Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX

Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX
Series
Release
16.1
Modified: 2017-01-27
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Juniper Networks, Inc.
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www.juniper.net
Juniper Networks, Junos, Steel-Belted Radius, NetScreen, and ScreenOS are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the United
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Juniper Networks assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies in this document. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify,
transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice.
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
16.1
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
All rights reserved.
The information in this document is current as of the date on the title page.
YEAR 2000 NOTICE
Juniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. Junos OS has no known time-related limitations through the
year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.
END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT
The Juniper Networks product that is the subject of this technical documentation consists of (or is intended for use with) Juniper Networks
software. Use of such software is subject to the terms and conditions of the End User License Agreement (“EULA”) posted at
http://www.juniper.net/support/eula.html. By downloading, installing or using such software, you agree to the terms and conditions of
that EULA.
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Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Documentation and Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Supported Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Using the Examples in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Merging a Full Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Merging a Snippet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Documentation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Requesting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Opening a Case with JTAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii
Chapter 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Multicast Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Comparing Multicast to Unicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
IP Multicast Uses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
IP Multicast Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Reverse-Path Forwarding for Loop Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Shortest-Path Tree for Loop Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Administrative Scoping for Loop Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Multicast Leaf and Branch Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
IP Multicast Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Multicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Layer 2 Frames and IPv4 Multicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Multicast Interface Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Multicast Routing Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
T Series Router Multicast Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Part 1
Managing Group Membership
Chapter 2
Using IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Understanding Group Membership Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Understanding IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Configuring IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Enabling IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Changing the IGMP Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Modifying the IGMP Host-Query Message Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Modifying the IGMP Last-Member Query Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Specifying Immediate-Leave Host Removal for IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Filtering Unwanted IGMP Reports at the IGMP Interface Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Accepting IGMP Messages from Remote Subnetworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Modifying the IGMP Query Response Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Modifying the IGMP Robustness Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Limiting the Maximum IGMP Message Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Recording IGMP Join and Leave Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Limiting the Number of IGMP Multicast Group Joins on Logical Interfaces . . . . . . 61
Understanding Multicast Route Leaking for VRF and Virtual-Router
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Tracing IGMP Protocol Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Disabling IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Chapter 3
Using IGMP Snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
IGMP Snooping Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
How IGMP Snooping Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
How IGMP Snooping Works with Routed VLAN Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
How Hosts Join and Leave Multicast Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
IGMP Snooping and Forwarding Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
General Forwarding Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Using a Switch as an IGMP Querier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Configuring IGMP Snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Configuring VLAN-Specific IGMP Snooping Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Using a Switch as an IGMP Querier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Monitoring IGMP Snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Changing the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Verifying the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Chapter 4
Using MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Understanding MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Examples: Configuring MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Understanding MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Configuring MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Enabling MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Modifying the MLD Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Modifying the MLD Host-Query Message Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Modifying the MLD Query Response Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Modifying the MLD Last-Member Query Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Specifying Immediate-Leave Host Removal for MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Filtering Unwanted MLD Reports at the MLD Interface Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Example: Modifying the MLD Robustness Variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Limiting the Maximum MLD Message Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Enabling MLD Static Group Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Create a MLD Static Group Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Automatically create static groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Automatically increment group addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Specify multicast source address (in SSM mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Automatically specify multicast sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Automatically increment source addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Exclude multicast source addresses (in SSM mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Example: Recording MLD Join and Leave Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
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Table of Contents
Configuring the Number of MLD Multicast Group Joins on Logical
Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Disabling MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Part 2
Configuring PIM
Chapter 5
Using PIM Basic Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
PIM Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Basic PIM Network Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
PIM on Aggregated Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Changing the PIM Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Modifying the PIM Hello Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Preserving Multicast Performance by Disabling Response to the ping Utility . . . . 114
Configuring PIM Trace Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Configuring Interface Priority for PIM Designated Router Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Configuring PIM Designated Router Election on Point-to-Point Links . . . . . . . . . . 118
Configuring BFD for PIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Configuring BFD Authentication Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Viewing Authentication Information for BFD Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Disabling PIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Disabling the PIM Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Disabling PIM on an Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Disabling PIM for a Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Disabling PIM for a Rendezvous Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Chapter 6
Using PIM Sparse Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Rendezvous Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
RP Mapping Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Designated Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Enabling PIM Sparse Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Configuring PIM Join Load Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Modifying the Join State Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Example: Enabling Join Suppression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Chapter 7
Using PIM Dense Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Understanding PIM Dense Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Understanding PIM Sparse-Dense Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Mixing PIM Sparse and Dense Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Configuring PIM Dense Mode Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Configuring PIM Sparse-Dense Mode Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Chapter 8
Using Source-Specific Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Source-Specific Multicast Groups Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Understanding PIM Source-Specific Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
PIM SSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Example: Configuring PIM SSM on a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Example: Configuring an SSM-Only Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Example: Configuring SSM Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast Groups with Any-Source
Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Example: Configuring SSM Maps for Different Groups to Different Sources . . . . 159
Multiple SSM Maps and Groups for Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Example: Configuring Multiple SSM Maps Per Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Chapter 9
Using Static RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Understanding Static RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Configuring Local PIM RPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Configuring the Static PIM RP Address on the Non-RP Routing Device . . . . . . . . 168
Chapter 10
Using Anycast RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Understanding RP Mapping with Anycast RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router with MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router Using Only PIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Configuring All PIM Anycast Non-RP Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Example: Configuring Multiple RPs in a Domain with Anycast RP . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Chapter 11
Using Auto-RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Understanding PIM Auto-RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Configuring PIM Auto-RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Chapter 12
Using PIM Bootstrap Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Understanding the PIM Bootstrap Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Example: Rejecting PIM Bootstrap Messages at the Boundary
of a PIM Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Example: Configuring PIM BSR Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Chapter 13
Using PIM Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Understanding Multicast Message Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Filtering MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Filtering RP and DR Register Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Configuring Interface-Level PIM Neighbor Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Filtering Outgoing PIM Join Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Filtering Incoming PIM Join Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Configuring Register Message Filters on a PIM RP and DR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Chapter 14
Using PIM RPT and SPT Cutover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Understanding Multicast Rendezvous Points, Shared Trees, and
Rendezvous-Point Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Building an RPT Between the RP and Receivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
PIM Sparse Mode Source Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Multicast Shortest-Path Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
SPT Cutover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
SPT Cutover Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Example: Configuring the PIM Assert Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Example: Configuring the PIM SPT Threshold Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
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Part 3
Configuring MSDP
Chapter 15
Using MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Understanding MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Configuring MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Filtering MSDP SA Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Tracing MSDP Protocol Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Configuring the Interface to Accept Traffic from a Remote Source . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Example: Configuring MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups . . . . . 224
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router with MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Part 4
Configuration Statements and Operational Commands
Chapter 16
Configuration Statements (IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
accounting (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
accounting (Protocols IGMP Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
asm-override-ssm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
disable (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
exclude (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
group (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
group-count (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
group-increment (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
group-limit (IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
group-policy (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
igmp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
immediate-leave (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
interface (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
maximum-transmit-rate (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
oif-map (IGMP Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
passive (IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
promiscuous-mode (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
query-interval (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
query-last-member-interval (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
query-response-interval (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
robust-count (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
source (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
source-count (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
source-increment (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
static (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
traceoptions (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
version (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Chapter 17
Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
data-forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
disable (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
group (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
group-limit (IGMP and MLD Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
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host-only-interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
igmp-querier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
igmp-snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
immediate-leave (Bridge Domains) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
interface (Bridge Domains) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
interface (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
l2-querier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
multicast-router-interface (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
query-interval (Bridge Domains) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
query-last-member-interval (Bridge Domains) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
query-response-interval (Bridge Domains) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
robust-count (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
source-address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
src-address (IGMP Querier) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
source-vlans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
static (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
traceoptions (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
version (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
vlan (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Chapter 18
Configuration Statements (PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
address (Anycast RPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
address (Local RPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
address (Static RPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
anycast-pim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
assert-timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
authentication (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
auto-rp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
bfd-liveness-detection (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
bootstrap-export . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
bootstrap-import . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
bootstrap-priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
dense-groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
detection-time (BFD for PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
disable (PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
dr-election-on-p2p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
dr-register-policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
embedded-rp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
export (Bootstrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
export (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
family (Bootstrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
family (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
family (Local RP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
group (RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
group-ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
hello-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
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hold-time (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
import (Protocols PIM Bootstrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
import (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
infinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
join-load-balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
join-prune-timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
key-chain (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
local . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
local-address (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
loose-check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
mapping-agent-election . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
maximum-rps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
minimum-interval (PIM BFD Liveness Detection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
minimum-interval (PIM BFD Transmit Interval) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
minimum-receive-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
mode (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
multiplier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
neighbor-policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
next-hop (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
no-adaptation (PIM BFD Liveness Detection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
override-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331
pim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
prefix-list (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
priority (Bootstrap) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
priority (PIM Interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
priority (PIM RPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
propagation-delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339
register-probe-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
reset-tracking-bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
rib-group (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
rp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
rp-register-policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
rp-set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
rpf-selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
source (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
spt-threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
static (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
threshold (PIM BFD Detection Time) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
threshold (PIM BFD Transmit Interval) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
transmit-interval (PIM BFD Liveness Detection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
traceoptions (Protocols PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
version (BFD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
version (PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
wildcard-source (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359
Chapter 19
Configuration Statements (Source-Specific Multicast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
asm-override-ssm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
policy (SSM Maps) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
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ssm-groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
ssm-map (Protocols IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364
ssm-map (Routing Options Multicast) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
ssm-map-policy (IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Chapter 20
Configuration Statements (MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
active-source-limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
authentication-key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
data-encapsulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370
default-peer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
disable (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372
export (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
group (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
import (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
local-address (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
maximum (MSDP Active Source Messages) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377
mode (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378
msdp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
peer (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
rib-group (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382
source (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383
threshold (MSDP Active Source Messages) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384
traceoptions (Protocols MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
Chapter 21
Operational Commands (IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
clear igmp membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390
clear igmp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
show igmp group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395
show configuration protocols igmp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399
show igmp interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401
show igmp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405
show system statistics igmp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
Chapter 22
Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
clear igmp-snooping membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
clear igmp-snooping statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
show igmp-snooping membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416
show igmp-snooping route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419
show igmp-snooping statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
show igmp-snooping vlans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423
Chapter 23
Operational Commands (PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425
clear multicast bandwidth-admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427
clear multicast scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429
clear multicast sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430
clear multicast statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
clear pim join . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
clear pim register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434
clear pim statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436
mtrace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439
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mtrace from-source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442
mtrace monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445
mtrace to-gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447
show multicast flow-map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
show multicast interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
show multicast mrinfo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454
show multicast next-hops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461
show multicast route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
show multicast rpf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472
show multicast scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 476
show multicast sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478
show multicast usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
show pim bootstrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484
show pim interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486
show pim join . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489
show pim neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510
show pim rps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514
show pim source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
show pim statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524
Chapter 24
Operational Commands (MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
clear msdp cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538
clear msdp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539
show msdp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540
show msdp source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542
show msdp source-active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544
show msdp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547
test msdp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551
Part 2
Index
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555
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List of Figures
Chapter 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Figure 1: Multicast Terminology in an IP Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Figure 2: Converting MAC Addresses to Multicast Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Part 1
Managing Group Membership
Chapter 4
Using MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Figure 3: Routing Devices Start Up on a Subnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Figure 4: Querier Routing Device Is Determined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Figure 5: General Query Message Is Issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Figure 6: Reports Are Received by the Querier Routing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Figure 7: Host Has No Interested Receivers and Sends a Done Message to Routing
Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Figure 8: Host Address Timer Expires and Address Is Removed from Multicast
Address List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Figure 9: Routing Devices Start Up on a Subnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Figure 10: Querier Routing Device Is Determined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Figure 11: General Query Message Is Issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Figure 12: Reports Are Received by the Querier Routing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Figure 13: Host Has No Interested Receivers and Sends a Done Message to
Routing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Figure 14: Host Address Timer Expires and Address Is Removed from Multicast
Address List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Part 2
Configuring PIM
Chapter 6
Using PIM Sparse Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Figure 15: Rendezvous Point As Part of the RPT and SPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Figure 16: Join Suppression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Chapter 7
Using PIM Dense Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Figure 17: Multicast Traffic Flooded from the Source Using PIM Dense Mode . . . 142
Figure 18: Prune Messages Sent Back to the Source to Stop Unwanted Multicast
Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Chapter 8
Using Source-Specific Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Figure 19: Receiver Announces Desire to Join Group G and Source S . . . . . . . . . . 150
Figure 20: Router 3 (Last-Hop Router) Joins the Source Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Figure 21: (S,G) State Is Built Between the Source and the Receiver . . . . . . . . . . 150
Figure 22: Network on Which to Configure PIM SSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Figure 23: Receiver Sends Messages to Join Group G and Source S . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Figure 24: Router 3 (Last-Hop Router) Joins the Source Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
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Figure 25: (S,G) State Is Built Between the Source and the Receiver . . . . . . . . . . 157
Figure 26: Simple RPF Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Chapter 14
Using PIM RPT and SPT Cutover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Figure 27: Building an RPT Between the RP and the Receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Figure 28: PIM Register Message and PIM Join Message Exchanged . . . . . . . . . . 202
Figure 29: Traffic Sent from the Source to the RP Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Figure 30: Traffic Sent from the RP Router Toward the Receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Figure 31: Receiver DR Sends a PIM Join Message to the Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Figure 32: PIM Prune Message Is Sent from the Receiver’s DR Toward the RP
Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Figure 33: RP Router Receives PIM Prune Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Figure 34: RP Router Sends a PIM Prune Message to the Source DR . . . . . . . . . 207
Figure 35: Source’s DR Stops Sending Duplicate Multicast Packets Toward the
RP Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Figure 36: PIM Assert Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Part 3
Configuring MSDP
Chapter 15
Using MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Figure 37: Accepting Multicast Traffic from a Remote Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Figure 38: Source-Active Message Flooding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
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List of Tables
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Table 1: Notice Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Chapter 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Table 3: Multicast Routing Protocols Compared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Part 1
Managing Group Membership
Chapter 2
Using IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Table 4: IGMP Event Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Chapter 3
Using IGMP Snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Table 5: Components of the IGMP Snooping Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Table 6: Summary of IGMP Snooping Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Chapter 4
Using MLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Table 7: MLD Event Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Part 2
Configuring PIM
Chapter 8
Using Source-Specific Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Table 8: ASM and SSM Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Chapter 11
Using Auto-RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Table 9: Local RP and Auto-RP Message Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Chapter 13
Using PIM Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Table 10: PIM Join Filter Match Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Part 3
Configuring MSDP
Chapter 15
Using MSDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Table 11: Source-Active Message Flooding Explanation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Part 4
Configuration Statements and Operational Commands
Chapter 21
Operational Commands (IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Table 12: show igmp group Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395
Table 13: show igmp group Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399
Table 14: show igmp interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401
Table 15: show igmp statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405
Chapter 22
Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
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Table 16: show igmp-snooping membership Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416
Table 17: show igmp-snooping route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419
Table 18: show igmp-snooping statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
Table 19: show igmp-snooping vlans Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423
Chapter 23
Operational Commands (PIM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425
Table 20: mtrace Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 439
Table 21: mtrace from-source Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443
Table 22: mtrace monitor Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445
Table 23: mtrace to-gateway Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448
Table 24: show multicast flow-map Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
Table 25: show multicast interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
Table 26: show multicast mrinfo Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454
Table 27: show multicast next-hops Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457
Table 28: show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Table 29: show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461
Table 30: show multicast route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Table 31: show multicast rpf Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473
Table 32: show multicast scope Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 476
Table 33: show multicast sessions Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478
Table 34: show multicast usage Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482
Table 35: show pim bootstrap Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484
Table 36: show pim interfaces Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486
Table 37: show pim join Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491
Table 38: show pim neighbors Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Table 39: show pim rps Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515
Table 40: show pim source Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522
Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525
Chapter 24
Operational Commands (MSDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
Table 42: show msdp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540
Table 43: show msdp source Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543
Table 44: show msdp source-active Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545
Table 45: show msdp statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547
xvi
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
•
Documentation and Release Notes on page xvii
•
Supported Platforms on page xvii
•
Using the Examples in This Manual on page xvii
•
Documentation Conventions on page xix
•
Documentation Feedback on page xxi
•
Requesting Technical Support on page xxi
Documentation and Release Notes
®
To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation,
see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/.
If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the
documentation, follow the product Release Notes.
Juniper Networks Books publishes books by Juniper Networks engineers and subject
matter experts. These books go beyond the technical documentation to explore the
nuances of network architecture, deployment, and administration. The current list can
be viewed at http://www.juniper.net/books.
Supported Platforms
For the features described in this document, the following platforms are supported:
•
QFX Series
Using the Examples in This Manual
If you want to use the examples in this manual, you can use the load merge or the load
merge relative command. These commands cause the software to merge the incoming
configuration into the current candidate configuration. The example does not become
active until you commit the candidate configuration.
If the example configuration contains the top level of the hierarchy (or multiple
hierarchies), the example is a full example. In this case, use the load merge command.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xvii
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
If the example configuration does not start at the top level of the hierarchy, the example
is a snippet. In this case, use the load merge relative command. These procedures are
described in the following sections.
Merging a Full Example
To merge a full example, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration example into a
text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing
platform.
For example, copy the following configuration to a file and name the file ex-script.conf.
Copy the ex-script.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform.
system {
scripts {
commit {
file ex-script.xsl;
}
}
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
disable;
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/24;
}
}
}
}
2. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge configuration mode command:
[edit]
user@host# load merge /var/tmp/ex-script.conf
load complete
Merging a Snippet
To merge a snippet, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration snippet into a text
file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform.
For example, copy the following snippet to a file and name the file
ex-script-snippet.conf. Copy the ex-script-snippet.conf file to the /var/tmp directory
on your routing platform.
commit {
file ex-script-snippet.xsl; }
2. Move to the hierarchy level that is relevant for this snippet by issuing the following
configuration mode command:
xviii
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
[edit]
user@host# edit system scripts
[edit system scripts]
3. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge relative configuration mode command:
[edit system scripts]
user@host# load merge relative /var/tmp/ex-script-snippet.conf
load complete
For more information about the load command, see CLI Explorer.
Documentation Conventions
Table 1 on page xix defines notice icons used in this guide.
Table 1: Notice Icons
Icon
Meaning
Description
Informational note
Indicates important features or instructions.
Caution
Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage.
Warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death.
Laser warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser.
Tip
Indicates helpful information.
Best practice
Alerts you to a recommended use or implementation.
Table 2 on page xix defines the text and syntax conventions used in this guide.
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions
Convention
Description
Examples
Bold text like this
Represents text that you type.
To enter configuration mode, type the
configure command:
user@host> configure
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xix
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
Fixed-width text like this
Represents output that appears on the
terminal screen.
user@host> show chassis alarms
•
Introduces or emphasizes important
new terms.
•
•
Identifies guide names.
A policy term is a named structure
that defines match conditions and
actions.
•
Identifies RFC and Internet draft titles.
•
Junos OS CLI User Guide
•
RFC 1997, BGP Communities Attribute
Italic text like this
Italic text like this
No alarms currently active
Represents variables (options for which
you substitute a value) in commands or
configuration statements.
Configure the machine’s domain name:
Represents names of configuration
statements, commands, files, and
directories; configuration hierarchy levels;
or labels on routing platform
components.
•
To configure a stub area, include the
stub statement at the [edit protocols
ospf area area-id] hierarchy level.
•
The console port is labeled CONSOLE.
< > (angle brackets)
Encloses optional keywords or variables.
stub <default-metric metric>;
| (pipe symbol)
Indicates a choice between the mutually
exclusive keywords or variables on either
side of the symbol. The set of choices is
often enclosed in parentheses for clarity.
broadcast | multicast
# (pound sign)
Indicates a comment specified on the
same line as the configuration statement
to which it applies.
rsvp { # Required for dynamic MPLS only
[ ] (square brackets)
Encloses a variable for which you can
substitute one or more values.
community name members [
community-ids ]
Indention and braces ( { } )
Identifies a level in the configuration
hierarchy.
; (semicolon)
Identifies a leaf statement at a
configuration hierarchy level.
Text like this
[edit]
root@# set system domain-name
domain-name
(string1 | string2 | string3)
[edit]
routing-options {
static {
route default {
nexthop address;
retain;
}
}
}
GUI Conventions
Bold text like this
xx
Represents graphical user interface (GUI)
items you click or select.
•
In the Logical Interfaces box, select
All Interfaces.
•
To cancel the configuration, click
Cancel.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
> (bold right angle bracket)
Separates levels in a hierarchy of menu
selections.
In the configuration editor hierarchy,
select Protocols>Ospf.
Documentation Feedback
We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can
improve the documentation. You can provide feedback by using either of the following
methods:
•
Online feedback rating system—On any page of the Juniper Networks TechLibrary site
at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/index.html, simply click the stars to rate the content,
and use the pop-up form to provide us with information about your experience.
Alternately, you can use the online feedback form at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/feedback/.
•
E-mail—Send your comments to techpubs-comments@juniper.net. Include the document
or topic name, URL or page number, and software version (if applicable).
Requesting Technical Support
Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance
Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or Partner Support Service
support contract, or are covered under warranty, and need post-sales technical support,
you can access our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC.
•
JTAC policies—For a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies,
review the JTAC User Guide located at
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/local/pdf/resource-guides/7100059-en.pdf.
•
Product warranties—For product warranty information, visit
http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/.
•
JTAC hours of operation—The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, 365 days a year.
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources
For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online
self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the
following features:
•
Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/
•
Search for known bugs: http://www2.juniper.net/kb/
•
Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/
•
Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base: http://kb.juniper.net/
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xxi
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
Download the latest versions of software and review release notes:
http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/
•
Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications:
http://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/
•
Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum:
http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/
•
Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/
To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement
(SNE) Tool: https://tools.juniper.net/SerialNumberEntitlementSearch/
Opening a Case with JTAC
You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone.
•
Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/.
•
Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico).
For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, see
http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.html.
xxii
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 1
Overview
•
Multicast Overview on page 23
Multicast Overview
IP has three fundamental types of addresses: unicast, broadcast, and multicast. A unicast
address is used to send a packet to a single destination. A broadcast address is used to
send a datagram to an entire subnetwork. A multicast address is used to send a datagram
to a set of hosts that can be on different subnetworks and that are configured as members
of a multicast group.
A multicast datagram is delivered to destination group members with the same best-effort
reliability as a standard unicast IP datagram. This means that multicast datagrams are
not guaranteed to reach all members of a group or to arrive in the same order in which
they were transmitted. The only difference between a multicast IP packet and a unicast
IP packet is the presence of a group address in the IP header destination address field.
Multicast addresses use the Class D address format.
NOTE: On all SRX Series devices, reordering is not supported for multicast
fragments. Reordering of unicast fragments is supported.
Individual hosts can join or leave a multicast group at any time. There are no restrictions
on the physical location or the number of members in a multicast group. A host can be
a member of more than one multicast group at any time. A host does not have to belong
to a group to send packets to members of a group.
Routers use a group membership protocol to learn about the presence of group members
on directly attached subnetworks. When a host joins a multicast group, it transmits a
group membership protocol message for the group or groups that it wants to receive and
sets its IP process and network interface card to receive frames addressed to the multicast
group.
Comparing Multicast to Unicast
®
The Junos operating system (Junos OS) routing protocol process supports a wide variety
of routing protocols. These routing protocols carry network information among routing
devices not only for unicast traffic streams sent between one pair of clients and servers,
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
23
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
but also for multicast traffic streams containing video, audio, or both, between a single
server source and many client receivers. The routing protocols used for multicast differ
in many key ways from unicast routing protocols.
Information is delivered over a network by three basic methods: unicast, broadcast, and
multicast.
The differences among unicast, broadcast, and multicast can be summarized as follows:
•
Unicast: One-to-one, from one source to one destination.
•
Broadcast: One-to-all, from one source to all possible destinations.
•
Multicast: One-to-many, from one source to multiple destinations expressing an interest
in receiving the traffic.
NOTE: This list does not include a special category for many-to-many
applications, such as online gaming or videoconferencing, where there are
many sources for the same receiver and where receivers often double as
sources. Many-to-many is a service model that repeatedly employs
one-to-many multicast and therefore requires no unique protocol. The
original multicast specification, RFC 1112, supports both the any-source
multicast (ASM) many-to-many model and the source-specific multicast
(SSM) one-to-many model.
With unicast traffic, many streams of IP packets that travel across networks flow from
a single source, such as a website server, to a single destination such as a client PC.
Unicast traffic is still the most common form of information transfer on networks.
Broadcast traffic flows from a single source to all possible destinations reachable on the
network, which is usually a LAN. Broadcasting is the easiest way to make sure traffic
reaches its destinations.
Television networks use broadcasting to distribute video and audio. Even if the television
network is a cable television (CATV) system, the source signal reaches all possible
destinations, which is the main reason that some channels’ content is scrambled.
Broadcasting is not feasible on the Internet because of the enormous amount of
unnecessary information that would constantly arrive at each end user's device, the
complexities and impact of scrambling, and related privacy issues.
Multicast traffic lies between the extremes of unicast (one source, one destination) and
broadcast (one source, all destinations). Multicast is a “one source, many destinations”
method of traffic distribution, meaning only the destinations that explicitly indicate their
need to receive the information from a particular source receive the traffic stream.
On an IP network, because destinations (clients) do not often communicate directly with
sources (servers), the routing devices between source and destination must be able to
determine the topology of the network from the unicast or multicast perspective to avoid
routing traffic haphazardly. Multicast routing devices replicate packets received on one
input interface and send the copies out on multiple output interfaces.
24
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Chapter 1: Overview
In IP multicast, the source and destination are almost always hosts and not routing
devices. Multicast routing devices distribute the multicast traffic across the network from
source to destinations. The multicast routing device must find multicast sources on the
network, send out copies of packets on several interfaces, prevent routing loops, connect
interested destinations with the proper source, and keep the flow of unwanted packets
to a minimum. Standard multicast routing protocols provide most of these capabilities,
but some router architectures cannot send multiple copies of packets and so do not
support multicasting directly.
IP Multicast Uses
Multicast allows an IP network to support more than just the unicast model of data
delivery that prevailed in the early stages of the Internet. Multicast, originally defined as
a host extension in RFC 1112 in 1989, provides an efficient method for delivering traffic
flows that can be characterized as one-to-many or many-to-many.
Unicast traffic is not strictly limited to data applications. Telephone conversations,
wireless or not, contain digital audio samples and might contain digital photographs or
even video and still flow from a single source to a single destination. In the same way,
multicast traffic is not strictly limited to multimedia applications. In some data
applications, the flow of traffic is from a single source to many destinations that require
the packets, as in a news or stock ticker service delivered to many PCs. For this reason,
the term receiver is preferred to listener for multicast destinations, although both terms
are common.
Network applications that can function with unicast but are better suited for multicast
include collaborative groupware, teleconferencing, periodic or “push” data delivery (stock
quotes, sports scores, magazines, newspapers, and advertisements), server or website
replication, and distributed interactive simulation (DIS) such as war simulations or virtual
reality. Any IP network concerned with reducing network resource overhead for
one-to-many or many-to-many data or multimedia applications with multiple receivers
benefits from multicast.
If unicast were employed by radio or news ticker services, each radio or PC would have
to have a separate traffic session for each listener or viewer at a PC (this is actually the
method for some Web-based services). The processing load and bandwidth consumed
by the server would increase linearly as more people “tune in” to the server. This is
extremely inefficient when dealing with the global scale of the Internet. Unicast places
the burden of packet duplication on the server and consumes more and more backbone
bandwidth as the number of users grows.
If broadcast were employed instead, the source could generate a single IP packet stream
using a broadcast destination address. Although broadcast eliminates the server packet
duplication issue, this is not a good solution for IP because IP broadcasts can be sent
only to a single subnetwork, and IP routing devices normally isolate IP subnetworks on
separate interfaces. Even if an IP packet stream could be addressed to literally go
everywhere, and there were no need to “tune” to any source at all, broadcast would be
extremely inefficient because of the bandwidth strain and need for uninterested hosts
to discard large numbers of packets. Broadcast places the burden of packet rejection on
each host and consumes the maximum amount of backbone bandwidth.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
25
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
For radio station or news ticker traffic, multicast provides the most efficient and effective
outcome, with none of the drawbacks and all of the advantages of the other methods.
A single source of multicast packets finds its way to every interested receiver. As with
broadcast, the transmitting host generates only a single stream of IP packets, so the load
remains constant whether there is one receiver or one million. The network routing devices
replicate the packets and deliver the packets to the proper receivers, but only the
replication role is a new one for routing devices. The links leading to subnets consisting
of entirely uninterested receivers carry no multicast traffic. Multicast minimizes the burden
placed on sender, network, and receiver.
IP Multicast Terminology
Multicast has its own particular set of terms and acronyms that apply to IP multicast
routing devices and networks. Figure 1 on page 27 depicts some of the terms commonly
used in an IP multicast network.
In a multicast network, the key component is the routing device, which is able to replicate
packets and is therefore multicast-capable. The routing devices in the IP multicast
network, which has exactly the same topology as the unicast network it is based on, use
a multicast routing protocol to build a distribution tree that connects receivers (preferred
to the multimedia implications of listeners, but listeners is also used) to sources. In
multicast terminology, the distribution tree is rooted at the source (the root of the
distribution tree is the source). The interface on the routing device leading toward the
source is the upstream interface, although the less precise terms incoming or inbound
interface are used as well. To keep bandwidth use to a minimum, it is best for only one
upstream interface on the routing device to receive multicast packets. The interface on
the routing device leading toward the receivers is the downstream interface, although
the less precise terms outgoing or outbound interface are used as well. There can be 0
to N–1 downstream interfaces on a routing device, where N is the number of logical
interfaces on the routing device. To prevent looping, the upstream interface must never
receive copies of downstream multicast packets.
26
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
Figure 1: Multicast Terminology in an IP Network
Routing loops are disastrous in multicast networks because of the risk of repeatedly
replicated packets. One of the complexities of modern multicast routing protocols is the
need to avoid routing loops, packet by packet, much more rigorously than in unicast
routing protocols.
Reverse-Path Forwarding for Loop Prevention
The routing device's multicast forwarding state runs more logically based on the reverse
path, from the receiver back to the root of the distribution tree. In RPF, every multicast
packet received must pass an RPF check before it can be replicated or forwarded on any
interface. When it receives a multicast packet on an interface, the routing device verifies
that the source address in the multicast IP packet is the destination address for a unicast
IP packet back to the source.
If the outgoing interface found in the unicast routing table is the same interface that the
multicast packet was received on, the packet passes the RPF check. Multicast packets
that fail the RPF check are dropped, because the incoming interface is not on the shortest
path back to the source. routing devices can build and maintain separate tables for RPF
purposes.
Shortest-Path Tree for Loop Prevention
The distribution tree used for multicast is rooted at the source and is the shortest-path
tree (SPT), but this path can be long if the source is at the periphery of the network.
Providing a shared tree on the backbone as the distribution tree locates the multicast
source more centrally in the network. Shared distribution trees with roots in the core
network are created and maintained by a multicast routing device operating as a
rendezvous point (RP), a feature of sparse mode multicast protocols.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Administrative Scoping for Loop Prevention
Scoping limits the routing devices and interfaces that can forward a multicast packet.
Multicast scoping is administrative in the sense that a range of multicast addresses is
reserved for scoping purposes, as described in RFC 2365, Administratively Scoped IP
Multicast. routing devices at the boundary must filter multicast packets and ensure that
packets do not stray beyond the established limit.
Multicast Leaf and Branch Terminology
Each subnetwork with hosts on the routing device that has at least one interested receiver
is a leaf on the distribution tree. routing devices can have multiple leaves on different
interfaces and must send a copy of the IP multicast packet out on each interface with a
leaf. When a new leaf subnetwork is added to the tree (that is, the interface to the host
subnetwork previously received no copies of the multicast packets), a new branch is built,
the leaf is joined to the tree, and replicated packets are sent out on the interface. The
number of leaves on a particular interface does not affect the routing device. The action
is the same for one leaf or a hundred.
NOTE: On Juniper Networks security devices, if the maximum number of
leaves on a multicast distribution tree is exceeded, multicast sessions are
created up to the maximum number of leaves, and any multicast sessions
that exceed the maximum number of leaves are ignored. The maximum
number of leaves on a multicast distribution tree is device specific.
When a branch contains no leaves because there are no interested hosts on the routing
device interface leading to that IP subnetwork, the branch is pruned from the distribution
tree, and no multicast packets are sent out that interface. Packets are replicated and
sent out multiple interfaces only where the distribution tree branches at a routing device,
and no link ever carries a duplicate flow of packets.
Collections of hosts all receiving the same stream of IP packets, usually from the same
multicast source, are called groups. In IP multicast networks, traffic is delivered to
multicast groups based on an IP multicast address, or group address. The groups determine
the location of the leaves, and the leaves determine the branches on the multicast
network.
IP Multicast Addressing
Multicast uses the Class D IP address range (224.0.0.0 through 239.255.255.255). Class
D addresses are commonly referred to as multicast addresses because the entire classful
address concept is obsolete. Multicast addresses can never appear as the source address
in an IP packet and can only be the destination of a packet.
Multicast addresses usually have a prefix length of /32, although other prefix lengths are
allowed. Multicast addresses represent logical groupings of receivers and not physical
collections of devices. Blocks of multicast addresses can still be described in terms of
prefix length in traditional notation, but only for convenience. For example, the multicast
28
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
address range from 232.0.0.0 through 232.255.255.255 can be written as 232.0.0.0/8 or
232/8.
Internet service providers (ISPs) do not typically allocate multicast addresses to their
customers because multicast addresses relate to content, not to physical devices.
Receivers are not assigned their own multicast addresses, but need to know the multicast
address of the content. Sources need to be assigned multicast addresses only to produce
the content, not to identify their place in the network. Every source and receiver still needs
an ordinary, unicast IP address.
Multicast addressing most often references the receivers, and the source of multicast
content is usually not even a member of the multicast group for which it produces content.
If the source needs to monitor the packets it produces, monitoring can be done locally,
and there is no need to make the packets traverse the network.
Many applications have been assigned a range of multicast addresses for their own use.
These applications assign multicast addresses to sessions created by that application.
You do not usually need to statically assign a multicast address, but you can do so.
Multicast Addresses
Multicast host group addresses are defined to be the IP addresses whose high-order four
bits are 1110, giving an address range from 224.0.0.0 through 239.255.255.255, or simply
224.0.0.0/4. (These addresses also are referred to as Class D addresses.)
The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) maintains a list of registered IP multicast
groups. The base address 224.0.0.0 is reserved and cannot be assigned to any group.
The block of multicast addresses from 224.0.0.1 through 224.0.0.255 is reserved for local
wire use. Groups in this range are assigned for various uses, including routing protocols
and local discovery mechanisms.
The range from 239.0.0.0 through 239.255.255.255 is reserved for administratively scoped
addresses. Because packets addressed to administratively scoped multicast addresses
do not cross configured administrative boundaries, and because administratively scoped
multicast addresses are locally assigned, these addresses do not need to be unique
across administrative boundaries.
Layer 2 Frames and IPv4 Multicast Addresses
Multicasting on a LAN is a good place to start an investigation of multicasting at Layer 2.
At Layer 2, multicast deals with media access control (MAC) frames and addresses
instead of IPv4 or IPv6 packets and addresses. Consider a single LAN, without routing
devices, with a multicast source sending to a certain group. The rest of the hosts are
receivers interested in the multicast group’s content. So the multicast source host
generates packets with its unicast IP address as the source, and the multicast group
address as the destination.
Which MAC addresses are used on the frame containing this packet? The packet source
address—the unicast IP address of the host originating the multicast content—translates
easily and directly to the MAC address of the source. But what about the packet’s
destination address? This is the IP multicast group address. Which destination MAC
address for the frame corresponds to the packet’s multicast group address?
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
One option is for LANs simply to use the LAN broadcast MAC address, which guarantees
that the frame is processed by every station on the LAN. However, this procedure defeats
the whole purpose of multicast, which is to limit the circulation of packets and frames
to interested hosts. Also, hosts might have access to many multicast groups, which
multiplies the amount of traffic to noninterested destinations. Broadcasting frames at
the LAN level to support multicast groups makes no sense.
However, there is an easy way to effectively use Layer 2 frames for multicast purposes.
The MAC address has a bit that is set to 0 for unicast (the LAN term is individual address)
and set to 1 to indicate that this is a multicast address. Some of these addresses are
reserved for multicast groups of specific vendors or MAC-level protocols. Internet multicast
applications use the range 0x01-00-5E-00-00-00 to 0x01-00-5E-FF-FF-FF. Multicast
receivers (hosts running TCP/IP) listen for frames with one of these addresses when the
application joins a multicast group. The host stops listening when the application
terminates or the host leaves the group at the packet layer (Layer 3).
This means that 3 bytes, or 24 bits, are available to map IPv4 multicast addresses at
Layer 3 to MAC multicast addresses at Layer 2. However, all IPv4 addresses, including
multicast addresses, are 32 bits long, leaving 8 IP address bits left over. Which method
of mapping IPv4 multicast addresses to MAC multicast addresses minimizes the chance
of “collisions” (that is, two different IP multicast groups at the packet layer mapping to
the same MAC multicast address at the frame layer)?
First, it is important to realize that all IPv4 multicast addresses begin with the same 4
bits (1110), so there are really only 4 bits of concern, not 8. A LAN must not drop the last
bits of the IPv4 address because these are almost guaranteed to be host bits, depending
on the subnet mask. But the high-order bits, the leftmost address bits, are almost always
network bits, and there is only one LAN (for now).
One other bit of the remaining 24 MAC address bits is reserved (an initial 0 indicates an
Internet multicast address), so the 5 bits following the initial 1110 in the IPv4 address are
dropped. The 23 remaining bits are mapped, one for one, into the last 23 bits of the MAC
address. An example of this process is shown in Figure 2 on page 31.
30
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
Figure 2: Converting MAC Addresses to Multicast Addresses
5
Note that this process means that there are 32 (2 ) IPv4 multicast addresses that could
map to the same MAC multicast addresses. For example, multicast IPv4 addresses
224.8.7.6 and 229.136.7.6 translate to the same MAC address (0x01-00-5E-08-07-06).
This is a real concern, and because the host could be interested in frames sent to both
of the those multicast groups, the IP software must reject one or the other.
NOTE: This “collision” problem does not exist in IPv6 because of the way
IPv6 handles multicast groups, but it is always a concern in IPv4. The
procedure for placing IPv6 multicast packets inside multicast frames is nearly
identical to that for IPv4, except for the MAC destination address 0x3333
prefix (and the lack of “collisions”).
Once the MAC address for the multicast group is determined, the host's operating system
essentially orders the LAN interface card to join or leave the multicast group. Once joined
to a multicast group, the host accepts frames sent to the multicast address as well as
the host’s unicast address and ignores other multicast group’s frames. It is possible for
a host to join and receive multicast content from more than one group at the same time,
of course.
Multicast Interface Lists
To avoid multicast routing loops, every multicast routing device must always be aware
of the interface that leads to the source of that multicast group content by the shortest
path. This is the upstream (incoming) interface, and packets are never to be forwarded
back toward a multicast source. All other interfaces are potential downstream (outgoing)
interfaces, depending on the number of branches on the distribution tree.
routing devices closely monitor the status of the incoming and outgoing interfaces, a
process that determines the multicast forwarding state. A routing device with a multicast
forwarding state for a particular multicast group is essentially “turned on” for that group's
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
content. Interfaces on the routing device's outgoing interface list send copies of the
group's packets received on the incoming interface list for that group. The incoming and
outgoing interface lists might be different for different multicast groups.
The multicast forwarding state in a routing device is usually written in either (S,G) or
(*,G) notation. These are pronounced “ess comma gee” and “star comma gee,”
respectively. In (S,G), the S refers to the unicast IP address of the source for the multicast
traffic, and the G refers to the particular multicast group IP address for which S is the
source. All multicast packets sent from this source have S as the source address and G
as the destination address.
The asterisk (*) in the (*,G) notation is a wildcard indicating that the state applies to any
multicast application source sending to group G. So, if two sources are originating exactly
the same content for multicast group 224.1.1.2, a routing device could use (*,224.1.1.2) to
represent the state of a routing device forwarding traffic from both sources to the group.
Multicast Routing Protocols
Multicast routing protocols enable a collection of multicast routing devices to build (join)
distribution trees when a host on a directly attached subnet, typically a LAN, wants to
receive traffic from a certain multicast group, prune branches, locate sources and groups,
and prevent routing loops.
There are several multicast routing protocols:
32
•
Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP)—The first of the multicast routing
protocols and hampered by a number of limitations that make this method unattractive
for large-scale Internet use. DVMRP is a dense-mode-only protocol, and uses the
flood-and-prune or implicit join method to deliver traffic everywhere and then determine
where the uninterested receivers are. DVMRP uses source-based distribution trees in
the form (S,G), and builds its own multicast routing tables for RPF checks.
•
Multicast OSPF (MOSPF)—Extends OSPF for multicast use, but only for dense mode.
However, MOSPF has an explicit join message, so routing devices do not have to flood
their entire domain with multicast traffic from every source. MOSPF uses source-based
distribution trees in the form (S,G).
•
Bidirectional PIM mode—A variation of PIM. Bidirectional PIM builds bidirectional shared
trees that are rooted at a rendezvous point (RP) address. Bidirectional traffic does not
switch to shortest path trees as in PIM-SM and is therefore optimized for routing state
size instead of path length. This means that the end-to-end latency might be longer
compared to PIM sparse mode. Bidirectional PIM routes are always wildcard-source
(*,G) routes. The protocol eliminates the need for (S,G) routes and data-triggered
events. The bidirectional (*,G) group trees carry traffic both upstream from senders
toward the RP, and downstream from the RP to receivers. As a consequence, the strict
reverse path forwarding (RPF)-based rules found in other PIM modes do not apply to
bidirectional PIM. Instead, bidirectional PIM (*,G) routes forward traffic from all sources
and the RP. Bidirectional PIM routing devices must have the ability to accept traffic on
many potential incoming interfaces. Bidirectional PIM scales well because it needs no
source-specific (S,G) state. Bidirectional PIM is recommended in deployments with
many dispersed sources and many dispersed receivers.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
•
PIM dense mode—In this mode of PIM, the assumption is that almost all possible
subnets have at least one receiver wanting to receive the multicast traffic from a source,
so the network is flooded with traffic on all possible branches, then pruned back when
branches do not express an interest in receiving the packets, explicitly (by message)
or implicitly (time-out silence). This is the dense mode of multicast operation. LANs
are appropriate networks for dense-mode operation. Some multicast routing protocols,
especially older ones, support only dense-mode operation, which makes them
inappropriate for use on the Internet. In contrast to DVMRP and MOSPF, PIM dense
mode allows a routing device to use any unicast routing protocol and performs RPF
checks using the unicast routing table. PIM dense mode has an implicit join message,
so routing devices use the flood-and-prune method to deliver traffic everywhere and
then determine where the uninterested receivers are. PIM dense mode uses
source-based distribution trees in the form (S,G), as do all dense-mode protocols. PIM
also supports sparse-dense mode, with mixed sparse and dense groups, but there is
no special notation for that operational mode. If sparse-dense mode is supported, the
multicast routing protocol allows some multicast groups to be sparse and other groups
to be dense.
•
PIM sparse mode—In this mode of PIM, the assumption is that very few of the possible
receivers want packets from each source, so the network establishes and sends packets
only on branches that have at least one leaf indicating (by message) an interest in the
traffic. This multicast protocol allows a routing device to use any unicast routing
protocol and performs reverse-path forwarding (RPF) checks using the unicast routing
table. PIM sparse mode has an explicit join message, so routing devices determine
where the interested receivers are and send join messages upstream to their neighbors,
building trees from receivers to the rendezvous point (RP). PIM sparse mode uses an
RP routing device as the initial source of multicast group traffic and therefore builds
distribution trees in the form (*,G), as do all sparse-mode protocols. PIM sparse mode
migrates to an (S,G) source-based tree if that path is shorter than through the RP for
a particular multicast group's traffic. WANs are appropriate networks for sparse-mode
operation, and indeed a common multicast guideline is not to run dense mode on a
WAN under any circumstances.
•
Core Based Trees (CBT)—Shares all of the characteristics of PIM sparse mode (sparse
mode, explicit join, and shared (*,G) trees), but is said to be more efficient at finding
sources than PIM sparse mode. CBT is rarely encountered outside academic discussions.
There are no large-scale deployments of CBT, commercial or otherwise.
•
PIM source-specific multicast (SSM)—Enhancement to PIM sparse mode that allows
a client to receive multicast traffic directly from the source, without the help of an RP.
Used with IGMPv3 to create a shortest-path tree between receiver and source.
•
IGMPv1—The original protocol defined in RFC 1112, Host Extensions for IP Multicasting.
IGMPv1 sends an explicit join message to the routing device, but uses a timeout to
determine when hosts leave a group. Three versions of the Internet Group Management
Protocol (IGMP) run between receiver hosts and routing devices.
•
IGMPv2—Defined in RFC 2236, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 2. Among
other features, IGMPv2 adds an explicit leave message to the join message.
•
IGMPv3—Defined in RFC 3376, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3. Among
other features, IGMPv3 optimizes support for a single source of content for a multicast
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
group, or source-specific multicast (SSM). Used with PIM SSM to create a shortest-path
tree between receiver and source.
•
Bootstrap Router (BSR) and Auto-Rendezvous Point (RP)—Allow sparse-mode routing
protocols to find RPs within the routing domain (autonomous system, or AS). RP
addresses can also be statically configured.
•
Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP)—Allows groups located in one multicast
routing domain to find RPs in other routing domains. MSDP is not used on an RP if all
receivers and sources are located in the same routing domain. Typically runs on the
same routing device as PIM sparse mode RP. Not appropriate if all receivers and sources
are located in the same routing domain.
•
Session Announcement Protocol (SAP) and Session Description Protocol
(SDP)—Display multicast session names and correlate the names with multicast
traffic. SDP is a session directory protocol that advertises multimedia conference
sessions and communicates setup information to participants who want to join the
session. A client commonly uses SDP to announce a conference session by periodically
multicasting an announcement packet to a well-known multicast address and port
using SAP.
•
Pragmatic General Multicast (PGM)—Special protocol layer for multicast traffic that
can be used between the IP layer and the multicast application to add reliability to
multicast traffic. PGM allows a receiver to detect missing information in all cases and
request replacement information if the receiver application requires it.
The differences among the multicast routing protocols are summarized in
Table 3 on page 34.
Table 3: Multicast Routing Protocols Compared
Multicast Routing
Protocol
Dense Mode
Sparse Mode
Implicit Join
Explicit Join
(S,G) SBT
(*,G) Shared Tree
DVMRP
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
MOSPF
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
PIM dense mode
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
PIM sparse mode
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, maybe
Yes, initially
Bidirectional PIM
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
CBT
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
SSM
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, maybe
Yes, initially
IGMPv1
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, maybe
Yes, initially
IGMPv2
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, maybe
Yes, initially
IGMPv3
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, maybe
Yes, initially
34
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
Table 3: Multicast Routing Protocols Compared (continued)
Multicast Routing
Protocol
Dense Mode
Sparse Mode
Implicit Join
Explicit Join
(S,G) SBT
(*,G) Shared Tree
BSR and Auto-RP
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, maybe
Yes, initially
MSDP
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes, maybe
Yes, initially
It is important to realize that retransmissions due to a high bit-error rate on a link or
overloaded routing device can make multicast as inefficient as repeated unicast.
Therefore, there is a trade-off in many multicast applications regarding the session
support provided by the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) (but TCP always resends
missing segments), or the simple drop-and-continue strategy of the User Datagram
Protocol (UDP) datagram service (but reordering can become an issue). Modern multicast
uses UDP almost exclusively.
T Series Router Multicast Performance
The Juniper Networks T Series Core Routers handle extreme multicast packet replication
requirements with a minimum of router load. Each memory component replicates a
multicast packet twice at most. Even in the worst-case scenario involving maximum
fan-out, when 1 input port and 63 output ports need a copy of the packet, the T Series
routing platform copies a multicast packet only six times. Most multicast distribution
trees are much sparser, so in many cases only two or three replications are necessary. In
no case does the T Series architecture have an impact on multicast performance, even
with the largest multicast fan-out requirements.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
36
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 1
Managing Group Membership
•
Using IGMP on page 39
•
Using IGMP Snooping on page 67
•
Using MLD on page 81
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
37
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
38
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 2
Using IGMP
•
Understanding Group Membership Protocols on page 39
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Configuring IGMP on page 43
•
Enabling IGMP on page 44
•
Changing the IGMP Version on page 45
•
Modifying the IGMP Host-Query Message Interval on page 46
•
Modifying the IGMP Last-Member Query Interval on page 47
•
Specifying Immediate-Leave Host Removal for IGMP on page 48
•
Filtering Unwanted IGMP Reports at the IGMP Interface Level on page 49
•
Accepting IGMP Messages from Remote Subnetworks on page 50
•
Modifying the IGMP Query Response Interval on page 51
•
Modifying the IGMP Robustness Variable on page 51
•
Limiting the Maximum IGMP Message Rate on page 53
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
•
Recording IGMP Join and Leave Events on page 59
•
Limiting the Number of IGMP Multicast Group Joins on Logical Interfaces on page 61
•
Understanding Multicast Route Leaking for VRF and Virtual-Router Instances on page 63
•
Tracing IGMP Protocol Traffic on page 64
•
Disabling IGMP on page 65
Understanding Group Membership Protocols
There is a big difference between the multicast protocols used between host and routing
device and between the multicast routing devices themselves. Hosts on a given
subnetwork need to inform their routing device only whether or not they are interested
in receiving packets from a certain multicast group. The source host needs to inform its
routing devices only that it is the source of traffic for a particular multicast group. In other
words, no detailed knowledge of the distribution tree is needed by any hosts; only a group
membership protocol is needed to inform routing devices of their participation in a
multicast group. Between adjacent routing devices, on the other hand, the multicast
routing protocols must avoid loops as they build a detailed sense of the network topology
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
and distribution tree from source to leaf. So, different multicast protocols are used for
the host-router portion and the router-router portion of the multicast network.
Multicast group membership protocols enable a routing device to detect when a host
on a directly attached subnet, typically a LAN, wants to receive traffic from a certain
multicast group. Even if more than one host on the LAN wants to receive traffic for that
multicast group, the routing device sends only one copy of each packet for that multicast
group out on that interface, because of the inherent broadcast nature of LANs. When
the multicast group membership protocol informs the routing device that there are no
interested hosts on the subnet, the packets are withheld and that leaf is pruned from the
distribution tree.
The Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) and the Multicast Listener Discovery
(MLD) Protocol are the standard IP multicast group membership protocols: IGMP and
MLD have several versions that are supported by hosts and routing devices:
•
IGMPv1—The original protocol defined in RFC 1112. An explicit join message is sent to
the routing device, but a timeout is used to determine when hosts leave a group. This
process wastes processing cycles on the routing device, especially on older or smaller
routing devices.
•
IGMPv2—Defined in RFC 2236. Among other features, IGMPv2 adds an explicit leave
message to the join message so that routing devices can more easily determine when
a group has no interested listeners on a LAN.
•
IGMPv3—Defined in RFC 3376. Among other features, IGMPv3 optimizes support for
a single source of content for a multicast group, or source-specific multicast (SSM).
•
MLDv1—Defined in RFC 2710. MLDv1 is similar to IGMPv2.
•
MLDv2—Defined in RFC 3810. MLDv2 similar to IGMPv3.
The various versions of IGMP and MLD are backward compatible. It is common for a
routing device to run multiple versions of IGMP and MLD on LAN interfaces. Backward
compatibility is achieved by dropping back to the most basic of all versions run on a LAN.
For example, if one host is running IGMPv1, any routing device attached to the LAN running
IGMPv2 can drop back to IGMPv1 operation, effectively eliminating the IGMPv2 advantages.
Running multiple IGMP versions ensures that both IGMPv1 and IGMPv2 hosts find peers
for their versions on the routing device.
CAUTION: On MX Series platforms, IGMPv2 and IGMPv3 can or cannot be
configured together on the same interface, depending on the Junos OS release
at your installation. Configuring both together can cause unexpected behavior
in multicast traffic forwarding.
Related
Documentation
40
•
Examples: Configuring MLD on page 84
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
Understanding IGMP
The Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) manages the membership of hosts
and routing devices in multicast groups. IP hosts use IGMP to report their multicast group
memberships to any immediately neighboring multicast routing devices. Multicast routing
devices use IGMP to learn, for each of their attached physical networks, which groups
have members.
IGMP is also used as the transport for several related multicast protocols (for example,
Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol [DVMRP] and Protocol Independent Multicast
version 1 [PIMv1]).
A routing device receives explicit join and prune messages from those neighboring routing
devices that have downstream group members. When PIM is the multicast protocol in
use, IGMP begins the process as follows:
1.
To join a multicast group, G, a host conveys its membership information through IGMP.
2. The routing device then forwards data packets addressed to a multicast group G to
only those interfaces on which explicit join messages have been received.
3. A designated router (DR) sends periodic join and prune messages toward a
group-specific rendezvous point (RP) for each group for which it has active members.
One or more routing devices are automatically or statically designated as the RP, and
all routing devices must explicitly join through the RP.
4. Each routing device along the path toward the RP builds a wildcard (any-source)
state for the group and sends join and prune messages toward the RP.
The term route entry is used to refer to the state maintained in a routing device to
represent the distribution tree.
A route entry can include such fields as:
•
source address
•
group address
•
incoming interface from which packets are accepted
•
list of outgoing interfaces to which packets are sent
•
timers
•
flag bits
The wildcard route entry's incoming interface points toward the RP.
