8.8
26
26
26
26
0.8
0.4
0.8
0.4
0.8
0.6
0.8
0.6
0.8
0.6
0.8
0.6
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
10
10
10
10
Open Loop Stability
± (ppm of output +
[2][3]
mV) per Hour
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
200
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
1.5
1.5
0.8
0.8
3.0
3.0
0.8
0.8
10
10
10
10
Four-wire sense only, for two-wire operation, add an additional voltage = 0.3 Ω x maximum burden current to the accuracy specification.
[2]
For ±1 °C and constant load and connection conditions.
[3]
When Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are applied, Open Loop Stability specification must be added to the 1year accuracy specification as described in “Open and Closed Loop Operation”.
[4]
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
[5]
Output levels less than the range minimum can be set but are not specified.
[6]
These specifications assume a ‘sampling’ measuring instrument. Some rms sensing instruments have voltage input bandwidths of several
MHz. The 6100A specification should be expanded by the non-harmonic noise floor in the “Voltage Distortion and Noise” table for rms
sensing devices.
1-7
6100A
Users Manual
1-19. Voltage DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications
Range
Output
0V-8V
1.0 V - 16 V
0 V - 4.8 V
0 V - 16.5 V
2.3 V - 33 V
0 V - 9.9 V
0 V - 39 V
5.6 V - 78 V
0 V - 23 V
0 V - 84 V
11 V - 168 V
0 V - 50 V
0 V - 168 V
23 V - 336 V
0 V - 100 V
0 V - 504 V
70 V - 1008 V
0 V - 302 V
[1]
1-8
Frequency
[4][5]
1-Year Accuracy,
Closed Loop Stability Open Loop Stability
[6]
tcal ±5 °C
± (ppm of output + mV) ± (ppm of output +
[2]
[2][3]
± (ppm of output + mV)
per Hour
mV) per Hour
[1]
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
122
122
164
512
122
122
164
512
122
122
164
512
122
122
164
512
122
122
164
512
5.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
24
2.0
2.0
2.0
50
4.4
4.4
4.4
100
12.0
12.0
12.0
40
40
40
60
40
40
40
60
40
40
40
60
40
40
40
60
40
40
40
60
1.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
3.3
0.8
0.8
0.8
8.0
0.8
0.8
0.8
15
1.5
1.5
1.5
30
3.0
3.0
3.0
200
200
200
400
200
200
200
400
200
200
200
400
200
200
200
400
200
200
200
400
1.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
3.3
0.8
0.8
0.8
8.0
0.8
0.8
0.8
15
1.5
1.5
1.5
30
3.0
3.0
3.0
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
166
166
190
524
300
33
33
33
100
100
100
150
100
10
10
10
200
200
200
450
100
10
10
10
Four wire sense only, for two wire operation, add an additional voltage = 0.3 Ω x maximum burden current to the accuracy specification.
[2]
For ±1 °C and constant load and connection conditions.
[3]
When Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are applied, ‘Open loop’ stability specification must be added to the 1-year
accuracy specification as described in “Open and Closed Loop Operation”.
[4]
These specifications are only applicable if the combined voltage rms output is greater than the range minimum. If the combined output is
below the range minimum the output is not specified.
[5]
The maximum value for a single harmonic (2nd to 100th) below 2850 Hz is 30 % of range. See “Amplitude/Frequency Limits” for profile above
2850 Hz.
[6]
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
1-20. Maximum Capacitive Loading for Output Stability
The voltage output will remain stable with 100 nF load but may not be able to drive that capacitance at all
voltage/frequency/harmonic combinations due to burden current limitations.
1-21. Voltage Distortion and Noise
Maximum Harmonic Distortion
Either:
Range and Frequency
Full
Range
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
[1]
the largest of
dB
Volts
Frequency
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-76
850 Hz - 6 kHz
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-52
-76
850 Hz - 6 kHz
16 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
16 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
16 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
16 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-52
-76
-52
-76
-52
-76
-52
-76
-52
480 μV
2.4 mV
990 μV
5.0 mV
2.3 mV
11 mV
5.0 mV
25 mV
10 mV
50 mV
30 mV
151 mV
[1]
Non-harmonic Noise Floor
(relative to full range)
or the largest of
% Setting
% Range
16 Hz - 4 MHz
dB
%
0.016
0.003
-66
0.05
0.25
0.016
0.015
0.003
-66
-70
0.05
0.032
0.25
0.016
0.25
0.016
0.25
0.016
0.25
0.016
0.25
0.015
0.003
0.015
0.003
0.015
0.003
0.015
0.003
0.015
-70
-72
-72
-76
-76
-66
-66
-60
-60
0.032
0.025
0.025
0.016
0.016
0.05
0.05
0.10
0.10
dB harmonic distortion increases linearly between 850 Hz and 6 kHz.
1-9
6100A
Users Manual
1-22. Current Specifications
Option 6100A/80A adds the 80 A range to 6100A and 6101A. Without option 6100A/80A the maximum output
current is 21 A rms.
1-23. Current Range Limits
Full Range (FR)
[1][2]
Max peak
Maximum compliance voltage
[3][4]
at FR (Vpk)
0.25 A
0.353 A
0.5 A
0.707 A
1A
1.414 A
2A
2.828 A
5A
7.07 A
10 A
14.14 A
21 A
29.7 A
80 A
113 A
14 V
14 V
14 V
14 V
14 V
14 V
12.5 V
2V
[1]
These values apply to sinusoidal, distorted and modulated wave-shapes.
[2]
Current harmonic phase angle significantly affects the peak value of a non-sinusoidal waveform.
[3]
Above 450 Hz, the instrument will drive current outputs that develop maximum compliance voltage across the load, but an ‘adder’ to
the accuracy specification in “Current DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications” and “Current Distortion and Noise” may be
required. Calculation of the ‘adders’ is described below.
[4]
Compliance voltage at the end of connecting leads will be reduced by the IR drop in the cables.
1-24. Load Regulation Specification ‘adder’
The finite output impedance of the current amplifier causes a ‘load regulation’ effect that must be taken into
consideration. Let VF = the peak voltage developed across the load due to current IF at frequency F. Let IFR be the
maximum current and Vmax the maximum compliance peak voltage for the range in use.
If VF/Vmax≤ IF/IFR no specification adder is required. Otherwise, the adder is calculated:
if VF/Vmax > IF/IFR, add:
I FR × F × VF
μA
20 × Vmax
Example: The output is a 800 Hz, 0.5 A rms sinewave on the 5 A range. The current specification from “Current Sine
Amplitude Specifications” is:
182 ppm + 120 μA = 91 μA + 120 μA
The voltage across the output is 6 V peak and maximum compliance is 14 V, i.e., VF/Vmax > IF/IFR. The ‘adder’ is:
5 × 800 × 6
= 85 μA
20 × 14
The current specification becomes:
91 μA + 120 μA + 85 μA = 296 μA
1-10
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
1-25. Current Sine Amplitude Specifications
Range
Frequency
16 Hz - 450 Hz
0.01 A - 0.25 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
0.05 A - 0.5 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
0.1 A -1 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
0.2 A - 2 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
0.5 A - 5 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
1 A - 10 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
16 Hz - 450 Hz
2 A - 21 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
40 Hz - 450 Hz
8 A - 80 A
450 Hz - 850 Hz
Current
[4]
0.01 A - 0.1 A
0.1 A - 0.25 A
0.01 A - 0.1 A
0.1 A - 0.25 A
0.05 A - 0.2 A
0.2 A - 0.5 A
0.05 A - 0.2 A
0.2 A - 0.5 A
0.1 A - 0.4 A
0.4 A - 1 A
0.1 A - 0.4 A
0.4 A - 1 A
0.2 A - 0.8 A
0.8 A - 2 A
0.2 A - 0.8 A
0.8 A - 2 A
0.5 A - 2 A
2A-5A
0.5 A - 2 A
2A-5A
1A-4A
4 A - 10 A
1A-4A
4 A - 10 A
2A-8A
8 A - 21 A
2A-8A
8 A - 21 A
8 A - 32 A
32 A - 80 A
8 A - 32 A
32 A - 80 A
1-Year Accuracy,
[3]
tcal ±5 °C
± (ppm of output +
[5]
μA)
139
130
182
170
139
130
182
170
139
130
182
170
139
130
182
170
139
130
182
170
191
164
267
250
213
189
267
250
265
250
300
280
6
6
6
6
12
12
12
12
24
24
24
24
48
48
48
48
120
120
120
120
240
240
240
240
720
720
720
720
2800
2800
2800
2800
Closed Loop
Open Loop Stability
Stability ± (ppm of
± (ppm of output +
output + μA) per
[1][2]
μA) per Hour
[1]
Hour
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
70
70
70
70
90
90
90
90
120
120
120
120
3
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
10
10
10
10
20
20
20
20
50
50
50
50
100
100
100
100
300
300
300
300
1200
1200
1200
1200
240
240
360
360
240
240
360
360
240
240
360
360
240
240
360
360
240
240
360
360
280
280
420
420
320
320
480
480
1000
1000
1000
1000
3
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
10
10
10
10
20
20
20
20
50
50
50
50
100
100
100
100
300
300
300
300
1200
1200
1200
1200
[1]
For ±1 °C and constant load and connection conditions.
[2]
When Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are applied, ‘Open loop’ stability specification must be added to the 1year accuracy specification as described in “Open and Closed Loop Operation”.
[3]
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
[4]
Output levels less than the range minimum can be set but are not specified.
[5]
These specifications assume a ‘sampling’ measuring instrument. Some rms sensing instruments have voltage input bandwidths of several
MHz. The 6100A specification should be expanded by the non-harmonic noise floor in “Current Distortion and Noise” for rms sensing
devices.
[6]
Settling time (TS) of 21 A and 80 A ranges depends on rms output as a proportion of full range and can be calculated from:
TS = %FR2 x 180 seconds.
1-11
6100A
Users Manual
1-26. Current DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications
Range
Output
[4][5]
0 A - 0.125 A
0.01 A - 0.25 A
0 A - 0.075 A
0 A - 0.25 A
0.05 A - 0.5 A
0 A - 0.15 A
0 A - 0.5 A
0.1 A -1 A
0 A - 0.3 A
0A-1A
0.2 A - 2 A
0 A - 0.6 A
0 A - 2.5 A
0.5 A - 5 A
0 A - 1.5 A
0A-5A
1 A - 10 A
0A-3A
0 A - 10 A
2 A - 21 A
8 A - 80 A
[1]
1-12
0A-6A
0 A - 24 A
Frequency
1-Year Accuracy,
Closed Loop
[1]
Open Loop Stability ±
tcal ±5 °C
Stability ± (ppm of
(ppm of output + μA)
output
+
μA)
per
[1][2]
± (ppm of output +
per Hour
[1]
Hour
μA)
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
139
139
182
505
139
139
182
505
139
139
182
505
139
139
182
505
139
139
182
505
191
191
267
519
213
213
267
665
75
6
6
6
150
12
12
12
300
24
24
24
600
48
48
48
1500
120
120
120
3000
240
240
240
6000
720
720
720
50
50
50
100
50
50
50
100
50
50
50
100
50
50
50
100
50
50
50
100
70
70
70
110
90
90
90
120
11
3
3
3
22
5
5
5
45
10
10
10
90
20
20
20
225
50
50
50
450
100
100
100
900
300
300
300
240
240
360
1000
240
240
360
1000
240
240
360
1000
240
240
360
1000
240
240
360
1000
280
280
420
1100
320
320
480
1300
11
3
3
3
22
5
5
5
45
10
10
10
90
20
20
20
225
50
50
50
450
100
100
100
900
300
300
300
40 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 3 kHz
265
300
690
2800
2800
2800
120
120
150
1200
1200
1200
1000
1000
2000
1200
1200
1200
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
[2]
For ±1 °C and constant load and connection conditions.
[3]
When Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are applied, ‘Open loop’ stability specification must be added to the
1-year accuracy specification as described in “Open and Closed Loop Operation”.
[4]
These specifications are only applicable if the combined voltage rms output is greater than the range minimum. If the combined output
is below the range minimum the output is not specified.
[5]
The maximum value for a single harmonic (2nd to 100th) below 2850 Hz is 30 % of range. See “Amplitude/Frequency Limits” for profile
above 2850 Hz.
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
1-27. Current Distortion and Noise
Maximum Harmonic Distortion
Either:
Range and Frequency
Full
Range
the largest of
dB
Amps
Frequency
[1]
Non-harmonic Noise Floor
(relative to full range)
or the largest of
% Setting
% Range
16 Hz - 4 MHz
dB
%
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
7.5 μA
0.010
0.003
-50
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
25 μA
0.100
0.010
-50
0.316
0.5 A
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
15 μA
0.010
0.003
-60
0.100
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
50 μA
0.100
0.010
-60
0.100
1A
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
30 μA
0.010
0.003
-60
0.100
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
100 μA
0.100
0.010
-60
0.100
2A
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
60 μA
0.010
0.003
-65
0.056
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
200 μA
0.100
0.010
-65
0.056
5A
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
150 μA
0.010
0.003
-65
0.056
850 Hz - 6 kHz
--60
500 μA
0.100
0.010
-65
0.056
10 A
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
0.003
-50
0.316
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
300 μA
1.0 mA
0.010
21 A
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
80 A
850 Hz - 6 kHz
16 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 3 kHz
-60
-80
-60
0.25 A
[1]
600 μA
2.0 mA
2.4 mA
8.0 mA
0.316
0.100
0.010
-50
0.316
0.010
0.003
-50
0.316
0.100
0.100
0.100
0.010
0.003
0.010
-50
-70
-70
0.316
0.032
0.032
dB harmonic distortion increases linearly between 850 Hz and 6 kHz.
1-28. Maximum Inductive Loading for Output Stability
Full Range (FR)
Maximum Inductive Load, Hi
[1]
Bandwidth
Maximum Inductive Load, Lo
[1][2]
Bandwidth
0.25 A
0.5 A
1A
2A
5A
10 A
21 A
80 A
300 μH
300 μH
300 μH
300 μH
300 μH
30 μH
30 μH
30 μH
2 mH
2 mH
1 mH
1 mH
500 μH
360 μH
500 μH
250 μH
[1]
The current output will remain stable with the inductive loads shown but may not be able to drive that inductance at all
current/frequency/harmonic combinations due to voltage burden limitations. The inductive load due to connecting cables may be
decreased by reducing their loop area, e.g., by tying the cables together or shortening the cables.
[2]
In low bandwidth mode maximum frequency is 1.5 kHz.
1-29. Voltage from the Current Terminals
1-30. Range Limits and Impedances
0.25 V
0.353 V
Full Range (FR)
[1][2]
Max Peak
Source Impedance
Minimum load impedance to maintain specification
[1]
[3]
1.5 V
2.121 V
10 V
14.14 V
1Ω
6.67 Ω
40.02 Ω
25 kΩ
170 kΩ
1 MΩ
These values apply to sinusoidal, distorted and modulated wave shapes.
[2]
Harmonic phase angle significantly affects the peak value of a non-sinusoidal waveform.
[3]
For a load less than specified, calculate error from parallel combination of source and load impedance.
1-13
6100A
Users Manual
1-31. Sine Specifications
Range
0.05 V - 0.25 V
Output
[3]
Component
Frequency
0.05 V - 0.1 V
0.1 V - 0.25 V
0.05 V - 0.25 V
0.15 V - 0.6 V
0.6 V - 1.5 V
0.15 V - 1.5 V
1V-4V
4 V - 10 V
1 V - 10 V
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
0.15 V - 1.5 V
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
1 V - 10 V
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
1-Year Accuracy,
[4]
tcal ±5 °C
± (ppm of output +
[5]
μV)
Closed Loop
Stability ± (ppm of
output + μV) for 1
[1]
Hour
Open Loop
Stability ± (ppm of
output + μV) for 1
[1][2]
Hour
200
200
231
200
200
231
200
200
231
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
240
30
30
30
50
40
50
300
240
300
15
15
15
25
20
25
150
120
150
15
15
15
25
25
25
150
150
150
[1]
For ±1 °C and constant load and connection conditions.
[2]
When Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are applied, ‘Open loop’ stability specification must be added to the 1year accuracy specification as described in “Open and Closed Loop Operation”.
[3]
Output levels less than the range minimum can be set but are not specified.
[4]
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
[5]
These specifications assume a ‘sampling’ measuring instrument. Some rms sensing instruments have voltage input bandwidths of several
MHz. The 6100A specification should be expanded by the non-harmonic noise floor in “Current Distortion and Noise” for rms sensing
devices.
1-32. DC and Harmonic Amplitude Specifications
[1]
Range
Output
[4][5]
0 V - 0.125 V
0.05 V - 0.25 V
0 V - 0.075 V
0 V - 0.75 V
0.15 V - 1.5 V
0 V - 0.45 V
0V-5V
1 V - 10 V
[1]
1-14
0V-3V
Frequency
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
DC
16 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 6 kHz
1-Year Accuracy, tcal
±5 °C
± (ppm of output + μV)
231
200
231
1000
231
200
231
1000
231
200
231
1000
75
30
30
30
450
50
50
50
3000
300
300
300
Closed Loop
Open Loop Stability ±
Stability ± (ppm of
(ppm of output + μV)
output + μV) per
[2][3]
per Hour
[2]
Hour
50
50
50
100
50
50
50
100
50
50
50
100
15
15
15
15
75
25
25
25
450
150
150
150
240
240
240
1000
240
240
240
1000
240
240
240
1000
15
15
15
15
75
25
25
25
450
150
150
150
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
[2]
For ±1 °C and constant load and connection conditions.
[3]
When Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or Interharmonics are applied, ‘Open loop’ stability specification must be added to the
1-year accuracy specification as described in “Open and Closed Loop Operation”.
[4]
These specifications are only applicable if the combined voltage rms output is greater than the range minimum. If the combined output
is below the range minimum the output is not specified.
[5]
The maximum value for a single harmonic (2nd to 100th) below 2850 Hz is 30 % of range. See “Amplitude/Frequency Limits” for profile
above 2850 Hz.
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
1-33. Voltage from Current Terminals, Distortion and Noise
Maximum Harmonic Distortion
Either
Range and Frequency
Full
Range
1.5 V
10 V
[1]
Non-harmonic Noise Floor
(relative to full range)
or the largest of
% Setting
% Range
16 Hz - 4 MHz
dB
%
-80
2.5 μV
0.010
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
25 μV
0.100
0.01
-50
0.316
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
15 μV
0.010
0.001
-60
0.100
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
150 μV
0.100
0.01
-60
0.100
16 Hz - 850 Hz
-80
0.010
0.001
-60
0.100
850 Hz - 6 kHz
-60
100 μV
1 mV
0.100
0.01
-60
0.100
16 Hz - 850 Hz
0.25 V
the largest of
dB
Volts
Frequency
[1]
0.001
-50
0.316
dB harmonic distortion increases linearly between 50 Hz and 6 kHz.
1-34. Current to Voltage Phase Specifications
Note
For phase specifications of voltage from the current terminals, use 0.25 A to 5 A
specification from the Current to Voltage Phase specifications.
For All Voltage Ranges
(16 V - 1008 V)
Voltage and Current Components
>40 % of Range
Voltage or Current Component
[5]
0.5 % - 40 % of Range
1-Year Accuracy, Stability per hour
[2][3]
[1][2]
tcal ±5 °C
1-Year Accuracy,
[4]
[1][2]
tcal ±5 °C
Stability per
[2][3]
hour
0.25 A - 5 A
16 Hz - 69 Hz
69 Hz - 180 Hz
180 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 3 kHz
3 kHz - 6 kHz
0.003 °
0.005 °
0.015 °
0.030 °
0.150 °
0.300 °
0.0002 °
0.0002 °
0.0005 °
0.0008 °
0.0010 °
0.0010 °
0.010 °
0.017 °
0.050 °
0.070 °
0.200 °
0.450 °
0.001 °
0.002 °
0.005 °
0.018 °
0.100 °
0.100 °
5 A - 21 A
16 Hz - 69 Hz
69 Hz - 180 Hz
180 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 3 kHz
3 kHz - 6 kHz
0.004 °
0.007 °
0.020 °
0.040 °
0.200 °
0.400 °
0.0003 °
0.0003 °
0.0005 °
0.0008 °
0.0015 °
0.0020 °
0.013 °
0.023 °
0.065 °
0.080 °
0.250 °
0.600 °
0.002 °
0.004 °
0.010 °
0.020 °
0.100 °
0.150 °
20 A - 80 A
16 Hz - 69 Hz
69 Hz - 180 Hz
180 Hz - 450 Hz
450 Hz - 850 Hz
850 Hz - 3 kHz
0.004 °
0.008 °
0.025 °
0.050 °
0.250 °
0.0005 °
0.0005 °
0.0010 °
0.0015 °
0.0020 °
0.016 °
0.028 °
0.080 °
0.100 °
0.300 °
0.003 °
0.005 °
0.015 °
0.030 °
0.150 °
Current Range
Frequency
[1]
Current phase angle errors are relative to the voltage channel of the same phase e.g., L2 current is relative to L2 voltage.
[2]
Phase angle contribution to power accuracy varies with set phase angle see “Power Specifications” below.
[3]
For constant load and connection conditions.
[4]
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
[5]
Phase performance at less than 0.5 % of full range degrades as output components approach the resolution limit of the digital
feedback system.
1-15
6100A
Users Manual
1-35. Power Specifications
The example power specifications below are only valid for rms values greater than 40 % of range for voltage and
current and frequency less than 450 Hz. They are not valid when any of: Flicker, Fluctuating harmonics, Dip/Swell or
Interharmonics are applied to the voltage or current channel of that 6100A/6101A.
1-36. Sinusoidal VA Specifications
The following table shows in parts per million the minimum to maximum VA accuracy for specific voltage and current
bands under sinusoidal conditions.
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 5 A
233 to 329
220 to
295
206 to 259
207
to
260
207 to
260
240
to
304
5.1 - 10 A
256 to 341
245 to
309
233 to 275
233
to
276
233 to
276
263
to
317
10.1 - 21 A
284 to 373
274 to
344
263 to 314
264
to
315
264 to
315
290
to
352
20.1 - 80 A
347 to 485
339 to
463
330 to 441
330
to
442
330 to
442
352
to
469
1-37. Sinusoidal Power Specifications
The following tables show in parts per million the minimum to maximum Power accuracy for specific voltage and
current bands under sinusoidal conditions.
16 Hz to 69 Hz, 1.0 > Power Factor > 0.75
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 2 A
237 to 323
225 to 288
212 to 252
212 to
253
212 to
253
244 to
297
2.1 - 5 A
241 to 333
229 to 299
215 to 264
216 to
265
216 to
265
248 to
308
5.1 - 10 A
264 to 347
253 to 315
241 to 282
241 to
283
241 to
283
270 to
323
10.1 - 21 A
291 to 378
281 to 350
270 to 320
271 to
321
271 to
321
297 to
357
20.1 - 80 A
398 to 489
391 to 467
383 to 445
384 to
446
384 to
446
402 to
473
16 Hz to 69 Hz, 0.75 > Power Factor > 0.5
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 2 A
250 to 332
238 to
299
225 to
264
226 to
264
226 to
264
257 to
307
2.1 - 5 A
262 to 349
251 to
317
239 to
284
240 to
285
240 to
285
269 to
325
5.1 - 10 A
283 to 362
273 to
332
262 to
300
263 to
301
263 to
301
290 to
340
10.1 - 21 A
309 to 393
300 to
365
290 to
337
290 to
337
290 to
337
315 to
372
20.1 - 80 A
411 to 500
404 to
478
397 to
457
397 to
458
397 to
458
416 to
484
16 Hz to 69 Hz, 0.5 > Power Factor > 0.25
1-16
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
V Range
I Setting
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
0.1 - 2.1 A
309 to 378
299 to 349
289 to 320
290 to
321
290 to
321
314 to
357
2.1 - 5 A
357 to 424
349 to 399
340 to 373
340 to
374
340 to
374
362 to
405
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
5.1 - 10 A
373 to 435
365 to 410
357 to 386
357 to
386
357 to
386
377 to
417
10.1 - 21 A
392 to 461
385 to 438
377 to 414
378 to
415
378 to
415
397 to
444
20.1 - 80 A
477 to 555
471 to 536
465 to 517
465 to
518
465 to
518
481 to
541
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
69 Hz to 180 Hz, 1.0 > Power Factor > 0.75
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
V Range
I Setting
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
0.1 - 2 A
245 to 329
233 to 295
220 to 259
221 to
260
221 to
260
252 to
304
2.1 - 5 A
256 to 344
245 to 312
233 to 279
233 to
280
233 to
280
263 to
321
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
5.1 - 10 A
278 to 358
268 to 327
257 to 295
257 to
296
257 to
296
284 to
335
10.1 - 21 A
304 to 389
295 to 361
285 to 332
285 to
333
285 to
333
310 to
368
20.1 - 80 A
412 to 500
405 to 479
398 to 458
398 to
458
398 to
458
416 to
485
69 Hz to 180 Hz, 0.75 > Power Factor > 0.5
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 2 A
277 to 353
267 to 322
256 to 290
256 to
291
256 to
291
284 to
330
369
2.1 - 5 A
314 to 389
305 to 361
296 to 333
296 to
334
296 to
334
320 to
5.1 - 10 A
332 to 401
324 to 374
315 to 347
315 to
348
315 to
348
338 to
381
10.1 - 21 A
354 to 429
346 to 404
338 to 379
338 to
379
338 to
379
359 to
410
20.1 - 80 A
462 to 542
455 to 522
449 to 503
449 to
503
449 to
503
465 to
527
69 Hz to 180 Hz, 0.5 > Power Factor > 0.25
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 2 A
410 to 465
403 to 442
396 to 419
396 to
419
396 to
419
415 to
448
2.1 - 5 A
527 to 575
522 to 557
516 to 539
516 to
539
516 to
539
531 to
561
5.1 - 10 A
538 to 583
533 to 565
527 to 547
528 to
548
528 to
548
541 to
570
10.1 - 21 A
552 to 603
547 to 585
542 to 568
542 to
568
542 to
568
555 to
590
20.1 - 80 A
669 to 726
664 to 712
660 to 698
660 to
698
660 to
698
671 to
716
180 Hz to 450 Hz, 1.0 > Power Factor > 0.75
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 2 A
328 to 394
319 to 366
310 to 338
310 to
339
310 to
339
333 to
374
2.1 - 5 A
386 to 449
378 to 425
371 to 401
371 to
402
371 to
402
390 to
431
5.1 - 10 A
401 to 460
394 to 436
386 to 413
386 to
413
386 to
413
405 to
442
10.1 - 21 A
419 to 484
412 to 462
405 to 440
405 to
440
405 to
440
423 to
467
20.1 - 80 A
550 to 619
545 to 602
540 to 585
540 to
586
540 to
586
553 to
606
180 Hz to 450 Hz, 0.75 > Power Factor > 0.5
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
336 V
1008 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
(134 - 336 V)
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 2 A
510 to 555
504 to 535
498 to 517
498 to
517
498 to
517
513 to
540
2.1 - 5 A
648 to 687
643 to 672
639 to 657
639 to
657
639 to
657
651 to
676
5.1 - 10 A
657 to 694
652 to 679
648 to 664
648 to
665
648 to
665
659 to
683
10.1 - 21 A
668 to 711
664 to 696
660 to 681
660 to
682
660 to
682
671 to
700
20.1 - 80 A
852 to 898
849 to 886
845 to 875
845 to
875
845 to
875
854 to
889
1-17
6100A
Users Manual
180 Hz to 450 Hz, 0.5 > Power Factor > 0.25
V Range
I Setting
16 V
33 V
78 V
168 V
(6.4 - 16 V)
(13.2 - 33 V)
(31 - 78 V)
(67 - 168 V)
336 V
(134 - 336 V)
1008 V
(330 - 1008 V)
0.1 - 2 A
1040 to 1063 1038 to 1053 1035 to 1044 1035 to 1044
1035 to 1044
1042 to
1056
2.1 - 5 A
1372 to 1391 1370 to 1383 1368 to 1376 1368 to 1376
1368 to 1376
1373 to
1385
5.1 - 10 A
1376 to 1394 1374 to 1387 1372 to 1380 1372 to 1380
1372 to 1380
1377 to
1389
10.1 - 21 A
1382 to 1403 1380 to 1395 1377 to 1388 1377 to 1388
1377 to 1388
1383 to
1397
20.1 - 80 A
1735 to 1758 1734 to 1752 1732 to 1747 1732 to 1747
1732 to 1747
1736 to
1754
Power Factor <0.25
For Power Factor less than 0.25, phase angle dominates power specifications and voltage and current accuracy
becomes negligible. Calculate Power uncertainty from:
u ( P) = (1 −
Φ
where
cos(Φ + u (φ )
cos(Φ)
) ×10 6 ppm
is the set phase angle and
u (φ ) is the phase uncertainty.
Reactive Power, Power Factor <0.25
Use the relevant frequency table for Power, 1.0 > Power Factor > 0.75
Reactive Power, 0.25 > Power Factor >0.5
Use the relevant frequency table for Power, 0.75 > Power Factor > 0.5
Reactive Power, 0.5 > Power Factor >0.75
Use the relevant frequency table for Power, 0. 5 > Power Factor > 0.25
Reactive Power, Power Factor >0.75
For reactive Power (Q) where power factor >0.75 calculate u(Q) from
u (Q) = (1 −
sin(Φ + u (φ )
sin(Φ)
) ×10 −6 ppm
The method used for calculation of reactive power in non-sinusoidal conditions is user selectable.
Reactive Power Calculation Methods
Under pure sinusoidal conditions, Apparent Power (S), Power (P) and Reactive power (Q) are related by:
2
2
2
S = P + Q . This relationship is known as the Power Triangle. When either the voltage or current waveform is not
sinusoidal, the power triangle is not satisfied by this equation. This has lead to various attempts to better define
Reactive Power (Q) but no single definition has been agreed. The difficulty is that Q is used for a number of different
calculations including transmission line efficiency and voltage line drop. The 6100A/6101A allows users to select the
definition that best meets their needs. The following methods are supported:
Budeanu
Fryze
Kusters and Moore
Shepherd and Zakikhani
Sharon / Czarnecki
IEEE working group
Because of the complexity of the subject, definition of the methods listed is beyond the scope of this document.
References to relevant documentation are provided at 0.
1-38. Flicker Specifications
Although Flicker is a primarily a voltage phenomena the 6100A provides the same facility on its current output.
Flicker is not available on a voltage or current channel if Fluctuating Harmonics are already enabled on that channel.
1-18
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
1-39. Voltage and Current Sinusoidal and Rectangular Modulation Flicker
Specification
±30 % of set value within range values (60 % ΔV/V)
0.025 %
0.001 %
Rectangular, Square or Sinusoidal
Setting range
Flicker modulation depth accuracy
Modulation depth setting resolution
Shape of modulation envelope
Duty cycle (shape = rectangular)
Frequency
Modulation units Either:
or
Changes per minute
[1][2]
Modulating frequency accuracy
0.01 % to 99.99 %; accuracy = ±31 μs
0.5 Hz to 40 Hz
1.0 CPM to 4800 CPM
<0.13 % (1 CPM to 4800 CPM)
[1]
Rectangular modulation accuracy is ±{(50 + 31 x modulating frequency) ppm + 10 μHz}
[2]
Sine modulation accuracy is ±(50 ppm +10 μHz)
Pst and Pinst Indication Accuracy
Pst and Pinst values are from IEC 61000-4-15, (amendment 1). Note that Pst and Pinst indications are only valid for 230
V and 120 V, 50 Hz and 60 Hz. Pst values are not valid for the current channel.
Voltage Setting
Pst Indication Accuracy
220 V - 240 V
±0.25 %
115 V - 125 V
±0.25 %
Note that long term flicker (Plt) can be simulated either by a steady Pst over a suitable period, or by changing Pst and
calculating Plt from:
N
Plt =
3
∑P
i =1
3
sti
N
where Psti (i=1,2,3, ...) are different consecutive readings of Pst. See IEC61000-4-15 for details.
Other Flicker Modes
Extended Flicker functions are provided. The accuracy of these signals is better than 1 %:
•
Frequency Changes
•
Distorted voltage with multiple zero crossings
•
Harmonics with side band
•
Phase jumps
•
Rectangular voltage changes with duty ratio
1-40. Fluctuating Harmonic Specifications
Fluctuating harmonics are available on voltage and current outputs. Fluctuating Harmonics are not available on a
voltage or current channel if Flicker is already enabled on that channel.
Number of harmonics to fluctuate
[1]
Modulation depth setting range
Any number from 0 to all set harmonics can fluctuate
0 % to 100 % of nominal harmonic voltage
Fluctuation accuracy (0 % to ±30 % modulation)
Modulation depth setting resolution
Shape
Duty cycle (shape = rectangular)
Modulating Frequency range
Sine modulating frequency accuracy
±0.025 %
0.001 %
Rectangular or Sinusoidal
0.1 % to 99.99 %
0.008 Hz to 30 Hz
Rectangular modulating frequency accuracy
Modulating Frequency setting resolution
±(50ppm + 10 μHz)
[2]
<1300ppm
0.001 Hz
[1]
Fluctuation accuracy is not specified for modulation depth >±30 %.
[2]
Accuracy is ± {(50 + 31 x modulating frequency) ppm + 10 μHz}.
1-19
6100A
Users Manual
1-41. Interharmonic Specifications
Interharmonics are available on voltage and current outputs
Frequency accuracy
±500 ppm
Amplitude accuracy 16 Hz to <6 kHz
±1 %
4%
The maximum value for an interharmonic <2850 Hz is 30 % of
range. See “Amplitude/Frequency Limits” for profile above 2850
Hz.
16 Hz to 9 kHz
Amplitude accuracy >6 kHz
Maximum value of a single interharmonic
Frequency range of interharmonic
1-42. Dip/Swell Specifications
Although Dips and Swells are primarily a voltage phenomena, the 6100A provides the same facility on its current
output.
TTL falling edge remaining low for 10 μs
Trigger-in requirement
Either:
Trigger-in delay
OR
Phase-angle synchronization with respect to
channel fundamental frequency zero crossing
Dip/Swell Min duration
Dip/Swell Max duration
Dip Min amplitude
Swell Max amplitude
Ramp up/down period
±180 ° ±31 μs
1 ms
1 minute
0 % of the nominal output
The least of full range value and 140 % of the nominal output
Settable 100 μs to 30 s
0 to 60 s ±31 μs
Optional repeat with delay
±0.025 % of level
Starting level amplitude accuracy
Dip/Swell level amplitude accuracy
[1]
±0.25 % of level
0 to 60 s ±31 μs from start of dip/swell event
TTL falling edge co-incident with end of trigger out delay, remaining
low for 10 μs to 31 μs
Trigger out delay
Trigger out
[1]
0 to 60 s ±31 μs
Accuracy not specified below 10 % of starting level or below the range minimum value.