The outgoing interfaces point to the neighboring downstream routing devices that
have sent join and prune messages toward the RP as well as the directly connected
hosts that have requested membership to group G.
5. This state creates a shared, RP-centered, distribution tree that reaches all group
members.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
IGMP is also used as the transport for several related multicast protocols (for example,
Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol [DVMRP] and Protocol Independent Multicast
version 1 [PIMv1]).
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, PIMv1 is not supported.
IGMP is an integral part of IP and must be enabled on all routing devices and hosts that
need to receive IP multicast traffic.
For each attached network, a multicast routing device can be either a querier or a
nonquerier. The querier routing device periodically sends general query messages to
solicit group membership information. Hosts on the network that are members of a
multicast group send report messages. When a host leaves a group, it sends a leave
group message.
IGMP version 3 (IGMPv3) supports inclusion and exclusion lists. Inclusion lists enable
you to specify which sources can send to a multicast group. This type of multicast group
is called a source-specific multicast (SSM) group, and its multicast address is 232/8.
IGMPv3 provides support for source filtering. For example, a routing device can specify
particular routing devices from which it accepts or rejects traffic. With IGMPv3, a multicast
routing device can learn which sources are of interest to neighboring routing devices.
Exclusion mode works the opposite of an inclusion list. It allows any source but the ones
listed to send to the SSM group.
IGMPv3 interoperates with versions 1 and 2 of the protocol. However, to remain compatible
with older IGMP hosts and routing devices, IGMPv3 routing devices must also implement
versions 1 and 2 of the protocol. IGMPv3 supports the following membership-report record
types: mode is allowed, allow new sources, and block old sources.
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
42
Release
Description
15.2
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, PIMv1 is not supported.
•
Supported IP Multicast Protocol Standards
•
Enabling IGMP on page 44
•
Disabling IGMP on page 65
•
Configuring IGMP
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
Configuring IGMP
Before you begin:
1.
Determine whether the router is directly attached to any multicast sources. Receivers
must be able to locate these sources.
2. Determine whether the router is directly attached to any multicast group receivers. If
receivers are present, IGMP is needed.
3. Determine whether to configure multicast to use sparse, dense, or sparse-dense mode.
Each mode has different configuration considerations.
4. Determine the address of the RP if sparse or sparse-dense mode is used.
5. Determine whether to locate the RP with the static configuration, BSR, or auto-RP
method.
6. Determine whether to configure multicast to use its own RPF routing table when
configuring PIM in sparse, dense, or sparse-dense mode.
7. Configure the SAP and SDP protocols to listen for multicast session announcements.
See Configuring the Session Announcement Protocol.
To configure the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP), include the igmp
statement:
igmp {
accounting;
interface interface-name {
disable;
(accounting | no-accounting);
group-policy [ policy-names ];
immediate-leave;
oif-map map-name;
promiscuous-mode;
ssm-map ssm-map-name;
static {
group multicast-group-address {
exclude;
group-count number;
group-increment increment;
source ip-address {
source-count number;
source-increment increment;
}
}
}
version version;
}
query-interval seconds;
query-last-member-interval seconds;
query-response-interval seconds;
robust-count number;
traceoptions {
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols]
By default, IGMP is enabled on all interfaces on which you configure Protocol Independent
Multicast (PIM), and on all broadcast interfaces on which you configure the Distance
Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP).
NOTE: You can configure IGMP on an interface without configuring PIM. PIM
is generally not needed on IGMP downstream interfaces. Therefore, only one
“pseudo PIM interface” is created to represent all IGMP downstream
(IGMP-only) interfaces on the router. This reduces the amount of router
resources, such as memory, that are consumed. You must configure PIM on
upstream IGMP interfaces to enable multicast routing, perform reverse-path
forwarding for multicast data packets, populate the multicast forwarding
table for upstream interfaces, and in the case of bidirectional PIM and PIM
sparse mode, to distribute IGMP group memberships into the multicast routing
domain.
Enabling IGMP
The Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) manages multicast groups by
establishing, maintaining, and removing groups on a subnet. Multicast routing devices
use IGMP to learn which groups have members on each of their attached physical
networks. IGMP must be enabled for the router to receive IPv4 multicast packets. IGMP
is only needed for IPv4 networks, because multicast is handled differently in IPv6 networks.
IGMP is automatically enabled on all IPv4 interfaces on which you configure PIM and on
all IPv4 broadcast interfaces when you configure DVMRP.
If IGMP is not running on an interface—either because PIM and DVMRP are not configured
on the interface or because IGMP is explicitly disabled on the interface—you can explicitly
enable IGMP.
To explicitly enable IGMP:
1.
If PIM and DVMRP are not running on the interface, explicitly enable IGMP by including
the interface name.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/0/0.0
2. See if IGMP is disabled on any interfaces. In the following example, IGMP is disabled
on a Gigabit Ethernet interface.
[edit protocols igmp]
44
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
user@host# show
interface fe-0/0/0.0;
interface ge-1/0/0.0 {
disable;
}
3. Enable IGMP on the interface by deleting the disable statement.
[edit protocols igmp]
delete interface ge-1/0/0.0 disable
4. Verify the configuration.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# show
interface fe-0/0/0.0;
interface ge-1/0/0.0;
5. Verify the operation of IGMP on the interfaces by checking the output of the show
igmp interface command.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Disabling IGMP on page 65
•
show igmp interface on page 401
Changing the IGMP Version
By default, the routing device runs IGMPv2. Routing devices running different versions of
IGMP determine the lowest common version of IGMP that is supported by hosts on their
subnet and operate in that version.
To enable source-specific multicast (SSM) functionality, you must configure version 3
on the host and the host’s directly connected routing device. If a source address is specified
in a multicast group that is statically configured, the version must be set to IGMPv3.
If a static multicast group is configured with the source address defined, and the IGMP
version is configured to be version 2, the source is ignored and only the group is added.
In this case, the join is treated as an IGMPv2 group join.
BEST PRACTICE: If you configure the IGMP version setting at the individual
interface hierarchy level, it overrides the interface all statement. That is, the
new interface does not inherit the version number that you specified with the
interface all statement. By default, that new interface is enabled with version
2. You must explicitly specify a version number when adding a new interface.
For example, if you specified version 3 with interface all, you would need to
configure the version 3 statement for the new interface. Additionally, if you
configure an interface for a multicast group at the [edit interface interface-name
static group multicast-group-address] hierarchy level, you must specify a version
number as well as the other group parameters. Otherwise, the interface is
enabled with the default version 2.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
If you have already configured the routing device to use IGMP version 1 (IGMPv1) and then
configure it to use IGMPv2, the routing device continues to use IGMPv1 for up to 6 minutes
and then uses IGMPv2.
To change to IGMPv3 for SSM functionality:
1.
Configure the IGMP interface.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface ge-0/0/0 version 3
2. Verify the configuration by checking the version field in the output of the show igmp
interfaces command. The show igmp statistics command has version-specific output
fields, such as V1 Membership Report, V2 Membership Report, and V3 Membership
Report.
CAUTION: On MX Series platforms, IGMPv2 and IGMPv3 can or cannot be
configured together on the same interface, depending on the Junos OS release
at your installation. Configuring both together can cause unexpected behavior
in multicast traffic forwarding.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
show pim interfaces on page 486
•
show igmp statistics on page 405
•
RFC 2236, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 2
•
RFC 3376, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3
Modifying the IGMP Host-Query Message Interval
The objective of IGMP is to keep routers up to date with group membership of the entire
subnet. Routers need not know who all the members are, only that members exist. Each
host keeps track of which multicast groups are subscribed to. On each link, one router is
elected the querier. The IGMP querier router periodically sends general host-query
messages on each attached network to solicit membership information. The messages
are sent to the all-systems multicast group address, 224.0.0.1.
The query interval, the response interval, and the robustness variable are related in that
they are all variables that are used to calculate the group membership timeout. The
group membership timeout is the number of seconds that must pass before a multicast
router determines that no more members of a host group exist on a subnet. The group
membership timeout is calculated as the (robustness variable x query-interval) +
(query-response-interval). If no reports are received for a particular group before the
group membership timeout has expired, the routing device stops forwarding
remotely-originated multicast packets for that group onto the attached network.
By default, host-query messages are sent every 125 seconds. You can change this interval
to change the number of IGMP messages sent on the subnet.
46
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Chapter 2: Using IGMP
To modify the query interval:
1.
Configure the interval.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set query-interval 200
The value can be from 1 through 1024 seconds.
2. Verify the configuration by checking the IGMP Query Interval field in the output of the
show igmp interface command.
3. Verify the operation of the query interval by checking the Membership Query field in
the output of the show igmp statistics command.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Modifying the IGMP Query Response Interval on page 51
•
Modifying the IGMP Robustness Variable on page 51
•
show igmp interface on page 401
•
show igmp statistics on page 405
Modifying the IGMP Last-Member Query Interval
The last-member query interval is the maximum amount of time between group-specific
query messages, including those sent in response to leave-group messages. You can
configure this interval to change the amount of time it takes a routing device to detect
the loss of the last member of a group.
When the routing device that is serving as the querier receives a leave-group message
from a host, the routing device sends multiple group-specific queries to the group being
left. The querier sends a specific number of these queries at a specific interval. The number
of queries sent is called the last-member query count. The interval at which the queries
are sent is called the last-member query interval. Because both settings are configurable,
you can adjust the leave latency. The IGMP leave latency is the time between a request
to leave a multicast group and the receipt of the last byte of data for the multicast group.
The last-member query count x (times) the last-member query interval = (equals) the
amount of time it takes a routing device to determine that the last member of a group
has left the group and to stop forwarding group traffic.
The default last-member query interval is 1 second. You can configure a subsecond
interval up to one digit to the right of the decimal point. The configurable range is 0.1
through 0.9, then in 1-second intervals 1 through 999,999.
To modify this interval:
1.
Configure the time (in seconds) that the routing device waits for a report in response
to a group-specific query.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set query-last-member-interval 0.1
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2. Verify the configuration by checking the IGMP Last Member Query Interval field in the
output of the show igmp interfaces command.
NOTE: You can configure the last-member query count by configuring the
robustness variable. The two are always equal.
Related
Documentation
•
Modifying the IGMP Robustness Variable on page 51
•
show pim interfaces on page 486
Specifying Immediate-Leave Host Removal for IGMP
The immediate leave setting is useful for minimizing the leave latency of IGMP
memberships. When this setting is enabled, the routing device leaves the multicast group
immediately after the last host leaves the multicast group.
The immediate-leave setting enables host tracking, meaning that the device keeps track
of the hosts that send join messages. This allows IGMP to determine when the last host
sends a leave message for the multicast group.
When the immediate leave setting is enabled, the device removes an interface from the
forwarding-table entry without first sending IGMP group-specific queries to the interface.
The interface is pruned from the multicast tree for the multicast group specified in the
IGMP leave message. The immediate leave setting ensures optimal bandwidth
management for hosts on a switched network, even when multiple multicast groups are
being used simultaneously.
When immediate leave is disabled and one host sends a leave group message, the routing
device first sends a group query to determine if another receiver responds. If no receiver
responds, the routing device removes all hosts on the interface from the multicast group.
Immediate leave is disabled by default for both IGMP version 2 and IGMP version 3.
NOTE: Although host tracking is enabled for IGMPv2 and MLDv1 when you
enable immediate leave, use immediate leave with these versions only when
there is one host on the interface. The reason is that IGMPv2 and MLDv1 use
a report suppression mechanism whereby only one host on an interface sends
a group join report in response to a membership query. The other interested
hosts suppress their reports. The purpose of this mechanism is to avoid a
flood of reports for the same group. But it also interferes with host tracking,
because the router only knows about the one interested host and does not
know about the others.
To enable immediate leave on an interface:
1.
Configure immediate leave on the IGMP interface.
[edit protocols IGMP]
48
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
user@host# set interface ge-0/0/0.1 immediate-leave
2. Verify the configuration by checking the Immediate Leave field in the output of the
show igmp interface command.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
show igmp interface on page 401
Filtering Unwanted IGMP Reports at the IGMP Interface Level
Suppose you need to limit the subnets that can join a certain multicast group. The
group-policy statement enables you to filter unwanted IGMP reports at the interface
level. When this statement is enabled on a router running IGMP version 2 (IGMPv2) or
version 3 (IGMPv3), after the router receives an IGMP report, the router compares the
group against the specified group policy and performs the action configured in that policy
(for example, rejects the report if the policy matches the defined address or network).
You define the policy to match only IGMP group addresses (for IGMPv2) by using the
policy's route-filter statement to match the group address. You define the policy to match
IGMP (source, group) addresses (for IGMPv3) by using the policy's route-filter statement
to match the group address and the policy's source-address-filter statement to match
the source address.
CAUTION: On MX Series platforms, IGMPv2 and IGMPv3 can or cannot be
configured together on the same interface, depending on the Junos OS release
at your installation. Configuring both together can cause unexpected behavior
in multicast traffic forwarding.
To filter unwanted IGMP reports:
1.
Configure an IGMPv2 policy.
[edit policy-statement reject_policy_v2]
user@host# set from route-filter 233.252.0.1/32 exact
user@host# set from route-filter 239.0.0.0/8 orlonger
user@host# set then reject
2. Configure an IGMPv3 policy.
[edit policy-statement reject_policy_v3]
user@host# set from route-filter 233.252.0.1/32 exact
user@host# set from route-filter 239.0.0.0/8 orlonger
user@host# set from source-address-filter 10.0.0.0/8 orlonger
user@host# set from source-address-filter 127.0.0.0/8 orlonger
user@host# set then reject
3. Apply the policies to the IGMP interfaces on which you prefer not to receive specific
group or (source, group) reports. In this example, ge-0/0/0.1 is running IGMPv2, and
ge-0/1/1.0 is running IGMPv3.
[edit protocols igmp]
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
user@host# set interface ge-0/0/0.1 group-policy reject_policy_v2
user@host# set interface ge-0/1/1.0 group-policy reject_policy_v3
4. Verify the operation of the filter by checking the Rejected Report field in the output
of the show igmp statistics command.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Example: Configuring Policy Chains and Route Filters
•
show igmp statistics on page 405
Accepting IGMP Messages from Remote Subnetworks
By default, IGMP interfaces accept IGMP messages only from the same subnet. Including
the promiscuous-mode statement enables the routing device to accept IGMP messages
from indirectly connected subnets.
NOTE: When you enable IGMP on an unnumbered Ethernet interface that
uses a /32 loopback address as a donor address, you must configure IGMP
promiscuous mode to accept the IGMP packets received on this interface.
NOTE: When enabling promiscuous-mode, all routers on the ethernet
segment must be configured with the promiscuous mode statement.
Otherwise, only the interface configured with lowest IPv4 address acts as
the querier for IGMP for this Ethernet segment.
To enable IGMP promiscuous mode on an interface:
1.
Configure the IGMP interface.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface ge-0/1/1.0 promiscuous-mode
2. Verify the configuration by checking the Promiscuous Mode field in the output of the
show igmp interface command.
3. Verify the operation of the filter by checking the Rx non-local field in the output of the
show igmp statistics command.
Related
Documentation
50
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Configuring the Loopback Interface in the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing
Devices
•
show igmp interface on page 401
•
show igmp statistics on page 405
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
Modifying the IGMP Query Response Interval
The query response interval is the maximum amount of time that can elapse between
when the querier router sends a host-query message and when it receives a response
from a host. Configuring this interval allows you to adjust the burst peaks of IGMP
messages on the subnet. Set a larger interval to make the traffic less bursty. Bursty traffic
refers to an uneven pattern of data transmission: sometimes a very high data transmission
rate, whereas at other times a very low data transmission rate.
The query response interval, the host-query interval, and the robustness variable are
related in that they are all variables that are used to calculate the group membership
timeout. The group membership timeout is the number of seconds that must pass before
a multicast router determines that no more members of a host group exist on a subnet.
The group membership timeout is calculated as the (robustness variable x query-interval)
+ (query-response-interval). If no reports are received for a particular group before the
group membership timeout has expired, the routing device stops forwarding remotely
originated multicast packets for that group onto the attached network.
The default query response interval is 10 seconds. You can configure a subsecond interval
up to one digit to the right of the decimal point. The configurable range is 0.1 through 0.9,
then in 1-second intervals 1 through 999,999.
To modify the query response interval:
1.
Configure the interval.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set query-response-interval 0.4
2. Verify the configuration by checking the IGMP Query Response Interval field in the
output of the show igmp interface command.
3. Verify the operation of the query interval by checking the Membership Query field in
the output of the show igmp statistics command.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Modifying the IGMP Host-Query Message Interval on page 46
•
Modifying the IGMP Robustness Variable on page 51
•
show igmp interface on page 401
•
show igmp statistics on page 405
Modifying the IGMP Robustness Variable
Fine-tune the IGMP robustness variable to allow for expected packet loss on a subnet.
The robust count automatically changes certain IGMP message intervals for IGMPv2 and
IGMPv3. Increasing the robust count allows for more packet loss but increases the leave
latency of the subnetwork.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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When the query router receives an IGMP leave message on a shared network running
IGMPv2, the query router must send an IGMP group query message a specified number
of times. The number of IGMP group query messages sent is determined by the robust
count.
The value of the robustness variable is also used in calculating the following IGMP
message intervals:
•
Group member interval—Amount of time that must pass before a multicast router
determines that there are no more members of a group on a network. This interval is
calculated as follows: (robustness variable x query-interval) + (1 x
query-response-interval).
•
Other querier present interval—The robust count is used to calculate the amount of
time that must pass before a multicast router determines that there is no longer another
multicast router that is the querier. This interval is calculated as follows: (robustness
variable x query-interval) + (0.5 x query-response-interval).
•
Last-member query count—Number of group-specific queries sent before the router
assumes there are no local members of a group. The number of queries is equal to the
value of the robustness variable.
In IGMPv3, a change of interface state causes the system to immediately transmit a
state-change report from that interface. In case the state-change report is missed by
one or more multicast routers, it is retransmitted. The number of times it is retransmitted
is the robust count minus one. In IGMPv3, the robust count is also a factor in determining
the group membership interval, the older version querier interval, and the other querier
present interval.
By default, the robustness variable is set to 2. You might want to increase this value if
you expect a subnet to lose packets.
The number can be from 2 through 10.
To change the value of the robustness variable:
1.
Configure the robust count.
When you set the robust count, you are in effect configuring the number of times the
querier retries queries on the connected subnets.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set robust-count 5
2. Verify the configuration by checking the IGMP Robustness Count field in the output
of the show igmp interfaces command.
Related
Documentation
52
•
Modifying the IGMP Host-Query Message Interval on page 46
•
Modifying the IGMP Query Response Interval on page 51
•
Modifying the IGMP Last-Member Query Interval on page 47
•
show pim interfaces on page 486
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
•
RFC 2236, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 2
•
RFC 3376, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3
Limiting the Maximum IGMP Message Rate
This section describes how to change the limit for the maximum number of IGMP packets
transmitted in 1 second by the router.
Increasing the maximum number of IGMP packets transmitted per second might be
useful on a router with a large number of interfaces participating in IGMP.
To change the limit for the maximum number of IGMP packets the router can transmit
in 1 second, include the maximum-transmit-rate statement and specify the maximum
number of packets per second to be transmitted.
Related
Documentation
•
maximum-transmit-rate (Protocols IGMP) on page 249
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership
You can create IGMP static group membership to test multicast forwarding without a
receiver host. When you enable IGMP static group membership, data is forwarded to an
interface without that interface receiving membership reports from downstream hosts.
The router on which you enable static IGMP group membership must be the designated
router (DR) for the subnet. Otherwise, traffic does not flow downstream.
When enabling IGMP static group membership, you cannot configure multiple groups
using the group-count, group-increment, source-count, and source-increment statements
if the all option is specified as the IGMP interface.
Class-of-service (CoS) adjustment is not supported with IGMP static group membership.
In this example, you create static group 233.252.0.1.
1.
On the DR, configure the static groups to be created by including the static statement
and group statement and specifying which IP multicast address of the group to be
created. When creating groups individually, you must specify a unique address for
each group.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group 233.252.0.1
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol igmp command
to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol igmp
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group 233.252.0.1 ;
}
}
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show igmp group command to verify that static group 233.252.0.1 has been created.
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
NOTE: When you configure static IGMP group entries on point-to-point links
that connect routing devices to a rendezvous point (RP), the static IGMP
group entries do not generate join messages toward the RP.
When you create IGMP static group membership to test multicast forwarding on an
interface on which you want to receive multicast traffic, you can specify that a number
of static groups be automatically created. This is useful when you want to test forwarding
to multiple receivers without having to configure each receiver separately.
In this example, you create three groups.
1.
On the DR, configure the number of static groups to be created by including the
group-count statement and specifying the number of groups to be created.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group 233.252.0.1 group-count 3
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol igmp command
to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol igmp
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group 233.252.0.1 {
group-count 3;
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and after the source is sending traffic,
use the show igmp group command to verify that static groups 233.252.0.1, 233.252.0.2,
and 233.252.0.3 have been created.
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.3
Source: 10.0.0.2
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Chapter 2: Using IGMP
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
When you create IGMP static group membership to test multicast forwarding on an
interface on which you want to receive multicast traffic, you can also configure the group
address to be automatically incremented for each group created. This is useful when
you want to test forwarding to multiple receivers without having to configure each receiver
separately and when you do not want the group addresses to be sequential.
In this example, you create three groups and increase the group address by an increment
of two for each group.
1.
On the DR, configure the group address increment by including the group-increment
statement and specifying the number by which the address should be incremented
for each group. The increment is specified in dotted decimal notation similar to an
IPv4 address.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group 233.252.0.1 group-count 3
group-increment 0.0.0.2
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol igmp command
to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol igmp
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
version 3;
static {
group 233.252.0.1 {
group-increment 0.0.0.2;
group-count 3;
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and after the source is sending traffic,
use the show igmp group command to verify that static groups 233.252.0.1, 233.252.0.3,
and 233.252.0.5 have been created.
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.3
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.5
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
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When you create IGMP static group membership to test multicast forwarding on an
interface on which you want to receive multicast traffic, and your network is operating
in source-specific multicast (SSM) mode, you can also specify that the multicast source
address be accepted. This is useful when you want to test forwarding to multicast
receivers from a specific multicast source.
If you specify a group address in the SSM range, you must also specify a source.
If a source address is specified in a multicast group that is statically configured, the IGMP
version on the interface must be set to IGMPv3. IGMPv2 is the default value.
In this example, you create group 233.252.0.1 and accept IP address 10.0.0.2 as the only
source.
1.
On the DR, configure the source address by including the source statement and
specifying the IPv4 address of the source host.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group 233.252.0.1 source 10.0.0.2
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol igmp command
to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol igmp
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
version 3;
static {
group 233.252.0.1 {
source 10.0.0.2;
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show igmp group command to verify that static group 233.252.0.1 has been created
and that source 10.0.0.2 has been accepted.
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
When you create IGMP static group membership to test multicast forwarding on an
interface on which you want to receive multicast traffic, you can specify that a number
of multicast sources be automatically accepted. This is useful when you want to test
forwarding to multicast receivers from more than one specified multicast source.
In this example, you create group 233.252.0.1 and accept addresses 10.0.0.2, 10.0.0.3,
and 10.0.0.4 as the sources.
1.
56
On the DR, configure the number of multicast source addresses to be accepted by
including the source-count statement and specifying the number of sources to be
accepted.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group 233.252.0.1 source 10.0.0.2 source-count
3
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol igmp command
to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol igmp
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
version 3;
static {
group 233.252.0.1 {
source 10.0.0.2 {
source-count 3;
}
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show igmp group command to verify that static group 233.252.0.1 has been created
and that sources 10.0.0.2, 10.0.0.3, and 10.0.0.4 have been accepted.
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.3
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.4
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic, and specify that a number of multicast sources be automatically accepted, you
can also specify the number by which the address should be incremented for each source
accepted. This is useful when you want to test forwarding to multiple receivers without
having to configure each receiver separately and you do not want the source addresses
to be sequential.
In this example, you create group 233.252.0.1 and accept addresses 10.0.0.2, 10.0.0.4,
and 10.0.0.6 as the sources.
1.
Configure the multicast source address increment by including the source-increment
statement and specifying the number by which the address should be incremented
for each source. The increment is specified in dotted decimal notation similar to an
IPv4 address.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group 233.252.0.1 source 10.0.0.2 source-count
3 source-increment 0.0.0.2
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2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol igmp command
to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol igmp
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
version 3;
static {
group 233.252.0.1 {
source 10.0.0.2 {
source-count 3;
source-increment 0.0.0.2;
}
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and after the source is sending traffic,
use the show igmp group command to verify that static group 233.252.0.1 has been
created and that sources 10.0.0.2, 10.0.0.4, and 10.0.0.6 have been accepted.
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.4
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.6
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic and your network is operating in source-specific multicast (SSM) mode, you can
specify that certain multicast source addresses be excluded.
By default the multicast source address configured in a static group operates in include
mode. In include mode the multicast traffic for the group is accepted from the source
address configured. You can also configure the static group to operate in exclude mode.
In exclude mode the multicast traffic for the group is accepted from any address other
than the source address configured.
If a source address is specified in a multicast group that is statically configured, the IGMP
version on the interface must be set to IGMPv3. IGMPv2 is the default value.
In this example, you exclude address 10.0.0.2 as a source for group 233.252.0.1.
1.
On the DR, configure a multicast static group to operate in exclude mode by including
the exclude statement and specifying which IPv4 source address to exclude.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group 233.252.0.1 exclude source 10.0.0.2
58
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Chapter 2: Using IGMP
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol igmp command
to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol igmp
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
version 3;
static {
group 233.252.0.1 {
exclude;
source 10.0.0.2;
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show igmp group detail command to verify that static group 233.252.0.1 has been
created and that the static group is operating in exclude mode.
user@host> show igmp group detail
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Group mode: Exclude
Source: 10.0.0.2
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Related
Documentation
•
Enabling MLD Static Group Membership on page 95
•
group (Protocols IGMP) on page 241
•
group-count (Protocols IGMP) on page 242
•
group-increment (Protocols IGMP) on page 242
•
source-count (Protocols IGMP) on page 257
•
source-increment (Protocols IGMP) on page 258
•
static (Protocols IGMP) on page 259
Recording IGMP Join and Leave Events
To determine whether IGMP tuning is needed in a network, you can configure the routing
device to record IGMP join and leave events. You can record events globally for the routing
device or for individual interfaces.
Table 4 on page 59 describes the recordable IGMP events.
Table 4: IGMP Event Messages
ERRMSG Tag
Definition
RPD_IGMP_JOIN
Records IGMP join events.
RPD_IGMP_LEAVE
Records IGMP leave events.
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Table 4: IGMP Event Messages (continued)
ERRMSG Tag
Definition
RPD_IGMP_ACCOUNTING_ON
Records when IGMP accounting is enabled on an IGMP interface.
RPD_IGMP_ACCOUNTING_OFF
Records when IGMP accounting is disabled on an IGMP interface.
RPD_IGMP_MEMBERSHIP_TIMEOUT
Records IGMP membership timeout events.
To enable IGMP accounting:
1.
Enable accounting globally or on an IGMP interface. This example shows both options.
[edit protocols igmp]
user@host# set accounting
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/0.2 accounting
2. Configure the events to be recorded and filter the events to a system log file with a
descriptive filename, such as igmp-events.
[edit system syslog file igmp-events]
user@host# set any info
user@host# set match “.*RPD_IGMP_JOIN.* | .*RPD_IGMP_LEAVE.* |
.*RPD_IGMP_ACCOUNTING.* | .*RPD_IGMP_MEMBERSHIP_TIMEOUT.*”
3. Periodically archive the log file.
This example rotates the file size when it reaches 100 KB and keeps three files.
[edit system syslog file igmp-events]
user@host# set archive size 100000
user@host# set archive files 3
user@host# set archive archive-sites “ftp://user@host1//var/tmp” password
“anonymous”
user@host# set archive archive-sites “ftp://user@host2//var/tmp” password “test”
user@host# set archive transfer-interval 24
user@host# set archive start-time 2011-01-07:12:30
4. You can monitor the system log file as entries are added to the file by running the
monitor start and monitor stop commands.
user@host> monitor start igmp-events
*** igmp-events ***
Apr 16 13:08:23 host mgd[16416]: UI_CMDLINE_READ_LINE: User 'user', command
'run monitor start igmp-events '
monitor
Related
Documentation
60
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Specifying Log File Size, Number, and Archiving Properties
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
Limiting the Number of IGMP Multicast Group Joins on Logical Interfaces
The group-limit statement enables you to limit the number of IGMP multicast group joins
for logical interfaces. When this statement is enabled on a router running IGMP version 2
(IGMPv2) or version 3 (IGMPv3), the limit is applied upon receipt of the group report.
Once the group limit is reached, subsequent join requests are rejected.
When configuring limits for IGMP multicast groups, keep the following in mind:
•
Each any-source group (*,G) counts as one group toward the limit.
•
Each source-specific group (S,G) counts as one group toward the limit.
•
Groups in IGMPv3 exclude mode are counted toward the limit.
•
Multiple source-specific groups count individually toward the group limit, even if they
are for the same group. For example, (S1, G1) and (S2, G1) would count as two groups
toward the configured limit.
•
Combinations of any-source groups and source-specific groups count individually
toward the group limit, even if they are for the same group. For example, (*, G1) and
(S, G1) would count as two groups toward the configured limit.
•
Configuring and committing a group limit on a network that is lower than what already
exists on the network results in the removal of all groups from the configuration. The
groups must then request to rejoin the network (up to the newly configured group
limit).
•
You can dynamically limit multicast groups on IGMP logical interfaces using dynamic
profiles.
Starting in Junos OS Release 12.2, you can optionally configure a system log warning
threshold for IGMP multicast group joins received on the logical interface. It is helpful to
review the system log messages for troubleshooting purposes and to detect if an excessive
amount of IGMP multicast group joins have been received on the interface. These log
messages convey when the configured group limit has been exceeded, when the
configured threshold has been exceeded, and when the number of groups drop below
the configured threshold.
The group-threshold statement enables you to configure the threshold at which a warning
message is logged. The range is 1 through 100 percent. The warning threshold is a
percentage of the group limit, so you must configure the group-limit statement to configure
a warning threshold. For instance, when the number of groups exceed the configured
warning threshold, but remain below the configured group limit, multicast groups continue
to be accepted, and the device logs the warning message. In addition, the device logs a
warning message after the number of groups drop below the configured warning threshold.
You can further specify the amount of time (in seconds) between the log messages by
configuring the log-interval statement. The range is 6 through 32,767 seconds.
You might consider throttling log messages because every entry added after the
configured threshold and every entry rejected after the configured limit causes a warning
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
message to be logged. By configuring a log interval, you can throttle the amount of system
log warning messages generated for IGMP multicast group joins.
NOTE: On ACX Series routers, the maximum number of multicast routes is
1024.
To limit multicast group joins on an IGMP logical interface:
1.
Access the logical interface at the IGMP protocol hierarchy level.
[edit]
user@host# edit protocols igmp interface interface-name
2. Specify the group limit for the interface.
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
user@host# set group-limit limit
3. (Optional) Configure the threshold at which a warning message is logged.
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
user@host# set group-threshold value
4. (Optional) Configure the amount of time between log messages.
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
user@host# set log-interval seconds
To confirm your configuration, use the show protocols igmp command. To verify the
operation of IGMP on the interface, including the configured group limit and the optional
warning threshold and interval between log messages, use the show igmp interface
command.
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
62
•
Release
Description
12.2
Starting in Junos OS Release 12.2, you can optionally configure a system log
warning threshold for IGMP multicast group joins received on the logical
interface.
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Using IGMP
Understanding Multicast Route Leaking for VRF and Virtual-Router Instances
In certain Layer 3 VPN scenarios, shared services might require routes to be written to
routing tables for multiple virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) or virtual-router instances.
This situation would require a switch to share, or leak, route information with each
configured VRF or virtual-router routing instance.
Starting with Junos OS Release 14.1x53-D40, you can configure static multicast route
leaking for VRF or virtual-router instances on QFX5100 switches and EX4300 switches.
On EX4300 switches, multicast route leaking is supported only when the switch functions
as a line card in a Virtual Chassis, not as a standalone switch.
This implementation enables you to share multicast routes from a Layer 3 VPN routing
instance running a multicast protocol such as Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) with
customer virtual-router or VRF instances. You can leak only static multicast routes with
a prefix length of /32. Therefore, routes are shared for Internet Group Management
Protocol (IGMP) groups and not for a specific source. All Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces
must have IGMP version 3 enabled. No other version of IGMP is supported.
Additionally, you must configure an integrated routing and bridging (IRB) interface for
each Layer 3 interface. To ensure that the multicast static routes are present in the routing
instance that is running multicast, use IGMP to add the routes to each IRB interface
configured in the routing instance. Include the group multicast-group-address source
ip-address statements at the [edit protocols igmp interface irb-interface-name static]
hierarchy level. This implementation also requires you to enable IGMP snooping on all
customer interfaces receiving multicast traffic. Use the multicast-router-interface
statement to configure each customer interface to face the multicast routing instance.
You must also add each multicast group to each customer interface by including the
group multicast-group-address statement at the [edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id
interface interface-name] hierarchy level. The customer VRF or virtual-router instances
are not required to have a multicast protocol such as PIM configured.
To enable multicast route leaking, configure static multicast routes in a customer VRF
or virtual-router instance for each configured multicast group and point each route to
the routing table for the multicast routing instance. To configure, include the static route
destination-prefix/32 next-table instance-name.inet.0 group of statements at the [edit
routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options] hierarchy level.
For example, to leak multicast route 239.159.104.0/32 to a customer routing instance
named cust-11:
user@switch# set routing-instances cust-11 routing-options route 239.159.104.0/32 next
table HQ.inet.0
In this example, the static multicast route is configured on the customer routing instance
and points to the routing table for the multicast routing instance, HQ. This configuration
ensures that multicast traffic is forwarded.
Related
Documentation
•
igmp on page 245
•
igmp-snooping on page 268
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Tracing IGMP Protocol Traffic
Tracing operations record detailed messages about the operation of routing protocols,
such as the various types of routing protocol packets sent and received, and routing policy
actions. You can specify which trace operations are logged by including specific tracing
flags. The following table describes the flags that you can include.
Flag
Description
all
Trace all operations.
client-notification
Trace notifications.
general
Trace general flow.
group
Trace group operations.
host-notification
Trace host notifications.
leave
Trace leave group messages (IGMPv2 only).
mtrace
Trace mtrace packets. Use the mtrace command to
troubleshoot the software.
normal
Trace normal events.
packets
Trace all IGMP packets.
policy
Trace policy processing.
query
Trace IGMP membership query messages, including
general and group-specific queries.
report
Trace membership report messages.
route
Trace routing information.
state
Trace state transitions.
task
Trace task processing.
timer
Trace timer processing.
In the following example, tracing is enabled for all routing protocol packets. Then tracing
is narrowed to focus only on IGMP packets of a particular type. To configure tracing
operations for IGMP:
1.
(Optional) Configure tracing at the routing options level to trace all protocol packets.
[edit routing-options traceoptions]
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Chapter 2: Using IGMP
user@host# set file all-packets-trace
user@host# set flag all
2. Configure the filename for the IGMP trace file.
[edit protocols igmp traceoptions]
user@host# set file igmp-trace
3. (Optional) Configure the maximum number of trace files.
[edit protocols igmp traceoptions]
user@host# set file files 5
4. (Optional) Configure the maximum size of each trace file.
[edit protocols igmp traceoptions]
user@host# set file size 1m
5. (Optional) Enable unrestricted file access.
[edit protocols igmp traceoptions]
user@host# set file world-readable
6. Configure tracing flags. Suppose you are troubleshooting issues with a particular
multicast group. The following example shows how to flag all events for packets
associated with the group IP address.
[edit protocols igmp traceoptions]
user@host# set flag group | match 233.252.0.2
7. View the trace file.
user@host> file list /var/log
user@host> file show /var/log/igmp-trace
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Tracing and Logging Junos OS Operations
•
mtrace on page 439
Disabling IGMP
To disable IGMP on an interface, include the disable statement:
disable;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name]
NOTE: ACX Series routers do not support [edit logical-systems
logical-system-name protocols] hierarchy level.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Related
Documentation
66
•
Understanding IGMP on page 41
•
Configuring IGMP on page 43
•
Enabling IGMP on page 44
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 3
Using IGMP Snooping
•
IGMP Snooping Overview on page 67
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
Configuring VLAN-Specific IGMP Snooping Parameters on page 73
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Using a Switch as an IGMP Querier on page 76
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
•
Changing the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value on page 78
•
Verifying the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value on page 79
IGMP Snooping Overview
With IGMP snooping enabled, a switch monitors the IGMP (Internet Group Management
Protocol) traffic between hosts and multicast routers and uses what it learns to forward
multicast traffic to only the downstream interfaces that are connected to interested
receivers. This conserves bandwidth by allowing the switch to send multicast traffic to
only those interfaces that are connected to devices that want to receive the traffic
(instead of flooding the traffic to all the downstream VLAN interfaces).
This IGMP snooping topic includes:
•
How IGMP Snooping Works on page 67
•
How IGMP Snooping Works with Routed VLAN Interfaces on page 68
•
How Hosts Join and Leave Multicast Groups on page 68
•
IGMP Snooping and Forwarding Interfaces on page 69
•
General Forwarding Rules on page 69
•
Using a Switch as an IGMP Querier on page 70
How IGMP Snooping Works
A switch usually learns unicast MAC addresses by checking the source address field of
the frames it receives and then sends any traffic for that unicast address only to the
appropriate interface. However, a multicast MAC address can never be the source address
for a packet. As a result, when a switch receives traffic for a multicast destination address,
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
it floods the traffic on the relevant VLAN, which can cause a significant amount of traffic
to be sent unnecessarily.
IGMP snooping prevents this flooding. When you enable IGMP snooping, the switch
monitors IGMP packets between receivers and multicast routers and uses the content
of the packets to build a multicast cache table—a database of multicast groups and the
interfaces that are connected to members of the groups. When the switch receives
multicast packets, it uses the cache table to selectively forward the traffic to only the
interfaces that are connected to members of the appropriate multicast groups.
NOTE: IGMP snooping is enabled by default on the default VLAN only. With
versions of Junos OS for the QFX Series previous to 13.2, IGMP snooping is
enabled by default on all VLANs.
NOTE: You cannot configure IGMP snooping on a secondary (private) VLAN.
How IGMP Snooping Works with Routed VLAN Interfaces
A switch can use a routed VLAN interface (RVI) to forward traffic between VLANs that
connect to it. IGMP snooping works with Layer 2 interfaces and RVIs to forward multicast
traffic in a switched network.
When a switch receives a multicast packet, its Packet Forwarding Engines perform a
multicast lookup on the packet to determine how to forward the packet to its local
interfaces. From the results of the lookup, each Packet Forwarding Engine extracts a list
of Layer 3 interfaces that have ports local to the Packet Forwarding Engine. If the list
includes an RVI, the switch provides a bridge multicast group ID for the RVI to the Packet
Forwarding Engine.
For VLANs that include multicast receivers, the bridge multicast ID includes a sub-next-hop
ID, which identifies the Layer 2 interfaces in the VLAN that are interested in receiving the
multicast stream. The Packet Forwarding Engine then forwards multicast traffic to bridge
multicast IDs that have multicast receivers for a given multicast group.
How Hosts Join and Leave Multicast Groups
Hosts can join multicast groups in two ways:
•
By sending an unsolicited IGMP join message to a multicast router that specifies the
IP multicast group that the host is attempting to join.
•
By sending an IGMP join message in response to a general query from a multicast
router.
A multicast router continues to forward multicast traffic to a VLAN provided that at least
one host on that VLAN responds to the periodic general IGMP queries. For a host to remain
a member of a multicast group, therefore, it must continue to respond to the periodic
general IGMP queries.
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Chapter 3: Using IGMP Snooping
To leave a multicast group, either a host cannot respond to the periodic general IGMP
queries, which results in a “silent leave” (the only leave option for IGMPv1), or a host can
send a group-specific IGMPv2 leave message.
IGMP Snooping and Forwarding Interfaces
To determine how to forward multicast traffic, a switch with IGMP snooping enabled
maintains information about the following interfaces in its multicast forwarding table:
•
Multicast-router interfaces—These interfaces lead toward multicast routers or IGMP
queriers.
•
Group-member interfaces—These interfaces lead toward hosts that are members of
multicast groups.
The switch learns about these interfaces by monitoring IGMP traffic. If an interface
receives IGMP queries or Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) updates, the switch adds
the interface to its multicast forwarding table as a multicast-router interface. If an
interface receives membership reports for a multicast group, the switch adds the interface
to its multicast forwarding table as a group-member interface.
Table entries for interfaces that the switch learns about are subject to aging. For example,
if a learned multicast-router interface does not receive IGMP queries or PIM hellos within
a certain interval, the switch removes the entry for that interface from its multicast
forwarding table.
NOTE: For a switch to learn multicast-router interfaces and group-member
interfaces, an IGMP querier must exist in the network. This is often a multicast
router, but if there is no multicast router on the local network, you can
configure the switch itself to be an IGMP querier.
You can statically configure an interface to be a multicast-router interface or a
group-member interface. The switch adds a static interface to its multicast forwarding
table without having to learn about the interface, and the entry in the table is not subject
to aging. You can have a mix of statically configured and dynamically learned interfaces
on a switch.
General Forwarding Rules
Multicast traffic received on a switch interface in a VLAN on which IGMP snooping is
enabled is forwarded according to the following rules.
IGMP traffic is forwarded as follows:
•
IGMP general queries received on a multicast-router interface are forwarded to all
other interfaces in the VLAN.
•
IGMP group-specific queries received on a multicast-router interface are forwarded to
only those interfaces in the VLAN that are members of the group.
•
IGMP reports received on a host interface are forwarded to multicast-router interfaces
in the same VLAN, but not to the other host interfaces in the VLAN.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Multicast traffic that is not IGMP traffic is forwarded as follows:
•
A multicast packet with a destination address of 224.0.0.0/24 is flooded to all other
interfaces on the VLAN.
•
An unregistered multicast packet—that is, a packet for a group that has no current
members—is forwarded to all multicast-router interfaces in the VLAN.
•
A registered multicast packet is forwarded only to those host interfaces in the VLAN
that are members of the multicast group and to all multicast-router interfaces in the
VLAN.
Using a Switch as an IGMP Querier
If IGMP snooping is enabled on a pure Layer 2 a local network (that is, Layer 3 is not
enabled on the network), and there is not multicast router in the network, multicast traffic
might not be properly forwarded through the network. This problem occurs if the local
network is configured such that multicast traffic must be forwarded between switches
in order to reach a multicast receiver. In this case, an upstream switch does not forward
multicast traffic to a downstream switch (and therefore to the multicast receivers
attached to the downstream switch) because the downstream switch does not forward
IGMP reports to the upstream switch. You can solve this problem by configuring one of
the switches to be an IGMP querier. This switch sends periodic general query packets to
all the switches in the network, which ensures that the snooping membership tables are
updated and prevents any multicast traffic loss.
If you configure multiple switches to be IGMP queriers, the switch with the lowest
(smallest) IGMP querier source address takes precedence and acts as the querier.
Switches with higher IGMP querier source addresses stop sending IGMP queries unless
they do not receive IGMP queries for 255 seconds. If a switch with a higher IGMP querier
source address does not receive any IGMP queries during that period, it starts sending
queries again.
NOTE: The igmp-querier statement is supported on QFabric systems in Junos
OS Release 14.1X53-D15 but is not supported in Junos OS 15.1.
The igmp-querier statement is supported on QFX systems in Junos OS releases
up to but not including Junos OS Release 15.1. It is supported in Junos OS
Release 15.2 and later releases. It is not supported in Junos OS Release 15.1.
To configure a standalone switch to act as an IGMP querier, enter the following:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name l2-querier source-address source address
To configure a QFabric Node device switch to act as an IGMP querier, enter the following:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name igmp-querier source-address source address
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Chapter 3: Using IGMP Snooping
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
Release
Description
15.1
The igmp-querier statement is supported on QFX systems in Junos OS
releases up to but not including Junos OS Release 15.1. It is supported in Junos
OS Release 15.2 and later releases. It is not supported in Junos OS Release
15.1.
14.1X53-D15
The igmp-querier statement is supported on QFabric systems in Junos OS
Release 14.1X53-D15 but is not supported in Junos OS 15.1.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
•
Configuring IGMP on page 43
•
RFC 3171, IANA Guidelines for IPv4 Multicast Address Assignments
•
IGMPv1—See RFC 1112, Host extensions for IP multicasting.
•
IGMPv2—See RFC 2236, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 2.
•
IGMPv3—See RFC 3376, Internet Group Management Protocol, Version 3.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Configuring IGMP Snooping
With IGMP snooping enabled, a switch monitors the IGMP (Internet Group Management
Protocol) traffic between hosts and multicast routers and uses what it learns to forward
multicast traffic to only the downstream interfaces that are connected to interested
receivers. This conserves bandwidth by allowing the switch to send multicast traffic to
only those interfaces that are connected to devices that want to receive the traffic
(instead of flooding the traffic to all the downstream VLAN interfaces).
NOTE: You cannot configure IGMP snooping on a secondary VLAN.
NOTE: Starting in Junos OS Release 14.1X53 support for the igmp-querier
statement is provided, The igmp-querier statement is not supported on
QFabric switches. In Junos OS Release 15.2, support for the igmp-querier
statement is restored.
To enable IGMP snooping and configure individual options as needed for your network
by using the CLI:
1.
Enable IGMP snooping on a VLAN:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan
2. Configure the switch to immediately remove group membership from interfaces on
a VLAN when it receives a leave message through that VLAN, and have it not forward
any membership queries for the multicast group to the VLAN (IGMPv2 only):
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name immediate-leave
3. Configure an interface to belong to a multicast group:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan-name interface interface-name static group
group-address
4. Configure an interface to forward IGMP queries received from multicast routers.
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name interface interface-name
multicast-router-interface
5. Configure the switch to wait for four timeout intervals before timing out a multicast
group on a VLAN:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name robust-count 4
6. If you want a standalone switch to act as an IGMP querier, enter the following:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name l2-querier source-address source address
The switch uses the address that you configure as the source address in the IGMP
queries that it sends. If there are any multicast routers on the same local network,
make sure the source address for the IGMP querier is greater (a higher number) than
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Chapter 3: Using IGMP Snooping
the IP addresses for those routers on the network. This ensures that switch is always
the IGMP querier on the network.
7. If you want a QFabric Node device to act as an IGMP querier, enter the following:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name igmp-querier source-address source address
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
Release
Description
14.1X53
Starting in Junos OS Release 14.1X53 support for the igmp-querier statement
is provided, The igmp-querier statement is not supported on QFabric
switches. In Junos OS Release 15.2, support for the igmp-querier statement
is restored.
•
IGMP Snooping Overview on page 67
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
Configuring VLAN-Specific IGMP Snooping Parameters
All of the IGMP snooping statements configured with the igmp-snooping statement, with
the exception of the traceoptions statement, can be qualified with the same statement
at the VLAN level. To configure IGMP snooping parameters at the VLAN level, include
the vlan statement:
vlan vlan-id;
immediate-leave;
interface interface-name {
group-limit limit;
host-only-interface;
multicast-router-interface;
static {
group ip-address {
source ip-address;
}
}
}
proxy {
source-address ip-address;
}
query-interval seconds;
query-last-member-interval seconds;
query-response-interval seconds;
robust-count number;
}
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping]
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•
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name
protocols igmp-snooping]
Related
Documentation
•
Layer 2 Frames and IPv4 Multicast Addresses on page 29
•
Understanding Multicast Snooping
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
With IGMP snooping enabled, a switch monitors the IGMP (Internet Group Management
Protocol) traffic between hosts and multicast routers and uses what it learns to forward
multicast traffic to only the downstream interfaces that are connected to interested
receivers. This conserves bandwidth by allowing the switch to send multicast traffic to
only those interfaces that are connected to devices that want to receive the traffic
(instead of flooding the traffic to all the downstream VLAN interfaces).
This example describes how to configure IGMP snooping:
•
Requirements on page 74
•
Overview and Topology on page 74
•
Configuration on page 75
Requirements
This example requires Junos OS Release 11.1 or later on a QFX Series product.
Before you configure IGMP snooping, be sure you have:
•
Configured the employee-vlan VLAN
•
Assigned interfaces ge-0/0/1, ge-0/0/2, and ge-0/0/3 to employee-vlan
Overview and Topology
In this example you configure an interface to receive multicast traffic from a source and
configure some multicast-related behavior for downstream interfaces. The example
assumes that IGMP snooping was previously disabled for the VLAN.
Table 5 on page 74 shows the components of the topology for this example.
Table 5: Components of the IGMP Snooping Topology
74
Components
Settings
VLAN name
employee-vlan, tag 20
Interfaces in employee-vlan
ge-0/0/1, ge-0/0/2, ge-0/0/3
Multicast IP address for employee-vlan
225.100.100.100
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Using IGMP Snooping
Configuration
To configure basic IGMP snooping on a switch:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure IGMP snooping, copy the following commands and paste them into
a terminal window:
[edit protocols]
set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan
set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan interface ge-0/0/3 static group 225.100.100.100
set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan interface ge-0/0/2 multicast-router-interface
set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan robust-count 4
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Configure IGMP snooping:
1.
Enable and configure IGMP snooping on the VLAN employee-vlan:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan
2.
Configure a interface to belong to a multicast group:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan interface ge-0/0/3 static group
225.100.100.100
3.
Configure an interface to forward IGMP queries received from multicast routers.
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan interface ge-0/0/2
multicast-router-interface
4.
Configure the switch to wait for four timeout intervals before timing out a multicast
group on a VLAN:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan robust-count 4
Results
Check the results of the configuration:
user@switch# show protocols igmp-snooping
vlan employee-vlan {
robust-count 4;
}
interface ge-0/0/2 {
multicast-router-interface;
}
interface ge-0/0/3 {
static {
group 255.100.100.100;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
IGMP Snooping Overview on page 67
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
Changing the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value on page 78
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
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•
Example: Setting Up Bridging with Multiple VLANs.
Using a Switch as an IGMP Querier
If IGMP snooping is enabled on a pure Layer 2 a local network (that is, Layer 3 is not
enabled on the network), and there is not multicast router in the network, multicast traffic
might not be properly forwarded through the network. This problem occurs if the local
network is configured such that multicast traffic must be forwarded between switches
in order to reach a multicast receiver. In this case, an upstream switch does not forward
multicast traffic to a downstream switch (and therefore to the multicast receivers
attached to the downstream switch) because the downstream switch does not forward
IGMP reports to the upstream switch. You can solve this problem by configuring one of
the switches to be an IGMP querier. This switch sends periodic general query packets to
all the switches in the network, which ensures that the snooping membership tables are
updated and prevents any multicast traffic loss.
If you configure multiple switches to be IGMP queriers, the switch with the lowest
(smallest) IGMP querier source address takes precedence and acts as the querier.
Switches with higher IGMP querier source addresses stop sending IGMP queries unless
they do not receive IGMP queries for 255 seconds. If a switch with a higher IGMP querier
source address does not receive any IGMP queries during that period, it starts sending
queries again.
NOTE: The igmp-querier statement is supported on QFabric systems in Junos
OS 14.1X53-D15 but is not supported in Junos OS 15.1.
Starting in Junos OS 15.1, the igmp-querier statement is not supported on QFX
systems. The statement is supported on QFX systems in Junos OS 15.2 and
following.
To configure a standalone switch to act as an IGMP querier, enter the following:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name l2-querier source-address source address
To configure a QFabric Node device to act as an IGMP querier, enter the following:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name igmp-querier source-address source address
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Release History Table
Related
Documentation
Release
Description
15.1
The igmp-querier statement is supported on QFabric systems in Junos OS
14.1X53-D15 but is not supported in Junos OS 15.1.
15.1
Starting in Junos OS 15.1, the igmp-querier statement is not supported on
QFX systems. The statement is supported on QFX systems in Junos OS 15.2
and following.
•
IGMP Snooping Overview on page 67
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
Changing the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value on page 78
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
Monitoring IGMP Snooping
Purpose
Use the monitoring feature to view status and information about the IGMP snooping
configuration.
Action
To display details about IGMP snooping, enter the following operational commands:
•
show igmp snooping interface—Display information about interfaces enabled with IGMP
snooping, including which interfaces are being snooped in a learning domain and the
number of groups on each interface.
•
show igmp snooping membership—Display IGMP snooping membership information,
including the multicast group address and the number of active multicast groups.
•
show igmp snooping options—Display brief or detailed information about IGMP snooping.
•
show igmp snooping statistics—Display IGMP snooping statistics, including the number
of messages sent and received.
The show igmp snooping interface, show igmp snooping membership, and show igmp
snooping statistics commands also support the following options:
Meaning
•
instance instance-name
•
interface interface-name
•
qualified-vlan vlan-identifier
•
vlan vlan-name
Table 6 on page 78 summarizes the IGMP snooping details displayed.
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Table 6: Summary of IGMP Snooping Output Fields
Field
Values
IGMP Snooping Monitor
VLAN
VLAN for which IGMP snooping is enabled.
Interfaces
Interface connected to a multicast router.
Groups
Number of the multicast groups learned by the VLAN.
MRouters
Multicast router.
Receivers
Multicast receiver.
IGMP Route Information
VLAN
VLAN for which IGMP snooping is enabled.
Next-Hop
Next hop assigned by the switch after performing the route lookup.
Group
Multicast groups learned by the VLAN.
Related
Documentation
•
IGMP Snooping Overview on page 67
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
Changing the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value on page 78
Changing the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value
The IGMP snooping group timeout value determines how long a switch waits to receive
an IGMP query from a multicast router before removing a multicast group from its
multicast cache table. A switch calculates the timeout value by using the query-interval
and query-response-interval values.
When you enable IGMP snooping, the query-interval and query-response-interval values
are applied to all VLANs on the switch. The values are:
•
query-interval—125 seconds
•
query-response-interval—10 seconds
The switch automatically calculates the group timeout value for an IGMP
snooping-enabled switch by multiplying the query-interval value by 2 (the default
robust-count value) and then adding the query-response-interval value. By default, the
switch waits 260 seconds to receive an IGMP query before removing a multicast group
from its multicast cache table: (125 x 2) + 10 = 260.
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You can modify the group timeout value by changing the robust-count value. For example,
if you want the system to wait 510 seconds before timing groups out—(125 x 4) + 10 =
510—enter this command:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set igmp-snooping vlan employee-vlan robust-count 4
Related
Documentation
•
Verifying the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value on page 79
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
Verifying the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value
Purpose
Verify that the IGMP snooping group timeout value has been changed correctly from its
default value.
Action
Display the IGMP snooping membership information, which contains the group timeout
value that was derived from the IGMP configuration:
user@switch> show igmp-snooping membership detail
VLAN: v43 Tag: 43 (Index: 4)
Group: 225.0.0.1
Receiver count: 1, Flags: <v2–hosts>
ge-0/0/15.0 Uptime: 00:00:05 timeout: 510
Meaning
Related
Documentation
The IGMP snooping group timeout value determines how long a switch waits to receive
an IGMP query from a multicast router before removing a multicast group from its
multicast cache table. When you enable IGMP snooping, the default IGMP snooping
group timeout value of 260 seconds is applied to all VLANs, which means that the switch
waits 260 seconds to receive an IGMP query before removing a multicast group from its
multicast cache table. You can change the timeout value by using the robust-count
option.
•
Changing the IGMP Snooping Group Timeout Value on page 78
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CHAPTER 4
Using MLD
•
Understanding MLD on page 81
•
Examples: Configuring MLD on page 84
Understanding MLD
The Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Protocol manages the membership of hosts and
routers in multicast groups. IP version 6 (IPv6) multicast routers use MLD to learn, for
each of their attached physical networks, which groups have interested listeners. Each
routing device maintains a list of host multicast addresses that have listeners for each
subnetwork, as well as a timer for each address. However, the routing device does not
need to know the address of each listener—just the address of each host. The routing
device provides addresses to the multicast routing protocol it uses, which ensures that
multicast packets are delivered to all subnetworks where there are interested listeners.
In this way, MLD is used as the transport for the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
Protocol.
MLD is an integral part of IPv6 and must be enabled on all IPv6 routing devices and hosts
that need to receive IP multicast traffic. The Junos OS supports MLD versions 1 and 2.
Version 2 is supported for source-specific multicast (SSM) include and exclude modes.
In include mode, the receiver specifies the source or sources it is interested in receiving
the multicast group traffic from. Exclude mode works the opposite of include mode. It
allows the receiver to specify the source or sources it is not interested in receiving the
multicast group traffic from.
For each attached network, a multicast routing device can be either a querier or a
nonquerier. A querier routing device, usually one per subnet, solicits group membership
information by transmitting MLD queries. When a host reports to the querier routing
device that it has interested listeners, the querier routing device forwards the membership
information to the rendezvous point (RP) routing device by means of the receiver's
(host's) designated router (DR). This builds the rendezvous-point tree (RPT) connecting
the host with interested listeners to the RP routing device. The RPT is the initial path used
by the sender to transmit information to the interested listeners. Nonquerier routing
devices do not transmit MLD queries on a subnet but can do so if the querier routing
device fails.
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All MLD-configured routing devices start as querier routing devices on each attached
subnet (see Figure 3 on page 82). The querier routing device on the right is the receiver's
DR.
Figure 3: Routing Devices Start Up on a Subnet
To elect the querier routing device, the routing devices exchange query messages
containing their IPv6 source addresses. If a routing device hears a query message whose
IPv6 source address is numerically lower than its own selected address, it becomes a
nonquerier. In Figure 4 on page 82, the routing device on the left has a source address
numerically lower than the one on the right and therefore becomes the querier routing
device.
NOTE: In the practical application of MLD, several routing devices on a subnet
are nonqueriers. If the elected querier routing device fails, query messages
are exchanged among the remaining routing devices. The routing device with
the lowest IPv6 source address becomes the new querier routing device. The
IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP) implementation drops incoming
Neighbor Announcement (NA) messages that have a broadcast or multicast
address in the target link-layer address option. This behavior is recommended
by RFC 2461.
Figure 4: Querier Routing Device Is Determined
The querier routing device sends general MLD queries on the link-scope all-nodes multicast
address FF02::1 at short intervals to all attached subnets to solicit group membership
information (see Figure 5 on page 83). Within the query message is the maximum response
delay value, specifying the maximum allowed delay for the host to respond with a report
message.
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Figure 5: General Query Message Is Issued
If interested listeners are attached to the host receiving the query, the host sends a report
containing the host's IPv6 address to the routing device (see Figure 6 on page 83). If the
reported address is not yet in the routing device's list of multicast addresses with
interested listeners, the address is added to the list and a timer is set for the address. If
the address is already on the list, the timer is reset. The host's address is transmitted to
the RP in the PIM domain.
Figure 6: Reports Are Received by the Querier Routing Device
If the host has no interested multicast listeners, it sends a done message to the querier
routing device. On receipt, the querier routing device issues a multicast address-specific
query containing the last listener query interval value to the multicast address of the host.
If the routing device does not receive a report from the multicast address, it removes the
multicast address from the list and notifies the RP in the PIM domain of its removal (see
Figure 7 on page 83).
Figure 7: Host Has No Interested Receivers and Sends a Done Message
to Routing Device
If a done message is not received by the querier routing device, the querier routing device
continues to send multicast address-specific queries. If the timer set for the address on
receipt of the last report expires, the querier routing device assumes there are no longer
interested listeners on that subnet, removes the multicast address from the list, and
notifies the RP in the PIM domain of its removal (see Figure 8 on page 84).
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Figure 8: Host Address Timer Expires and Address Is Removed from
Multicast Address List
Related
Documentation
•
Enabling MLD on page 88
•
Example: Recording MLD Join and Leave Events on page 102
•
Example: Modifying the MLD Robustness Variable on page 93
Examples: Configuring MLD
•
Understanding MLD on page 84
•
Configuring MLD on page 87
•
Enabling MLD on page 88
•
Modifying the MLD Version on page 89
•
Modifying the MLD Host-Query Message Interval on page 89
•
Modifying the MLD Query Response Interval on page 90
•
Modifying the MLD Last-Member Query Interval on page 90
•
Specifying Immediate-Leave Host Removal for MLD on page 91
•
Filtering Unwanted MLD Reports at the MLD Interface Level on page 92
•
Example: Modifying the MLD Robustness Variable on page 93
•
Limiting the Maximum MLD Message Rate on page 94
•
Enabling MLD Static Group Membership on page 95
•
Example: Recording MLD Join and Leave Events on page 102
•
Configuring the Number of MLD Multicast Group Joins on Logical Interfaces on page 104
•
Disabling MLD on page 105
Understanding MLD
The Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Protocol manages the membership of hosts and
routers in multicast groups. IP version 6 (IPv6) multicast routers use MLD to learn, for
each of their attached physical networks, which groups have interested listeners. Each
routing device maintains a list of host multicast addresses that have listeners for each
subnetwork, as well as a timer for each address. However, the routing device does not
need to know the address of each listener—just the address of each host. The routing
device provides addresses to the multicast routing protocol it uses, which ensures that
multicast packets are delivered to all subnetworks where there are interested listeners.
In this way, MLD is used as the transport for the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
Protocol.
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MLD is an integral part of IPv6 and must be enabled on all IPv6 routing devices and hosts
that need to receive IP multicast traffic. The Junos OS supports MLD versions 1 and 2.
Version 2 is supported for source-specific multicast (SSM) include and exclude modes.
In include mode, the receiver specifies the source or sources it is interested in receiving
the multicast group traffic from. Exclude mode works the opposite of include mode. It
allows the receiver to specify the source or sources it is not interested in receiving the
multicast group traffic from.
For each attached network, a multicast routing device can be either a querier or a
nonquerier. A querier routing device, usually one per subnet, solicits group membership
information by transmitting MLD queries. When a host reports to the querier routing
device that it has interested listeners, the querier routing device forwards the membership
information to the rendezvous point (RP) routing device by means of the receiver's
(host's) designated router (DR). This builds the rendezvous-point tree (RPT) connecting
the host with interested listeners to the RP routing device. The RPT is the initial path used
by the sender to transmit information to the interested listeners. Nonquerier routing
devices do not transmit MLD queries on a subnet but can do so if the querier routing
device fails.
All MLD-configured routing devices start as querier routing devices on each attached
subnet (see Figure 3 on page 82). The querier routing device on the right is the receiver's
DR.
Figure 9: Routing Devices Start Up on a Subnet
To elect the querier routing device, the routing devices exchange query messages
containing their IPv6 source addresses. If a routing device hears a query message whose
IPv6 source address is numerically lower than its own selected address, it becomes a
nonquerier. In Figure 4 on page 82, the routing device on the left has a source address
numerically lower than the one on the right and therefore becomes the querier routing
device.
NOTE: In the practical application of MLD, several routing devices on a subnet
are nonqueriers. If the elected querier routing device fails, query messages
are exchanged among the remaining routing devices. The routing device with
the lowest IPv6 source address becomes the new querier routing device. The
IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP) implementation drops incoming
Neighbor Announcement (NA) messages that have a broadcast or multicast
address in the target link-layer address option. This behavior is recommended
by RFC 2461.
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Figure 10: Querier Routing Device Is Determined
The querier routing device sends general MLD queries on the link-scope all-nodes multicast
address FF02::1 at short intervals to all attached subnets to solicit group membership
information (see Figure 5 on page 83). Within the query message is the maximum response
delay value, specifying the maximum allowed delay for the host to respond with a report
message.
Figure 11: General Query Message Is Issued
If interested listeners are attached to the host receiving the query, the host sends a report
containing the host's IPv6 address to the routing device (see Figure 6 on page 83). If the
reported address is not yet in the routing device's list of multicast addresses with
interested listeners, the address is added to the list and a timer is set for the address. If
the address is already on the list, the timer is reset. The host's address is transmitted to
the RP in the PIM domain.
Figure 12: Reports Are Received by the Querier Routing Device
If the host has no interested multicast listeners, it sends a done message to the querier
routing device. On receipt, the querier routing device issues a multicast address-specific
query containing the last listener query interval value to the multicast address of the host.
If the routing device does not receive a report from the multicast address, it removes the
multicast address from the list and notifies the RP in the PIM domain of its removal (see
Figure 7 on page 83).
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Figure 13: Host Has No Interested Receivers and Sends a Done Message
to Routing Device
If a done message is not received by the querier routing device, the querier routing device
continues to send multicast address-specific queries. If the timer set for the address on
receipt of the last report expires, the querier routing device assumes there are no longer
interested listeners on that subnet, removes the multicast address from the list, and
notifies the RP in the PIM domain of its removal (see Figure 8 on page 84).
Figure 14: Host Address Timer Expires and Address Is Removed from
Multicast Address List
Configuring MLD
To configure the Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Protocol, include the mld statement:
mld {
accounting;
interface interface-name {
disable;
(accounting | no-accounting);
group-policy [ policy-names ];
immediate-leave;
oif-map [ map-names ];
passive;
ssm-map ssm-map-name;
static {
group multicast-group-address {
exclude;
group-count number;
group-increment increment;
source ip-address {
source-count number;
source-increment increment;
}
}
}
version version;
}
maximum-transmit-rate packets-per-second;
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query-interval seconds;
query-last-member-interval seconds;
query-response-interval seconds;
robust-count number;
}
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols]
By default, MLD is enabled on all broadcast interfaces when you configure Protocol
Independent Multicast (PIM) or the Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP).
Enabling MLD
The Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Protocol manages multicast groups by
establishing, maintaining, and removing groups on a subnet. Multicast routing devices
use MLD to learn which groups have members on each of their attached physical networks.
MLD must be enabled for the router to receive IPv6 multicast packets. MLD is only needed
for IPv6 networks, because multicast is handled differently in IPv4 networks. MLD is
enabled on all IPv6 interfaces on which you configure PIM and on all IPv6 broadcast
interfaces when you configure DVMRP.
MLD specifies different behaviors for multicast listeners and for routers. When a router
is also a listener, the router responds to its own messages. If a router has more than one
interface to the same link, it needs to perform the router behavior over only one of those
interfaces. Listeners, on the other hand, must perform the listener behavior on all interfaces
connected to potential receivers of multicast traffic.
If MLD is not running on an interface—either because PIM and DVMRP are not configured
on the interface or because MLD is explicitly disabled on the interface—you can explicitly
enable MLD.
To explicitly enable MLD:
1.
If PIM and DVMRP are not running on the interface, explicitly enable MLD by including
the interface name.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/0/0.0
2. Check to see if MLD is disabled on any interfaces. In the following example, MLD is
disabled on a Gigabit Ethernet interface.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# show
interface fe-0/0/0.0;
interface ge-0/0/0.0 {
disable;
}
3. Enable MLD on the interface by deleting the disable statement.
[edit protocols mld]
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delete interface ge-0/0/0.0 disable
4. Verify the configuration.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# show
interface fe-0/0/0.0;
interface ge-0/0/0.0;
5. Verify the operation of MLD by checking the output of the show mld interface command.
Modifying the MLD Version
By default, the router supports MLD version 1 (MLDv1). To enable the router to use MLD
version 2 (MLDv2) for source-specific multicast (SSM) only, include the version 2
statement.
If you configure the MLD version setting at the individual interface hierarchy level, it
overrides configuring the IGMP version using the interface all statement.
If a source address is specified in a multicast group that is statically configured, the version
must be set to MLDv2.
To change an MLD interface to version 2:
1.
Configure the MLD interface.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/0/0.0 version 2
2. Verify the configuration by checking the version field in the output of the show mld
interface command. The show mld statistics command has version-specific output
fields, such as the counters in the MLD Message type field.
Modifying the MLD Host-Query Message Interval
The objective of MLD is to keep routers up to date with IPv6 group membership of the
entire subnet. Routers need not know who all the members are, only that members exist.
Each host keeps track of which multicast groups are subscribed to. On each link, one
router is elected the querier. The MLD querier router periodically sends general host-query
messages on each attached network to solicit membership information. These messages
solicit group membership information and are sent to the link-scope all-nodes address
FF02::1. A general host-query message has a maximum response time that you can set
by configuring the query response interval.
The query response timeout, the query interval, and the robustness variable are related
in that they are all variables that are used to calculate the multicast listener interval. The
multicast listener interval is the number of seconds that must pass before a multicast
router determines that no more members of a host group exist on a subnet. The multicast
listener interval is calculated as the (robustness variable x query-interval) + (1 x
query-response-interval). If no reports are received for a particular group before the
multicast listener interval has expired, the routing device stops forwarding
remotely-originated multicast packets for that group onto the attached network.
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By default, host-query messages are sent every 125 seconds. You can change this interval
to change the number of MLD messages sent on the subnet.
To modify the query interval:
1.
Configure the interval.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set query-interval 200
The value can be from 1 through 1024 seconds.
2. Verify the configuration by checking the MLD Query Interval field in the output of the
show mld interface command.
3. Verify the operation of the query interval by checking the Listener Query field in the
output of the show mld statistics command.
Modifying the MLD Query Response Interval
The query response interval is the maximum amount of time that can elapse between
when the querier router sends a host-query message and when it receives a response
from a host. You can change this interval to adjust the burst peaks of MLD messages on
the subnet. Set a larger interval to make the traffic less bursty.
The query response timeout, the query interval, and the robustness variable are related
in that they are all variables that are used to calculate the multicast listener interval. The
multicast listener interval is the number of seconds that must pass before a multicast
router determines that no more members of a host group exist on a subnet. The multicast
listener interval is calculated as the (robustness variable x query-interval) + (1 x
query-response-interval). If no reports are received for a particular group before the
multicast listener interval has expired, the routing device stops forwarding
remotely-originated multicast packets for that group onto the attached network.
The default query response interval is 10 seconds. You can configure a subsecond interval
up to one digit to the right of the decimal point. The configurable range is 0.1 through 0.9,
then in 1-second intervals 1 through 999,999.
To modify the query response interval:
1.
Configure the interval.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set query-response-interval 0.5
2. Verify the configuration by checking the MLD Query Response Interval field in the output
of the show mld interface command.
3. Verify the operation of the query interval by checking the Listener Query field in the
output of the show mld statistics command.
Modifying the MLD Last-Member Query Interval
The last-member query interval (also called the last-listener query interval) is the
maximum amount of time between group-specific query messages, including those sent
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in response to done messages sent on the link-scope-all-routers address FF02::2. You
can lower this interval to reduce the amount of time it takes a router to detect the loss
of the last member of a group.
When the routing device that is serving as the querier receives a leave-group (done)
message from a host, the routing device sends multiple group-specific queries to the
group. The querier sends a specific number of these queries, and it sends them at a
specific interval. The number of queries sent is called the last-listener query count. The
interval at which the queries are sent is called the last-listener query interval. Both settings
are configurable, thus allowing you to adjust the leave latency. The IGMP leave latency
is the time between a request to leave a multicast group and the receipt of the last byte
of data for the multicast group.
The last-listener query count x (times) the last-listener query interval = (equals) the
amount of time it takes a routing device to determine that the last member of a group
has left the group and to stop forwarding group traffic.
The default last-listener query interval is 1 second. You can configure a subsecond interval
up to one digit to the right of the decimal point. The configurable range is 0.1 through 0.9,
then in 1-second intervals 1 through 999,999.
To modify this interval:
1.
Configure the time (in seconds) that the routing device waits for a report in response
to a group-specific query.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set query-last-member-interval 0.1
2. Verify the configuration by checking the MLD Last Member Query Interval field in the
output of the show igmp interfaces command.
NOTE: You can configure the last-member query count by configuring the
robustness variable. The two are always equal.
Specifying Immediate-Leave Host Removal for MLD
The immediate leave setting is useful for minimizing the leave latency of MLD
memberships. When this setting is enabled, the routing device leaves the multicast group
immediately after the last host leaves the multicast group.
The immediate-leave setting enables host tracking, meaning that the device keeps track
of the hosts that send join messages. This allows MLD to determine when the last host
sends a leave message for the multicast group.
When the immediate leave setting is enabled, the device removes an interface from the
forwarding-table entry without first sending MLD group-specific queries to the interface.
The interface is pruned from the multicast tree for the multicast group specified in the
MLD leave message. The immediate leave setting ensures optimal bandwidth
management for hosts on a switched network, even when multiple multicast groups are
being used simultaneously.
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When immediate leave is disabled and one host sends a leave group message, the routing
device first sends a group query to determine if another receiver responds. If no receiver
responds, the routing device removes all hosts on the interface from the multicast group.
Immediate leave is disabled by default for both MLD version 1 and MLD version 2.
NOTE: Although host tracking is enabled for IGMPv2 and MLDv1 when you
enable immediate leave, use immediate leave with these versions only when
there is one host on the interface. The reason is that IGMPv2 and MLDv1 use
a report suppression mechanism whereby only one host on an interface sends
a group join report in response to a membership query. The other interested
hosts suppress their reports. The purpose of this mechanism is to avoid a
flood of reports for the same group. But it also interferes with host tracking,
because the router only knows about the one interested host and does not
know about the others.
To enable immediate leave:
1.
Configure immediate leave on the MLD interface.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface ge-0/0/0.1 immediate-leave
2. Verify the configuration by checking the Immediate Leave field in the output of the
show mld interface command.
Filtering Unwanted MLD Reports at the MLD Interface Level
Suppose you need to limit the subnets that can join a certain multicast group. The
group-policy statement enables you to filter unwanted MLD reports at the interface level.
When the group-policy statement is enabled on a router, after the router receives an MLD
report, the router compares the group against the specified group policy and performs
the action configured in that policy (for example, rejects the report if the policy matches
the defined address or network).
You define the policy to match only MLD group addresses (for MLDv1) by using the policy's
route-filter statement to match the group address. You define the policy to match MLD
(source, group) addresses (for MLDv2) by using the policy's route-filter statement to
match the group address and the policy's source-address-filter statement to match the
source address.
To filter unwanted MLD reports:
1.
Configure an MLDv1 policy.
[edit policy-statement reject_policy_v1]
user@host# set from route-filter fec0:1:1:4::/64 exact
user@host# set then reject
2. Configure an MLDv2 policy.
[edit policy-statement reject_policy_v2]
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user@host# set from route-filter fec0:1:1:4::/64 exact
user@host# set from source-address-filter fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d/32 orlonger
user@host# set then reject
3. Apply the policies to the MLD interfaces where you prefer not to receive specific group
or (source, group) reports. In this example, ge-0/0/0.1 is running MLDv1 and ge-0/1/1.0
is running MLDv2.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface ge-0/0/0.1 group-policy reject_policy_v1
user@host# set interface ge-0/1/1.0 group-policy reject_policy_v2
4. Verify the operation of the filter by checking the Rejected Report field in the output of
the show mld statistics command.
Example: Modifying the MLD Robustness Variable
This example shows how to configure and verify the MLD robustness variable in a multicast
domain.
•
Requirements on page 93
•
Overview on page 93
•
Configuration on page 94
•
Verification on page 94
Requirements
Before you begin:
•
Configure the router interfaces.
•
Configure an interior gateway protocol or static routing. See the Junos OS Routing
Protocols Library.
•
Enable IPv6 unicast routing. See the Junos OS Routing Protocols Library.
•
Enable PIM. See “PIM Overview” on page 109.
Overview
The MLD robustness variable can be fine-tuned to allow for expected packet loss on a
subnet. Increasing the robust count allows for more packet loss but increases the leave
latency of the subnetwork.
The value of the robustness variable is used in calculating the following MLD message
intervals:
•
Group member interval—Amount of time that must pass before a multicast router
determines that there are no more members of a group on a network. This interval is
calculated as follows: (robustness variable x query-interval) + (1 x
query-response-interval).
•
Other querier present interval—Amount of time that must pass before a multicast
router determines that there is no longer another multicast router that is the querier.
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This interval is calculated as follows: (robustness variable x query-interval) + (0.5 x
query-response-interval).
•
Last-member query count—Number of group-specific queries sent before the router
assumes there are no local members of a group. The default number is the value of
the robustness variable.
By default, the robustness variable is set to 2. The number can be from 2 through 10. You
might want to increase this value if you expect a subnet to lose packets.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set protocols mld robust-count 5
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To change the value of the robustness variable:
1.
Configure the robust count.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set robust-count 5
2.
If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# commit
Verification
To verify the configuration is working properly, check the MLD Robustness Count field in
the output of the show mld interfaces command.
Limiting the Maximum MLD Message Rate
You can change the limit for the maximum number of MLD packets transmitted in 1
second by the router.
Increasing the maximum number of MLD packets transmitted per second might be useful
on a router with a large number of interfaces participating in MLD.
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To change the limit for the maximum number of MLD packets the router can transmit in
1 second, include the maximum-transmit-rate statement and specify the maximum
number of packets per second to be transmitted.
Enabling MLD Static Group Membership
•
Create a MLD Static Group Member on page 95
•
Automatically create static groups on page 96
•
Automatically increment group addresses on page 97
•
Specify multicast source address (in SSM mode) on page 98
•
Automatically specify multicast sources on page 99
•
Automatically increment source addresses on page 100
•
Exclude multicast source addresses (in SSM mode) on page 101
Create a MLD Static Group Member
You can create MLD static group membership to test multicast forwarding without a
receiver host. When you enable MLD static group membership, data is forwarded to an
interface without that interface receiving membership reports from downstream hosts.
Class-of-service (CoS) adjustment is not supported with MLD static group membership.
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic, you can specify the number of static groups to be automatically created.
In this example, you create static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d.
1.
Configure the static groups to be created by including the static statement and group
statement and specifying which IPv6 multicast address of the group to be created.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol mld command
to verify the MLD protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol mld
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d;
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and after the source is sending traffic,
use the show mld group command to verify that static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d has
been created.
user@host> show mld group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Group mode: Include
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
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NOTE: You must specify a unique address for each group.
Automatically create static groups
When you create MLD static group membership to test multicast forwarding on an
interface on which you want to receive multicast traffic, you can specify that a number
of static groups be automatically created. This is useful when you want to test forwarding
to multiple receivers without having to configure each receiver separately.
In this example, you create three groups.
1.
Configure the number of static groups to be created by including the group-count
statement and specifying the number of groups to be created.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d group-count 3
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol mld command
to verify the MLD protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol mld
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d {
group-count 3;
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show mld group command to verify that static groups ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d, ff0e::1:ff05:1a8e,
and ff0e::1:ff05:1a8f have been created.
user@host> show mld group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8e
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8f
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
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Automatically increment group addresses
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic and you specify the number of static groups to be automatically created, you can
also configure the group address to be automatically incremented by some number of
addresses.
In this example, you create three groups and increase the group address by an increment
of two for each group.
1.
Configure the group address increment by including the group-increment statement
and specifying the number by which the address should be incremented for each
group. The increment is specified in a format similar to an IPv6 address.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d group-count 3
group-increment ::2
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol mld command
to verify the MLD protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol mld
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d {
group-increment ::2;
group-count 3;
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show mld group command to verify that static groups ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d, ff0e::1:ff05:1a8f,
and ff0e::1:ff05:1a91 have been created.
user@host> show mld group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8f
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a91
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
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Specify multicast source address (in SSM mode)
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic and your network is operating in source-specific multicast (SSM) mode, you can
specify the multicast source address to be accepted.
If you specify a group address in the SSM range, you must also specify a source.
If a source address is specified in a multicast group that is statically configured, the MLD
version must be set to MLDv2 on the interface. MLDv1 is the default value.
In this example, you create group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d and accept IPv6 address
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d as the only source.
1.
Configure the source address by including the source statement and specifying the
IPv6 address of the source host.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d source
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol mld command
to verify the MLD protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol mld
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d {
source fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d;
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show mld group command to verify that static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d has been created
and that source fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d has been accepted.
user@host> show mld group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
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Automatically specify multicast sources
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic, you can specify a number of multicast sources to be automatically accepted.
In this example, you create static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d and accept
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d, fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8e, and fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8f as the
source addresses.
1.
Configure the number of multicast source addresses to be accepted by including the
source-count statement and specifying the number of sources to be accepted.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d source
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d source-count 3
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol mld command
to verify the MLD protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol mld
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d {
source fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d {
source-count 3;
}
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show mld group command to verify that static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d has been created
and that sources fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d, fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8e, and
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8f have been accepted.
user@host> show mld group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8e
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8f
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
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Automatically increment source addresses
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic, and specify a number of multicast sources to be automatically accepted, you can
also specify the number by which the address should be incremented for each source
accepted.
In this example, you create static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d and accept
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d, fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8f, and fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a91 as the
sources.
1.
Configure the number of multicast source addresses to be accepted by including the
source-increment statement and specifying the number of sources to be accepted.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d source
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d source-count 3 source-increment ::2
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol mld command
to verify the MLD protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol mld
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d {
source fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d {
source-count 3;
source-increment ::2;
}
}
}
}
3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show mld group command to verify that static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d has been created
and that sources fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d, fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8f, and
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a91 have been accepted.
user@host> show mld group
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8f
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e2::1:ff05:1a8d
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a91
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
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Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Group mode: Include
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Group mode: Include
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8f
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Group mode: Include
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a91
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Exclude multicast source addresses (in SSM mode)
When you configure static groups on an interface on which you want to receive multicast
traffic and your network is operating in source-specific multicast (SSM) mode, you can
specify that certain multicast source addresses be excluded.
By default the multicast source address configured in a static group operates in include
mode. In include mode the multicast traffic for the group is accepted from the configured
source address. You can also configure the static group to operate in exclude mode. In
exclude mode the multicast traffic for the group is accepted from any address other than
the configured source address.
If a source address is specified in a multicast group that is statically configured, the MLD
version must be set to MLDv2 on the interface. MLDv1 is the default value.
In this example, you exclude address fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d as a source for group
ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d.
1.
Configure a multicast static group to operate in exclude mode by including the exclude
statement and specifying which IPv6 source address to be excluded.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe-0/1/2 static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d exclude source
fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
2. After you commit the configuration, use the show configuration protocol mld command
to verify the MLD protocol configuration.
user@host> show configuration protocol mld
interface fe-0/1/2.0 {
static {
group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d {
exclude;
source fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d;
}
}
}
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3. After you have committed the configuration and the source is sending traffic, use the
show mld group detail command to verify that static group ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d has been
created and that the static group is operating in exclude mode.
user@host> show mld group detail
Interface: fe-0/1/2
Group: ff0e::1:ff05:1a8d
Group mode: Exclude
Source: fe80::2e0:81ff:fe05:1a8d
Last reported by: Local
Timeout: 0 Type: Static
Similar configuration is available for IPv4 multicast traffic using the IGMP protocol.
Example: Recording MLD Join and Leave Events
This example shows how to determine whether MLD tuning is needed in a network by
configuring the routing device to record MLD join and leave events.
•
Requirements on page 102
•
Overview on page 102
•
Configuration on page 103
•
Verification on page 104
Requirements
Before you begin:
•
Configure the router interfaces.
•
Configure an interior gateway protocol or static routing. See the Junos OS Routing
Protocols Library.
•
Enable IPv6 unicast routing. See the Junos OS Routing Protocols Library.
•
Enable PIM. See “PIM Overview” on page 109.
Overview
Table 7 on page 102 describes the recordable MLD join and leave events.
Table 7: MLD Event Messages
ERRMSG Tag
Definition
RPD_MLD_JOIN
Records MLD join events.
RPD_MLD_LEAVE
Records MLD leave events.
RPD_MLD_ACCOUNTING_ON
Records when MLD accounting is enabled on an MLD interface.
RPD_MLD_ACCOUNTING_OFF
Records when MLD accounting is disabled on an MLD interface.
RPD_MLD_MEMBERSHIP_TIMEOUT
Records MLD membership timeout events.
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Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set protocols mld interface fe-0/1/0.2 accounting
set system syslog file mld-events any info
set system syslog file mld-events match ".*RPD_MLD_JOIN.* | .*RPD_MLD_LEAVE.* |
.*RPD_MLD_ACCOUNTING.* | .*RPD_MLD_MEMBERSHIP_TIMEOUT.*"
set system syslog file mld-events archive size 100000
set system syslog file mld-events archive files 3
set system syslog file mld-events archive transfer-interval 1440
set system syslog file mld-events archive archive-sites "ftp://user@host1//var/tmp"
password "anonymous"
set system syslog file mld-events archive archive-sites "ftp://user@host2//var/tmp"
password "test"
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To configure recording of MLD join and leave events:
1.
Enable accounting globally or on an MLD interface. This example shows the interface
configuration.
[edit protocols mld]
user@host# set interface fe–0/1/0.2 accounting
2.
Configure the events to be recorded, and filter the events to a system log file with
a descriptive filename, such as mld-events.
[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set any info
[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set match “.*RPD_MLD_JOIN.* | .*RPD_MLD_LEAVE.* |
.*RPD_MLD_ACCOUNTING.* | .*RPD_MLD_MEMBERSHIP_TIMEOUT.*”
3.
Periodically archive the log file.
This example rotates the file every 24 hours (1440 minutes) when it reaches 100 KB
and keeps three files.
[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set archive size 100000
[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set archive files 3
[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set archive archive-sites “ftp://user@host1//var/tmp” password
“anonymous”
[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set archive archive-sites “ftp://user@host2//var/tmp” password “test”
[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set archive transfer-interval 1440
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[edit system syslog file mld-events]
user@host# set archive start-time 2011–01–07:12:30
4.
If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration.
[edit system syslog file mld-events]]
user@host# commit
Verification
You can view the system log file by running the file show command.
user@host> file show mld-events
You can monitor the system log file as entries are added to the file by running the monitor
start and monitor stop commands.
user@host> monitor start mld-events
*** mld-events ***
Apr 16 13:08:23 host mgd[16416]: UI_CMDLINE_READ_LINE: User 'user', command 'run
monitor start mld-events '
monitor
Configuring the Number of MLD Multicast Group Joins on Logical Interfaces
The group-limit statement enables you to limit the number of MLD multicast group joins
for logical interfaces. When this statement is enabled on a router running MLD version 2,
the limit is applied upon receipt of the group report. Once the group limit is reached,
subsequent join requests are rejected.
When configuring limits for MLD multicast groups, keep the following in mind:
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•
Each any-source group (*,G) counts as one group toward the limit.
•
Each source-specific group (S,G) counts as one group toward the limit.
•
Groups in MLDv2 exclude mode are counted toward the limit.
•
Multiple source-specific groups count individually toward the group limit, even if they
are for the same group. For example, (S1, G1) and (S2, G1) would count as two groups
toward the configured limit.
•
Combinations of any-source groups and source-specific groups count individually
toward the group limit, even if they are for the same group. For example, (*, G1) and
(S, G1) would count as two groups toward the configured limit.
•
Configuring and committing a group limit on a network that is lower than what already
exists on the network results in the removal of all groups from the configuration. The
groups must then request to rejoin the network (up to the newly configured group
limit).
•
You can dynamically limit multicast groups on MLD logical interfaces by using dynamic
profiles. For detailed information about creating dynamic profiles, see the Junos OS
Broadband Subscriber Management and Services Library.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Using MLD
Beginning with Junos OS 12.2, you can optionally configure a system log warning threshold
for MLD muticast group joins received on the logical interface.
The group-threshold statement enables you to configure the threshold at which a warning
message is logged. The range is 1 through 100 percent. The warning threshold is a
percentage of the group limit, so you must configure the group-limit statement to configure
a warning threshold. For instance, when the number of groups exceed the configured
warning threshold, but remain below the configured group limit, multicast groups continue
to be accepted, and the device logs a warning message. In addition, the device logs a
warning message after the number of groups drop below the configured warning threshold.
You can further specify the amount of time (in seconds) between the log messages by
configuring the log-interval statement. The range is 6 through 32,767 seconds.
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You might consider throttling log messages because every entry added after the
configured threshold and every entry rejected after the configured limit causes a warning
message to be logged. By configuring a log interval, you can throttle the amount of system
log warning messages generated for MLD multicast group joins.
To limit multicast group joins on an MLD logical interface:
1.
Access the logical interface at the MLD protocol hierarchy level.
[edit]
user@host# edit protocols mld interface interface-name
2. Specify the group limit for the interface.
[edit protocols mld interface interface-name]
user@host# set group-limit limit
3. (Optional) Configure the threshold at which a warning message is logged.
[edit protocols mld interface interface-name]
user@host# set group-threshold value
4. (Optional) Configure the amount of time between log messages.
[edit protocols mld interface interface-name]
user@host# set log-interval seconds
To confirm your configuration, use the show protocols mld command. To verify the
operation of MLD on the interface, including the configured group limit and the optional
warning threshold and interval between log messages, use the show mld interface
command.
Disabling MLD
To disable MLD on an interface, include the disable statement:
interface interface-name {
disable;
}
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
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Related
Documentation
106
•
[edit protocols mld]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mld]
•
Configuring IGMP
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 2
Configuring PIM
•
Using PIM Basic Features on page 109
•
Using PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
Using PIM Dense Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode on page 141
•
Using Source-Specific Multicast on page 147
•
Using Static RP on page 165
•
Using Anycast RP on page 171
•
Using Auto-RP on page 181
•
Using PIM Bootstrap Router on page 187
•
Using PIM Filtering on page 191
•
Using PIM RPT and SPT Cutover on page 199
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108
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 5
Using PIM Basic Features
•
PIM Overview on page 109
•
PIM on Aggregated Interfaces on page 113
•
Changing the PIM Version on page 113
•
Modifying the PIM Hello Interval on page 113
•
Preserving Multicast Performance by Disabling Response to the ping Utility on page 114
•
Configuring PIM Trace Options on page 115
•
Configuring Interface Priority for PIM Designated Router Selection on page 117
•
Configuring PIM Designated Router Election on Point-to-Point Links on page 118
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM on page 120
•
Disabling PIM on page 124
PIM Overview
The predominant multicast routing protocol in use on the Internet today is Protocol
Independent Multicast, or PIM. The type of PIM used on the Internet is PIM sparse mode.
PIM sparse mode is so accepted that when the simple term “PIM” is used in an Internet
context, some form of sparse mode operation is assumed.
PIM emerged as an algorithm to overcome the limitations of dense-mode protocols such
as the Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP), which was efficient for
dense clusters of multicast receivers, but did not scale well for the larger, sparser, groups
encountered on the Internet. The Core Based Trees (CBT) Protocol was intended to
support sparse mode as well, but CBT, with its all-powerful core approach, made
placement of the core critical, and large conference-type applications (many-to-many)
resulted in bottlenecks in the core. PIM was designed to avoid the dense-mode scaling
issues of DVMRP and the potential performance issues of CBT at the same time.
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, only PIM version 2 is supported. In the CLI, the command
for specifying a version (1 or 2) is removed.
PIMv1 and PIMv2 can coexist on the same routing device and even on the same interface.
The main difference between PIMv1 and PIMv2 is the packet format. PIMv1 messages
use Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) packets, whereas PIMv2 has its own
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IP protocol number (103) and packet structure. All routing devices connecting to an IP
subnet such as a LAN must use the same PIM version. Some PIM implementations can
recognize PIMv1 packets and automatically switch the routing device interface to PIMv1.
Because the difference between PIMv1 and PIMv2 involves the message format, but not
the meaning of the message or how the routing device processes the PIM message, a
routing device can easily mix PIMv1 and PIMv2 interfaces.
PIM is used for efficient routing to multicast groups that might span wide-area and
interdomain internetworks. It is called “protocol independent” because it does not depend
on a particular unicast routing protocol. Junos OS supports bidirectional mode, sparse
mode, dense mode, and sparse-dense mode.
NOTE: ACX Series routers supports only sparse mode. Dense mode on ACX
series is supported only for control multicast groups for auto-discovery of
rendezvous point (auto-RP).
PIM operates in several modes: bidirectional mode, sparse mode, dense mode, and
sparse-dense mode. In sparse-dense mode, some multicast groups are configured as
dense mode (flood-and-prune, [S,G] state) and others are configured as sparse mode
(explicit join to rendezvous point [RP], [*,G] state).
PIM drafts also establish a mode known as PIM source-specific mode, or PIM SSM. In
PIM SSM there is only one specific source for the content of a multicast group within a
given domain.
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Chapter 5: Using PIM Basic Features
Because the PIM mode you choose determines the PIM configuration properties, you first
must decide whether PIM operates in bidirectional, sparse, dense, or sparse-dense mode
in your network. Each mode has distinct operating advantages in different network
environments.
•
In sparse mode, routing devices must join and leave multicast groups explicitly.
Upstream routing devices do not forward multicast traffic to a downstream routing
device unless the downstream routing device has sent an explicit request (by means
of a join message) to the rendezvous point (RP) routing device to receive this traffic.
The RP serves as the root of the shared multicast delivery tree and is responsible for
forwarding multicast data from different sources to the receivers.
Sparse mode is well suited to the Internet, where frequent interdomain join messages
and prune messages are common.
NOTE: On all the EX series switches (except EX4300 and EX9200),
QFX5100 switches, and OCX series switches, the rate limit is set to 1pps
per SG to avoid overwhelming the rendezvous point (RP), First hop router
(FHR) with PIM-sparse mode (PIM-SM) register messages and cause CPU
hogs. This rate limit helps in improving scaling and convergence times by
avoiding duplicate packets being trapped, and tunneled to RP in software.
(Platform support depends on the Junos OS release in your installation.)
•
Bidirectional PIM is similar to sparse mode, and is especially suited to applications that
must scale to support a large number of dispersed sources and receivers. In bidirectional
PIM, routing devices build shared bidirectional trees and do not switch to a source-based
tree. Bidirectional PIM scales well because it needs no source-specific (S,G) state.
Instead, it builds only group-specific (*,G) state.
•
Unlike sparse mode and bidirectional mode, in which data is forwarded only to routing
devices sending an explicit PIM join request, dense mode implements a flood-and-prune
mechanism, similar to the Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP). In
dense mode, a routing device receives the multicast data on the incoming interface,
then forwards the traffic to the outgoing interface list. Flooding occurs periodically and
is used to refresh state information, such as the source IP address and multicast group
pair. If the routing device has no interested receivers for the data, and the outgoing
interface list becomes empty, the routing device sends a PIM prune message upstream.
Dense mode works best in networks where few or no prunes occur. In such instances,
dense mode is actually more efficient than sparse mode.
•
Sparse-dense mode, as the name implies, allows the interface to operate on a per-group
basis in either sparse or dense mode. A group specified as “dense” is not mapped to
an RP. Instead, data packets destined for that group are forwarded by means of PIM
dense mode rules. A group specified as “sparse” is mapped to an RP, and data packets
are forwarded by means of PIM sparse-mode rules. Sparse-dense mode is useful in
networks implementing auto-RP for PIM sparse mode.
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NOTE: On SRX Series devices, PIM does not support upstream and
downstream interfaces across different virtual routers in flow mode.
Basic PIM Network Components
PIM dense mode requires only a multicast source and series of multicast-enabled routing
devices running PIM dense mode to allow receivers to obtain multicast content. Dense
mode makes sure that all multicast traffic gets everywhere by periodically flooding the
network with multicast traffic, and relies on prune messages to make sure that subnets
where all receivers are uninterested in that particular multicast group stop receiving
packets.
PIM sparse mode is more complicated and requires the establishment of special routing
devices called rendezvous points (RPs) in the network core. These routing devices are
where upstream join messages from interested receivers meet downstream traffic from
the source of the multicast group content. A network can have many RPs, but PIM sparse
mode allows only one RP to be active for any multicast group.
If there is only one RP in a routing domain, the RP and adjacent links might become
congested and form a single point of failure for all multicast traffic. Thus, multiple RPs
are the rule, but the issue then becomes how other multicast routing devices find the RP
that is the source of the multicast group the receiver is trying to join. This RP-to-group
mapping is controlled by a special bootstrap router (BSR) running the PIM BSR mechanism.
There can be more than one bootstrap router as well, also for single-point-of-failure
reasons.
The bootstrap router does not have to be an RP itself, although this is a common
implementation. The bootstrap router's main function is to manage the collection of RPs
and allow interested receivers to find the source of their group's multicast traffic. PIM
bootstrap messages are sourced from the loopback address, which is always up. The
loopback address must be routable. If it is not routable, then the bootstrap router is
unable to send bootstrap messages to update the RP domain members. The show pim
bootstrap command displays only those bootstrap routers that have routable loopback
addresses.
PIM SSM can be seen as a subset of a special case of PIM sparse mode and requires no
specialized equipment other than that used for PIM sparse mode (and IGMP version 3).
Bidirectional PIM RPs, unlike RPs for PIM sparse mode, do not need to perform PIM
Register tunneling or other specific protocol action. Bidirectional PIM RPs implement no
specific functionality. RP addresses are simply a location in the network to rendezvous
toward. In fact, for bidirectional PIM, RP addresses need not be loopback interface
addresses or even be addresses configured on any routing device, as long as they are
covered by a subnet that is connected to a bidirectional PIM-capable routing device and
advertised to the network.
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Release History Table
Related
Documentation
•
Release
Description
15.2
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, only PIM version 2 is supported. In the CLI,
the command for specifying a version (1 or 2) is removed.
Supported IP Multicast Protocol Standards
PIM on Aggregated Interfaces
If you configure PIM on an aggregated (ae- or as-) interface, each of the interfaces in the
aggregate is included in the multicast output interface list and carries the single stream
of replicated packets in a load-sharing fashion. The multicast aggregate interface is
“expanded” into its constituent interfaces in the next-hop database.
Related
Documentation
•
PIM Overview on page 109
•
interface on page 317
Changing the PIM Version
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, it is no longer necessary to configure the PIM version.
Support for PIM version 1 has been removed and the remaining, default, version is PIM 2.
PIM version 2 is the default for both rendezvous point (RP) mode (at the [edit protocols
pim rp static address address] hierarchy level) and for interface mode (at the [edit protocols
pim interface interface-name] hierarchy level).
Release History Table
Release
Description
15.2
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, it is no longer necessary to configure the
PIM version.
Modifying the PIM Hello Interval
Routing devices send hello messages at a fixed interval on all PIM-enabled interfaces.
By using hello messages, routing devices advertise their existence as PIM routing devices
on the subnet. With all PIM-enabled routing devices advertised, a single designated router
for the subnet is established.
When a routing device is configured for PIM, it sends a hello message at a 30-second
default interval. The interval range is from 0 through 255. When the interval counts down
to 0, the routing device sends another hello message, and the timer is reset. A routing
device that receives no response from a neighbor in 3.5 times the interval value drops
the neighbor. In the case of a 30-second interval, the amount of time a routing device
waits for a response is 105 seconds.
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If a PIM hello message contains the hold-time option, the neighbor timeout is set to the
hold-time sent in the message. If a PIM hello message does not contain the hold-time
option, the neighbor timeout is set to the default hello hold time.
To modify how often the routing device sends hello messages out of an interface:
1.
This example shows the configuration for the routing instance. Configure the interface
globally or in the routing instance.
[edit routing-instances PIM.master protocols pim interface fe-3/0/2.0]
user@host# set hello-interval 255
2. Verify the configuration by checking the Hello Option Holdtime field in the output of
the show pim neighbors detail command.
user@host> show pim neighbors detail
Instance: PIM.master
Interface: fe-3/0/2.0
Address: 192.168.195.37, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse
Hello Option Holdtime: 255 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
Rx Join: Group Source Timeout
225.1.1.1 192.168.195.78 0
225.1.1.1 0
Interface: lo0.0
Address: 10.255.245.91, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse
Hello Option Holdtime: 255 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
Interface: pd-6/0/0.32768
Address: 0.0.0.0, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse
Hello Option Holdtime: 255 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 0
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
Related
Documentation
•
show pim neighbors on page 510
Preserving Multicast Performance by Disabling Response to the ping Utility
The ping utility uses ICMP Echo messages to verify connectivity to any device with an IP
address. However, in the case of multicast applications, a single ping sent to a multicast
address can degrade the performance of routers because the stream of packets is
replicated multiple times.
You can disable the router's response to ping (ICMP Echo) packets sent to multicast
addresses. The system responds normally to unicast ping packets.
To disable the router's response to ping packets sent to multicast addresses:
1.
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Include the no-multicast-echo statement:
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Using PIM Basic Features
[edit system]
user@host# set no-multicast-echo
2. Verify the configuration by checking the echo drops with broadcast or multicast
destination address field in the output of the show system statistics icmp command.
user@host> show system statistics icmp
icmp:
0 drops due to rate limit
0 calls to icmp_error
0 errors not generated because old message was icmp
Output histogram:
echo reply: 21
0 messages with bad code fields
0 messages less than the minimum length
0 messages with bad checksum
0 messages with bad source address
0 messages with bad length
100 echo drops with broadcast or multicast destination address
0 timestamp drops with broadcast or multicast destination address
Input histogram:
echo: 21
21 message responses generated
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Junos OS to Disable the Routing Engine Response to Multicast Ping Packets
•
show system statistics icmp
Configuring PIM Trace Options
Tracing operations record detailed messages about the operation of routing protocols,
such as the various types of routing protocol packets sent and received, and routing policy
actions. You can specify which trace operations are logged by including specific tracing
flags. The following table describes the flags that you can include.
Flag
Description
all
Trace all operations.
assert
Trace assert messages, which are used to resolve which
of the parallel routers connected to a multiaccess LAN is
responsible for forwarding packets to the LAN.
autorp
Trace bootstrap, RP, and auto-RP messages.
bidirectional-df-election
Trace bidirectional PIM designated-forwarder (DF)
election events.
bootstrap
Trace bootstrap messages, which are sent periodically
by the PIM domain's bootstrap router and are forwarded,
hop by hop, to all routers in that domain.
general
Trace general events.
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Flag
Description
graft
Trace graft and graft acknowledgment messages.
hello
Trace hello packets, which are sent so that neighboring
routers can discover one another.
join
Trace join messages, which are sent to join a branch onto
the multicast distribution tree.
mdt
Trace messages related to multicast data tunnels.
normal
Trace normal events.
nsr-synchronization
Trace nonstop routing synchronization events
packets
Trace all PIM packets.
policy
Trace poison-route-reverse packets.
prune
Trace prune messages, which are sent to prune a branch
off the multicast distribution tree.
register
Trace register and register-stop messages. Register
messages are sent to the RP when a multicast source first
starts sending to a group.
route
Trace routing information.
rp
Trace candidate RP advertisements.
state
Trace state transitions.
task
Trace task processing.
timer
Trace timer processing.
In the following example, tracing is enabled for all routing protocol packets. Then tracing
is narrowed to focus only on PIM packets of a particular type.
To configure tracing operations for PIM:
1.
(Optional) Configure tracing at the [routing-options hierarchy level to trace all protocol
packets.
[edit routing-options traceoptions]
user@host# set file all-packets-trace
user@host# set flag all
2. Configure the filename for the PIM trace file.
[edit protocols pim traceoptions]
user@host# set file pim-trace
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3. (Optional) Configure the maximum number of trace files.
[edit protocols pim traceoptions]
user@host# set file files 5
4. (Optional) Configure the maximum size of each trace file.
[edit protocols pim traceoptions]
user@host# set file size 1m
5. (Optional) Enable unrestricted file access.
[edit protocols pim traceoptions]
user@host# set file world-readable
6. Configure tracing flags.
Suppose you are troubleshooting issues with PIM version 1 control packets that are
received on an interface configured for PIM version 2. The following example shows
how to trace messages associated with this problem.
[edit protocols pim traceoptions]
user@host# set flag packets | match “Rx V1 Require V2”
7. View the trace file.
user@host> file list /var/log
user@host> file show /var/log/pim-trace
Related
Documentation
•
PIM Overview on page 109
•
Tracing and Logging Junos OS Operations
Configuring Interface Priority for PIM Designated Router Selection
A designated router (DR) sends periodic join messages and prune messages toward a
group-specific rendezvous point (RP) for each group for which it has active members.
When a Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) router learns about a source, it originates
a Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) source-address message if it is the DR
on the upstream interface.
By default, every PIM interface has an equal probability (priority 1) of being selected as
the DR. Configuring the interface DR priority helps ensure that changing an IP address
does not alter your forwarding model.
To configure the interface designated router priority:
1.
This example shows the configuration for the routing instance. Configure the interface
globally or in the routing instance.
[edit routing-instances PIM.master protocols pim interface ge-0/0/0.0 family inet]
user@host# set priority 5
2. Verify the configuration by checking the Hello Option DR Priority field in the output of
the show pim neighbors detail command.
user@host> show pim neighbors detail
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Instance: PIM.master
Interface: ge-0/0/0.0
Address: 192.168.195.37, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 5
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
Rx Join: Group Source Timeout
225.1.1.1 192.168.195.78 0
225.1.1.1 0
Interface: lo0.0
Address: 10.255.245.91, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
Interface: pd-6/0/0.32768
Address: 0.0.0.0, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 0
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring PIM Designated Router Election on Point-to-Point Links on page 118
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
show pim neighbors on page 510
Configuring PIM Designated Router Election on Point-to-Point Links
To comply with the latest PIM drafts, enable designated router (DR) election on all PIM
interfaces, including point-to-point (P2P) interfaces. (DR election is enabled by default
on all other interfaces.) One of the two routers might join a multicast group on its P2P
link interface. The DR on that link is responsible for initiating the relevant join messages.
To enable DR election on point-to-point interfaces:
1.
On both point-to-point link routers, configure the router globally or in the routing
instance. This example shows the configuration for the routing instance.
[edit routing-instances PIM.master protocols pim]
user@host# set dr-election-on-p2p
2. Verify the configuration by checking the State field in the output of the show pim
interfaces command. The possible values for the State field are DR, NotDR, and P2P.
When a point-to-point link interface is elected to be the DR, the interface state
becomes DR instead of P2P.
3. If the show pim interfaces command continues to report the P2P state, consider running
the restart routing command on both routers on the point-to-point link. Then recheck
the state.
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CAUTION: Do not restart a software process unless specifically asked to
do so by your Juniper Networks customer support representative.
Restarting a software process during normal operation of a routing
platform could cause interruption of packet forwarding and loss of data.
[edit]
user@host# run restart routing
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
Configuring Interface Priority for PIM Designated Router Selection on page 117
•
show pim interfaces on page 486
Configuring BFD for PIM
The Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) Protocol is a simple hello mechanism that
detects failures in a network. BFD works with a wide variety of network environments
and topologies. A pair of routing devices exchanges BFD packets. Hello packets are sent
at a specified, regular interval. A neighbor failure is detected when the routing device
stops receiving a reply after a specified interval. The BFD failure detection timers have
shorter time limits than the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) hello hold time, so
they provide faster detection.
The BFD failure detection timers are adaptive and can be adjusted to be faster or slower.
The lower the BFD failure detection timer value, the faster the failure detection and vice
versa. For example, the timers can adapt to a higher value if the adjacency fails (that is,
the timer detects failures more slowly). Or a neighbor can negotiate a higher value for a
timer than the configured value. The timers adapt to a higher value when a BFD session
flap occurs more than three times in a span of 15 seconds. A back-off algorithm increases
the receive (Rx) interval by two if the local BFD instance is the reason for the session
flap. The transmission (Tx) interval is increased by two if the remote BFD instance is the
reason for the session flap. You can use the clear bfd adaptation command to return BFD
interval timers to their configured values. The clear bfd adaptation command is hitless,
meaning that the command does not affect traffic flow on the routing device.