1-43. Multi-Phase Operation
Voltage Channel to Voltage Channel Phase Specifications
Frequency
(For all voltage ranges
(16 V - 1008 V))
1-Year Accuracy,
[2]
Stability per Hour
[3]
[1]
tcal ±5 °C
0.0002 °
Voltage Components 0.5 % - 40 % of
[4]
Range
1-Year
Accuracy, tcal Stability per Hour [2]
[3]
[1]
±5 °C
16 Hz - 69 Hz
0.005 °
69 Hz - 180 Hz
0.007 °
0.0002 °
0.018 °
0.002 °
180 Hz - 450 Hz
0.025 °
0.0005 °
0.052 °
0.005 °
450 Hz - 850 Hz
0.050 °
0.0008 °
0.075 °
0.018 °
850 Hz - 3 kHz
0.170 °
0.0010 °
0.220 °
0.100 °
3 kHz - 6 kHz
0.350 °
0.0015 °
0.400 °
0.150 °
[1]
1-20
Voltage Components >40 % of Range
0.010 °
0.001 °
Phase errors relative to L1 Voltage
[2]
For constant load and connection conditions.
[3]
tcal = temperature of last calibration.
[4]
Phase performance at less than 0.5 % of full range degrades as output components approach the resolution limit
of the digital feedback system.
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
1-44. Determining Non-sinusoidal Waveform Amplitude Specifications
The rms value of the combination of voltage components is:
N
2
V RMS
= ∑ Vi 2
and, assuming symmetrical uncertainties,
i =1
u (V ) i , for each of Vi ,
Note that the uncertainties of the components of a 6100A non-sinusoidal voltage (or current) waveform are correlated
so must be combined by linear addition.
(VRMS + u (V RMS )) 2 =
N
∑ (V
i =1
i
+ u (Vi )) 2
2
V RMS
+ 2VRMS u (VRMS ) + u 2 (VRMS ) =
V12 + 2V1 u (V1 ) + u 2 (V )1 + V22 + 2V2 u (V2 ) + u 2 (V2 ) ... Vn2 + 2Vn u (Vn )u 2Vn
N
But
2
V RMS
= ∑ Vi 2 ,
i =1
2
and, where uncertainties are relatively small (as in the 6100A), u vi components become negligible. The uncertainty
of the combined waveform becomes:
2VRMS u (VRMS ) = 2V1 u (V1 ) + 2V2 u (V2 ) ... 2Vn u (Vn )
which simplifies to give
uc
as the combined uncertainty:
N
u c (VRMS ) = ∑ ci u (Vi )
i =1
where
ci =
Vi
VRMS
and is known as the sensitivity coefficient.
1-45. Non-sinusoidal Voltage Example
th
rd
The waveform is a 60 Hz, 110 V rms waveform, from the 168 V range, comprising 10 % 95 harmonic, 30 % 3
harmonic with the remainder contributed by the fundamental frequency. Using the voltage uncertainty values in
“Voltage and Sine Amplitude Specifications” and “Voltage DC and Harmonic Specifications”, determine the 1-year
accuracy.
rd
3 Harmonic rms voltage = 0.3x110 = 33 V
th
95 Harmonic rms voltage = 0.1x110 = 11 V
2
2
2
Fundamental rms voltage = √(110 - 33 - 11 } = 104.3552 V
Accuracy contribution from the fundamental:
112ppm of output+4.4 mV=(104.3552x0.000112)+0.0044=0.011688+0.0044=0.016088 V
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0.016088x104.3552 ÷ 110 = 0.015262 V
rd
Accuracy contribution from the 3 Harmonic (180 Hz):
rd
122ppm of 3 harmonic value+4.4 mV = (0.000122x33)+0.0044 = 0.008426 V
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0.008426x33 ÷ 110 = 0.002528 V
th
Accuracy contribution from the 95 Harmonic (5700 Hz):
th
512ppm of 95 harmonic value+4.4 mV = (0.000512x11)+0.0044 = 0.010032 V
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0. 010032x11 ÷ 110 = 0. 001003 V
Combining the uncertainties:
Total amplitude uncertainty = 0.015262+0.002528+0. 010032 = 0.018793 V
Voltage Accuracy =110±0.018793 V
1-21
6100A
Users Manual
1-46. Apparent Power (S) Accuracy Calculations
For the purpose of calculation of apparent power (S) for non-sinusoidal outputs the following equations are used:
S=
∑V ∑ I
2
n
n
2
n VA
n
To calculate the accuracy of apparent power (S), the amplitude accuracy specifications of voltage harmonic
components must be combined as described in “Determining Non-Sinusoidal Waveform Amplitude Specifications”
above. Current components are combined using the same method. As apparent power is the product of two different
quantities, uncertainties are conveniently combined using relative values. Note that 6100A voltage and current
components are generated independently and are therefore largely uncorrelated.
As
2
2
S 2 = VRMS
.I RMS
;
2
u c ( S ) u (VRMS ) 2 u ( I RMS ) 2
] +[
]
=[
S2
VRMS
I RMS
where
u c (S ) is the combined uncertainty of the apparent Power,
u (VRMS ) is the uncertainty of the rms voltage and
u ( I RMS ) is the uncertainty of the rms current.
1-47. Apparent Power Example
rd
Voltage channel fundamental frequency output is 109 V on the 168 V range at 60 Hz. A 15 V 3 harmonic has been
rd
th
added. The current channel output is 7 A at 60 Hz on the 10 A range with 3 and 5 harmonics at 0.7 A and 0.3 A
respectively. Phase angles are not relevant to the calculation of apparent power. Voltage uncertainty values are
given in “Voltage and Sine Amplitude Specifications” and “Voltage DC and Harmonic Specifications”, current
uncertainty values are given in “Current Sine Amplitude Specifications” and “Current DC and Harmonic Amplitude
Specifications”.
The voltage rms value is
109 2 + 15 2 = 110.02727 V
Accuracy contribution from the voltage fundamental:
112ppm of 109 V+4.4 mV = (109x0.000112)+0.0044 = 0.012208+0.0044 = 0.016608 V
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0.016608x109 ÷ 110.02727 = 0.016453 V
rd
Accuracy contribution from the voltage 3 harmonic:
122ppm of 15 V+4.4 mV = (15x0.000112)+0.0044 = 0.01830+0.0044 = 0.006230 V
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0.006230x15 ÷ 110.02727 = 0.000849 V
Combined voltage uncertainty:
u (VRMS ) 0.016453 + 0.000849
=
= 0.000157 (or 157 ppm).
110.02727
VRMS
The current rms value is
7 2 + 0.7 2 + 0.3 2 = 7.041307
Accuracy contribution from the current fundamental:
164ppm of 7 A+240 μA = (7x0.000164)+0.000240 = 0.001148+0.000240 = 0.001388
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0.001388x7 ÷ 7.041307 = 0.001380 A
rd
Accuracy contribution from the current 3 harmonic:
191ppm of 0.7 A+240 μA = (0.7x0.000191)+0. 000240 = 0.000134+0.000240 = 0.000374
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0. 000374x0.7 ÷ 7.041307 = 0.000037 A
1-22
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
th
Accuracy contribution from the current 5 harmonic:
191ppm of 0.3 A+240 μA = (0.3x0.000191)+0. 000240 = 0.000058+0.000240 = 0.000297
Modified by the sensitivity coefficient = 0. 000297x0.3 ÷ 7.041307 = 0.000013 A
Combined current uncertainty:
u ( I RMS ) 0.001388 + 0.000037 + 0.000013
=
= 0.000204 (or 204 ppm).
7.041307
I RMS
Now,
2
2
S 2 = VRMS
.I RMS
= 110.02727 × 7.041307 = 774.7358 VA
Apparent Power uncertainty:
u (V RMS ) 2 u ( I RMS ) 2
u(S )
= [
] +[
] = 0.000157 2 + 0.000204 2 = 0.0002574
S
V RMS
I RMS
giving:
u c ( S ) = 0.0002574 × 774.735748 = 0.1994 VA
Apparent Power Accuracy = 774.7358± 0.1994 VA
1-48. Power (P) Accuracy Calculations
Real power is the sum of the products of volt/current/phase-angle at each harmonic frequency.
P = ∑ Vn I n cos Φ n
Watts
where n is the harmonic order of the components.
Calculation of power accuracy uses the same techniques shown previously. The uncorrelated uncertainty
components of voltage, current and phase are combined using root sum of squares for each frequency.
u 2 ( Pf )
Pf
2
=[
u (V f )
Vf
]2 + [
u( I f )
If
]2 + [
u ( phase f )
phase f
]2
u (x) is the uncertainty of the component x and phase is the phase angle between the current and voltage
at frequency f . It is easiest to express each of these contributions as ppm.
where
The contribution of phase angle accuracy varies with the set phase angle as shown below.
cos(Φ + u (φ ))
cos Φ
Φ is the set phase angle and u (φ ) is the phase accuracy.
u ( phase) = 1 −
where
The power uncertainties for each frequency, modified by the appropriate sensitivity coefficient ci, are then linearly
summed to give the combined uncertainty uc (linearly summed because voltage components are correlated, as are
those of current and phase).
N
uc ( P ) = ∑ ci u ( Pi )
i =1
1-23
6100A
Users Manual
1-49. Power Example
rd
rd
Voltage channel output is 109 V on the 168 V range at 60 Hz with 3 harmonic at 15 V. The voltage 3 harmonic has
0 ° phase angle relative to the voltage fundamental.
rd
th
The current channel output is 7 A on the 10 A range at 60 Hz with 3 and 5 harmonics at 0.7 A and 0.3 A
rd
respectively. The current fundamental phase angle is 12 ° relative to the voltage fundamental. The current 3
rd
harmonic has a phase angle of +25 ° relative to the current fundamental, i.e., the phase angle between the 3
rd
th
current harmonic and the 3 voltage harmonic is 25 ° + (3 x 12 °) = 61 °. As the current 5 harmonic is not matched
th
th
by a voltage 5 harmonic, there is no 5 harmonic power contribution.
Voltage uncertainty values are given in “Voltage and Sine Amplitude Specifications” and “Voltage DC and Harmonic
Specifications”, current uncertainty values are given in “Current Sine Amplitude Specifications” and “Current DC and
Harmonic Amplitude Specifications”. Phase uncertainty values are given in “Current to Voltage Phase
Specifications”.
Converting all values to ppm, accuracy contribution at the fundamental frequency
u (V1 ) = 112 ppm +
0.0044 V × 10 6
= 152 ppm
109 V
0.00024 A × 10 6
u ( I 1 ) = 164 ppm +
= 198 ppm
7 A
⎛ cos(12 + 0.004) ⎞
⎟⎟ × 1e6 = 15 ppm
u ( phase1 ) = ⎜⎜1 −
cos(12)
⎝
⎠
Combined accuracy for the fundamental frequency components:
u ( P1 ) = 152 2 + 198 2 + 15 2 = 250 ppm
Power in the fundamental frequency:
P1 = V1 I 1 cos Φ 1 = 109 × 7 × 0.9781476 = 746.3266 Watts
u ( P1 ) = 250 × 10 −6 × 746.3266 = 0.1866 Watts
Accuracy contribution for the 3rd harmonic
u (V3 ) = 122 ppm +
0.0044 V × 10 6
= 415 ppm
15 V
u ( I 3 ) = 191 ppm +
0.00024 A × 10 6
= 534 ppm
0.7 A
⎛ cos(61 + 0.023) ⎞
⎟⎟ × 1e6 = 724 ppm
u ( phase3 ) = ⎜⎜1 −
cos(61)
⎝
⎠
Combined accuracy for the 3rd harmonic components
u ( P3 ) = 415 2 + 534 2 + 724 2 = 991 ppm
Power in the 3rd harmonic components:
P3 = V3 I 3 cos Φ 3 = 15 × 0.7 × 0.484810 = 5.0905 Watts so:
u ( P3 ) = 991 × 10 −6 × 5.0905 = 0.005045 Watts
Total power P
1-24
= P1 + P3 = 746.3266 + 5.0905 = 751.4171 Watts
so:
Introduction and Specifications
Electrical Specifications
1
From:
N
u c ( P ) = ∑ ci .u ( Pi )
i =1
uc (P ) =
746.3266
5.0905
× 0.1866 +
× 0.005045 = 0.1854 Watts
751.4171
751.4171
Power Accuracy = 751.4171 ± 0.1854 Watts
1-50. References
6100A and 6101A reactive power calculations are guided by the published work of Dr. Stefan Svensson:
Svensson, S., (1999), Power Measurement Techniques for Nonsinusoidal Conditions, Chalmers
Other pertinent papers are:
Budeanu, C., (1927), "Reactive and fictitious powers", Rumanian National Institute, No.2.
Czarnecki, L. S., (1885), "Considerations on the reactive power in nonsinusoidal situations", IEEE Trans. on Inst. and
Meas., Vol. 34, No. 3, pp399-404, Sept.
Czarnecki, L. S., (1987), "What is wrong with the Budeanu concept of reactive and distortion power and why it should
be abandoned", IEEE Trans. on Inst. and Meas., Vol. 36, No. 3, pp834-837, Sept
Filipski, P., (1980), "A new approach to reactive current and reactive power measurements in nonsinusoidal
systems", IEEE Trans. on Inst. and Meas., Vol. 29, No. 4, pp423-426, Dec.
Fryze, S., (1932), "Wirk- Blind- und Scheinleistung in elektrischen Stromkreisen mit nichtsinusformigen Verlauf von
Strom und Spannung", Elektrotechnische Zeitschrift, No25, pp 596-99, 625-627, 700-702.
Kusters, N. L. and Moore, W. J. M., (1980), "On the definition of reactive power under nonsinusoidal conditions",
IEEE Transaction on Power Apparatus and Systems, Vol PAS-99, No. 5, pp1845-1854, Sept/Oct.
Sharon, D., (1973), "Reactive power definition and power factor improvement in non-linear systems", PROC. IEE,
Vol. 120, No. 6, pp 704-706, July.
Shepherd, W. and Zakikhani, P., (1972), "Suggested definition of reactive power for nonsinusoidal systems", PROC.
IEE, Vol. 119, No. 9, pp 1361-1362, Sept.
IEC, Reactive power in nonsinusoidal situations, Report TC 25/wg7.
1-25
6100A
Users Manual
1-26
Chapter 2
Installation
Title
2-1.
2-2.
2-3.
2-4.
2-5.
2-6.
2-7.
2-8.
2-9.
Introduction.............................................................................................
Unpacking and Inspection ......................................................................
Reshipping the 6100A ............................................................................
Placement and Rack Mounting ...............................................................
Cooling Considerations...........................................................................
Line Voltage ...........................................................................................
Connecting to Line Power ......................................................................
Connecting 6101A Auxiliary units .........................................................
Allocation of phases................................................................................
Page
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-1
6100A
Users Manual
2-2
Installation
Introduction
2
2-1. Introduction
XWWARNING
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard can supply lethal voltages
to the binding posts of Master and Auxiliary units.
This chapter provides instructions for unpacking and installing the 6100A Electrical
Power Standard. The procedures for fuse replacement, and connection to line power are
provided here. Read this chapter before operating the 6100A Electrical Power Standard.
Instructions for cable connections other than line power connection can be found in the
following chapters of the manual:
Voltage and Current output connections and instructions for use of the 6100A lead set
can be found in Chapter 4
IEEE-488 interface bus connection: Chapter 5
2-2. Unpacking and Inspection
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard is shipped in a container designed to prevent
damage during shipping.
Inspect the 6100A Electrical Power Standard carefully for damage, and immediately
report any damage to the shipper. Instructions for inspection and claims are included in
the shipping container.
A packing list is included in the packaging. When you unpack the 6100A Electrical
Power Standard, check for all the standard equipment listed and check the shipping order
for any additional items ordered. Report any shortage to the place of purchase or to the
nearest Fluke Service Center.
2-3. Reshipping the 6100A
A ‘transit’ case intended for accompanied transit can be purchased from Fluke. The
Fluke part number is 1887580. This container is suitable for most handling conditions
but provides less shock protection than the original cardboard packaging. It is
recommended that the original container be used when possible.
2-4. Placement and Rack Mounting
This equipment is designed to operate in a controlled electromagnetic environment such
as calibration and measurement laboratories i.e. where R.F. transmitters such as mobile
telephones are not be used in close proximity.
The 6100A and 6101A units are suitable for benchtop use, so long as there is sufficient
space either side (minimum 4 inches (100 mm) per side) to allow adequate ventilation.
The 6100A and 6101A units can be rack mounted using Fluke part number 1887571.
Details of the rack mounting kit and fitting instructions are provided with the kit. Note
that the airflow through the 6100A is from left to right as viewed from the front. If
6100A is mounted in a rack the airflow must be in the same direction.
2-3
6100A
Users Manual
2-5. Cooling Considerations
WCaution
Damage caused by overheating may occur if the area around
the air intake is restricted, the intake air is too warm, or the air
filter becomes clogged.
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard must be at least 4 inches from nearby walls or rack
enclosures on both sides.
The inlet and exhaust perforations on the sides of the 6100A Electrical Power Standard
must be clear of obstruction.
The air entering the instrument must be between 5 C and 35 C. Make sure that exhaust
from another instrument is not directed into the fan inlet.
Clean the air filter every 30 days or more frequently if the 6100A Electrical Power
Standard is operated in a dusty environment. (Instructions for cleaning the air filter are in
Chapter 6)
2-6. Line Voltage
The 6100A and 6101A Electrical Power Standards have automatic mains sensing in the
range 100-240V, so no user line voltage selection is required. The fuse specified covers
this voltage range. Chapter 6 describes fuse access.
2-7. Connecting to Line Power
XWWARNING
To avoid shock hazard, connect the factory supplied
three-conductor line power cord to a properly grounded power
outlet. Do not use a two-conductor adapter or extension cord;
this will break the protective ground connection. If a
two-conductor power cord must be used, a protective
grounding wire must be connected between the ground
terminal on the rear panel and ground before connecting the
power cord or operating the instrument.
The power outlets supplying the 6100A/6101A system should be
controlled by an emergency switch so that power can be
switched off if a hazard arises.
The line current requirement of the 6100A Electrical Power Standard may exceed the
capacity of standard 10 A IEC connectors so the unit is fitted with a 16 A power
receptacle at the rear.
A suitable supply lead is provided. Ensure that the room supply outlet is suited to
delivering the 1250VA maximum power requirements and that the 6100A Electrical
Power Standard is connected to a properly grounded three-prong outlet. Note: typical
maximum power requirement at 115V is 1000VA.
If a supply lead is provided WITHOUT a mains connector, please observe the following
color coding when wiring up your own mains connector - line = brown, neutral = blue,
earth =green/yellow.
2-4
Installation
Connecting 6101A Auxiliary units
Country
Fluke Line cord part number
UK
1998167
Europe
1998171
Australia, New Zealand, China
1998198
USA, Japan
1998209
Other (no plug fitted)
1998211
2
2-8. Connecting 6101A Auxiliary units
Each 6101A Auxiliary unit added to a 6100A Master provides an additional voltage and
current phase. A 6100A Master can control up to three auxiliary units. The control
connections are made by interconnection cable part number 2002080 supplied with each
6101A. The control connections are via connectors on 6100A and 6101A rear panels.
Figure 2.1 shows the layout of connections on the 6100A.
Figure 2-1. Auxiliary Unit connectors on the 6100A rear panel
2-9. Allocation of phases
The 6100A is always L1 in a multiphase system. 6101A Auxiliary units are allocated
phase depending on which auxiliary control connector they are attached to. Connector A
controls ‘L2’, the 6101A on connector B becomes ‘L3’ and that on connector C is
designated as the ‘N’ phase. See chapter 3 for an overview of instrument control and the
user interface.
2-5
6100A
Users Manual
2-6
Chapter 3
Features
Title
3-1.
3-2.
3-3.
3-4.
3-5.
3-6.
3-7.
3-8.
3-9.
Introduction.............................................................................................
Front Panel Features ...............................................................................
Windows™ User Interface .....................................................................
The main graphical user interface areas .............................................
Data entry from the front panel ..........................................................
Data entry from an external keyboard and mouse ..............................
Output channel selection ....................................................................
Output control.....................................................................................
Rear Panel Features ................................................................................
Page
3-3
3-3
3-6
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-9
3-10
3-1
6100A
Users Manual
3-2
Features
Introduction
3
3-1. Introduction
This chapter is a reference for the functions and locations of the 6100A Electrical Power
Standard’s front and rear panel features, and provides brief descriptions of each feature
for quick access.
Please read this information before operating the Electrical Power Standard.
Front panel operating instructions for the Electrical Power Standard are provided in
Chapter 4, and remote operating instructions are provided in Chapter 5.
3-2. Front Panel Features
Front panel features (including all controls, displays, indicators, and terminals) are shown
in Figure 3-1. Each front panel feature is briefly described in Table 3-1.
Figure 3-1. 6100A Front Panel
3-3
6100A
Users Manual
Table 3-1. Front Panel Features
1 Voltage Binding Posts
The HI and LO Output Voltage Binding Posts provide connections for
voltage outputs.
The HI and LO Sense Binding Posts provide External Sensing for best
accuracy. Two-wire sensing may be selected via the Global Settings
Menu. See chapter 4
2 Current Binding Posts
Currents are output from the Current Binding Posts.
3 Softkeys
The softkeys provide direct access to setup functions (see chapter 4). If an
external keyboard is connected, the keyboard function keys (F1-F8)
provide the same navigation technique.
4 Keyboard Connector
PS/2 connector for an external keyboard if preferred.
5 Mouse Connector
PS/2 connector for a mouse if preferred.
6 Navigation Keypad
The SELECT MENU key switches between the three main ‘menus’:
Output, Global settings and Waveform.
The ESC (escape) key changes the softkey level up through the control
hierarchy
The central a TAB key moves focus from control to control within the
selected ‘menu’ area.
The left/right and up/down arrow keys allow selection of values in data
entry and selection fields.
3-4
7 Floppy Disc Drive
Allows saving and reloading of waveform configurations.
8 Power On/Off Switch
Turns the power on and off. The switch remains locked inwards when the
power is on. Pushing the switch again unlocks it and turns the power off.
Note: this controls the power supply electronically and is not an isolation
switch. The Main Power On-Off switch is on the rear panel.
9 Dual action ‘spin’ wheel
Provides quick data entry within a field. When rotated without pressing,
scrolls the value of the currently highlighted numeric character in an input
field. When rotated whilst pressed inwards, moves the cursor along the
characters in the field.
10 DIRECT MODE key
In Direct Mode, the key LED is lit and all waveform changes take
immediate effect. When Direct Mode is not active, the 6100A is in
‘Deferred’ mode. In Deferred mode changes to waveforms are stored but
not applied. Stored changes can be applied simultaneously or ‘undone’.
11 STBY (standby) key
Turns the output OFF.
12 OPER (operate) key
Turns the outputs of ‘enabled’ channels ON. The LED’s above the
terminals indicate which outputs are ON.
Features
Front Panel Features
3
Table 3-1. Front Panel Features (continued)
13 NEXT CHAR key
In text input mode (Alpha Lock LED lit), key text using a
combination of the NEXT CHAR key and the AlphaNumeric keypad
(15). This operates much in the manner of a cell ‘phone, allowing
one alpha key to source more than one text character by being
pressed repeatedly until the required character is displayed. Use
the NEXT CHAR key to move onto the next position you wish to
key. Press ENTER to finish the text entry.
14 ALPHA LOCK key
Switches between text and numeric input.
In numeric input mode. The Alpha Lock light is out. In text input
mode the Alpha Lock light is lit.
15 AlphaNumeric Keypad
Provides text and numeric input. Use the ALPHA LOCK key (14) to
switch between numeric and text input.
In numeric input mode (Alpha Lock light out), key numeric values
directly (the E key allows exponents to be entered).
In text input mode (Alpha Lock light lit), key text using a
combination of the AlphaNumeric keypad and the NEXT CHAR key
(13). This operates much in the manner of a cell ‘phone, allowing
one alpha key to source more than one text character.
16 Windows User Interface
The setup of waveforms and other functions of the Electrical Power
Standard has been implemented as a Windows program. Chapter 4
contains these operational procedures.
3-5
6100A
Users Manual
3-3. Windows™ User Interface
The user interface of the Electrical Power Standard has been implemented as a Windows
program. This chapter gives a broad outline of the user interface. Chapter 4 contains
detailed operational procedures.
Figure 3-2. Graphical user interface
3-4.
The main graphical user interface areas
The user interface is divided into 5 different areas. The three ‘menu’ areas provide user
input fields
The Global Settings Menu provides settings that are applied to the 6100A and all
6101A auxiliaries connected to it.
The Output Menu provides part of the output control system and selection of the
‘phase’ and ‘channel’ (voltage or current) to be set up. The Output Menu
always shows the actual values that are at the voltage and current binding posts
(or will be when OPER is pressed).
The Waveform Menu is the area where the waveform for a channel is constructed.
This part of the user interface shows what will be output when the settings are
‘Enabled’
Under the Waveform Menu is the message window which provides context sensitive
help and error messages. The window background changes from white to red
when an error message is displayed.
3-6
Features
Windows™ User Interface
3
Eight ‘Soft keys’ which act with the selected ‘menu’ appear across the bottom of the
screen.
In addition there are five ‘pop-up’ screens to load a previous set-up, to save the current
set-up, to set date and time, to alter GPIB settings and an ‘about’ screen giving details of
the GUI and embedded software. These ‘pop-ups’ are accessed from the Global Menu
and More Settings soft key.
3-5.
Data entry from the front panel
The principal navigation keys are:
The SELECT MENU key
This key moves the focus around the three
main ‘menu’ panes. The pane with focus has a
blue outline.
The softkeys
Context dependent softkeys at the bottom of
the screen.
The ESC (escape) key
Moves upwards in the hierarchy of softkey
level
‘Escapes’ from popup dialog boxes
Removes warning and error messages.
The TAB key (center of the
navigation keypad)
Moves the focus from control to control within
the active ‘menu’ pane.
Up/down and left/right arrow keys
Assist selection and modification of values in
data entry and selection fields
The ENTER key
Completes entry of data from thealphaNumeric
keypad.
In Direct Mode all waveform changes take immediate effect. When the Direct Mode is
not active, a number of changes can be made, stored and then applied simultaneously.
Use the DIRECT MODE key to toggle between these options. The DIRECT MODE key
is lit when in Direct Mode.
Figure 3-3. Direct Mode key
When in deferred mode, modifications of fields that affect the output waveform are
notified by an orange background color. To activate the changes, select the softkey
"Apply All" (visible when Output Menu is highlighted). Alternatively, if the output is on,
press the OPER key to invoke the changes.
To undo deferred actions select “Undo all” from the Output menu. Selection of Direct
Mode without applying the changes as described will also undo deferred actions.
3-7
6100A
Users Manual
Navigating to a screen data ‘field’ or pop-down ‘combo'.
Use the SELECT MENU key to move around the three menus on the page. When the
required menu is highlighted (blue outline), use the TAB key to reach the field you
require
OR
Use the softkeys that correspond to the required fields
Selecting values from a pop-down ‘combo’
Once the ‘combo’ is highlighted, use the Up/Down or Left/Right keys to scroll through to
find the required value
Changing values in a data field
Enter values directly from the alphanumeric keypad. The field changes color to an orange
background while you are entering the new value. You must press the ENTER key or the
TAB key to finish the data entry. (The orange background is retained in deferred mode
operation).
OR
Use the ‘navigation’ keys to ‘scroll’ the value to the required number. Use the left and
right arrow keys to select the column of the current value and the up and down arrow
keys to change the value. For example, to change 123 to 163, first use the left and right
keys until the 2 is highlighted, then use the up key (4 times) to set it to the required value.
There is no need to press ENTER when the ‘scroll’ method is used.
The dual action spin wheel offers similar control; when depressed, the cursor is moved
left and right; when not depressed the selected digit is incremented/decremented.
3-6.
Data entry from an external keyboard and mouse
Navigating to a screen ‘field’. Either:
Point to the required ‘active’ data entry field and click the left mouse key to select it.
OR
Select the required ‘menu’ with the F9 key and then ‘tab’ to the required field using
the Tab keys
Selecting from a pop-down ‘combo’
Once the ‘combo’ is highlighted, use the up and down arrow keys to scroll to the
required value
Changing values in a data field
Enter values directly from the keyboard. The field changes color to orange
background while you are entering the new value. You must press the Enter key or
Tab key to finish the data entry
OR
3-8
Features
Windows™ User Interface
3
Use the keyboard up, down, left and right arrow keys to ‘scroll’ the value to the
required number. Use the left and right arrow keys to select the column of the current
value and the up and down arrow keys to change the value. For example to change
123 to 163, first use the left and right keys until the 2 is highlighted, then use the up
key (4 times) to set it to the required value. There is no need to press ENTER when
the ‘scroll’ method is used.
Selecting check boxes and radio buttons
To toggle the selected check boxes press the space bar. To change the highlighted
radio button use the cursor keys.
3-7.
Output channel selection
Figure 3-4. The Output Menu
The Output Menu provides part of the output control system and selection of the ‘phase’
and ‘channel’ (voltage or current) to be set up. This menu is selected via the SELECT
MENU key (or F9 on an external keyboard).
shows that the 6100A has two 6101A connected, one to 6100A connector A (L2), the
other to connector B (L3).
3-8.
Output control
The Enable/Disable softkeys that appear when the Output Menu is highlighted
enable/disable particular waveshapes in the output. You can also use the TAB key and
up and down arrow keys to move between fields. ENTER toggles the state of the button
i.e., enables or disables the waveshape.
Figure 3-5. Output Menu softkeys
Voltages and currents can only appear at the output binding posts if the relevant channel
is ‘enabled’ and the OPER key has been pressed. Pressing OPER turns on all ‘enabled’
channels. Note that pressing the OPER key when no voltage or current channels are
enabled causes an error message to appear in the message window.
3-9
6100A
Users Manual
3-9. Rear Panel Features
B
A
C
D
F
E
AU XIL IA R Y C ONT R O L
+5V P K MA X
T R IG G E R
INP U T
SA MP L E R E F
OU T P U T
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Figure 3-6. Rear Panel Features
3-10
H
Features
Rear Panel Features
3
Table 3-2. Rear Panel Features
1 Main power On-Off
Switch
This is a true mains isolating switch.
2 Auxiliary Unit Connectors
Connection to Auxiliary units via Fluke supplied cable.
3 Trigger Out Connector
The Trigger Output Connector has a +5V CMOS logic drive providing a
falling edge time marker intended to synchronize external equipment to
the dip/swell function. The point at which the falling edge occurs is
controlled by the Trigger Output Delay. After the falling edge the signal
will remain low for a minimum of 10us.
4 Trigger Input Connector
The Trigger Input Connector is a TTL compatible input which can be
selected to initiate a dip/swell on a falling edge. The falling edge can
either start the user programmable initial delay timer or arms the user
settable output waveform phase angle comparator. These are mutually
exclusive. When the timer delay has expired or the comparator has
found the required angle of the output waveform the Ramp In section of
the dip/swell will commence. The input must remain low for 10us after
the falling edge to be recognized properly.
5 Sample Ref Output
Connector
The Sample Ref Output Connector has a +5V CMOS logic drive
providing a falling edge intended to drive sampling measuring
instruments synchronously with the internal sampling of the 6100A. The
GPIB can enable and disable this signal. When it enables it the first
falling edge will be delayed until the rising zero crossing of the L1
voltage fundamental. The signal will then continue until the GPIB
disables it.
6 Phase Ref Output
Connector
The Phase Reference Output Connector has a +5V CMOS logic drive
providing a rising edge synchronous to the rising zero crossing of the
L1 fundamental voltage. This signal has a 50% duty.
7 Air Filter
See Chapter 6 for air filter maintenance procedure.
8 Calibration Enable
Switch
9 IEEE 488 Connector
For connection to a GPIB system.
10 Ground Binding Post
Auxiliary protective earth/ground connection stud.
11 Fuse
See Chapter6 for fuse replacement procedure.
12 Mains Power Receptacle
16A mains connector.
13 Energy Pulse Out
connector (if fitted)
When the Energy option is fitted, the Energy pulse output provides
pulses proportional to output power. See chapter eight for
specifications and description. Blanked if the Energy option is not fitted.
14 Energy Gate In/Out
connector (if fitted)
A bidirectional input or output gate control used with the Energy option.
See chapter eight for specifications and description. Blanked if the
Energy option is not fitted.
15 Reference signal output
when 'CLK' option is
fitted.
TTL compatible 10 MHz or 20 MHz reference output signal derived
from the system master clock. Blanked if the CLK option is not fitted.
3-11
6100A
Users Manual
Figure 3-7. Rear Panel Connections
3-12
Chapter 4
Front Panel Operation
Title
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
4-4.
4-5.
4-6.
4-7.
4-8.
4-9.
4-10.
4-11.
4-12.
4-13.
4-14.
4-15.
4-16.
4-17.
4-18.
4-19.
4-20.
4-21.
4-22.
4-23.
4-24.
4-25.
4-26.
4-27.
4-28.
4-29.
4-30.
4-31.
4-32.
4-33.
4-34.
4-35.
Introduction.............................................................................................
Power up .................................................................................................
Warm up .................................................................................................
Basic Setup Procedures...........................................................................
Global settings ........................................................................................
Frequency ...........................................................................................
Line locking........................................................................................
Harmonic edit mode ...........................................................................
Reactive power calculation.................................................................
Phase units..........................................................................................
Voltage output 4-wire or 2-wire connection.......................................
Soft Start.............................................................................................
Reference Clock Out ..........................................................................
More Settings .....................................................................................
Edit mode................................................................................................
Direct Mode........................................................................................
Deferred mode ....................................................................................
Changes that are not deferred .............................................................
Setting up voltage and current waveforms..............................................
Harmonics, DC and Sine ........................................................................
Definition............................................................................................
Access to this function........................................................................
6100A Specification ...........................................................................
Sine/harmonic mode...........................................................................
Setting up harmonics and DC.............................................................
Interharmonics ........................................................................................
Definition............................................................................................
Access to this function........................................................................
6100A Specification ...........................................................................
Setting up Interharmonics...................................................................
Fluctuating harmonics.............................................................................
Definition............................................................................................
Access to this function........................................................................
6100A Specification ...........................................................................
Setting up Fluctuating Harmonics ......................................................
Page
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-8
4-9
4-9
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-15
4-15
4-15
4-15
4-16
4-1
6100A
Users Manual
4-36.
4-37.
4-38.
4-39.
4-40.
4-41.
4-42.
4-43.
4-44.
4-45.
4-46.
4-47.
4-48.
4-49.
4-50.
4-51.
4-52.
4-53.
4-54.
4-2
Dips and Swells ......................................................................................
Definition............................................................................................
Access to this function........................................................................
6100A Specification ...........................................................................
Setting up Dips/swells ........................................................................
Flicker .....................................................................................................
Definition............................................................................................
Access to this function........................................................................
6100A Specification ...........................................................................
Setting up Basic Flicker......................................................................
Setting up Flicker Extended Functions...............................................
Periodic Frequency Changes ..............................................................
Distorted Voltage with Multiple Zero Crossings ...............................
Harmonics with Side bands ................................................................
Phase Jumps ...................................................................................
Rectangular Voltage Changes with 20% Duty Cycle ....................