You must specify the minimum transmit and minimum receive intervals to enable BFD
on PIM.
To enable failure detection:
1.
Configure the interface globally or in a routing instance.
This example shows the global configuration.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# edit interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection
2. Configure the minimum transmit interval.
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This is the minimum interval after which the routing device transmits hello packets
to a neighbor with which it has established a BFD session. Specifying an interval smaller
than 300 ms can cause undesired BFD flapping.
[edit protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection]
user@host# set transmit-interval 350
3. Configure the minimum interval after which the routing device expects to receive a
reply from a neighbor with which it has established a BFD session.
Specifying an interval smaller than 300 ms can cause undesired BFD flapping.
[edit protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection]
user@host# set minimum-receive-interval 350
4. (Optional) Configure other BFD settings.
As an alternative to setting the receive and transmit intervals separately, configure
one interval for both.
[edit protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection]
user@host# set minimum-interval 350
5. Configure the threshold for the adaptation of the BFD session detection time.
When the detection time adapts to a value equal to or greater than the threshold, a
single trap and a single system log message are sent.
[edit protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection]
user@host# set detection-time threshold 800
6. Configure the number of hello packets not received by a neighbor that causes the
originating interface to be declared down.
[edit protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection]
user@host# set multiplier 50
7. Configure the BFD version.
[edit protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection]
user@host# set version 1
8. Specify that BFD sessions should not adapt to changing network conditions.
We recommend that you not disable BFD adaptation unless it is preferable not to
have BFD adaptation enabled in your network.
[edit protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 family inet bfd-liveness-detection]
user@host# set no-adaptation
9. Verify the configuration by checking the output of the show bfd session command.
Related
Documentation
•
show bfd session
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM
1.
Specify the BFD authentication algorithm for the PIM protocol.
2. Associate the authentication keychain with the PIM protocol.
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3. Configure the related security authentication keychain.
Beginning with Junos OS Release 9.6, you can configure authentication for Bidirectional
Forwarding Detection (BFD) sessions running over Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM).
Routing instances are also supported.
The following sections provide instructions for configuring and viewing BFD authentication
on PIM:
•
Configuring BFD Authentication Parameters on page 121
•
Viewing Authentication Information for BFD Sessions on page 122
Configuring BFD Authentication Parameters
BFD authentication is only supported in the Canada and United States version of the
Junos OS image and is not available in the export version.
To configure BFD authentication:
1.
Specify the algorithm (keyed-md5, keyed-sha-1, meticulous-keyed-md5,
meticulous-keyed-sha-1, or simple-password) to use for BFD authentication on a PIM
route or routing instance.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface ge-0/1/5 family inet bfd-liveness-detection authentication
algorithm keyed-sha-1
NOTE: Nonstop active routing (NSR) is not supported with the
meticulous-keyed-md5 and meticulous-keyed-sha-1 authentication
algorithms. BFD sessions using these algorithms might go down after a
switchover.
2. Specify the keychain to be used to associate BFD sessions on the specified PIM route
or routing instance with the unique security authentication keychain attributes.
The keychain you specify must match the keychain name configured at the [edit
security authentication key-chains] hierarchy level.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface ge-0/1/5 family inet bfd-liveness-detection authentication
keychain bfd-pim
NOTE: The algorithm and keychain must be configured on both ends of
the BFD session, and they must match. Any mismatch in configuration
prevents the BFD session from being created.
3. Specify the unique security authentication information for BFD sessions:
•
The matching keychain name as specified in Step 2.
•
At least one key, a unique integer between 0 and 63. Creating multiple keys allows
multiple clients to use the BFD session.
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•
The secret data used to allow access to the session.
•
The time at which the authentication key becomes active, in the format
yyyy-mm-dd.hh:mm:ss.
[edit security]
user@host# set authentication-key-chains key-chain bfd-pim key 53 secret $ABC123$/
start-time 2009-06-14.10:00:00
4. (Optional) Specify loose authentication checking if you are transitioning from
nonauthenticated sessions to authenticated sessions.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface ge-0/1/5 family inet bfd-liveness-detection authentication
loose-check
5. (Optional) View your configuration by using the show bfd session detail or show bfd
session extensive command.
6. Repeat these steps to configure the other end of the BFD session.
Viewing Authentication Information for BFD Sessions
You can view the existing BFD authentication configuration by using the show bfd session
detail and show bfd session extensive commands.
The following example shows BFD authentication configured for the ge-0/1/5 interface.
It specifies the keyed SHA-1 authentication algorithm and a keychain name of bfd-pim.
The authentication keychain is configured with two keys. Key 1 contains the secret data
“$ABC123/” and a start time of June 1, 2009, at 9:46:02 AM PST. Key 2 contains the secret
data “$ABC123/” and a start time of June 1, 2009, at 3:29:20 PM PST.
[edit protocols pim]
interface ge-0/1/5 {
family inet {
bfd-liveness-detection {
authentication {
key-chain bfd-pim;
algorithm keyed-sha-1;
}
}
}
}
[edit security]
authentication key-chains {
key-chain bfd-pim {
key 1 {
secret “$ABC123/”;
start-time “2009-6-1.09:46:02 -0700”;
}
key 2 {
secret “$ABC123/”;
start-time “2009-6-1.15:29:20 -0700”;
}
}
}
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If you commit these updates to your configuration, you see output similar to the following
example. In the output for the show bfd session detail command, Authenticate is displayed
to indicate that BFD authentication is configured. For more information about the
configuration, use the show bfd session extensive command. The output for this command
provides the keychain name, the authentication algorithm and mode for each client in
the session, and the overall BFD authentication configuration status, keychain name,
and authentication algorithm and mode.
show bfd session detail
user@host# show bfd session detail
Detect
Transmit
Address
State
Interface
Time
Interval
192.0.2.2
Up
ge-0/1/5.0
0.900
0.300
Client PIM, TX interval 0.300, RX interval 0.300, Authenticate
Session up time 3d 00:34
Local diagnostic None, remote diagnostic NbrSignal
Remote state Up, version 1
Replicated
Multiplier
3
show bfd session extensive
user@host# show bfd session extensive
Detect
Transmit
Address
State
Interface
Time
Interval Multiplier
192.0.2.2
Up
ge-0/1/5.0
0.900
0.300
3
Client PIM, TX interval 0.300, RX interval 0.300, Authenticate
keychain bfd-pim, algo keyed-sha-1, mode strict
Session up time 00:04:42
Local diagnostic None, remote diagnostic NbrSignal
Remote state Up, version 1
Replicated
Min async interval 0.300, min slow interval 1.000
Adaptive async TX interval 0.300, RX interval 0.300
Local min TX interval 0.300, minimum RX interval 0.300, multiplier 3
Remote min TX interval 0.300, min RX interval 0.300, multiplier 3
Local discriminator 2, remote discriminator 2
Echo mode disabled/inactive
Authentication enabled/active, keychain bfd-pim, algo keyed-sha-1, mode strict
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
Release
Description
9.6
Beginning with Junos OS Release 9.6, you can configure authentication for
Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) sessions running over Protocol
Independent Multicast (PIM). Routing instances are also supported.
•
Understanding Bidirectional Forwarding Detection Authentication for PIM
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
authentication-key-chains
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
•
show bfd session
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Disabling PIM
By default, when you enable the PIM protocol it applies to the specified interface only.
To enable PIM for all interfaces, include the all parameter (for example, set protocol pim
interface all). You can disable PIM at the protocol, interface, or family hierarchy levels.
The hierarchy in which you configure PIM is critical. In general, the most specific
configuration takes precedence. However, if PIM is disabled at the protocol level, then
any disable statements with respect to an interface or family are ignored.
For example, the order of precedence for disabling PIM on a particular interface family
is:
1.
If PIM is disabled at the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name family] hierarchy
level, then PIM is disabled for that interface family.
2. If PIM is not configured at the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name family]
hierarchy level, but is disabled at the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name]
hierarchy level, then PIM is disabled for all families on the specified interface.
3. If PIM is not configured at either the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name family]
hierarchy level or the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name] hierarchy level, but
is disabled at the [edit protocols pim] hierarchy level, then the PIM protocol is disabled
globally for all interfaces and all families.
The following sections describe how to disable PIM at the various hierarchy levels.
•
Disabling the PIM Protocol on page 124
•
Disabling PIM on an Interface on page 125
•
Disabling PIM for a Family on page 125
•
Disabling PIM for a Rendezvous Point on page 126
Disabling the PIM Protocol
You can explicitly disable the PIM protocol. Disabling the PIM protocol disables the
protocol for all interfaces and all families. This is accomplished at the [edit protocols
pim] hierarchy level:
[edit protocols]
pim {
disable;
}
To disable the PIM protocol:
1.
Include the disable statement.
user@host# set protocols pim disable
2. (Optional) Verify your configuration settings before committing them by using the
show protocols pim command.
user@host# run show protocols pim
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Disabling PIM on an Interface
You can disable the PIM protocol on a per-interface basis. This is accomplished at the
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name] hierarchy level:
[edit protocols]
pim {
interface interface-name {
disable;
}
}
To disable PIM on an interface:
1.
Include the disable statement.
user@host# set protocols pim interface fe-0/1/0 disable
2. (Optional) Verify your configuration settings before committing them by using the
show protocols pim command.
user@host# run show protocols pim
Disabling PIM for a Family
You can disable the PIM protocol on a per-family basis. This is accomplished at the [edit
protocols pim family] hierarchy level:
[edit protocols]
pim {
family inet {
disable;
}
family inet6 {
disable;
}
}
To disable PIM for a family:
1.
Include the disable statement.
user@host# set protocols pim family inet disable
user@host# set protocols pim family inet6 disable
2. (Optional) Verify your configuration settings before committing them by using the
show protocols pim command.
user@host# run show protocols pim
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Disabling PIM for a Rendezvous Point
You can disable the PIM protocol for a rendezvous point (RP) on a per-family basis. This
is accomplished at the [edit protocols pim rp local family] hierarchy level:
[edit protocols]
pim {
rp {
local {
family inet {
disable;
}
family inet6 {
disable;
}
}
}
}
To disable PIM for an RP family:
1.
Use the disable statement.
user@host# set protocols pim rp local family inet disable
user@host# set protocols pim rp local family inet6 disable
2. (Optional) Verify your configuration settings before committing them by using the
show protocols pim command.
user@host# run show protocols pim
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CHAPTER 6
Using PIM Sparse Mode
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
Designated Router on page 130
•
Enabling PIM Sparse Mode on page 130
•
Configuring PIM Join Load Balancing on page 131
•
Modifying the Join State Timeout on page 135
•
Example: Enabling Join Suppression on page 135
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode
A Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) sparse-mode domain uses reverse-path
forwarding (RPF) to create a path from a data source to the receiver requesting the data.
When a receiver issues an explicit join request, an RPF check is triggered. A (*,G) PIM join
message is sent toward the RP from the receiver's designated router (DR). (By definition,
this message is actually called a join/prune message, but for clarity in this description, it
is called either join or prune, depending on its context.) The join message is multicast
hop by hop upstream to the ALL-PIM-ROUTERS group (224.0.0.13) by means of each
router’s RPF interface until it reaches the RP. The RP router receives the (*,G) PIM join
message and adds the interface on which it was received to the outgoing interface list
(OIL) of the rendezvous-point tree (RPT) forwarding state entry. This builds the RPT
connecting the receiver with the RP. The RPT remains in effect, even if no active sources
generate traffic.
NOTE: State—the (*,G) or (S,G) entries—is the information used for
forwarding unicast or multicast packets. S is the source IP address, G is the
multicast group address, and * represents any source sending to group G.
Routers keep track of the multicast forwarding state for the incoming and
outgoing interfaces for each group.
When a source becomes active, the source DR encapsulates multicast data packets into
a PIM register message and sends them by means of unicast to the RP router.
If the RP router has interested receivers in the PIM sparse-mode domain, it sends a PIM
join message toward the source to build a shortest-path tree (SPT) back to the source.
The source sends multicast packets out on the LAN, and the source DR encapsulates
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the packets in a PIM register message and forwards the message toward the RP router
by means of unicast. The RP router receives PIM register messages back from the source,
and thus adds a new source to the distribution tree, keeping track of sources in a PIM
table. Once an RP router receives packets natively (with S,G), it sends a register stop
message to stop receiving the register messages by means of unicast.
In actual application, many receivers with multiple SPTs are involved in a multicast traffic
flow. To illustrate the process, we track the multicast traffic from the RP router to one
receiver. In such a case, the RP router begins sending multicast packets down the RPT
toward the receiver’s DR for delivery to the interested receivers. When the receiver’s DR
receives the first packet from the RPT, the DR sends a PIM join message toward the
source DR to start building an SPT back to the source. When the source DR receives the
PIM join message from the receiver’s DR, it starts sending traffic down all SPTs. When
the first multicast packet is received by the receiver’s DR, the receiver’s DR sends a PIM
prune message to the RP router to stop duplicate packets from being sent through the
RPT. In turn, the RP router stops sending multicast packets to the receiver’s DR, and
sends a PIM prune message for this source over the RPT toward the source DR to halt
multicast packet delivery to the RP router from that particular source.
If the RP router receives a PIM register message from an active source but has no
interested receivers in the PIM sparse-mode domain, it still adds the active source into
the PIM table. However, after adding the active source into the PIM table, the RP router
sends a register stop message. The RP router discovers the active source’s existence and
no longer needs to receive advertisement of the source (which utilizes resources).
NOTE: If the number of PIM join messages exceeds the configured MTU, the
messages are fragmented in IPv6 PIM sparse mode. To avoid the
fragmentation of PIM join messages, the multicast traffic receives the
interface MTU instead of the path MTU.
The major characteristics of PIM sparse mode are as follows:
•
Routers with downstream receivers join a PIM sparse-mode tree through an explicit
join message.
•
PIM sparse-mode RPs are the routers where receivers meet sources.
•
Senders announce their existence to one or more RPs, and receivers query RPs to find
multicast sessions.
•
Once receivers get content from sources through the RP, the last-hop router (the router
closest to the receiver) can optionally remove the RP from the shared distribution tree
(*,G) if the new source-based tree (S,G) is shorter. Receivers can then get content
directly from the source.
The transitional aspect of PIM sparse mode from shared to source-based tree is one
of the major features of PIM, because it prevents overloading the RP or surrounding
core links.
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There are related issues regarding source, RPs, and receivers when sparse mode multicast
is used:
•
Sources must be able to send to all RPs.
•
RPs must all know one another.
•
Receivers must send explicit join messages to a known RP.
•
Receivers initially need to know only one RP (they later learn about others).
•
Receivers can explicitly prune themselves from a tree.
•
Receivers that never transition to a source-based tree are effectively running Core
Based Trees (CBT).
PIM sparse mode has standard features for all of these issues.
Rendezvous Point
The RP router serves as the information exchange point for the other routers. All routers
in a PIM domain must provide mapping to an RP router. It is the only router that needs
to know the active sources for a domain—the other routers just need to know how to
reach the RP. In this way, the RP matches receivers with sources.
The RP router is downstream from the source and forms one end of the shortest-path
tree. As shown in Figure 15 on page 129, the RP router is upstream from the receiver and
thus forms one end of the rendezvous-point tree.
Figure 15: Rendezvous Point As Part of the RPT and SPT
The benefit of using the RP as the information exchange point is that it reduces the
amount of state in non-RP routers. No network flooding is required to provide non-RP
routers information about active sources.
RP Mapping Options
RPs can be learned by one of the following mechanisms:
•
Static configuration
•
Anycast RP
•
Auto-RP
•
Bootstrap router
We recommend a static RP mapping with anycast RP and a bootstrap router (BSR) with
auto-RP configuration, because static mapping provides all the benefits of a bootstrap
router and auto-RP without the complexity of the full BSR and auto-RP mechanisms.
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Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Static RP on page 165
•
Understanding RP Mapping with Anycast RP on page 171
•
Understanding the PIM Bootstrap Router on page 187
•
Understanding PIM Auto-RP on page 181
Designated Router
In a PIM sparse mode (PIM-SM) domain, there are two types of designated routers to
consider:
•
The receiver DR sends PIM join and PIM prune messages from the receiver network
toward the RP.
•
The source DR sends PIM register messages from the source network to the RP.
Neighboring PIM routers multicast periodic PIM hello messages to each other every
30 seconds (the default). The PIM hello message usually includes a holdtime value for
the neighbor to use, but this is not a requirement. If the PIM hello message does not
include a holdtime value, a default timeout value (in Junos OS, 105 seconds) is used. On
receipt of a PIM hello message, a router stores the IP address and priority for that neighbor.
If the DR priorities match, the router with the highest IP address is selected as the DR.
If a DR fails, a new one is selected using the same process of comparing IP addresses.
NOTE: In PIM dense mode (PIM-DM), a DR is elected by the same process
that PIM-SM uses. However, the only time that a DR has any effect in PIM-DM
is when IGMPv1 is used on the interface. (IGMPv2 is the default.) In this case,
the DR also functions as the IGMP Query Router because IGMPv1 does not
have a Query Router election mechanism.
Enabling PIM Sparse Mode
In PIM sparse mode (PIM-SM), the assumption is that very few of the possible receivers
want packets from a source, so the network establishes and sends packets only on
branches that have at least one leaf indicating (by message) a desire for the traffic.
WANs are appropriate networks for sparse-mode operation.
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, PIM is disabled by default. When you enable PIM, it
operates in sparse mode by default. You do not need to configure Internet Group
Management Protocol (IGMP) version 2 for a sparse mode configuration. After you enable
PIM, by default, IGMP version 2 is also enabled.
Junos OS uses PIM version 2 for both rendezvous point (RP) mode (at the [edit protocols
pim rp static address address] hierarchy level) and interface mode (at the [edit protocols
pim interface interface-name] hierarchy level).
All systems on a subnet must run the same version of PIM.
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You can configure PIM sparse mode globally or for a routing instance. This example
shows how to configure PIM sparse mode globally on all interfaces. It also shows how
to configure a static RP router and how to configure the non-RP routers.
To configure the router properties for PIM sparse mode:
1.
Configure the static RP router.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set rp local family inet address 192.168.3.253
2. Configure the RP router interfaces. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0
management interface by including the disable statement for that interface.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface all mode sparse
user@host# set interface fxp0.0 disable
3. Configure the non-RP routers. Include the following configuration on all of the non-RP
routers.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set rp static address 192.168.3.253
user@host# set interface all mode sparse
user@host# set interface fxp0.0 disable
4. Monitor the operation of PIM sparse mode.
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
•
•
show pim interfaces
•
show pim join
•
show pim neighbors
•
show pim rps
Release
Description
16.1
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, PIM is disabled by default. When you enable
PIM, it operates in sparse mode by default.
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
Configuring PIM Join Load Balancing
By default, PIM join messages are sent toward a source based on the RPF routing table
check. If there is more than one equal-cost path toward the source, then one upstream
interface is chosen to send the join message. This interface is also used for all downstream
traffic, so even though there are alternative interfaces available, the multicast load is
concentrated on one upstream interface and routing device.
For PIM sparse mode, you can configure PIM join load balancing to spread join messages
and traffic across equal-cost upstream paths (interfaces and routing devices) provided
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by unicast routing toward a source. PIM join load balancing is only supported for PIM
sparse mode configurations.
PIM join load balancing is supported on draft-rosen multicast VPNs (also referred to as
dual PIM multicast VPNs). PIM join load balancing is not supported on multiprotocol
BGP-based multicast VPNs (also referred to as next-generation Layer 3 VPN multicast).
When PIM join load balancing is enabled in a draft-rosen Layer 3 VPN scenario, the load
balancing is achieved based on the join counts for the far-end PE routing devices, not for
any intermediate P routing devices.
If an internal BGP (IBGP) multipath forwarding VPN route is available, the Junos OS uses
the multipath forwarding VPN route to send join messages to the remote PE routers to
achieve load balancing over the VPN.
By default, when multiple PIM joins are received for different groups, all joins are sent to
the same upstream gateway chosen by the unicast routing protocol. Even if there are
multiple equal-cost paths available, these alternative paths are not utilized to distribute
multicast traffic from the source to the various groups.
When PIM join load balancing is configured, the PIM joins are distributed equally among
all equal-cost upstream interfaces and neighbors. Every new join triggers the selection
of the least-loaded upstream interface and neighbor. If there are multiple neighbors on
the same interface (for example, on a LAN), join load balancing maintains a value for
each of the neighbors and distributes multicast joins (and downstream traffic) among
these as well.
Join counts for interfaces and neighbors are maintained globally, not on a per-source
basis. Therefore, there is no guarantee that joins for a particular source are load-balanced.
However, the joins for all sources and all groups known to the routing device are
load-balanced. There is also no way to administratively give preference to one neighbor
over another: all equal-cost paths are treated the same way.
You can configure message filtering globally or for a routing instance. This example shows
the global configuration.
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You configure PIM join load balancing on the non-RP routers in the PIM domain.
1.
Determine if there are multiple paths available for a source (for example, an RP) with
the output of the show pim join extensive or show pim source commands.
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
Group: 224.1.1.1
Source: *
RP: 10.255.245.6
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: t1-0/2/3.0
Upstream neighbor: 192.168.38.57
Upstream state: Join to RP
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: t1–0/2/1.0
192.168.38.16 State: JOIN Flags; SRW Timeout: 164
Group: 224.2.127.254
Source: *
RP: 10.255.245.6
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: so–0/3/0.0
Upstream neighbor: 192.168.38.47
Upstream state: Join to RP
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: t1–0/2/3.0
192.168.38.16 State: JOIN Flags; SRW Timeout: 164
Note that for this router, the RP at IP address 10.255.245.6 is the source for two
multicast groups: 224.1.1.1 and 224.2.127.254. This router has two equal-cost paths
through two different upstream interfaces (t1-0/2/3.0 and so-0/3/0.0) with two
different neighbors (192.168.38.57 and 192.168.38.47). This router is a good candidate
for PIM join load balancing.
2. On the non-RP router, configure PIM sparse mode and join load balancing.
[edit protocols pim ]
user@host# set interface all mode sparse version 2
user@host# set join-load-balance
3. Then configure the static address of the RP.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set static address 10.10.10.1
4. Monitor the operation.
If load balancing is enabled for this router, the number of PIM joins sent on each
interface is shown in the output for the show pim interfaces command.
user@host> show pim interfaces
Instance: PIM.master
Name
lo0.0
pe-1/2/0.32769
so-0/3/0.0
t1-0/2/1.0
t1-0/2/3.0
lo0.0
Stat
Up
Up
Up
Up
Up
Up
Mode
Sparse
Sparse
Sparse
Sparse
Sparse
Sparse
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IP
4
4
4
4
4
6
V
2
2
2
2
2
2
State NbrCnt JoinCnt
DR
0
0
P2P
0
0
P2P
1
1
P2P
1
0
P2P
1
1
DR
0
0
DR address
10.255.168.58
fe80::2a0:a5ff:4b7
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Note that the two equal-cost paths shown by the show pim interfaces command now
have nonzero join counts. If the counts differ by more than one and were zero (0)
when load balancing commenced, an error occurs (joins before load balancing are
not redistributed). The join count also appears in the show pim neighbors detail output:
user@host> show pim neighbors detail
Interface: so-0/3/0.0
Address: 192.168.38.46, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse, Join Count: 0
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 1689116164
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Address: 192.168.38.47, IPv4, PIM v2, Join Count: 1
BFD: Disabled
Hello Option Holdtime: 105 seconds 102 remaining
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 792890329
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Interface: t1-0/2/3.0
Address: 192.168.38.56, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse, Join Count: 0
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 678582286
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Address: 192.168.38.57, IPv4, PIM v2, Join Count: 1
BFD: Disabled
Hello Option Holdtime: 105 seconds 97 remaining
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 1854475503
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Note that the join count is nonzero on the two load-balanced interfaces toward the
upstream neighbors.
PIM join load balancing only takes effect when the feature is configured. Prior joins
are not redistributed to achieve perfect load balancing. In addition, if an interface or
neighbor fails, the new joins are redistributed among remaining active interfaces and
neighbors. However, when the interface or neighbor is restored, prior joins are not
redistributed. The clear pim join-distribution command redistributes the existing flows
to new or restored upstream neighbors. Redistributing the existing flows causes traffic
to be disrupted, so we recommend that you perform PIM join redistribution during a
maintenance window.
Related
Documentation
134
•
clear pim join-distribution
•
show pim interfaces on page 486
•
show pim neighbors on page 510
•
show pim source on page 521
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Chapter 6: Using PIM Sparse Mode
Modifying the Join State Timeout
This section describes how to configure the join state timeout.
A downstream router periodically sends join messages to refresh the join state on the
upstream router. If the join state is not refreshed before the timeout expires, the join state
is removed.
By default, the join state timeout is 210 seconds. You can change this timeout to allow
additional time to receive the join messages. Because the messages are called join-prune
messages, the name used is the join-prune-timeout statement.
To modify the timeout, include the join-prune-timeout statement:
user@host# set protocols pim join-prune-timeout 230
The join timeout value can be from 210 through 420 seconds.
Related
Documentation
•
join-prune-timeout on page 319
Example: Enabling Join Suppression
This example describes how to enable PIM join suppression.
•
Requirements on page 135
•
Overview on page 135
•
Configuration on page 138
•
Verification on page 139
Requirements
Before you begin:
•
Configure the router interfaces.
•
Configure an interior gateway protocol or static routing. See the Junos OS Routing
Protocols Library.
•
Configure PIM Sparse Mode on the interfaces. See “Enabling PIM Sparse Mode” on
page 130.
Overview
PIM join suppression enables a router on a multiaccess network to defer sending join
messages to an upstream router when it sees identical join messages on the same
network. Eventually, only one router sends these join messages, and the other routers
suppress identical messages. Limiting the number of join messages improves scalability
and efficiency by reducing the number of messages sent to the same router.
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This example includes the following statements:
•
override-interval—Sets the maximum time in milliseconds to delay sending override
join messages. When a router sees a prune message for a join it is currently suppressing,
it waits before it sends an override join message. Waiting helps avoid multiple
downstream routers sending override join messages at the same time. The override
interval is a random timer with a value of 0 through the maximum override value.
•
propagation-delay—Sets a value in milliseconds for a prune pending timer, which
specifies how long to wait before executing a prune on an upstream router. During this
period, the router waits for any prune override join messages that might be currently
suppressed. The period for the prune pending timer is the sum of the override-interval
value and the value specified for propagation-delay.
•
reset-tracking-bit—Enables PIM join suppression on each multiaccess downstream
interface. This statement resets a tracking bit field (T-bit) on the LAN prune delay hello
option from the default of 1 (join suppression disabled) to 0 (join suppression enabled).
When multiple identical join messages are received, a random join suppression timer
is activated, with a range of 66 through 84 milliseconds. The timer is reset each time
join suppression is triggered.
Figure 16 on page 137 shows the topology used in this example.
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Figure 16: Join Suppression
Host 0
R0
Host 5
R1
PE
R2
R3
R4
Host 4
R5
Host 3
Host 2
g040620
Host 1
The items in the figure represent the following functions:
•
Host 0 is the multicast source.
•
Host 1, Host 2, Host 3, and Host 4 are receivers.
•
Router R0 is the first-hop router and the RP.
•
Router R1 is an upstream router.
•
Routers R2, R3, R4, and R5 are downstream routers in the multicast LAN.
This example shows the configuration of the downstream devices: Routers R2, R3, R4,
and R5.
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Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
[edit]
set protocols pim traceoptions file pim.log
set protocols pim traceoptions file size 5m
set protocols pim traceoptions file world-readable
set protocols pim traceoptions flag join detail
set protocols pim traceoptions flag prune detail
set protocols pim traceoptions flag normal detail
set protocols pim traceoptions flag register detail
set protocols pim rp static address 10.255.112.160
set protocols pim interface all mode sparse
set protocols pim interface all version 2
set protocols pim interface fxp0.0 disable
set protocols pim reset-tracking-bit
set protocols pim propagation-delay 500
set protocols pim override-interval 4000
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To configure PIM join suppression on a non-RP downstream router in the multicast LAN:
1.
Configure PIM sparse mode on the interfaces.
[edit]
user@host# edit protocols pim
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set rp static address 10.255.112.160
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface all mode sparse version 2
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface all version 2
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface fxp0.0 disable
2.
Enable the join suppression timer.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set reset-tracking-bit
3.
Configure the prune override interval value.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set override-interval 4000
4.
Configure the propagation delay of the link.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set propagation-delay 500
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5.
(Optional) Configure PIM tracing operations.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set traceoptions file pim.log size 5m world-readable
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set traceoptions flag join detail
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set traceoptions flag normal detail
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set traceoptions flag register detail
6.
If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# commit
Results
From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show protocols
command. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the
instructions in this example to correct the configuration.
user@host# show protocols
pim {
traceoptions {
file pim.log size 5m world-readable;
flag join detail;
flag prune detail;
flag normal detail;
flag register detail;
}
rp {
static {
address 10.255.112.160;
}
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
reset-tracking-bit;
propagation-delay 500;
override-interval 4000;
}
Verification
To verify the configuration, run the following commands on the upstream and downstream
routers:
•
show pim join extensive
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Related
Documentation
140
•
show multicast route extensive
•
Example: Configuring the PIM Assert Timeout on page 208
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
•
Example: Configuring the PIM SPT Threshold Policy on page 210
•
Enabling PIM Sparse Mode on page 130
•
PIM Overview on page 109
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 7
Using PIM Dense Mode and PIM
Sparse-Dense Mode
•
Understanding PIM Dense Mode on page 141
•
Understanding PIM Sparse-Dense Mode on page 143
•
Mixing PIM Sparse and Dense Modes on page 143
•
Configuring PIM Dense Mode Properties on page 144
•
Configuring PIM Sparse-Dense Mode Properties on page 145
Understanding PIM Dense Mode
PIM dense mode is less sophisticated than PIM sparse mode. PIM dense mode is useful
for multicast LAN applications, the main environment for all dense mode protocols.
PIM dense mode implements the same flood-and-prune mechanism that DVMRP and
other dense mode routing protocols employ. The main difference between DVMRP and
PIM dense mode is that PIM dense mode introduces the concept of protocol
independence. PIM dense mode can use the routing table populated by any underlying
unicast routing protocol to perform reverse-path-forwarding (RPF) checks.
Internet service providers (ISPs) typically appreciate the ability to use any underlying
unicast routing protocol with PIM dense mode because they do not need to introduce
and manage a separate routing protocol just for RPF checks. While unicast routing
protocols extended as multiprotocol BGP (MBGP) and Multitopology Routing in IS-IS
(M-IS-IS) were later employed to build special tables to perform RPF checks, PIM dense
mode does not require them.
PIM dense mode can use the unicast routing table populated by OSPF, IS-IS, BGP, and
so on, or PIM dense mode can be configured to use a special multicast RPF table
populated by MBGP or M-IS-IS when performing RPF checks.
Unlike sparse mode, in which data is forwarded only to routing devices sending an explicit
request, dense mode implements a flood-and-prune mechanism, similar to DVMRP. In
PIM dense mode, there is no RP. A routing device receives the multicast data on the
interface closest to the source, then forwards the traffic to all other interfaces (see
Figure 17 on page 142).
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Figure 17: Multicast Traffic Flooded from the Source Using PIM Dense
Mode
Flooding occurs periodically. It is used to refresh state information, such as the source IP
address and multicast group pair. If the routing device has no interested receivers for the
data, and the OIL becomes empty, the routing device sends a prune message upstream
to stop delivery of multicast traffic (see Figure 18 on page 143).
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Chapter 7: Using PIM Dense Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode
Figure 18: Prune Messages Sent Back to the Source to Stop Unwanted
Multicast Traffic
Understanding PIM Sparse-Dense Mode
Sparse-dense mode, as the name implies, allows the interface to operate on a per-group
basis in either sparse or dense mode. A group specified as dense is not mapped to an RP.
Instead, data packets destined for that group are forwarded by means of PIM dense-mode
rules. A group specified as sparse is mapped to an RP, and data packets are forwarded
by means of PIM sparse-mode rules.
For information about PIM sparse-mode and PIM dense-mode rules, see “Understanding
PIM Sparse Mode” on page 127 and “Understanding PIM Dense Mode” on page 141.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
Understanding PIM Dense Mode on page 141
Mixing PIM Sparse and Dense Modes
It is possible to mix PIM dense mode, PIM sparse mode, and PIM source-specific multicast
(SSM) on the same network, the same routing device, and even the same interface. This
is because modes are effectively tied to multicast groups, an IP multicast group address
must be unique for a particular group's traffic, and scoping limits enforce the division
between potential or actual overlaps.
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NOTE: PIM sparse mode was capable of forming shortest-path trees (SPTs)
already. Changes to PIM sparse mode to support PIM SSM mainly involved
defining behavior in the SSM address range, because shared-tree behavior
is prohibited for groups in the SSM address range.
A multicast routing device employing sparse-dense mode is a good example of mixing
PIM modes on the same network or routing device or interface. Dense modes are easy
to support because of the flooding, but scaling issues make dense modes inappropriate
for Internet use beyond very restricted uses.
Configuring PIM Dense Mode Properties
In PIM dense mode (PIM-DM), the assumption is that almost all possible subnets have
at least one receiver wanting to receive the multicast traffic from a source, so the network
is flooded with traffic on all possible branches, then pruned back when branches do not
express an interest in receiving the packets, explicitly (by message) or implicitly (time-out
silence). LANs are appropriate networks for dense-mode operation.
By default, PIM is disabled. When you enable PIM, it operates in sparse mode by default.
You can configure PIM dense mode globally or for a routing instance. This example shows
how to configure the routing instance and how to specify that PIM dense mode use inet.2
as its RPF routing table instead of inet.0.
To configure the router properties for PIM dense mode:
1.
(Optional) Create an IPv4 routing table group so that interface routes are installed
into two routing tables, inet.0 and inet.2.
[edit routing-options rib-groups]
user@host# set pim-rg export-rib inet.0
user@host# set pim-rg import-rib [ inet.0 inet.2 ]
2. (Optional) Associate the routing table group with a PIM routing instance.
[edit routing-instances PIM.dense protocols pim]
user@host# set rib-group inet pim-rg
3. Configure the PIM interface. If you do not specify any interfaces, PIM is enabled on all
router interfaces. Generally, you specify interface names only if you are disabling PIM
on certain interfaces.
[edit routing-instances PIM.dense protocols pim]
user@host# set interface fe-0/0/1.0 mode dense
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Chapter 7: Using PIM Dense Mode and PIM Sparse-Dense Mode
NOTE: You cannot configure both PIM and Distance Vector Multicast
Routing Protocol (DVMRP) in forwarding mode on the same interface.
You can configure PIM on the same interface only if you configured DVMRP
in unicast-routing mode.
4. Monitor the operation of PIM dense mode by running the show pim interfaces, show
pim join, show pim neighbors, and show pim statistics commands.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM Dense Mode on page 141
•
Example: Configuring a Dedicated PIM RPF Routing Table
Configuring PIM Sparse-Dense Mode Properties
Sparse-dense mode allows the interface to operate on a per-group basis in either sparse
or dense mode. A group specified as “dense” is not mapped to an RP. Instead, data
packets destined for that group are forwarded by means of PIM dense mode rules. A
group specified as “sparse” is mapped to an RP, and data packets are forwarded by
means of PIM sparse-mode rules. Sparse-dense mode is useful in networks implementing
auto-RP for PIM sparse mode.
By default, PIM is disabled. When you enable PIM, it operates in sparse mode by default.
You can configure PIM sparse-dense mode globally or for a routing instance. This example
shows how to configure PIM sparse-dense mode globally on all interfaces, specifying
that the groups 224.0.1.39 and 224.0.1.40 are using dense mode.
To configure the router properties for PIM sparse-dense mode:
1.
Configure the dense-mode groups.
[protocols pim]
user@host# set dense-groups 224.0.1.39
user@host# set dense-groups 224.0.1.40
2. Configure all interfaces on the routing device to use sparse-dense mode. When
configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface by adding the
disable statement for that interface.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set interface all mode sparse-dense
user@host# set interface fxp0.0 disable
3. Monitor the operation of PIM sparse-dense mode by running the show pim interfaces,
show pim join, show pim neighbors, and show pim statistics commands.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM Sparse-Dense Mode on page 143
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146
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 8
Using Source-Specific Multicast
•
Source-Specific Multicast Groups Overview on page 147
•
Understanding PIM Source-Specific Mode on page 148
•
PIM SSM on page 149
•
Example: Configuring PIM SSM on a Network on page 151
•
Example: Configuring an SSM-Only Domain on page 153
•
Example: Configuring SSM Mapping on page 153
•
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast Groups with Any-Source
Override on page 156
•
Example: Configuring SSM Maps for Different Groups to Different Sources on page 159
Source-Specific Multicast Groups Overview
Source-specific multicast (SSM) is a service model that identifies session traffic by both
source and group address. SSM implemented in Junos OS has the efficient explicit join
procedures of Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) sparse mode but eliminates the
immediate shared tree and rendezvous point (RP) procedures using (*,G) pairs. The (*)
is a wildcard referring to any source sending to group G, and “G” refers to the IP multicast
group. SSM builds shortest-path trees (SPTs) directly represented by (S,G) pairs. The
“S” refers to the source's unicast IP address, and the “G” refers to the specific multicast
group address. The SSM (S,G) pairs are called channels to differentiate them from
any-source multicast (ASM) groups. Although ASM supports both one-to-many and
many-to-many communications, ASM's complexity is in its method of source discovery.
For example, if you click a link in a browser, the receiver is notified about the group
information, but not the source information. With SSM, the client receives both source
and group information.
SSM is ideal for one-to-many multicast services such as network entertainment channels.
However, many-to-many multicast services might require ASM.
To deploy SSM successfully, you need an end-to-end multicast-enabled network and
applications that use an Internet Group Management Protocol version 3 (IGMPv3) or
Multicast Listener Discovery version 2 (MLDv2) stack, or you need to configure SSM
mapping from IGMPv1 or IGMPv2 to IGMPv3. An IGMPv3 stack provides the capability of
a host operating system to use the IGMPv3 protocol. IGMPv3 is available for Windows
XP, Windows Vista, and most UNIX operating systems.
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SSM mapping allows operators to support an SSM network without requiring all hosts
to support IGMPv3. This support exists in static (S,G) configurations, but SSM mapping
also supports dynamic per-source group state information, which changes as hosts join
and leave the group using IGMP.
SSM is typically supported with a subset of IGMPv3 and PIM sparse mode known as PIM
SSM. Using SSM, a client can receive multicast traffic directly from the source. PIM SSM
uses the PIM sparse-mode functionality to create an SPT between the client and the
source, but builds the SPT without the help of an RP.
An SSM-configured network has distinct advantages over a traditionally configured PIM
sparse-mode network. There is no need for shared trees or RP mapping (no RP is required),
or for RP-to-RP source discovery through the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP).
Understanding PIM Source-Specific Mode
RFC 1112, the original multicast RFC, supported both many-to-many and one-to-many
models. These came to be known collectively as any-source multicast (ASM) because
ASM allowed one or many sources for a multicast group's traffic. However, an ASM
network must be able to determine the locations of all sources for a particular multicast
group whenever there are interested listeners, no matter where the sources might be
located in the network. In ASM, the key function of source discovery is a required function
of the network itself.
Multicast source discovery appears to be an easy process, but in sparse mode it is not.
In dense mode, it is simple enough to flood traffic to every router in the whole network
so that every router learns the source address of the content for that multicast group.
However, the flooding presents scalability and network resource use issues and is not a
viable option in sparse mode.
PIM sparse mode (like any sparse mode protocol) achieves the required source discovery
functionality without flooding at the cost of a considerable amount of complexity. The
RP routers must be added and must know all multicast sources, and complicated shared
distribution trees must be built to the RPs.
In an environment where many sources come and go, such as for a videoconferencing
service, ASM is appropriate. However, by ignoring the many-to-many model and focusing
attention on the one-to-many source-specific multicast (SSM) model, several
commercially promising multicast applications, such as television channel distribution
over the Internet, might be brought to the Internet much more quickly and efficiently than
if full ASM functionality were required of the network.
PIM SSM is simpler than PIM sparse mode because only the one-to-many model is
supported. Initial commercial multicast Internet applications are likely to be available to
subscribers (that is, receivers that issue join messages) from only a single source (a special
case of SSM covers the need for a backup source). PIM SSM therefore forms a subset
of PIM sparse mode. PIM SSM builds shortest-path trees (SPTs) rooted at the source
immediately because in SSM, the router closest to the interested receiver host is informed
of the unicast IP address of the source for the multicast traffic. That is, PIM SSM bypasses
the RP connection stage through shared distribution trees, as in PIM sparse mode, and
goes directly to the source-based distribution tree.
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Chapter 8: Using Source-Specific Multicast
PIM SSM introduces new terms for many of the concepts in PIM sparse mode. PIM SSM
can technically be used in the entire 224/4 multicast address range, although PIM SSM
operation is guaranteed only in the 232/8 range (232.0.0/24 is reserved). The new SSM
terms are appropriate for Internet video applications and are summarized in
Table 8 on page 149.
Table 8: ASM and SSM Terminology
Term
Any-Source Multicast
Source-Specific Multicast
Address identifier
G
S,G
Address designation
group
channel
Receiver operations
join, leave
subscribe, unsubscribe
Group address range
224/4 excluding 232/8
224/4 (guaranteed only for
232/8)
Although PIM SSM describes receiver operations as subscribe and unsubscribe, the same
PIM sparse mode join and leave messages are used by both forms of the protocol. The
terminology change distinguishes ASM from SSM even though the receiver messages
are identical.
PIM SSM
PIM source-specific multicast (SSM) uses a subset of PIM sparse mode and IGMP version 3
(IGMPv3) to allow a client to receive multicast traffic directly from the source. PIM SSM
uses the PIM sparse-mode functionality to create an SPT between the receiver and the
source, but builds the SPT without the help of an RP.
By default, the SSM group multicast address is limited to the IP address range from
232.0.0.0 through 232.255.255.255. However, you can extend SSM operations into another
Class D range by including the ssm-groups statement at the [edit routing-options multicast]
hierarchy level. The default SSM address range from 232.0.0.0 through 232.255.255.255
cannot be used in the ssm-groups statement. This statement is for adding other multicast
addresses to the default SSM group addresses. This statement does not override the
default SSM group address range.
You can also configure Junos OS to accept any-source multicast (ASM) join messages
(*,G) for group addresses that are within the default or configured range of source-specific
multicast (SSM) groups. This allows you to support a mix of any-source and
source-specific multicast groups simultaneously.
An SSM-configured network has distinct advantages over a traditionally configured PIM
sparse-mode network. There is no need for shared trees or RP mapping (no RP is required),
or for RP-to-RP source discovery through MSDP.
Deploying SSM is easy. You need to configure PIM sparse mode on all router interfaces
and issue the necessary SSM commands, including specifying IGMPv3 on the receiver's
LAN. If PIM sparse mode is not explicitly configured on both the source and group member
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interfaces, multicast packets are not forwarded. Source lists, supported in IGMPv3, are
used in PIM SSM. As sources become active and start sending multicast packets,
interested receivers in the SSM group receive the multicast packets.
In a PIM SSM-configured network, a host subscribes to an SSM channel (by means of
IGMPv3), announcing a desire to join group G and source S (see Figure 19 on page 150).
The directly connected PIM sparse-mode router, the receiver's DR, sends an (S,G) join
message to its RPF neighbor for the source. Notice in Figure 19 on page 150 that the RP is
not contacted in this process by the receiver, as would be the case in normal PIM
sparse-mode operations.
Figure 19: Receiver Announces Desire to Join Group G and Source S
The (S,G) join message initiates the source tree and then builds it out hop by hop until it
reaches the source. In Figure 20 on page 150, the source tree is built across the network
to Router 3, the last-hop router connected to the source.
Figure 20: Router 3 (Last-Hop Router) Joins the Source Tree
Using the source tree, multicast traffic is delivered to the subscribing host (see
Figure 21 on page 150).
Figure 21: (S,G) State Is Built Between the Source and the Receiver
To configure additional SSM groups, include the ssm-groups statement at the [edit
routing-options multicast] hierarchy level.
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Chapter 8: Using Source-Specific Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Source-Specific Multicast Groups Overview on page 147
•
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast Groups with Any-Source Override on
page 156
Example: Configuring PIM SSM on a Network
The following example shows how PIM SSM is configured between a receiver and a
source in the network illustrated in Figure 22 on page 151.
Figure 22: Network on Which to Configure PIM SSM
Source
3
2
g017108
RP router 4
1
Receiver
This example shows how to configure the IGMP version to IGMPv3 on all receiving host
interfaces.
1.
Enable IGMPv3 on all host-facing interfaces, and disable IGMP on the fxp0.0 interface
on Router 1.
user@router1# set protocols igmp interface all version 3
user@router1# set protocols igmp interface fxp0.0 disable
NOTE: When you configure IGMPv3 on a router, hosts on interfaces
configured with IGMPv2 cannot join the source tree.
2. After the configuration is committed, use the show configuration protocol igmp
command to verify the IGMP protocol configuration.
user@router1> show configuration protocol igmp
[edit protocols igmp]
interface all {
version 3;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
3. Use the show igmp interface command to verify that IGMP interfaces are configured.
user@router1> show igmp interface
Interface
State
Querier
Timeout Version
fe-0/0/0.0
Up
198.51.100.245
213
fe-0/0/1.0
Up
198.51.100.241
220
fe-0/0/2.0
Up
198.51.100.237
218
Configured Parameters:
IGMP Query Interval (1/10 secs): 1250
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Groups
3
0
3
0
3
0
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IGMP Query Response Interval (1/10 secs): 100
IGMP Last Member Query Interval (1/10 secs): 10
IGMP Robustness Count: 2
Derived Parameters:
IGMP Membership Timeout (1/10 secs): 2600
IGMP Other Querier Present Timeout (1/10 secs): 2550
4. Use the show pim join extensive command to verify the PIM join state on Router 2 and
Router 3 (the upstream routers).
user@router2> show pim join extensive
232.1.1.1
10.4.1.2
Upstream interface: fe-1/1/3.0
Upstream State: Local Source
Keepalive timeout: 209
Downstream Neighbors:
Interface: so-1/0/2.0
10.10.71.1
State: Join
sparse
Flags: S
Timeout: 209
5. Use the show pim join extensive command to verify the PIM join state on Router 1 (the
router connected to the receiver).
user@router1> show pim join extensive
232.1.1.1
10.4.1.2
Upstream interface: so-1/0/2.0
Upstream State: Join to Source
Keepalive timeout: 209
Downstream Neighbors:
Interface: fe-0/2/3.0
10.3.1.1
State: Join
sparse
Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
NOTE: IP version 6 (IPv6) multicast routers use the Multicast Listener
Discovery (MLD) Protocol to manage the membership of hosts and routers
in multicast groups and to learn which groups have interested listeners for
each attached physical networks. Each routing device maintains a list of host
multicast addresses that have listeners for each subnetwork, as well as a
timer for each address. However, the routing device does not need to know
the address of each listener—just the address of each host. The routing device
provides addresses to the multicast routing protocol it uses, which ensures
that multicast packets are delivered to all subnetworks where there are
interested listeners. In this way, MLD is used as the transport for the Protocol
Independent Multicast (PIM) Protocol. MLD is an integral part of IPv6 and
must be enabled on all IPv6 routing devices and hosts that need to receive
IP multicast traffic. The Junos OS supports MLD versions 1 and 2. Version 2
is supported for source-specific multicast (SSM) include and exclude modes.
Related
Documentation
152
•
Example: Configuring SSM Mapping on page 153
•
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Example: Configuring an SSM-Only Domain
Deploying an SSM-only domain is much simpler than deploying an ASM domain because
it only requires a few configuration steps. Enable PIM sparse mode on all interfaces by
adding the mode statement at the [edit protocols pim interface all] hierarchy level. When
configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface by adding the disable
statement for that interface. Then configure IGMPv3 on all host-facing interfaces by
adding the version statement at the [edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
hierarchy level.
In the following example, the host-facing interface is fe-0/1/2:
[edit]
protocols {
pim {
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
igmp {
interface fe-0/1/2 {
version 3;
}
}
}
Example: Configuring SSM Mapping
SSM mapping does not require that all hosts support IGMPv3. SSM mapping translates
IGMPv1 or IGMPv2 membership reports to an IGMPv3 report. This enables hosts running
IGMPv1 or IGMPv2 to participate in SSM until the hosts transition to IGMPv3.
SSM mapping applies to all group addresses that match the policy, not just those that
conform to SSM addressing conventions (232/8 for IPv4, ff30::/32 through ff3F::/32 for
IPv6).
We recommend separate SSM maps for IPv4 and IPv6 if both address families require
SSM support. If you apply an SSM map containing both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to an
interface in an IPv4 context (using IGMP), only the IPv4 addresses in the list are used. If
there are no such addresses, no action is taken. Similarly, if you apply an SSM map
containing both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to an interface in an IPv6 context (using MLD),
only the IPv6 addresses in the list are used. If there are no such addresses, no action is
taken.
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In this example, you create a policy to match the group addresses that you want to
translate to IGMPv3. Then you define the SSM map that associates the policy with the
source addresses where these group addresses are found. Finally, you apply the SSM
map to one or more IGMP (for IPv4) or MLD (for IPv6) interfaces.
1.
Create an SSM policy named ssm-policy-example. The policy terms match the IPv4
SSM group address 232.1.1.1/32 and the IPv6 SSM group address ff35::1/128. All other
addresses are rejected.
user@router1# set policy-options policy-statement ssm-policy-example term A from
route-filter 232.1.1.1/32 exact
user@router1# set policy-options policy-statement ssm-policy-example term A then
accept
user@router1# set policy-options policy-statement ssm-policy-example term B from
route-filter ff35::1/128 exact
user@router1# set policy-options policy-statement ssm-policy-example term B then
accept
2. After the configuration is committed, use the show configuration policy-options
command to verify the policy configuration.
user@host> show configuration policy-options
[edit policy-options]
policy-statement ssm-policy-example {
term A {
from {
route-filter 232.1.1.1/32 exact;
}
then accept;
}
term B {
from {
route-filter ff35::1/128 exact;
}
then accept;
}
then reject;
}
The group addresses must match the configured policy for SSM mapping to occur.
3. Define two SSM maps, one called ssm-map-ipv6-example and one called
ssm-map-ipv4-example, by applying the policy and configuring the source addresses
as a multicast routing option.
user@host# set routing-options multicast ssm-map ssm-map-ipv6-example policy
ssm-policy-example
user@host# set routing-options multicast ssm-map ssm-map-ipv6-example source
fec0::1 fec0::12
user@host# set routing-options multicast ssm-map ssm-map-ipv4-example policy
ssm-policy-example
user@host# set routing-options multicast ssm-map ssm-map-ipv4-example source
10.10.10.4
user@host# set routing-options multicast ssm-map ssm-map-ipv4-example source
192.168.43.66
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4. After the configuration is committed, use the show configuration routing-options
command to verify the policy configuration.
user@host> show configuration routing-options
[edit routing-options]
multicast {
ssm-map ssm-map-ipv6-example {
policy ssm-policy-example;
source [ fec0::1 fec0::12 ];
}
ssm-map ssm-map-ipv4-example {
policy ssm-policy-example;
source [ 10.10.10.4 192.168.43.66 ];
}
}
We recommend separate SSM maps for IPv4 and IPv6.
5. Apply SSM maps for IPv4-to-IGMP interfaces and SSM maps for IPv6-to-MLD
interfaces:
user@host# set protocols igmp interface fe-0/1/0.0 ssm-map ssm-map-ipv4-example
user@host# set protocols mld interface fe-0/1/1.0 ssm-map ssm-map-ipv6-example
6. After the configuration is committed, use the show configuration protocol command
to verify the IGMP and MLD protocol configuration.
user@router1> show configuration protocol
[edit protocols]
igmp {
interface fe-0/1/0.0 {
ssm-map ssm-map-ipv4-example;
}
}
mld {
interface fe-/0/1/1.0 {
ssm-map ssm-map-ipv6-example;
}
}
7. Use the show igmp interface and the show mld interface commands to verify that the
SSM maps are applied to the interfaces.
user@host> show igmp interface fe-0/1/0.0
Interface: fe-0/1/0.0
Querier: 192.168.224.28
State:
Up Timeout:
None Version:
SSM Map: ssm-map-ipv4-example
user@host> show mld interface fe-0/1/1.0
Interface: fe-0/1/1.0
Querier: fec0:0:0:0:1::12
State:
Up Timeout:
None Version:
SSM Map: ssm-map-ipv6-example
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2
2 Groups:
2
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Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast Groups with Any-Source Override
This example shows how to extend source-specific multicast (SSM) group operations
beyond the default IP address range of 232.0.0.0 through 232.255.255.255. This example
also shows how to accept any-source multicast (ASM) join messages (*,G) for group
addresses that are within the default or configured range of SSM groups. This allows you
to support a mix of any-source and source-specific multicast groups simultaneously.
•
Requirements on page 156
•
Overview on page 156
•
Configuration on page 157
•
Verification on page 159
Requirements
Before you begin, configure the router interfaces.
Overview
To deploy SSM, configure PIM sparse mode on all routing device interfaces and issue the
necessary SSM commands, including specifying IGMPv3 or MLDv2 on the receiver's LAN.
If PIM sparse mode is not explicitly configured on both the source and group members
interfaces, multicast packets are not forwarded. Source lists, supported in IGMPv3 and
MLDv2, are used in PIM SSM. Only sources that are specified send traffic to the SSM
group.
In a PIM SSM-configured network, a host subscribes to an SSM channel (by means of
IGMPv3 or MLDv2) to join group G and source S (see Figure 23 on page 156). The directly
connected PIM sparse-mode router, the receiver's designated router (DR), sends an (S,G)
join message to its reverse-path forwarding (RPF) neighbor for the source. Notice in
Figure 23 on page 156 that the RP is not contacted in this process by the receiver, as would
be the case in normal PIM sparse-mode operations.
Figure 23: Receiver Sends Messages to Join Group G and Source S
The (S,G) join message initiates the source tree and then builds it out hop by hop until it
reaches the source. In Figure 24 on page 157, the source tree is built across the network
to Router 3, the last-hop router connected to the source.
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Figure 24: Router 3 (Last-Hop Router) Joins the Source Tree
Using the source tree, multicast traffic is delivered to the subscribing host (see
Figure 25 on page 157).
Figure 25: (S,G) State Is Built Between the Source and the Receiver
SSM can operate in include mode or in exclude mode. In exclude mode the receiver
specifies a list of sources that it does not want to receive the multicast group traffic from.
The routing device forwards traffic to the receiver from any source except the sources
specified in the exclusion list. The receiver accepts traffic from any sources except the
sources specified in the exclusion list.
This example works with the simple RPF topology shown in Figure 26 on page 157.
Figure 26: Simple RPF Topology
Router A
RP
g040609
Host 1
Receiver
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface fxp0.0 disable
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface all
set protocols pim rp local address 10.255.72.46
set protocols pim rp local group-ranges 239.0.0.0/24
set protocols pim interface fe-1/0/0.0 mode sparse
set protocols pim interface lo0.0 mode sparse
set routing-options multicast ssm-groups 232.0.0.0/8
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set routing-options multicast ssm-groups 239.0.0.0/8
set routing-options multicast asm-override-ssm
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires that you navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To configure an RPF policy:
1.
Configure OSPF.
[edit protocols ospf]
user@host# set area 0.0.0.0 interface fxp0.0 disable
user@host# set area 0.0.0.0 interface all
2.
Configure PIM sparse mode.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set rp local address 10.255.72.46
user@host# set rp local group-ranges 239.0.0.0/24
user@host# set interface fe-1/0/0.0 mode sparse
user@host# set interface lo0.0 mode sparse
3.
Configure additional SSM groups.
[edit routing-options]
user@host# set ssm-groups [ 232.0.0.0/8 239.0.0.0/8 ]
4.
Configure the RP to accept ASM join messages for groups within the SSM address
range.
[edit routing-options]
user@host# set multicast asm-override-ssm
5.
If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration.
user@host# commit
Results
Confirm your configuration by entering the show protocols and show routing-options
commands.
user@host# show protocols
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
interface all;
}
}
pim {
rp {
local {
address 10.255.72.46;
group-ranges {
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239.0.0.0/24;
}
}
}
interface fe-1/0/0.0 {
mode sparse;
}
interface lo0.0 {
mode sparse;
}
}
user@host# show routing-options
multicast {
ssm-groups [ 232.0.0.0/8 239.0.0.0/8 ];
asm-override-ssm;
}
Verification
To verify the configuration, run the following commands:
Related
Documentation
•
show igmp group
•
show igmp statistics
•
show pim join
•
Source-Specific Multicast Groups Overview on page 147
Example: Configuring SSM Maps for Different Groups to Different Sources
•
Multiple SSM Maps and Groups for Interfaces on page 159
•
Example: Configuring Multiple SSM Maps Per Interface on page 159
Multiple SSM Maps and Groups for Interfaces
You can configure multiple source-specific multicast (SSM) maps so that different groups
map to different sources, which enables a single multicast group to map to different
sources for different interfaces.
Example: Configuring Multiple SSM Maps Per Interface
This example shows how to assign more than one SSM map to an IGMP interface.
•
Requirements on page 160
•
Overview on page 160
•
Configuration on page 160
•
Verification on page 162
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Requirements
This example requires Junos OS Release 11.4 or later.
Overview
In this example, you configure a routing policy, POLICY-ipv4-example1, that maps
multicast group join messages over an IGMP logical interface to IPv4 multicast source
addresses based on destination IP address as follows:
Routing Policy Name
Multicast Group Join Messages
for a Route Filter at This
Destination Address
Multicast Source
Addresses
POLICY-ipv4-example1 term
1
232.1.1.1
10.10.10.4,
192.168.43.66
POLICY-ipv4-example1 term
2
232.1.1.2
10.10.10.5,
192.168.43.67
You apply routing policy POLICY-ipv4-example1 to IGMP logical interface fe-0/1/0.0.
Configuration
The following example requires that you navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see the CLI User Guide.
To configure this example, perform the following task:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following configuration commands into a
text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 1 from route-filter
232.1.1.1/32 exact
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 1 then ssm-source
10.10.10.4
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 1 then ssm-source
192.168.43.66
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 1 then accept
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 2 from route-filter
232.1.1.2/32 exact
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 2 then ssm-source
10.10.10.5
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 2 then ssm-source
192.168.43.67
set policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 2 then accept
set protocols igmp interface fe-0/1/0.0 ssm-map-policy POLICY-ipv4-example1
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Chapter 8: Using Source-Specific Multicast
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure multiple SSM maps per interface:
1.
Configure protocol-independent routing options for route filter 232.1.1.1, and specify
the multicast source addresses to which matching multicast groups are to be
mapped.
[edit policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 1]
user@host# set from route-filter 232.1.1.1/32 exact
user@host# set then ssm-source 10.10.10.4
user@host# set then ssm-source 192.168.43.66
user@host# set then accept
2.
Configure protocol-independent routing options for route filter 232.1.1.2, and specify
the multicast source addresses to which matching multicast groups are to be
mapped.
[edit policy-options policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 term 2]
user@host# set from route-filter 232.1.1.2/32 exact
user@host# set then ssm-source 10.10.10.5
user@host# set then ssm-source 192.168.43.67
user@host# set then accept
3.
Apply the policy map POLICY-ipv4-example1 to IGMP logical interface fe-0/1/1/0.
[edit protocols igmp interface fe-0/1/0.0]
user@host# set ssm-map-policy POLICY-ipv4-example1
Results
After the configuration is committed, confirm the configuration by entering the
show policy-options and show protocols configuration mode commands. If the command
output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this
procedure to correct the configuration.
user@host# show policy-options
policy-statement POLICY-ipv4-example1 {
term 1 {
from {
route-filter 232.1.1.1/32 exact;
}
then {
ssm-source [ 10.10.10.4 192.168.43.66 ];
accept;
}
}
term 2{
from {
route-filter 232.1.1.2/32 exact;
}
then {
ssm-source [ 10.10.10.5 192.168.43.67 ];
accept;
}
}
}
user@host# show protocols
igmp {
interface fe-0/1/0.0 {
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ssm-map-policy POLICY-ipv4-example1;
}
}
Verification
Confirm that the configuration is working properly.
•
Displaying Information About IGMP-Enabled Interfaces on page 162
•
Displaying the PIM Groups on page 162
•
Displaying the Entries in the IP Multicast Forwarding Table on page 162
Displaying Information About IGMP-Enabled Interfaces
Purpose
Action
Verify that the SSM map policy POLICY-ipv4-example1 is applied to logical interface
fe-0/1/0.0.
Use the show igmp interface operational mode command for the IGMP logical interface
to which you applied the SSM map policy.
user@host> show igmp interface
Interface: fe-0/1/0.0
Querier: 10.111.30.1
State:
Up Timeout:
None Version:
SSM Map Policy: POLICY-ipv4-example1;
2 Groups:
2
Configured Parameters:
IGMP Query Interval: 125.0
IGMP Query Response Interval: 10.0
IGMP Last Member Query Interval: 1.0
IGMP Robustness Count: 2
Derived Parameters:
IGMP Membership Timeout: 260.0
IGMP Other Querier Present Timeout: 255.0
The command output displays the name of the IGMP logical interface (fe-0/1/0.0), which
is the address of the routing device that has been elected to send membership queries
and group information.
Displaying the PIM Groups
Purpose
Action
Verify the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) source and group pair (S,G) entries.
Use the show pim join extensive 232.1.1.1 operational mode command to display the PIM
source and group pair (S,G) entries for the 232.1.1.1 group.
Displaying the Entries in the IP Multicast Forwarding Table
Purpose
Action
162
Verify that the IP multicast forwarding table displays the multicast route state.
Use the show multicast route extensive operational mode command to display the entries
in the IP multicast forwarding table to verify that the Route state is active and that the
Forwarding state is forwarding.
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Chapter 8: Using Source-Specific Multicast
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast
•
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Draft-Rosen 7 Multicast VPNs
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CHAPTER 9
Using Static RP
•
Understanding Static RP on page 165
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
•
Configuring the Static PIM RP Address on the Non-RP Routing Device on page 168
Understanding Static RP
Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) sparse mode is the most common multicast
protocol used on the Internet. PIM sparse mode is the default mode whenever PIM is
configured on any interface of the device. However, because PIM must not be configured
on the network management interface, you must disable it on that interface.
Each any-source multicast (ASM) group has a shared tree through which receivers learn
about new multicast sources and new receivers learn about all multicast sources. The
rendezvous point (RP) router is the root of this shared tree and receives the multicast
traffic from the source. To receive multicast traffic from the groups served by the RP, the
device must determine the IP address of the RP for the source.
You can configure a static rendezvous point (RP) configuration that is similar to static
routes. A static configuration has the benefit of operating in PIM version 1 or version 2.
When you configure the static RP, the RP address that you select for a particular group
must be consistent across all routers in a multicast domain.
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, the static configuration uses PIM version 2 by default,
which is the only version supported in that release and beyond..
One common way for the device to locate RPs is by static configuration of the IP address
of the RP. A static configuration is simple and convenient. However, if the statically
defined RP router becomes unreachable, there is no automatic failover to another RP
router. To remedy this problem, you can use anycast RP.
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Release History Table
Related
Documentation
Release
Description
15.2
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, the static configuration uses PIM version 2
by default, which is the only version supported in that release and beyond.
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
•
Configuring the Static PIM RP Address on the Non-RP Routing Device on page 168
Configuring Local PIM RPs
Local RP configuration makes the routing device a statically defined RP. Consider statically
defining an RP if the network does not have many different RPs defined or if the RP
assignment does not change very often. The Junos IPv6 PIM implementation supports
only static RP configuration. Automatic RP announcement and bootstrap routers are not
available with IPv6.
You can configure a local RP globally or for a routing instance. This example shows how
to configure a local RP in a routing instance for IPv4 or IPv6.
To configure the routing device’s RP properties:
1.
Configure the routing instance as the local RP.
[routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim]
user@host# set rp local
2. Configure the IP protocol family and IP address.
IPv6 PIM hello messages are sent to every interface on which you configure family
inet6, whether at the PIM level of the hierarchy or not. As a result, if you configure an
interface with both family inet at the [edit interface interface-name] hierarchy level
and family inet6 at the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name] hierarchy level,
PIM sends both IPv4 and IPv6 hellos to that interface.
By default, PIM operates in sparse mode on an interface. If you explicitly configure
sparse mode, PIM uses this setting for all IPv6 multicast groups. However, if you
configure sparse-dense mode, PIM does not accept IPv6 multicast groups as dense
groups and operates in sparse mode over them.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp local]
user@host# set family inet6 address 2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334
user@host# set family inet address 10.1.2.254
3. (IPv4 only) Configure the routing device’s RP priority.
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NOTE: The priority statement is not supported for IPv6, but is included
here for informational purposes. The routing device’s priority value for
becoming the RP is included in the bootstrap messages that the routing
device sends. Use a smaller number to increase the likelihood that the
routing device becomes the RP for local multicast groups. Each PIM routing
device uses the priority value and other factors to determine the candidate
RPs for a particular group range. After the set of candidate RPs is
distributed, each routing device determines algorithmically the RP from
the candidate RP set using a hash function. By default, the priority value
is set to 1. If this value is set to 0, the bootstrap router can override the
group range being advertised by the candidate RP.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp local]
user@host# set priority 5
4. Configure the groups for which the routing device is the RP.
By default, a routing device running PIM is eligible to be the RP for all IPv4 or IPv6
groups (224.0.0.0/4 or FF70::/12 to FFF0::/12). The following example limits the groups
for which this routing device can be the RP.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp local]
user@host# set group-ranges fec0::/10
user@host# set group-ranges 10.1.2.0/24
5. (IPv4 only) Modify the local RP hold time.
If the local routing device is configured as an RP, it is considered a candidate RP for
its local multicast groups. For candidate RPs, the hold time is used by the bootstrap
router to time out RPs, and applies to the bootstrap RP-set mechanism. The RP hold
time is part of the candidate RP advertisement message sent by the local routing
device to the bootstrap router. If the bootstrap router does not receive a candidate
RP advertisement from an RP within the hold time, it removes that routing device
from its list of candidate RPs. The default hold time is 150 seconds.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp local]
user@host# set hold-time 200
6. (Optional) Override dynamic RP for the specified group address range.
If you configure both static RP mapping and dynamic RP mapping (such as auto-RP)
in a single routing instance, allow the static mapping to take precedence for the given
static RP group range, and allow dynamic RP mapping for all other groups.
If you exclude this statement from the configuration and you use both static and
dynamic RP mechanisms for different group ranges within the same routing instance,
the dynamic RP mapping takes precedence over the static RP mapping, even if static
RP is defined for a specific group range.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp local]
user@host# set override
7. Monitor the operation of PIM by running the show pim commands. Run show pim ? to
display the supported commands.
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Related
Documentation
•
PIM Overview on page 109
•
Understanding MLD on page 81
Configuring the Static PIM RP Address on the Non-RP Routing Device
Consider statically defining an RP if the network does not have many different RPs defined
or if the RP assignment does not change very often. The Junos IPv6 PIM implementation
supports only static RP configuration. Automatic RP announcement and bootstrap routers
are not available with IPv6.
You configure a static RP address on the non-RP routing device. This enables the non-RP
routing device to recognize the local statically defined RP. For example, if R0 is a non-RP
router and R1 is the local RP router, you configure R0 with the static RP address of R1.
The static IP address is the routable address assigned to the loopback interface on R1.
In the following example, the loopback address of the RP is
2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334.
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, the default PIM version is version 2, and version 1 is not
supported.
For Junsos OS Release 15.1 and earlier, the default PIM version can be version 1 or version
2, depending on the mode you are configuring. PIM version 1 is the default for RP mode
([edit pim rp static address address]). PIM version 2 is the default for interface mode ([edit
pim interface interface-name]). An explicitly configured PIM version will override the
default setting.
You can configure a static RP address globally or for a routing instance. This example
shows how to configure a static RP address in a routing instance for IPv6.
To configure the static RP address:
1.
On a non-RP routing device, configure the routing instance to point to the routable
address assigned to the loopback interface of the RP.
[routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp]
user@host# set static address 2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334
NOTE: Logical systems are also supported. You can configure a static RP
address in a logical system only if the logical system is not directly
connected to a source.
2. (Optional) Set the PIM sparse mode version.
For each static RP address, you can optionally specify the PIM version. For Junos OS
Release 15.1 and earlier, the default PIM version is version 1.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp]
user@host# set static address 2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334 version 2
3. (Optional) Set the group address range.
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Chapter 9: Using Static RP
By default, a routing device running PIM is eligible to be the RP for all IPv4 or IPv6
groups (224.0.0.0/4 or FF70::/12 to FFF0::/12). The following example limits the groups
for which the 2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334 address can be the RP.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp]
user@host# set static address 2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334 group-ranges fec0::/10
The RP that you select for a particular group must be consistent across all routers in
a multicast domain.
4. (Optional) Override dynamic RP for the specified group address range.
If you configure both static RP mapping and dynamic RP mapping (such as auto-RP)
in a single routing instance, allow the static mapping to take precedence for the given
static RP group range, and allow dynamic RP mapping for all other groups.
If you exclude this statement from the configuration and you use both static and
dynamic RP mechanisms for different group ranges within the same routing instance,
the dynamic RP mapping takes precedence over the static RP mapping, even if static
RP is defined for a specific group range.
[edit routing-instances VPN-A protocols pim rp static address
2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334]
user@host# set override
5. Monitor the operation of PIM by running the show pim commands. Run show pim ? to
display the supported commands.
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
Release
Description
15.2
Starting in Junos OS Release 15.2, the default PIM version is version 2, and
version 1 is not supported.
15.1
For Junsos OS Release 15.1 and earlier, the default PIM version can be version
1 or version 2, depending on the mode you are configuring. PIM version 1 is the
default for RP mode ([edit pim rp static address address]). PIM version 2
is the default for interface mode ([edit pim interface interface-name]).
An explicitly configured PIM version will override the default setting.
•
PIM Overview on page 109
•
Understanding MLD on page 81
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CHAPTER 10
Using Anycast RP
•
Understanding RP Mapping with Anycast RP on page 171
•
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP on page 172
•
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router with MSDP on page 175
•
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router Using Only PIM on page 176
•
Configuring All PIM Anycast Non-RP Routers on page 177
•
Example: Configuring Multiple RPs in a Domain with Anycast RP on page 178
Understanding RP Mapping with Anycast RP
Having a single active rendezvous point (RP) per multicast group is much the same as
having a single server providing any service. All traffic converges on this single point,
although other servers are sitting idle, and convergence is slow when the resource fails.
In multicast specifically, there might be closer RPs on the shared tree, so the use of a
single RP is suboptimal.
For the purposes of load balancing and redundancy, you can configure anycast RP. You
can use anycast RP within a domain to provide redundancy and RP load sharing. When
an RP fails, sources and receivers are taken to a new RP by means of unicast routing.
When you configure anycast RP, you bypass the restriction of having one active RP per
multicast group, and instead deploy multiple RPs for the same group range. The RP
routers share one unicast IP address. Sources from one RP are known to other RPs that
use the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP). Sources and receivers use the
closest RP, as determined by the interior gateway protocol (IGP).
Anycast means that multiple RP routers share the same unicast IP address. Anycast
addresses are advertised by the routing protocols. Packets sent to the anycast address
are sent to the nearest RP with this address. Anycast addressing is a generic concept
and is used in PIM sparse mode to add load balancing and service reliability to RPs.
Anycast RP is defined in RFC3446 , Anycast RP Mechanism Using PIM and MSDP, and can
be found here: https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3446.txt .
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring the Static PIM RP Address on the Non-RP Routing Device on page 168
•
Example: Configuring Multiple RPs in a Domain with Anycast RP on page 178
•
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP on page 172
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Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP
When you configure anycast RP, you bypass the restriction of having one active rendezvous
point (RP) per multicast group, and instead deploy multiple RPs for the same group
range. The RP routers share one unicast IP address. Sources from one RP are known to
other RPs that use the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP). Sources and receivers
use the closest RP, as determined by the interior gateway protocol (IGP).
You can use anycast RP within a domain to provide redundancy and RP load sharing.
When an RP stops operating, sources and receivers are taken to a new RP by means of
unicast routing.
You can configure anycast RP to use PIM and MSDP for IPv4, or PIM alone for both IPv4
and IPv6 scenarios. Both are discussed in this section.
We recommend a static RP mapping with anycast RP over a bootstrap router and auto-RP
configuration because it provides all the benefits of a bootstrap router and auto-RP
without the complexity of the BSR and auto-RP mechanisms.
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, all systems on a subnet must run the same version of
PIM.
The default PIM version can be version 1 or version 2, depending on the mode you are
configuring. PIMv1 is the default RP mode (at the [edit protocols pim rp static address
address] hierarchy level). However, PIMv2 is the default for interface mode (at the [edit
protocols pim interface interface-name] hierarchy level). Explicitly configured versions
override the defaults. This example explicitly configures PIMv2 on the interfaces.
The following example shows an anycast RP configuration for the RP routers, first with
MSDP and then using PIM alone, and for non-RP routers.
1.
For a network using an RP with MSDP, configure the RP using the lo0 loopback
interface, which is always up. Include the address statement and specify the unique
and routable router ID and the RP address at the [edit interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet]
hierarchy level. In this example, the router ID is 198.51.100.254 and the shared RP
address is 198.51.100.253. Include the primary statement for the first address. Including
the primary statement selects the router’s primary address from all the preferred
addresses on all interfaces.
interfaces {
lo0 {
description "PIM RP";
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 198.51.100.254/32;
primary;
address 198.51.100.253/32;
}
}
}
}
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2. Specify the RP address. Include the address statement at the [edit protocols pim rp
local] hierarchy level (the same address as the secondary lo0 interface).
For all interfaces, include the mode statement to set the mode to sparse and the
version statement to specify PIM version 2 at the [edit protocols pim rp local interface
all] hierarchy level. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management
interface by including the disable statement for that interface.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
local {
family inet;
address 198.51.100.253;
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
}
3. Configure MSDP peering. Include the peer statement to configure the address of the
MSDP peer at the [edit protocols msdp] hierarchy level. For MSDP peering, use the
unique, primary addresses instead of the anycast address. To specify the local address
for MSDP peering, include the local-address statement at the [edit protocols msdp
peer] hierarchy level.
protocols {
msdp {
peer 198.51.100.250 {
local-address address 198.51.100.254;
}
}
}
NOTE: If you need to configure a PIM RP for both IPv4 and IPv6 scenarios,
perform Step 4 and Step 5. Otherwise, go to Step 6.
4. Configure an RP using the lo0 loopback interface, which is always up. Include the
address statement to specify the unique and routable router address and the RP
address at the [edit interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet] hierarchy level. In this example,
the router ID is 198.51.100.254 and the shared RP address is 198.51.100.253. Include
the primary statement on the first address. Including the primary statement selects
the router’s primary address from all the preferred addresses on all interfaces.
interfaces {
lo0 {
description "PIM RP";
unit 0 {
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family inet {
address 198.51.100.254/32 {
primary;
}
address 198.51.100.253/32;
}
}
}
}
5. Include the address statement at the [edit protocols pim rp local] hierarchy level to
specify the RP address (the same address as the secondary lo0 interface).
For all interfaces, include the mode statement to set the mode to sparse, and the
version statement to specify PIM version 2 at the [edit protocols pim rp local interface
all] hierarchy level. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management
interface by Including the disable statement for that interface.
Include the anycast-pim statement to configure anycast RP without MSDP (for
example, if IPv6 is used for multicasting). The other RP routers that share the same
IP address are configured using the rp-set statement. There is one entry for each RP,
and the maximum that can be configured is 15. For each RP, specify the routable IP
address of the router and whether MSDP source active (SA) messages are forwarded
to the RP.
MSDP configuration is not necessary for this type of IPv4 anycast RP configuration.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
local {
family inet {
address 198.51.100.253;
anycast-pim {
rp-set {
address 198.51.100.240;
address 198.51.100.241 forward-msdp-sa;
}
local-address 198.51.100.254; #If not configured, use lo0 primary
}
}
}
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
6. Configure the non-RP routers. The anycast RP configuration for a non-RP router is
the same whether MSDP is used or not. Specify a static RP by adding the address at
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Chapter 10: Using Anycast RP
the [edit protocols pim rp static] hierarchy level. Include the version statement at the
[edit protocols pim rp static address] hierarchy level to specify PIM version 2.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
static {
address 198.51.100.253 {
version 2;
}
}
}
}
}
7. Include the mode statement at the [edit protocols pim interface all] hierarchy level to
specify sparse mode on all interfaces. Then include the version statement at the [edit
protocols pim rp interface all mode] to configure all interfaces for PIM version 2. When
configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface by including the
disable statement for that interface.
protocols {
pim {
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
Release History Table
Release
Description
16.1
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, all systems on a subnet must run the same
version of PIM.
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router with MSDP
Add the address statement at the [edit protocols pim rp local] hierarchy level to specify
the RP address (the same address as the secondary lo0 interface).
For all interfaces, use the mode statement to set the mode to sparse and the version
statement to specify PIM version 2 at the [edit protocols pim rp local interface all] hierarchy
level. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface by
adding the disable statement for that interface.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
local {
family inet;
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address 198.51.100.253;
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
}
To configure MSDP peering, add the peer statement to configure the address of the MSDP
peer at the [edit protocols msdp] hierarchy level. For MSDP peering, use the unique,
primary addresses instead of the anycast address. To specify the local address for MSDP
peering, add the local-address statement at the [edit protocols msdp peer] hierarchy
level.
protocols {
msdp {
peer 198.51.100.250 {
local-address 198.51.100.254;
}
}
}
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router Using Only PIM
In this example, configure an RP using the lo0 loopback interface, which is always up.
Use the address statement to specify the unique and routable router address and the
RP address at the [edit interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet] hierarchy level. In this case, the
router ID is 198.51.100.254/32 and the shared RP address is 198.51.100/32. Add the flag
statement primary to the first address. Using this flag selects the router's primary address
from all the preferred addresses on all interfaces.
interfaces {
lo0 {
description "PIM RP";
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 198.51.100.254/32 {
primary;
}
address 198.51.100.253/32;
}
}
}
}
Add the address statement at the [edit protocols pim rp local] hierarchy level to specify
the RP address (the same address as the secondary lo0 interface).
For all interfaces, use the mode statement to set the mode to sparse, and include the
version statement to specify PIM version 2 at the [edit protocols pim rp local interface all]
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Chapter 10: Using Anycast RP
hierarchy level. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface
by adding the disable statement for that interface.
Use the anycast-pim statement to configure anycast RP without MSDP (for example, if
IPv6 is used for multicasting). The other RP routers that share the same IP address are
configured using the rp-set statement. There is one entry for each RP, and the maximum
that can be configured is 15. For each RP, specify the routable IP address of the router
and whether MSDP source active (SA) messages are forwarded to the RP.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
local {
family inet {
address 198.51.100.253;
anycast-pim {
rp-set {
address 198.51.100.240;
address 198.51.100.241 forward-msdp-sa;
}
local-address 198.51.100.254; #If not configured, use lo0 primary
}
}
}
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
MSDP configuration is not necessary for this type of IPv4 anycast RP configuration.
Configuring All PIM Anycast Non-RP Routers
Use the mode statement at the [edit protocols pim rp interface all] hierarchy level to
specify sparse mode on all interfaces. Then add the version statement at the [edit
protocols pim rp interface all mode] to configure all interfaces for PIM version 2. When
configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface by adding the disable
statement for that interface.
protocols {
pim {
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
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}
}
Example: Configuring Multiple RPs in a Domain with Anycast RP
This example shows how to configure anycast RP on each RP router in the PIM-SM
domain. With this configuration you can deploy more than one RP for a single group
range. This enables load balancing and redundancy.
•
Requirements on page 178
•
Overview on page 178
•
Configuration on page 178
•
Verification on page 180
Requirements
Before you begin:
•
Configure the router interfaces.
•
Configure an interior gateway protocol or static routing. See the Junos OS Routing
Protocols Library.
•
Configure PIM Sparse Mode on the interfaces. See “Enabling PIM Sparse Mode” on
page 130.
Overview
When you configure anycast RP, the RP routers in the PIM-SM domain use a shared
address. In this example, the shared address is 10.1.1.2/32. Anycast RP uses Multicast
Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) to discover and maintain a consistent view of the
active sources. Anycast RP also requires an RP selection method, such as static, auto-RP,
or bootstrap RP. This example uses static RP and shows only one RP router configuration.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
RP Routers
Non-RP Routers
178
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.132.1/32 primary
set interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.1.2/32
set protocols msdp local-address 192.168.132.1
set protocols msdp peer 192.168.12.1
set protocols pim rp local address 10.1.1.2
set routing-options router-id 192.168.132.1
set protocols pim rp static address 10.1.1.2
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Chapter 10: Using Anycast RP
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires that you navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To configure anycast RP:
1.
On each RP router in the domain, configure the shared anycast address on the
router’s loopback address.
[edit interfaces]
user@host# set lo0 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.1.2/32
2.
On each RP router in the domain, make sure that the router’s regular loopback
address is the primary address for the interface, and set the router ID.
[edit interfaces]
user@host# set lo0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.132.1/32 primary
[edit routing-options]
user@host# set router-id 192.168.132.1
3.
On each RP router in the domain, configure the local RP address, using the shared
address.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set rp local address 10.1.1.2
4.
On each RP router in the domain, create MSDP sessions to the other RPs in the
domain.
[edit protocols msdp]
user@host# set local-address 192.168.132.1
user@host# set peer 192.168.12.1
5.
On each non-RP router in the domain, configure a static RP address using the shared
address.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set rp static address 10.1.1.2
6.
If you are done configuring the devices, commit the configuration.
user@host# commit
Results
From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show interfaces,
show protocols, and show routing-options commands. If the output does not display the
intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.
user@host# show interfaces
lo0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.168.132.1/32 {
primary;
}
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address 10.1.1.2/32;
}
}
}
On the RP routers:
user@host# show protocols
msdp {
local-address 192.168.132.1;
peer 192.168.12.1;
}
pim {
rp {
local {
address 10.1.1.2;
}
}
}
On the non-RP routers:
user@host# show protocols
pim {
rp {
static {
address 10.1.1.2;
}
}
}
user@host# show routing-options
router-id 192.168.132.1;
Verification
To verify the configuration, run the show pim rps extensive inet command.
Related
Documentation
180
•
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP on page 172
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
Understanding RP Mapping with Anycast RP on page 171
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 11
Using Auto-RP
•
Understanding PIM Auto-RP on page 181
•
Configuring PIM Auto-RP on page 181
Understanding PIM Auto-RP
You can configure a more dynamic way of assigning rendezvous points (RPs) in a multicast
network by means of auto-RP. When you configure auto-RP for a router, the router learns
the address of the RP in the network automatically and has the added advantage of
operating in PIM version 1 and version 2.
Although auto-RP is a nonstandard (non-RFC-based) function that typically uses dense
mode PIM to advertise control traffic, it provides an important failover advantage that
simple static RP assignment does not. You can configure multiple routers as RP
candidates. If the elected RP fails, one of the other preconfigured routers takes over the
RP functions. This capability is controlled by the auto-RP mapping agent.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring PIM Auto-RP on page 181
Configuring PIM Auto-RP
For correct operation, every multicast router within a PIM domain must be able to map
a particular multicast group address to the same rendezvous point (RP). The auto-RP
mechanism is one way that a multicast router can learn the set of group-to-RP mappings.
Auto-RP automatically distributes mapping information to routing devices. It simplifies
use of multiple RPs for different multicast group ranges, thus allowing multiple RPs to
act as backups for each other. Auto-RP relies on a router to act as the RP mapping agent.
Potential RPs announce themselves to the mapping agent, and the mapping agent
resolves any conflicts.
The mapping agent sends the multicast group-RP mapping information to the other
routers using PIM dense mode. The specific groups used are 224.0.1.39 and .40. The first
(.39) is used to advertise, the second (.40) is used for discovery. Because PIM dense
mode is necessary to enable auto-RP to work, which in turns enables PIM sparse mode
to work, you must configure PIM sparse-dense mode in the PIM domains that use auto-RP.
Although auto-RP is a nonstandard (non-RFC-based) function requiring dense mode
PIM to advertise control traffic, it provides an important failover advantage that static
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RP assignment does not. That is, you can configure multiple routing devices as RP
candidates. If the elected RP fails, one of the other preconfigured routing devices takes
over the RP functions. This capability is controlled by the auto-RP mapping agent.
In most cases, how the routing device handles auto-RP discovery, announce, or mapping
messages depends on whether the routing device is an RP (configured as local RP) or
not. Table 9 on page 182 shows how the routing device behaves depending on the local
RP configuration.
Table 9: Local RP and Auto-RP Message Types
Auto-RP Message Type
Local RP?
Routing Device Behavior
discovery
No
Listen for auto-RP mapping messages.
discovery
Yes
Listen for auto-RP mapping messages.
announce
No
Listen for auto-RP mapping messages.
announce
Yes
Listen for auto-RP mapping messages. Send
auto-RP announce messages.
mapping
No
Listen for auto-RP mapping messages. Listen
for auto-RP announce messages. If elected
mapping agent, send auto-RP mapping
messages.
mapping
Yes
Listen for auto-RP mapping messages. Send
auto-RP announce messages. Listen for
auto-RP announce messages. If elected
mapping agent, send auto-RP mapping
messages.
NOTE: If the routing device receives auto-RP announcements split across
multiple messages, the routing device loses the information in the previous
part of the message as soon as the next part of the message is received.
You can configure auto-RP properties globally or for a routing instance. This example
shows the global configuration.
To configure auto-RP properties:
1.
Configure PIM in sparse-dense mode on all routing devices in the PIM domain.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# edit
user@host# set interface all mode sparse-dense
This configuration allows the routing device to operate in sparse mode for most groups
and dense mode for others. The default is to operate in sparse mode unless the routing
device is specifically informed of a dense mode group.
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2. Configure a routable loopback interface address on all routing devices in the PIM
domain.
The routing device joins the auto-RP groups on the configured interfaces and on the
loopback interface lo0.0. For auto-RP to work correctly, configure a routable IP address
on the loopback interface. You cannot use the loopback address 127.0.0.1. Also, you
must enable PIM sparse-dense mode on the lo0.0 interface if you do not specify
interface all.
[edit interfaces lo0.0 unit 0 family inet]
user@host# set address 192.168.0.3 preferred
3. Configure the two multicast dense groups on all the routing devices.
Auto-RP requires multicast flooding to announce potential RP candidates and to
discover the elected RPs in the network. Multicast flooding occurs through a PIM dense
mode model, where group 224.0.1.39 is used for announce messages and group
224.0.1.40 is used for discovery messages.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set dense-groups 224.0.1.39/32
user@host# set dense-groups 224.0.1.40/32
TIP: Step 3 is required. When auto-RP is enabled, the auto-RP announce
group (224.0.1.39) and auto-RP-discovery group (224.0.1.40) must be
configured explicitly as dense groups. When the auto-RP discovery group
is not configured as a dense group, auto-RP is not enabled. When the
auto-RP announce group is not configured as a dense group, auto-RP is
enabled in the discovery mode only, and mapping and announce modes
are disabled.
4. Configure the auto-RP announce option.
At least one routing device in the PIM domain must announce auto-RP messages and
at least one must map them, or you can configure a routing device to perform both
functions.
When a routing device sends announce messages in the network, it is advertising itself
as a candidate RP. A routing device configured with this option must also be configured
as an RP, or announce messages are not sent.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set local address 192.168.0.1
user@host# set auto-rp announce
NOTE: You cannot include the auto-rp announce option at the [edit
logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
protocols pim] hierarchy level.
5. Configure the auto-RP mapping agent.
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The mapping agent sends discovery messages to the network, informing all routing
devices in a multicast group of which RP to use. If the mapping agent is also an RP,
the mapping option also allows the routing device to send auto-RP announcements
(mapping on an RP allows the routing device to perform both the announcement and
mapping functions).
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set auto-rp mapping
If the mapping agent is also an RP, configure the mapping agent as a local RP.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set local address 192.168.0.2
6. Configure mapping agent election.
If you configure the mapping option on more than one routing device in the PIM domain,
configure mapping agent election on each potential mapping agent.
Auto-RP specifications state that mapping agents do not send mapping messages
if they receive messages from a mapping agent with a higher IP address. However,
some vendors' mapping agents continue to announce mappings, even in the presence
of higher-addressed mapping agents. In other words, some mapping agents will always
send mapping messages.
The default auto-RP operation is to perform mapping agent election. To explicitly
configure mapping agent election, you can include the mapping-agent-election
statement. When this option is configured, the mapping agent will stop sending
mapping messages if it receives messages from a mapping agent with a higher IP
address.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set auto-rp mapping mapping-agent-election
Mapping message suppression is disabled with the no-mapping-agent-election
statement. When this option is configured, the mapping agent will always send
mapping messages even in the presence of higher-addressed mapping agents.
To disable mapping agent election for compatibility with other vendors' equipment,
include the no-mapping-agent-election statement.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set auto-rp mapping no-mapping-agent-election
7. Configure the remaining routing devices in the PIM domain to discover the RP.
Discovery enables the routing devices to receive and process discovery messages
from the mapping agent. This is the most basic auto-RP option.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set auto-rp discovery
8. Monitor the operation of PIM auto-RP routers by running the following commands:
184
•
show pim interfaces
•
show pim rps
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Using Auto-RP
•
show pim rps
9. Issue the show pim rps extensive command to see information about how an RP is
learned, what groups it handles, and the number of groups actively using the RP.
user@host> show pim rps extensive
RP: 192.168.5.1
Learned from 192.168.5.1 via: auto-rp
Time Active: 00:34:29
Holdtime: 150 with 108 remaining
Device Index: 6
Subunit: 32769
Interface: pd-0/0/0.32769
Group Ranges:
224.0.0.0/4
Active groups using RP:
224.2.2.100
total 1 groups active
Register State for RP:
Group
Source FirstHop
RP Address
Timeout
StateRP address Type Holdtime
In the example, the RP at 192.168.5.1 was learned through auto-RP. The RP is able to
support all groups in the 224.0.0.0/4 range (all possible groups). The local router has
sent PIM control traffic for the 224.2.2.100 group to the RP.
Additionally, the presence of a Tunnel Physical Interface Card (PIC) in an RP router
creates a de-encapsulation interface, which allows the RP to receive multicast traffic
from the source. This interface is indicated by pd-0/0/0.32769.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
show pim interfaces on page 486
•
show pim rps on page 514
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186
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CHAPTER 12
Using PIM Bootstrap Router
•
Understanding the PIM Bootstrap Router on page 187
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6 on page 187
•
Example: Rejecting PIM Bootstrap Messages at the Boundary
of a PIM Domain on page 189
•
Example: Configuring PIM BSR Filters on page 189
Understanding the PIM Bootstrap Router
To determine which router is the rendezvous point (RP), all routers within a PIM
sparse-mode domain collect bootstrap messages. A PIM sparse-mode domain is a group
of routers that all share the same RP router. The domain bootstrap router initiates
bootstrap messages, which are sent hop by hop within the domain. The routers use
bootstrap messages to distribute RP information dynamically and to elect a bootstrap
router when necessary.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
For correct operation, every multicast router within a PIM domain must be able to map
a particular multicast group address to the same rendezvous point (RP). The bootstrap
router mechanism is one way that a multicast router can learn the set of group-to-RP
mappings. Bootstrap routers are supported in IPv4 and IPv6.
To determine which routing device is the RP, all routing devices within a PIM domain
collect bootstrap messages. A PIM domain is a contiguous set of routing devices that
implement PIM. All devices are configured to operate within a common boundary. The
domain's bootstrap router initiates bootstrap messages, which are sent hop by hop within
the domain. The routing devices use bootstrap messages to distribute RP information
dynamically and to elect a bootstrap router when necessary.
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You can configure bootstrap properties globally or for a routing instance. This example
shows the global configuration.
To configure the bootstrap router properties:
1.
Configure the bootstrap priority.
By default, each routing device has a bootstrap priority of 0, which means the routing
device can never be the bootstrap router. The routing device with the highest priority
value is elected to be the bootstrap router. In the case of a tie, the routing device with
the highest IP address is elected to be the bootstrap router. A simple bootstrap
configuration assigns a bootstrap priority value to a routing device.
NOTE: In the IPv4-only configuration, specifying a bootstrap priority of 0
disables the bootstrap function and does not cause the routing device to
send BSR packets with a 0 in the priority field. In the combined IPv4 and
IPv6 configuration, specifying a bootstrap priority of 0 does not disable
the function, but causes the routing device to send BSR packets with a 0
in the priority field. To disable the bootstrap function in the IPv4 and IPv6
configuration, delete the bootstrap statement.
user@host# edit protocols pim rp
user@host# set bootstrap family inet priority 3
2. (Optional) Create import and export policies to control the flow of bootstrap messages
to and from the RP, and apply the policies to PIM. Import and export policies are useful
when some of the routers in your PIM domain have interfaces that connect to other
PIM domains. Configuring a policy prevents bootstrap messages from crossing domain
boundaries. The import statement prevents messages from being imported into the
RP. The export statement prevents messages from being exported from the RP.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set bootstrap family inet import pim-bootstrap-import
user@host# set bootstrap family inet export pim-bootstrap-export
user@host# exit
3. Configure the policies.
user@host# edit policy-options policy-statement pim-bootstrap-import
[edit policy-options policy-statement pim-bootstrap-import]
user@host# set from interface se-0/0/0
user@host# set then reject
user@host# exit
user@host# edit policy-options policy-statement pim-bootstrap-export
user@host# set from interface se-0/0/0
user@host# set then reject
user@host# exit
4. Monitor the operation of PIM bootstrap routers by running the show pim bootstrap
command.
Related
Documentation
188
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Using PIM Bootstrap Router
•
Example: Rejecting PIM Bootstrap Messages at the Boundary of a PIM Domain on
page 189
•
show pim bootstrap on page 484 in the CLI Explorer
Example: Rejecting PIM Bootstrap Messages at the Boundary of a PIM Domain
In this example, the from interface so-0-1/0 then reject policy statement rejects bootstrap
messages from the specified interface (the example is configured for both IPv4 and IPv6
operation):
protocols {
pim {
rp {
bootstrap {
family inet {
priority 1;
import pim-import;
export pim-export;
}
family inet6 {
priority 1;
import pim-import;
export pim-export;
}
}
}
}
}
policy-options {
policy-statement pim-import {
from interface so-0/1/0;
then reject;
}
policy-statement pim-export {
to interface so-0/1/0;
then reject;
}
}
Example: Configuring PIM BSR Filters
Configure a filter to prevent BSR messages from entering or leaving your network. Add
this configuration to all routers:
protocols {
pim {
rp {
bootstrap-import no-bsr;
bootstrap-export no-bsr;
}
}
}
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policy-options {
policy-statement no-bsr {
then reject;
}
}
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CHAPTER 13
Using PIM Filtering
•
Understanding Multicast Message Filters on page 191
•
Filtering MAC Addresses on page 192
•
Filtering RP and DR Register Messages on page 192
•
Configuring Interface-Level PIM Neighbor Policies on page 193
•
Filtering Outgoing PIM Join Messages on page 194
•
Filtering Incoming PIM Join Messages on page 195
•
Configuring Register Message Filters on a PIM RP and DR on page 197
Understanding Multicast Message Filters
Multicast sources and routers generate a considerable number of control messages,
especially when using PIM sparse mode. These messages form distribution trees, locate
rendezvous points (RPs) and designated routers (DRs), and transition from one type of
tree to another. In most cases, this multicast messaging system operates transparently
and efficiently. However, in some configurations, more control over the sending and
receiving of multicast control messages is necessary.
You can configure multicast filtering to control the sending and receiving of multicast
control messages.
To prevent unauthorized groups and sources from registering with an RP router, you can
define a routing policy to reject PIM register messages from specific groups and sources
and configure the policy on the designated router or the RP router.
•
If you configure the reject policy on an RP router, it rejects incoming PIM register
messages from the specified groups and sources. The RP router also sends a register
stop message by means of unicast to the designated router. On receiving the register
stop message, the designated router sends periodic null register messages for the
specified groups and sources to the RP router.
•
If you configure the reject policy on a designated router, it stops sending PIM register
messages for the specified groups and sources to the RP router.
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NOTE: If you have configured the reject policy on an RP router, we recommend
that you configure the same policy on all the RP routers in your multicast
network.
NOTE: If you delete a group and source address from the reject policy
configured on an RP router and commit the configuration, the RP router will
register the group and source only when the designated router sends a null
register message.
Related
Documentation
•
Filtering MAC Addresses on page 192
•
Filtering RP and DR Register Messages on page 192
•
Filtering MSDP SA Messages on page 220
Filtering MAC Addresses
When a router is exclusively configured with multicast protocols on an interface, multicast
sets the interface media access control (MAC) filter to multicast promiscuous mode,
and the number of multicast groups is unlimited. However, when the router is not
exclusively used for multicasting and other protocols such as OSPF, Routing Information
Protocol version 2 (RIPv2), or Network Time Protocol (NTP) are configured on an interface,
each of these protocols individually requests that the interface program the MAC filter
to pick up its respective multicast group only. In this case, without multicast configured
on the interface, the maximum number of multicast MAC filters is limited to 20. For
example, the maximum number of interface MAC filters for protocols such as OSPF
(multicast group 224.0.0.5) is 20, unless a multicast protocol is also configured on the
interface.
No configuration is necessary for MAC filters.
Filtering RP and DR Register Messages
You can filter Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) register messages sent from the
designated router (DR) or to the rendezvous point (RP). The PIM RP keeps track of all
active sources in a single PIM sparse mode domain. In some cases, more control over
which sources an RP discovers, or which sources a DR notifies other RPs about, is desired.
A high degree of control over PIM register messages is provided by RP and DR register
message filtering. Message filtering also prevents unauthorized groups and sources from
registering with an RP router.
Register messages that are filtered at a DR are not sent to the RP, but the sources are
available to local users. Register messages that are filtered at an RP arrive from source
DRs, but are ignored by the router. Sources on multicast group traffic can be limited or
directed by using RP or DR register message filtering alone or together.
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Chapter 13: Using PIM Filtering
If the action of the register filter policy is to discard the register message, the router needs
to send a register-stop message to the DR. Register-stop messages are throttled to
prevent malicious users from triggering them on purpose to disrupt the routing process.
Multicast group and source information is encapsulated inside unicast IP packets. This
feature allows the router to inspect the multicast group and source information before
sending or accepting the PIM register message.
Incoming register messages to an RP are passed through the configured register message
filtering policy before any further processing. If the register message is rejected, the RP
router sends a register-stop message to the DR. When the DR receives the register-stop
message, the DR stops sending register messages for the filtered groups and sources to
the RP. Two fields are used for register message filtering:
•
Group multicast address
•
Source address
The syntax of the existing policy statements is used to configure the filtering on these
two fields. The route-filter statement is useful for multicast group address filtering, and
the source-address-filter statement is useful for source address filtering. In most cases,
the action is to reject the register messages, but more complex filtering policies are
possible.
Filtering cannot be performed on other header fields, such as DR address, protocol, or
port. In some configurations, an RP might not send register-stop messages when the
policy action is to discard the register messages. This has no effect on the operation of
the feature, but the router will continue to receive register messages.
When anycast RP is configured, register messages can be sent or received by the RP. All
the RPs in the anycast RP set need to be configured with the same RP register message
filtering policies. Otherwise, it might be possible to circumvent the filtering policy.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding RP Mapping with Anycast RP on page 171
•
Configuring Register Message Filters on a PIM RP and DR on page 197
Configuring Interface-Level PIM Neighbor Policies
You can configure a policy to filter unwanted PIM neighbors. In the following example,
the PIM interface compares neighbor IP addresses with the IP address in the policy
statement before any hello processing takes place. If any of the neighbor IP addresses
(primary or secondary) match the IP address specified in the prefix list, PIM drops the
hello packet and rejects the neighbor.
If you configure a PIM neighbor policy after PIM has already established a neighbor
adjacency to an unwanted PIM neighbor, the adjacency remains intact until the neighbor
hold time expires. When the unwanted neighbor sends another hello message to update
its adjacency, the router recognizes the unwanted address and rejects the neighbor.
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To configure a policy to filter unwanted PIM neighbors:
1.
Configure the policy. The neighbor policy must be a properly structured policy
statement that uses a prefix list (or a route filter) containing the neighbor primary
address (or any secondary IP addresses) in a prefix list, and the reject option to reject
the unwanted address.
[edit policy-options]
user@host# set prefix-list nbrGroup 1 20.20.20.1/32
user@host# set policy-statement nbr-policy from prefix-list nbrGroup1
user@host# set policy-statement nbr-policy then reject
2. Configure the interface globally or in the routing instance. This example shows the
configuration for the routing instance.
[edit routing-instances PIM.master protocols pim]
user@host# set neighbor-policy nbr-policy
3. Verify the configuration by checking the Hello dropped on neighbor policy field in the
output of the show pim statistics command.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
•
show pim statistics on page 524
Filtering Outgoing PIM Join Messages
When the core of your network is using MPLS, PIM join and prune messages stop at the
customer edge (CE) routers and are not forwarded toward the core, because these
routers do not have PIM neighbors on the core-facing interfaces. When the core of your
network is using IP, PIM join and prune messages are forwarded to the upstream PIM
neighbors in the core of the network.
When the core of your network is using a mix of IP and MPLS, you might want to filter
certain PIM join and prune messages at the upstream egress interface of the CE routers.
You can filter PIM sparse mode (PIM-SM) join and prune messages at the egress interfaces
for IPv4 and IPv6 in the upstream direction. The messages can be filtered based on the
group address, source address, outgoing interface, PIM neighbor, or a combination of
these values. If the filter is removed, the join is sent after the PIM periodic join timer expires.
To filter PIM sparse mode join and prune messages at the egress interfaces, create a
policy rejecting the group address, source address, outgoing interface, or PIM neighbor,
and then apply the policy.
The following example filters PIM join and prune messages for group addresses 224.0.1.2
and 225.1.1.1.
1.
In configuration mode, create the policy.
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement block-groups term t1 from route-filter
224.0.1.2/32 exact
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement block-groups term t1 from route-filter
225.1.1.1/32 exact
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user@host# set policy-options policy-statement block-groups term t1 then reject
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement block-groups term last then accept
2. Verify the policy configuration by running the show policy-options command.
user@host# show policy-options
policy-statement block-groups {
term t1 {
from {
route-filter 224.0.1.2/32 exact;
route-filter 225.1.1.1/32 exact;
then reject;
}
term last {
then accept;
}
}
3. Apply the PIM join and prune message filter.
user@host> set protocols pim export block-groups
4. After the configuration is committed, use the show pim statistics command to verify
that outgoing PIM join and prune messages are being filtered.
user@host> show pim statistics | grep filtered
RP Filtered Source
0
Rx Joins/Prunes filtered
0
Tx Joins/Prunes filtered
254
The egress filter count is shown on the Tx Joins/Prunes filtered line.
Related
Documentation
•
Filtering Incoming PIM Join Messages on page 195
Filtering Incoming PIM Join Messages
Multicast scoping controls the propagation of multicast messages. Whereas multicast
scoping prevents the actual multicast data packets from flowing in or out of an interface,
PIM join filters prevent a state from being created in a router. A state—the (*,G) or (S,G)
entries—is the information used for forwarding unicast or multicast packets. Using PIM
join filters prevents the transport of multicast traffic across a network and the dropping
of packets at a scope at the edge of the network. Also, PIM join filters reduce the potential
for denial-of-service (DoS) attacks and PIM state explosion—large numbers of PIM join
messages forwarded to each router on the rendezvous-point tree (RPT), resulting in
memory consumption.
To use PIM join filters to efficiently restrict multicast traffic from certain source addresses,
create and apply the routing policy across all routers in the network.
See Table 10 on page 196 for a list of match conditions.
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Table 10: PIM Join Filter Match Conditions
Match Condition
Matches On
interface
Router interface or interfaces specified by name or IP address
neighbor
Neighbor address (the source address in the IP header of the join and
prune message)
route-filter
Multicast group address embedded in the join and prune message
source-address-filter
Multicast source address embedded in the join and prune message
The following example shows how to create a PIM join filter. The filter is composed of a
route filter and a source address filter—bad-groups and bad-sources, respectively. the
bad-groups filter prevents (*,G) or (S,G) join messages from being received for all groups
listed. The bad-sources filter prevents (S,G) join messages from being received for all
sources listed. The bad-groups filter and bad-sources filter are in two different terms. If
route filters and source address filters are in the same term, they are logically ANDed.
To filter incoming PIM join messages:
1.
Configure the policy.
[edit policy-statement pim-join-filter term bad-groups]
user@host# set from route-filter 224.0.1.2/32 exact
user@host# set from route-filter 239.0.0.0/8 orlonger
user@host# set then reject
[edit policy-statement pim-join-filter term bad-sources]
user@host# set from source-address-filter 10.0.0.0/8 orlonger
user@host# set from source-address-filter 127.0.0.0/8 orlonger
user@host# set then reject
[edit policy-statement pim-join-filter term last]
user@host# set then accept
2. Apply one or more policies to routes being imported into the routing table from PIM.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set import pim-join-filter
3. Verify the configuration by checking the output of the show pim join and show policy
commands.
Related
Documentation
196
•
Understanding Multicast Administrative Scoping
•
Filtering Outgoing PIM Join Messages on page 194
•
show pim join on page 489 in the CLI Explorer
•
show policy in the CLI Explorer
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Using PIM Filtering
Configuring Register Message Filters on a PIM RP and DR
PIM register messages are sent to the rendezvous point (RP) by a designated router (DR).
When a source for a group starts transmitting, the DR sends unicast PIM register packets
to the RP.
Register messages have the following purposes:
•
Notify the RP that a source is sending to a group.
•
Deliver the initial multicast packets sent by the source to the RP for delivery down the
shortest-path tree (SPT).
The PIM RP keeps track of all active sources in a single PIM sparse mode domain. In some
cases, you want more control over which sources an RP discovers, or which sources a
DR notifies other RPs about. A high degree of control over PIM register messages is
provided by RP or DR register message filtering. Message filtering prevents unauthorized
groups and sources from registering with an RP router.
You configure RP or DR register message filtering to control the number and location of
multicast sources that an RP discovers. You can apply register message filters on a DR
to control outgoing register messages, or apply them on an RP to control incoming register
messages.
When anycast RP is configured, all RPs in the anycast RP set need to be configured with
the same register message filtering policy.
You can configure message filtering globally or for a routing instance. These examples
show the global configuration.
To configure an RP filter to drop the register packets for multicast group range 224.1.1.0/24
from source address 10.10.94.2:
1.