Copy and Paste .......................................................................................
Copy ...................................................................................................
Paste....................................................................................................
4-16
4-16
4-17
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-19
4-19
4-20
4-21
4-22
4-22
4-23
4-24
4-25
4-25
4-26
4-26
4-26
Front Panel Operation
Introduction
4
4-1. Introduction
This chapter provides instructions for operating the 6100A Electrical Power Standard
from the front panel, which includes all aspects of setting up and configuring the 6100A
Electrical Power Standard.
Before you begin following the procedures in this chapter, you should be familiar with
the front panel controls, displays, and terminals, which are identified and described in
detail in Chapter 3. For information on using remote commands to operate the 6100A
Electrical Power Standard, refer to Chapter 5.
XWWARNING
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard is capable of supplying
lethal voltages. Do not make connections to the output
terminals when any voltage is present. Placing the instrument
in standby may not be enough to avoid shock hazard.
Disconnect the GPIB cable from 6100A to avoid remote
commands setting unexpected outputs.
4-2. Power up
XWWARNING
To avoid electric shock, make sure the 6100A Electrical Power
Standard is grounded as described in Chapter 2.
Note
After switching power On, it may take up to 2 seconds for the main display
to illuminate and the cooling fans to start running.
4-3. Warm up
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard must allowed to warmed up to ensure it meets the
specifications listed in Chapter 1. Warm up periods are described in the specifications in
Chapter 1
4-3
6100A
Users Manual
4-4. Basic Setup Procedures
Refer to Chapter 3 for an explanation of how to ‘navigate’ about the Windows user
interface and how to set up text and numeric values.
Figure 4-1. Main Setup Page
When the 6100A start-up sequence is complete, the instrument's main setup page is
displayed.
This page contains the Output Menu at the top left. Below the Output Menu is the
Waveform Menu whose content will change depending on the waveform parameter that
is being edited.
Important Note: the Waveform menu displays the waveform that will be output if the
waveshape settings are enabled.
To the right is the Global Settings Menu. Navigate between the menus using the SELECT
MENU key.
4-4
Front Panel Operation
Global settings
4
4-5. Global settings
Navigate to the Global Settings Menu using the SELECT MENU key.
Figure 4-2. Global menu softkeys
4-6.
Frequency
Set the required output frequency. An attempt to set frequency outside the active band
when any output is ON will cause an error message to be displayed.
4-7.
Line locking
It is essential for correct operation of 6100A that line locking is not selected unless the
selected frequency is the same as the nominal input line frequency. Select line locking by
checking the line lock box. The Lock indication shows green when the system is locked
to line frequency. Red indicates that the 6100A has not locked to line frequency.
Figure 4-3. Frequency, Line Locking
4-8.
Harmonic edit mode
If necessary navigate to the Global Settings Menu using the SELECT MENU key. Press
the V, I and Power Modes soft key to access the Harmonic mode softkeys. Return to the
top level softkeys by pressing escape. Select the way voltage and current harmonics are
entered. The available modes are as follows.
Harmonics entered as % of RMS value. Here the RMS value is maintained constant by
reducing the level of the fundamental frequency component as harmonics are added.
Changing the RMS value alters each harmonic accordingly.
Harmonics entered as % of the fundamental (first harmonic) value. Here the fundamental
value is constant and the RMS value changes as harmonics are added. Note that an error
message will be generated if the peak value of the waveform exceeds the range maximum.
Changing the fundamental value alters all harmonics accordingly.
Harmonics entered as dB down value from the fundamental value. This mode acts in the
same way as % of fundamental. Note that 0dB is an invalid entry as it exceeds the 30%
limit for harmonics. The maximum value for a harmonic is –10.5dB
4-5
6100A
Users Manual
Harmonics entered as absolute RMS values. The RMS value of the output waveform
increases as harmonics are added. Note that an error message will be generated if the
peak value of the waveform exceeds the range maximum.
4-9.
Reactive power calculation
Navigate to the Global Settings Menu using the SELECT MENU key. Press the V, I and
Power Modes soft key to access the Power calculation mode soft keys. Press Escape to
return to the top level soft keys.
Figure 4-4. Reactive power calculation
Select the reactive power calculation method most suitable for your purpose from
Budeanu, Fryze, Kusters & Moore, Shepherd & Zakikhani, Sharon/Czarnecki or IEEE.
4-10. Phase units
Select the Phase Units softkey and select degrees or radians. Press ESC to return to the
previous soft key level.
Figure 4-5. Global Settings Menu
4-11. Voltage output 4-wire or 2-wire connection
WWARNING
The sense wires and voltage binding posts are at output
potential even when 2-wire is selected.
4-6
Front Panel Operation
Global settings
4
Select the Terminals softkey and select 2 wire or 4-wire connection. Note that full
accuracy is only available with a 4-wire connecting lead and 4-wire selected. Press ESC
to return to the previous soft key level.
Figure 4-6. 4-wire/2-wire selection
The lead kit provided includes a voltage lead that can be used for 2-wire or 4-wire
connection. The brown wire connects to SENSE-HI, blue to SENSE-LO, red to
OUTPUT-HI and black to OUTPUT-LO.
4-12. Soft Start
The Soft Start feature reduces the likelihood of 6100A internal over-voltage/currentdetector trips caused by inrush current. Soft Start should not be used with Energy option
modes when Warm-up period is set to less than 2 seconds.
When the Soft Start box is not checked, the output ramps-up to full value in
approximately 10 ms. Checking the Soft Start box slows the ramp-up to 2 seconds.
4-13. Reference Clock Out
If the reference clock output option is fitted, a drop down selection control appears in the
Global Settings Menu. The Reference Clock Out option provides either 10 MHz or 20
MHz as a reference signal at the rear panel. The reference output is derived from the
master processor clock frequency and may be used to synchronize systems to the 6100A.
The reference may be switched between Off, 10 MHz, and 20 MHz. Enter the More
Settings sub menu for access to the switch.
4-14. More Settings
The More Settings softkey provides access to five ‘pop-up’ screens and a softkey that
allows the instrument to be reset to the factory default settings.
When the Save setup softkey is pressed, internal memory and the floppy disk drive are
searched for setup files. Previous setups can be copied to internal memory or external
storage and renamed or deleted. The name of the file where the current setup is to be
stored can be edited by selecting the File Name softkey and using the keyboard
alphanumeric keys. Press the Save softkey to store the current ‘system’ setup.
Select Load Set-up and a configuration stored previously can be loaded from internal
memory or an external device.
Note: settings are those of the entire system so one three phase setup can be transferred to
another three-phase system. Where the saving and loading configurations differ, only
settings appropriate to the loading system are transferred. If for example the settings of a
three-phase system are loaded onto a single-phase system, only the settings for the 6100A
are loaded.
The 6100A date and time settings are altered via the Set Date and Time softkey.
4-7
6100A
Users Manual
The GPIB settings softkey allows Bus address, Event Status Enable (ESE) and Status
Register Enable (SRE) and the Power On Status Clear (PON) values to be set.
The About screen giving details of the GUI and embedded software and which if any
options are fitted.
4-15. Edit mode
The DIRECT MODE key controls edit mode.
4-16. Direct Mode
In Direct Mode, the DIRECT MODE key LED is lit. All waveform changes take
immediate effect.
4-17. Deferred mode
When the DIRECT MODE LED is not lit, the 6100A is in Deferred Mode. In this mode,
changes made are stored for later invocation. When in deferred mode, if the output for
the channel being modified is ON, modification to fields that affect the output waveform
are notified by an orange background color.
Note: operations which are invalid when the output is ON are also invalid when Deferred
mode is active, even if the output is OFF. For example you cannot change range in
Deferred mode even if the output is OFF
To activate deferred mode changes:
select the Output Menu softkey ‘Apply All’ or,
if the output is already ON, press the OPER (operate) key.
The following actions undo all pending changes:
press the softkey 'Undo All',
press STBY or,
press the DIRECT MODE key (edit mode changes to Direct).
4-8
Front Panel Operation
Setting up voltage and current waveforms
4
4-18. Changes that are not deferred
In deferred mode, changes to all fields are deferred with the following exceptions.
Line Locking.
Change of harmonic edit mode (e.g. Absolute RMS, % of RMS etc).
Power calculation method.
Selection of Phase Units (Degrees/Radians).
Selection of 2 Wire/4 Wire because terminal configuration cannot be changed when the
output is on.
Global settings Time/Date and GPIB settings cannot be changed in deferred mode.
Load/Save setup is not available in deferred mode
Note: Entry into calibration mode automatically selects Direct Mode.
4-19. Setting up voltage and current waveforms
The following describes setting up voltage waveforms but applies equally to current.
Navigate to the Output Menu and use the cursor up/down keys until the voltage or current
channel to be set up is highlighted. Notice that the N-phase Voltage channel is, by
default, limited to 33 Volts. The N-phase channel can be set to provide up to 1000 Volts
if required.
XW WARNING
To avoid electrical shock hazard, disconnect the 'N' phase
voltage Hi terminal from any 6140A Lo terminal before electing
to override the limit.
To override the limit; select the N-phase Voltage channel in the Output Menu. Select the
Waveform Menu. With the N-phase output set to Off, check the Override Limit box.
4-9
6100A
Users Manual
Figure 4-7. Channel selection
Note: a channel must be ‘enabled’ and the OPER key pressed for an output to appear at
the binding posts. If the output is already on but the active channel is not enabled,
pressing the Enable/Disable Channel softkey will cause the output to appear at the
relevant binding posts.
Navigate to the Waveform Menu with the SELECT MENU key. If necessary press ESC
until the top level softkeys are shown (Figure 4-8). Select Edit Harmonics, Fluctuating
Harmonics, Interharmonics Flicker or Dip by pressing the appropriate softkey.
Figure 4-8. Waveform top level
4-20. Harmonics, DC and Sine
4-21. Definition
A Harmonic is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. In the 6100 harmonic
number 1 is the fundamental frequency. DC is denoted by harmonic 0.
4-22. Access to this function
Use the SELECT MENU key to navigate to the Waveform Menu and select Edit
Harmonics from the softkeys.
4-23. 6100A Specification
4-10
nd
Harmonics
2 to 100th up to 6 kHz
Simultaneous Harmonics
99 (excluding DC and the 1st)
Max. Amplitude of a Single Harmonic
The maximum value for a harmonic < 2850Hz is 30%
of range. (See Chapter 1, 1-8 for the profile above
2850Hz)
Current channel bandwidth setting
1.5kHz or 6kHz (1.5kHz or 3kHz for 80A option if
fitted)
Front Panel Operation
Harmonics, DC and Sine
4
Note that selecting the lower bandwidth setting reduces the number of harmonics that can
be set but increases inductive drive capability (see Chapter 1, paragraph 1-22).
4-24. Sine/harmonic mode
Pressing the Enable/Disable Waveshape softkey toggles between Sine and Harmonics
mode.
Note that the Output Menu will show either “Sine” or “Harmonic”.
In Sine mode only Range, RMS and Angle fields can be edited. The one exception is the
voltage channel of L1 where the phase angle is fixed at 0.000 degrees. Select the required
entry field using the softkeys or TAB key.
DC is not available in Sine mode.
Figure 4.9 below shows the Harmonic mode with time domain waveform selected. In
figure 4.10, frequency domain graph is selected.
Note that Figure 4-7 shows the L1 voltage channel in ‘sine’ mode. Figures 4.9 and 4.10
show L1 voltage in Harmonics mode.
Figure 4-9. Harmonics with time domain graph
4-11
6100A
Users Manual
Figure 4-10. Harmonics with frequency domain graph
4-25. Setting up harmonics and DC
If the Global Settings are set to "percentage of RMS value", the fundamental amplitude is
automatically adjusted as harmonics are added, in order to maintain the RMS value
constant. The fundamental amplitude cannot be altered.
To add a harmonic, change the value in the Harmonic field to the required number. A
harmonic number of 0 represents a DC component.
The default amplitude will appear as 0%, - 200 dB or 0 V (or 0 A). The default phase
angle for harmonics is 0 degrees or 0 radians.
Each time the value in the Harmonic field is changed and its amplitude is set to a nonzero value, a new harmonic is added to the waveshape and displayed in the graph.
Harmonics do not appear at the output unless Harmonics mode is enabled for that
channel.
Review the selections via the Previous Harmonic and Next Harmonic softkeys.
The Reset Harmonics softkey removes all harmonics from the active channel (see Figure
4-11).
Figure 4-11. Softkeys for Harmonics top level
4-12
Front Panel Operation
Harmonics, DC and Sine
4
To remove a single harmonic from the set-up, set its amplitude to 0% or use the Remove
Harmonic softkey (see Figure 4-12).
Figure 4-12. Softkeys for Harmonics second level
Use the Enable/Disable Waveshape softkey to revert to the fundamental, leaving the
harmonics available for re-application. The graph display retains the combined
waveshape. (Change between Sine and Harmonics mode is also available from the
Output Menu softkeys).
Note that changing from ‘Harmonic’ to ‘Sine’ mode leaving non-zero amplitude
harmonics set-up may lead to an error message on subsequent change to a lower range.
This is because of the way the 6100A avoids outputting waveforms that are distorted
because of overload within the 6100A. For example: 1A DC is set-up on the 2A range in
‘harmonic’ mode. ‘Sine’ mode is selected and range change to 1A ordered by the user.
The 6100A will not allow the range change and report that the DC offset is too big.
Before a range change is allowed, the instrument checks that the RMS value of the
potential output is within the capability of the new range. Although Harmonics (thus DC)
are disabled, they could be enabled and the 1A DC output set would exceed the
maximum allowed for the range (50%).
4-13
6100A
Users Manual
4-26. Interharmonics
4-27. Definition
A frequency component of a periodic quantity (AC waveform) that is not an integer
multiple of the frequency at which the system is operating (e.g., if the fundamental
frequency is 60Hz, an 83Hz component in the waveform is an interharmonic).
4-28. Access to this function
Use the SELECT MENU key to navigate to the Waveform Menu and select Edit
Interharmonics from the Softkeys
Figure 4-13. Waveform Menu for Interharmonics
4-29. 6100A Specification
Frequency accuracy
50ppm
Amplitude accuracy 16Hz to < 6kHz
1%
Amplitude accuracy > 6kHz
4%
Maximum value of a single
interharmonic
The maximum value for an interharmonic < 2850Hz is 30%
of range. (See Chapter 1, 1-8 for the profile above 2850Hz)
Frequency range of interharmonic
16Hz to 9kHz
4-30. Setting up Interharmonics
Two interharmonic phenomena can be applied simultaneously.
Set the required amplitude and frequency of each and enable them with the check box.
Values entered outside the specified range result in an error message.
Figure 4-14. Softkeys for Interharmonics
Use the ‘Enable/Disable Waveshape’ softkey to turn this function on or off from the
Waveform Menu. Alternatively use the ‘Enable/Disable Interharmonics’ softkey in the
Output menu.
4-14
Front Panel Operation
Fluctuating harmonics
4
4-31. Fluctuating harmonics
4-32. Definition
Fluctuating harmonics are those that maintain their fixed harmonic relationship with the
fundamental, but vary in amplitude over time. If all components of a waveform vary in
amplitude over time, this is equivalent to Flicker.
4-33. Access to this function
Use the SELECT MENU key to navigate to the Waveform Menu and select Edit Fluct
Harmonics from the Softkeys.
Figure 4-15. Waveform Menu for Fluctuating Harmonics
4-34. 6100A Specification
Number of harmonics to fluctuate
Any number from 0 to all set harmonics can fluctuate
Modulation depth setting range [1]
0% to 100% of nominal harmonic voltage
Fluctuation accuracy (0% to ± 30% modulation)
0.025%
Modulation depth setting resolution
0.001%
Shape
Rectangular or Sinusoidal
Duty cycle (shape = rectangular)
0.1 % to 99.99 %
Modulating Frequency range
0.008Hz to 30Hz
Sine modulating frequency accuracy
50ppm ± 10 μHz
Rectangular modulating frequency accuracy
< 1300ppm [2]
Modulating Frequency setting resolution
0.001 Hz
4-15
6100A
Users Manual
4-35. Setting up Fluctuating Harmonics
It is only possible to set-up Fluctuating Harmonics properties for existing harmonics.
Select ‘Edit Fluct Harmonics’ from the Waveform Menu softkeys.
Figure 4-16. Softkeys for Fluctuating Harmonics
Select the harmonic to that fluctuation is to be applied to using the ‘Previous Harmonic’,
‘Next Harmonic’ or the ‘Harmonic’ softkeys. The ’Modulated’ softkey toggles the
‘modulated’ check box.
The ‘Waveshape’ softkey provides access to a further softkey menu allowing control of
depth, frequency and shape of the modulation.
Figure 4-17. Waveshape Softkeys
Use the ‘Enable/Disable Waveshape’ softkey to turn this function on or off from the
Waveform Menu. Alternatively use the ‘Enable/Disable Fluct Harmonics’ softkey in the
Output menu.
4-36. Dips and Swells
Dips/swells are primarily a voltage phenomenon but are also provided for current outputs
in the 6100A.
4-37. Definition
A dip is a sudden decrease of voltage at a point in the electrical system, followed by
voltage recovery after a short period of time, from half a cycle to a few tens of seconds. A
swell is an increase.
When triggered externally, dip/swell events occur simultaneously on all channels that
have dip enabled.
4-16
Front Panel Operation
Dips and Swells
4
4-38. Access to this function
Use the SELECT MENU key to navigate to the Waveform Menu and select Edit Dip
from the Softkeys.
Figure 4-18. Waveform Menu for Dip
4-39. 6100A Specification
Trigger in requirement
Either:
Trigger in delay
TTL falling edge remaining low for 10us at the Trigger input
connector on the rear panel.
0 to 60 seconds ± 31μs
OR
Phase angle synchronization with
respect to channel fundamental
frequency zero crossing
±180° ± 31μs
Dip/Swell Min duration
1 ms
Dip/Swell Max duration
1 minute
Dip Min amplitude
0% of the nominal output
Swell Max amplitude
The least of full range value and 140% of the nominal output
Ramp up/down period
Settable 100μs to 30 seconds
Optional repeat with delay
0 to 60 seconds ± 31μs
Starting level amplitude accuracy
±0.025% of level
Dip/Swell level amplitude accuracy [1]
±0.25% of level
Trigger out delay
0 to 60 seconds ± 31μs from start of dip/swell event
Trigger out
TTL falling edge co-incident with end of trigger out delay,
remaining low for 10μs to 31μs
4-17
6100A
Users Manual
4-40. Setting up Dips/swells
The Dip waveform menu has two sections: Waveshape and Trigger.
Figure 4-19. Top level Dip softkeys
Waveshape parameters
The start of the dip/swell can be set to start after a delay (in seconds) or at a particular
phase angle. All other parameters can be set in seconds or cycles.
Figure 4-20. Dip Waveshape softkeys
Start On Delay
Start a fixed time period after an external trigger.
Start on Phase Angle
Start determined by phase angle.
Note: to ensure all phases start simultaneously, this is the phase angle
of the L1 phase irrespective of which phases dips are programmed on.
Start Delay or Angle
Set selected value for delay or phase angle
Ramp in
Ramp in period
Period
Time at the Dip/swell ‘change to’ level
Ramp Out
Ramp out period
Change to
The value to dip to as a percentage of the starting level
End delay
Minimum end period before a re-trigger can occur
Trigger control
Figure 4-21. Dip Trigger Softkeys
There are three trigger-input modes:
Free Running The dip/swell is triggered internally, and is controlled by the set
parameters and repeats indefinitely. In a multiphase system, the relative start of dips on
each phase may be unpredictable if dip event durations, including all delays, exceeds 1
cycle. In other words, the relative phase of dips on L1, L2, L3 may vary, as parameters
contributing to dip event durations are changed when free running trigger mode is
selected.
External Trigger (One Shot) The dip/swell is triggered once by external trigger
applied to the TRIGGER INPUT connector on the 6100A rear panel. The trigger signal
must be TTL compatible. The low going transition causes a trigger.
4-18
Front Panel Operation
Flicker
4
External Repetitive
The dip/swell is triggered by a single external low going trigger
applied to the TRIGGER INPUT connector and repeats in ‘free running’ mode until
stopped by a change to any dip/swell parameter.
An output trigger is provided to control external equipment. This trigger appears on the
TRIGGER OUTPUT connector on the rear of any 6100A or 6101A producing a dip or
swell. The output trigger may be set to occur at the same time as the input trigger (0
seconds delay), or delayed by a time set in the Trigger Output control field. When either
Free Running or External Repetitive trigger input mode is selected, the trigger output
delay must be less than the total combined dip/swell event time for a trigger output signal
to be generated.
Force Ext. Trigger This softkey triggers a Dip when in External Trigger mode. It has
the same effect as an external trigger signal.
Use the Enable/Disable Waveshape softkey to turn this function on or off from the
Waveform Menu. Alternatively, use the Enable/Disable Dip softkey in the Output menu.
4-41. Flicker
Flicker is primarily a voltage phenomenon but is also provided for current outputs in the
6100A.
4-42. Definition
Repetitive (voltage) level variation in the range to cause the physiological phenomenon
of flicker. Flicker severity is described by perception level. This is either perception level
for a short term called Pst (nominally 10 minutes) or long term called Plt. Pst indications
are valid for voltage at 120 V and 230 V, 50Hz and 60Hz. Pst values, where the
modulating frequency is as tabulated in IEC 61000-4-15 but ΔV/V is some other value,
are valid. In this case, the Pst value is proportional to the ratio of the tabulated and set
ΔV/V values. Pst values are never valid for the Current channel.
4-43. Access to this function
Use the SELECT MENU key to navigate to the Waveform Menu and select Edit Flicker
from the Softkeys.
Figure 4-22. Flicker Softkeys
4-19
6100A
Users Manual
4-44. 6100A Specification
The implementation of Flicker is separated into two groups, Basic Functions and
Extended Functions. The Basic Functions group allow the depth and frequency of
rectangular and Sine to be chosen for calibration of Flickermeters at the settings in IEC
61000-4-15. The Extended Functions provide additional tests with distorted waveforms
and combinations of frequency, amplitude and phase angle changes.
Extended Flicker Function
Extended Flicker function Pst / Pinst.max
Accuracy
1%
Basic Flicker Function
Setting range
±30% of set value within range values (60%
ΔV/V)
Flicker modulation depth accuracy
0.025%
Modulation depth setting resolution
0.001%
Shape of modulation envelope
Rectangular, Square or Sinusoidal
Duty cycle (shape = rectangular)
0.01 % to 99.99 %; accuracy = ±31us
Modulation units
Frequency
0.05 Hz to 40 Hz
Changes per
minute
1.0 CPM to 4800 CPM
Either:
Or:
Modulating frequency accuracy [1][2]
< 0.13% (1 CPM to 4800 CPM)
[1] Rectangular modulation accuracy is ± {(50 + 31 x modulating frequency) ppm + 10 μHz}.
[2] Sine modulation accuracy is ±(50ppm + 10 μHz).
4-20
Front Panel Operation
Flicker
4
4-45. Setting up Basic Flicker
Figure 4-23. Flicker Menu (Frequency)
Figure 4-24. Flicker Menu (changes per minute)
Select the Basic Functions softkey from the top level Ficker menu. The Flicker panel has
three sections. The Modulation and Waveform panes set the modulation shape. The
Flicker severity pane shows the Pst and Pinst values that the Flickermeter should display.
Flicker parameters can be set within the ranges specified in the previous table. Note that
change rate units can be set to frequency (Hz) or changes per minute (CPM). Pst and
Pinst cannot be directly set. Pst can only be set by varying ‘ΔV/V’, ‘Change Rate’ and
‘Waveform’ parameters, or by changing the channel voltage or frequency settings. ‘Duty
Cycle setting does not affect Pst value.
Note
Pinst.max and Pst values are ‘greyed out’ to indicate that the combination
of ‘ΔV/V’, ‘Change Rate’, and ‘Waveform’ parameters are not valid for
the channel voltage or frequency settings.
4-21
6100A
Users Manual
Figure 4-25. Basic Flicker Softkeys
Use the ‘Enable/Disable Waveshape’ softkey on the top level Flicker softkeys to turn this
function on or off from the Waveform Menu. Alternatively use the ‘Enable/Disable
Flicker’ softkey in the Output menu.
4-46. Setting up Flicker Extended Functions
Note:
The extended functions are only available for fundamental frequencies 50
Hz and 60 Hz and Voltage channel settings 120 Volts or 230 Volts.
Select the Extended Functions softkey from the top level Flicker menu. Select the
required Extended Flicker function from the softkeys displayed.
Figure 4-26. Extended Flicker softkeys
4-47. Periodic Frequency Changes
Figure 4-27. Combined frequency and voltage changes
The Periodic Frequency Changes Flicker function provides a fixed pattern of changes
every 4 seconds. Frequency is stepped ±0.25 Hz either side of the fundamental
frequency while voltage steps by up to 1.2 V depending on voltage and fundamental
frequency settings. It should be noted that in a multiphase system the ±0.25 Hz
frequency changes will occur on every phase. The voltage changes will occur only on the
selected voltage channel.
4-22
Front Panel Operation
Flicker
120V
230 V
Change
to
frequenc
y (Hz)
Fundamental
frequency (Hz)
4
59.75
Change to
frequency
(Hz)
Fundamental
frequency
(Hz)
Change to
voltage (V)
120.000
60
Change to
voltage (V)
49.75
230.000
50.25
228.812
59.75
230.000
60.25
228.805
50
60.25
119.266
49.75
120.000
50
60
50.25
119.270
The observed Pinst.max should be 1.00.
4-48. Distorted Voltage with Multiple Zero Crossings
Figure 4-28. Distorted Voltage with Multiple Zero Crossings
The Distorted Voltage with Multiple Zero Crossings Flicker function output consists of
the fundamental frequency plus 12 ‘odd’ harmonics. The phase angle of the harmonics is
180º.
Harmonic
order
3
5
7
9
11
13
17
19
23
25
29
31
Percent of
fundamental
5
6
5
1.5
3.5
3.0
2.0
1.76
1.41
1.27
1.06
0.97
The signal is sinusoidally modulated at 8.8 Hz with modulation depth depending on the
combination of voltage and fundamental frequency.
230 V
Fundamental
frequency
(Hz)
120 V
Voltage
fluctuation %
Fundamental
frequency
(Hz)
Voltage
fluctuation %
50
0.250
60
0.321
60
0.250
50
0.321
4-23
6100A
Users Manual
The observed Pinst.max should be 1.00.
4-49. Harmonics with Side bands
Figure 4-29. Harmonics with Side Bands
The Harmonics with Side Bands Flicker function allows the input bandwidth of
Flickermeters to be explored. The Fundamental frequency voltage waveform is
modulated by two frequencies simultaneously. Both frequencies are of the same
amplitude.
Entering a harmonic number (hn) sets the harmonic frequency (fv) as a multiple of the
fundamental frequency. An interharmonic modulating frequency fi = fv - 10 Hz is also
applied. For example:
fundamental frequency = 50 Hz,
hn = 7, fv = 50 * 7 = 350 Hz,
fi = 350 - 10 = 340 Hz.
120V
Fundamental
frequency
(Hz)
Starting
frequencie
s (Hz)
230 V
Modulating
frequency
amplitude
(V)
Fundament
al
frequency
(Hz)
Change to
voltage
(V)
60
170 & 180
4.126
50
140 & 150
3.611
50
140 & 150
4.126
60
170 & 180
3.611
Flicker meter input bandwidth is the maximum fv frequency at which Pinst,max is 1.00.
4-24
Change to
frequency
(Hz)
Front Panel Operation
Flicker
4
4-50. Phase Jumps
Figure 4-30. Phase Jumps
The Phase Jumps Flicker function causes a series of voltage channel phase jumps over a
ten minute period. The phase jumps occur at the positive zero crossing at 1 minute, 3
minutes, 5 minutes, 7 minutes and 9 minutes after the end of the settling period. The
phase jump direction and size is selected by the operator at the start of a sequence. The
table below shows the expected Pst for the different combinations of voltage, frequency
and phase jump size.
Phase jump
angle Δß
120 V, 60 Hz
(Pst)
230 V, 50 Hz
(Pst)
120 V, 50 Hz
(Pst)
230 V, 60 Hz
(Pst)
±30º
0.587
0.913
0.706
0.760
±45º
0.681
1.060
0.819
0.882
4-51. Rectangular Voltage Changes with 20% Duty Cycle
Figure 4-31. Rectangular Voltage Changes with 20 % Duty Cycle
The rectangular voltage changes with 20% duty cycle Flicker function adds rectangular
modulation for 12 seconds every 60 second period. The voltage output is not modulated
during the remaining 48 seconds of each period. The depth of modulation is shown in
the following table.
4-25
6100A
Users Manual
230 V
Fundamental
frequency (Hz)
120 V
Voltage
fluctuation
%
Fundamental
frequency
(Hz)
Voltage
fluctuation %
50
1.418
60
2.126
60
1.480
50
2.017
The observed Pst should be 1.00.
4-52. Copy and Paste
Each of the Waveform menus has ‘Copy’ and ‘Paste’ softkeys at the top level.
4-53. Copy
Pressing ‘Copy’ puts a copy of the currently active Waveform Menu into the clipboard.
There is only one clipboard and this is overwritten each time ‘Copy’ is pressed. The
contents of the clipboard are lost when line power is turned off.
4-54. Paste
‘Paste’ allows setups to be copied from the clipboard onto another channel as long as the
active Waveform Menu is of the same type. You cannot copy from a Current channel to a
Voltage channel.
Pasting erases any existing data in the active Waveform menu.
The harmonics and fluctuation waveform menus share harmonic data, so pasting
harmonic data will refresh the data used in the other, i.e., pasting Harmonic data into
another channel will also paste the modulation settings.
4-26
Chapter 5
Remote Operation
Title
5-1.
5-2.
5-3.
5-4.
5-5.
5-6.
5-7.
5-8.
5-9.
5-10.
5-11.
5-12.
5-13.
5-14.
5-15.
5-16.
5-17.
5-18.
5-19.
5-20.
5-21.
5-22.
5-25.
5-26.
5-27.
5-31.
5-32.
5-33.
5-34.
5-38.
5-42.
5-43.
5-44.
5-45.
5-46.
5-47.
5-48.
5-49.
Page
Introduction.............................................................................................
Using the IEEE-488 Port for Remote Control ........................................
Programming Options.............................................................................
Capability Codes.....................................................................................
Bus Addresses.........................................................................................
Default bus address.............................................................................
Limited Access........................................................................................
Interconnections......................................................................................
Operation via the IEEE 488 Interface.....................................................
General ...............................................................................................
Operating Conditions..........................................................................
Programmed Transfer to Local Control (GTL or REN False)............
‘Device Clear’ ....................................................................................
Levels of Reset ...................................................................................
Message Exchange..................................................................................
IEEE 488.2 Model ..............................................................................
Instrument STATUS Subsystem ........................................................
Incoming Commands and Queries......................................................
Instrument Functions and Facilities....................................................
Outgoing Responses ...........................................................................
‘Query Error’ ......................................................................................
Request Service (RQS).......................................................................
Retrieval of Device Status Information ..................................................
General ...............................................................................................
IEEE 488 and SCPI Standard defined Features..................................
Instrument Status Reporting IEEE 488.2 Basics ...................................
IEEE 488.2 Model ..............................................................................
Instrument Model Structure................................................................
Status Byte Register ...........................................................................
IEEE 488.2 defined Event Status Register .........................................
Instrument Status Reporting — SCPI Elements .....................................
General ...............................................................................................
SCPI Status Registers .........................................................................
Reportable SCPI States.......................................................................
SCPI Programming Language. ...............................................................
SCPI Commands and Syntax ..................................................................
SCPI Command Summary..................................................................
Calibration Subsystem Command Details ..........................................
5-3
5-3
5-3
5-4
5-4
5-5
5-5
5-5
5-5
5-5
5-5
5-6
5-6
5-6
5-7
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-8
5-8
5-9
5-9
5-9
5-9
5-10
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-13
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-17
5-18
5-18
5-24
5-1
6100A
Users Manual
5-50.
5-51.
5-52.
5-61.
5-75.
5-76.
5-77.
5-78.
5-79.
5-80.
5-81.
5-82.
5-83.
5-84.
5-85.
5-86.
5-87.
5-88.
5-89.
5-90.
5-91.
5-92.
5-93.
5-94.
5-95.
5-96.
5-97.
5-98.
5-99.
5-100.
5-101.
5-102.
5-2
Output Subsystem Command Details.................................................
Input Subsystem Command Details ...................................................
Source Subsystem Command Details.................................................
Extended flicker sub-system...............................................................
Status Subsystem Command Details ..................................................
System Subsystem Command Details ................................................
Unit Subsystem Command Details.....................................................
Common Commands and Queries ..........................................................
Clear Status.........................................................................................
Event Status Enable............................................................................
Recall Event Status Enable.................................................................
Read Event Status Register.................................................................
*IDN? (Instrument Identification)......................................................
Operation Complete............................................................................
Operation Complete?..........................................................................
Recall the instrument Hardware Fitment............................................
Power-On Status Clear .......................................................................
Recall Power On Status Clear Flag ....................................................
Reset ...................................................................................................
Service Request Enable ......................................................................
Recall Service Request Enable ...........................................................
Read Service Request Register...........................................................
Test Operations — Full Selftest .........................................................
Wait ....................................................................................................
Device settings after *RST .....................................................................
Introduction ........................................................................................
Device Settings at POWER ON..............................................................
General ...............................................................................................
Power-On Settings Related to Common IEEE 488.2 Commands ......
*RST Settings Related to Common IEEE 488.2 Commands .............
*RST Settings Related to SCPI Commands .......................................
Worked examples ...................................................................................
5-26
5-27
5-28
5-36
5-44
5-46
5-46
5-48
5-48
5-48
5-49
5-49
5-50
5-50
5-51
5-51
5-52
5-52
5-53
5-53
5-54
5-54
5-55
5-55
5-56
5-56
5-57
5-57
5-57
5-58
5-59
5-61
Remote Operation
Introduction
5
5-1. Introduction
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard is capable of operating under the remote control of
an instrument controller, computer or terminal, as well as under the direct control from
the front panel.
The 6101A Auxiliary units can also be controlled remotely. But, in this case the remote
control connection is still made to the 6100A Electrical Power Standard, which in turn
communicates with the Auxiliary units.
XWWARNING
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard is capable of supplying
lethal voltages. Do not make or touch connections to the
output binding posts while the 6100A is connected to the GPIB
to avoid unexpected, dangerous settings.
5-2. Using the IEEE-488 Port for Remote Control
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard is fully programmable for use on the IEEE
Standard 488.1 interface bus (IEEE-488 bus). The interface is also designed in
compliance with supplemental standard IEEE-488.2. Devices connected to the bus in a
system are designated as talkers, listeners, talker/listeners, or controllers. Under the
remote control of an instrument controller, the 6100A Electrical Power Standard operates
exclusively as a talker/listener on the IEEE-488 bus.
For more detailed information, refer to the standard specification in the publications
ANSI/ IEEE Std. 488.1 - 1987 and IEEE Std. 488.2 - 1988.
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard conforms to the Standard Specification IEEE 488.1
- 1987: ‘IEEE Standard Digital Interface for Programmable Instrumentation’, and to
IEEE 488.2 - 1988: ‘Codes, Formats, Protocols and Common Commands’.
In IEEE 488.2 terminology the 6100A Electrical Power Standard is a device containing a
system interface. It can be connected to a system via its system bus and set into
programmed communication with other bus-connected devices under the direction of a
system controller.
5-3. Programming Options
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard can be programmed via the IEEE Interface, to:
•
•
•
Change its operating state (Function, Source, etc).
Transmit its own status data over the bus.
Request service from the system controller.
5-3
6100A
Users Manual
5-4. Capability Codes
• To conform to the IEEE 488.1 standard specification, it is not essential for a device to
encompass the full range of bus capabilities.
• For IEEE 488.2, the device must conform exactly to a specific subset of IEEE 488.1,
with a minimal choice of optional capabilities.
The IEEE 488.1 document describes and codes the standard bus features, for
manufacturers to give brief coded descriptions of their own interfaces’ overall capability.
For IEEE 488.2, this description is required to be part of the device documentation. A
code string is often printed on the product itself.
The codes that apply to the 6100A Electrical Power Standard are given in the Figure 5-1
below, together with short descriptions.
They also appear on the rear of the 6100A Electrical Power Standard next to the interface
connector. These codes conform to IEEE 488.2 requirements.
Appendix C of the IEEE 488.1 document contains a fuller description of each code.
Figure 5-1. IEEE 488 Compatibility Codes
5-5. Bus Addresses
When an IEEE 488 system comprises several instruments, a unique ‘Address’ is assigned
to each to enable the controller to communicate with them individually.
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard has one primary address, which can be set by the
user to an exclusive value within the range from 0 to 30 inclusive. It cannot be made to
respond to any address outside this range. Secondary addressing is not available. The
application program adds data to the active address, to define ‘talk’ or ‘listen’.
5-4
Remote Operation
Limited Access
5-6.
5
Default bus address
The default setting is 18.
5-7. Limited Access
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard has three basic operating modes. Some of these
modes only give limited support for remote control:
•
Manual Mode - Remote operation is available for all of manual mode, but for
ease of programming, some remote commands do not mirror front panel
operations exactly.
•
Calibration Mode - Remote operation is available.
•
Test Mode - Remote operation is not available, but the 'Full' selftest can be
initiated by a SCPI command. The 6100A Electrical Power Standard will give a
straight Pass/ Fail response, but to investigate further, it is necessary to re-run
Test mode from the front panel.
5-8. Interconnections
Instruments fitted with an IEEE 488 interface communicate with each other through a
standard set of interconnecting cables, as specified in the IEEE 488.1 Standard document.
The IEEE 488 interface socket is fitted on the rear panel.
5-9. Operation via the IEEE 488 Interface
5-10. General
The power-up sequence is performed as in local operation. The instrument can be
programmed to generate an SRQ at power-up.
5-11. Operating Conditions
When the instrument is operating under the direction of the application program, there are
two main conditions, depending on whether the application program has set the 'REN'
management line 'true' or 'false':
1. REN True ('REN' line low).
The instrument can be addressed and commanded if in either 'Manual' or 'Calibration'
mode. All access to front panel control will be removed, except for the bottom right soft
key, labeled 'Enable Local Usage'. If LLO (Local Lockout) has been sent with REN true,
then the 'Enable Local Usage' screen key will be inoperative. If LLO has not been sent,
the 'Enable Local Usage' screen key will return to local control as if REN were false (see
2 below).
The instrument will act in response to valid commands, performing any changes in
output, etc. The display presentation will track the changes.
2. REN False ('REN' line high).
The instrument will remain in Local Operation, but can be addressed and commanded,
while full access to front panel control is also retained.
The instrument will act in response to the commands, performing any changes in output,
etc. No visible effect will be observed, other than the display presentation tracking the
changes.
5-5
6100A
Users Manual
5-12. Programmed Transfer to Local Control (GTL or REN False)
The application program can switch the instrument into ‘Local’ Control (by sending
Command GTL, or by setting the REN line false), permitting a user to take manual
control from the front panel.
The application program can regain ‘Remote’ control by sending the overriding
command: Listen Address with REN true (addressing the instrument as a listener with the
Remote Enable management line true {Low}). This will re-impose remote control.
5-13. ‘Device Clear’
Either of the commands DCL or SDC will force the following instrument states:
•
All IEEE 488 input and output buffers cleared.
•
With 'IFC' (Interface Clear), any device-dependent message bus hold-offs
cleared.
•
The status byte is changed by clearing the MAV bit.
These commands will not:
•
Change any settings or stored data within the device except as listed above.
•
Interrupt analog output.
•
Interrupt or affect any functions of the device not associated with the IEEE 488
system.
5-14. Levels of Reset
Three levels of reset are defined for IEEE 488.2 application programs, a complete system
reset being accomplished by resetting at all three levels, in order, to every device. In other
circumstances they may be used individually or in combination:
•
•
•
IFC Bus initialization.
DCL Message exchange initialization.
∗RST Device initialization.
The effects of the ∗RST command are described in "Device settings at power on".
5-6
Remote Operation
Message Exchange
5
5-15. Message Exchange
5-16. IEEE 488.2 Model
Figure 5-2. IEEE 488 Message Exchange Model
The IEEE 488.2 Standard document illustrates its Message Exchange Control Interface
model at the detail level required by the device designer. Much of the information at this
level of interpretation (such as the details of the internal signal paths etc.) is transparent to
the application programmer. However, because each of the types of errors flagged in the
Event Status Register is related to a particular stage in the process, a simplified
instrument interface model can provide helpful background. This is shown below,
together with brief descriptions of the actions of its functional blocks.
5-17. Instrument STATUS Subsystem
Input/ Output Control transfers messages from the instrument output queue to the
system bus; and conversely from the bus to either the input buffer, or other predetermined
destinations within the device interface. It receives the Status Byte from the status
reporting system, as well as the state of the Request Service bit that it imposes on bit 6 of
the Status Byte response. Bit 6 reflects the ‘Request Service state true’ condition of the
interface.
5-7
6100A
Users Manual
5-18. Incoming Commands and Queries
The Input Buffer is a first in, first out queue, which has a maximum capacity of 1024
bytes (characters).
Each incoming character in the I/O Control generates an interrupt to the instrument
processor, which places it in the Input Buffer for examination by the Parser. The
characters are removed from the buffer and translated with appropriate levels of syntax
checking. If the rate of programming is too fast for the Parser or Execution Control, the
buffer will progressively fill up. When the buffer is full, the handshake is held.
The Parser checks each incoming character and its message context for correct Standarddefined generic syntax, and correct device-defined syntax. Offending syntax is reported
as a Command Error, by setting true bit 5 (CME) of the Standard defined Event Status
register (refer to ‘Retrieval of Device Status Information’).
Execution Control receives successfully parsed messages, and assesses whether they can
be executed, given the currently programmed state of the instrument functions and
facilities. If a message is not viable then an Execution Error is reported, by setting true bit
4 (EXE) of the Standard defined Event Status register. Viable messages are executed in
order, altering the instrument functions, facilities etc. Execution does not ‘overlap’
commands; instead, the instrument Execution Control processes all commands
‘sequentially’ (i.e. waits for actions resulting from the previous command to complete
before executing the next).
5-19. Instrument Functions and Facilities
The instrument Functions and Facilities block contains all the device-specific functions
and features of the instrument, accepting Executable Message Elements from Execution
Control and performing the associated operations. It responds to any of the elements
which are valid Query Requests (both IEEE 488.2 Common Query Commands and
instrument Device-specific Commands) by sending any required Response Data to the
Response Formatter (after carrying out the assigned internal operations).
Device dependent errors are detected in this block. Bit 3 (DDE) of the Standard Event
Status register is set true when an internal operating fault is detected. Each reportable
error number is appended to the Error Queue as the error occurs.
5-20. Outgoing Responses
The Response Formatter derives its information from Response Data (being supplied by
the Functions and Facilities block) and valid Query Requests. From these it builds
Response Message Elements, which are placed as a Response Message into the Output
Queue.
The Output Queue acts as a store for outgoing messages, until they are read over the
system bus by the application program. For as long as the output queue holds one or more
bytes, it reports the fact by setting true bit 4 (Message Available MAV) of the Status
Byte register. Bit 4 is set false when the output queue is empty (refer to ‘Retrieval of
Device Status Information’).
5-8
Remote Operation
Retrieval of Device Status Information
5
5-21. ‘Query Error’
This is an indication that the application program is following an inappropriate message
exchange protocol, resulting in the Interrupted, Unterminated or Deadlocked condition:
Refer to 'Bit 2' in Event Status Register (5-10.).
The Standard document defines the instrument’s response, part of which is to set true bit
2 (QYE) of the Standard defined Event Status register.
5-22. Request Service (RQS)
5-23. Reasons for Requesting Service
There are two main reasons for the application program to request service from the
controller:
•
When the instrument’s message exchange interface is programmed to report a
system programming error.
•
When the instrument’s is programmed to report significant events by RQS.
The significant events vary between types of devices; thus there is a class of events which
are known as ‘Device Specific’. The device designer determines these.
5-24. RQS in the IEEE 488.2 Model
The application programmer can enable or disable the event(s) which are required to
originate an RQS at particular stages of the application program. The IEEE 488.2 model
is extended to incorporate a flexible SCPI status reporting structure in which the
requirements of the device designer and application programmer are both met.
This structure is described in ‘Retrieval of Device Status Information’.
5-25. Retrieval of Device Status Information
5-26. General
For any remotely operated system, the provision of up to date information about the
performance of the system is of major importance. In the case of systems, which operate
under automatic control, the controller requires the necessary feedback to enable it to
progress the task; any break in the continuity of the process can have serious results.
When developing an application program, the programmer needs to test and revise it,
knowing its effects. Confidence that the program elements are couched in the correct
grammar and syntax (and that the program commands and queries are thus being
accepted and acted upon), helps to reduce the number of iterations needed to confirm and
develop the viability of the whole program. Such information is given in the following
pages.
5-9
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5-27. IEEE 488 and SCPI Standard defined Features
Figure 5-3. IEEE-488 and SCPI Standard Defined Features
5-10
Remote Operation
Retrieval of Device Status Information
5
5-28. Status Summary Information and SRQ
The Status Byte consists of four 'summary' bits which notify events in the 8 bit latched
IEEE-488.2 defined ‘Event Status Register’ (ESB), the two 16 bit latched SCPI defined
registers (OSS & QSS), and the Output Queue (MAV). Whenever one of these summary
bits is enabled and set true, the Status Byte summary bit (MSS) is also set true. The
buffered bit 'RQS' follows true when MSS goes true, and will set the IEEE 488 SRQ line
true (Note that in the diagram above no arrow points at bit 6 of the Service Request
Enable Register - bit 6 is always enabled).
A subsequent serial poll by the Application Program will discover that the instrument
was the requesting device (while resetting RQS false again, MSS remaining true), and
which of the summary bits is true. The ∗STB? command is an equivalent command to
serial poll, where serial poll is not available.
5-29. Event Register Conditions
The Status Byte summary bits direct the application program down the structure towards
causal events.
ESB and MAV are standard IEEE-488 features, described in detail in 'Instrument Status
Reporting IEEE 488.2 basics) OSS and QSS are features of the SCPI structure, described
in 'Instrument Status Reporting SCPI Element'.
5-30. Access via the Application Program
Referring to figure at the beginning of this sub-section take as an example the main Event
Status register:
•
Enabling the Events
The main Standard-Defined Event Status Register' has a second 'Event Status
Enable Register'. A program command (*ESE phs Nrf ) can be used to set the
state of the bits in the Enable register. This enables or disables the events, which
will set the main register's summary bit true.
•
Reading the Enable Register
A 'query' command (*ESE?) permits the application program to read the state of
the Enable register, and hence find out which events are enabled to be reported.
•
Reading the Main Register
Another 'query' command (*ESR?) reads the state of the main Standard-Defined
register, to discover which event has occurred (i. e. has caused the summary bit to
be set true). Reading this register clears all its bits.
•
Reporting the Event
If an event is to be reported via the SRQ, its corresponding enable bit will have
been set true, (using the number Nrf ). Each bit in the Standard-Defined register
remains in false condition unless its assigned event occurs, when its condition
changes to true and remains true until cleared by *ESR? or *CLS. This causes
the register's summary bit in the Status Byte also to be set true. If this bit is
enabled, then the Status Byte bit 6 (MSS/ RQS) will be set true, and the
instrument will set the IEEE-488 bus SRQ line true.
•
SCPI Status Registers
The two SCPI Status registers operate in the same way, using the appropriate
program commands to set the enable registers, and query commands to discover
the condition of the registers (the 6100A does not make use of these registers).
5-11
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Users Manual
•
Subsequent Action
Thus the application programmer can enable any assigned event to cause an
SRQ, or not. The controller can be programmed to read the Status Byte, using a
serial poll to read the Status Byte register and the true summary bit (ESB or
MAV). The application program then investigates the appropriate event structure
until the causal event is discovered. The detail for each register is expanded in the
following paragraphs, and in the command descriptions.
5-31. Instrument Status Reporting IEEE 488.2 Basics
5-32. IEEE 488.2 Model
This develops the IEEE 488.1 model into an extended structure with more definite rules.
These rules invoke the use of standard ‘Common’ messages and provide for devicedependent messages. A feature of the structure is the use of ‘Event’ registers, each with
its own enabling register as shown in 'Retrieval of Device Status Information'.
5-33. Instrument Model Structure
The IEEE 488.2 Standard provides for an extensive hierarchical structure with the Status
Byte at the apex, defining its bits 4, 5 and 6 and their use as summaries of a Standard–
defined event structure, which must be included if the device is to claim conformance
with the Standard. The instrument employs these bits as defined in the Standard.
Bits 0, 1, 2 and 3 and 7 are available to the device designer; only bits 3 and 7 are used in
the instrument, and these are as defined by the SCPI standard. The application
programmer must recognize that whenever the application program reads the Status Byte,
it can only receive summaries of types of events, and further query messages will be
needed to probe the details relating to the events themselves. For example: a further byte
is used to expand on the summary at bit 5 of the Status Byte.
5-34. Status Byte Register
In this structure the Status Byte is held in the ‘Status Byte Register’; the bits being
allocated as follows:
•
Bits: 0 (DIO1), 1 (DIO2) and 2 (DIO3) are not used in the instrument status byte.
They are always false.
•
Bit 3 summarizes the state of the ‘Questionable Status data’, held in the
‘Questionable Status register’ (QSR), whose bits represent SCPI-defined and
device-dependent conditions in the instrument. The QSS bit is true when the data
in the QSR contains one or more enabled bits, which are true, or false, when all
the enabled bits in the byte are false. The SCPI Standard defines the QSR and its
data, (not used in 6100A).
•
Bit 4 (DIO5) IEEE 488.2 defined Message Available Bit (MAV).
The MAV bit helps to synchronize information exchange with the controller. It is
true when a message is placed in the Output Queue; or false when the Output
Queue is empty. The common command ∗CLS can clear the Output Queue and
the MAV bit 4 of the Status Byte Register; providing it is sent immediately
following a ‘Program Message Terminator’.
•
Bit 5 (DIO6) IEEE 488.2 defined Standard Event Summary Bit (ESB).
Summarizes the state of the ‘Event Status byte’, held in the ‘Event Status
register’ (ESR), whose bits represent IEEE 488.2 defined conditions in the
5-12
Remote Operation
Instrument Status Reporting IEEE 488.2 Basics
5
device. The ESB bit is true when the byte in the ESR contains one or more
enabled bits which are true; or false when all the enabled bits in the byte are
false.
•
Bit 6 (DIO7) is the Master Status Summary Message (MSS bit), and is set true if
one of the bits 0 to 5 or bit 7 is true (bits 0, 1 and 2 are always false in the
instrument).
•
Bit 7 (DIO4) SCPI defined Operation Status Summary Bit (QSS).
Summarizes the state of the ‘Operation Status data’, held in the ‘Operation Status
register’ (OSR), whose bits represent processes in progress in the instrument. The
OSS bit is true when the data in the OSR contains one or more enabled bits
which are true, or false when all the enabled bits in the byte are false. The OSR is
not used in the 6100A.
5-35. Reading the Status Byte Register
The common query: ∗STB? reads the binary number in the Status Byte register. The
response is in the form of a decimal number that is the sum of the binary weighted values
in the enabled bits of the register. In the instrument, the binary weighted values of bits 0,
1 and 2 are always zero.
5-36. Service Request Enable Register
The SRE register is a means for the application program to select, by enabling individual
Status Byte summary bits, those types of events which are to cause the instrument to
originate an RQS. It contains a user modifiable image of the Status Byte, whereby each
true bit acts to enable its corresponding bit in the Status Byte.
The common program command: ∗SRE phs Nrf performs the selection, where Nrf is a
decimal numeric, whose binary decode is the required bit pattern in the enabling byte.
For example:
If an RQS is required only when a Standard-defined event occurs and when a message is
available in the output queue, then Nrf should be set to 48. The binary decode is
00110000 so bit 4 or bit 5, when true , will generate an RQS; but with this decode, even
if bit 3 is true , no RQS will result. The instrument always sets false the Status Byte bits
0, 1 and 2, so they can never originate an RQS whether enabled or not.
5-37. Reading the Service Request Enable Register
The common query: ∗SRE? reads the binary number in the SRE register. The response is
in the form of a decimal number, which is the sum of the binary-weighted values in the
register. The binary weighted values of bits 0, 1 and 2 will always be zero.
5-38. IEEE 488.2 defined Event Status Register
The ‘Event Status Register’ holds the Event Status Byte, consisting of event bits, each of
which directs attention to particular information. All bits are ‘sticky’, i.e. once true,
cannot return to false until the register is cleared. This occurs automatically when it is
read by the query ∗ESR?. The common command ∗CLS clears the Event Status Register
and associated error queue, but not the Event Status Enable Register.
Note that because the bits are 'sticky', it is necessary to read the appropriate subordinate
register of the status structure in order to clear its bits and allow a new event from the
same source to be reported.
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The ‘Event Status Register’ bits are named in mnemonic form as follows:
•
Bit 0 Operation Complete (OPC).
This bit is true only if *OPC has been programmed and all selected pending
operations are complete. As the instrument operates in serial mode, its usefulness
is limited to registering the completion of long operations, such as self test.
•
Bit 1 Request Control (RQC).
This bit is not used in the instrument. It is always set false.
•
Bit 2 Query Error (QYE).
QYE true indicates that the application program is following an inappropriate
message exchange protocol, resulting in the following situations:
•
o
Interrupted Condition. When the instrument has not finished outputting
its Response Message to a Program Query, and is interrupted by a new
Program Message.
o
Unterminated Condition. When the application program attempts to read
a Response Message from the instrument without having first sent the
complete Query Message (including the Program Message
Terminator) to the instrument.
o
Deadlocked Condition. When the input and output buffers are filled,
with the parser and the execution control blocked.
Bit 3 Device Dependent Error (DDE).
DDE is set true when an internal operating fault is detected, and the appropriate
error message is added to the Error Queue. See the 'Note about the Error Queue'
below:
Note about the ERROR Queue
The Error Queue is a sequential memory stack. Each reportable error has
been given a listed number and explanatory message, which are entered into
the error queue as the error occurs. The queue is read destructively as a
First In/ First Out stack, using the query command SYSTem:ERRor? to
obtain a code number and message.
Repeated use of the query SYSTem:ERRor? will read successive Device
Dependent, Command and Execution errors until the queue is empty, when
the 'Empty' message (0,"No error") will be returned.
It would be good practice to repeatedly read the Error Queue until the
'Empty' message is returned. The common command *CLS clears the queue.
•
Bit 4 Execution Error (EXE).
An execution error is generated if the received command cannot be executed,
owing to the device state or the command parameter being out of bounds. The
appropriate error message is added to the Error Queue.
See the 'Note about the Error Queue' above.
•
Bit 5 Command Error (CME).
CME occurs when a received bus command does not satisfy the IEEE 488.2
generic syntax or the device command syntax programmed into the instrument
interface’s parser, and so is not recognized as a valid command. The appropriate
error message is added to the Error Queue. See the 'Note about the Error Queue'
above.
5-14
Remote Operation
Instrument Status Reporting IEEE 488.2 Basics
•
5
Bit 6 User Request (URQ).
This bit is not used. It is always set false.
•
Bit 7 Instrument Power Supply On (PON).
This bit is set true only when the Line Power has just been switched on to the
instrument.
Whether or not an SRQ is generated by setting bit 7 true, depends on the
previously-programmed ‘Power On Status Clear’ message ∗PSC phs Nrf:
o
For an Nrf of 1, the Event Status Enable register would have been cleared
at power on, so PON would not generate the ESB bit in the Status Byte
register, and no SRQ would occur at power on.
o
If Nrf was 0, and the Event Status Enabling register bit 7 true, and the
Service Request Enabling register bit 5 true ; a change from Power Off
to Power On will generate an SRQ. This is only possible because the
enabling register conditions are held in non volatile memory, and
restored at power on. This facility is included to allow the application
program to set up conditions so that a momentary Power Off followed by
reversion to Power On (which could upset the instrument programming)
will be reported by SRQ.
To achieve this, the Event Status register bit 7 must be permanently true (by
∗ESE phs Nrf , where Nrf ≥ 128); the Status Byte Enable register bit 5 must be
set permanently true (by command ∗SRE phs Nrf , where Nrf lies in one of the
ranges 32 - 63, 96 - 127, 160 - 191, or 224 - 255); Power On Status Clear must be
disabled (by ∗PSC phs Nrf, where Nrf = 0); and the Event Status register must be
read destructively immediately following the Power On SRQ (by the common
query ∗ESR?).
5-39. Standard Event Status Enable Register
The ESE register is a means for the application program to select, from the positions of
the bits in the Standard defined Event Status Byte, those events which when true will set
the ESB bit true in the Status Byte. It contains a user-modifiable image of the standard
Event Status Byte, whereby each true bit acts to enable its corresponding bit in the
standard Event Status Byte.
The program command: ∗ESE phs Nrf performs the selection, where Nrf is a decimal
numeric, which when decoded into binary, produces the required bit pattern in the
enabling byte.
For example:
If the ESB bit is required to be set true only when an execution or device dependent error
occurs, then Nrf should be set to 24. The binary decode is 00011000 so bit 3 or bit 4,
when true, will set the ESB bit true; but when bits 0 - 2, or 5 - 7 are true, the ESB bit will
remain false.
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5-40. Reading the Standard Event Enable Register
The common query: ∗ESE? reads the binary number in the ESE register. The response is
a decimal number, which is the sum of the binary-weighted values in the register.
5-41. The Error Queue
As errors in the instrument are detected, they are placed in a 'first in, first out' queue,
called the 'Error Queue'. This queue conforms to the format described in the SCPI
Command Reference (Volume 2) Chapter 19, paragraph 19.7, although only errors are
detected. Three kinds of errors are reported in the error queue: command errors, execution
errors and device-specific errors.
The queue is read destructively, as described in the SCPI Command Reference, using the
query command ‘SYSTem:ERRor?’. This command will return a code number and error
message. The query SYSTem:ERRor? can be used to read errors in the queue until it is
empty, (when the message '0, No Error' will be returned).
5-42. Instrument Status Reporting — SCPI Elements
5-43. General
In addition to IEEE 488.2 status reporting the instrument implements the Operation and
Questionable Status registers with associated 'Condition', 'Event' and 'Enable' commands.
The extra status deals with current operation of the instrument and the quality of
operations.
The structure of these two registers is detailed in the diagram at the beginning of ‘IEEE488 and SCPI Standard defined Features section’, together with the nature of the reported
events. Access to the registers is detailed in the STATus subsystem of the 'SCPI
Commands and Syntax' section of this document.
5-44. SCPI Status Registers
The SCPI states are divided into two groups, reporting from the Operation or
Questionable Status event register. Each Status register has its own 'Enable' register,
which can be used as a mask to enable bits in the event register itself, in a similar way to
that set by the ∗ESE command for the Standard Event status Register (ESR).
Each Status Register is associated with its own third 'Condition' register, in which the bits
are not 'sticky', but are set and reset as the internal conditions change.
Each Enable Register can be commanded to set its mask to enable selected bits in the
corresponding Event Register. All registers (Event, Enable and Condition) can be
interrogated by appropriate 'Queries' to divulge their bits' states.
5-45. Reportable SCPI States
The 6100A does not normally use the Operation Status Event Register, but future
hardware options may make use of it (for example, the energy counter/timer option).
5-16
Remote Operation
SCPI Programming Language.
5
5-46. SCPI Programming Language.
Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments (SCPI) is an instrument command
language which goes beyond IEEE 488.2 to address a wide variety of instrument
functions in a standard manner.
IEEE 488.2 defines sets of Mandatory Common Commands and Optional Common
Commands along with a method of Standard Status Reporting. The instrument
implementation of SCPI language conforms to all IEEE 488.2 mandatory commands but
not all optional commands. It conforms to the SCPI approved status reporting method.
Note: Commands in SCPI language, prefaced by an asterisk (e.g.: ∗CLS), are IEEE-488.2
standard-defined ‘Common’ commands. Conformance of the instrument remote
programming commands to SCPI ensures that the instrument has a high degree of
consistency with other conforming instruments.
SCPI commands are easy to learn, self-explanatory and account for a wide variety of
usage skills. The full range of instrument commands, with their actions and meanings in
the instrument, is detailed in alphabetical order in 'SCPI Commands and Syntax'. The
IEEE 488 Common Commands implemented in The 6100A Electrical Power Standard,
together with their operating information are given in 'Common Commands and Queries'.
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5-47. SCPI Commands and Syntax
5-48. SCPI Command Summary
Keyword
Parameter Form
Notes
CALibration
:SECure
:PASSword
<spd>
:EXIT
Used to enter calibration mode: Requires calibration password.
Used to exit calibration mode.
:PHASe<x>
<x> is phase (1 to 4): 1 is master phase.
:VOLTage
:RANGe
<dnpd>, <dnpd>
Calibration range:
:RANGe?
[<cpd> {LOW | HIGH}]
Calibration range query.
:ACTual
<dnpd>,<dnpd>
<dnpd> = Amplitude, Angle.
<dnpd> = Low limit, High limit.
Note: Angle relative to master phase.
:FREQuency?
:TARGet
Query only of Actual frequency.
<dnpd>[,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>]
<dnpd> = Target point.
Or,
<dnpd> =
Point,
Fund Freq,
Harmonic,
Amplitude,
Angle.
Note1: Angle relative to master phase.
Note2: Second form is only required when changing target point.
:TRIGger?
:STORe
:DUMP?
Dump all stores for active range:
Point,(<target data>,<actual data>)
<target data> =
Fund, Harm, Ampl, Angle
<actual data> =
Freq, Ampl, Angle
5-18
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
Keyword
Parameter Form
5
Notes
:CURRent
:RANGe
<dnpd>, <dnpd>
:RANGe?
[<cpd> {LOW | HIGH}]
Calibration range query.
:VOLTage
<dpnd>, <dpnd>
<dnpd> = low limit, high limit.
:VOLTage(?)
[<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
:UNIT?
Calibration range: <dnpd> = Low limit, High limit.
Response is VOLT (voltage) or CURR (current).
Query only.
:ACTual
<dnpd>,<dnpd>
:FREQuency?
:TARGet
<dnpd> = Amplitude, Angle. Note: Angle relative to master phase.
Query only of Actual frequency.
<dnpd>[,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>]
<dnpd> = Target point.
Or,
<dnpd> =
Point,
Fund Freq,
Harmonic,
Amplitude,
Angle.
Note1: Angle relative to master phase.
Note2: Second form is only required when changing target point.
:TRIGger?
:STORe
:DUMP?
Dump all stores for active range:
Point,(<target data>,<actual data>), …
<target data> =
Fund, Harm, Ampl, Angle
<actual data> =
Freq, Ampl, Angle
OUTPut
[:STATe](?)
<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}
:ROSCillator
[:STATe](?)
:SENSe(?)
<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}
<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}
:DEFer(?)
[:STATe](?)
<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}
:ACTion
[<cpd> {APPLy | UNDO}]
:RAMP(?)
{FAST | SLOW}
:RCLOCk(?)
<dnpd>
:VOLTage
:NLIMit(?)
<cpd> {LOW | HIGH}
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INPut
:DIP
:TRIGger
[No query form]
[SOURce]
:FREQuency(?)
<dnpd>
:LINE(?)
<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}
:LOCKed?
:PHASe<x>
<x> is phase (1 to 4).
1 is master phase.
:FITTed(?)
:SERial?
Serial number of phase.
:POWer
[:WATTs]?
:VA?
:PFACtor?
:BUDeanu?
[<cpd> { P | S | Q | D}]
:FRYZe?
[<cpd> { P | S | Q}]
:KUSTers?
[<cpd> { P | S | QC | QCR | QL | QLR}]
:SHEPherd?
[<cpd> { P | S | SR | SX | SD}]
:SHARon?
[<cpd> { P | S | SQ | SC}]
:IEEE?
[<cpd> { P | S | N | SN | P1 | S1 | Q1 | PH |
SH | NH}]
:VOLTage
[:STATe](?)
<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}
:RANGe
<dnpd>, <dnpd>
:RANGe?
[<cpd> {LOW | HIGH}]
:AMPLitude?
<dnpd> = Low limit, High limit.
Absolute final output amplitude. Query only.
:MHARmonics
[:STATe](?)
<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}
:CLEar
:AMPLitude(?)
:HARMonic<y>
<dnpd>
<dnpd> = RMS amplitude.
<dnpd>,<dnpd>
<y> is harmonic number.
<dnpd> = Amplitude, Phase.
Note: amplitude absolute or % depending on value of UNIT:MHAR:...
:AMPLitude(?)
:PANGle(?)
<dnpd>
Absolute or %
<dnpd>
:HARMonic<y>?
[<cpd> {AMPLitude | PANGle}]
:ALL?
[<cpd> {AMPLitude | PANGle}]
Response is in csv format.
:FHARmonics
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:CLEar
:FLUCtuate<y>(?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:ALL?
5-20
<y> is harmonic number.
Response in csv format.
:MODulation
<dnpd>,<dnpd>
:MODulation?
[<cpd>{ DEPTh | FREQuency }]
:SHAPe(?)
<cpd>{ RECTangular | SINusoidal | SQUare}
<dnpd> = Depth, Frequency.
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
:DUTY(?)
5
<dnpd>
:IHARmonics
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:SIGNal<y>
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}[,<dnpd>,<dnpd>]
<y> = signal (1 or 2).
<dnpd> = Amplitude, Frequency.
:SIGNal<y>?
[<cpd>{ STATe | AMPLitude | FREQuency }]
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:ENVelope
<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>
:DIP
<dnpd> =
Change to,
Ramp in,
Duration,
Ramp out,
End Delay
:ENVelope?
[<cpd>{CHANge | RIN | DURation | ROUT |
EDELay}]
:TRIGger
:INPut(?)
<cpd>{ FREE | EONE | EREPeat}
:ODELay(?)
<dnpd>
:HOLDoff(?)
<cpd>{ PHASe | DELay },<dnpd>
<dnpd> units depends on the <cpd>.
:FLICker
[:STATe](?)
:FREQuency(?)
:UNIT(?)
:DEPTh(?)
<bool> { OFF | ON | 0 | 1 }
<dnpd>
<cpd> { HZ | CPM }
<dnpd>
:PINSt?
:PST?
:SHAPe(?)
<cpd> { RECTangular | SINusoidal |
SQUare }
:DUTY(?)
<dnpd>
:EFLicker
[:STATe](?)
<bool> { OFF | ON | 0 | 1 }
:CONFigure(?)
<cpd> { PF | MZ | HS | PJ | RV }
:SPERiod(?)
<cpd> { OFF | S5 | S10 | M1 | M5 | M10 }
:HSIDeband
:HARMonic(?)
<dnpd>
:PJUMp
:ANGLe(?)
<dnpd>
Only +/- 30.0 and +/- 45.0 accepted.
:STAGe?
:ELAPsed?
Query Only command <dnpd>,<dnpd> = minute, second
:CURRent
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:RANGe
<dpnd>, <dpnd>
:RANGe?
[<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
:VOLTage
<dpnd>, <dpnd>
:VOLTage(?)
[<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
:UNIT?
<dnpd> = low limit, high limit
<dnpd> = low limit, high limit
Response is VOLT (voltage) or CURR (current).
Query only.
:AMPLitude?
Absolute final output amplitude. Query only.
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:BANDwidth(?)
[<cpd>{NORMAL | LOW}]
:MHARmonics
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:CLEar
:AMPLitude(?)
<dnpd>
<dnpd> = RMS amplitude.
:HARMonic<y>
<dnpd>,<dnpd>
<y> is harmonic number.
<dnpd> = Amplitude, Phase.
Note: amplitude absolute or % depending on value of UNIT:MHAR:...
:AMPLitude(?)
:PANGle(?)
<dnpd>
<dnpd>
:HARMonic<y>?
[<cpd>{ AMPLitude | PANGle ]}
:ALL?
[<cpd>{ AMPLitude | PANGle ]}
Response is in CSV format.
:FHARmonics
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:CLEar
:FLUCtuate<y>(?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:ALL?
<y> is harmonic number.
Response in CSV format.
:MODulation
<dnpd>,<dnpd>
:MODulation?
[<cpd>{ DEPTh | FREQuency }]
:SHAPe(?)
<cpd>{ RECTangular | SINusoidal | SQUare}
:DUTY(?)
<dnpd>
<dnpd> = Depth, Frequency.
:IHARmonics
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:SIGNal<y>
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}[,<dnpd>,<dnpd>]
:SIGNal<y>?
[<cpd> {STATe | AMPLitude | PANGle}]
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
:ENVelope
<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>
<y> = Signal (1 or 2).
<dnpd> = Amplitude, Frequency.
:DIP
<dnpd> =
Change to,
Ramp in,
Duration,
Ramp out,
End Delay
:ENVelope?
[<cpd>{CHANge | RIN | DURation | ROUT |
EDELay}]
:TRIGger
5-22
:INPut(?)
<cpd>{ FREE | EONE | EREPeat}
:ODELay(?)
<dnpd>
:HOLDoff(?)
<cpd>{ PHASe | DELay },<dnpd>
<dnpd> units depends on the <cpd>.
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
:FLICker
[:STATe](?)
<bool>{ OFF|ON|0|1 }
:FREQuency(?)
<dnpd>
:UNIT(?)
:DEPTh(?)
:UNIT(?)
<cpd> [HZ | CPM]
<dnpd>
<cpd> [HZ | CPM]
:PST?
Deprecated
:SHAPe(?)
<cpd>{ RECTangular | SINusoidal | SQUare}
:DUTY(?)
<dnpd>
STATus
:OPERation
[:EVENt]?
:ENABle(?)
Query only.