On the RP, configure the policy.
[edit policy-options policy-statement incoming-policy-for-rp from]
user@host# set route-filter 224.1.1.0/24 orlonger
user@host# set source-address-filter 10.10.94.2/32 exact
user@host# set then reject
user@host# exit
2. Apply the policy to the RP.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set rp-register-policy incoming-policy-for-rp
user@host# set local address 10.10.10.5
user@host# exit
To configure a DR filter to prevent sending register packets for group range 224.1.1.0/24
and source address 10.10.10.1/32:
1.
On the DR, configure the policy.
[edit policy-options policy-statement outgoing-policy-for-rp]
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user@host# set from route-filter 224.1.1.0/24 orlonger
user@host# set from source-address-filter 10.10.10.1/32 exact
user@host# set then reject
user@host# exit
2. Apply the policy to the DR.
The static address is the address of the RP to which you do not want the DR to send
the filtered register messages.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set dr-register-policy outgoing-policy-for-dr
user@host# set static 10.10.10.3
user@host# exit
To configure a policy expression to accept register messages for multicast group 224.1.1.5
but reject those for 224.1.1.1:
1.
On the RP, configure the policies.
[edit policy-options policy-statement reject_224_1_1_1]
user@host# set from route-filter 224.1.1.0/24 orlonger
user@host# set from source-address-filter 10.10.94.2/32 exact
user@host# set then reject
user@host# exit
[edit policy-options policy-statement accept_224_1_1_5]
user@host# set term one from route-filter 224.1.1.5/32 exact
user@host# set term one from source-address-filter 10.10.94.2/32 exact
user@host# set term one then accept
user@host# set term two then reject
user@host# exit
2. Apply the policies to the RP.
[edit protocols pim rp]
user@host# set rp-register-policy [ reject_224_1_1_1 | accept_224_1_1_5 ]
user@host# set local address 10.10.10.5
To monitor the operation of the filters, run the show pim statistics command. The
command output contains the following fields related to filtering:
Related
Documentation
198
•
RP Filtered Source
•
Rx Joins/Prunes filtered
•
Tx Joins/Prunes filtered
•
Rx Register msgs filtering drop
•
Tx Register msgs filtering drop
•
PIM Sparse Mode Source Registration on page 201
•
Filtering RP and DR Register Messages on page 192
•
show pim statistics on page 524
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 14
Using PIM RPT and SPT Cutover
•
Understanding Multicast Rendezvous Points, Shared Trees, and Rendezvous-Point
Trees on page 199
•
Building an RPT Between the RP and Receivers on page 200
•
PIM Sparse Mode Source Registration on page 201
•
Multicast Shortest-Path Tree on page 204
•
SPT Cutover on page 205
•
SPT Cutover Control on page 208
•
Example: Configuring the PIM Assert Timeout on page 208
•
Example: Configuring the PIM SPT Threshold Policy on page 210
Understanding Multicast Rendezvous Points, Shared Trees, and Rendezvous-Point
Trees
In a shared tree, the root of the distribution tree is a router, not a host, and is located
somewhere in the core of the network. In the primary sparse mode multicast routing
protocol, Protocol Independent Multicast sparse mode (PIM SM), the core router at the
root of the shared tree is the rendezvous point (RP). Packets from the upstream source
and join messages from the downstream routers “rendezvous” at this core router.
In the RP model, other routers do not need to know the addresses of the sources for every
multicast group. All they need to know is the IP address of the RP router. The RP router
discovers the sources for all multicast groups.
The RP model shifts the burden of finding sources of multicast content from each router
(the (S,G) notation) to the network (the (*,G) notation knows only the RP). Exactly how
the RP finds the unicast IP address of the source varies, but there must be some method
to determine the proper source for multicast content for a particular group.
Consider a set of multicast routers without any active multicast traffic for a certain group.
When a router learns that an interested receiver for that group is on one of its directly
connected subnets, the router attempts to join the distribution tree for that group back
to the RP, not to the actual source of the content.
To join the shared tree, or rendezvous-point tree (RPT) as it is called in PIM sparse mode,
the router must do the following:
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•
Determine the IP address of the RP for that group. Determining the address can be as
simple as static configuration in the router, or as complex as a set of nested protocols.
•
Build the shared tree for that group. The router executes an RPF check on the RP
address in its routing table, which produces the interface closest to the RP. The router
now detects that multicast packets from this RP for this group need to flow into the
router on this RPF interface.
•
Send a join message out on this interface using the proper multicast protocol (probably
PIM sparse mode) to inform the upstream router that it wants to join the shared tree
for that group. This message is a (*,G) join message because S is not known. Only the
RP is known, and the RP is not actually the source of the multicast packets. The router
receiving the (*,G) join message adds the interface on which the message was received
to its outgoing interface list (OIL) for the group and also performs an RPF check on the
RP address. The upstream router then sends a (*,G) join message out from the RPF
interface toward the source, informing the upstream router that it also wants to join
the group.
Each upstream router repeats this process, propagating join messages from the RPF
interface, building the shared tree as it goes. The process stops when the join message
reaches one of the following:
•
The RP for the group that is being joined
•
A router along the RPT that already has a multicast forwarding state for the group that
is being joined
In either case, the branch is created, and packets can flow from the source to the RP and
from the RP to the receiver. Note that there is no guarantee that the shared tree (RPT)
is the shortest path tree to the source. Most likely it is not. However, there are ways to
“migrate” a shared tree to an SPT once the flow of packets begins. In other words, the
forwarding state can transition from (*,G) to (S,G). The formation of both types of tree
depends heavily on the operation of the RPF check and the RPF table. For more
information about the RPF table, see Understanding Multicast Reverse Path Forwarding.
Building an RPT Between the RP and Receivers
The RPT is the path between the RP and receivers (hosts) in a multicast group (see
Figure 27 on page 201). The RPT is built by means of a PIM join message from a receiver's
DR:
1.
A receiver sends a request to join group (G) in an Internet Group Management Protocol
(IGMP) host membership report. A PIM sparse-mode router, the receiver’s DR, receives
the report on a directly attached subnet and creates an RPT branch for the multicast
group of interest.
2. The receiver’s DR sends a PIM join message to its RPF neighbor, the next-hop address
in the RPF table, or the unicast routing table.
3. The PIM join message travels up the tree and is multicast to the ALL-PIM-ROUTERS
group (224.0.0.13). Each router in the tree finds its RPF neighbor by using either the
RPF table or the unicast routing table. This is done until the message reaches the RP
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and forms the RPT. Routers along the path set up the multicast forwarding state to
forward requested multicast traffic back down the RPT to the receiver.
Figure 27: Building an RPT Between the RP and the Receiver
PIM Sparse Mode Source Registration
The RPT is a unidirectional tree, permitting traffic to flow down from the RP to the receiver
in one direction. For multicast traffic to reach the receiver from the source, another branch
of the distribution tree, called the shortest-path tree, needs to be built from the source's
DR to the RP.
The shortest-path tree is created in the following way:
1.
The source becomes active, sending out multicast packets on the LAN to which it is
attached. The source’s DR receives the packets and encapsulates them in a PIM
register message, which it sends to the RP router (see Figure 28 on page 202).
2. When the RP router receives the PIM register message from the source, it sends a PIM
join message back to the source.
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Figure 28: PIM Register Message and PIM Join Message Exchanged
3. The source’s DR receives the PIM join message and begins sending traffic down the
SPT toward the RP router (see Figure 29 on page 203).
4. Once traffic is received by the RP router, it sends a register stop message to the source’s
DR to stop the register process.
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Figure 29: Traffic Sent from the Source to the RP Router
5. The RP router sends the multicast traffic down the RPT toward the receiver (see
Figure 30 on page 203).
Figure 30: Traffic Sent from the RP Router Toward the Receiver
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Multicast Shortest-Path Tree
The distribution tree used for multicast is rooted at the source and is the shortest-path
tree (SPT) as well. Consider a set of multicast routers without any active multicast traffic
for a certain group (that is, they have no multicast forwarding state for that group). When
a router learns that an interested receiver for that group is on one of its directly connected
subnets, the router attempts to join the tree for that group.
To join the distribution tree, the router determines the unicast IP address of the source
for that group. This address can be a simple static configuration on the router, or as
complex as a set of protocols.
To build the SPT for that group, the router executes an a reverse path forwarding (RPF)
check on the source address in its routing table. The RPF check produces the interface
closest to the source, which is where multicast packets from this source for this group
need to flow into the router.
The router next sends a join message out on this interface using the proper multicast
protocol to inform the upstream router that it wants to join the distribution tree for that
group. This message is an (S,G) join message because both S and G are known. The
router receiving the (S,G) join message adds the interface on which the message was
received to its output interface list (OIL) for the group and also performs an RPF check
on the source address. The upstream router then sends an (S,G) join message out on
the RPF interface toward the source, informing the upstream router that it also wants to
join the group.
Each upstream router repeats this process, propagating joins out on the RPF interface,
building the SPT as it goes. The process stops when the join message does one of two
things:
•
Reaches the router directly connected to the host that is the source.
•
Reaches a router that already has multicast forwarding state for this source-group
pair.
In either case, the branch is created, each of the routers has multicast forwarding state
for the source-group pair, and packets can flow down the distribution tree from source
to receiver. The RPF check at each router makes sure that the tree is an SPT.
SPTs are always the shortest path, but they are not necessarily short. That is, sources
and receivers tend to be on the periphery of a router network, not on the backbone, and
multicast distribution trees have a tendency to sprawl across almost every router in the
network. Because multicast traffic can overwhelm a slow interface, and one packet can
easily become a hundred or a thousand on the opposite side of the backbone, it makes
sense to provide a shared tree as a distribution tree so that the multicast source can be
located more centrally in the network, on the backbone. This sharing of distribution trees
with roots in the core network is accomplished by a multicast rendezvous point. For more
information about RPs, see “Understanding Multicast Rendezvous Points, Shared Trees,
and Rendezvous-Point Trees” on page 199.
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SPT Cutover
Instead of continuing to use the SPT to the RP and the RPT toward the receiver, a direct
SPT is created between the source and the receiver in the following way:
1.
Once the receiver’s DR receives the first multicast packet from the source, the DR
sends a PIM join message to its RPF neighbor (see Figure 31 on page 205).
2. The source’s DR receives the PIM join message, and an additional (S,G) state is created
to form the SPT.
3. Multicast packets from that particular source begin coming from the source's DR and
flowing down the new SPT to the receiver’s DR. The receiver’s DR is now receiving
two copies of each multicast packet sent by the source—one from the RPT and one
from the new SPT.
Figure 31: Receiver DR Sends a PIM Join Message to the Source
4. To stop duplicate multicast packets, the receiver’s DR sends a PIM prune message
toward the RP router, letting it know that the multicast packets from this particular
source coming in from the RPT are no longer needed (see Figure 32 on page 206).
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Figure 32: PIM Prune Message Is Sent from the Receiver’s DR Toward the
RP Router
5. The PIM prune message is received by the RP router, and it stops sending multicast
packets down to the receiver’s DR. The receiver’s DR is getting multicast packets only
for this particular source over the new SPT. However, multicast packets from the
source are still arriving from the source’s DR toward the RP router (see
Figure 33 on page 206).
Figure 33: RP Router Receives PIM Prune Message
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6. To stop the unneeded multicast packets from this particular source, the RP router
sends a PIM prune message to the source’s DR (see Figure 34 on page 207).
Figure 34: RP Router Sends a PIM Prune Message to the Source DR
7. The receiver’s DR now receives multicast packets only for the particular source from
the SPT (see Figure 35 on page 207).
Figure 35: Source’s DR Stops Sending Duplicate Multicast Packets Toward
the RP Router
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SPT Cutover Control
In some cases, the last-hop router needs to stay on the shared tree to the RP and not
transition to a direct SPT to the source. You might not want the last-hop router to
transition when, for example, a low-bandwidth multicast stream is forwarded from the
RP to a last-hop router. All routers between last hop and source must maintain and
refresh the SPT state. This can become a resource-intensive activity that does not add
much to the network efficiency for a particular pair of source and multicast group
addresses.
In these cases, you configure an SPT threshold policy on the last-hop router to control
the transition to a direct SPT. An SPT cutover threshold of infinity applied to a
source-group address pair means the last-hop router will never transition to a direct SPT.
For all other source-group address pairs, the last-hop router transitions immediately to
a direct SPT rooted at the source DR.
Example: Configuring the PIM Assert Timeout
This example shows how to configure the timeout period for a PIM assert forwarder.
•
Requirements on page 208
•
Overview on page 208
•
Configuration on page 210
Requirements
Before you begin:
•
Configure the router interfaces.
•
Configure an interior gateway protocol or static routing. See the Junos OS Routing
Protocols Library.
•
Configure PIM Sparse Mode on the interfaces. See “Enabling PIM Sparse Mode” on
page 130.
Overview
The role of PIM assert messages is to determine the forwarder on a network with multiple
routers. The forwarder is the router that forwards multicast packets to a network with
multicast group members. The forwarder is generally the same as the PIM DR.
A router sends an assert message when it receives a multicast packet on an interface
that is listed in the outgoing interface list of the matching routing entry. Receiving a
message on an outgoing interface is an indication that more than one router forwards
the same multicast packets to a network.
In Figure 36 on page 209, both routing devices R1 and R2 forward multicast packets for
the same (S,G) entry on a network. Both devices detect this situation and both devices
send assert messages on the Ethernet network. An assert message contains, in addition
to a source address and group address, a unicast cost metric for sending packets to the
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source, and a preference metric for the unicast cost. The preference metric expresses a
preference between unicast routing protocols. The routing device with the smallest
preference metric becomes the forwarder (also called the assert winner). If the preference
metrics are equal, the device that sent the lowest unicast cost metric becomes the
forwarder. If the unicast metrics are also equal, the routing device with the highest IP
address becomes the forwarder. After the transmission of assert messages, only the
forwarder continues to forward messages on the network.
When an assert message is received and the RPF neighbor is changed to the assert winner,
the assert timer is set to an assert timeout period. The assert timeout period is restarted
every time a subsequent assert message for the route entry is received on the incoming
interface. When the assert timer expires, the routing device resets its RPF neighbor
according to its unicast routing table. Then, if multiple forwarders still exist, the forwarders
reenter the assert message cycle. In effect, the assert timeout period determines how
often multicast routing devices enter a PIM assert message cycle.
The range is from 5 through 210 seconds. The default is 180 seconds.
Assert messages are useful for LANs that connect multiple routing devices and no hosts.
Figure 36 on page 209 shows the topology for this example.
Figure 36: PIM Assert Topology
PIM network
src: S
dest: G
R2
R1
Assert:
(S,G)
src: S
dest: G
Assert:
(S,G)
Ethernet
g040614
Host
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Configuration
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To configure an assert timeout:
1.
Configure the timeout period, in seconds.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set assert-timeout 60
2.
(Optional) Trace assert messages.
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set traceoptions file PIM.log
user@host# set traceoptions flag assert detail
3.
If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration.
user@host# commit
4.
Related
Documentation
To verify the configuration, run the following commands:
•
show pim join
•
show pim statistics
•
Configuring PIM Trace Options on page 115
•
SPT Cutover on page 205
•
SPT Cutover Control on page 208
Example: Configuring the PIM SPT Threshold Policy
This example shows how to apply a policy that suppresses the transition from the
rendezvous-point tree (RPT) rooted at the RP to the shortest-path tree (SPT) rooted at
the source.
•
Requirements on page 210
•
Overview on page 211
•
Configuration on page 212
•
Verification on page 214
Requirements
Before you begin:
210
•
Configure the router interfaces.
•
Configure an interior gateway protocol or static routing. See the Junos OS Routing
Protocols Library.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Using PIM RPT and SPT Cutover
•
Configure PIM Sparse Mode on the interfaces. See “Enabling PIM Sparse Mode” on
page 130.
Overview
Multicast routing devices running PIM sparse mode can forward the same stream of
multicast packets onto the same LAN through an RPT rooted at the RP or through an
SPT rooted at the source. In some cases, the last-hop routing device needs to stay on
the shared RPT to the RP and not transition to a direct SPT to the source. Receiving the
multicast data traffic on SPT is optimal but introduces more state in the network, which
might not be desirable in some multicast deployments. Ideally, low-bandwidth multicast
streams can be forwarded on the RPT, and high-bandwidth streams can use the SPT.
This example shows how to configure such a policy.
This example includes the following settings:
•
spt-threshold—Enables you to configure an SPT threshold policy on the last-hop routing
device to control the transition to a direct SPT. When you include this statement in the
main PIM instance, the PE router stays on the RPT for control traffic.
•
infinity—Applies an SPT cutover threshold of infinity to a source-group address pair,
so that the last-hop routing device never transitions to a direct SPT. For all other
source-group address pairs, the last-hop routing device transitions immediately to a
direct SPT rooted at the source DR. This statement must reference a properly configured
policy to set the SPT cutover threshold for a particular source-group pair to infinity.
The use of values other than infinity for the SPT threshold is not supported. You can
configure more than one policy.
•
policy-statement—Configures the policy. The simplest type of SPT threshold policy
uses a route filter and source address filter to specify the multicast group and source
addresses and to set the SPT threshold for that pair of addresses to infinity. The policy
is applied to the main PIM instance.
This example sets the SPT transition value for the source-group pair 10.10.10.1 and
224.1.1.1 to infinity. When the policy is applied to the last-hop router, multicast traffic
from this source-group pair never transitions to a direct SPT to the source. Traffic will
continue to arrive through the RP. However, traffic for any other source-group address
combination at this router transitions to a direct SPT to the source.
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Note these points when configuring the SPT threshold policy:
•
Configuration changes to the SPT threshold policy affect how the routing device handles
the SPT transition.
Note these points when configuring the SPT threshold policy:
•
Configuration changes to the SPT threshold policy affect how the routing device handles
the SPT transition.
Note these points when configuring the SPT threshold policy:
•
Configuration changes to the SPT threshold policy affect how the routing device handles
the SPT transition.
•
When the policy is configured for the first time, the routing device continues to transition
to the direct SPT for the source-group address pair until the PIM-join state is cleared
with the clear pim join command.
•
If you do not clear the PIM-join state when you apply the infinity policy configuration
for the first time, you must apply it before the PE router is brought up.
•
When the policy is deleted for a source-group address pair for the first time, the routing
device does not transition to the direct SPT for that source-group address pair until
the PIM-join state is cleared with the clear pim join command.
•
When the policy is changed for a source-group address pair for the first time, the routing
device does not use the new policy until the PIM-join state is cleared with the clear pim
join command.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
[edit]
set policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy term one from route-filter
224.1.1.1/32 exact
set policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy term one from source-address-filter
10.10.10.1/32 exact
set policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy term one then accept
set policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy term two then reject
set protocols pim spt-threshold infinity spt-infinity-policy
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see the CLI User Guide.
To configure an SPT threshold policy:
1.
Apply the policy.
[edit]
user@host# edit protocols pim
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[edit protocols pim]
user@host# set spt-threshold infinity spt-infinity-policy
[edit protocols pim]
user@host# exit
2.
Configure the policy.
[edit]
user@host# edit policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy
[edit policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy]
user@host# set term one from route-filter 224.1.1.1/32 exact
[edit policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy]
user@host# set term one from source-address-filter 10.10.10.1/32 exact
[edit policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy]
user@host# set term one then accept
[edit policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy]
user@host# set term two then reject
[edit policy-options policy-statement spt-infinity-policy]
user@host# exit
policy-statement {
3.
If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration.
[edit]
user@host# commit
4.
Clear the PIM join cache to force the configuration to take effect.
[edit]
user@host# run clear pim join
Results
Confirm your configuration by entering the show policy-options command and the show
protocols command from configuration mode. If the output does not display the intended
configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.
user@host# show policy-options
policy-statement spt-infinity-policy {
term one {
from {
route-filter 224.1.1.1/32 exact;
source-address-filter 10.10.10.1/32 exact;
}
then accept;
}
term two {
then reject;
}
}
user@host# show protocols
pim {
spt-threshold {
infinity spt-infinity-policy;
}
}
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Verification
To verify the configuration, run the show pim join command.
Related
Documentation
214
•
SPT Cutover Control on page 208
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PART 3
Configuring MSDP
•
Using MSDP on page 217
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CHAPTER 15
Using MSDP
•
Understanding MSDP on page 217
•
Configuring MSDP on page 218
•
Filtering MSDP SA Messages on page 220
•
Tracing MSDP Protocol Traffic on page 220
•
Configuring the Interface to Accept Traffic from a Remote Source on page 222
•
Example: Configuring MSDP on page 223
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
•
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP on page 230
•
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router with MSDP on page 233
Understanding MSDP
The Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) is used to connect multicast routing
domains. It typically runs on the same router as the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
sparse-mode rendezvous point (RP). Each MSDP router establishes adjacencies with
internal and external MSDP peers similar to the way BGP establishes peers. These peer
routers inform each other about active sources within the domain. When they detect
active sources, the routers can send PIM sparse-mode explicit join messages to the active
source.
The peer with the higher IP address passively listens to a well-known port number and
waits for the side with the lower IP address to establish a Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) connection. When a PIM sparse-mode RP that is running MSDP becomes aware
of a new local source, it sends source-active type, length, and values (TLVs) to its MSDP
peers. When a source-active TLV is received, a peer-reverse-path-forwarding (peer-RPF)
check (not the same as a multicast RPF check) is done to make sure that this peer is in
the path that leads back to the originating RP. If not, the source-active TLV is dropped.
This TLV is counted as a “rejected” source-active message.
The MSDP peer-RPF check is different from the normal RPF checks done by non-MSDP
multicast routers. The goal of the peer-RPF check is to stop source-active messages
from looping. Router R accepts source-active messages originated by Router S only from
neighbor Router N or an MSDP mesh group member. For more information about
configuring MSDP mesh groups, see “Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source
Limits and Mesh Groups” on page 224.
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Router R locates its MSDP peer-RPF neighbor (Router N) deterministically. A series of
rules is applied in a particular order to received source-active messages, and the first rule
that applies determines the peer-RPF neighbor. All source-active messages from other
routers are rejected.
The six rules applied to source-active messages originating at Router S received at
Router R from Router X are as follows:
1.
If Router X originated the source-active message (Router X is Router S), then Router X
is also the peer-RPF neighbor, and its source-active messages are accepted.
2. If Router X is a member of the Router R mesh group, or is the configured peer, then
Router X is the peer-RPF neighbor, and its source-active messages are accepted.
3. If Router X is the BGP next hop of the active multicast RPF route toward Router S
(Router X installed the route on Router R), then Router X is the peer-RPF neighbor,
and its source-active messages are accepted.
4. If Router X is an external BGP (EBGP) or internal BGP (IBGP) peer of Router R, and
the last autonomous system (AS) number in the BGP AS-path to Router S is the same
as Router X's AS number, then Router X is the peer-RPF neighbor, and its source-active
messages are accepted.
5. If Router X uses the same next hop as the next hop to Router S, then Router X is the
peer-RPF neighbor, and its source-active messages are accepted.
6. If Router X fits none of these criteria, then Router X is not an MSDP peer-RPF neighbor,
and its source-active messages are rejected.
The MSDP peers that receive source-active TLVs can be constrained by BGP reachability
information. If the AS path of the network layer reachability information (NLRI) contains
the receiving peer's AS number prepended second to last, the sending peer is using the
receiving peer as a next hop for this source. If the split horizon information is not being
received, the peer can be pruned from the source-active TLV distribution list.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring MSDP on page 218
Configuring MSDP
To configure the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP), include the msdp
statement:
msdp {
disable;
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
data-encapsulation (disable | enable);
export [ policy-names ];
group group-name {
... group-configuration ...
}
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hold-time seconds;
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
keep-alive seconds;
peer address {
... peer-configuration ...
}
rib-group group-name;
source ip-prefix</prefix-length> {
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
}
sa-hold-time seconds;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier > <disable>;
}
group group-name {
disable;
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
mode (mesh-group | standard);
peer address {
... same statements as at the [edit protocols msdp peer address] hierarchy level shown
just following ...
}
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
peer address {
disable;
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
authentication-key peer-key;
default-peer;
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
}
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
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•
[edit protocols]
•
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
protocols]
By default, MSDP is disabled.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
Filtering MSDP SA Messages
Along with applying MSDP source active (SA) filters on all external MSDP sessions (in
and out) to prevent SAs for groups and sources from leaking in and out of the network,
you need to apply bootstrap router (BSR) filters. Applying a BSR filter to the boundary
of a network prevents foreign BSR messages (which announce RP addresses) from
leaking into your network. Since the routers in a PIM sparse-mode domain need to know
the address of only one RP router, having more than one in the network can create issues.
If you did not use multicast scoping to create boundary filters for all customer-facing
interfaces, you might want to use PIM join filters. Multicast scopes prevent the actual
multicast data packets from flowing in or out of an interface. PIM join filters prevent PIM
sparse-mode state from being created in the first place. Since PIM join filters apply only
to the PIM sparse-mode state, it might be more beneficial to use multicast scoping to
filter the actual data.
NOTE: When you apply firewall filters, firewall action modifiers, such as log,
sample, and count, work only when you apply the filter on an inbound interface.
The modifiers do not work on an outbound interface.
Related
Documentation
•
Filtering Incoming PIM Join Messages on page 195
•
Example: Configuring PIM BSR Filters on page 189
Tracing MSDP Protocol Traffic
Tracing operations record detailed messages about the operation of routing protocols,
such as the various types of routing protocol packets sent and received, and routing policy
actions. You can specify which trace operations are logged by including specific tracing
flags. The following table describes the flags that you can include.
220
Flag
Description
all
Trace all operations.
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Chapter 15: Using MSDP
Flag
Description
general
Trace general events.
keepalive
Trace keepalive messages.
normal
Trace normal events.
packets
Trace all MSDP packets.
policy
Trace policy processing.
route
Trace MSDP changes to the routing table.
source-active
Trace source-active packets.
source-active-request
Trace source-active request packets.
source-active-response
Trace source-active response packets.
state
Trace state transitions.
task
Trace task processing.
timer
Trace timer processing.
You can configure MSDP tracing for all peers, for all peers in a particular group, or for a
particular peer.
In the following example, tracing is enabled for all routing protocol packets. Then tracing
is narrowed to focus only on MSDP peers in a particular group. To configure tracing
operations for MSDP:
1.
(Optional) Configure tracing by including the traceoptions statement at the [edit
routing-options] hierarchy level and set the all-packets-trace and all flags to trace all
protocol packets.
[edit routing-options traceoptions]
user@host# set file all-packets-trace
user@host# set flag all
2. Configure the filename for the MSDP trace file.
[edit protocols msdp group groupa traceoptions]
user@host# set file msdp-trace
3. (Optional) Configure the maximum number of trace files.
[edit protocols msdp group groupa traceoptions]
user@host# set file files 5
4. (Optional) Configure the maximum size of each trace file.
[edit protocols msdp group groupa traceoptions]
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user@host# set file size 1m
5. (Optional) Enable unrestricted file access.
[edit protocols msdp group groupa traceoptions]
user@host# set file world-readable
6. Configure tracing flags. Suppose you are troubleshooting issues with the source-active
cache for groupa. The following example shows how to trace messages associated
with the group address.
[edit protocols msdp group groupa traceoptions]
user@host# set flag source-active | match 230.0.0.3
7. View the trace file.
user@host> file list /var/log
user@host> file show /var/log/msdp-trace
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding MSDP on page 217
•
Tracing and Logging Junos OS Operations in the Junos OS Administration Library
Configuring the Interface to Accept Traffic from a Remote Source
You can configure an incoming interface to accept multicast traffic from a remote source.
A remote source is a source that is not on the same subnet as the incoming interface.
Figure 37 on page 222 shows such a topology, where R2 connects to the R1 source on one
subnet, and to the incoming interface on R3 (ge-1/3/0.0 in the figure) on another subnet.
Figure 37: Accepting Multicast Traffic from a Remote Source
In this topology R2 is a pass-through device not running PIM, so R3 is the first hop router
for multicast packets sent from R1. Because R1 and R3 are in different subnets, the default
behavior of R3 is to disregard R1 as a remote source. You can have R3 accept multicast
traffic from R1, however, by enabling accept-remote-source on the target interface.
To accept traffic from a remote source:
1.
Identify the router and physical interface that you want to receive multicast traffic
from the remote source.
2. Configure the interface to accept traffic from the remote source.
[edit protocols pim interface ge-1/3/0.0]
user@host# set accept-remote-source
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NOTE: If the interface you identified is not the only path from the remote
source, you need to ensure that it is the best path. For example you can
configure a static route on the receiver side PE router to the source, or you
can prepend the AS path on the other possible routes:
[edit policy-options policy-statement as-path-prepend term prepend]
user@host# set from route-filter 192.168.0.0/16 orlonger
user@host# set from route-filter 172.16.0.0/16 orlonger
user@host# set then as-path-prepend "1 1 1 1"
3. Commit the configuration changes.
4. Confirm that the interface you configured accepts traffic from the remote source.
user@host# show pim statistics
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Allowing MBGP MVPN Remote Sources
•
Understanding Prepending AS Numbers to BGP AS Paths
•
show pim statistics on page 524
Example: Configuring MSDP
Configure a router to act as a PIM sparse-mode rendezvous point and an MSDP peer:
[edit]
routing-options {
interface-routes {
rib-group ifrg;
}
rib-groups {
ifrg {
import-rib [inet.0 inet.2];
}
mcrg {
export-rib inet.2;
import-rib inet.2;
}
}
}
protocols {
bgp {
group lab {
type internal;
family any;
neighbor 192.168.6.18 {
local-address 192.168.6.17;
}
}
}
pim {
dense-groups {
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224.0.1.39/32;
224.0.1.40/32;
}
rib-group mcrg;
rp {
local {
address 192.168.1.1;
}
}
interface all {
mode sparse-dense;
version 1;
}
}
msdp {
rib-group mcrg;
group lab {
peer 192.168.6.18 {
local-address 192.168.6.17;
}
}
}
}
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups
This example shows how to configure MSDP to filter source-active messages and limit
the flooding of source-active messages.
•
Requirements on page 224
•
Overview on page 224
•
Configuration on page 228
•
Verification on page 229
Requirements
Before you begin:
•
Configure the router interfaces.
•
Configure an interior gateway protocol or static routing. See the Junos OS Routing
Protocols Library.
•
Enable PIM sparse mode. See “PIM Overview” on page 109.
•
Configure the router as a PIM sparse-mode RP. See “Configuring Local PIM RPs” on
page 166.
Overview
A router interested in MSDP messages, such as an RP, might have to process a large
number of MSDP messages, especially source-active messages, arriving from other
routers. Because of the potential need for a router to examine, process, and create state
tables for many MSDP packets, there is a possibility of an MSDP-based denial-of-service
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(DoS) attack on a router running MSDP. To minimize this possibility, you can configure
the router to limit the number of source active messages the router accepts. Also, you
can configure a threshold for applying random early detection (RED) to drop some but
not all MSDP active source messages.
By default, the router accepts 25,000 source active messages before ignoring the rest.
The limit can be from 1 through 1,000,000. The limit is applied to both the number of
messages and the number of MSDP peers.
By default, the router accepts 24,000 source-active messages before applying the RED
profile to prevent a possible DoS attack. This number can also range from 1 through
1,000,000. The next 1000 messages are screened by the RED profile and the accepted
messages processed. If you configure no drop profiles (as this example does not), RED
is still in effect and functions as the primary mechanism for managing congestion. In the
default RED drop profile, when the packet queue fill-level is 0 percent, the drop probability
is 0 percent. When the fill-level is 100 percent, the drop probability is 100 percent.
NOTE: The router ignores source-active messages with encapsulated TCP
packets. Multicast does not use TCP; segments inside source-active messages
are most likely the result of worm activity.
The number configured for the threshold must be less than the number configured for
the maximum number of active MSDP sources.
You can configure an active source limit globally, for a group, or for a peer. If active source
limits are configured at multiple levels of the hierarchy (as shown in this example), all
are applied.
You can configure an active source limit for an address range as well as for a specific
peer. A per-source active source limit uses an IP prefix and prefix length instead of a
specific address. You can configure more than one per-source active source limit. The
longest match determines the limit.
Per-source active source limits can be combined with active source limits at the peer,
group, and global (instance) hierarchy level. Per-source limits are applied before any
other type of active source limit. Limits are tested in the following order:
•
Per-source
•
Per-peer or group
•
Per-instance
An active source message must “pass” all limits established before being accepted. For
example, if a source is configured with an active source limit of 10,000 active multicast
groups and the instance is configured with a limit of 5000(and there are no other sources
or limits configured), only 5000 active source messages are accepted from this source.
MSDP mesh groups are groups of peers configured in a full-mesh topology that limits
the flooding of source-active messages to neighboring peers. Every mesh group member
must have a peer connection with every other mesh group member. When a source-active
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message is received from a mesh group member, the source-active message is always
accepted but is not flooded to other members of the same mesh group. However, the
source-active message is flooded to non-mesh group peers or members of other mesh
groups. By default, standard flooding rules apply if mesh-group is not specified.
CAUTION: When configuring MSDP mesh groups, you must configure all
members the same way. If you do not configure a full mesh, excessive flooding
of source-active messages can occur.
A common application for MSDP mesh groups is peer-reverse-path-forwarding (peer-RPF)
check bypass. For example, if there are two MSDP peers inside an autonomous system
(AS), and only one of them has an external MSDP session to another AS, the internal
MSDP peer often rejects incoming source-active messages relayed by the peer with the
external link. Rejection occurs because the external MSDP peer must be reachable by
the internal MSDP peer through the next hop toward the source in another AS, and this
next-hop condition is not certain. To prevent rejections, configure an MSDP mesh group
on the internal MSDP peer so it always accepts source-active messages.
NOTE: An alternative way to bypass the peer-RPF check is to configure a
default peer. In networks with only one MSDP peer, especially stub networks,
the source-active message always needs to be accepted. An MSDP default
peer is an MSDP peer from which all source-active messages are accepted
without performing the peer-RPF check. You can establish a default peer at
the peer or group level by including the default-peer statement.
Table 11 on page 226 explains how flooding is handled by peers in this example. .
Table 11: Source-Active Message Flooding Explanation
Source-Active Message
Received From
Source-Active Message
Flooded To
Source-Active Message Not
Flooded To
Peer 21
Peer 11, Peer 12, Peer 13,
Peer 31, Peer 32
Peer 22
Peer 11
Peer 21, Peer 22, Peer 31,
Peer 32
Peer 12, Peer 13
Peer 31
Peer 21, Peer 22, Peer 11,
Peer 12, Peer 13, Peer 32
–
Figure 38 on page 227 illustrates source-active message flooding between different mesh
groups and peers within the same mesh group.
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Figure 38: Source-Active Message Flooding
This example includes the following settings:
•
active-source-limit maximum 10000—Applies a limit of 10,000 active sources to all
other peers.
•
data-encapsulation disable—On an RP router using MSDP, disables the default
encapsulation of multicast data received in MSDP register messages inside MSDP
source-active messages.
MSDP data encapsulation mainly concerns bursty sources of multicast traffic. Sources
that send only one packet every few minutes have trouble with the timeout of state
relationships between sources and their multicast groups (S,G). Routers lose data
while they attempt to reestablish (S,G) state tables. As a result, multicast register
messages contain data, and this data encapsulation in MSDP source-active messages
can be turned on or off through configuration.
By default, MSDP data encapsulation is enabled. An RP running MSDP takes the data
packets arriving in the source's register message and encapsulates the data inside an
MSDP source-active message.
However, data encapsulation creates both a multicast forwarding cache entry in the
inet.1 table (this is also the forwarding table) and a routing table entry in the inet.4
table. Without data encapsulation, MSDP creates only a routing table entry in the inet.4
table. In some circumstances, such as the presence of Internet worms or other forms
of DoS attack, the router's forwarding table might fill up with these entries. To prevent
the forwarding table from filling up with MSDP entries, you can configure the router
not to use MSDP data encapsulation. However, if you disable data encapsulation, the
router ignores and discards the encapsulated data. Without data encapsulation,
multicast applications with bursty sources having transmit intervals greater than about
3 minutes might not work well.
•
group MSDP-group local-address 10.1.2.3—Specifies the address of the local router (this
router).
•
group MSDP-group mode mesh-group—Specifies that all peers belonging to the
MSDP-group group are mesh group members.
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•
group MSDP-group peer 10.10.10.10—Prevents the sending of source-active messages
to neighboring peer 10.10.10.10.
•
group MSDP-group peer 10.10.10.10 active-source-limit maximum 7500—Applies a limit
of 7500 active sources to MSDP peer 10.10.10.10 in group MSDP-group.
•
peer 10.0.0.1 active-source-limit maximum 5000 threshold 4000—Applies a threshhold
of 4000 active sources and a limit of 5000 active sources to MSDP peer 10.0.0.1.
•
source 10.1.0.0/16 active-source-limit maximum 500—Applies a limit of 500 active
sources to any source on the 10.1.0.0/16 network.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level,
and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set protocols msdp data-encapsulation disable
set protocols msdp active-source-limit maximum 10000
set protocols msdp peer 10.0.0.1 active-source-limit maximum 5000
set protocols msdp peer 10.0.0.1 active-source-limit threshold 4000
set protocols msdp source 10.1.0.0/16 active-source-limit maximum 500
set protocols msdp group MSDP-group mode mesh-group
set protocols msdp group MSDP-group local-address 10.1.2.3
set protocols msdp group MSDP-group peer 10.10.10.10 active-source-limit maximum
7500
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires that you navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To configure MSDP source active routes and mesh groups:
1.
(Optional) Disable data encapsulation.
[edit protocols msdp]
user@host# set data-encapsulation disable
2.
Configure the active source limits.
[edit protocols msdp]
user@host# set peer 10.0.0.1 active-source-limit maximum 5000 threshold 4000
user@host# set group MSDP-group peer 10.10.10.10 active-source-limit maximum
7500
user@host# set active-source-limit maximum 10000
user@host# set source 10.1.0.0/16 active-source-limit maximum 500
3.
(Optional) Configure the threshold at which warning messages are logged and the
amount of time between log messages.
[edit protocols msdp]
user@host# set active-source-limit log-warning 80
user@host# set active-source-limit log-interval 20
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4.
Configure the mesh group.
[edit protocols msdp]
user@host# set group MSDP-group mode mesh-group
user@host# set group MSDP-group peer 10.10.10.10
user@host# set group MSDP-group local-address 10.1.2.3
5.
If you are done configuring the device, commit the configuration.
[edit routing-instances]
user@host# commit
Results
Confirm your configuration by entering the show protocols command.
user@host# show protocols
msdp {
data-encapsulation disable;
active-source-limit {
maximum 10000;
}
peer 10.0.0.1 {
active-source-limit {
maximum 5000;
threshold 4000;
}
}
source 10.1.0.0/16 {
active-source-limit {
maximum 500;
}
}
group MSDP-group {
mode mesh-group;
local-address 10.1.2.3;
peer 10.10.10.10 {
active-source-limit {
maximum 7500;
}
}
}
}
Verification
To verify the configuration, run the following commands:
Related
Documentation
•
show msdp source-active
•
show msdp statistics
•
Examples: Configuring MSDP
•
Filtering MSDP SA Messages on page 220
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•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP
When you configure anycast RP, you bypass the restriction of having one active rendezvous
point (RP) per multicast group, and instead deploy multiple RPs for the same group
range. The RP routers share one unicast IP address. Sources from one RP are known to
other RPs that use the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP). Sources and receivers
use the closest RP, as determined by the interior gateway protocol (IGP).
You can use anycast RP within a domain to provide redundancy and RP load sharing.
When an RP stops operating, sources and receivers are taken to a new RP by means of
unicast routing.
You can configure anycast RP to use PIM and MSDP for IPv4, or PIM alone for both IPv4
and IPv6 scenarios. Both are discussed in this section.
We recommend a static RP mapping with anycast RP over a bootstrap router and auto-RP
configuration because it provides all the benefits of a bootstrap router and auto-RP
without the complexity of the BSR and auto-RP mechanisms.
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, all systems on a subnet must run the same version of
PIM.
The default PIM version can be version 1 or version 2, depending on the mode you are
configuring. PIMv1 is the default RP mode (at the [edit protocols pim rp static address
address] hierarchy level). However, PIMv2 is the default for interface mode (at the [edit
protocols pim interface interface-name] hierarchy level). Explicitly configured versions
override the defaults. This example explicitly configures PIMv2 on the interfaces.
The following example shows an anycast RP configuration for the RP routers, first with
MSDP and then using PIM alone, and for non-RP routers.
1.
For a network using an RP with MSDP, configure the RP using the lo0 loopback
interface, which is always up. Include the address statement and specify the unique
and routable router ID and the RP address at the [edit interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet]
hierarchy level. In this example, the router ID is 198.51.100.254 and the shared RP
address is 198.51.100.253. Include the primary statement for the first address. Including
the primary statement selects the router’s primary address from all the preferred
addresses on all interfaces.
interfaces {
lo0 {
description "PIM RP";
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 198.51.100.254/32;
primary;
address 198.51.100.253/32;
}
}
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}
}
2. Specify the RP address. Include the address statement at the [edit protocols pim rp
local] hierarchy level (the same address as the secondary lo0 interface).
For all interfaces, include the mode statement to set the mode to sparse and the
version statement to specify PIM version 2 at the [edit protocols pim rp local interface
all] hierarchy level. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management
interface by including the disable statement for that interface.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
local {
family inet;
address 198.51.100.253;
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
}
3. Configure MSDP peering. Include the peer statement to configure the address of the
MSDP peer at the [edit protocols msdp] hierarchy level. For MSDP peering, use the
unique, primary addresses instead of the anycast address. To specify the local address
for MSDP peering, include the local-address statement at the [edit protocols msdp
peer] hierarchy level.
protocols {
msdp {
peer 198.51.100.250 {
local-address address 198.51.100.254;
}
}
}
NOTE: If you need to configure a PIM RP for both IPv4 and IPv6 scenarios,
perform Step 4 and Step 5. Otherwise, go to Step 6.
4. Configure an RP using the lo0 loopback interface, which is always up. Include the
address statement to specify the unique and routable router address and the RP
address at the [edit interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet] hierarchy level. In this example,
the router ID is 198.51.100.254 and the shared RP address is 198.51.100.253. Include
the primary statement on the first address. Including the primary statement selects
the router’s primary address from all the preferred addresses on all interfaces.
interfaces {
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lo0 {
description "PIM RP";
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 198.51.100.254/32 {
primary;
}
address 198.51.100.253/32;
}
}
}
}
5. Include the address statement at the [edit protocols pim rp local] hierarchy level to
specify the RP address (the same address as the secondary lo0 interface).
For all interfaces, include the mode statement to set the mode to sparse, and the
version statement to specify PIM version 2 at the [edit protocols pim rp local interface
all] hierarchy level. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management
interface by Including the disable statement for that interface.
Include the anycast-pim statement to configure anycast RP without MSDP (for
example, if IPv6 is used for multicasting). The other RP routers that share the same
IP address are configured using the rp-set statement. There is one entry for each RP,
and the maximum that can be configured is 15. For each RP, specify the routable IP
address of the router and whether MSDP source active (SA) messages are forwarded
to the RP.
MSDP configuration is not necessary for this type of IPv4 anycast RP configuration.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
local {
family inet {
address 198.51.100.253;
anycast-pim {
rp-set {
address 198.51.100.240;
address 198.51.100.241 forward-msdp-sa;
}
local-address 198.51.100.254; #If not configured, use lo0 primary
}
}
}
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
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6. Configure the non-RP routers. The anycast RP configuration for a non-RP router is
the same whether MSDP is used or not. Specify a static RP by adding the address at
the [edit protocols pim rp static] hierarchy level. Include the version statement at the
[edit protocols pim rp static address] hierarchy level to specify PIM version 2.
protocols {
pim {
rp {
static {
address 198.51.100.253 {
version 2;
}
}
}
}
}
7. Include the mode statement at the [edit protocols pim interface all] hierarchy level to
specify sparse mode on all interfaces. Then include the version statement at the [edit
protocols pim rp interface all mode] to configure all interfaces for PIM version 2. When
configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface by including the
disable statement for that interface.
protocols {
pim {
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
Release History Table
Release
Description
16.1
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, all systems on a subnet must run the same
version of PIM.
Configuring a PIM Anycast RP Router with MSDP
Add the address statement at the [edit protocols pim rp local] hierarchy level to specify
the RP address (the same address as the secondary lo0 interface).
For all interfaces, use the mode statement to set the mode to sparse and the version
statement to specify PIM version 2 at the [edit protocols pim rp local interface all] hierarchy
level. When configuring all interfaces, exclude the fxp0.0 management interface by
adding the disable statement for that interface.
protocols {
pim {
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rp {
local {
family inet;
address 198.51.100.253;
}
interface all {
mode sparse;
version 2;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
}
}
To configure MSDP peering, add the peer statement to configure the address of the MSDP
peer at the [edit protocols msdp] hierarchy level. For MSDP peering, use the unique,
primary addresses instead of the anycast address. To specify the local address for MSDP
peering, add the local-address statement at the [edit protocols msdp peer] hierarchy
level.
protocols {
msdp {
peer 198.51.100.250 {
local-address 198.51.100.254;
}
}
}
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PART 4
Configuration Statements and
Operational Commands
•
Configuration Statements (IGMP) on page 237
•
Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping) on page 263
•
Configuration Statements (PIM) on page 285
•
Configuration Statements (Source-Specific Multicast) on page 361
•
Configuration Statements (MSDP) on page 367
•
Operational Commands (IGMP) on page 389
•
Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping) on page 413
•
Operational Commands (PIM) on page 425
•
Operational Commands (MSDP) on page 537
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236
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CHAPTER 16
Configuration Statements (IGMP)
•
accounting (Protocols IGMP) on page 238
•
accounting (Protocols IGMP Interface) on page 238
•
asm-override-ssm on page 239
•
disable (Protocols IGMP) on page 239
•
exclude (Protocols IGMP) on page 240
•
group (Protocols IGMP) on page 241
•
group-count (Protocols IGMP) on page 242
•
group-increment (Protocols IGMP) on page 242
•
group-limit (IGMP) on page 243
•
group-policy (Protocols IGMP) on page 244
•
igmp on page 245
•
immediate-leave (Protocols IGMP) on page 247
•
interface (Protocols IGMP) on page 248
•
maximum-transmit-rate (Protocols IGMP) on page 249
•
oif-map (IGMP Interface) on page 249
•
passive (IGMP) on page 250
•
promiscuous-mode (Protocols IGMP) on page 251
•
query-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 252
•
query-last-member-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 253
•
query-response-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 254
•
robust-count (Protocols IGMP) on page 255
•
source (Protocols IGMP) on page 256
•
source-count (Protocols IGMP) on page 257
•
source-increment (Protocols IGMP) on page 258
•
static (Protocols IGMP) on page 259
•
traceoptions (Protocols IGMP) on page 260
•
version (Protocols IGMP) on page 262
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accounting (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
accounting;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable the collection of IGMP join and leave event statistics on the system.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Recording IGMP Join and Leave Events on page 59
accounting (Protocols IGMP Interface)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
238
(accounting | no-accounting);
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable or disable the collection of IGMP join and leave event statistics for an interface.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Recording IGMP Join and Leave Events on page 59
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Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
asm-override-ssm
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
asm-override-ssm;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
routing-options multicast],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-options multicast]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Enable the routing device to accept any-source multicast join messages (*,G) for group
addresses that are within the default or configured range of source-specific multicast
groups.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast Groups with Any-Source Override on
page 156
disable (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
disable;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Disable IGMP on the system.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Disabling IGMP on page 65
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exclude (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
240
exclude;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name static
group multicast-group-address],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name static group multicast-group-address]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.3.
Configure the static group to operate in exclude mode. In exclude mode all sources except
the address configured are accepted for the group. If this statement is not included, the
group operates in include mode.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
group (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
group multicast-group-address {
exclude;
group-count number;
group-increment increment;
source ip-address {
source-count number;
source-increment increment;
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name static],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name static]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Specify the IGMP multicast group address and (optionally) the source address for the
multicast group being statically configured on an interface.
NOTE: You must specify a unique address for each group.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
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group-count (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
group-count number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name static
group multicast-group-address],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name static group multicast-group-address]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the number of static groups to be created.
number—Number of static groups.
Range: 1 through 512
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
group-increment (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
group-increment increment;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name static
group multicast-group-address],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name static group multicast-group-address]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the number of times the address should be incremented for each static group
created. The increment is specified in dotted decimal notation similar to an IPv4 address.
increment—Number of times the address should be incremented.
Default: 0.0.0.1
Range: 0.0.0.1 through 255.255.255.255
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
242
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
group-limit (IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
group-limit limit;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure a limit for the number of multicast groups (or [S,G] channels in IGMPv3)
allowed on an interface. After this limit is reached, new reports are ignored and all related
flows are not flooded on the interface.
To confirm the configured group limit on the interface, use the show igmp interface
command.
Default
Options
By default, there is no limit to the number of multicast groups that can join the interface.
limit—group limit value for the interface.
Range: 1 through 32767
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Limiting the Number of IGMP Multicast Group Joins on Logical Interfaces on page 61
•
group-threshold
•
log-interval
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group-policy (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
244
group-policy [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
When this statement is enabled on a router running IGMP version 2 (IGMPv2) or version 3
(IGMPv3), after the router receives an IGMP report, the router compares the group against
the specified group policy and performs the action configured in that policy (for example,
rejects the report).
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Filtering Unwanted IGMP Reports at the IGMP Interface Level on page 49
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
igmp
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
igmp {
accounting;
interface interface-name {
disable;
(accounting | no-accounting);
group-limit limit;
group-policy [ policy-names ];
group-threshold
immediate-leave;
log-interval
oif-map map-name;
passive;
promiscuous-mode;
ssm-map ssm-map-name;
ssm-map-policy ssm-map-policy-name;
static {
group multicast-group-address {
exclude;
group-count number;
group-increment increment;
source ip-address {
source-count number;
source-increment increment;
}
}
}
version version;
}
query-interval seconds;
query-last-member-interval seconds;
query-response-interval seconds;
robust-count number;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols],
[edit protocols]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2 for EX Series switches.
Enable IGMP on the router or switch. IGMP must be enabled for the router or switch to
receive multicast packets.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
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Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
246
IGMP is disabled on the router or switch. IGMP is automatically enabled on all broadcast
interfaces when you configure Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) or Distance Vector
Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP).
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP on page 44
•
Understanding Multicast Route Leaking for VRF and Virtual-Router Instances on page 63
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
immediate-leave (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
immediate-leave;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.3.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
The immediate leave setting is useful for minimizing the leave latency of IGMP
memberships. When this setting is enabled, the routing device leaves the multicast group
immediately after the last host leaves the multicast group.
The immediate leave setting enables host tracking, meaning that the device keeps track
of the hosts that send join messages. This allows IGMP to determine when the last host
sends a leave message for the multicast group.
When the immediate leave setting is enabled, the device removes an interface from the
forwarding-table entry without first sending IGMP group-specific queries to the interface.
The interface is pruned from the multicast tree for the multicast group specified in the
IGMP leave message. The immediate leave setting ensures optimal bandwidth
management for hosts on a switched network, even when multiple multicast groups are
being used simultaneously.
When immediate leave is disabled and one host sends a leave group message, the routing
device first sends a group query to determine if another receiver responds. If no receiver
responds, the routing device removes all hosts on the interface from the multicast group.
Immediate leave is disabled by default for both IGMP version 2 and IGMP version 3.
NOTE: Although host tracking is enabled for IGMPv2 and MLDv1 when you
enable immediate leave, use immediate leave with these versions only when
there is one host on the interface. The reason is that IGMPv2 and MLDv1 use
a report suppression mechanism whereby only one host on an interface sends
a group join report in response to a membership query. The other interested
hosts suppress their reports. The purpose of this mechanism is to avoid a
flood of reports for the same group. But it also interferes with host tracking,
because the router only knows about the one interested host and does not
know about the others.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Specifying Immediate-Leave Host Removal for IGMP on page 48
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
interface (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
interface interface-name {
disable;
(accounting | no-accounting);
group-limit limit;
group-policy [ policy-names ];
immediate-leave;
oif-map map-name;
passive;
promiscuous-mode;
ssm-map ssm-map-name;
ssm-map-policy ssm-map-policy-name;
static {
group multicast-group-address {
exclude;
group-count number;
group-increment increment;
source ip-address {
source-count number;
source-increment increment;
}
}
}
version version;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable IGMP on an interface and configure interface-specific properties.
interface-name—Name of the interface. Specify the full interface name, including the
physical and logical address components. To configure all interfaces, you can specify
all.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
248
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP on page 44
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
maximum-transmit-rate (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
maximum-transmit-rate packets-per-second;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.3.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Limit the transmission rate of IGMP packets
packets-per-second—Maximum number of IGMP packets transmitted in one second by
the routing device.
Range: 1 through 10000
Default: 500 packets
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Limiting the Maximum IGMP Message Rate on page 53
oif-map (IGMP Interface)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
oif-map map-name;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Associates an outgoing interface (OIF) map to the IGMP interface. The OIF map is a
routing policy statement that can contain multiple terms.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Multicast with Subscriber VLANs
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
passive (IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
passive <allow-receive> <send-general-query> <send-group-query>;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
allow-receive, send-general-query, and send-group-query options were added in Junos
OS Release 10.0.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify that IGMP run on the interface and either not send and receive control traffic or
selectively send and receive control traffic such as IGMP reports, queries, and leaves.
NOTE: You can selectively activate up to two out of the three available
options for the passive statement while keeping the other functions passive
(inactive). Activating all three options would be equivalent to not using the
passive statement.