<dnpd>
:CONDition?
Query only.
:QUEStionable
[:EVENt]?
:ENABle(?)
Query only.
<dnpd>
:CONDition?
Query only.
:PRESet
SYSTem
:ERRor?
Query only.
:DATE(?)
<dpnd>,<dpnd>,<dpnd>
<dnpd> = Year, Month, Day.
TIME(?)
<dpnd>,<dpnd>,<dpnd>
<dnpd> = Hour, Minute, Second.
:VERSion?
Query only.
:UNIT
:ANGLe(?)
<cpd> {DEGrees|RADians}
Selection affects all phase angle entries.
:MHARmonics
:CURRent(?)
<cpd> {PRMS | PFUNdamental |
DBFundamental | ABSolute}
:VOLTage(?)
<cpd> {PRMS | PFUNdamental |
DBFundamental | ABSolute}
:DIP
:TIME(?)
<cpd> {SEConds|CYCLes}
:FLICker
:CURRent(?)
<cpd> {HZ | CPM}
:VOLTage(?)
<cpd> {HZ | CPM}
5-23
6100A
Users Manual
5-49. Calibration Subsystem Command Details
This subsystem is used to calibrate the functions and hardware ranges of the 6100A. This
will correct for any system errors due to drift or ageing effects.
Before any adjustments can take place, access to calibration must be enabled.
There is a switch (on the rear panel of the 6100A, marked CALIBRATION) that must be
set to ENABLE. Having done this, the calibration password command must be sent. Once
entered into calibration mode, only calibration commands are accepted; these can then be
used to adjust the instrument.
CALibration:SECure:PASSword <spd>
This command is used to gain access to calibration mode. The <spd> must be the
correct 'calibration' password registered in the 6100A software. The calibration password
can be changed only in calibration mode, (from the 6100A front panel).
CALibration:SECure:EXIT
This command is used to exit calibration mode, and return to normal operation, any
pending adjustment operations will be cancelled.
CALibration:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:RANGe <dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel hardware range:
•
•
The first parameter is the lower limit that the range must cover.
The second parameter is the upper limit that the range must cover.
The instrument determines the narrowest amplitude range that encompasses the limits.
CALibration:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:RANGe? [<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
The default version will return the low and high limits of the presently selected range,
(comma separated). Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these
values.
CALibration:PHASe<x>: VOLTage:ACTual <dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command is used to change the actual values that the calibration will take place at:
•
•
The first parameter is the amplitude (interpreted as an absolute voltage).
The second parameter is the phase angle (interpreted according to the active setting
of the UNIT:ANGLE command, i.e. Degrees or Radians).
CALibration:PHASe<x>: VOLTage:ACTual:FREQuency?
This command is used to query the frequency the adjustment will take place at.
Note: The frequency itself is not adjustable.
CALibration:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:TARGet<dnpd>[,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>]
For each calibration operation, the required calibration point (factor) must be targeted.
This command is used to select this point, and also permits the user to define parameters
associated with the calibration point in the current operation:
•
The first <dnpd> is an integer (from 0 to 2) that indicates the target point to adjust.
Note: This corresponds to the list of target entries on the ‘adjust instrument’ screen,
(in the target field), for the corresponding function and hardware range.
5-24
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
•
5
The subsequent (and optional) <dnpd>'s correspond to the fundamental
frequency, harmonic number, absolute amplitude and phase angle of this point. These
parameters allow the target point itself to be moved. In practice, the factory set target
defaults should not require modification, so the non-optional form of the command
should be all that is required.
Once a target has been set, the 6100A adjustment is restricted to values within the
selected hardware voltage span, and frequency band. In order to release this restriction,
one of the following commands must be sent:
TRIG?, EXIT or a new TARG command.
CALibration:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:TRIGer?
After the parameters are set for calibration at a single calibration point, this command
initiates the internal calibration process. This command applies to the TARGet settings.
The response returns a '0' for success, and a '1' for failure. In this latter case an error
message is put in the error queue.
Note: The current channel calibration commands are the same as voltage above, but
replace ‘VOLT’ with ‘CURR’.
The exceptions to this rule are as follows:
CALibration:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe:VOLTage <dpnd>,<dpnd>
This command sets the specified phase’s current channel hardware range to output a
voltage instead of a current. The first parameter is the lower limit that the range must
cover. The second parameter is the upper limit that the range must cover. The instrument
determines the narrowest amplitude range that encompasses the limits.
For reference purposes, note that the following ranges are presently defined:
Range
Lower Limit
Upper Limit
0.5V range
1V range
10V range
0.05V
0.15V
1V
0.25V
1.5V
10V
CALibration:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe:VOLTage? [<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
The default version will return the low and high limits of the presently selected range,
comma separated. Use the parameters to query just one of these values.
CALibration:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe:UNIT?
This query only command can be used to check whether the voltage out of current ranges
are in use.
The response is:
CURRent An ordinary current range is active.
VOLTage A voltage out of current range is active.
5-25
6100A
Users Manual
5-50. Output Subsystem Command Details
OUTPut[:STATe](?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the instrument’s output on or off, dependent upon the individual
Voltage and Current channel output settings of each phase.
•
•
ON or 1 will set the output on.
OFF or 0 will set the output off.
The query command returns 1 if the output is on, or 0 if the output is off.
OUTPut:ROSCillator[:STATe](?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the instrument’s reference oscillator signal on or off.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable the generation of a sample reference signal.
OFF or 0 will disable the generation of a sample reference signal.
The query command returns 1 if reference oscillator is on, or 0 if reference oscillator is
off.
OUTPut:SENSe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the instrument’s 2-wire or 4-wire sense capability on or off.
•
•
ON or 1 will select 4-wire sensing.
OFF or 0 will select 2-wire sensing.
The query command returns 1 if 4-wire sensing is on, or 0 if 2-wire sensing is on.
OUTPut:DEFer[:STATe](?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command sets the deferred or direct operating mode.
When deferred mode is active, all commands that effect the output signal of the master
instrument and phases, are buffered until the instrument receives an apply or undo
operation. At this point, the actual output signal on all phases is updated to reflect the
buffered state, or the buffered state is undone.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable deferred mode.
OFF or 0 will disable deferred mode, and return the instrument to direct operation.
The query command returns 1 if deferred mode is on, or 0 if deferred mode is off.
Note: The instrument will default to direct mode.
OUTPut:DEFer:ACTion <cpd>{APPLy | UNDO}
This command will apply or undo any pending (buffered) command that have been
received when in deferred mode.
•
•
APPLy will act upon those commands last received since the last apply/undo.
UNDO will discard any commands received since the last apply.
The command has no query form. Note that it will report a ‘settings conflict’ if DEFer
mode is not ON.
Note: operations which are invalid when the output is ON are also invalid when Deferred
mode is active, even if the output is OFF. For example you cannot change range in
Deferred mode even if the output is OFF.
5-26
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
[SOURce]:OUTPut:RCLOCk(?) <dnpd>
This command allows a signal derived from the internal master oscillator to be routed to
the rear panel.
The following values are accepted:
•
0.0 - disable reference out signal.
•
10e6
- set reference out to 10MHz.
•
20e6
- set reference out to 20MHz.
The default value is 0.0 (i.e. reference out signal is off).
SOURce]:OUTPut:RAMP(?) <CPD>{ FAST | SLOW }
When the output is enabled, the output level is not instantaneously applied at its full
amplitude; instead it ramps up to this value over a short period of time. This normally
takes 10 ms; it is possible to set this time to 2 s to provide a ‘soft start’ for systems which
might trip the internal over-voltage/current detectors, if the default rate of change is too
fast.
Select whether the output ramp up time is 10 ms or 2s.
ƒ
FAST - Ramp up within 10 ms,
ƒ
SLOW - Ramp up within 2 s.
The default value is FAST.
[SOURce]:OUTPut:VOLTage:NLIMit <CPD>{ LOW | HIGH }
This command allows the neutral phases’ voltage channel range limits to be extended
from 33V to 1008V.
The parameters are:
ƒ
LOW
ƒ
HIGH - Maximum amplitude is 1008V.
- Maximum amplitude is 33V
The default value is LOW.
Note: The ‘HIGH’ setting is intended for use when the instrument’s neutral phase is
being used as an independent supply – i.e. not connected in a star or delta configuration.
Damage to the instrument can result if the 'N' phase voltage Hi is connected to any
6140A Lo terminal when an amplitude greater than 33V is selected.
5-51. Input Subsystem Command Details
INPut:DIP:TRIGger
This command triggers all dip/swell phenomena that have external trigger selected. It has
the same effect as supplying a trigger signal to the rear input External Trigger BNC.
5-27
6100A
Users Manual
5-52. Source Subsystem Command Details
5-53. General Commands
SOURce:FREQuency(?) <dnpd>
This command is used to set the fundamental frequency for all voltage and current
channels on all phases. The <dnpd> is a number, which sets the required fundamental
frequency, expressed in Hz. It will automatically choose the 'best' hardware range for the
defined frequency of output.
The query version will return the present output frequency value. The returned number
will be in standard scientific format (300 Hz would be returned as 3.0E2).
SOURce:FREQuency:LINE(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command is used to set the line locking of the frequency for all voltage and current
channels on all phases.
•
•
ON or 1 will select line locking.
OFF or 0 will select line locking
The query command will return 1 if line locking is enabled, or 0 if line locking is
disabled.
SOURce:FREQuency:LOCK?
This query only command returns line lock state:
•
•
1 indicates that line-lock has been achieved.
0 indicates that line lock has not been achieved.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:FITTed?
This command is a query only and is used to return whether or not a phase is present.
The query version returns 1 if the phase is present and 0 otherwise.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:SERial?
This command is used to get the serial number of an instrument.
The query response is a <spd>, for example "12345"
5-54. Power Values
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:WATT?
This command is a query only and is used to return a Phase’s Power value in units of
Watts (this is always the same irrespective of the reactive power calculation method).
The instrument will return the specified Phase’s output power value. The returned
number will be in standard scientific format (24.3kW would be returned as 2.43E4).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:VA?
This command is a query only and is used to return a Phase’s Power value in units of VA
(this is always the same irrespective of the power calculation).
The instrument will return the specified Phase’s output power value. The returned
number will be in standard scientific format (453.6VA would be returned as 4.536E2).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:PFACtor?
This command is a query only and is used to return a Phase’s Power Factor value (this is
always the same irrespective of the power calculation).
5-28
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:BUDeanu? [<cpd>{ P | S | Q | D }]
This command is a query only. The default (no parameter) version will return all of the
components from a calculation of the Phase’s Power according to Budeanu in comma
separated format, in the order P, S, Q, D. The parameters select a specific component to
return. The returned numbers will be in standard scientific format.
Example:
1.0E1,1.141E1,0.0E0,0.0E0
Note:
P is identical to WATT.
S is identical to VA.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:FRYZe? [<cpd>{ P | S | Q }]
This command is a query only. The default (no parameter) version will return all of the
components from a calculation of the Phase’s Power according to Fryze in comma
separated format, in the order P, S, Q. The parameters select a specific component to
return. The returned numbers will be in standard scientific format.
Example:
1.0E1,1.141E1,0.0E0
Note:
P is identical to WATT.
S is identical to VA.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:KUSTers? [<cpd>{ P | S | QC | QCR | QL | QLR }]
This command is a query only. The default (no parameter) version will return all of the
components from a calculation of the Phase’s Power according to Kusters & Moore in
comma separated format, in the order P, S, Qc, Qcr, Ql, Qlr. The parameters select a
specific component to return. The returned numbers will be in standard scientific format.
Example:
1.0E1,1.414E1,0.314E0,0.1E0,0.207E0,0.207E0
Note:
P is identical to WATT.
S is identical to VA.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:SHEPherd? [<cpd>{ P | S | SR | SX | SD }]
This command is a query only. The default (no parameter) version will return all of the
components from a calculation of the Phase’s Power according to Shepherd & Zakikhani
in comma separated format, in the order P, S, Sr, Sx, Sd. The parameters select a specific
component to return. The returned numbers will be in standard scientific format.
Example:
1.0E1,1.414E1,1.314E0,0.1E0,0.0E0
Note:
P is identical to WATT.
S is identical to VA.
5-29
6100A
Users Manual
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:SHARon? [<cpd>{ P | S | SQ | SC }]
This command is a query only. The default (no parameter) version will return all of the
components from a calculation of the Phase’s Power according to Sharon & Czarnecki in
comma separated format, in the order P, S, Sq, Sc. The parameters select a specific
component to return. The returned numbers will be in standard scientific format.
Example:
1.0E1,1.414E1,1.314E0,0.1E0
Note:
P is identical to WATT.
S is identical to VA.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:POWer:IEEE? [<cpd>{ P | S | N | SN | P1 | S1 | Q1 | PH | SH | NH }]
This command is a query only. The default (no parameter) version will return all of the
components from a calculation of the Phase’s Power according to the IEEE Working
Group on Harmonics in comma separated format, in the order P, S, N, SN, P1, S1, Q1,
PH, SH, NH. The parameters select a specific component to return. The returned numbers
will be in standard scientific format.
Example:
1.0E1,1.414E1,1.314E0,0.1E0,0.0E0,0.7E1,0.8E1,0.1E1,0.3E1
,0.614E1,1.2E-3
Note:
P is identical to WATT.
S is identical to VA.
5-55. Voltage Setup
SOURce:PHAeS<x>:VOLTage:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command will make the specified Phase’s Voltage channel enabled or disabled.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable the channel.
OFF or 0 will disable the channel.
The query command returns 1 if channel enabled, or 0 if channel is disabled.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:RANGe <dpnd>,<dpnd>
This command sets the specified Phase’s Voltage channel hardware range. The first
parameter is the lower limit that the range must cover. The second parameter is the upper
limit that the range must cover. The instrument determines the narrowest amplitude range
that encompasses the limits.
For reference purposes, note that the following ranges are presently defined:
Range
11V range
23V range
56V range
110V range
230V range
560V range
5-30
Lower Limit
1.0V
2.3V
5.6V
11V
23V
56V
Upper Limit
16V
33V
78V
168V
336V
1008V
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:RANGe? [<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
The default version will return the low and high limits of the presently selected range,
comma separated. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these
values.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:AMPLitude?
This query only command is used to find out the specified phase's output amplitude, in
RMS Volts.
The instrument will return the present voltage value. The returned number will be in
standard scientific format (550V would be returned as 5.5E2).
5-56. DC and Harmonics Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:MHARmonics:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s voltage channel harmonics phenomena on and
off, toggling it with the sine mode:
•
•
ON or 1 will enable Harmonics mode, disabling sine mode.
OFF or 0 will disable Harmonics mode, enabling sine mode.
The query command will return 1 if the harmonics are applied, or 0 if the harmonics
are inactive.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:MHARmonics:CLEar
This command clears all harmonics, except the fundamental associated with this phase's
voltage. It does not have a query form.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:MHARmonics:AMPLitude(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the RMS value of the harmonic waveshape. Any harmonics will be
scaled appropriately to keep the waveshape of the composite waveform the same. The
query form returns the RMS value.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage: MHARmonics: HARMonic<y> <dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel harmonics for harmonic number
y (0 to 100). DC is represented by harmonic number zero. The parameters specify
amplitude (in the presently selected voltage amplitude units), and phase angle (in the
presently selected phase angle units), respectively. The phase angle for the 0th harmonic
(DC) must be zero.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:MHARmonics:HARMonic<y>? [<cpd>{
AMPLitude | PANGle }]
This query returns the amplitude (in the presently selected voltage amplitude units), and
phase angle (in the presently selected phase angle units) of the specified harmonic on the
specified phase. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these values.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:MHARmonics:HARMonic<y>:AMPLitude?
This query returns the amplitude (in the presently selected Voltage amplitude Units of the
specified harmonic on the specified phase.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:MHARmonics:HARMonic<y>:PANGle?
This query returns the phase angle (in the presently selected phase angle units) of the
specified harmonic on the specified phase.
5-31
6100A
Users Manual
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:MHARmonics:ALL? [<cpd>{ AMPLitude | PANGle }]
This query returns the amplitude (in the presently selected voltage amplitude units), and
phase angle (in the presently selected phase angle units) of all harmonics on the specified
phase as a comma separated list. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one
of these values.
Example:
Suppose we have the following arrangement:
Harmonic
1
2
3
4
5
Amplitude
25.0V
0.0V
10.9V
0.0V
2.5V
Phase
90.0 deg
0.0 deg
0.0 deg
0.0 deg
165.0 deg
Expected responses:
:SOUR:PHAS:VOLT:HARM:ALL?
:SOUR:PHAS:VOLT:HARM:ALL? AMPL
:SOUR:PHAS:VOLT:HARM:ALL? PANG
"2.5E1,9.0E1,0.0E0,0.0E0,1.09E1,0.0E0,0.0E0,0.0E0
,2.5E0,1.65E2"
"2.5E1,0.0E0,1.09E1,0.0E0,0.0E0,2.5E0"
"9.0E1,0.0E0,0.0E0,0.0E0,1.65E2"
5-57. Fluctuating Harmonics Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s voltage channel fluctuating harmonics
phenomena on and off. If no harmonics are currently selected for the specified phase, a
suitable error message will be reported indicating that some harmonics need to be
activated before fluctuation can be applied.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable fluctuation of the phase’s voltage harmonics.
OFF or 0 will disable fluctuation of the phase’s voltage harmonics.
The query command will return 1 if the specified fluctuation is being applied, or 0 if
the specified fluctuation is inactive.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:CLEar
This command clears the modulation of harmonics associated with this phase's voltage. It
does not have a query form.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:FLUCtuate<y>(?)<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns on/off the fluctuation of harmonic y on the Voltage channel of
Phase x.
The query command will return 1 if the specified harmonic is being fluctuated, or 0 if
the specified harmonic is not being fluctuated.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:ALL?
This query allows all the active harmonics to return their fluctuation state as a comma
delimited string. The comma separated string will contain a value for each harmonic.
Inactive harmonics will always cause 0 to be returned.
5-32
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:MODulation <dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel fluctuating harmonics
modulation parameters. The first parameter is the modulation depth (expressed as a
percentage of the voltage waveform RMS amplitude). The second parameter is the
required modulation frequency (expressed in Hertz).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:MODulation? [<cpd>{DEPTh |
FREQuency}]
This query returns the modulation depth and frequency for the Voltage channel of the
specified phase. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these values.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:SHAPe(?)
<cpd>{RECTangular|SINusoidal|SQUare}
This command selects the specified phase’s voltage channel fluctuating harmonics
modulation shape:
•
•
•
RECT will set the modulation waveform to be rectangular.
SIN will set the modulation waveform to be sinusoidal.
SQU will set the modulation waveform to be square.
The query command will return SIN if the modulation shape is sinusoidal etc.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FHARmonics:DUTY(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel fluctuating harmonics duty
cycle value for rectangular modulation.
The query command will return the present duty cycle value. The returned number will
be in standard scientific format (10.55 would be returned as 1.055E1).
5-58. Interharmonics Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:IHARmonics:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s voltage channel interharmonics phenomena on
and off.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable interharmonics on this phase’s voltage channel.
OFF or 0 will disable interharmonics on this phase’s voltage channel.
The query command will return 1 if the interharmonics are enabled, or 0 if the interharmonics are disabled.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:IHARmonics:SIGNal<y> <bool>
{OFF|ON|0|1}[,<dnpd>,<dnpd>]
This command sets the specified inter-harmonics parameters. The <bool> parameter
controls whether the inter-harmonic is active or not. The two optional <dnpd> parameters
are numbers, which set the required amplitude (expressed in volts), and the required
frequency (expressed in Hertz). <y> specifies the inter-harmonic to be set since the
instrument is capable of producing 2 inter-harmonics simultaneously.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:IHARmonics:SIGNal<y>? [<cpd>{STATe |
AMPLitude | FREQuency}]
The default version of this query returns all of the settings of the specified Inter
Harmonic, comma separated. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of
these values.
5-33
6100A
Users Manual
5-59. Dip Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:DIP:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified Phase’s Voltage channel Dip phenomena on and off.
•
•
ON or 1 will set the specified Dip to be applied.
OFF or 0 will set the specified Dip to be removed.
The query command will return 1 if Dip is applied, or 0 if Dip is inactive.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:DIP:ENVelope
<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel dip parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
1st dnpd - ‘Change To’ value (expressed as a percentage of total RMS voltage).
2nd dnpd - ‘Ramp In’ period (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
3rd dnpd - ‘Duration’ (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
4th dnpd - ‘Ramp Out’ period (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
5th dnpd - 'End Delay' period (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:DIP:ENVelope? [<cpd>{CHANe | RIN | DURation |
ROUT | EDELay}]
The default version of this query returns the dip envelope settings for the specified
phase's voltage channel. Add the appropriate optional parameter to return a single value:
CHANge
RIN
DURation
ROUT
EDELay
'Change To' value, expressed as a percentage of the total RMS Voltage
the 'Ramp In' period, expressed in Seconds or Cycles depending on the Dip Units setting
the 'Duration', expressed in Seconds or Cycles depending on the Dip Units setting
the 'Ramp Out' period, expressed in Seconds or Cycles depending on the Dip Units
setting
the 'End Delay' period (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:DIP:TRIGger:INPut(?) <cpd>{ FREE | EONE |
EREPeat}
This command sets and queries the trigger mode used to determine the event that starts
the dip or swell:
•
•
•
FREE is used for free running dips/swells.
EONE is used to produce one dips/swell triggered from an external source.
EREPeat is used to produce continuous dips/swells triggered from an external source.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:DIP:TRIGger:HOLDoff(?)
<cpd>{PHASe|DELay},<dnpd>
This command selects sets and queries the hold-off before the dip/swell starts following a
trigger.
PHASe
DELay
The hold-off is an angle following the trigger point. In this case the delay ,<dnpd>, has
units of degrees or radians.
The hold-off is a time. In this case the delay ,<dnpd>, has units of seconds or cycles
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:DIP:TRIGger:ODELay(?)<dnpd>
This sets and queries the delay (in seconds or cycles) before the output trigger is
generated, following the completion of a dip or swell.
5-34
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
5-60. Flicker Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FLICker:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified Phase’s Voltage channel flicker phenomena on and off.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable flicker on this phase’s voltage channel.
OFF or 0 will disable flicker on this phase’s voltage channel.
The query command will return 1 if flicker is applied, or 0 if flicker is inactive.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FLICker:DEPTh(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel flicker modulation depth.
The <dnpd> is a number, which sets the required modulation depth, expressed as a
percentage of the total RMS voltage signal.
The query version of this command will return the present modulation depth value. The
returned number will be in standard scientific format (15.1% would be returned as
1.51E1).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FLICker:FREQuency(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel flicker modulation frequency.
The <dnpd> is a number, which sets the required modulation frequency, expressed in
Hertz.
The query command will return the present modulation frequency value. The returned
number will be in standard scientific format (440.0Hz would be returned as 4.40E2).
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FLICKer:FREQuency:UNIT(?) <cpd> { HZ | CPM }
This command selects the units for change rate:
•
Hz - will set the change rate to Hertz.
•
CPM - set the change rate to Changes per Minute.
The query command will return HZ or CPM.
Note: On changing the units, the change rate will return to its default value of 1 CPM or
0.5 Hz depending on the unit selected.
Note: The "UNIT:FLICker:VOLTAge:FREQuency(?) <cpd> {HZ|CPM}" command is
now depreciated as it only affects Channel 1.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FLICker:PST?
This query only command will return the present PST value. The returned number will
be in standard scientific format (1.82 would be returned as 1.82E0).
SOURce:PHASe<x>.:VOLTage:FLICKer:SHAPe(?)<cpd>{RECTangular|
SINusoidal|SQUare}
This command selects the specified phase’s voltage channel flicker modulation shape.
•
•
•
RECT will set the modulation waveform to be rectangular.
SIN will set the modulation waveform to be sinusoidal.
SQU will set the modulation waveform to be square.
The query command will return SIN if the modulation shape is sinusoidal etc.
5-35
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Users Manual
SOURce:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:FLICker:DUTY(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s voltage channel flicker duty cycle value for
rectangular modulation.
The query command will return the present duty cycle value. The returned number will
be in standard scientific format (10.55 would be returned as 1.055E1).
5-61. Extended flicker sub-system
The extended flicker sub-system allows the generation of signals conforming to the
flicker-meter test scenarios described in IEC 60000-4 section 4.3.3 to 4.3.7.
When one of the extended functions is active, it will over-ride the existing behaviour of
the phenomena selected for the voltage channel of the passed phase (the current channel
will be unaffected), the original settings will be restored on disabling the extended
function.
5-62. Extended flicker state
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:EFLicker:[STATe](?) <bool> { ON | OFF | 0 | 1 }
Enable or disable the currently selected extended flicker signal configuration (for the
passed phase x). If the output is on, the new configuration will be applied immediately to
the output.
5-63. Configure signal
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:EFLicker:CONFigure(?) <cpd> { PF | MZ | HS |
PJ | RV }
Select the extended flicker signal function (for the passed phase x).
Note: The instrument’s state will not change until ‘:EFLicker:STATe’ is set to ‘ON’ (or
‘1’ ). If the extended flicker function is changed, ‘:EFLicker:STATe’ will automatically
be set back to ‘OFF’ or (‘0’).
The extended functions are:
•
PF - Flicker signal with periodic frequency changes (section 4.3.3 of IEC 601000-4).
•
MZ - Distorted voltage with multiple zero crossings (section 4.3.43 of IEC 6010004).
•
HS - Harmonics with sideband (section 4.3.5 of IEC 601000-4).
•
PJ - Phase jumps (section 4.3.6 of IEC 601000-4).
•
RV - Rectangular voltage changes with duty cycle (section 4.3.7 of IEC 601000-4).
The default value is ‘PF’ (periodic frequency changes).
5-36
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
5-64. Select sideband harmonic
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:EFLicker:HSIDeband:HARMonic(?) <dnpd>
Select the distorting harmonic to use when generating the ‘harmonics with side-band test’
signal.
Value range:
3-99.
Value default: 3.
Note: This value is only applied when ‘HSIDeband’ is selected using the
‘:EFLicker:CONFigure’ command.
5-65. Select phase jump angle
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:EFLicker:PJUMp:ANGLe(?) < dnpd >
Select the phase angle to use with the phase jump sequence test: Only values of +/- 30.0
degrees or +/- 45.0 degrees will be accepted.
The default value is +30.0.
Note: This value is only applied when ‘PJUMp’ is selected using the
‘:EFLicker:CONFigure’ command.
5-66. Select phase jump settle period
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:EFLicker:PJUMp:SPERiod(?) <cpd> { OFF | S5 |
S10 | M1 | M5 | M10 }
Select the settle period to use before starting the phase jump sequence. The output is on
during this period:
•
OFF
•
S5 - Delay by 5 Seconds.
•
S10 - Delay by 10 Seconds.
•
M1 - Delay by 1 Minute.
•
M5 - Delay by 5 Minutes.
•
M10 - Delay by 10 Minutes.
- Apply no delay.
The default value is ‘OFF’.
Note: This value is only applied when ‘PJUMp’ is selected using the
‘:EFLicker:CONFigure’ command.
5-67. Report phase jump stage
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:EFLicker:PJUMp:STAGe?
Report the progress of the phase jump sequence:
•
Stage 0 – Settle period.
•
Stage 1 – Perform phase jump at 1 minute elapsed.
•
Stage 2 – Perform phase jump at 3 minutes elapsed.
•
Stage 3 – Perform phase jump at 5 minutes elapsed.
•
Stage 4 – Perform phase jump at 7 minutes elapsed.
•
Stage 5 – Perform phase jump at 9 minutes elapsed.
5-37
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•
Stage 6 – End sequence at 10 minutes elapsed.
Note: query only.
5-68. Report phase jump elapsed time
[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:VOLTage:EFLicker:PJUMp:ELAPsed?
Report the elapsed time since the phase jump sequence started as: Minutes, Seconds.
Note: query only.
5-69. Current Setup
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s current channel enabled or disabled.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable the channel.
OFF or 0 will disable the channel.
The query command will return 1 if output is on, or 0 if output is off.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe <dpnd>,<dpnd>
This command sets the specified phase’s current channel hardware range. The first
parameter is the lower limit that the range must cover. The second parameter is the upper
limit that the range must cover. The instrument determines the narrowest amplitude range
that encompasses the limits.
For reference purposes, note that the following ranges are presently defined:
Range
Lower Limit
Upper Limit
0.25A range
0.5A range
1A range
2A range
5A range
10A range
21A range
80 A range
0.05A
0. 05A
0.1A
0.2A
0.5A
1A
2A
8A
0.25A
0.5A
1A
2A
5A
10A
21A
80 A
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe? [<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
The default version will return the low and high limits of the presently selected range,
comma separated. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these
values.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe:VOLTage <dpnd>,<dpnd>
This command sets the specified phase’s current channel hardware range to output a
voltage instead of a current. The first parameter is the lower limit that the range must
cover. The second parameter is the upper limit that the range must cover. The instrument
determines the narrowest amplitude range that encompasses the limits.
For reference purposes, note that the following ranges are presently defined:
5-38
Range
Lower Limit
Upper Limit
0.5V range
1V range
10V range
0.05V
0.15V
1V
0.25V
1.5V
10V
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe:VOLTage? [<cpd>{ LOW | HIGH }]
The default version will return the low and high limits of the presently selected range,
comma separated. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these
values.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:RANGe:UNIT?
This query only command can be used to check whether the voltage out of current ranges
are in use.
The response is:
CURRent An ordinary current range is active.
VOLTage A voltage out of current range is active.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:AMPLitude?
This query only command is used to find out the specified phase's output amplitude, in
RMS amps (or volts, if this mode is active.
The query command will return the present current value. The returned number will be
in standard scientific format (14.4A would be returned as 1.44E1).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:BANDwidth(?) [<cpd>{ NORMal | LOW }]
This command is used to select the current channel bandwidth limit.
•
•
NORMAL a 6kHz limit is applied.
LOW
a 1.5 kHz limit is applied.
The query command will return the active setting.
Note: the *OPT? command reports whether bandwidth selection is available.
5-70. Harmonics Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:MHARmonic:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s current channel harmonics phenomena on and
off, toggling it with the Sine mode
•
•
ON or 1 will enable harmonics mode, disabling Sine mode.
OFF or 0 will disable harmonics mode, enabling Sine mode.
The query form returns the current state.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:MHARmonics:CLEar
This command clears all harmonics, except the fundamental associated with this phase's
Current. It does not have a query form.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:MHARmonics:AMPLitude(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the RMS value of the harmonic waveshape. Any harmonics will be
scaled appropriately to keep the waveshape of the composite waveform the same. The
query form returns the RMS value.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent: MHARmonic:HARMonic<y> <dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s current channel harmonics for harmonic number
y (1 to 100). The parameters specify amplitude (in the presently selected current
amplitude units), and phase angle (in the presently selected phase angle units),
respectively.
5-39
6100A
Users Manual
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:MHARmonic:HARMonic<y>? [<cpd>{ AMPLitude
| PANGle }]
This query returns the amplitude (in the presently selected current amplitude units), and
phase angle (in the presently selected phase angle units) of the specified harmonic on the
specified phase. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these values.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:MHARmonics:HARMonic<y>:AMPLitude?
This query returns the amplitude (in the presently selected Current amplitude Units of the
specified harmonic on the specified phase.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:MHARmonics:HARMonic<y>:PANGle?
This query returns the phase angle (in the presently selected phase angle units) of the
specified harmonic on the specified phase.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:MHARmonic:ALL? [<cpd>{ AMPLitude |
PANGle }]
This query returns the amplitude (in the presently selected current amplitude units), and
phase angle (in the presently selected phase angle units) of all harmonics on the specified
phase as a comma separated list. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one
of these values.
Example, suppose we have the following arrangement:
Harmonic
Amplitude
Phase
1
2.5A
90.0 deg
2
0.0V
0.0 deg
3
1.09A
0.0 deg
4
0.0V
0.0 deg
5
0.25A
165.0 deg
Expected responses:
:SOUR:PHAS:CURR:HARM:ALL?
:SOUR:PHAS:CURR:HARM:ALL? AMPL
:SOUR:PHAS:CURR:HARM:ALL? PANG
"2.5E0,9.0E1,0.0E0,0.0E0,1.09E0,0.0E0,0.0E0,0.0E
0,2.5E-1,1.65E2"
"2.5E0,0.0E0,1.09E0,0.0E0,0.0E0,2.5E-1"
"9.0E1,0.0E0,0.0E0,0.0E0,1.65E2"
5-71. Fluctuating Harmonics Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FHARmonics:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s current channel fluctuating harmonics
phenomena on and off. If no harmonics are currently selected for the specified Phase, a
suitable error message will be reported indicating that some harmonics need to be
activated before fluctuation can be applied.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable fluctuation of this phase’s current harmonics.
OFF or 0 will disable fluctuation of this phase’s current harmonics.
The query command will return 1 if the specified fluctuation is being applied, or 0 if
the specified fluctuation is inactive.
5-40
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FHARmonics:CLEar
This command clears the modulation of harmonics associated with this phase's current. It
does not have a query form.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FHARmonics:FLUCtuate<y>(?)<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns on/off the fluctuation of harmonic y on the Current channel of Phase
x.
The query command will return 1 if the specified harmonic is being fluctuated, or 0 if
the specified harmonic is not being fluctuated.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent: FHARmonics:ALL?
This query allows all the active harmonics to return their Fluctuation State as a comma
delimited string. The comma separated string will contain a value for each harmonic.
Inactive harmonics will always cause 0 to be returned.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent: FHARmonics:MODulation <dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s current channel fluctuating harmonics
modulation parameters. The first parameter is the modulation depth (expressed as a
percentage of the current waveform RMS amplitude). The second parameter is the
required modulation frequency (expressed in Hertz).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FHARmonics:MODulation? [<cpd>{DEPTh |
FREQuency}]
This query returns the modulation depth and frequency for the current channel of the
specified phase. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these values.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FHARmonics:SHAPe(?)
<cpd>{RECTangular|SINusoidal|SQUare}
This command selects the specified Phase’s Current channel fluctuating harmonics
modulation shape.
•
•
•
RECT will set the modulation waveform to be rectangular.
SIN will set the modulation waveform to be sinusoidal.
SQU will set the modulation waveform to be square.
The query command will return SIN if the modulation shape is sinusoidal etc.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FHARmonics:DUTY(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified Phase’s Current channel fluctuating harmonics duty
cycle value for rectangular modulation.
The query command will return the present duty cycle value. The returned number will
be in standard scientific format (10.55 would be returned as 1.055E1).
5-72. Interharmonics Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:IHARmonics:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s current channel interharmonics phenomena on
and off.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable interharmonics on this phase’s current channel.
OFF or 0 will disable interharmonics on this phase’s current channel.
The query command will return 1 if the inter-harmonics are applied, or 0 if the interharmonics are inactive.
5-41
6100A
Users Manual
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:IHARmonics:SIGNal<y>
<bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}[,<dnpd>,<dnpd>]
This command sets the specified interharmonics parameters. The <bool> parameter
controls whether the inter-harmonic is active or not. The two optional <dnpd> parameters
are numbers, which set the required amplitude (expressed in amps), and the required
frequency (expressed in Hertz). <y> specifies the interharmonic to be set since the
instrument is capable of producing 2 interharmonics simultaneously.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:IHARmonic:SIGNal<y>? [<cpd>{STATe |
AMPLitude | FREQuency}]
The default version of this query returns all of the settings of the specified interharmonic, comma separated. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of
these values.
5-73. Dip Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:DIP:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified Phase’s Current channel Dip phenomena on and off.
•
•
ON or 1 will set the specified Dip to be applied.
OFF or 0 will set the specified Dip to be removed.
The query command will return 1 if Dip is applied, or 0 if Dip is inactive.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:DIP:ENVelope
<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command sets the specified Phase’s current channel Dip parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
1st dnpd - ‘Change To’ value (expressed as a percentage of total RMS voltage).
2nd dnpd - ‘Ramp In’ period (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
3rd dnpd - ‘Duration’ (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
4th dnpd - ‘Ramp Out’ period (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
5th dnpd - 'End Delay' period (expressed in Seconds or Cycles).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:DIP:ENVelope? [<cpd>{CHANge | RIN | DURation
| ROUT | EDELay}]
The default version of this query returns the Dip Envelope settings for the specified
phase's current channel. Add the appropriate optional parameter to query just one of these
values:
CHANge
RIN
DURation
ROUT
EDELay
5-42
'Change To' value, expressed as a percentage of the total RMS Voltage
'Ramp In' period, expressed in Seconds or Cycles depending on the Dip Units setting
'Duration', expressed in Seconds or Cycles depending on the Dip Units setting
'Ramp Out' period, expressed in Seconds or Cycles depending on Dip Units setting
End Delay' period, expressed in Seconds or Cycles
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:DIP:TRIGger:INPut(?) <cpd>{ FREE | EONE |
EREPeat}
This command sets and queries the trigger mode used to determine the event that starts
the dip or swell.
•
•
•
FREE is used for free running dips/swells.
EONE is used to produce one dips/swell triggered from an external source.
EREPeat is used to produce continuous dips/swells triggered from an external source.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:DIP:TRIGger:HOLDoff (?)
<cpd>{PHASe|DELay},<dnpd>
This command selects sets and queries the hold-off before the dip/swell starts following a
trigger:
PHASe
The hold-off is an angle following the trigger point. In this case the delay ,<dnpd>, has units
of degrees or radians.
DELay
The hold-off is a time. In this case the delay ,<dnpd>, has units of seconds or cycles.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:DIP:TRIGger:ODELay(?)<dnpd>
This sets and queries the delay (in seconds or cycles) before the output trigger is
generated, following the completion of a dip or swell.
5-74. Flicker Phenomenon
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FLICker:STATe(?) <bool>{OFF|ON|0|1}
This command turns the specified phase’s current channel flicker phenomena on and off.
•
•
ON or 1 will enable flicker on this phase’s current channel.
OFF or 0 will disable flicker on this phase’s current channel.
The query command will return 1 if flicker is applied, or 0 if flicker is inactive.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FLICker:DEPTh(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s current channel flicker modulation depth.
The <dnpd> is a number, which sets the required modulation depth, expressed as a
percentage of the total RMS current signal.
The query command will return the present modulation depth value. The returned
number will be in standard scientific format (15.1% would be returned as 1.51E1).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FLICker:FREQuency(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified phase’s current channel flicker modulation frequency.
The <dnpd> is a number, which sets the required modulation frequency, expressed in Hz.
The query command will return the present modulation frequency value. The returned
number will be in standard scientific format (440.0Hz would be returned as 4.40E2).
5-43
6100A
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[SOURce]:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FLICKer:FREQuency:UNIT(?) <cpd> { HZ |
CPM }
This command selects the units for change rate:
•
Hz - will set the change rate to Hertz.
•
CPM - set the change rate to Changes per Minute.
The query command will return HZ or CPM.
Note: On changing the units, the change rate will return to its default value of 1 CPM or
0.5 Hz depending on the unit selected.
Note: The "UNIT:FLICker:CURRent:FREQuency(?) <cpd> {HZ|CPM}" command is
now depreciated as it only affects Channel 1.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FLICker:PST?
This query only command will return the present PST value. The returned number will
be in standard scientific format (1.82 would be returned as 1.82E0).
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FLICker:SHAPe(?)
<cpd>{RECTangular|SINusoidal|SQUare}
This command selects the specified phase’s current channel flicker modulation shape.
•
•
•
RECT will set the modulation waveform to be rectangular.
SIN will set the modulation waveform to be sinusoidal.
SQU will set the modulation waveform to be square.
The query command will return SIN if the modulation shape is sinusoidal etc.
SOURce:PHASe<x>:CURRent:FLICker:DUTY(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the specified Phase’s Current channel Flicker duty cycle value for
rectangular modulation.
The query command will return the present duty cycle value. The returned number will
be in standard scientific format (10.55 would be returned as 1.055E1).
5-75. Status Subsystem Command Details
This subsystem is used to enable bits in the Operation and Questionable Event registers.
The Operation and Questionable: Event, Enable and Condition registers can be
interrogated to determine their state.
STATus:OPERational [:EVENt]?
This command returns the contents of the Operation Event register, clearing the register.
The standard 6100A does not make use of this register, but additional hardware options
do, (for example, the energy counter/timer option), see the option chapter for details.
STATus:OPERational:ENABle(?) <dnpd>
This command sets or returns the mask which enables those Operation Event register bits
which are required to be summarized at bit 7 of the IEEE 488.2 Status Byte register.
5-44
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
STATus:OPERational:CONDition?
This query only command returns the contents of the Operation Condition register, which
is not cleared by the command. N. B. This register contains transient states, in that its bits
are not 'sticky', but are set and reset by the referred operations. The response to the query
therefore represents an instantaneous 'Snapshot' of the register state, at the time that the
query was accepted.
Normally the 6100A does not make use of this register, but future hardware options will,
(for example, the energy counter/timer option), see the option chapter for details.
STATus:QUEStionable [:EVENt]?
The 6100A does not set any bits in this register.
This command returns the contents of the Questionable Event register, clearing the
register.
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the mask which enables those Questionable Event register bits which
are required to be summarised at bit 3 of the IEEE 488.2 Status Byte register.
STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?
The 6100A does not set any bits in this register.
This query only command returns the contents of the Questionable Condition register
which is not cleared by the command. N. B. This register contains transient states, in that
its bits are not 'sticky', but are set and reset by the referred conditions. The response to the
query therefore represents an instantaneous 'Snapshot' of the register state, at the time that
the query was accepted.
STATus:PRESet
This is a SCPI mandated command. The intention behind mandating the STAT:PRES
command is to enable all bits in the SCPI defined 'device-dependent' and 'transition'
registers in order to provide a "device-independent structure for determining the gross
status of a device".
In the 6100A, the functions of the 'transition' registers are not required, so no access is
given. The PRES command therefore affects only the two device-dependent enabling
registers:
•
•
The Operation Event Enable register.
The Questionable Event Enable register.
Sending STAT:PRES will set true all bits in both Enable registers. This will enable all
bits in the two Event registers, so that all reportable device-dependent events, reported in
the two registers, will be capable of generating an SRQ; providing only that bits 3 and 7
in the IEEE 488.2 Status Byte Register are also enabled.
The use of STAT:PRES in the 6100A allows the status-reporting structure to be set to a
known state, not only for the intention of the SCPI mandate, but also to provide a known
starting point for application programmers.
5-45
6100A
Users Manual
5-76. System Subsystem Command Details
SYSTem:ERRor?
As errors in the 6100A are detected, they are placed in a 'first in, first out' queue, called
the 'Error Queue'. This queue conforms to the format described in the SCPI Command
Reference (Volume 2), although errors only are detected. Three kinds of errors are
reported in the Error Queue, in the sequence that they are detected:
Command errors, execution errors and device-dependent errors.
Queue Overflow
Any time the Error Queue overflows, the earliest errors remain in the queue, and the most
recent error is discarded. The latest error in the queue is replaced by the error:
-350,"Queue overflow".
Purpose of SYST:ERR? — Reading the Error Queue
This query is used to return any error that has reached the head of the Error Queue, and
delete the error from the queue. The Error Queue is first in / first out, so the returned
string will represent the earliest error in the queue.
The queue is read destructively as described in the SCPI Command Reference to obtain a
code number and error message. The query can be used successively to read errors in the
queue until it is empty, when the message 0,"No Error" will be returned.
The response is in the form of 'String Program Data', and consists of two elements: a code
number and error message.
SYSTem:DATE(?) <dnpd>,<dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command is used to change the date of the clock within the 6100A. The date format
is YYYY, MM, DD
The Query will return the presently programmed date YYYY, MM, DD.
SYSTem:TIME(?)<dnpd>,<dnpd>
This command changes the present time as recorded by the 6100A. Any new time will be
updated from a non-volatile real-time internal 24-hour clock.
A 24-hour clock format is used to set the time: HH, MM.
The Query will return the updated time at the moment the query was accepted as
HH,MM,SS.
SYSTem:VERSion?
The query only command returns an <Nr2> formatted numeric value corresponding to
the SCPI version number for which the 6100A complies. At the time of writing, this will
be 1999.0.
5-77. Unit Subsystem Command Details
UNIT:ANGLe(?) <cpd>{DEGrees|RADians}
This command sets the units to be used to express all instances of Phase Angle.
•
•
DEG will set the phase angle units to be Degrees.
RAD will set the phase angle units to be Radians.
The query command will return DEG if the units are set to Degrees, or RAD if the units
are set to Radians.
5-46
Remote Operation
SCPI Commands and Syntax
5
UNIT:MHARmonics:CURRurrent(?) <cpd>{PRMS|PFUN|DBF|ABS }
This command selects the specified harmonics amplitude units for current.
•
•
•
•
PRMS will set the units to be ‘Percentage of RMS Current' amplitude.
PFUN will set the units to be ‘Percentage of Fundamental' amplitude.
DBF will set the units to be ‘dB down from Fundamental' amplitude.
ABS will set the units to be ‘Absolute’ value.
The query command will return PRMS if the units are set to ‘Percentage of RMS
Current', etc.
UNIT:MHARmonics:VOLTage(?) <cpd>{PRMS|PFUN|DBF|ABS}
This command selects the specified harmonics amplitude units for voltage.
•
•
•
•
PRMS will set the units to be ‘Percentage of RMS Voltage' amplitude.
PFUN will set the units to be ‘Percentage of Fundamental' amplitude.
DBF will set the units to be ‘dB down from Fundamental' amplitude.
ABS will set the units to be ‘Absolute’ value.
The query command will return PRMS if the units are set to ‘percentage of RMS
voltage', etc.
UNIT:DIP:TIME(?) <cpd>{SEConds|CYCLes}
This command selects the units used for time, when specifying dip parameters.
•
•
SEC will set the Dip time units to be seconds.
CYCL will set the Dip time units to be cycles.
The query command will return SEC if the Dip time units are set to seconds etc.
UNIT:FLICker:CURRent:FREQuency(?) <cpd> {HZ|CPM}
This command selects the units for change rate when specifying flicker parameters for
current:
• HZ will set the change rate to Hertz.
• CPM will set the change rate to Changes Per Minute
The query command will return HZ or CPM.
UNIT:FLICker:VOLTage:FREQuency(?) <cpd> {HZ|CPM}
This command selects the units for change rate when specifying flicker parameters for
voltage:
•
•
HZ will set the change rate to Hertz.
CPM will set the change rate to Changes per Minute.
The query command will return HZ or CPM.
5-47
6100A
Users Manual
5-78. Common Commands and Queries
5-79. Clear Status
This measurement event status data structure conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard
requirements for this structure.
Figure 5-4. Clear Status
∗CLS clears all the event registers and queues except the output queue.
The output queue and MAV bit will be cleared if ∗CLS immediately follows a 'Program
Message Terminator'; refer to the IEEE 488.2 standard document.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-80. Event Status Enable
This event status data structure conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements for
this structure.
Figure 5-5. Event Status Enable
∗ESE enables the standard defined event bits, which will generate a summary message in
the status byte.
Nrf is a Decimal Numeric Data Element representing an integer decimal value equivalent
to the Hex value required to enable the appropriate bits in this 8 bit register. The detailed
definition is contained in the IEEE 488.2 standard document. Note that numbers will be
rounded to an integer.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-48
Remote Operation
Common Commands and Queries
5
5-81. Recall Event Status Enable
This event status data structure conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements for
this structure.
Figure 5-6. Event Status Enable Query
Execution Errors:
None
Power On and Reset Conditions
The Power On condition depends on the condition stored by the common ∗PSC
command if 0 then it is not cleared; if 1 then the register is cleared. Reset has no effect.
*ESE? recalls the enable mask for the standard defined events.
Response Decode:
The value returned, when converted to base 2 (binary), identifies the enabled bits which
will generate a summary message in the service request byte, for this data structure. The
detailed definition is contained in the IEEE 488.2 document.
5-82. Read Event Status Register
This event status data structure conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements for
this structure.
Figure 5-7. Event Status Register Query
*ESR? recalls the standard defined events.
Response Decode:
The value returned, when converted to base 2 (binary), identifies the bits as defined in the
IEEE 488.2 standard.
Execution Errors:
None
5-49
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Users Manual
5-83. *IDN? (Instrument Identification)
This command conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements.
Figure 5-8. Instrument Identification
∗IDN? will recall the instrument’s manufacturer, model number, serial number and
firmware level.
Response Format:
Character position
Fluke Ltd,6100A,XXXXXXXXXXXX,X.XX
Where:
The data contained in the response consists of four comma-separated fields, the last two
of which are instrument-dependent. The data element type is defined in the IEEE 488.2
standard specification.
Response Decode:
The data contained in the four fields is organized as follows:
•
•
•
•
First field - manufacturer.
Second field - model.
Third field - serial number.
Fourth field - firmware level (will possibly vary from one instrument to another).
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-84. Operation Complete
This command conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements.
Figure 5-9. Operation Complete
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
*OPC is a synchronization command which will generate an operation complete message
in the standard Event Status Register when all pending operations are complete.
5-50
Remote Operation
Common Commands and Queries
5
5-85. Operation Complete?
This query conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements.
Figure 5-10. Operation Complete Query
Response Decode:
The value returned is always 1, which is placed in the output queue when all pending
operations are complete.
5-86. Recall the instrument Hardware Fitment
This command conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements.
Figure 5-11. Option Query
∗OPT? recalls the instrument’s hardware configuration.
Response Format:
The data in the response consists of eight comma-separated values, one for each channel.
These values are a binary weighted to indicate which options are fitted.
Response Decode:
The data element type is Nr1 as defined in the IEEE 488.2 standard specification.
A list of comma delimited Nr1 values represent the installed options per channel. This list
is terminated by a newline with EOI character:
Phase1 V, Phase 1 I, Phase 2 V, Phase 2 I, Phase 3 V, Phase 3 I, Neutral V, Neutral I
A bit weighted number represents the (optional) hardware included with a channel.
• Bit 0
80A current option has been fitted.
• Bit 1
The bandwidth current option has been fitted.
• Bit 2
The energy timer/counter option has been fitted.
• Bit 3
The 50mR shunt upgrade has been fitted.
• Bit 4
The version II energy timer/counter option has been fitted.
• Bit 5
The 20 MHz reference clock out option has been fitted.
• Bit 6-7
Unused
For example, a 6100A and a 6101A, the latter having 80A and bandwidth option would
report “ 0,0,0,3,0,0,0,0”.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
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5-87. Power-On Status Clear
This common command conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements.
Figure 5-12. Power On Status Clear
∗PSC sets the flag controlling the clearing of defined registers at Power On.
Nrf is a decimal numeric value which, when rounded to an integer value of zero, sets the
power on clear flag false. This allows the instrument to assert SRQ at power on,
providing that the PON bit in the ESR is enabled at the time of power down, by the
corresponding bit in its Enable register (ESE).
When the value rounds to an integer value other than zero it sets the power on clear flag
true, which clears the standard event status enable and service request enable registers so
that the instrument will not assert an SRQ on power up.
Examples:
∗PSC 0 or ∗PSC 0.173 sets the instrument to assert an SRQ at Power On.
∗PSC 1 or ∗PSC 0.773 sets the instrument to not assert an SRQ on Power On.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-88. Recall Power On Status Clear Flag
This common query conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements. The existing flag
condition will have been determined by the ∗PSC command.
Figure 5-13. Power On Status Clear Query
∗PSC? will recall the Power On Status condition.
Response Format:
A single ASCII character is returned.
Response Decode:
The value returned identifies the state of the saved flag:
Zero indicates false. The instrument is not programmed to clear the Standard Event
Status Enable Register and Service Request Enable Register at power PO, so the
instrument will generate a 'power on' SRQ, providing that the PON bit in the ESR is
enabled at the time of power-down, by the corresponding bit in its Enable register (ESE).
One indicates true. The instrument is programmed to clear the Standard Event Status
Enable Register and Service Request Enable Register at power on, so the instrument
cannot generate any SRQ at power on.
5-52
Remote Operation
Common Commands and Queries
5
Execution Errors:
None
Power On and Reset Conditions
No change. This data is saved in non-volatile memory at power off, for use at power on.
5-89. Reset
Figure 5-14. Reset
*RST will reset the instrument to a defined condition, stated for each applicable
command with the command's description, and listed in 'Device Settings at Power On'.
The reset condition is not dependent on past use history of the instrument except as noted
below:
∗RST does not affect the following:
•
•
•
•
The selected address of the instrument.
Calibration data that affect specifications.
SRQ mask conditions.
The state of the IEEE 488.1 interface.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-90. Service Request Enable
This Status Byte data structure conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements for this
structure.
Figure 5-15. Service Request Enable
*SRE enables the standard and user defined summary bits in the service request byte,
which will generate a service request.
Nrf is a Decimal Numeric Data Element representing an integer decimal value equivalent
to the Hex value required to enable the appropriate bits in this 8 bit register. The detail
definition is contained in the IEEE 488.2 document.
Note that numbers will be rounded to an integer.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-53
6100A
Users Manual
5-91. Recall Service Request Enable
This Status Byte data structure conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements for this
structure.
Figure 5-16. Service Request Enable Query
*SRE? recalls the enable mask for the standard defined events.
Response Decode:
The value returned, when converted to base 2 (binary), identifies the enabled bits that
will generate a service request. The detail is contained in the IEEE 488.2 standard
document.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
The Power On condition depends on the condition stored by the common ∗PSC
command if 0 then it is not cleared. If 1 then the register is cleared. Reset has no effect.
5-92. Read Service Request Register
This Status Byte data structure conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements for this
structure.
*STB? recalls the service request register for summary bits.
Figure 5-17. Status Byte Query
Response Decode:
The value returned, when converted to base 2 (binary), identifies the summary bits for the
current status of the data structures involved. For the detail definition see the IEEE 488.2
standard document. There is no method of clearing this byte directly. Its condition relies
on the clearing of the overlying status data structure.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-54
Remote Operation
Common Commands and Queries
5
5-93. Test Operations — Full Selftest
This query conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements.
Figure 5-18. Test Query
*TST? executes a Full selftest. A response is generated after the test is completed.
N. B. Operational selftest is valid only at temperatures: 23 ° C ± 10 ° C.
Response Decode:
The value returned identifies pass or failure of the operational selftest:
•
ZERO indicates operational selftest complete with no errors detected.
•
Non zero indicates operational selftest has failed. The number itself represents the
number of test failures.
The failure codes can be found only by re-running the self-test manually.
Execution Errors:
Operational selftest is not permitted when calibration is successfully enabled.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-94. Wait
This command conforms to the IEEE 488.2 standard requirements.
Figure 5-19. Wait
*WAI prevents the instrument from executing any further commands or queries until the
No Pending Operations Flag is set true. This is a mandatory command for IEEE-488.2
but has little relevance to this instrument as there are no parallel processes requiring
Pending Operation Flags.
Execution Errors:
None.
Power On and Reset Conditions
Not applicable.
5-55
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Users Manual
5-95. Device settings after *RST
5-96. Introduction
*RST will reset the instrument to a defined condition, stated for each applicable command.
The reset condition is not dependent on past use history of the instrument except as noted
below:
*RST does not affect the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The selected address of the instrument.
Calibration data that affect specifications.
SRQ mask conditions.
The state of the IEEE 488.1 interface.
The Error Queue.
The Power on Status Clear flag setting.
The contents of:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The Status Byte Register.
The Status Byte Enable Register.
The Standard Event Status Register.
The Standard Event Status Enable Register.
The SCPI Operation Status Register.
The SCPI Operation Status Enable Register.
The SCPI Questionable Status Register.
The SCPI Questionable Status Enable Register.
∗RST enforces the following states:
•
•
The instrument is returned to 'Operation Complete Command Idle State' (OCIS).
The instrument is returned to 'Operation Complete Query Idle State' (OQIS.
Settings Related to Common IEEE 488.2 Commands are as detailed in 'Common Commands
and Queries':
•
•
•
5-56
The 'Enable Macro Command' (∗EMC) is not used in the instrument.
The 'Define Device Trigger Command' (∗DDT) is not used in the instrument.
Parallel Poll is not implemented in the instrument.
Remote Operation
Device Settings at POWER ON
5
5-97. Device Settings at POWER ON
5-98. General
Active Mode: The instrument powers up in 'manual' mode.
Device I/D (Serial Number).
Factory serial number preserved.
Status Reporting Conditions:
Status Byte Register.
Status Byte Enable Register.
Event Status Register.
Event Status Enable Register.
Operation Status Event Register.
Operation Status Enable Register.
Questionable Status Event Register.
Questionable Status Enable Register.
Error Queue.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Depends on state of *PSC.
Empty until first error is detected.
5-99. Power-On Settings Related to Common IEEE 488.2 Commands
Program Coding
Condition
*CLS
Not applicable
*ESE Nrf
Not applicable
*ESE?
Response depends on state of *PSC
*ESR?
Response depends on state of *PSC
*IDN?
Not applicable
*OPC
Not applicable
*OPC?
Not applicable
*PSC
0/ 1 Not applicable
*PSC?
No change. This data is saved at power off for use at power on.
*PUD
Data area remains unchanged
*PUD?
Data area remains unchanged
*RST
Not applicable
*SRE Nrf
Not applicable
*SRE?
Response depends on state of *PSC
*STB?
Response depends on state of *PSC
*TST?
Not applicable
*WAI
Not applicable
5-57
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Users Manual
5-100. *RST Settings Related to Common IEEE 488.2 Commands
Program Coding
5-58
Condition
*CLS
Not applicable
*ESE Nrf
Not applicable
*ESE?
Previous state preserved
*ESR?
Previous state preserved
*IDN?
No Change
*OPC
OPIC state forced
*OPC?
OPIQ state forced
*OPT?
Not applicable
*PSC
0/ 1 Not applicable
*PSC?
No change.
*PUD
Data area remains unchanged
*PUD?
Data area remains unchanged
*SRE Nrf
Not applicable
*SRE?
Previous state preserved
*STB?
Previous state preserved
*TST?
Not applicable
*WAI
Not applicable
Remote Operation
Device Settings at POWER ON
5
5-101. *RST Settings Related to SCPI Commands
Setting
Value following *RST
OUTPut
:STATe
OFF
ROSCillator
:STATe
OFF
:SENSe
Last set manually
:DEFer
:STATe
OFF
:OUTPut
:RAMP
Unchanged
:RCLock
0.0
:VOLTage
0.0
:NLIMit
Unchanged
SOURce
:FREQuency
Last set manually
:LINE
OFF
:PHASe<x>
:VOLTage
:STATe
OFF
:RANGe
11,168
:AMPLitude
110
:MHARmonics
:STATe
OFF
:HARMonic<y>
Harmonic 1
100%
Harmonic 2 – 100
0%
:FHARmonics
:STATe
OFF
:FLUCtuate<y>
Harmonic 1 – 100
:MODulation
Depth
0.0%
Frequency
10.0 Hz
:SHAPe
OFF
SINusoidal
:IHARmonics
:STATe
:SIGNal<y>
OFF
State
OFF
Amplitude
0.0%
Frequency
33 Hz
:DIP
:STATe
:ENVelope
OFF
Change to
10.0%
Ramp In
0.0001 seconds
Period
0.001 seconds
Ramp Out
0.0001 seconds
End Delay
0.0 seconds
TRIGger:
INPut:
FREE
5-59
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Users Manual
Setting
Value following *RST
HOLDoff:
DEL, 0.0
ODELay:
0.0
:FLICker
:STATe
OFF
:FREQuency
13.5 Hz
:DEPTh
0.402
:SHAPe
SQUare
:EFLicker
[:STATe](?)
0 or ‘OFF’
:CONFiguration(?)
‘PF’
:HSIDeband
:HARMonic(?)
3
:PJUMp
:SPERiod(?)
‘OFF’
:ANGLe(?)
30.0
:CURRent
:STATe
OFF
:RANGe
0.1 1
:AMPLitude
0.5
:UNIT?
CURR
:MHARmonics
[:STATe](?)
OFF
:HARMonic<y>
Harmonic 1
100%
Harmonic 2 – 100
0%
:FHARmonics
:STATe
OFF
:FLUCtuate<y>
Harmonic 1 – 100
:MODulation
Depth
0.0%
Frequency
10.0 Hz
:SHAPe
OFF
SINusoidal
:IHARmonics
:STATe
:SIGNal<y>
OFF
State
OFF
Amplitude
0.0%
Frequency
33 Hz
:DIP
:STATe
:ENVelope
OFF
Change to
10.0%
Ramp In
0.0001 seconds
Period
0.001 seconds
Ramp Out
0.0001 seconds
End Delay
0.0 seconds
TRIGger:
5-60
INPut:
FREE
HOLDoff:
DEL, 0.0
ODELay:
0.0
Remote Operation
Worked examples
Setting
5
Value following *RST
:FLICker
:STATe
OFF
:FREQuency
13.5 Hz
:DEPTh
0.402
:SHAPe
SQUare
:UNIT
:ANGLe
Last set manually
:MHARmonics
:CURRent
Last set manually
:VOLTage
Last set manually
:TIME
Last set manually.
:DIP
:FLICker
:CURRent
Last set manually.
:VOLTage
Last set manually.
5-102. Worked examples
Examples summary:
• Example 1
Create a pure AC voltage signal.
• Example 2
Create an AC voltage signal with 2nd harmonic destortion.
• Example 3
Create an AC voltage signal with fluctuating 2nd harmonic destortion.
• Example 4
Create an AC current signal with flicker.
• Example 5
Create an AC voltage signal with multiple harmonic destortion and
phase shifts.
• Example 6
Clear harmonics.
• Example 7
Create an AC multichannel signal.
• Example 8
Create an AC multiphase signal.
• Example 9
Create a pure DC voltage signal.
• Example 10 Create an AC voltage signal with a DC offset.
• Example 11 Create a pure DC voltage signal using SCPI tree-walked method.
Example 1.
Configure a master unit to output a sinusoidal signal of 60 Hz, 115 V RMS, containing
no sub-harmonics or aberrations, and no phase shifts.
Setting UNIT:MHAR:VOLT (main harmonics units) to ABS (absolute) will allow the
amplitude value to be entered directly in volts:
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
Use abs units for voltage harmonics.
UNIT:MHAR:VOLT ABS
5-61
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Users Manual
Setup Phase 1 (master) voltage range.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 23,336
Fundamental amplitude and angle.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM1 115,0
Setup the fundamental frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 60
Enable voltage output on this phase.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 2.
Configure a master unit to output a sinusoidal signal of 60 Hz, 115 V RMS, containing
no aberrations, and no phase shifts.
Add a 2ND Harmonic component of 10 V RMS, 0° Phase angle to the waveform.
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
Use abs units for voltage harmonics.
UNIT:MHAR:VOLT ABS
Setup Phase 1 (master) voltage range.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 23,336
Fundamental amplitude and angle.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM1 115,0
Set amplitude (in absolute units).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM2 10,0
Setup the fundamental frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 60
Enable voltage output on this phase.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 3.
Fluctuate the 2nd Harmonic with a 25Hz, sinewave at 30% amplitude.
Ensure output is off .
OUTP:STAT OFF
Clear any modulation in progress.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:FHAR:CLE
Select the harmonic to fluctuate.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:FHAR:FLUC2 ON
Set fluctuation wave shape to sine.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:FHAR:SHAP SIN
Set fluctuation.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:FHAR:MOD 30,25
Enable fluctuating harmonics.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:FHAR:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 4.
In a similar way, a 1A, 60Hz Current Output with 20%, 25Hz Sinewave Flicker can be
produced:
5-62
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
Set units to absolute.
UNIT:MHAR:CURR ABS
Setup phase 1 (master) current range.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:RANG 0.2,2
Remote Operation
Worked examples
Set amplitude (in absolute units).
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:MHAR:HARM1 1,0
Setup frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 60
Set flicker wave shape to sine.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:FLIC:SHAP SIN
Set flicker frequency.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:FLIC:FREQ 25
Set flicker depth.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:FLIC:DEPT 20
Enable flicker.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:FLIC:STAT ON
Enable current output (phase 1).
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
5
Example 5.
This example shows how to setup a fundamental and the 3rd and 5th harmonics.
The fundamental is set to 110V, 60Hz, the 3rd harmonic to 10V with 0° phase angle, and
the 5th harmonic to 5V with a 90° phase angle.
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
Ensure output is off.
OUTP:STAT OFF
Set units to absolute.
UNIT:MHAR:VOLT ABS
Setup frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 60
Setup phase 1 (master) voltage range.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 23,336
Set amplitude (in absolute units).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM1 110,0
Set amplitudes and phases of harm 3.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM3 10,0
Set amplitudes and phases of harm 5.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM5 5,90
Enable main harmonics.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:STAT ON
Enable voltage output (phase 1).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 6.
The harmonics in the previous example can be cleared before setting up new parameters
so that they do not interfere with any new setup. This can be a useful approach, if a full
*RST is not convenient.
Note: This will also clear the fundamental.
Clear all the harmonics.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:CLE
Example 7.
This example shows how to setup a 110 VRMS 60Hz voltage output from the voltage
terminals and a 1A, 60 Hz current output from the current terminals. The current output
lags the voltage output by 90°.
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
5-63
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Users Manual
Ensure Output is off.
OUTP:STAT OFF
Set voltage units to absolute.
UNIT:MHAR:VOLT ABS
Set current units to absolute.
UNIT:MHAR:CURR ABS
Setup frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 60
Setup phase 1 (master) voltage range.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 23,336
Set Amplitude (in absolute units).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM1 110,0
Setup phase 1 (master) current range.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:RANG 0.2,2
Set amplitude and phase.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:MHAR:HARM1 1,-90
Enable voltage output.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT ON
Enable current output.
SOUR:PHAS1:CURR:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 8.
The previous example can be duplicated using a master unit to produce the voltage and an auxiliary
unit to produce the current.
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
Ensure output is off.
OUTP:STAT OFF
Disable voltage output (master).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT OFF
Disable current output (auxiliary).
SOUR:PHAS2:CURR:STAT OFF
Setup Frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 100
Setup phase 1 (master) voltage range.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 23,414
Set amplitude (in absolute units).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM1 110,0
Setup phase 2 (aux) current range.
SOUR:PHAS2:CURR:RANG 0.2,2
Set amplitude and phase.
SOUR:PHAS2:CURR:MHAR:HARM1 1,-90
Enable voltage output.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT ON
Enable current output.
SOUR:PHAS2:CURR:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 9.
Configure a master unit to output a pure 5V DC signal. Note that as DC is treated by the
6100A as the 0th harmonic of a fundamental frequency, that frequency must be defined
even when as in this case, the fundamental has zero amplitude.
Also note that previously enabled phenomena e.g., dip or interharmonic etc. would
remain enabled if the *RST was not commanded.
5-64
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
Use abs units for voltage harmonics.
UNIT:MHAR:VOLT ABS
Remote Operation
Worked examples
Setup Phase 1 (master) voltage range.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 1.1,16
Enable main harmonics (needed for DC).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:STAT ON
RMS amplitude (to remove fundemetal).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:AMPL 0
DC amplitude (will calculate new RMS).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM0 5,0
Setup the fundamental frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 60
Enable voltage output on this phase.
5
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT ON
Set output to on (all phases).
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 10.
Configure a master unit to output an AC signal of 60 Hz, 10 V RMS, with a 5V DC
offset, containing no aberrations.
Reset all parameters to a known state.
*RST
Use % rms mode to easily calculate offset. UNIT:MHAR:VOLT PRMS
Setup Phase 1 (master) voltage range.
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 1.1,16
Enable main harmonics (needed for DC).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:STAT ON
RMS amplitude (to remove fundemetal).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:AMPL 10
DC amplitude (will calculate new RMS).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:MHAR:HARM0 50,0
Setup the fundamental frequency.
SOUR:FREQ 60
Enable voltage output on this phase.
Set output to on (all phases).
SOUR:PHAS1:VOLT:STAT ON
OUTP:STAT ON
Example 11.
This example creates the same output as example 9 (a pure 5V DC signal), but using
SCPI tree walking, and avoiding *RST.
:FREQ 60;:UNIT:MHAR:VOLT ABS;:PHAS1:VOLT:RANG 1.1,16;STATE
ON;MHAR:STAT ON;AMPL 0;CLE;HARM0 5,0;:OUTP ON
5-65
6100A
Users Manual
5-66
Chapter 6
Operator Maintenance
Title
6-1.
6-2.
6-3.
6-4.
6-5.
6-6.
6-7.
Introduction.............................................................................................
Confidence Test ......................................................................................
Setting up and running the Confidence Test ......................................
Changing the user password ...................................................................
Accessing the Fuse..................................................................................
Cleaning the Air Filter ............................................................................
Lithium Battery Replacement .................................................................
Page
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-4
6-4
6-6
6-8
6-1
6100A
Users Manual
6-2
Operator Maintenance
Introduction
6
6-1. Introduction
This chapter explains how to perform the routine user maintenance required to keep your
6100A Power Standard in optimal operating condition. The topics covered in this chapter
include the following.
•
Changing the user password
•
Running the Confidence Test
•
Replacing the fuse
•
Cleaning the air filter and external surfaces
Calibration is discussed in chapter 7
6-2. Confidence Test
The Confidence Test provides an indication that instrument performance has not
deteriorated significantly. The test for connected 6101A Auxiliary units is run from the
6100A Master instrument. The test is not designed to be used to determine service
intervals as the measurements made are relatively crude compared with those that would
be made at routine calibration and adjustment.
Note: Some temperature (Pic) tests may report percentage error of 100% but this is
normal and should not be of concern
6-3.
Setting up and running the Confidence Test
Navigate key to the Waveform menu with the Select Menu key. If necessary press ESC
until the top level softkey menu is displayed, see figure 6-1.
Select Support Functions, Diagnostic tools, and enter the user password (see 6-4 ).
The softkeys associated with the Self Test pop-up menu allow you to:
•
Select which channels to test i.e., L1 Voltage, L1 Current ... N Current.