Options
allow-receive—Enables IGMP to receive control traffic on the interface.
send-general-query—Enables IGMP to send general queries on the interface.
send-group-query—Enables IGMP to send group-specific and group-source-specific
queries on the interface.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
250
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Multicast with Subscriber VLANs
•
Enabling IGMP on page 44
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
promiscuous-mode (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
promiscuous-mode;
[edit dynamic-profiles profile-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.3.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.2 for dynamic profiles.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify that the interface accepts IGMP reports from hosts on any subnetwork. Note
that when enabling promiscuous-mode, all routing devices on the ethernet segment
must be configured with the promiscuous mode statement. Otherwise, only the interface
configured with lowest IPv4 address acts as the querier for IGMP for this Ethernet segment.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Dynamic IGMP Configuration Overview
•
Configuring Dynamic DHCP Client Access to a Multicast Network
•
Accepting IGMP Messages from Remote Subnetworks on page 50
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
query-interval (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
query-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify how often the querier routing device sends general host-query messages.
seconds—Time interval.
Range: 1 through 1024
Default: 125 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
252
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Modifying the IGMP Host-Query Message Interval on page 46
•
query-last-member-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 253
•
query-response-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 254
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
query-last-member-interval (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
query-last-member-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify how often the querier routing device sends group-specific query messages.
seconds—Time interval, in fractions of a second or seconds.
Range: 0.1 through 0.9, then in 1-second intervals 1 through 999999
Default: 1 second
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Modifying the IGMP Last-Member Query Interval on page 47
•
query-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 252
•
query-response-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 254
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
query-response-interval (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
query-response-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify how long the querier routing device waits to receive a response to a host-query
message from a host.
seconds—The query response interval must be less than the query interval.
Range: 1 through 1024
Default: 10 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
254
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Modifying the IGMP Query Response Interval on page 51
•
query-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 252
•
query-last-member-interval (Protocols IGMP) on page 253
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
robust-count (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
robust-count number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Tune the expected packet loss on a subnet. This factor is used to calculate the group
member interval, other querier present interval, and last-member query count.
number—Robustness variable.
Range: 2 through 10
Default: 2
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Modifying the IGMP Robustness Variable on page 51
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source (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
source ip-address {
source-count number;
source-increment increment;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name static
group multicast-group-address],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name static group multicast-group-address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the IP version 4 (IPv4) unicast source address for the multicast group being
statically configured on an interface.
ip-address—IPv4 unicast address.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
256
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
source-count (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
source-count number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name static
group multicast-group-address source],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name static group multicast-group-address source]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the number of multicast source addresses that should be accepted for each
static group created.
number—Number of source addresses.
Default: 1
Range: 1 through 1024
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
source-increment (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
source-increment number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name static
group multicast-group-address source],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name static group multicast-group-address source]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the number of times the multicast source address should be incremented for
each static group created. The increment is specified in dotted decimal notation similar
to an IPv4 address.
increment—Number of times the source address should be incremented.
Default: 0.0.0.1
Range: 0.0.0.1 through 255.255.255.255
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
258
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
static (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
static {
group multicast-group-address {
exclude;
group-count number;
group-increment increment;
source ip-address {
source-count number;
source-increment increment;
}
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Test multicast forwarding on an interface without a receiver host.
The static statement simulates IGMP joins on a routing device statically on an interface
without any IGMP hosts. It is supported for both IGMPv2 and IGMPv3 joins. This statement
is especially useful for testing multicast forwarding on an interface without a receiver
host.
NOTE: To prevent joining too many groups accidentally, the static statement
is not supported with the interface all statement.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing and trace—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control and trace-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling IGMP Static Group Membership on page 53
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
traceoptions (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp],
[edit protocols igmp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure IGMP tracing options.
To specify more than one tracing operation, include multiple flag statements.
To trace the paths of multicast packets, use the mtrace command.
Default
Options
The default IGMP trace options are those inherited from the routing protocols traceoptions
statement included at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level.
disable—(Optional) Disable the tracing operation. You can use this option to disable a
single operation when you have defined a broad group of tracing operations, such
as all.
file filename—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation. Enclose the
name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory /var/log. We
recommend that you place tracing output in the file igmp-log.
files number—(Optional) Maximum number of trace files. When a trace file named
trace-file reaches its maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and
so on, until the maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file
is overwritten.
If you specify a maximum number of files, you must also include the size statement to
specify the maximum file size.
Range: 2 through 1000 files
Default: 2 files
flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation, include
multiple flag statements.
IGMP Tracing Flags
260
•
leave—Leave group messages (for IGMP version 2 only).
•
mtrace—Mtrace packets. Use the mtrace command to troubleshoot the software.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 16: Configuration Statements (IGMP)
•
packets—All IGMP packets.
•
query—IGMP membership query messages, including general and group-specific queries.
•
report—Membership report messages.
Global Tracing Flags
•
all—All tracing operations
•
general—A combination of the normal and route trace operations
•
normal—All normal operations
Default: If you do not specify this option, only unusual or abnormal operations are traced.
•
policy—Policy operations and actions
•
route—Routing table changes
•
state—State transitions
•
task—Interface transactions and processing
•
timer—Timer usage
flag-modifier—(Optional) Modifier for the tracing flag. You can specify one or more of
these modifiers:
•
detail—Detailed trace information
•
receive—Packets being received
•
send—Packets being transmitted
no-stamp—(Optional) Do not place timestamp information at the beginning of each line
in the trace file.
Default: If you omit this option, timestamp information is placed at the beginning of
each line of the tracing output.
no-world-readable—(Optional) Do not allow users to read the log file.
replace—(Optional) Replace an existing trace file if there is one.
Default: If you do not include this option, tracing output is appended to an existing trace
file.
size size—(Optional) Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
or gigabytes (GB). When a trace file named trace-file reaches this size, it is renamed
trace-file.0. When trace-file again reaches this size, trace-file.0 is renamed trace-file.1
and trace-file is renamed trace-file.0. This renaming scheme continues until the
maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is overwritten.
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If you specify a maximum file size, you must also include the files statement to specify
the maximum number of trace files.
Syntax: xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify GB
Range: 10 KB through the maximum file size supported on your system
Default: 1 MB
world-readable—(Optional) Allow any user to read the log file.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing and trace—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control and trace-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Tracing IGMP Protocol Traffic on page 64
version (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
version version;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the version of IGMP.
version—IGMP version number.
Range: 1, 2, or 3
Default: IGMP version 2
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
262
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Changing the IGMP Version on page 45
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 17
Configuration Statements (IGMP
Snooping)
•
all on page 264
•
data-forwarding on page 264
•
disable (IGMP Snooping) on page 265
•
group (IGMP Snooping) on page 265
•
group-limit (IGMP and MLD Snooping) on page 266
•
host-only-interface on page 267
•
igmp-querier on page 267
•
igmp-snooping on page 268
•
immediate-leave (Bridge Domains) on page 269
•
interface (Bridge Domains) on page 270
•
interface (IGMP Snooping) on page 271
•
l2-querier on page 271
•
multicast-router-interface (IGMP Snooping) on page 272
•
query-interval (Bridge Domains) on page 273
•
query-last-member-interval (Bridge Domains) on page 274
•
query-response-interval (Bridge Domains) on page 275
•
receiver on page 276
•
robust-count (IGMP Snooping) on page 276
•
source-address on page 277
•
src-address (IGMP Querier) on page 278
•
source-vlans on page 278
•
static (IGMP Snooping) on page 279
•
traceoptions (IGMP Snooping) on page 280
•
version (IGMP Snooping) on page 282
•
vlan (IGMP Snooping) on page 283
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all
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
all;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan ]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 15.1 for the QFX series.
Apply IGMP snooping to all configured VLANs.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
data-forwarding
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
data-forwarding {
receiver {
source-vlans vlan-list;
install;
}
source {
groups group-prefix;
}
}
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan (all | vlan-name)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure the VLAN to be a multicast source VLAN (MVLAN) or a multicast VLAN
registration (MVR) receiver VLAN. Each data-forwarding VLAN, which can be a multicast
source VLAN (MVLAN) or a multicast receiver VLAN, must have exactly one source
statement or exactly one receiver statement. A data-forwarding VLAN can operate only
in IGMP version 2 (IGMPv2) mode.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
264
Disabled
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Multicast VLAN Registration
•
Configuring Multicast VLAN Registration (CLI Procedure)
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
disable (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
disable;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Disable IGMP snooping on all interfaces in a VLAN.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
group (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
group ip-address;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name interface interface-name static]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure a static multicast group using a valid IP multicast address.
None.
ip-address —IP address of the multicast group receiving data on an interface.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
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group-limit (IGMP and MLD Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
266
group-limit limit;
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping interface
interface-name],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id interface
interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
vlan vlan-id igmp-snooping interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Configure a limit for the number of multicast groups (or [S,G] channels in IGMPv3)
allowed on an interface. After this limit is reached, new reports are ignored and all related
flows are not flooded on the interface.
By default, there is no limit to the number of multicast groups joining an interface.
limit—a 32-bit number for the limit on the interface.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
host-only-interface
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
host-only-interface;
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping interface
interface-name],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id interface
interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
vlan vlan-id igmp-snooping interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Configure an interface as a host-facing interface. IGMP queries received on these interfaces
are dropped.
The interface can either be a host-side or multicast-router interface.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
igmp-querier
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
igmp-querier source-addresssource address;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D15 for QFabric Systems.
Configure a QFabric Node device to be an IGMP querier. If there are any multicast routers
on the same local network, make sure the source address for the IGMP querier is lower
(a smaller number) than the IP addresses for those routers on the network. This ensures
that Node is always the IGMP querier on the network.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
•
show configuration protocols igmp on page 399
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igmp-snooping
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit protocols]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Enable IGMP snooping on the router or switch.
Default
IGMP snooping is disabled on the router or switch.
Options
The statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
268
igmp-snooping {
vlan vlan-id {
all
immediate-leave;
interface interface-name {
group-limit limit;
host-only-interface;
immediate-leave;
multicast-router-interface;
static {
group ip-address {
source ip-address;
}
}
}
l2-querier {
source-address ip-address;
}
proxy {
source-address ip-address;
}
query-interval seconds;
query-last-member-interval seconds;
query-response-interval seconds;
robust-count number;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <no-stamp> <replace> <size size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier>;
}
}
}
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding IGMP Snooping
•
IGMP Snooping in MC-LAG Active-Active Mode
•
Understanding Multicast Route Leaking for VRF and Virtual-Router Instances on page 63
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
immediate-leave (Bridge Domains)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
immediate-leave;
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping interface
interface-name],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id interface
interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
vlan vlan-id igmp-snooping interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
The immediate leave setting is useful for minimizing the leave latency of IGMP
memberships. When this setting is enabled, the routing device leaves the multicast group
immediately after the last host leaves the multicast group.
The immediate-leave setting enables host tracking, meaning that the device keeps track
of the hosts that send join messages. This allows IGMP to determine when the last host
sends a leave message for the multicast group.
When the immediate leave setting is enabled, the device removes an interface from the
forwarding-table entry without first sending IGMP group-specific queries to the interface.
The interface is pruned from the multicast tree for the multicast group specified in the
IGMP leave message. The immediate leave setting ensures optimal bandwidth
management for hosts on a switched network, even when multiple multicast groups are
being used simultaneously.
When immediate leave is disabled and one host sends a leave group message, the routing
device first sends a group query to determine if another receiver responds. If no receiver
responds, the routing device removes all hosts on the interface from the multicast group.
Immediate leave is disabled by default for both IGMP version 2 and IGMP version 3.
NOTE: Although host tracking is enabled for IGMPv2 and MLDv1 when you
enable immediate leave, use immediate leave with these versions only when
there is one host on the interface. The reason is that IGMPv2 and MLDv1 use
a report suppression mechanism whereby only one host on an interface sends
a group join report in response to a membership query. The other interested
hosts suppress their reports. The purpose of this mechanism is to avoid a
flood of reports for the same group. But it also interferes with host tracking,
because the router only knows about the one interested host and does not
know about the others.
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Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
interface (Bridge Domains)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
interface interface-name {
group-limit limit;
host-only-interface;
static {
group ip-address {
source ip-address;
}
}
}
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
vlan vlan-id igmp-snooping]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Enable IGMP snooping on an interface and configure interface-specific properties.
interface-name—Name of the interface. Specify the full interface name, including the
physical and logical address components. To configure all interfaces, you can specify
all.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
270
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
interface (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
interface interface-name {
multicast-router-interface;
static {
group ip-address;
}
}
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable IGMP snooping on an interface and configure interface-specific properties.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface-name—Name of the interface.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
l2-querier
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
l2-querier {
source-address ip-address;
}
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan],
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Configure the switch to be an IGMP querier. Use the source-address statement to configure
the source address to use for IGMP snooping queries.
seconds—Time interval.
Range: 1 through 1024
Default: 125 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Related
Documentation
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multicast-router-interface (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
272
multicast-router-interface;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure an interface to forward IGMP messages to multicast routers.
Disabled. If this statement is disabled, the interface drops IGMP messages it receives.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
query-interval (Bridge Domains)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
query-interval seconds;
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols mld-snooping ] ,
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping interface
interface-name],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id interface
interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping interface interface-name],[
edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
mld-snooping ]
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id interface interface-name]
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols mld-snooping ]
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2 for MX series Routers with MPC.
Configure the interval for host-query message timeouts.
seconds—Time interval. This value must be greater than the interval set for
query-response-interval.
Range: 1 through 1024
Default: 125 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
•
query-last-member-interval (Bridge Domains) on page 274
•
query-response-interval (Bridge Domains) on page 275
•
mld-snooping
•
igmp-snooping
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query-last-member-interval (Bridge Domains)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
query-last-member-interval seconds;
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols mld-snooping ] ,
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping interface
interface-name],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id interface
interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
mld-snooping ]
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols mld-snooping ]interface
interface-name]
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan],
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2 for MX series Routers with MPC.
Configure the interval for group-specific query timeouts.
seconds—Time interval, in fractions of a second or seconds.
Range: 0.1 through 0.9, then in 1-second intervals 1 through 1024
Default: 1 second
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
274
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
•
query-interval on page 273
•
query-response-interval on page 275
•
mld-snooping
•
igmp-snooping
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
query-response-interval (Bridge Domains)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
query-response-interval seconds;
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping interface
interface-name],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snoopingvlan vlan-id interface
interface-name],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols mld-snooping ] ,
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snoopingvlan vlan-id
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
mld-snooping ]interface interface-name]
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols mld-snooping ]
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan],
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2 for MX series Routers with MPC.
Specify how long to wait to receive a response to a specific query message from a host.
seconds—Time interval. This interval should be less than the host-query interval.
Range: 1 through 1024
Default: 10 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
•
query-interval (Bridge Domains) on page 273
•
query-last-member-interval (Bridge Domains) on page 274
•
mld-snooping
•
igmp-snooping
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receiver
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
receiver {
source-vlans vlan-list;
install;
}
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan (all | vlan-name) data-forwarding]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure a VLAN as a multicast receiver VLAN of the multicast VLAN (MVLAN).
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
Disabled
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Multicast VLAN Registration
•
Configuring Multicast VLAN Registration (CLI Procedure)
robust-count (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
robust-count number;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure the number of intervals the switch waits before removing a multicast group
from the multicast forwarding table. Configure the length of each interval using the
query-interval statement.
2 intervals
number—Number of intervals the switch waits before timing out a multicast group.
Range: 2 through 10
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
276
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
source-address
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
source-address ip-address;
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping proxy],
[edit bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id proxy],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping proxy],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name bridge-domains bridge-domain-name protocols
igmp-snooping vlan vlan-id proxy]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX series.
Specify the IP address to use as the source for IGMP snooping reports in proxy mode.
Reports are sent with address 0.0.0.0 as the source address unless there is a source
address configured. You can also use this statement to configure the source address to
use for IGMP snooping queries.
ip-address—IP address to use as the source for proxy-mode IGMP snooping reports.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping
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src-address (IGMP Querier)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
src-address source address;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name igmp-querier]
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name l2-querier]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D15 for QFabric Systems.
Configure the address that the switch uses as the source address in the IGMP queries
that it sends. If there are any multicast routers on the same local network, make sure the
source address for the IGMP querier is smaller (a lower number) than the IP addresses
for those routers on the network. This ensures that switch is always the IGMP querier on
the network.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
•
show configuration protocols igmp on page 399
source-vlans
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
278
source-vlans vlan-list;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan (all | vlan-name) data-forwarding receiver]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for the QFX Series.
Specify a list of multicast VLANs (MVLANs) from which this multicast receiver VLAN
receives multicast traffic. Either all of these MVLANs must be in proxy mode or none of
them can be in proxy mode.
Disabled
vlan-list—Names of the MVLANs.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Multicast VLAN Registration
•
Configuring Multicast VLAN Registration (CLI Procedure)
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
static (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
static {
group ip-address;
}
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan vlan-name interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statically define multicast groups on an interface.
The remaining statement is explained separately.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
No multicast groups are statically defined.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
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traceoptions (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <no-stamp> <size size> <replace> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag (detail | disable | receive | send);
}
For platforms without ELS:
[edit protocols igmp-snooping]
For platforms with ELS:
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan]
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Define tracing operations for IGMP snooping.
The traceoptions feature is disabled by default.
file filename—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation. Enclose the
name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory /var/log.
files number—(Optional) Maximum number of trace files. When a trace file named
trace-file reaches its maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and
so on, until the maximum number of trace files is reached (xk to specify KB, xm to
specify MB, or xg to specify gigabytes), at which point the oldest trace file is
overwritten. If you specify a maximum number of files, you also must specify a
maximum file size with the size option.
Range: 2 through 1000
Default: 3 files
flag flag —Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation,
include multiple flag statements. You can include the following flags:
280
•
all—All tracing operations.
•
general—Trace general IGMP snooping protocol events.
•
krt—Trace communication over routing sockets.
•
nexthop— Trace next-hop related events.
•
normal—Trace normal IGMP snooping protocol events.
•
packets—Trace all IGMP packets.
•
policy—Trace policy processing.
•
query—Trace IGMP membership query messages.
•
report—Trace membership report messages.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
•
route—Trace routing information.
•
state—Trace IGMP state transitions.
•
task—Trace routing protocol task processing.
•
timer—Trace routing protocol timer processing.
•
vlan—Trace VLAN related events.
no-stamp—(Optional) Do not time stamp trace file.
no-world-readable—(Optional) Restrict file access to the user who created the file.
size size —(Optional) Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
or gigabytes (GB). When a trace file named trace-file reaches its maximum size, it
is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and so on, until the maximum number of
trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is overwritten. If you specify a
maximum number of files, you also must specify a maximum file size with the files
option. Use xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify gigabytes.
Range: 10 KB through 1 gigabytes
Default: 128 KB
world-readable—(Optional) Enable unrestricted file access.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 74
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
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version (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
version number;
[edit protocols igmp-snooping vlan (all | vlan-name)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Specify the IGMP version for the IGMP general query that the switch sends to hosts when
an interface comes up. The configured IGMP version affects only the version of the general
queries sent by a switch. It does not affect the version of IGMP messages that the switch
can snoop. For example, If the switch is configured for IGMP version 1 (IGMPv1), it can
snoop IGMPv2 and IGMPv3 messages.
If you do not configure the version statement, the default is IGMPv2.
version—IGMP version number.
Range: 1 and 2.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
282
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: Configuration Statements (IGMP Snooping)
vlan (IGMP Snooping)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
vlan vlan-name {
immediate-leave;
interface interface-name {
group-limit limit;
host-only-interface;
multicast-router-interface;
static {
group multicast-group-address {
source ip-address;
}
}
}
qualified-vlan ;
proxy {
source-address ip-address;
}
query-interval seconds;
query-last-member-interval seconds;
query-response-interval seconds;
robust-count number;
}
[edit protocols igmp-snooping ],
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX series.
Configure IGMP snooping parameters for a particular VLAN.
By default, IGMP snooping options apply to all VLANs.
vlan-name—Apply the parameters to this VLAN.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring VLAN-Specific IGMP Snooping Parameters on page 73
•
igmp-snooping on page 268
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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284
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 18
Configuration Statements (PIM)
•
address (Anycast RPs) on page 287
•
address (Local RPs) on page 288
•
address (Static RPs) on page 289
•
algorithm on page 290
•
anycast-pim on page 291
•
assert-timeout on page 292
•
authentication (Protocols PIM) on page 293
•
auto-rp on page 294
•
bfd-liveness-detection (Protocols PIM) on page 295
•
bootstrap on page 296
•
bootstrap-export on page 297
•
bootstrap-import on page 298
•
bootstrap-priority on page 299
•
dense-groups on page 300
•
detection-time (BFD for PIM) on page 301
•
disable (PIM) on page 302
•
dr-election-on-p2p on page 303
•
dr-register-policy on page 303
•
embedded-rp on page 304
•
export (Bootstrap) on page 305
•
export (Protocols PIM) on page 306
•
family (Bootstrap) on page 307
•
family (Protocols PIM) on page 308
•
family (Local RP) on page 309
•
group (RPF Selection) on page 310
•
group-ranges on page 311
•
hello-interval on page 312
•
hold-time (Protocols PIM) on page 313
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286
•
import (Protocols PIM Bootstrap) on page 314
•
import (Protocols PIM) on page 315
•
infinity on page 316
•
interface on page 317
•
join-load-balance on page 318
•
join-prune-timeout on page 319
•
key-chain (Protocols PIM) on page 320
•
local on page 321
•
local-address (Protocols PIM) on page 322
•
loose-check on page 323
•
mapping-agent-election on page 324
•
maximum-rps on page 325
•
minimum-interval (PIM BFD Liveness Detection) on page 326
•
minimum-interval (PIM BFD Transmit Interval) on page 327
•
minimum-receive-interval on page 328
•
mode (Protocols PIM) on page 328
•
multiplier on page 329
•
neighbor-policy on page 329
•
next-hop (PIM RPF Selection) on page 330
•
no-adaptation (PIM BFD Liveness Detection) on page 330
•
override-interval on page 331
•
pim on page 332
•
prefix-list (PIM RPF Selection) on page 335
•
priority (Bootstrap) on page 336
•
priority (PIM Interfaces) on page 337
•
priority (PIM RPs) on page 338
•
propagation-delay on page 339
•
register-probe-time on page 340
•
reset-tracking-bit on page 341
•
rib-group (Protocols PIM) on page 342
•
rp on page 343
•
rp-register-policy on page 345
•
rp-set on page 346
•
rpf-selection on page 347
•
source (PIM RPF Selection) on page 348
•
spt-threshold on page 349
•
static (Protocols PIM) on page 350
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
•
threshold (PIM BFD Detection Time) on page 351
•
threshold (PIM BFD Transmit Interval) on page 352
•
transmit-interval (PIM BFD Liveness Detection) on page 353
•
traceoptions (Protocols PIM) on page 354
•
version (BFD) on page 357
•
version (PIM) on page 358
•
wildcard-source (PIM RPF Selection) on page 359
address (Anycast RPs)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
address address <forward-msdp-sa>;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp local (inet | inet6) anycast-pim
rp-set],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp local (inet | inet6) anycast-pim rp-set],
[edit protocols pim rp local (inet | inet6) anycast-pim rp-set],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local (inet | inet6) anycast-pim
rp-set]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure the anycast rendezvous point (RP) addresses in the RP set. Multiple addresses
can be configured in an RP set. If the RP has peer Multicast Source Discovery Protocol
(MSDP) connections, then the RP must forward MSDP source active (SA) messages.
address—RP address in an RP set.
forward-msdp-sa—(Optional) Forward MSDP SAs to this address.
Required Privilege
Level
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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address (Local RPs)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
288
address address;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the local rendezvous point (RP) address.
address—Local RP address.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
address (Static RPs)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
address address {
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
override;
version version;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp static],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp static],
[edit protocols pim static],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp static]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure static rendezvous point (RP) addresses. You can configure a static RP in a
logical system only if the logical system is not directly connected to a source.
For each static RP address, you can optionally specify the PIM version and the groups
for which this address can be the RP. The default PIM version is version 1.
Options
address—Static RP address.
Default: 224.0.0.0/4
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Static PIM RP Address on the Non-RP Routing Device on page 168
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algorithm
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
algorithm algorithm-name;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection authentication],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection authentication]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the algorithm to use for BFD authentication.
algorithm-name—Name of algorithm to use for BFD authentication:
•
simple-password—Plain-text password. One to 16 bytes of plain text. One or more
passwords can be configured.
•
keyed-md5—Keyed Message Digest 5 hash algorithm for sessions with transmit and
receive rates greater than 100 ms.
•
meticulous-keyed-md5—Meticulous keyed Message Digest 5 hash algorithm.
•
keyed-sha-1—Keyed Secure Hash Algorithm I for sessions with transmit and receive
rates greater than 100 ms.
•
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
290
meticulous-keyed-sha-1—Meticulous keyed Secure Hash Algorithm I.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Bidirectional Forwarding Detection Authentication for PIM
•
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM on page 120
•
authentication on page 293
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
anycast-pim
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
anycast-pim {
rp-set {
address address <forward-msdp-sa>;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure properties for anycast RP using PIM.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP on page 172
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assert-timeout
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
assert-timeout seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Multicast routing devices running PIM sparse mode often forward the same stream of
multicast packets onto the same LAN through the rendezvous-point tree (RPT) and
shortest-path tree (SPT). PIM assert messages help routing devices determine which
routing device forwards the traffic and prunes the RPT for this group. By default, routing
devices enter an assert cycle every 180 seconds. You can configure this assert timeout
to be between 5 and 210 seconds.
seconds—Time for routing device to wait before another assert message cycle.
Range: 5 through 210 seconds
Default: 180 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
292
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring the PIM Assert Timeout on page 208
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
authentication (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
authentication {
algorithm algorithm-name;
key-chain key-chain-name;
loose-check;
}
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name family (inet | inet6) bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface family (inet | inet6)
interface-name bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the algorithm, security keychain, and level of authentication for BFD sessions
running on PIM interfaces.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
The statements are explained separately.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM on page 120
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
Understanding Bidirectional Forwarding Detection Authentication for PIM
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
•
key-chain (Protocols PIM) on page 320
•
loose-check on page 323
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auto-rp
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
auto-rp {
(announce | discovery | mapping);
(mapping-agent-election | no-mapping-agent-election);
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure automatic RP announcement and discovery.
announce—Configure the routing device to listen only for mapping packets and also to
advertise itself if it is an RP.
discovery—Configure the routing device to listen only for mapping packets.
mapping—Configures the routing device to announce, listen for and generate mapping
packets, and announce that the routing device is eligible to be an RP.
The remaining statement is explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
294
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Auto-RP on page 181
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
bfd-liveness-detection (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
bfd-liveness-detection {
authentication {
algorithm algorithm-name;
key-chain key-chain-name;
loose-check;
}
detection-time {
threshold milliseconds;
}
minimum-interval milliseconds;
minimum-receive-interval milliseconds;
multiplier number;
no-adaptation;
transmit-interval {
minimum-interval milliseconds;
threshold milliseconds;
}
version (0 | 1 | automatic);
}
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name family
(inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.1.
authentication option introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure bidirectional forwarding detection (BFD) timers and authentication for PIM.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM on page 120
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bootstrap
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
bootstrap {
family (inet | inet6) {
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
priority number;
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure parameters to control bootstrap routers and messages.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
296
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
bootstrap-export
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
bootstrap-export [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Apply one or more export policies to control outgoing PIM bootstrap messages.
policy-names—Name of one or more import policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
•
bootstrap-import on page 298
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bootstrap-import
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
298
bootstrap-import [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Apply one or more import policies to control incoming PIM bootstrap messages.
policy-names—Name of one or more import policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
•
bootstrap-export on page 297
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
bootstrap-priority
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
bootstrap-priority number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Description
Configure whether this routing device is eligible to be a bootstrap router. In the case of
a tie, the routing device with the highest IP address is elected to be the bootstrap router.
Options
number—Priority for becoming the bootstrap router. A value of 0 means that the routing
device is not eligible to be the bootstrap router.
Range: 0 through 255
Default: 0
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
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dense-groups
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
300
dense-groups {
addresses;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure which groups are operating in dense mode.
addresses—Address of groups operating in dense mode.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Sparse-Dense Mode Properties on page 145
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
detection-time (BFD for PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
detection-time {
threshold milliseconds;
}
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Support for BFD authentication introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Enable BFD failure detection. The BFD failure detection timers are adaptive and can be
adjusted to be faster or slower. The lower the BFD failure detection timer value, the faster
the failure detection and vice versa. For example, the timers can adapt to a higher value
if the adjacency fails (that is, the timer detects failures more slowly). Or a neighbor can
negotiate a higher value for a timer than the configured value. The timers adapt to a
higher value when a BFD session flap occurs more than three times in a span of 15 seconds.
A back-off algorithm increases the receive (Rx) interval by two if the local BFD instance
is the reason for the session flap. The transmission (Tx) interval is increased by two if
the remote BFD instance is the reason for the session flap. You can use the clear bfd
adaptation command to return BFD interval timers to their configured values. The clear
bfd adaptation command is hitless, meaning that the command does not affect traffic
flow on the routing device.
The remaining statement is explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
•
threshold on page 351
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disable (PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
302
disable;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim family (inet | inet6)],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit protocols pim family (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
disable statement extended to the [family] hierarchy level in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Explicitly disable PIM at the protocol, interface or family hierarchy levels.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Disabling PIM on page 124
•
family (Protocols PIM) on page 308
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
dr-election-on-p2p
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
dr-election-on-p2p;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.1 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Enable PIM designated router (DR) election on point-to-point (P2P) links.
No PIM DR election is performed on point-to-point links.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Designated Router Election on Point-to-Point Links on page 118
dr-register-policy
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
dr-register-policy [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Description
Apply one or more policies to control outgoing PIM register messages.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
policy-names—Name of one or more import policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Register Message Filters on a PIM RP and DR on page 197
•
rp-register-policy on page 345
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embedded-rp
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
embedded-rp {
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
maximum-rps limit;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure properties for embedded IP version 6 (IPv6) RPs.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
304
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Embedded RP for IPv6
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
export (Bootstrap)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
export [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp bootstrap family (inet | inet6)],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp bootstrap family (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim rp bootstrap family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp bootstrap family (inet |
inet6)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply one or more export policies to control outgoing PIM bootstrap messages.
policy-names—Name of one or more import policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
•
import (Protocols PIM Bootstrap) on page 314
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export (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
306
export [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply one or more export policies to control outgoing PIM join and prune messages. PIM
join and prune filters can be applied to PIM-SM and PIM-SSM messages. PIM join and
prune filters cannot be applied to PIM-DM messages.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Filtering Outgoing PIM Join Messages on page 194
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
family (Bootstrap)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
family (inet | inet6) {
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
priority number;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp bootstrap],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp bootstrap],
[edit protocols pim rp bootstrap],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp bootstrap]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure which IP protocol type bootstrap properties to apply.
inet—Apply IP version 4 (IPv4) local RP properties.
inet6—Apply IPv6 local RP properties.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
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family (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
family (inet | inet6) {
disable;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Disable the PIM protocol for the specified family.
inet—Disable the PIM protocol for the IP version 4 (IPv4) address family.
inet6—Disable the PIM protocol for the IP version 6 (IPv6) address family.
Related
Documentation
308
•
Disabling PIM on page 124
•
disable (PIM Graceful Restart)
•
disable (PIM) on page 302
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
family (Local RP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
family (inet | inet6) {
disable;
address address;
anycast-pim {
local-address address;
rp-set {
address address <forward-msdp-sa>;
}
}
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
hold-time seconds;
override;
priority number;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp local],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp local],
[edit protocols pim rp local],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure which IP protocol type local RP properties to apply.
inet—Apply IP version 4 (IPv4) local RP properties.
inet6—Apply IPv6 local RP properties.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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group (RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
310
group group-address{
sourcesource-address{
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name edit protocols pim rpf-selection]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the PIM group address for which you configure RPF selectiongroup (RPF
Selection).
By default, PIM RPF selection is not configured.
group-address—PIM group address for which you configure RPF selection.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
group-ranges
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp embedded-rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances instance-name protocols pim
rp bidirectional address address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp embedded-rp],
[edit protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit protocols pim rp embedded-rp],
[edit protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim rp static address address],
[edit routing-instances instance-name protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp embedded-rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp static address address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Support for bidirectional RP addresses introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.3 for the PTX5000 router.
Configure the address ranges of the multicast groups for which this routing device can
be a rendezvous point (RP).
The routing device is eligible to be the RP for all IPv4 or IPv6 groups (224.0.0.0/4 or
FF70::/12 to FFF0::/12).
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>—Addresses or address ranges for which this routing
device can be an RP.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
•
Configuring PIM Embedded RP for IPv6
•
Example: Configuring Bidirectional PIM
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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hello-interval
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
hello-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Specify how often the routing device sends PIM hello packets out of an interface.
seconds—Length of time between PIM hello packets.
Range: 0 through 255
Default: 30 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
312
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
hold-time (Protocols PIM) on page 313
•
Modifying the PIM Hello Interval on page 113
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
hold-time (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
hold-time seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances instance-name protocols pim
rp bidirectional address address],
[edit protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances instance-name protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Support for bidirectional RP addresses introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Specify the time period for which a neighbor is to consider the sending routing device
(this routing device) to be operative (up).
seconds—Hold time.
Range: 1 through 65535
Default: 150 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
•
Example: Configuring Bidirectional PIM
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
import (Protocols PIM Bootstrap)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
314
import [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply one or more import policies to control incoming PIM bootstrap messages.
policy-names—Name of one or more import policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
•
export (Bootstrap) on page 305
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
import (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
import [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply one or more policies to routes being imported into the routing table from PIM. Use
the import statement to filter PIM join messages and prevent them from entering the
network.
policy-names—Name of one or more policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Filtering Incoming PIM Join Messages on page 195
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
infinity
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
316
infinity [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim spt-threshold],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim spt-threshold],
[edit protocols pim spt-threshold],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim spt-threshold]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.0.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Apply one or more policies to set the SPT threshold to infinity for a source-group address
pair. Use the infinity statement to prevent the last-hop routing device from transitioning
from the RPT rooted at the RP to an SPT rooted at the source for that source-group
address pair.
policy-names—Name of one or more policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring the PIM SPT Threshold Policy on page 210
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
interface
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
interface (all | interface-name) {
disable;
family (inet | inet6) {
disable;
}
hello-interval seconds;
mode (dense | sparse | sparse-dense);
neighbor-policy [ policy-names ];
override-interval milliseconds;
priority number;
propagation-delay milliseconds;
reset-tracking-bit;
version version;
}
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Enable PIM on an interface and configure interface-specific properties.
interface-name—Name of the interface. Specify the full interface name, including the
physical and logical address components. To configure all interfaces, you can specify
all.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
PIM on Aggregated Interfaces on page 113
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
join-load-balance
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
join-load-balance {
automatic;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Enable load balancing of PIM join messages across interfaces and routing devices.
automatic—Enables automatic load balancing of PIM join messages. When a new interface
or neighbor is introduced into the network, ECMP joins are redistributed with minimal
disruption to traffic.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
318
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM Make-Before-Break Join Load Balancing
•
Configuring PIM Join Load Balancing on page 131
•
clear pim join-distribution
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
join-prune-timeout
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
join-prune-timeout seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the timeout for the join state. If the periodic join refresh message is not received
before the timeout expires, the join state is removed.
seconds—Number of seconds to wait for the periodic join message to arrive.
Range: 210 through 240 seconds
Default: 210 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Modifying the Join State Timeout on page 135
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
key-chain (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
key-chain key-chain-name;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name family {inet | inet6} bfd-liveness-detection
authentication],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name family
{inet | inet6} bfd-liveness-detection authentication]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement modified in Junos OS Release 12.2 to include family in the hierarchy level.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the security keychain to use for BFD authentication.
key-chain-name—Name of the security keychain to use for BFD authentication. The name
is a unique integer between 0 and 63. This must match one of the keychains in the
authentication-key-chains statement at the [edit security] hierarchy level.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
320
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM on page 120
•
Understanding Bidirectional Forwarding Detection Authentication for PIM
•
authentication on page 293
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
local
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
local {
disable;
address address;
family (inet | inet6) {
disable;
address address;
anycast-pim {
local-address address;
rp-set {
address address <forward-msdp-sa>;
}
}
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
hold-time seconds;
override;
priority number;
}
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
hold-time seconds;
override;
priority number;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the routing device’s RP properties.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
local-address (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
322
local-address address;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)
anycast-pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp local family (inet | inet6) anycast-pim],
[edit protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6) anycast-pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)
anycast-pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure the routing device local address for the anycast rendezvous point (RP). If this
statement is omitted, the router ID is used as this address.
address—Anycast RP IPv4 or IPv6 address, depending on family configuration.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP on page 172
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
loose-check
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
loose-check;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection authentication],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection authentication]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify loose authentication checking on the BFD session. Use loose authentication for
transitional periods only when authentication might not be configured at both ends of
the BFD session.
By default, strict authentication is enabled and authentication is checked at both ends
of each BFD session. Optionally, to smooth migration from nonauthenticated sessions
to authenticated sessions, you can configure loose checking. When loose checking is
configured, packets are accepted without authentication being checked at each end of
the session.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD Authentication for PIM on page 120
•
Understanding Bidirectional Forwarding Detection Authentication for PIM
•
authentication on page 293
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mapping-agent-election
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
(mapping-agent-election | no-mapping-agent-election);
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp auto-rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp auto-rp],
[edit protocols pim rp auto-rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp auto-rp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure the routing device mapping announcements as a mapping agent.
mapping-agent-election—Mapping agents do not announce mappings when receiving
mapping messages from a higher-addressed mapping agent.
no-mapping-agent-election—Mapping agents always announce mappings and do not
perform mapping agent election.
Default: mapping-agent-election
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
324
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Auto-RP on page 181
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
maximum-rps
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
maximum-rps limit;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp embedded-rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp embedded-rp],
[edit protocols pim rp embedded-rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp embedded-rp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Limit the number of RPs that the routing device acknowledges.
limit—Number of RPs.
Range: 1 through 500
Default: 100
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Embedded RP for IPv6
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minimum-interval (PIM BFD Liveness Detection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
minimum-interval milliseconds;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the minimum interval after which the local routing device transmits hello
packets and then expects to receive a reply from a neighbor with which it has established
a BFD session. Optionally, instead of using this statement, you can specify the minimum
transmit and receive intervals separately using the transmit-interval minimum-interval
and minimum-receive-interval statements.
milliseconds—Minimum transmit and receive interval.
Range: 1 through 255,000 milliseconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
326
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
minimum-interval (PIM BFD Transmit Interval)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
minimum-interval milliseconds;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection transmit-interval],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection transmit-interval]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Support for BFD authentication introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the minimum interval after which the local routing device transmits hello
packets to a neighbor with which it has established a BFD session. Optionally, instead
of using this statement, you can configure the minimum transmit interval using the
minimum-interval statement at the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection] hierarchy level.
milliseconds—Minimum transmit interval value.
Range: 1 through 255,000
NOTE: The threshold value specified in the threshold statement must be
greater than the value specified in the minimum-interval statement for the
transmit-interval statement.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
•
minimum-interval on page 326
•
threshold on page 352
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minimum-receive-interval
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
minimum-receive-interval milliseconds;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the minimum interval after which the local routing device must receive a reply
from a neighbor with which it has established a BFD session. Optionally, instead of using
this statement, you can configure the minimum receive interval using the minimum-interval
statement at the [edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection]
hierarchy level.
milliseconds—Minimum receive interval.
Range: 1 through 255,000 milliseconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
mode (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
mode (dense | sparse | sparse-dense);
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure PIM to operate in sparse, dense, or sparse-dense mode.
dense—Operate in dense mode.
sparse—Operate in sparse mode.
sparse-dense—Operate in sparse-dense mode.
Default: sparse
Required Privilege
Level
328
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
multiplier
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
multiplier number;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the number of hello packets not received by a neighbor that causes the
originating interface to be declared down.
number—Number of hello packets.
Range: 1 through 255
Default: 3
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
neighbor-policy
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
neighbor-policy [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Apply a PIM interface-level policy to filter neighbor IP addresses.
policy-name—Name of the policy that filters neighbor IP addresses.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Interface-Level PIM Neighbor Policies on page 193
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next-hop (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
next-hop next-hop-address;
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
wildcard-source],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses wildcard-source]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the specific next-hop address for the PIM group source.
next-hop-address—Specific next-hop address for the PIM group source.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
no-adaptation (PIM BFD Liveness Detection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
330
no-adaptation;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Support for BFD authentication introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure BFD sessions not to adapt to changing network conditions. We recommend
that you do not disable BFD adaptation unless it is preferable to have BFD adaptation
disabled in your network.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
override-interval
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
override-interval milliseconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Set the maximum time in milliseconds to delay sending override join messages for a
multicast network that has join suppression enabled. When a router or switch sees a
prune message for a join it is currently suppressing, it waits for the interval specified by
the override timer before it sends an override join message.
This is a random timer with a value in milliseconds.
Range: 0 through maximum override value
Default: 2000 milliseconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Enabling Join Suppression on page 135
•
propagation-delay on page 339
•
reset-tracking-bit on page 341
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pim
Syntax
332
pim {
disable;
assert-timeout seconds;
dense-groups {
addresses;
}
dr-election-on-p2p;
export;
family (inet | inet6) {
disable;
}
graceful-restart {
disable;
restart-duration seconds;
}
import [ policy-names ];
interface interface-name {
accept-remote-source;
disable;
family (inet | inet6) {
disable;
}
hello-interval seconds;
mode (dense | sparse | sparse-dense);
neighbor-policy [ policy-names ];
override-interval milliseconds;
priority number;
propagation-delay milliseconds;
reset-tracking-bit;
version version;
}
join-load-balance;
join-prune-timeout;
nonstop-routing;
override-interval milliseconds;
propagation-delay milliseconds;
reset-tracking-bit;
rib-group group-name;
rp {
auto-rp {
(announce | discovery | mapping);
(mapping-agent-election | no-mapping-agent-election);
}
bootstrap {
family (inet | inet6) {
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
priority number;
}
}
bootstrap-import [ policy-names ];
bootstrap-export [ policy-names ];
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
bootstrap-priority number;
dr-register-policy [ policy-names ];
embedded-rp {
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
maximum-rps limit;
}
local {
family (inet | inet6) {
address address;
anycast-pim {
disable;
rp-set {
address address <forward-msdp-sa>;
}
local-address address;
}
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
hold-time seconds;
priority number;
}
}
rp-register-policy [ policy-names ];
spt-threshold {
infinity [ policy-names ];
}
static {
address address {
group-ranges {
version version;
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
}
}
}
rpf-selection {
group group-address{
source source-address{
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
prefix-list prefix-list-addresses {
source source-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
traceoptions {
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
tunnel-devices [ mt-fpc/pic/port ];
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
protocols],
[edit protocols],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
family statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Enable PIM on the routing device.
The statements are explained separately.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
334
PIM is disabled on the routing device.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
prefix-list (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
prefix-list prefix-list-addresses {
source source-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
wildcard-source],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses wildcard-source]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
(Optional) Configure a list of prefixes (addresses) for multiple PIM groups.
prefix-list-addresses—List of prefixes (addresses) for multiple PIM groups.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
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priority (Bootstrap)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
priority number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)],
[edit protocols pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp bootstrap (inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the routing device’s likelihood to be elected as the bootstrap router.
number—Routing device’s priority for becoming the bootstrap router. A higher value
corresponds to a higher priority.
Range: 0 through a 32-bit number
Default: 0 (The routing device has the least likelihood of becoming the bootstrap router
and sends packets with a priority of 0.)
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
336
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4
•
Configuring PIM Bootstrap Properties for IPv4 or IPv6
•
bootstrap-priority on page 299
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
priority (PIM Interfaces)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
priority number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the routing device’s likelihood to be elected as the designated router.
number—Routing device’s priority for becoming the designated router. A higher value
corresponds to a higher priority.
Range: 0 through 4294967295
Default: 1 (Each routing device has an equal probability of becoming the DR.)
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Interface Priority for PIM Designated Router Selection on page 117
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priority (PIM RPs)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
priority number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances instance-name protocols pim
rp bidirectional address address],
[edit protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)],
[edit routing-instances instance-name protocols pim rp bidirectional address address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp local family (inet | inet6)]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Support for bidirectional RP addresses introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.3 for the PTX5000 router.
For PIM-SM, configure this routing device’s priority for becoming an RP.
For bidirectional PIM, configure this RP address’ priority for becoming an RP.
The bootstrap router uses this field when selecting the list of candidate rendezvous points
to send in the bootstrap message. A smaller number increases the likelihood that the
routing device or RP address becomes the RP. A priority value of 0 means that bootstrap
router can override the group range being advertised by the candidate RP.
Options
number—Priority for becoming an RP. A lower value corresponds to a higher priority.
Range: 0 through 255
Default: 1
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
338
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Local PIM RPs on page 166
•
Example: Configuring Bidirectional PIM
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
propagation-delay
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
propagation-delay milliseconds;
[edit protocols pim],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Set a delay for implementing a PIM prune message on the upstream routing device on a
multicast network for which join suppression has been enabled. The routing device waits
for the prune pending period to detect whether a join message is currently being
suppressed by another routing device.
milliseconds—Interval for the prune pending timer, which is the sum of the
propagation-delay value and the override-interval value.
Range: 250 through 2000 milliseconds
Default: 500 milliseconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Enabling Join Suppression on page 135
•
override-interval on page 331
•
reset-tracking-bit on page 341
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
register-probe-time
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
register-probe-time register-probe-time;
[edit protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D16 for QFX Series switches.
Specify the amount of time before the register suppression time (RST) expires when a
designated switch can send a NULL-Register to the rendezvous point (RP).
register-probe-time—Amount of time before the RST expires.
Default: 5 seconds
Range: 5 to 60 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
340
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
PIM Overview on page 109
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
reset-tracking-bit
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
reset-tracking-bit;
[edit protocols pim],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Change the value of a tracking bit (T-bit) field in the LAN prune delay hello option from
the default of 1 to 0, which enables join suppression for a multicast interface. When the
network starts receiving multiple identical join messages, join suppression triggers a
random timer with a value of 66 through 84 milliseconds (1.1 × periodic through 1.4 ×
periodic, where periodic is 60 seconds). This creates an interval during which no identical
join messages are sent. Eventually, only one of the identical messages is sent. Join
suppression is triggered each time identical messages are sent for the same join.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Enabling Join Suppression on page 135
•
override-interval on page 331
•
propagation-delay on page 339
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
rib-group (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
rib-group {
inet group-name;
inet6 group-name;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Associate a routing table group with PIM.
table-name—Name of the routing table. The name must be one that you defined with
the rib-groups statement at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
342
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring a Dedicated PIM RPF Routing Table
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
rp
Syntax
register-probe-time {
auto-rp {
(announce | discovery | mapping);
(mapping-agent-election | no-mapping-agent-election);
}
bidirectional {
address address {
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
hold-time seconds;
priority number;
}
}
bootstrap {
family (inet | inet6) {
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
priority number;
}
}
bootstrap-export [ policy-names ];
bootstrap-import [ policy-names ];
bootstrap-priority number;
dr-register-policy [ policy-names ];
embedded-rp {
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
maximum-rps limit;
}
group-rp-mapping {
family (inet | inet6) {
log-interval seconds;
maximum limit;
threshold value;
}
}
log-interval seconds;
maximum limit;
threshold value;
}
}
local {
family (inet | inet6) {
disable;
address address;
anycast-pim {
local-address address;
address address <forward-msdp-sa>;
rp-set {
}
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}
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
hold-time seconds;
override;
priority number;
}
}
register-limit {
family (inet | inet6) {
log-interval seconds;
maximum limit;
threshold value;
}
}
log-interval seconds;
maximum limit;
threshold value;
}
}
register-probe-time register-probe-time;
}
rp-register-policy [ policy-names ];
static {
address address {
override;
version version;
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
}
}
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the routing device as an actual or potential RP. A routing device can be an RP
for more than one group.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Default
344
If you do not include the rp statement, the routing device can never become the RP.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding PIM Sparse Mode on page 127
rp-register-policy
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
rp-register-policy [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply one or more policies to control incoming PIM register messages.
policy-names—Name of one or more import policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Register Message Filters on a PIM RP and DR on page 197
•
dr-register-policy on page 303
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rp-set
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
rp-set {
address address <forward-msdp-sa>;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim local family (inet | inet6)
anycast-pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim local family (inet | inet6) anycast-pim],
[edit protocols pim local family (inet | inet6) anycast-pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim local family (inet | inet6)
anycast-pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure a set of rendezvous point (RP) addresses for anycast RP. You can configure
up to 15 RPs.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
346
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM Anycast With or Without MSDP on page 172
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
rpf-selection
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
rpf-selection {
group group-address {
sourcesource-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
prefix-list prefix-list-addresses {
source source-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the PIM RPF next-hop neighbor for a specific group and source for a VRF routing
instance.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
If you omit the rpf-selection statement, PIM RPF checks typically choose the best path
determined by the unicast protocol for all multicast flows.
source-address—Specific source address for the PIM group.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
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source (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
source source-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group
group-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the source address for the PIM group.
source-address—Specific source address for the PIM group.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
348
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
spt-threshold
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
spt-threshold {
infinity [ policy-names ];
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.0.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Set the SPT threshold to infinity for a source-group address pair. Last-hop multicast
routing devices running PIM sparse mode can forward the same stream of multicast
packets onto the same LAN through an RPT rooted at the RP or an SPT rooted at the
source. By default, last-hop routing devices transition to a direct SPT to the source. You
can configure this routing device to set the SPT transition value to infinity to prevent this
transition for any source-group address pair.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring the PIM SPT Threshold Policy on page 210
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static (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
static {
address address {
group-ranges {
destination-ip-prefix</prefix-length>;
}
override;
version version;
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp],
[edit protocols pim rp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure static RP addresses. The default static RP address is 224.0.0.0/4. To configure
other addresses, include one or more address statements. You can configure a static RP
in a logical system only if the logical system is not directly connected to a source.
For each static RP address, you can optionally specify the PIM version and the groups
for which this address can be the RP. The default PIM version is version 1.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
350
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Static PIM RP Address on the Non-RP Routing Device on page 168
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
threshold (PIM BFD Detection Time)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
threshold milliseconds;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection detection-time],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection detection-time]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Support for BFD authentication introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the threshold for the adaptation of the BFD session detection time. When the
detection time adapts to a value equal to or greater than the threshold, a single trap and
a single system log message are sent.
NOTE: The threshold value must be equal to or greater than the transmit
interval.
The threshold time must be equal to or greater than the value specified in
the minimum-interval or the minimum-receive-interval statement.
Options
milliseconds—Value for the detection time adaptation threshold.
Range: 1 through 255,000
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
•
detection-time on page 301
•
minimum-interval on page 326
•
minimum-receive-interval on page 328
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threshold (PIM BFD Transmit Interval)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
threshold milliseconds;
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection transmit-interval],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection transmit-interval]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the threshold for the adaptation of the BFD session transmit interval. When the
transmit interval adapts to a value greater than the threshold, a single trap and a single
system message are sent.
milliseconds—Value for the transmit interval adaptation threshold.
32
Range: 0 through 4,294,967,295 (2
– 1)
NOTE: The threshold value specified in the threshold statement must be
greater than the value specified in the minimum-interval statement for
the transmit-interval statement.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
352
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
transmit-interval (PIM BFD Liveness Detection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
transmit-interval {
minimum-interval milliseconds;
threshold milliseconds;
}
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Support for BFD authentication introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the transmit interval for the bfd-liveness-detection statement. The negotiated
transmit interval for a peer is the interval between the sending of BFD packets to peers.
The receive interval for a peer is the minimum interval between receiving packets sent
from its peer; the receive interval is not negotiated between peers. To determine the
transmit interval, each peer compares its configured minimum transmit interval with its
peer's minimum receive interval. The larger of the two numbers is accepted as the transmit
interval for that peer.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
•
bfd-liveness-detection on page 295
•
threshold on page 352
•
minimum-interval on page 327
•
minimum-receive-interval on page 328
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traceoptions (Protocols PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim],
[edit protocols pim],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure PIM tracing options.
To specify more than one tracing operation, include multiple flag statements.
Default
Options
The default PIM trace options are those inherited from the routing protocol's traceoptions
statement included at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level.
disable—(Optional) Disable the tracing operation. You can use this option to disable a
single operation when you have defined a broad group of tracing operations, such
as all.
file filename—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation. Enclose the
name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory /var/log. We
recommend that you place tracing output in the pim-log file.
files number—(Optional) Maximum number of trace files. When a trace file named
trace-file reaches its maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and
so on, until the maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file
is overwritten.
If you specify a maximum number of files, you must also include the size statement to
specify the maximum file size.
Range: 2 through 1000 files
Default: 2 files
flag flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation,
include multiple flag statements.
PIM Tracing Flags
354
•
assert—Assert messages
•
bidirectional-df-election—Bidirectional PIM designated-forwarder (DF) election events
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
•
bootstrap—Bootstrap messages
•
cache—Packets in the PIM sparse mode routing cache
•
graft—Graft and graft acknowledgment messages
•
hello—Hello packets
•
join—Join messages
•
mt—Multicast tunnel messages
•
nsr-synchronization—Nonstop active routing (NSR) synchronization messages
•
packets—All PIM packets
•
prune—Prune messages
•
register—Register and register stop messages
•
rp—Candidate RP advertisements
•
all—All tracing operations
•
general—A combination of the normal and route trace operations
•
normal—All normal operations
Default: If you do not specify this option, only unusual or abnormal operations are traced.