•
Chose which channel sub-components to test, i.e., all boards, the DSP board, the
control board or the first or second slave boards.
•
Start the self test.
•
Save the test results to floppy disc.
Once the test required regime has been set up, press Start Self Test to initiate the test.
Remember, when navigating the various menus, the ESC key takes you up through the
softkey hierarchy.
When the test is complete a summary report is presented in the Self Test menu.
The Test Pathway menu allows more detailed diagnosis of test results but this is
essentially a tool provided for service centers. Although the Test Pathway facilities are
available, a detailed description is not provided here as the technical content is beyond
the scope of this manual.
6-3
6100A
Users Manual
6-4. Changing the user password
Navigate key to the Waveform menu with the Select Menu key. If necessary press ESC
until the top level softkey menu is displayed.
Figure 6-1. Waveform menu top level softkeys
Select Support Functions, Diagnostic tools, and enter the user password. The default
password when the 6100A is first shipped is “12321”.
Select Change Password to display the “change the calibration password...” pop-up menu.
Enter the existing password, the new password and the new password again. Press Enter
to change the password (or ESC to cancel the operation).
6-5. Accessing the Fuse
The power fuse is accessible from the rear panel.
XWWARNING
Before attempting to access the power fuse, ensure that the
6100A Electrical Power Standard is switched off at the rear
mounted on/off switch and disconnected by removing the line
power cord from the power input socket.
To access the fuse, proceed as follows:
1. Disconnect line power.
2. Using a standard screwdriver, turn the fuse holder counterclockwise until the cap and
fuse are disengaged.
Always replace with the approved fuse shown below
6-4
Fluke part number and description:
1998159
T15AH 250V 32mm
Fuse manufacturer and part number:
Bussmann
MDA-15
Operator Maintenance
Accessing the Fuse
6
Figure 6-2. Rear Panel Showing Fuse
6-5
6100A
Users Manual
6-6. Cleaning the Air Filter
WCaution
Damage caused by overheating may occur if the area around
the fan is restricted, the intake air is too warm, or the air filter
becomes clogged.
The air filter must be removed and cleaned at least every 30
days or more frequently if the 6100A Power Standard is
operated in a dusty environment. The air filter is accessible
from the rear panel of the 6100A Power Standard.
To clean the air filter, refer to Figure 6-3 and proceed as follows:
1. Disconnect line power.
2. The air filter is accessible from the rear of the unit. If the unit is sited on a bench,
ensure that there is 24 inch clearance at the rear of the unit to allow you to withdraw
the filter.
3. Remove the filter by unscrewing the 2 knurled screws at the top and the bottom of the
vertical panel that secure the air filter. Pull the filter out of the unit.
4. Clean the filter by washing it in soapy water. Rinse and dry it thoroughly before
reinstalling.
5. Reinstall the filter and tighten the knurled screws.
6-6
Operator Maintenance
Cleaning the Air Filter
6
Figure 6-3. Air Filter Access
6-7
6100A
Users Manual
6-7. Lithium Battery Replacement
The PC within this instrument is fitted with a lithium battery (3V, 180mAH, CR2023
coin cell). Battery life should exceed 10 years. After this the PC setup and date
information may be lost. The battery should be replaced with a UL approved equivalent
by Fluke authorized technical personnel
6-8
Chapter 7
Calibration
Title
7-1.
7-2.
7-3.
7-4.
7-5.
7-6.
7-7.
7-8.
7-9.
7-10.
7-11.
7-12.
7-13.
7-14.
7-15.
7-16.
7-17.
7-18.
7-19.
7-20.
7-21.
7-22.
7-23.
7-24.
7-25.
7-26.
7-27.
7-28.
7-29.
7-30.
7-31.
Calibration methods ................................................................................
Amplitude measurements ...................................................................
Phase measurement.............................................................................
The effect of phase uncertainty on power accuracy ...........................
Calibration uncertainties for full accuracy..............................................
Voltage amplitude calibration uncertainty required ...........................
Current amplitude calibration uncertainty required............................
Phase calibration uncertainty required ...............................................
Equipment required.................................................................................
Overview of 6100A signal generation ....................................................
Independence of 6100A and 6101A ...................................................
The Fluke service center calibration system ...........................................
Characteristics of the calibration system ............................................
Transducers ....................................................................................
DMM amplitude error contributions ..............................................
DMM amplitude phase contributions.............................................
Voltage to voltage phase uncertainty .............................................
Current to voltage phase uncertainty..............................................
Overview of adjustment..........................................................................
Calibration adjustment process ...............................................................
Entering calibration mode ..................................................................
Select instrument configuration .....................................................
Determine the 6100A/6101A error ................................................
Initiate the adjustment ....................................................................
Return Calibration switch to Normal .............................................
Verification ....................................................................................
Calibration adjustment verification record .............................................
Voltage adjustment points ..................................................................
Current adjustment points...................................................................
Current adjustment points for 80A option (if fitted) ..........................
Voltage from current terminals adjustment points .............................
Page
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-4
7-4
7-4
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-6
7-8
7-10
7-10
7-10
7-11
7-11
7-11
7-11
7-12
7-12
7-13
7-13
7-14
7-14
7-14
7-15
7-15
7-16
7-17
7-17
7-1
6100A
Users Manual
7-2
Calibration
Calibration methods
7
7-1. Calibration methods
7-2.
Amplitude measurements
Rigorous type testing of the 6100A has shown that when the phase and gain of each
voltage or current channel are correctly adjusted, all other specifications will be met.
Consequently, calibration of 6100A/6101A can be achieved with sinusoidal signals.
Users should be aware however that the 6100A is optimized for use with sampling
measurement instruments. Some RMS sensing meters have AC input bandwidths of
many MHz and cannot reject non-harmonic components. As a result, this type of
instrument may report amplitude values different from those obtained by sampling
techniques. Sampling systems using Fourier Analysis have the advantage of extracting
the signal of interest from noise and also yield accurate phase information.
7-3.
Phase measurement
Potentially there are many ways of measuring amplitude and phase between Electrical
Power Standard output channels. The amplitude of voltage and current can be
determined independently but measurement of phase angle requires some form of
comparison to be made. Comparing the current and voltage outputs of a 6100A with a
zero crossing detection phase meter would provide phase information for that unit. But
there are two disadvantages to this method.
•
Comparison of the zero crossing of two signals is subject to noise at the zero crossing
points; whereas sampling techniques get information from at least two points on the
waveform.
•
Measuring only the phase angle between voltage and current of a single unit does not
allow independence of 6100A and 6101A calibration. Each 6101A auxiliary unit
would need to be calibrated with its Master 6100A unit for voltage to voltage
information.
If these disadvantages are acceptable for the calibration of a 6100A then phase
uncertainties in the order of 0.050 degrees are possible with zero detection phase meters.
Note that zero detection phase meters may give erroneous results in the presence of even
harmonics because even harmonics can cause the zero crossing of a composite waveform
to differ from the notional fundamental frequency zero crossing. . Sampling techniques,
on the other hand, can give phase uncertainties as low as 0.0008 degrees and are not
susceptible to other harmonics affecting the measurement.
7-4.
The effect of phase uncertainty on power accuracy
As power = V.I.Cos(A), the contribution from phase angle accuracy can be shown with
the following example:
If phase accuracy is ±0.05°, at nominal PF = 0.5, Cos(A) could vary between Cos(59.95)
and Cos(60.05) i.e., 0.5008 to 0.4992. This represents a range of
0.5008 − 0.4992
*100% = 0.3%
0. 5
If Φ is the set phase angle and u (φ ) is the phase accuracy, the general case of phase
accuracy contribution to power accuracy u(P) is given by:
u ( P ) = (1 −
cos( Φ + u (φ )
cos( Φ )
) × 100 %
Table 7-1 shows how phase uncertainty affects power accuracy at different power factors.
7-3
6100A
Users Manual
Table 7-1. The contribution of phase uncertainty to power accuracy
Phase uncertainty
PF = 1.0
PF = 0.75
PF = 0.5
PF = 0.25
0.0008°
±0.000%
±0.001%
±0.002%
±0.005%
0.050°
±0.000%
±0.077%
±0.151%
±0.338%
7-5. Calibration uncertainties for full accuracy
The uncertainties of measurement required to achieve the full specification of the 6100A
are below. Lower accuracy equipment can be used but at the expense of 6100A accuracy.
The calibration uncertainties stated are at 95% confidence probability.
7-6.
Voltage amplitude calibration uncertainty required
ppm of Range
7-7.
1V to 1008 V, 16 Hz to 450 Hz
< 30
1V to 1008 V, 450 Hz to 6 kHz
< 120
1V to 1008 V, 6 kHz to 9kHz
< 1%
Current amplitude calibration uncertainty required
ppm of Range
7-8.
0.25 A to 5 A, 16 Hz to 450 Hz
< 33
5 A to 10A, 16 Hz to 450 Hz
< 40
10 A to 20 A , 16 Hz to 450 Hz
< 45
0.25 A to 10 A, 450 Hz to 6 kHz
< 125
10 A to 20 A , 450 Hz to 6 kHz
< 160
0.25 A to 20 A, 6 kHz to 9 kHz
< 1%
Phase calibration uncertainty required
Phase measurement uncertainty
7-4
Frequency
Current to voltage
Voltage to voltage
16 Hz – 69 Hz
0.0008°
0.002°
69 Hz – 180 Hz
0.0013°
0.005°
180 Hz – 450 Hz
0.0038°
0.014°
450 Hz – 3 kHz
0.0375°
0.098°
3 kHz – 6 kHz
0.0750°
0.195°
Calibration
Equipment required
7
7-9. Equipment required
Two lists of equipment are provided, for two different methods of calibrating the 6100A.
The “Fluke method” is used within the Fluke Service Centers, and has measurement
uncertainties which support the full specifications of the 6100A
Two lists of equipment are provided. The alternative, non-Fluke service centre method
will not achieve full 6100A specified accuracy, particularly for phase and power
accuracy. You should perform your own uncertainty analysis if using alternative
methods.
Table 7-2. Calibration methods
Measurement
Fluke method
Alternative
System control
MET/CAL®
Manual control or custom
automation
Sampling
Fluke HP3458A/HFL with
memory extension option in
DC sampling mode.
Additional analysis software
Sampling measurement device
with appropriate analysis
software
Voltage amplitude
transducers
AC voltage divider set with
small, known phase
displacement errors
AC voltage dividers as
required
Current amplitude
transducers
AC current shunts with small,
known phase displacement
errors
AC current shunts as required
Voltage to phase
reference signal
phase angle
Derived from voltage
amplitude measurements
Custom design or use voltage
to current phase measurement
Current to phase
reference signal
phase angle
Derived from current
amplitude measurements
Custom design or use voltage
to current phase measurement
Voltage to current
phase angle
Not required
Clarke-hess model 6000 phase
meter or similar plus suitable
shunts
7-5
6100A
Users Manual
7-10. Overview of 6100A signal generation
An overview of the 6100A signal generation system will aid further discussion off the
Fluke method of calibration.
An Electrical Power Standard ‘system’ consists of a 6100A to provide a single phase of
voltage and current plus up to three 6101A auxiliaries. The voltage and current channels
are independent of each other for amplitude but are linked by a common internal ‘Phase
Reference’ signal. Calibration adjustment of 6100A phase at manufacture is
implemented independently on voltage and current channels by referring them to the
‘Phase Reference’.
An understanding of the way the 6100A Electrical Power Standard generates its output
signals will aid discussion of calibration methods.
7-11. Independence of 6100A and 6101A
Adding up to three 6101A Auxiliary units provides additional phases. Each 6101A
Auxiliary stores its own calibration constants but is configured and calibrated via a
6100A. The 6100A Master unit provides its ‘Phase Reference’ signal to its 6101A
Auxiliaries thus linking the phase of all output channels.
Because the phase of all signals is derived from the same, common Phase Reference, the
calibration of a 6101A Auxiliary unit is independent of the 6100A Master unit controlling
it.
The following describes the 6100A (L1) voltage channel. Unlike all other channels, the
phase angle on the L1 voltage channel cannot be altered from zero except in calibration
mode.
A digital representation of the requested output waveform is sampled, converted to an
analogue signal and amplified. The ‘D to A’ conversion process and subsequent
amplification introduces a phase shift and the output at the binding posts lags the digitally
generated waveform. Figure 7-1is a stylized representation of the relationship between
the ‘Phase Reference’, the digitally sampled waveform and the analog output signal.
7-6
Calibration
Overview of 6100A signal generation
7
Samples from the
digitally generated
signal
Phase shifted
analog
output
Phase
Reference
Figure 7-1. Signal generation
The objective of phase calibration adjustment is to remove the phase offset between the
Phase Reference and the analogue output signal. Figure 7-2 shows the digitally sampled
waveform phase shifted to align the analogue output to the Phase Reference. In practice
there will be a small residual phase error determined by the accuracy of measurement.
Analog output ‘in
phase’ with Phase
Reference
Phase shifted
digitally
generated
signal
Figure 7-2. After phase adjustment
With the analogue signal of both voltage and current channels ‘in phase’ with the
common Phase Reference, the phase relationship between voltage and current is known
7-7
6100A
Users Manual
with an uncertainty, which is the sum of the residual error from the voltage and current
calibration adjustment.
The phase angles relative to the Phase reference of voltage channels other than L1 are
nonzero by default. Nevertheless, the same principle applies but with the phase angle
between the analogue signal and the Phase Reference set to an appropriate nonzero value.
7-12. The Fluke service center calibration system
As described in section 7-11 above, the Fluke calibration system independently compares
a voltage or current channel to the system phase reference. Fourier Analysis of sampled
analogue signals yield amplitude and phase information which is used for calibration and
adjustment. The digitizing DMM is triggered externally by a signal from the 6100A.
The trigger signal, the Sample Reference, has a fixed phase relationship with the system
Master Phase and controls that start of the sample period. Thus the phase relationship of
the analogue signals is fixed to the phase reference and is known.
Figure 7-3. Phase Measurement Connections
Figure 7-3 shows how the 6100A, a digitizing DMM and transducer are connected. Note
that voltage dividers and shunts are used to scale the input to the DMM for optimum
performance. The same DMM is used to calibrate voltage and current.
7-8
Calibration
The Fluke service center calibration system
7
The Sample Reference and the Phase Reference signals are provided on the 6100A rear
panel. Figure 7-4 shows the relationship between reference signals and the analog
output. The Sample reference is turned OFF and ON with GPIB commands. Sample
Reference pulses do not appear after an ON command until the positive zero crossing of
the Phase Reference occurs. Then the first falling edge is simultaneous with the Phase
Reference rising edge. The DMM samples the analogue signal at each falling edge of the
‘trigger’ thereby phase-locking the sample to the analogue output.
Analogue
signal
Phase
reference
Sample
reference
Gpib command:
OUTPut:ROSCillator OFF
Gpib command:
OUTPut:ROSCillator ON
Figure 7-4. Waveforms
The system software programs the DMM to take the required number of samples so as
long as the minimum required time is allowed to elapse, the timing of the sample
reference ‘off’ command is not critical. The sample reference frequency is always a
binary multiple of the analog fundamental frequency thereby simplifying the task of
analyzing the sampled data.
7-9
6100A
Users Manual
7-13. Characteristics of the calibration system
Transducers are used to convert the different 6100A output voltage and current levels to
nominally 800 mV. The DMM , a Fluke HP3458A/HFL with extended memory option
is used on its 1.2 volt DC range for all measurements to reduce the relative phase
uncertainty contribution from the DMM, i.e., errors in the DMM are the same for voltage
and current. For each measurement, the DMM is programmed to take 65,536 samples
with an aperture of 1.4 μs. At least 20% of the waveform contributes to each
measurement minimizing variability due to noise. The system is automated with
MET/CAL®software. Table 7-3 below shows samples per fundamental cycle and the
minimum samples at the highest settable harmonic frequency.
Table 7-3. Samples per cycle
6100A fundamental
frequency (Hz)
Sample Reference
pulses per
fundamental cycle
Minimum samples
per cycle at
maximum harmonic
frequency
16 to 32
2048
20
32 to 69
1024
10
69 to 128
512
5
128 to 256
256
5
256 to 512
128
5
512 to 850
64
5
7-14. Transducers
The output from all transducers is 800mV RMS at full range. The switchable range
voltage transducer is built into a system switching control unit to provide full automation.
There are 6 voltage ranges each compensated by a parallel capacitive divider to
compensate for stray capacitance and the input capacitance of the system DMM. Voltage
divider phase uncertainty is typically 0.0002° at 60Hz, 0.002° at 1500Hz. Five special
co-axial shunts are used with values of 0.5A, 2 A 10A, 20A and 80A.
The shunts are designed to exhibit mutual inductance of 0.5 nH ± 0.5 nH. Shunts
typically have phase displacement error uncertainty of 0.0003° at 60Hz and 0.013° at
1500Hz. Both voltage and current shunts exhibit temperature coefficients of less than 1
ppm/degree.
7-15. DMM amplitude error contributions
DMM gain and bandwidth contribute to amplitude error. These errors are calculated and
combined with those of the transducers to provide amplitude corrections.
7-10
Calibration
Overview of adjustment
7
7-16. DMM amplitude phase contributions
The various phase error contributions of the DMM considerably exceed that of the
transducers. Some of these contributions cancel for current to voltage phase
measurements but not in voltage to voltage measurements for multiphase systems. The
main systematic contributions to phase error from the DMM are bandwidth, aperture and
trigger delay. Table 7-4 shows the phase displacement uncertainties achieved in the
Fluke system once DMM phase errors are compensated.
Table 7-4. DMM phase error uncertainty (degrees)
Frequency
Bandwidth
Uncertainty
Trigger
Uncertainty
Aperture
Uncertainty
Combined
uncertainty
Expanded
Uncertainty
(k = 2)
60 Hz
6 kHz
0.0004
0.0441
0.0008
0.0786
0.0000
0.0001
0.0009
0.0901
0.0018
0.1802
7-17. Voltage to voltage phase uncertainty
In Fluke service center systems errors are compensated by the application of corrections.
The uncertainty due to the short-term stability of the DMM and measurement noise, plus
the uncertainty due to voltage and current transducers must be combined with these
values but these at typically 0.00023° are negligible. Thus the voltage to voltage phase
calibration uncertainty for a 6100A and 6101A calibrated at different service centers will
fall within the uncertainties estimated in Table 7-3 above
7-18. Current to voltage phase uncertainty
The phase of the current output of a 6100A or 6101A is specified relative to the voltage
channel of the same instrument. By using the same DMM to measure both voltage and
current against the common Sample Reference signal means all DMM related
uncertainties other than short-term stability and measurement noise cancel. The
remaining contributions (typically 0.00023°) are combined with transducer contributions
giving a total expanded system uncertainty of 0.00049° for current to voltage phase.
7-19. Overview of adjustment
The steps required to calibrate at an adjustment point are enter the calibration mode then,
for each calibration point:
•
Select the instrument configuration required
•
Determine the 6100A error by measurement
•
Initiate the adjustment
Check the residual error is within acceptable limits and report the value to the calibration
certificate.
7-11
6100A
Users Manual
7-20. Calibration adjustment process
The 6100A Electrical Power Standard can be adjusted in the software configuration.
Select Support Functions/Adjust Instrument.
Figure 7-5. Waveform menu softkeys
7-21. Entering calibration mode
To make calibration adjustments, the 6100A (or 6101A) calibration switch must be in the
‘Enable’ position. See figure 3-6, item 8 and figure 3-7.
Figure 7-6. Password Prompt
The default password is “12321”. The password may be changed via the Change
Password softkey (see Chapter 6). Any alpha numeric character available via the 6100A
front panel can be used in passwords.
7-12
Calibration
Calibration adjustment process
7
7-22. Select instrument configuration
Figure 7-7. Adjust Instrument Screen
Select the instrument (L1, L2 etc.) and channel to be adjusted via the Output Menu
Select the required range
Select the required Target
For voltage calibration, ensure 4-wire is selected.
Note that line locking is disabled when calibration mode is entered. The previous state is
reinstated on exit from calibration mode.
7-23. Determine the 6100A/6101A error
Ensure the measurement equipment is correctly configured, connections are correctly
made and turn the 6100A/6101A output on. After allowing the 6100A/6101A and
measurement equipment time to settle, for each of the components to be adjusted:
Note the difference (D) between Target (T) and measured value (M): D=T–M
Calculate the required Actual value = T+D (which is the same as 2T–M)
Enter the Actual value in the Actual field
7-13
6100A
Users Manual
7-24. Initiate the adjustment
Press Accept adjustment.
The 6100A/6101A instrument stores the amplitude and phase calibration constants.
After allowing the 6100A/6101A and measurement equipment time to settle:
If the residual errors are within limits, report the amplitude and phase values to the
calibration certificate.
Otherwise, repeat the calibration adjustment process until the verification measurement
results are within the required tolerance.
7-25. Return Calibration switch to Normal
Once calibration adjustment is complete, return the calibration enable switch to the
‘Normal’ position.
7-26. Verification
The following tables present 6100A contributions appropriate assuming the verification
measurement is made within one hour of the adjustment with the same equipment and at
the same temperature. The 6100 contribution is approximately the one-hour stability
specification at k=2 (approximately 95% confidence). In the following tables, phase
measurements are made as part of the amplitude measurements so the instrument
amplitude settings are the same as for the associated amplitude measurement. The 95th
harmonic amplitudes settings are outside the normal range for harmonics and can only be
set in the calibration adjustment mode. Providing higher amplitudes in this special
application maximises accuracy by reducing the effect of random noise.
It is suggested that the standard deviation of the measurement be added to the 6100A
contribution to form the combined verification tolerance.
Note
Because the calibration uncertainty of the reference standard is not
included, the verification tolerance proposed is not the same as the
uncertainty of the calibration.
7-14
Calibration
Calibration adjustment verification record
7
7-27. Calibration adjustment verification record
7-28. Voltage adjustment points
Range
(volts)
Frequency Harmonic
(Hz)
Setting
number
6100A/ 6101A
contribution
0
0
DC offset
1.1 – 16
57
1
Amplitude
13 V
±0.9 mV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
13 V
±1.6 mV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
5643
99
0
0
DC offset
2.3 – 33
57
1
Amplitude
26 V
±1.6 mV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
26 V
±2.4 mV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
5643
99
0
0
DC offset
5.6 – 78
57
1
Amplitude
65 V
±3.4 mV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
65 V
±4.7 mV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
5643
99
0
0
DC offset
11 – 168
57
1
Amplitude
130 V
±6.7 mV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
130 V
±9.3 mV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
5643
99
±0.008 mV
23 – 336
0
0
DC offset
23 – 336
57
1
Amplitude
260 V
±13.4 mV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
200 V
±15 mV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
23 – 336
5643
99
±0.050 mV
70 – 1008
0
0
DC offset
70 – 1008
57
1
Amplitude
800 V
±90 mV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
300 V
±55 mV
Phase
0°
±0.100°
70 – 1008
5643
99
Result
±0.004 mV
11 – 168
11 – 168
tolerance (high) tolerance (low)
±1 mV
5.6 – 78
5.6 – 78
Combined
verification
±1 mV
2.3 – 33
2.3 – 33
Combined
verification
±0.9 mV
1.1 – 16
1.1 – 16
Measurement
Std. Deviation
7-15
6100A
Users Manual
7-29. Current adjustment points
Range
(Amps)
(Hz)
Setting
number
6100A/ 6101A
Measurement
Combined
Combined
contribution
Std. Deviation
verification
verification
tolerance (high) tolerance (low)
±10 μA
0.05 – 0.25
0
0
DC offset
0.05 – 0.25
57
1
Amplitude
0.2 A
±13 μA
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
0.2 A
±23 μA
Phase
0°
±0.001°
0.05 – 0.25
5643
99
±20 μA
0.05 – 0.5
0
0
DC offset
0.05 – 0.5
57
1
Amplitude
0.4 A
±25 μA
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
0.4 A
±45 μA
Phase
0°
±0.001°
0.05 – 0.5
5643
99
±40 μA
0.1 – 1
0
0
DC offset
0.1 – 1
57
1
Amplitude
0.8 A
±50 μA
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
0.8 A
±90 μA
Phase
0°
±0.001°
0.1 – 1
5643
99
0.2 – 2
0
0
DC offset
0.2 – 2
57
1
Amplitude
0.2 – 2
5643
99
±80 μA
1.6 A
±100 μA
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
1.6 A
±180 μA
Phase
0°
±0.001°
±200 μA
0.5 – 5
0
0
DC offset
0.5 – 5
57
1
Amplitude
4A
±300 μA
Phase
0°
±0.0003°
Amplitude
4A
±450 μA
Phase
0°
±0.001°
0.5 – 5
5643
99
±400 μA
1 – 10
0
0
DC offset
1 – 10
57
1
Amplitude
8A
±660 μA
Phase
0°
±0.0003°
Amplitude
8A
±980 μA
Phase
0°
±0.002°
1 – 10
5643
99
±2 mA
2 – 21
0
0
DC offset
2 – 21
57
1
Amplitude
16 A
±1.74 mA
Phase
0°
±0.0003°
Amplitude
16 A
±2.2 mA
Phase
0°
±0.002°
2 – 21
7-16
Frequency Harmonic
5643
99
Result
Calibration
Calibration adjustment verification record
7
7-30. Current adjustment points for 80A option (if fitted)
Range
Frequency Harmonic
(Amps)
(Hz)
8 – 0.80
57
Setting
number
1
2961
47
6100A/ 6101A
Measurement
Combined
Combined
contribution
Std. Deviation
verification
verification
tolerance (high) tolerance (low)
Amplitude
64 A
±8 mA
Phase
0°
±0.0005°
Amplitude
64 A
±11 mA
Phase
0°
±0.002°
Result
7-31. Voltage from current terminals adjustment points
Range
(Volts)
Frequency Harmonic
(Hz)
Setting
number
6100A/ 6101A
Measurement
Combined
Combined
contribution
Standard
verification
verification
Result
Deviation
±25 μV
0.05 – 0.25
0
0
DC offset
0.05 – 0.25
57
1
Amplitude
0.2 V
±25 μV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
0.2 V
±35 μV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
0.05 – 0.25
99
5643
±60 μV
0.15 – 1.5
0
0
DC offset
0.15 – 1.5
57
1
Amplitude
1.2 V
±80 μV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
1.2 V
±145 μV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
0.15 – 1.5
99
5643
±400 μV
1 – 10
0
0
DC offset
1 – 10
57
1
Amplitude
8V
±520 μV
Phase
0°
±0.0002°
Amplitude
8V
±950 μV
Phase
0°
±0.001°
1 – 10
5643
99
tolerance (high) tolerance (low)
7-17
6100A
Users Manual
7-18
Chapter 8
The ‘Energy’ Option
Title
8-1.
8-2.
8-3.
8-4.
8-5.
8-6.
8-7.
8-8.
8-9.
8-10.
8-11.
8-12.
8-13.
8-14.
8-15.
8-16.
8-17.
8-18.
8-19.
8-20.
8-21.
8-22.
8-23.
8-24.
8-25.
8-26.
8-27.
8-28.
8-29.
8-30.
8-31.
8-32.
8-33.
8-34.
8-35.
Introduction.............................................................................................
Overview of functionality .......................................................................
Principle of operation..............................................................................
Limitations ..............................................................................................
Energy specifications..............................................................................
Pulse Inputs ........................................................................................
Pulse and Gate Inputs .........................................................................
Pulse Output .......................................................................................
Gate Output ........................................................................................
Accuracy.............................................................................................
Test Duration ......................................................................................
Preparing to use the energy option .........................................................
Input channel configuration and meter constants ...................................
Connect MUT and reference meters...................................................
‘Type’ of energy .................................................................................
Internal Pull-ups .................................................................................
Energy Pulse Output meter constant and pull-up ...............................
Conduct the test ..................................................................................
Test modes ..............................................................................................
Free Run mode ...................................................................................
Counted/Timed mode .........................................................................
Gated mode.........................................................................................
Packet mode........................................................................................
Remote operation of the Energy option ..................................................
SCPI command set..................................................................................
Operating mode ..................................................................................
Energy Maintain Voltage ...................................................................
Energy units........................................................................................
Result presentation .............................................................................
Results ................................................................................................
Output gating ......................................................................................
Input gating.........................................................................................
Warm-up sequence tree ......................................................................
Warm-up duration ..............................................................................
Warm-up pulse source ........................................................................
Page
8-3
8-3
8-3
8-3
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-5
8-5
8-6
8-6
8-6
8-7
8-7
8-7
8-7
8-8
8-8
8-9
8-10
8-10
8-10
8-11
8-11
8-11
8-12
8-12
8-13
8-13
8-13
8-14
8-14
8-1
6100A
Users Manual
8-36.
8-37.
8-38.
8-39.
8-40.
8-41.
8-42.
8-43.
8-44.
8-45.
8-46.
8-47.
8-48.
8-49.
8-50.
8-51.
8-52.
8-53.
8-54.
8-55.
8-56.
8-57.
8-58.
8-59.
8-60.
8-61.
8-2
Test sequence tree...............................................................................
Test duration.......................................................................................
Test pulse source ................................................................................
MUT tree ............................................................................................
MUT meter constant...........................................................................
Input Debounce ..................................................................................
MUT source........................................................................................
MUT pull-up.......................................................................................
Reference tree .....................................................................................
Input Debounce ..................................................................................
Reference meter constant....................................................................
Reference source ................................................................................
Reference pull-up ...............................................................................
Output tree ..........................................................................................
Output meter constant.........................................................................
Output pull-up ....................................................................................
Status subsystem.................................................................................
Status operational Tree .......................................................................
Operation event ..................................................................................
Operational enable..............................................................................
Operation condition ............................................................................
Energy Command Summary ..............................................................
Action on receiving *RST ..................................................................
Calibration of the Energy option ............................................................
By direct measurement with a frequency meter: ................................
Using an external reference frequency: ..............................................
8-14
8-15
8-15
8-15
8-15
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-16
8-17
8-17
8-17
8-17
8-17
8-18
8-18
8-18
8-18
8-19
8-20
8-21
8-22
8-22
8-22
The ‘Energy’ Option
Introduction
8
8-1. Introduction
This chapter describes the 6100A Power Standard ‘Energy’ option. The topics covered in
this chapter include the following:
•
The Energy option specifications
•
Front panel operation of the Energy option
•
Remote operation of the Energy option
•
Calibration of the Energy option
8-2. Overview of functionality
Meters supply a stream of pulses of a frequency proportional to the power being applied
to their voltage and current input terminals. The total pulses represent the total energy
delivered. The 6100A has six pulse inputs that can be configured for combinations of
Meters Under Test (MUT) and reference meters. The 6100A also provides an output
stream of pulses, representing the calculated theoretical output power of the system, to
provide an ‘ideal’ pulse stream reference. A gate signal is available to switch external
equipment during a test, or for the user to electronically control the duration of the test.
The Energy Pulse Output and Energy Gate In/Out BNC connectors are mounted on the
6100A rear panel.
8-3. Principle of operation
One or more MUT are connected to the 6100A, or a 6101A auxiliary unit, voltage and
current terminals. A test is conducted which involves counting the number of pulses
received within a specified period. The result is compared with the theoretical amount of
energy delivered, or against a reference source that was connected in parallel to the MUT.
The duration of the test is set by specifying a limit condition, which can be an absolute
time, an amount of energy delivered, or as an accumulated energy from any MUT or
reference meter channel (expressed as energy or pulse count). Input channels can be
combined to allow up to three reference meters to be averaged or summed.
8-4. Limitations
The 6100A is an accurate reference source for independent voltage and current and
‘phantom power’. Unlike power supplies, the 6100A and 6101A have a closed loop
feedback system to ensure that the output waveforms are always of the demanded form.
Extremely non-linear loads such as the power supply of electronic meters disrupt the
6100A and 6101A ability to maintain the correct output state. Attempting to provide line
power to energy meters from the 6100A system may cause the 6100A and 6101A output
to trip or result in inaccurate readings. Always connect the meter’s auxiliary power
supply to a suitable external power source. The 6100A and 6101A output capabilities are
described in the specifications in Chapter 1.
The 6100A computed theoretical output power is accurate in Sine and Harmonic modes.
Adding Flicker, Dips, Fluctuating Harmonics or Interharmonics will reduce the accuracy
of the output power calculation and hence calculation of MUT error. If a reference meter
is used, measurement accuracy depends on the performance of the reference meter for
non-sinusoidal and amplitude modulated signal inputs. Negative power outputs are
accumulated as unsigned quantities. The user should apply a context to the displayed
magnitude of energy accumulated depending on the application and measurement
configuration.
8-3
6100A
Users Manual
8-5. Energy specifications
8-6.
Pulse Inputs
Max frequency
5MHz (100Hz for debounced inputs)
Min pulse width
50ns
Max counts per channel
232-1 (4,294,967,295)
8-7.
Pulse and Gate Inputs
Input Low level max
1V
Input High level min
3V
Internal pull-up values
135Ω and 940Ω to 4.5V nominal
(Approximately equivalent to 150Ω/1kΩ to 5V nominal)
Max input voltage
28V (clamped @ 30V approximately) [1]
Min input voltage
0V (clamped @ -0.5V approximately) [1]
8-8.
Pulse Output
Drive
Open-collector with optional internal 470Ω pull-up
Frequency range
1mHz – 5MHz
Frequency accuracy
±( 50ppm + 100nHz )
External pull-up voltage
30V MAX (clamped) [1]
Sink current
150mA MAX
8-9.
Gate Output
Drive
Open-drain
Internal Pull-up
As Gate-Input
External pull-up voltage
30V MAX (clamped) [1]
Sink current
1A MAX
[1] Input/Output protection: 30V / -0.5V (approximately) clamped, up to 120mA per
signal or 300mA maximum total all signals.
8-10. Accuracy
Counted/Timed timing accuracy
Gated mode accuracy
Packet mode accuracy (ppm)[3]
±( 50ppm + 100ns ) [2]
±( 50ppm + 100ns ) [2]
±( output power (ppm) + 50ppm + 110,000/Test Duration (secs) )
[2] Accuracy depends on the period between the application of power (pressing the
OPER key) and the gate signal becoming active being greater than 2 seconds.
[3] Specification not valid if ‘Soft Start’ is enabled.
8-4
The ‘Energy’ Option
Preparing to use the energy option
8
8-11. Test Duration
Maximum test duration
1000 hours
8-12. Preparing to use the energy option
Set the voltage and current output combinations for L1 (and L2 and L3) as required for
the test. See Chapters 3 and 4 for front panel operating instructions. Enable the channels
that will be used, but do not turn the outputs on.
To enter the Energy mode, navigate to the Waveform Menu. Press escape until the toplevel softkey menu is displayed as shown in Figure 8-1.
Figure 8-1. Waveform menu top-level softkeys
Press the Energy Counting softkey to enter the Energy mode.
Figure 8-2 shows the interface which overlays the Waveform menu. See paragraph 8-19
for a description of the test modes available.
Figure 8-2. Energy mode
Each row of the display relates to a MUT channel. From left to right, the display shows
the channel number, the instantaneous power indicated from that channel, the energy
8-5
6100A
Users Manual
accumulated from that channel since the start of the warm-up or test, the reference source
against which the error is calculated, the energy accumulated from that reference source
over the MUT measurement period, and the calculated error of the MUT relative to the
reference.
8-13. Input channel configuration and meter constants
The system must first be configured to the required MUT and reference meter set-up.
Press the Configure Meter Constants softkey to access the configuration options.
Figure 8-3. Input channel configuration and meter constants
8-14. Connect MUT and reference meters
Connect the MUT to channel(s) starting at the lowest numbered channel and working up.
For example, three MUT would connect to channels 1, 2 & 3. If reference meters are
used, they should be connected starting at the highest numbered channel and working
down. For example, a single reference meter would be on channel 6. Select the
combination of MUT and reference meters that you require from the lists on the left of
the configuration dialog. If Main Output is selected as the reference, MUT will be
compared against the theoretical energy output of the system. Note that if the sum of 4, 5
and 6 is used as the reference source, valid reference inputs should be applied to all threereference channels. Applying less than three inputs may cause the test duration to be one
count too long.
Signal debounce can be applied to inputs to prevent spurious counting. A debounced
input will ignore rapid activity in that signal. Debounce should not be applied when
input signal pulse rates are expected to be greater than 100Hz.
8-15. ‘Type’ of energy
It is necessary to set the type of energy being measured in the test: Real (Wh), Effective
(VAh) or Reactive (VARh). This setting should match the settings on the MUT and
reference meter(s). The meter constants then need to be specified. There is one value for
all MUT and one for all reference meters.
8-6
The ‘Energy’ Option
Test modes
8
Note that the 6100A provides various methods of specifying Reactive (VAR) power for
non-sinusoidal output waveforms. The 6100A Energy option always uses the Budeanu
method to calculate errors when ‘Main Output’ is the reference. If the reference source is
an external reference meter, then calculation will be dependent upon the method used by
the reference meter.
8-16. Internal Pull-ups
Each input group (MUT and Reference) may have either 150Ω or 1kΩ pull-ups internal
to the 6100A. It is recommended that 150Ω be selected when using higher frequency
pulse rates.
8-17. Energy Pulse Output meter constant and pull-up
A value can be set which specifies the effective meter constant of the Pulse Out
connector. Whenever an Energy test is active, this output is a pulse stream representing
the total power and energy of the active V/I outputs of all 6100A/6101A in the system.
A user selectable internal pull-up is provided for the Energy Pulse Output. The Use
Internal Pull-up check box selects and deselects this pull-up. The pull-up should remain
deselected (not checked) unless the device connected to the Energy Pulse Output does not
provide a pull-up.
8-18. Conduct the test
Press Enter to accept the newly defined values, or Escape to cancel all changes.
Pressing the OPER key starts the test. At this point, the voltage and current source main
output terminals become active. The user cannot leave (ESC) the Energy screen while the
test is active. To abort the test, press the STBY key.
During the test, the Energy screen will display rows of numbers corresponding to the user
channel configuration. Pulse rate and total pulses are displayed, either as power and
energy or as frequency and count depending on the Display Units setting. The
accumulated total is compared with the specified reference source and an error or
registration percentage is displayed. These display parameters can be changed ‘on the fly’
by pressing the corresponding softkey to activate the list box and changing the value with
the cursors. Time elapsed and time remaining (where known) for the test is also
displayed. Time remaining may be an estimate for some mode combinations.
8-19. Test modes
Under normal operating conditions, all 6100A/6101A main outputs are turned off at the
end of a test. If the MUT or reference meters are using the 6100A as a power source, they
may lose their configuration if the voltage is removed from them between tests. If
“Maintain Voltage Signal On Completion” is selected in `Counted/Timed', `Gated' or
`Packet mode', the Current output(s) will turn off, but the Voltage output(s) will not.
XW WARNING
High voltage will be present on the voltage output terminals
after the test has completed if the `Maintain Voltage Signal On
Completion' option is selected.
Pressing the STBY key will turn off all outputs regardless of this setting. Press OPER to
start a new test.
8-7
6100A
Users Manual
Note
Although the output, global and energy option menu settings can be
changed when `maintain voltage' is active, it is not possible to edit a
phenomena's settings without pressing STBY (standby) first.
Figure 8-4. Energy top-level softkeys
There are four test modes available. To change mode, press the Select Mode softkey, then
cycle through the available modes using the up/down cursor keys. In each case, the
parameters for the test can be changed in the configuration dialog for the currently
selected mode by pressing the Configure Mode softkey.
8-20. Free Run mode
In Free Run mode, power is applied to the MUT and a running tally is kept of the pulses
received from each. The test will continue until the user aborts the test. This mode is only
intended to offer approximate comparisons of performance and might be used, for
example, to monitor a MUT during adjustment, or for creep tests.
8-21. Counted/Timed mode
The purpose of the Counted/Timed mode is to allow measurements to be made when both
the 6100A and MUT are fully stabilized after warm-up and the 6100A output has settled
after the output is turned on. The minimum warm-up time is 2 seconds.
In this mode, the activity is divided into two periods, the warm-up and the test. Source
power is applied to the MUT immediately when the OPER key is pressed, but the
comparison of counts contributing to the result does not start until the specified warm-up
period has expired. Both the warm-up and test duration can be specified freely as time or
energy or pulse periods on any configured channel.
Figure 8-5. Counted/Timed Mode Configuration
If warm up is specified as energy or pulse periods, it is important to ensure the duration
specified is equivalent to at least 2 seconds to permit adequate settling of the main output.
8-8
The ‘Energy’ Option
Test modes
8
If duration is specified as energy from MUT or Reference channels, then the system will
accumulate at least this amount of energy on the specified channel(s) to the next whole
pulse period. Only whole pulse periods are allowed. One pulse period is the duration
between two pulses from a MUT or Reference. If both the warm-up and test duration are
specified as pulses from the same source, the last pulse of the warm-up is taken to be the
first pulse of the test. If time is used to specify the test duration, then it should be
adequate to cover at least one pulse period, otherwise there will be no meaningful
measurement.
If desired, a Gate Output signal may be enabled. This will be active for the duration of the
actual measured test (not the warm-up and settling period). The gate signal can consist of
a level of the required duration, or as a start and end pulse, and may be active high or
low.
In the Counted/Timed mode, the MUT and reference meter dials may advance more than
the amount measured by the 6100A Energy option. This is normal, and represents settling
and warm-up times included in the test. The actual test duration and count to achieve the
displayed result is accurate.
8-22. Gated mode
In Gated mode, the Energy Gate connector (on the rear panel) becomes an input. When
the OPER key is pressed, power is applied to the MUT. Energy counts and error
calculations will take place, but until the Gate signal becomes ‘active’, it is considered a
warm-up period. When the Gate signal activates, the counts reset and the true test starts.
The test terminates and the 6100A output is turned off when the gate becomes inactive.
If the period between the first application of power to the MUT and the gate becoming
active is more than 2 seconds, the Gated mode accuracy is the same as for the
Counted/Timed mode.
Figure 8-6. Gated Mode Configuration
The gate input signal may a pair of pulses or a change of level. If pulses, the first starts
the test, the second ends it. If the gate is a change of level, the test period is set by the
time the gate is at the active level. Gate polarity can be set to be active high or low.
In the Gated mode, the MUT and reference meter dials may advance more than the
amount measured by the 6100A Energy option. This is because the dial will advance in
8-9
6100A
Users Manual
the period before the gate signal becomes active. The count displayed by the 6100A
accurately reports the pulses received during the time the gate is active.
8-23. Packet mode
In Packet mode, the power from the main output terminals is timed to deliver the
requested amount of energy. This has the advantage that the dial advance on the MUT
will closely match the expected amount, unlike other modes which have settling times
and warm-up periods.
Figure 8-7. Packet Mode Configuration
The size of the ‘packet’ of energy will not be exact due to switching, ramping, and
settling times of the main output. If ‘Output ‘On’ Soft Start’ is enabled in the Global
Settings menu, the timing error may become excessive. The effect of the errors is reduced
as the test time increases.
8-24. Remote operation of the Energy option
Commands for the main 6100A unit are in chapter 5.
To start counting using the energy option, the energy-option status panel must be
displayed on the 6100A, if another wave-shape definition panel is shown, only the power
outputs will be activated, not the energy counter/timer. To guarantee correct operation it
is recommended that a command from the ‘ENERgy’ tree is the last one sent before
‘:OUTPut ON’; any command from this sub-system tree will re-display the energy status
screen.
Note: Some commands must be sent in a specific order and this is indicated when
applicable.
8-25. SCPI command set
The ‘[SOURce]:ENERgy’ SCPI subsystem is used to remotely control the energy
timer/counter hardware option. The SCPI status mechanism has also been expanded to
support the energy option (see Figure 5-3 in chapter 5 and the STATus:OPERation tree
commands and query commands at paragraph 8-52 to 8-55).
8-10
The ‘Energy’ Option
SCPI command set
8
8-26. Operating mode
ENERgy:MODE(?) <cpd> { TCOUnt|PACKet|GATE|FRUN }
This command selects the operating mode for the energy counter/timer option.
On receiving an ‘operate’ request (‘:OUTPut ON’), the selected operating mode will
count or time the pulse streams seen on the selected inputs.
•
TCOUnt
Counted/Timed mode.
The power outputs are activated, and allowed to stabilize. The selected energy pulse
inputs are counted for a defined period. Then the outputs are automatically returned to
standby when the completion criteria are met. This is the default mode of operation.
•
PACKet
Energy packet delivery mode.
The power outputs are activated for the time it takes the 6100A to deliver a specific
‘packet’ of energy and then deactivated again.
•
GATE Gated input mode.
The power outputs are activated. An externally generated signal can then be used to gate
the counting of the selected energy pulse inputs, and deactivate the power outputs.
•
FRUN Free-run mode.
The free run mode is mainly provided for manual use but remote control can be used.
8-27. Energy Maintain Voltage
ENERgy:MVOLtage(?) <cpd> { TCOUnt | PACKet | GATE}[,<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}]
This command allows the timed/counted, packet or gated operating modes to maintain the
presence of the voltage channel test signal on test completion, instead of automatically
shutting off all the enabled current and voltage channels.
The first parameter specifies the operating mode:
•
•
•
TCOUnt
PACKet
GATE
Timed/counted mode.
Energy packet mode.
Gated input mode.
The second parameter specifies whether all the enabled voltage channels should remain
on after test completion.
The default action is to turn off all enabled channels on test completion.
The query form of the command also requires the mode parameter (i.e. MVOLtage?
<cpd>). It will return whether the specified mode has ‘maintain voltage’ enabled.
Note
The energy ‘free-running’ mode is not supported by this operation.
When ‘maintain voltage’ is activated, and a test completes, a query using :OUTPut? will
report ‘1’ or ‘ON’ until a :OUTPut 0 is sent.
8-28. Energy units
ENERgy:UNIT(?) <cpd> { REAL|APParent|REACtive }
This command selects the base units used in energy counter/timer calculations.
•
REAL Real power (Wh).
8-11
6100A
Users Manual
•
APParent
•
REACtive Reactive power (VARh).
Apparent power (VAh).
8-29. Result presentation
ENERgy:PRESentation(?) <cpd> { COUNts|ENERgy }, <cpd> { PERRor|PREGistration }
This command configures the presentation of displayed results. It also defines the
meaning the result fields returned by using the ‘:ENERgy:RESults?’ command.
The first parameter defines the meaning of the MUT accumulated energy field:
•
COUNts
As raw counts.
•
ENERgy
As accumulated energy (using the base units defined by the
‘ENERgy:UNIT’ command).
The second parameter defines the meaning of the measured error field:
•
PERRor
•
PREGistration As percentage registration = (MUT counts / ref. counts) * 100.0.
As percentage error = ((MUT counts - ref. counts) / ref. counts) *
100.0.
8-30. Results
ENERgy: RESults? <cpd> { CH1|CH2|CH3|CH4|CH5|CH6 }
This query only command returns the result data for the selected channel:
•
1st <dnpd>
Power or Frequency [1] (the power field’s units are implied by the
active ‘ENERgy:UNITS’ definition).
•
2nd <dnpd>
MUT accumulated Energy or Counts [1].
•
3rd <dnpd>
Reference accumulated Energy or Counts [1].
•
4th <dnpd>
Percentage Error or Registration [2].
[1] Second meaning applies when ‘PRESentation’ is set to ‘COUNts’.
[2] Second meaning applies when ‘PRESentation’ is set to ‘PREGistration’.
If the selected channel is inactive, a comma-delimited list of zero value <dnpd>s will be
returned. A ‘ENERgy: RESults?’ query can be made at any time.
This command would typically be used in conjunction with the ‘STATus:OPERation’
commands, so data can be read a key stages in a test sequence.
The following conditions can be monitored using the ‘STATus’ system (see paragraph
51):
•
•
•
•
Warm up active.
Test active.
Input gate trigger pending.
Energy timer/counter active.
Notes:
The power field’s units are implied by the active ‘ENERgy:UNITS’ definition.
8-12
•
1 Second meaning applies when ‘PRESentation’ is set to ‘COUNts’.
•
2 Second meaning applies when ‘PRESentation’ is set to ‘PREGistration’.
The ‘Energy’ Option
SCPI command set
8
8-31. Output gating
ENERgy: OGATE(?) <bool> { OFF|ON|0|1 }, <cpd> { PULSe|LEVel }, <cpd> {
HIGH|LOW }, <cpd> { R150|R1000 }
This command configures the output-gating signal. The OGATE settings have no effect
when the operating mode is set to ‘GATED’
The first parameter enables the generation of a gating signal. This is active while the
power outputs are on.
The second parameter specifies the gating signal type:
•
PULSe Indicate start/stop with pulse.
•
LEVel Indicate start/stop with level change.
The third parameter specifies the gating signal level:
•
HIGH Go to high level to indicate start/stop.
•
LOW
Go to low level to indicate start/stop.
The fourth parameter specifies which internal pull-up resistance value to use:
•
R150
•
R1000 1 k Ohm.
150 Ohm.
8-32. Input gating
ENERgy: IGATE(?) <cpd> { PULSe|LEVel }, <cpd> { HIGH|LOW }, <cpd> {
R150|R1000 }
This command configures the input gating line. The settings only apply when the
operating mode is set to ‘GATED’.
The first parameter specifies the gating signal type:
•
PULSe Indicate start/stop with pulse.
•
LEVel Indicate start/stop with level change.
The second parameter specifies the gating signal level:
•
HIGH Go to high level to indicate start/stop.
•
LOW
Go to low level to indicate start/stop.
The third parameter specifies which internal pull-up resistance value to use:
•
R150
•
R1000 1 k Ohm.
150 Ohm.
8-33. Warm-up sequence tree
The warm-up test sequence can be used to allow the MUT and reference sources to settle.
A warm-up sequence can be configured in any operating mode, but will only have an
effect when the operating mode is ‘TCOUnt’. The warm-up test-sequence parameters
specify the initial actions that will occur on sending ‘OUTPut ON’. The test sequence
will then be executed (see 8-36).
The source of pulses to count can be specified, as well as whether to count for a specific
time period or counter value. The option to let the 6100 calculate the period (from
energy) is also available.
8-13
6100A
Users Manual
It should also be noted (when ‘TCOUnt’ is selected) that there is always a settling period
of approximately 1 Second, whether or not a warm-up period has been defined.
8-34. Warm-up duration
ENERgy:WUP:DURation(?) {SEConds|PPERiods|ENERgy},<dnpd>
This command specifies the duration of the warm-up sequence as a period of time, a
counter value (in terms of pulse periods), or a period defined in terms of energy.
SEConds
As a time delay in Seconds.
PPERiods As pulse periods.
COUNts
As pulse counts.(Depreciated on release of version II of the energy option.)
ENERgy
As accumulated energy.
Note: When energy is used (ENER), the actual limits applied will be determined by the
meter constant selected for the pulse source.
8-35. Warm-up pulse source
ENERgy:WUP:PSOUrce(?) { CH1|CH2|CH3|CH4|CH5|CH6|
SUM456|MEAN456|MEAN56|EMUT|MAIN }
This command specifies the pulse source to use when determining the warm-up
sequence-completion criteria.
The actual sources available will be determined by the active MUT source and reference
source selection.
Note: If one of the source parameters has been changed after using this command a valid
default will be set (typically ‘CH1’ or ‘MAIN’); so it is recommend that the
‘MUT:WUP:PSOUrce’ command is sent AFTER any ‘MUT:SOURce’ or
‘REFerence:SOURce’ commands, to prevent unexpected side effects.
The source can be:
•
CH1 to CH6
Raw pulse streams from individual channels.
•
SUM456
Sum of channels 4 through 5.
•
MEAN456
Arithmetic mean of channels 4 through 6.
•
MEAN56
Arithmetic mean of channels 5 and 6.
•
EMUT
On Every MUT channel. For example, on selecting a warm up
duration of 100 pulses, at least 100 pulses would have to be counted
on all selected MUTs before the warm-up sequence was considered
complete.
•
MAIN
Equivalent pulse count of the power outputs (value calculated from
the ‘OUTPut:CONStant’ meter constant value and active power
settings).
8-36. Test sequence tree
The test sequence commands specify the actions that will occur on sending ‘OUTPut
ON’. These parameters are applied in all operating modes except ‘FRUN’.
The source of pulses to count can be specified, as well as whether to count for a specific
period of time or counter value. The option to let the 6100 calculate the period (from
energy) is also available.
8-14
The ‘Energy’ Option
SCPI command set
8
8-37. Test duration
ENERgy:TEST:DURation(?) { SEConds|PPERiods|ENERgy }, <dnpd>
This command specifies the duration of the test sequence as either a time period, a
counter value, or a period defined in terms of energy. When energy is used, the actual
limits applied will be determined by the meter constant selected for the pulse source.
SEConds
As a time delay in Seconds.
PPERiods As pulse periods.
COUNts
As pulse counts.(Depreciated on release of version II of the energy option.)
ENERgy
As accumulated energy.
Note: When energy is used (ENER), the actual limits applied will be determined by the
meter constant selected for the pulse source.
8-38. Test pulse source
ENERgy:TEST:PSOUrce(?) {
CH1|CH2|CH3|CH4|CH5|CH6|SUM456|MEAN456|MEAN56|EMUT|MAIN}
This command specifies the pulse source to use when determining the test completion
criteria.
The actual sources available will be determined by the active MUT source and reference
source selection.
Note: If one of the source parameters has been changed after using this command a valid
default will be set (typically ‘MAIN’); so it is recommend that the
‘MUT:TEST:PSOUrce’ command is sent after any ‘MUT:SOURce’ or
‘REFerence:SOURce’ commands, to prevent unexpected side effects.
The source can be:
•
CH1 to CH6
Raw pulse streams from individual channels.
•
SUM456
Sum of channels 4 through 5.
•
MEAN456
Arithmetic mean of channels 4 through 6.
•
MEAN56
Arithmetic mean of channels 5 and 6.
•
EMUT
On Every MUT channel. For example, on selecting a test duration of
100 pulses, at least 100 pulses would have to be counted on all
selected MUTs before the test sequence was considered complete.
•
MAIN
Equivalent pulse count of the power outputs (value calculated from
the ‘OUTPut:CONStant’ meter constant value and active power
settings).
8-39. MUT tree
The MUT commands configure a MUT source. A MUT source is typically made up from
pulse streams from channels 1 to 3, though channels 4 to 6 can also be used when treated
as independent sources (i.e. for ‘drift monitoring’).
8-40. MUT meter constant
ENERgy:MUT:CONStant(?) <dnpd>
This command specifies the meter constant (as impulses per unit energy) used by
channels considered to be MUT sources.
8-15
6100A
Users Manual
8-41. Input Debounce
ENERgy:MUT:DEBounce[:STATe](?) <bool> { ON|OFF|0|1 }
The energy counter MUT inputs can be filtered to reduce switch contact bounce. The
maximum usable pulse rate is 100 Hz when debounce is enabled. “
8-42. MUT source
ENERgy:MUT:SOURce(?) { CH1|CH1TO2|CH1TO3|CH1TO4|CH1TO5|CH1TO6}
This command specifies the pulse source(s) used to define the MUT.
The source(s) can be:
•
CH1, CH1TO2 to CH1TO6
Pulse streams from (independent) channels.
•
SUM123
Sum of channels 1 through 3.
If the requested source channel is already in use as part of a reference source definition,
the reference source definition will default to a value that does not clash with the MUT
source (typically ‘MAIN’). Because of this, it is recommended that the MUT source be
defined before the reference source.
8-43. MUT pull-up
ENERgy:MUT:PULLup <cpd> { R150|R1000 }
This command specifies which internal pull-up resistance value to select for the reference
source:
•
R150
150 Ohm.
•
R1000
1 k Ohm.
8-44. Reference tree
The Reference commands configure a reference source. The reference source can be
made up from pulse streams on channels 4 to 6.
8-45. Input Debounce
ENERgy:REFerence:DEBounce[:STATe](?) <bool> { ON|OFF|0|1 }
The energy-counter reference inputs can be filtered to reduce switch contact bounce. The
maximum usable pulse rate is 100 Hz when debounce is enabled.
8-46. Reference meter constant
ENERgy:REFerence:CONStant(?) <dnpd>
This command specifies the meter constant (as impulses per unit energy) used by
channels considered to be reference sources.
8-16
The ‘Energy’ Option
SCPI command set
8
8-47. Reference source
ENERgy:REFerence:SOURce(?) {
CH6|SUM456|MEAN456|MEAN56|MMUT|MAIN }
This command specifies the pulse source(s) used to define the reference source.
The source(s) can be:
•
CH6
Pulse stream from (independent) channel 6.
•
SUM456
Sum of channels 4 through 6.
•
MEAN456 Arithmetic mean of channels 4 through 6.
•
MEAN56 Arithmetic mean of channels 5 and 6.
•
MMUT
Mean of the active MUT sources (typically used in ‘drift monitor’
scenarios).
•
MAIN
Equivalent pulse count of the power outputs (value calculated from the
‘OUTPut:CONStant’ meter constant value and active power settings).
Note: If the requested source channel is already in use as part of a MUT source
definition, an error will be reported.
8-48. Reference pull-up
ENERgy:REFerence:PULLup <cpd> { R150|R1000 }
This command specifies which internal pull-up resistance value to select for the reference
source:
•
R150
•
R1000 1 k Ohm.
150 Ohm.
8-49. Output tree
The output commands configure the pulse out channel. This channel generates a pulse
stream that is proportional to the active power outputs.
Pulses will be generated whenever the energy timer/counter option has been selected, and
the output is on.
8-50. Output meter constant
ENERgy:OUTPut:CONStant(?) <dnpd>
This command specifies the meter constant (as impulses per unit energy) used by the
output channel.
8-51. Output pull-up
ENERgy:OUTPut:PULLup[:STATe] <bool> { ON|OFF|0|1 }
This command specifies whether the output channel should switch in an internal pulled
up resistor.
8-17
6100A
Users Manual
8-52. Status subsystem
This subsystem is used to enable bits in the Operation and Questionable Event registers.
The Operation and Questionable: Event, Enable and Condition registers can be
interrogated to determine their state.
The energy option makes use of the operational registers only.
8-53. Status operational Tree
The energy timer/counter can report its status through these commands.
8-54. Operation event
STATus: OPERational [:EVENt]?
This command returns the contents of the Operation Event register, clearing the register.
Bit
Condition Event
Comment
8
Warm-Up Active
Set '1' during the warm-up period.
Set back to '0' when the period ends.
9
Test Active
Set '1' during the test period.
Set back to '0' when the period ends.
10
Gate Trigger Pending
Set to '1' when waiting for the trigger.
Set back to '0' when trigger is received.
11
Energy Active
Set '1' at the start of the Energy test.
Set back to '0' at the end of the test.
8-55. Operational enable
STATus: OPERational: ENABle(?) <dnpd>
This command sets the mask that enables those Operation Event register bits that are
required to be summarized at bit 7 of the IEEE 488.2 Status Byte register.
Note: Only the energy timer/counter option affects these bits:
8-18
Bit
Enable Condition
8
Warm-Up Active.
9
Test Active.
10
Gate Trigger
Pending.
11
Energy Active.
The ‘Energy’ Option
SCPI command set
8
8-56. Operation condition
STATus: OPERational: CONDition?
This query only command returns the contents of the Operation Condition register, which
is not cleared by the command.
Bit
Condition
Comment
8
Warm-Up Active
Set '1' during the warm-up period.
Set back to '0' when the period ends.
9
Test Active
Set '1' during the test period.
Set back to '0' when the period ends.
10
Gate Trigger Pending
Set to '1' when waiting for the trigger.
Set back to '0' when trigger is received.
11
Energy Active
Set '1' at the start of the Energy test.
Set back to '0' at the end of the test.
Note: This register contains transient states, in that its bits are not 'sticky', but are set and
reset by the referred operations. The response to the query therefore represents an
instantaneous 'Snapshot' of the Register State at the time that the query was accepted.
8-19
6100A
Users Manual
8-57. Energy Command Summary
[:SOURce]
:ENERgy
MODE(?)
:WUP:DURation(?)
<cpd>
{ TCOUnt | PACKet | GATE | FRUN }
<cpd>,
{ SEConds | PPERiods | ENERgy }
<dnpd>
Duration
:WUP:PSOUrce(?)
<cpd>
{CH1 | CH2 | CH3 | CH4 | CH5 | CH6 | SUM456 | MEAN456 | MEAN56 | EMUT |
:TEST:DURation(?)
<cpd>,
<dnpd>
Duration
:TEST:PSOUrce(?)
<cpd>
{CH1 | CH2 | CH3 | CH4 | CH5 | CH6 | SUM456 | MEAN456 | MEAN56 | EMUT |
MAIN}
{ SEConds | PPERiods | ENERgy }
MAIN}
:OGATe(?)
:IGATe(?)
:MVOLtage(?)
<bool>,
{ OFF | ON | 0 | 1 }
<cpd>,
{ PULSe | LEVel }
<cpd>,
{ HIGH | LOW }
<cpd>
{ R150 | R1000 }
<cpd>,
{ PULSe | LEVel }
<cpd>,
{ HIGH | LOW }
<cpd>
{ R150 | R1000 }
<cpd>
{TCOUnt | PACKet | GATE}[,<bool> {OFF | ON | 0 | 1}] <cpd> also required
parameter in query form of command (specifies mode to query)
:UNIT(?)
<cpd>
{ REAL | APParent | REACtive }
:MUT:SOURce(?)
<cpd>
{ CH1 | CH1TO2 | CH1TO3 | CH1TO4 | CH1TO5 | CH1TO6 }
:MUT:DEBounce:[STATe](?)
<bool>
{ OFF | ON | 0 | 1 }
:MUT:CONStant(?)
<dnpd>
in 'impulses per unit'
:MUT:PULLup(?)
<cpd>
{ R150 | R1000 }
:REFerence:SOURce(?)
<cpd>
{ CH6 |SUM456 | MEAN456 | MEAN56 | MMUT | MAIN }
:MUT:DEBounce:[STATe](?)
<bool>
{ OFF | ON | 0 | 1 }
:REFerence:CONStant(?)
<dnpd>
in 'impulses per unit'
:REFerence:PULLup(?)
<cpd>
{ R150 | R1000 }
:OUTput:CONStant(?)
<dnpd>
in 'impulses per unit'
:OUTput:PULLup:[STATe](?)
<bool>
{ OFF | ON | 0 | 1 }
RESults?
<cpd>
{ CH1 | CH2 | CH3 | CH4 | CH5 | CH6 }
Response =
<dnpd>,
power or frequency.
<dnpd>,
MUT Energy or counts.
<dnpd>,
Ref. Energy or counts.
<dnpd>
% Error or % Registration.
Note: Interpretation of above depends on setting of ENERgy:PRESentation.
PRESentation(?)
8-20
<cpd>,
{ COUNts | ENERgy }
<cpd>
{ PERRor | PREGistration }
The ‘Energy’ Option
SCPI command set
8
8-58. Action on receiving *RST
The following default settings are used on receiving a *RST command.
Setting
Value following *RST
[:SOURce]
:ENERgy
:MODE(?)
Timed/counted mode.
:UNIT(?)
Real (Wh).
:OGATe(?)
Output gate Off.
Gate type level.
Gate active low.
Internal pull-up 1k Ohm.
:IGATe(?)
Gate type level.
Gate active low.
Internal pull-up 1k Ohm.
:MVOLtage(?)
0 (all modes)
:PRESentation(?)
Accumulated Energy, % Error.
:RESults(?)
n/a
:WUP
:DURation(?)
Time delay, 100 Seconds.
:PSOUrce(?)
Channel 1.
:TEST
:DURation(?)
Time delay, 100 Seconds.
:PSOUrce(?)
Channel 1.
:MUT
:DEBounce
[:STATe](?)
0
:CONSTant(?)
1.0e5 i/Wh
:SOURce(?)
Channel 1.
:PULLup(?)
1 k Ohm.
:REFerence
:DEBounce
[:STATe](?)
0
:CONSTant(?)
1.0e5 i/Wh
:SOURce(?)
Channel 1.
:PULLup(?)
1 k Ohm.
:OUTPut
:CONSTant(?)
1.0e5 i/Wh
8-21
6100A
Users Manual
8-59. Calibration of the Energy option
The Energy option is not adjustable. The performance of the option depends on the
accuracy of the internal crystal oscillator. This may be measured and verified in two
ways:
8-60. By direct measurement with a frequency meter:
Equipment required: a frequency meter with accuracy 10ppm or better at the frequency to
be measured.
Connect the frequency meter to the Energy Pulse Out connector.
Use the Channel Configuration options (paragraph 8-13) to set a meter constant for the
Pulse Output that will result in a known output frequency for the total system power. The
Use Internal Pull-up check box should be enabled (checked) for most frequency meters.
For example, Enable and set the 6100A Voltage and Current to Sine 10V rms and 1A
rms, phase angle zero, providing 10W rms of real power. Set the Output meter constant to
360,000 i/Wh, to give an output frequency of 1 kHz.
Short Current Output terminals together, and ensure nothing is connected to the Voltage
Output terminals. Select Free Run test mode, then press OPER.
Verify that the frequency meter reads the expected frequency ±(50ppm - frequency meter
accuracy in ppm).
Terminate the test by pressing STBY.
8-61. Using an external reference frequency:
Equipment required: a pulse source with frequency accuracy 10ppm or better.
Connect any Pulse Input channel to an accurate frequency reference source between
10Hz and 5MHz. The source must be suitable to drive the Pulse Inputs (see paragraph 87. for input driving specifications).
Enable a voltage channel. For safety reasons, ensure nothing is connected to the voltage
terminals.
Use the Channel Configuration options (paragraph 8-13) to select MUT Source to be
‘Channel 1 to 6 independent’.
Press Enter to accept the Channel Configuration and select the Display Units to be
Counts.
Begin a Free Run test by pressing the OPER key.
Verify that the frequency displayed for the chosen Pulse Input channel is within ±(50ppm
- pulse source frequency accuracy in ppm) of the applied frequency.
Terminate the test by pressing STBY.
8-22
Appendix A
Glossary
A-1. Introduction
Glossary of terms and abbreviations found in the 6100A manual or referenced
documents.
Adjustment
Calibration
Channel
Dip
Distortion
EUT
First harmonic
Flicker
The operation that aligns or modifies the
calibrator output (or UUT indication) such that
its error in relation to its published specification
is minimized.
Measurement of the calibrator (or UUT) against
a defined and traceable standard using an
established, documented and verifiable process
with the object of determining the calibrator (or
UUT) error. Implicit in this process is the ability
to report the uncertainty of the measurement
process in accordance with the ISO Guide to the
Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement
Each output (voltage or current) is a channel. A
voltage channel and a current channel together
form a Phase
See Voltage Dip.
In a waveform, any steady state deviation from
the demanded shape.
Equipment Under Test
The first harmonic of a waveform is its
fundamental frequency. Note that for the
6100A, the 1st harmonic of a waveform may
have zero amplitude.
Repetitive (voltage) level variation in the range
to cause the physiological phenomenon of
flicker.
A-1
6100A
Users Manual
Fluctuation
Harmonics
IEC 61868
IEC 61000-3-2
IEC 61000-3-3
IEC 61000-4-7
IEC 61000-4-11
IEC 61000-4-14
IEC 61000-4-15
IEC 61000-4-30 (draft)
Interharmonic
Interruption
Measurement uncertainty
MUT
Nominal voltage
Phase
Phase angle
Pst
Reference channel
Reference voltage
A-2
A change in the amplitude of a waveform which
does not alter the harmonic content or phase
relationships within the waveform
Multiples of the fundamental supply frequency
Evaluation of Flicker severity
Limits for harmonic current emissions
(equipment input current <= 16A per phase
Limits of voltage changes, voltage fluctuations
and flicker in public low-voltage supply systems
(for equipment <= 16A per phase)
Harmonics and interharmonics measurements
Voltage dips, short interruptions and voltage
variations
Voltage fluctuation immunity test
Flicker meter functional design specification
A frequency component of a periodic quantity
(ac waveform) that is not an integer multiple of
the frequency at which the system is operating.
For a single-phase voltage, there is an
interruption if the RMS(1/2) value is below 10%
of the reference voltage. In a three-phase
system, an interruption is when all three phases
are below 10% simultaneously.
Where used in this document, Measurement
Uncertainty is the contribution to uncertainty
because of resolution of the measuring device
and the randomness of the indication due to
‘noise’.
Meter Under Test (used in the Energy option
chapter).
The nominal voltage is the reference voltage.
A phase is the combination of a voltage channel
and a current channel. The phases are identified
as L1, L2 and L3. L1 is the master phase in a
multi-phase system. Neutral phase is identified
as N.
Phase angle is the angular difference between
two corresponding points on two ac waveforms
of the same frequency or which have
frequencies which are integer multiples of each
other.
Short term flicker indicator, Pst = 1 is the
conventional threshold of irritability.
The reference channel is L1,Voltage
The reference voltage is the voltage that is used
for determining the depth of a dip and the height
Appendix A
Glossary
RMS voltage shape
RMS(1/2)
Sag
Short interruption
Swell
THD
Total harmonic current
Voltage dip
Voltage fluctuation
Voltage swell
A
of a swell.
The time function of the RMS voltage change
evaluated as a single value for each successive
half period between zero-crossings of the source
voltage.
Actual instantaneous RMS voltage: the sliding
value of the RMS voltage measured over an
exact period and refreshed each half period.
See Voltage Dip.
The disappearance of the supply voltage for a
period of time typically not exceeding 1 minute.
see Voltage swell
Total Harmonic Distortion
Total RMS value of the harmonic current
components.
A sudden reduction of the voltage at a point in
the electrical system, followed by voltage
recovery after a short period of time, from half a
cycle to a few seconds.
Series of changes of RMS voltage evaluated as a
single value for each successive half-period
between zero-crossings of the source voltage.
A sudden increase of the voltage at a point in the
electrical system, followed by voltage recovery
after a short period of time, from half a cycle to
a few seconds.
A-3
6100A
Users Manual
A-4
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