•
policy—Policy operations and actions
•
route—Routing table changes
•
state—State transitions
•
task—Interface transactions and processing
•
timer—Timer usage
flag-modifier—(Optional) Modifier for the tracing flag. You can specify one or more of
these modifiers:
•
detail—Detailed trace information
•
receive—Packets being received
•
send—Packets being transmitted
no-stamp—(Optional) Do not place timestamp information at the beginning of each line
in the trace file.
Default: If you omit this option, timestamp information is placed at the beginning of
each line of the tracing output.
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no-world-readable—(Optional) Do not allow users to read the log file.
replace—(Optional) Replace an existing trace file if there is one.
Default: If you do not include this option, tracing output is appended to an existing trace
file.
size size—(Optional) Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
or gigabytes (GB). When a trace file named trace-file reaches this size, it is renamed
trace-file.0. When trace-file again reaches this size, trace-file.0 is renamed trace-file.1
and trace-file is renamed trace-file.0. This renaming scheme continues until the
maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is overwritten.
If you specify a maximum file size, you must also include the files statement to specify
the maximum number of trace files.
Syntax: xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify GB
Range: 0 KB through the maximum file size supported on your system
Default: 1 MB
world-readable—(Optional) Allow any user to read the log file.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
356
routing and trace—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control and trace-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring PIM Trace Options on page 115
•
Tracing DVMRP Protocol Traffic
•
Tracing MSDP Protocol Traffic on page 220
•
Configuring PIM Trace Options on page 115
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
version (BFD)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
version (0 | 1 | automatic);
[edit protocols piminterface interface-name bfd-liveness-detection],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name
bfd-liveness-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the bidirectional forwarding detection (BFD) protocol version that you want to
detect.
Configure the BFD version to detect: 1 (BFD version 1) or automatic (autodetect the BFD
version)
Default: automatic
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring BFD for PIM on page 119
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version (PIM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
version version;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols pim rp static address address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
pim rp static address address],
[edit protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit protocols pim rp static address address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rp static address address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement deprecated (hidden) in Junos OS Release 16.1 for later removal.
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, it is no longer necessary to specify a PIM version. PIMv1
is being obsoleted so the version choice is moot.
version—PIM version number.
Range: See the Description, above.
Default: PIMv2 for both rendezvous point (RP) mode (at the [edit protocols pim rp static
address address] hierarchy level). and interface mode (at the [edit protocols pim
interface interface-name] hierarchy level).
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
358
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling PIM Sparse Mode on page 130
•
Configuring PIM Dense Mode Properties on page 144
•
Configuring PIM Sparse-Dense Mode Properties on page 145
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: Configuration Statements (PIM)
wildcard-source (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group
group-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Use a wildcard for the multicast source instead of (or in addition to) a specific multicast
source.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
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360
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CHAPTER 19
Configuration Statements
(Source-Specific Multicast)
•
asm-override-ssm on page 361
•
policy (SSM Maps) on page 362
•
ssm-groups on page 363
•
ssm-map (Protocols IGMP) on page 364
•
ssm-map (Routing Options Multicast) on page 365
•
ssm-map-policy (IGMP) on page 366
asm-override-ssm
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
asm-override-ssm;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
routing-options multicast],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-options multicast]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Enable the routing device to accept any-source multicast join messages (*,G) for group
addresses that are within the default or configured range of source-specific multicast
groups.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast Groups with Any-Source Override on
page 156
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policy (SSM Maps)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
362
policy [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
routing-options multicast ssm-map ssm-map-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options multicast
ssm-map ssm-map-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options multicast ssm-map
ssm-map-name],
[edit routing-options multicast ssm-map ssm-map-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series routers.
Apply one or more policies to an SSM map.
policy-names—Name of one or more policies for SSM mapping.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To view this statement in the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring SSM Mapping on page 153
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 19: Configuration Statements (Source-Specific Multicast)
ssm-groups
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
ssm-groups [ ip-addresses ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
routing-options multicast],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-options multicast]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure source-specific multicast (SSM) groups.
By default, the SSM group multicast address is limited to the IP address range from
232.0.0.0 through 232.255.255.255. However, you can extend SSM operations into another
Class D range by including the ssm-groups statement in the configuration. The default
SSM address range from 232.0.0.0 through 232.255.255.255 cannot be used in the
ssm-groups statement. This statement is for adding other multicast addresses to the
default SSM group addresses. This statement does not override the default SSM group
address range.
IGMPv3 supports SSM groups. By utilizing inclusion lists, only sources that are specified
send to the SSM group.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
ip-addresses—List of one or more additional SSM group addresses separated by a space.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Source-Specific Multicast Groups with Any-Source Override on
page 156
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ssm-map (Protocols IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
364
ssm-map ssm-map-name;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply an SSM map to an IGMP interface.
ssm-map-name—Name of SSM map.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring SSM Mapping on page 153
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 19: Configuration Statements (Source-Specific Multicast)
ssm-map (Routing Options Multicast)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
ssm-map ssm-map-name {
policy [ policy-names ];
source [ addresses ];
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
routing-options multicast],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-options multicast]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure SSM mapping.
ssm-map-name—Name of the SSM map.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring SSM Mapping on page 153
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ssm-map-policy (IGMP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
366
ssm-map-policy ssm-map-policy-name;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols igmp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols igmp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply an SSM map policy to an IGMP interface.
ssm-map-policy-name—Name of SSM map policy.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring SSM Maps for Different Groups to Different Sources on page 159
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 20
Configuration Statements (MSDP)
•
active-source-limit on page 368
•
authentication-key on page 369
•
data-encapsulation on page 370
•
default-peer on page 371
•
disable (Protocols MSDP) on page 372
•
export (Protocols MSDP) on page 373
•
group (Protocols MSDP) on page 374
•
import (Protocols MSDP) on page 375
•
local-address (Protocols MSDP) on page 376
•
maximum (MSDP Active Source Messages) on page 377
•
mode (Protocols MSDP) on page 378
•
msdp on page 379
•
peer (Protocols MSDP) on page 381
•
rib-group (Protocols MSDP) on page 382
•
source (Protocols MSDP) on page 383
•
threshold (MSDP Active Source Messages) on page 384
•
traceoptions (Protocols MSDP) on page 385
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active-source-limit
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp source ip-address/prefix-length],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp source ip-address/prefix-length],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp source ip-address/prefix-length],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name
peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp source
ip-address/prefix-length]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Limit the number of active source messages the routing device accepts.
Default
If you do not include this statement, the router accepts any number of MSDP active
source messages.
Options
The options are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
368
active-source-limit {
log-interval seconds;
log-warning value;
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
authentication-key
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
authentication-key peer-key;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name peer
address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Associate a Message Digest 5 (MD5) signature option authentication key with an MSDP
peering session.
Default
If you do not include this statement, the routing device accepts any valid MSDP messages
from the peer address.
Options
peer-key—MD5 authentication key. The peer key can be a text string up to 16 letters and
digits long. Strings can include any ASCII characters with the exception of (, ), &, and
[. If you include spaces in an MSDP authentication key, enclose all characters in
quotation marks (“ ”).
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
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data-encapsulation
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
data-encapsulation (disable | enable);
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure a rendezvous point (RP) using MSDP to encapsulate multicast data received
in MSDP register messages inside forwarded MSDP source-active messages.
If you do not include this statement, the RP encapsulates multicast data.
disable—(Optional) Do not use MSDP data encapsulation.
enable—Use MSDP data encapsulation.
Default: enable
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
370
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
default-peer
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
default-peer;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name
peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Establish this peer as the default MSDP peer and accept source-active messages from
the peer without the usual peer-reverse-path-forwarding (peer-RPF) check.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
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disable (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
372
disable;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name peer
address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Explicitly disable MSDP.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Disabling MSDP
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
export (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
export [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name
peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply one or more policies to routes being exported from the routing table into MSDP.
policy-names—Name of one or more policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
•
import on page 375
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
group (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
group group-name {
disable;
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
mode (mesh-group | standard);
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
peer address; {
disable;
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
authentication-key peer-key;
default-peer;
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Define an MSDP peer group. MSDP peers within groups share common tracing options,
if present and not overridden for an individual peer with the peer statement. To configure
multiple MSDP groups, include multiple group statements.
By default, the group's options are identical to the global MSDP options. To override the
global options, include group-specific options within the group statement.
The group must contain at least one peer.
Options
group-name—Name of the MSDP group.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
374
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Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
import (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
import [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name
peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply one or more policies to routes being imported into the routing table from MSDP.
policy-names—Name of one or more policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
•
export on page 373
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
local-address (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
376
local-address address;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name
peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the local end of an MSDP session. You must configure at least one peer for
MSDP to function. When configuring a peer, you must include this statement. This address
is used to accept incoming connections to the peer and to establish connections to the
remote peer.
address—IP address of the local end of the connection.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
maximum (MSDP Active Source Messages)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
maximum number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp active-source-limit],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp active-source-limit],
[edit protocols msdp active-source-limit],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp active-source-limit]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the maximum number of MSDP active source messages the router accepts.
number—Maximum number of active source messages.
Range: 1 through 1,000,000
Default: 25,000
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
•
threshold (MSDP Active Source Messages) on page 384
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mode (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
mode (mesh-group | standard);
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure groups of peers in a full mesh topology to limit excessive flooding of
source-active messages to neighboring peers. The default flooding mode is standard.
If you do not include this statement, default flooding is applied.
mesh-group—Group of peers that are mesh group members.
standard—Use standard MSDP source-active flooding rules.
Default: standard
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
378
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
msdp
Syntax
msdp {
disable;
active-source-limit {
log-interval seconds;
log-warning value;
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
data-encapsulation (disable | enable);
export [ policy-names ];
group group-name {
... group-configuration ...
}
hold-time seconds;
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
keep-alive seconds;
peer address {
... peer-configuration ...
}
rib-group group-name;
source ip-prefix</prefix-length> {
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
}
sa-hold-time seconds;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
group group-name {
disable;
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
mode (mesh-group | standard);
peer address {
... same statements as at the [edit protocols msdp peer address] hierarchy level shown
just following ...
}
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
peer address {
disable;
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
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}
authentication-key peer-key;
default-peer;
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable MSDP on the router or switch. You must also configure at least one peer for MSDP
to function.
Default
MSDP is disabled on the router or switch.
Options
The statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
380
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
protocols],
[edit protocols],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols]
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
peer (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
peer address {
disable;
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
authentication-key peer-key;
default-peer;
export [ policy-names ];
import [ policy-names ];
local-address address;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Define an MSDP peering relationship. An MSDP routing device must know which routing
devices are its peers. You define the peer relationships explicitly by configuring the
neighboring routing devices that are the MSDP peers of the local routing device. After
peer relationships are established, the MSDP peers exchange messages to advertise
active multicast sources. To configure multiple MSDP peers, include multiple peer
statements.
By default, the peer's options are identical to the global or group-level MSDP options.
To override the global or group-level options, include peer-specific options within the
peer (Protocols MSDP) statement.
At least one peer must be configured for MSDP to function. You must configure address
and local-address.
Options
address—Name of the MSDP peer.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
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Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
rib-group (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
rib-group group-name;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Associate a routing table group with MSDP.
group-name—Name of the routing table group. The name must be one that you defined
with the rib-groups statement at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
382
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP in a Routing Instance
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
source (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
source ip-address</prefix-length> {
active-source-limit {
maximum number;
threshold number;
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Limit the number of active source messages the routing device accepts from sources in
this address range.
Default
If you do not include this statement, the routing device accepts any number of MSDP
active source messages.
Options
The other statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
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threshold (MSDP Active Source Messages)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
threshold number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp active-source-limit],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp active-source-limit],
[edit protocols msdp active-source-limit],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp active-source-limit]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the random early detection (RED) threshold for MSDP active source messages.
This number must be less than the configured or default maximum.
number—RED threshold for active source messages.
Range: 1 through 1,000,000
Default: 24,000
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
384
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring MSDP with Active Source Limits and Mesh Groups on page 224
•
maximum (MSDP Active Source Messages) on page 377
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
traceoptions (Protocols MSDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols msdp peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
msdp peer address],
[edit protocols msdp],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit protocols msdp group group-name peer address],
[edit protocols msdp peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp group group-name
peer address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols msdp peer address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure MSDP tracing options.
To specify more than one tracing operation, include multiple flag statements.
Default
Options
The default MSDP trace options are those inherited from the routing protocol's
traceoptions statement included at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level.
disable—(Optional) Disable the tracing operation. You can use this option to disable a
single operation when you have defined a broad group of tracing operations, such
as all.
file filename—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation. Enclose the
name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory /var/log. We
recommend that you place tracing output in the msdp-log file.
files number—(Optional) Maximum number of trace files. When a trace file named
trace-file reaches its maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and
so on, until the maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file
is overwritten.
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If you specify a maximum number of files, you must also include the size statement to
specify the maximum file size.
Range: 2 through 1000 files
Default: 2 files
flag flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation,
include multiple flag statements.
MSDP Tracing Flags
•
keepalive—Keepalive messages
•
packets—All MSDP packets
•
route—MSDP changes to the routing table
•
source-active—Source-active packets
•
source-active-request—Source-active request packets
•
source-active-response—Source-active response packets
Global Tracing Flags
•
all—All tracing operations
•
general—A combination of the normal and route trace operations
•
normal—All normal operations
Default: If you do not specify this option, only unusual or abnormal operations are traced.
•
policy—Policy operations and actions
•
route—Routing table changes
•
state—State transitions
•
task—Interface transactions and processing
•
timer—Timer usage
flag-modifier—(Optional) Modifier for the tracing flag. You can specify one or more of
these modifiers:
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Chapter 20: Configuration Statements (MSDP)
•
detail—Detailed trace information
•
receive—Packets being received
•
send—Packets being transmitted
no-stamp—(Optional) Do not place timestamp information at the beginning of each line
in the trace file.
Default: If you omit this option, timestamp information is placed at the beginning of
each line of the tracing output.
no-world-readable—(Optional) Do not allow any user to read the log file.
replace—(Optional) Replace an existing trace file if there is one.
Default: If you do not include this option, tracing output is appended to an existing trace
file.
size size—(Optional) Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
or gigabytes (GB). When a trace file named trace-file reaches this size, it is renamed
trace-file.0. When trace-file again reaches this size, trace-file.0 is renamed trace-file.1
and trace-file is renamed trace-file.0. This renaming scheme continues until the
maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is overwritten.
If you specify a maximum file size, you must also include the files statement to specify
the maximum number of trace files.
Syntax: xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify GB
Range: 10 KB through the maximum file size supported on your system
Default: 1 MB
world-readable—(Optional) Allow any user to read the log file.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing and trace—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control and trace-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Tracing MSDP Protocol Traffic on page 220
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388
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CHAPTER 21
Operational Commands (IGMP)
•
clear igmp membership
•
clear igmp statistics
•
show igmp group
•
show configuration protocols igmp
•
show igmp interface
•
show igmp statistics
•
show system statistics igmp
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clear igmp membership
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 390
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 390
clear igmp membership
<all>
<group address-range>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
clear igmp membership
<group address-range>
<interface interface-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Clear Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) group members.
all—Clear IGMP members for groups and interfaces in the master instance.
group address-range—(Optional) Clear all IGMP members that are in a particular address
range. An example of a range is 233.252/16. If you omit the destination prefix length,
the default is /32.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Clear all IGMP group members on an interface.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show igmp group on page 395
•
show igmp interface on page 401
clear igmp membership all on page 390
clear igmp membership interface on page 391
clear igmp membership group on page 392
See show igmp group for an explanation of output fields.
Sample Output
clear igmp membership all
The following sample output displays IGMP group information before and after the clear
igmp membership command is entered:
390
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
user@host> show igmp group
Interface
Group
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.253
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.254
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.255
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.240
local
198.51.100.6
local
198.51.100.5
local
198.51.100.25
local
198.51.100.22
local
198.51.100.2
local
198.51.100.13
Last Reported
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
Timeout
186
186
187
188
0
0
0
0
0
0
user@host> clear igmp membership all
Clearing Group Membership Info for so-0/0/0
Clearing Group Membership Info for so-1/0/0
Clearing Group Membership Info for so-2/0/0
user@host> show igmp group
Interface
Group
local
198.51.100.6
local
198.51.100.5
local
198.51.100.254
local
198.51.100.255
local
198.51.100.2
local
198.51.100.13
Last Reported
Timeout
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
0
0
0
0
0
0
clear igmp membership interface
The following sample output displays IGMP group information before and after the clear
igmp membership interface command is issued:
user@host> show igmp group
Interface
Group
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.253
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.200
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.255
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.254
local
198.51.100.6
local
198.51.100.5
local
198.51.100.254
local
198.51.100.255
local
198.51.100.2
local
198.51.100.13
Last Reported
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
Timeout
210
210
215
216
0
0
0
0
0
0
user@host> clear igmp membership interface so-0/0/0
Clearing Group Membership Info for so-0/0/0
user@host> show igmp group
Interface
Group
local
198.51.100.6
local
198.51.100.5
local
198.51.100.254
local
198.51.100.255
local
198.51.100.2
local
198.51.100.13
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Last Reported
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
Timeout
0
0
0
0
0
0
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clear igmp membership group
The following sample output displays IGMP group information before and after the clear
igmp membership group command is entered:
user@host> show igmp group
Interface
Group
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.253
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.25
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.255
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.254
local
198.51.100.6
local
198.51.100.5
local
198.51.100.254
local
198.51.100.25
local
198.51.100.2
local
198.51.100.13
Last Reported
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
Timeout
210
210
215
216
0
0
0
0
0
0
user@host> clear igmp membership group 233.252/16
Clearing Group Membership Range 198.51.100.0/16 on so-0/0/0
Clearing Group Membership Range 198.51.100.0/16 on so-1/0/0
Clearing Group Membership Range 198.51.100.0/16 on so-2/0/0
user@host> show igmp group
Interface
Group
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.255
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.254
so-0/0/0
198.51.100.253
local
198.51.100.6
local
198.51.100.5
local
198.51.100.254
local
198.51.100.255
local
198.51.100.2
local
198.51.100.13
392
Last Reported
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
203.0.113.1
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
(null)
Timeout
231
233
236
0
0
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
clear igmp statistics
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 393
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 393
clear igmp statistics
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
clear igmp statistics
<interface interface-name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Clear Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) statistics.
none—Clear IGMP statistics on all interfaces.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Clear IGMP statistics for the specified interface
only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show igmp statistics on page 405
clear igmp statistics on page 393
See show igmp statistics for an explanation of output fields.
Sample Output
clear igmp statistics
The following sample output displays IGMP statistics information before and after the
clear igmp statistics command is entered:
user@host> show igmp statistics
IGMP packet statistics for all interfaces
IGMP Message type
Received
Sent
Membership Query
8883
459
V1 Membership Report
0
0
DVMRP
19784
35476
PIM V1
18310
0
Cisco Trace
0
0
V2 Membership Report
0
0
Group Leave
0
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Mtrace Response
0
Mtrace Request
0
Domain Wide Report
0
V3 Membership Report
0
Other Unknown types
IGMP v3 unsupported type
IGMP v3 source required for SSM
IGMP v3 mode not applicable for SSM
IGMP Global Statistics
Bad Length
Bad Checksum
Bad Receive If
Rx non-local
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1227
user@host> clear igmp statistics
user@host> show igmp statistics
IGMP packet statistics for all interfaces
IGMP Message type
Received
Sent
Membership Query
0
0
V1 Membership Report
0
0
DVMRP
0
0
PIM V1
0
0
Cisco Trace
0
0
V2 Membership Report
0
0
Group Leave
0
0
Mtrace Response
0
0
Mtrace Request
0
0
Domain Wide Report
0
0
V3 Membership Report
0
0
Other Unknown types
IGMP v3 unsupported type
IGMP v3 source required for SSM
IGMP v3 mode not applicable for SSM
IGMP Global Statistics
Bad Length
0
Bad Checksum
0
Bad Receive If
0
Rx non-local
0
394
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
show igmp group
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 395
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 395
show igmp group
<brief | detail>
<group-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show igmp group
<brief | detail>
<group-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) group membership information.
none—Display standard information about membership for all IGMP groups.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
group-name—(Optional) Display group membership for the specified IP address only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear igmp membership on page 390
show igmp group (Include Mode) on page 396
show igmp group (Exclude Mode) on page 397
show igmp group brief on page 397
show igmp group detail on page 397
Table 12 on page 395 describes the output fields for the show igmp group command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 12: show igmp group Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Interface
Name of the interface that received the IGMP membership report. A name of
local indicates that the local routing device joined the group itself.
All levels
Group
Group address.
All levels
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Table 12: show igmp group Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Group Mode
Mode the SSM group is operating in: Include or Exclude.
All levels
Source
Source address.
All levels
Source timeout
Time remaining until the group traffic is no longer forwarded. The timer is
refreshed when a listener in include mode sends a report. A group in exclude
mode or configured as a static group displays a zero timer.
detail
Last reported by
Address of the host that last reported membership in this group.
All levels
Timeout
Time remaining until the group membership is removed.
brief none
Group timeout
Time remaining until a group in exclude mode moves to include mode. The timer
is refreshed when a listener in exclude mode sends a report. A group in include
mode or configured as a static group displays a zero timer.
detail
Type
Type of group membership:
All levels
•
Dynamic—Host reported the membership.
•
Static—Membership is configured.
Sample Output
show igmp group (Include Mode)
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: t1-0/1/0.0
Group: 198.51.100.1
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.2
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Timeout:
24 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.1
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.3
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Timeout:
24 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.1
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.4
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Timeout:
24 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.2
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.4
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Timeout:
24 Type: Dynamic
Interface: t1-0/1/1.0
Interface: ge-0/2/2.0
Interface: ge-0/2/0.0
Interface: local
Group: 198.51.100.12
Source: 0.0.0.0
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Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
Last reported by: Local
Timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.22
Source: 0.0.0.0
Last reported by: Local
Timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
show igmp group (Exclude Mode)
user@host> show igmp group
Interface: t1-0/1/0.0
Interface: t1-0/1/1.0
Interface: ge-0/2/2.0
Interface: ge-0/2/0.0
Interface: local
Group: 198.51.100.2
Source: 0.0.0.0
Last reported by: Local
Timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.22
Source: 0.0.0.0
Last reported by: Local
Timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
show igmp group brief
The output for the show igmp group brief command is identical to that for the show igmp
group command.
show igmp group detail
user@host> show igmp group detail
Interface: t1-0/1/0.0
Group: 198.51.100.1
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.2
Source timeout: 12
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Group timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.1
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.3
Source timeout: 12
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Group timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.1
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.4
Source timeout: 12
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Group timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.2
Group mode: Include
Source: 203.0.113.4
Source timeout: 12
Last reported by: 203.0.113.52
Group timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
Interface: t1-0/1/1.0
Interface: ge-0/2/2.0
Interface: ge-0/2/0.0
Interface: local
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Group: 198.51.100.12
Group mode: Exclude
Source: 0.0.0.0
Source timeout: 0
Last reported by: Local
Group timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
Group: 198.51.100.22
Group mode: Exclude
Source: 0.0.0.0
Source timeout: 0
Last reported by: Local
Group timeout:
0 Type: Dynamic
398
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Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
show configuration protocols igmp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
show configuration protocols igmp
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) information.
view
•
IGMP Snooping Overview on page 67
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
show configuration protocols igmp on page 399
Table 12 on page 395 describes the output fields for the show configuration protocols igmp
command that relate to IGMP querying.
Table 13: show igmp group Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
accounting
Enables notification for join and leave events.
All levels
igmp-querier
Configured source address for the IGMP querier.
All levels
interface
Name of the interface that receives IGMP membership reports.
All levels
query-interval
Interval at which the IGMP querier sends general host-query messages to solicit
membership information.
All levels
query-responseinterval
How long the IGMP querier waits to receive a response from a query message
before sending another query.
All levels
src-address
Source address of IGMP queries.
version
IGMP version.
All levels
Sample Output
show configuration protocols igmp
user@switch> show configuration protocols igmp
query-interval 150;
query-response-interval 50;
accounting;
interface vlan.43 {
version 2;
}
igmp-querier {
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src-address 10.0.0.2;
}
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Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
show igmp interface
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches and the QFX
Series)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 401
Syntax (EX Series Switches and the QFX Series) on page 401
show igmp interface
<brief | detail>
<interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show igmp interface
<brief | detail>
<interface-name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display information about Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)-enabled
interfaces.
none—Display standard information about all IGMP-enabled interfaces.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
interface-name—(Optional) Display information about the specified IGMP-enabled
interface only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear igmp membership on page 390
show igmp interface on page 403
show igmp interface brief on page 404
show igmp interface detail on page 404
show igmp interface <interface-name> on page 404
Table 14 on page 401 describes the output fields for the show igmp interface command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 14: show igmp interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Interface
Name of the interface.
All levels
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Table 14: show igmp interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Querier
Address of the routing device that has been elected to send membership queries.
All levels
State
State of the interface: Up or Down.
All levels
SSM Map Policy
Name of the source-specific multicast (SSM) map policy that has been applied to the
IGMP interface.
All levels
Timeout
How long until the IGMP querier is declared to be unreachable, in seconds.
All levels
Version
IGMP version being used on the interface: 1 , 2 , or 3.
All levels
Groups
Number of groups on the interface.
All levels
Group limit
Maximum number of groups allowed on the interface. Any joins requested after the limit
is reached are rejected.
All levels
Group threshold
Configured threshold at which a warning message is generated.
All levels
This threshold is based on a percentage of groups received on the interface. If the number
of groups received reaches the configured threshold, the device generates a warning
message.
Group log-interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
All levels
Immediate Leave
State of the immediate leave option:
All levels
•
On—Indicates that the router removes a host from the multicast group as soon as the
router receives a leave group message from a host associated with the interface.
•
Off—Indicates that after receiving a leave group message, instead of removing a host
from the multicast group immediately, the router sends a group query to determine if
another receiver responds.
Promiscuous Mode
State of the promiscuous mode option:
•
All levels
On—Indicates that the router can accept IGMP reports from subnetworks that are not
associated with its interfaces.
•
Off—Indicates that the router can accept IGMP reports only from subnetworks that
are associated with its interfaces.
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Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
Table 14: show igmp interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Passive
State of the passive mode option:
All levels
•
On—Indicates that the router can run IGMP on the interface but not send or receive
control traffic such as IGMP reports, queries, and leaves.
•
Off—Indicates that the router can run IGMP on the interface and send or receive control
traffic such as IGMP reports, queries, and leaves.
The passive statement enables you to selectively activate up to two out of a possible
three available query or control traffic options. When enabled, the following options
appear after the on state declaration:
•
send-general-query—The interface sends general queries.
•
send-group-query—The interface sends group-specific and group-source-specific
queries.
•
allow-receive—The interface receives control traffic.
OIF map
Name of the OIF map (if configured) associated with the interface.
All levels
SSM map
Name of the source-specific multicast (SSM) map (if configured) used on the interface.
All levels
Configured
Parameters
Information configured by the user:
All levels
•
IGMP Query Interval—Interval (in seconds) at which this router sends membership
queries when it is the querier.
•
IGMP Query Response Interval—Time (in seconds) that the router waits for a report in
response to a general query.
•
IGMP Last Member Query Interval—Time (in seconds) that the router waits for a report
in response to a group-specific query.
•
Derived Parameters
IGMP Robustness Count—Number of times the router retries a query.
Derived information:
•
All levels
IGMP Membership Timeout—Timeout period (in seconds) for group membership. If no
report is received for these groups before the timeout expires, the group membership
is removed.
•
IGMP Other Querier Present Timeout—Time (in seconds) that the router waits for the
IGMP querier to send a query.
Sample Output
show igmp interface
user@host> show igmp interface
Interface: at-0/3/1.0
Querier: 203.0.3.113.31
State:
Up Timeout:
SSM Map Policy: ssm-policy-A
Interface: so-1/0/0.0
Querier: 203.0.113.11
State:
Up Timeout:
SSM Map Policy: ssm-policy-B
Interface: so-1/0/1.0
Querier: 203.0.113.21
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
None Version:
2 Groups:
4
None Version:
2 Groups:
2
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State:
Up Timeout:
SSM Map Policy: ssm-policy-C
Immediate Leave: On
Promiscuous Mode: Off
None Version:
2 Groups:
4
Configured Parameters:
IGMP Query Interval: 125.0
IGMP Query Response Interval: 10.0
IGMP Last Member Query Interval: 1.0
IGMP Robustness Count: 2
Derived Parameters:
IGMP Membership Timeout: 260.0
IGMP Other Querier Present Timeout: 255.0
show igmp interface brief
The output for the show igmp interface brief command is identical to that for the show
igmp interface command. For sample output, see show igmp interface on page 403.
show igmp interface detail
The output for the show igmp interface detail command is identical to that for the show
igmp interface command. For sample output, see show igmp interface on page 403.
show igmp interface <interface-name>
user@host# show igmp interface ge-3/2/0.0
Interface: ge-3/2/0.0
Querier: 203.0.113.111
State: Up Timeout:
None Version: 3 Groups:
Group limit: 8
Group threshold: 60
Group log-interval: 10
Immediate leave: Off
Promiscuous mode: Off
404
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Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
show igmp statistics
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 405
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 405
show igmp statistics
<brief | detail>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show igmp statistics
<brief | detail>
<interface interface-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) statistics.
none—Display IGMP statistics for all interfaces.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Display IGMP statistics about the specified interface
only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear igmp statistics on page 393
show igmp statistics on page 406
show igmp statistics interface on page 407
Table 15 on page 405 describes the output fields for the show igmp statistics command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 15: show igmp statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
IGMP packet statistics
Heading for IGMP packet statistics for all interfaces or for the specified interface name.
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Table 15: show igmp statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
IGMP Message type
Summary of IGMP statistics:
•
Membership Query—Number of membership queries sent and received.
•
V1 Membership Report—Number of version 1 membership reports sent and received.
•
DVMRP—Number of DVMRP messages sent or received.
•
PIM V1—Number of PIM version 1 messages sent or received.
•
Cisco Trace—Number of Cisco trace messages sent or received.
•
V2 Membership Report—Number of version 2 membership reports sent or received.
•
Group Leave—Number of group leave messages sent or received.
•
Mtrace Response—Number of Mtrace response messages sent or received.
•
Mtrace Request—Number of Mtrace request messages sent or received.
•
Domain Wide Report—Number of domain-wide reports sent or received.
•
V3 Membership Report—Number of version 3 membership reports sent or received.
•
Other Unknown types—Number of unknown message types received.
•
IGMP v3 unsupported type—Number of messages received with unknown and unsupported IGMP
version 3 message types.
•
IGMP v3 source required for SSM—Number of IGMP version 3 messages received that contained no
source.
•
IGMP v3 mode not applicable for SSM—Number of IGMP version 3 messages received that did not
contain a mode applicable for source-specific multicast (SSM). Beginning with certain releases,
this type includes records received for groups in the SSM range of addresses and in which the mode
is MODE_IS_EXCLUDE or CHANGE_TO_EXCLUDE_MODE. This includes records with a non-empty
source list.
Received
Number of messages received.
Sent
Number of messages sent.
Rx errors
Number of received packets that contained errors.
IGMP Global Statistics
Summary of IGMP statistics for all interfaces.
•
Bad Length—Number of messages received with length errors so severe that further classification
could not occur.
•
Bad Checksum—Number of messages received with a bad IP checksum. No further classification
was performed.
•
Bad Receive If—Number of messages received on an interface not enabled for IGMP.
•
Rx non-local—Number of messages received from senders that are not local.
•
Timed out—Number of groups that timed out as a result of not receiving an explicit leave message.
•
Rejected Report—Number of reports dropped because of the IGMP group policy.
•
Total Interfaces—Number of interfaces configured to support IGMP.
Sample Output
show igmp statistics
user@host> show igmp statistics
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Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
IGMP packet statistics for all interfaces
IGMP Message type
Received
Sent
Membership Query
8883
459
V1 Membership Report
0
0
DVMRP
0
0
PIM V1
0
0
Cisco Trace
0
0
V2 Membership Report
0
0
Group Leave
0
0
Mtrace Response
0
0
Mtrace Request
0
0
Domain Wide Report
0
0
V3 Membership Report
0
0
Other Unknown types
IGMP v3 unsupported type
IGMP v3 source required for SSM
IGMP v3 mode not applicable for SSM
IGMP Global Statistics
Bad Length
Bad Checksum
Bad Receive If
Rx non-local
Timed out
Rejected Report
Total Interfaces
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1227
0
0
2
show igmp statistics interface
user@host> show igmp statistics interface fe-1/0/1.0
IGMP interface packet statistics for fe-1/0/1.0
IGMP Message type
Received
Sent Rx errors
Membership Query
0
230
0
V1 Membership Report
0
0
0
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show system statistics igmp
List of Syntax
Syntax on page 408
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 408
Syntax (TX Matrix Router) on page 408
Syntax (TX Matrix Plus Router) on page 408
Syntax
show system statistics igmp
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
show system statistics igmp
<all-members>
<local>
<member member-id>
Syntax (TX Matrix
Router)
show system statistics igmp
<all-chassis | all-lcc | lcc number | scc>
Syntax (TX Matrix Plus
Router)
Release Information
Description
Options
show system statistics igmp
<all-chassis | all-lcc | lcc number | sfc number>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
sfc option introduced for the TX Matrix Plus router in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display system-wide Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) statistics.
none—Display system statistics for IGMP.
all-chassis—(TX Matrix routers and TX Matrix Plus routers only ) (Optional) Display
system statistics for IGMP for all the routers in the chassis.
all-lcc—(TX Matrix routers and TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) On a TX Matrix
router, display system statistics for IGMP for all T640 routers (or line-card chassis)
connected to the TX Matrix router. On a TX Matrix Plus router, display system
statistics for IGMP for all connected T1600 or T4000 LCCs.
all-members—(EX4200 switches only) (Optional) Display IGMP statistics for all members
of the Virtual Chassis configuration.
lcc number—(TX Matrix routers and TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) On a TX
Matrix router, display system statistics for IGMP for a specific T640 router that is
connected to the TX Matrix router. On a TX Matrix Plus router, display system
statistics for IGMP for a specific router that is connected to the TX Matrix Plus router.
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Replace number with the following values depending on the LCC configuration:
•
0 through 3, when T640 routers are connected to a TX Matrix router in a routing
matrix.
•
0 through 3, when T1600 routers are connected to a TX Matrix Plus router in a
routing matrix.
•
0 through 7, when T1600 routers are connected to a TX Matrix Plus router with 3D
SIBs in a routing matrix.
•
0, 2, 4, or 6, when T4000 routers are connected to a TX Matrix Plus router with
3D SIBs in a routing matrix.
local—(EX4200 switches only) (Optional) Display IGMP statistics for the local Virtual
Chassis member.
member member-id—(EX4200 switches only) (Optional) Display IGMP statistics for the
specified member of the Virtual Chassis configuration. Replace member-id with a
value from 0 through 9.
scc—(TX Matrix routers only) (Optional) Display system statistics for IGMP for the TX
Matrix router (or switch-card chassis).
sfc number—(TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) Display system statistics for IGMP
for the TX Matrix Plus router. Replace number with 0.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
By default, when you issue the show system statistics igmp command on the master
Routing Engine of a TX Matrix router or a TX Matrix Plus router, the command is broadcast
to all the master Routing Engines of the LCCs connected to it in the routing matrix.
Likewise, if you issue the same command on the backup Routing Engine of a TX Matrix
or a TX Matrix Plus router, the command is broadcast to all backup Routing Engines of
the LCCs that are connected to it in the routing matrix.
view
•
Routing Matrix with a TX Matrix Plus Router Solutions Page
show system statistics igmp on page 409
show system statistics igmp (EX Series Switches) on page 410
show system statistics igmp (TX Matrix Plus Router) on page 410
Sample Output
show system statistics igmp
user@host> show system statistics igmp
igmp:
17178 messages received
0 messages received with too few bytes
0 messages received with bad checksum
0 membership queries received
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0
0
0
0
0
membership
membership
membership
membership
membership
queries
reports
reports
reports
reports
received with invalid field(s)
received
received with invalid field(s)
received for groups to which we belong
sent
show system statistics igmp (EX Series Switches)
user@host>
igmp:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
show system statistics igmp
messages received
messages received with too few bytes
messages received with bad checksum
membership queries received
membership queries received with invalid fields
membership reports received
membership reports received with invalid fields
membership reports received for groups to which we belong
Membership reports sent
show system statistics igmp (TX Matrix Plus Router)
user@host> show system statistics igmp
sfc0-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------igmp:
0 messages received
0 messages received with too few bytes
0 messages received with bad checksum
0 membership queries received
0 membership queries received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received
0 membership reports received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received for groups to which we belong
0 membership reports sent
lcc0-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------igmp:
0 messages received
0 messages received with too few bytes
0 messages received with bad checksum
0 membership queries received
0 membership queries received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received
0 membership reports received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received for groups to which we belong
0 membership reports sent
lcc1-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------igmp:
0 messages received
0 messages received with too few bytes
0 messages received with bad checksum
0 membership queries received
0 membership queries received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received
0 membership reports received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received for groups to which we belong
0 membership reports sent
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Chapter 21: Operational Commands (IGMP)
lcc2-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------igmp:
0 messages received
0 messages received with too few bytes
0 messages received with bad checksum
0 membership queries received
0 membership queries received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received
0 membership reports received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received for groups to which we belong
0 membership reports sent
lcc3-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------igmp:
0 messages received
0 messages received with too few bytes
0 messages received with bad checksum
0 membership queries received
0 membership queries received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received
0 membership reports received with invalid field(s)
0 membership reports received for groups to which we belong
0 membership reports sent
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CHAPTER 22
Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping)
•
clear igmp-snooping membership
•
clear igmp-snooping statistics
•
show igmp-snooping membership
•
show igmp-snooping route
•
show igmp-snooping statistics
•
show igmp-snooping vlans
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clear igmp-snooping membership
Syntax
Release Information
clear igmp-snooping membership
<vlan vlan-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Description
Clear IGMP snooping membership information.
Options
vlan vlan-name—(Optional) Name of the VLAN.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
view
•
show igmp-snooping membership on page 416
clear igmp-snooping membership on page 414
Sample Output
clear igmp-snooping membership
user@switch> clear igmp-snooping membership vlan employee-vlan
414
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Chapter 22: Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping)
clear igmp-snooping statistics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
clear igmp-snooping statistics
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Clear IGMP snooping statistics.
view
•
show igmp-snooping statistics on page 421
clear igmp-snooping statistics on page 415
Sample Output
clear igmp-snooping statistics
user@switch> clear igmp-snooping statistics
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show igmp-snooping membership
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show igmp-snooping membership
<brief | detail>
<interface interface-name>
<vlan vlan-id | vlan-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
IGMPv3 output introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Display IGMP snooping membership information.
none—Display general parameters.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Display IGMP snooping information for the specified
interface.
vlan vlan-id | vlan-name—(Optional) Display IGMP snooping information for the specified
VLAN.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping route on page 419
•
show igmp-snooping statistics on page 421
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
show igmp-snooping membership on page 417
show igmp-snooping membership detail on page 418
Table 16 on page 416 lists the output fields for the show igmp-snooping membership
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 16: show igmp-snooping membership Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
VLAN
Name of the VLAN.
All
Interfaces
Interfaces assigned to the VLAN.
All
Tag
Numerical identifier of the VLAN.
detail
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Chapter 22: Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping)
Table 16: show igmp-snooping membership Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Router
interfaces
Names of multicast router
interfaces.
detail
•
static or dynamic
Whether the multicast router
interface is static or dynamic.
detail
•
Uptime
For static interfaces, length of time
since the interface was configured
as a multicast router interface; for
dynamic interfaces, length of time
since the first query was received
on the interface.
detail
•
timeout
Query timeout in seconds.
detail
Group
IP multicast address of the
multicast group.
detail
Receiver count
Number of interfaces that have
membership in a multicast group.
detail
Flags
IGMP version of the host sending a
join message.
detail
Uptime
Length of time a multicast group
has been active on the interface.
detail
timeout
Time (in seconds) left until the
entry for the multicast group is
removed.
All
Last reporter
Last host to report membership for
the multicast group.
detail
Include source
Source addresses from which
multicast streams are allowed
based on IGMPv3 reports.
detail
Sample Output
show igmp-snooping membership
user@switch> show igmp-snooping membership
VLAN: v1
224.1.1.1
*
258 secs
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
224.1.1.3
*
258 secs
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
224.1.1.5
*
258 secs
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
224.1.1.7
*
258 secs
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Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
224.1.1.9
*
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
224.1.1.11
*
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
258 secs
258 secs
show igmp-snooping membership detail
user@switch> show igmp-snooping membership detail
VLAN: v43 Tag: 43 (Index: 4)
Group: 225.0.0.2
Receiver count: 1, Flags: <V3-hosts>
ge-0/0/15.0 Uptime: 00:00:11 timeout: 248 Last reporter: 10.2.10.16
Include source: 1.2.1.1, 1.3.1.1
VLAN: v44 Tag: 44 (Index: 5)
Group: 225.0.0.1
Receiver count: 1, Flags: <V2-hosts>
ge-0/0/21.0 Uptime: 00:00:02 timeout: 257
VLAN: v110 Tag: 110 (Index: 4)
Router interfaces:
ge-0/0/3.0 static Uptime: 00:08:45
ge-0/0/2.0 static Uptime: 00:08:45
ge-0/0/4.0 dynamic Uptime: 00:16:41 timeout: 254
Group: 225.0.0.3
Receiver count: 1, Flags: <V3-hosts>
ge-0/0/5.0 Uptime: 00:00:19 timeout: 259
Group: 225.1.1.1
Receiver count: 1, Flags: <V2-hosts>
ge-0/0/5.0 Uptime: 00:22:43 timeout: 96
Group: 225.2.2.2
Receiver count: 1, Flags: <V2-hosts Static>
ge-0/0/5.0 Uptime: 00:23:13
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Chapter 22: Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping)
show igmp-snooping route
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show igmp-snooping route
<brief | detail>
<ethernet-switching <brief | detail | vlan (vlan-id | vlan-name )>>
<inet <brief | detail | vlan vlan-name>>
<vlan vlan-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Display IGMP snooping route information.
none—Display general parameters.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
ethernet-switching—(Optional) Display Ethernet switching information.
inet—(Optional) Display inet information.
vlan vlan-name—(Optional) Display route information for the specified VLAN.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping statistics on page 421
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
show igmp-snooping route on page 420
show igmp-snooping route vlan v1 on page 420
Table 17 on page 419 lists the output fields for the show igmp-snooping route command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 17: show igmp-snooping route Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Table
(For internal use only. Value is always 0.)
VLAN
Name of the VLAN.
Group
Multicast group address.
Interfaces
Interfaces on which IGMP packets were snooped.
Next-hop
ID associated with the next-hop device.
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Sample Output
show igmp-snooping route
user@switch> show igmp-snooping route
VLAN
Group
Next-hop
V11
224.1.1.1, *
533
Interfaces: ge-0/0/13.0, ge-0/0/1.0
VLAN
Group
Next-hop
v12
224.1.1.3, *
534
Interfaces: ge-0/0/13.0, ge-0/0/0.0
show igmp-snooping route vlan v1
user@switch> show igmp-snooping route vlan v1
Table: 0
VLAN
Group
Next-hop
v1
224.1.1.1, *
1266
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
v1
224.1.1.3, *
1266
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
v1
224.1.1.5, *
1266
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
v1
224.1.1.7, *
1266
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
v1
224.1.1.9, *
1266
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
v1
224.1.1.11, *
1266
Interfaces: ge-0/0/0.0
420
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping)
show igmp-snooping statistics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
show igmp-snooping statistics
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Display IGMP snooping statistics.
view
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping route on page 419
•
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 423
show igmp-snooping statistics on page 422
Table 18 on page 421 lists the output fields for the show igmp-snooping statistics command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 18: show igmp-snooping statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Bad length
IGMP packet has illegal or bad length.
Bad checksum
IGMP or IP checksum is incorrect.
Invalid interface
Packet was received through an invalid interface.
Not local
Number of packets received from senders that are not local.
Receive unknown
Unknown IGMP type.
Timed out
Number of timeouts for all multicast groups.
IGMP Type
Type of IGMP message (Queries, Reports, Leaves, or Other).
Received
Number of IGMP packets received.
Transmitted
Number of IGMP packets transmitted.
Recv Errors
Number of general receive errors.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Sample Output
show igmp-snooping statistics
user@switch> show igmp-snooping statistics
Bad length: 0 Bad checksum: 0 Invalid interface: 0
Not local: 0 Receive unknown: 0 Timed out: 58
IGMP Type
Queries:
Reports:
Leaves:
Other:
422
Received
74295
18148423
0
0
Transmitted
0
0
0
0
Recv Errors
0
16333523
0
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Operational Commands (IGMP Snooping)
show igmp-snooping vlans
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show igmp-snooping vlans
<brief | detail>
<vlan vlan-id | vlan-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Display IGMP snooping VLAN information.
none—Display general parameters.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
vlan vlan-id | vlan vlan-number—(Optional) Display VLAN information for the specified
VLAN.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Monitoring IGMP Snooping on page 77
•
Configuring IGMP Snooping on page 72
•
show igmp-snooping route on page 419
•
show igmp-snooping statistics on page 421
show igmp-snooping vlans on page 424
show igmp-snooping vlans vlan on page 424
show igmp-snooping vlans vlan detail on page 424
Table 19 on page 423 lists the output fields for the show igmp-snooping vlans command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 19: show igmp-snooping vlans Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
VLAN
Name of the VLAN.
All levels
IGMP-L2-Querier
Source address for IGMP snooping queries (if switch is an IGMP
querier)
All levels
Interfaces
Number of interfaces in the VLAN.
All levels
Groups
Number of groups in the VLAN.
All levels
MRouters
Number of multicast routers associated with the VLAN.
All levels
Receivers
Number of host receivers in the VLAN.
All levels
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Table 19: show igmp-snooping vlans Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Tag
Numerical identifier of the VLAN.
detail
tagged | untagged
Interface participates in a tagged (802.1Q) or untagged (native)
VLAN.
detail
vlan-interface
Internal VLAN interface identifier.
detail
Membership timeout
Membership timeout value.
detail
Querier timeout
Timeout value for interfaces dynamically marked as router or switch
interfaces (interfaces that receive queries). When the querier
timeout is reached, the switch marks the interface as a host
interface.
detail
Interface
Name of the interface.
detail
Reporters
Number of dynamic groups on an interface.
detail
Sample Output
show igmp-snooping vlans
user@switch> show igmp-snooping vlans
VLAN
Interfaces Groups MRouters Receivers
default
0
0
0
0
v1
11
50
0
0
v10
1
0
0
0
v11
1
0
0
0
v180
3
0
1
0
v181
3
0
0
0
v182
3
0
0
0
show igmp-snooping vlans vlan
user@switch> show igmp-snooping vlans vlan v10
user@switch> show igmp-snooping vlans vlan v10
VLAN
Interfaces Groups MRouters Receivers
v10
1
0
0
0
show igmp-snooping vlans vlan detail
user@switch> show igmp-snooping vlans vlan v10 detail
VLAN: v10, Tag: 10, vlan-interface: vlan.10
Interface: ge-0/0/10.0, tagged, Groups: 0
IGMP-L2-Querier: Stopped, SourceAddress: 10.10.1.2
424
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CHAPTER 23
Operational Commands (PIM)
•
clear multicast bandwidth-admission
•
clear multicast scope
•
clear multicast sessions
•
clear multicast statistics
•
clear pim join
•
clear pim register
•
clear pim statistics
•
mtrace
•
mtrace from-source
•
mtrace monitor
•
mtrace to-gateway
•
show multicast flow-map
•
show multicast interface
•
show multicast mrinfo
•
show multicast next-hops
•
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
•
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy
•
show multicast route
•
show multicast rpf
•
show multicast scope
•
show multicast sessions
•
show multicast usage
•
show pim bootstrap
•
show pim interfaces
•
show pim join
•
show pim neighbors
•
show pim rps
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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426
•
show pim source
•
show pim statistics
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
clear multicast bandwidth-admission
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
clear multicast bandwidth-admission
<group group-address>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
<source source-address>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.3.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Reapply IP multicast bandwidth admissions.
none—Reapply multicast bandwidth admissions for all IPv4 forwarding entries in the
master routing instance.
group group-address—(Optional) Reapply multicast bandwidth admissions for the
specified group.
inet—(Optional) Reapply multicast bandwidth admission settings for IPv4 flows.
inet6—(Optional) Reapply multicast bandwidth admission settings for IPv6 flows.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Reapply multicast bandwidth admission settings
for the specified instance. If you do not specify an instance, the command applies
to the master routing instance.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Examines the corresponding outbound interface in
the relevant entries and acts as follows:
•
If the interface is congested, and it was admitted previously, it is removed.
•
If the interface was rejected previously, the clear multicast bandwidth-admission
command enables the interface to be admitted as long as enough bandwidth
exists on the interface.
•
If you do not specify an interface, issuing the clear multicast bandwidth-admission
command readmits any previously rejected interface for the relevant entries as
long as enough bandwidth exists on the interface.
To manually reject previously admitted outbound interfaces, you must specify the
interface.
source source-address—(Optional) Use with the group option to reapply multicast
bandwidth admission settings for the specified (source, group) entry.
Required Privilege
Level
clear
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
•
show multicast interface on page 452
clear multicast bandwidth-admission on page 428
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear multicast bandwidth-admission
user@host> clear multicast bandwidth-admission
428
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
clear multicast scope
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 429
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 429
clear multicast scope
<inet | inet6>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
clear multicast scope
<inet | inet6>
<interface interface-name>
Release Information
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Clear IP multicast scope statistics.
none—(Same as logical-system all) Clear multicast scope statistics.
inet—(Optional) Clear multicast scope statistics for IPv4 family addresses.
inet6—(Optional) Clear multicast scope statistics for IPv6 family addresses.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Clear multicast scope statistics on a specific
interface.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show multicast scope on page 476
clear multicast scope on page 429
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear multicast scope
user@host> clear multicast scope
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
clear multicast sessions
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 430
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 430
clear multicast sessions
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<regular-expression>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
clear multicast sessions
<regular-expression>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Clear IP multicast sessions.
none—(Same as logical-system all) Clear multicast sessions.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
regular-expression—(Optional) Clear only multicast sessions that contain the specified
regular expression.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show multicast sessions on page 478
clear multicast sessions on page 430
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear multicast sessions
user@host> clear multicast sessions
430
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
clear multicast statistics
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 431
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 431
clear multicast statistics
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
clear multicast statistics
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Clear IP multicast statistics.
none—Clear multicast statistics for all supported address families on all interfaces.
inet—(Optional) Clear multicast statistics for IPv4 family addresses.
inet6—(Optional) Clear multicast statistics for IPv6 family addresses.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear multicast statistics for the specified instance.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Clear multicast statistics on a specific interface.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show multicast statistics
clear multicast statistics on page 431
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear multicast statistics
user@host> clear multicast statistics
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
clear pim join
List of Syntax
Syntax on page 432
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 432
Syntax
clear pim join
<all>
<group-address>
<bidirectional | dense | sparse>
<exact>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<rp ip-address/prefix | source ip-address/prefix>
<sg | star-g>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
clear pim join
<all>
<group-address>
<dense | sparse>
<exact>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<rp ip-address/prefix | source ip-address/prefix>
<sg | star-g>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Multiple new filter options introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Clear the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) join and prune states.
all—Clear the PIM join and prune states for all groups and family addresses in the master
instance.
group-address—(Optional) Clear the PIM join and prune states for a group address.
bidirectional | dense | sparse—(Optional) Clear PIM bidirectional mode, dense mode, or
sparse and source-specific multicast (SSM) mode entries.
exact—(Optional) Clear only the group that exactly matches the specified group address.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Clear the PIM entries for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear the entries for a specific PIM-enabled routing
instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
rp ip-address/prefix | source ip-address/prefix—(Optional) Clear the PIM entries with a
specified rendezvous point (RP) address and prefix or with a specified source address
and prefix. You can omit the prefix.
sg | star-g—(Optional) Clear PIM (S,G) or (*,G) entries.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
The clear pim join command cannot be used to clear the PIM join and prune state on a
backup Routing Engine when nonstop active routing is enabled.
clear
•
show pim join on page 489
clear pim join all on page 433
clear pim join inet6 on page 433
clear pim join inet6 star-g on page 433
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear pim join all
user@host> clear pim join all
Cleared 8 Join/Prune states
clear pim join inet6
user@host> clear pim join inet6
Cleared 4 Join/Prune states
clear pim join inet6 star-g
user@host> clear pim join inet6 star-g
Cleared 1 Join/Prune states
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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clear pim register
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 434
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 434
Syntax (PTX Series) on page 434
clear pim register
<all>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
clear pim register
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
Syntax (PTX Series)
clear pim register
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Release Information
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Clear Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) register message counters.
all—Required to clear the PIM register message counters for all groups and family
addresses in the master instance.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Clear PIM register message counters for IPv4 or IPv6 family
addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear register message counters for a specific
PIM-enabled routing instance.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Clear PIM register message counters for a specific
interface.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
434
The clear pim register command cannot be used to clear the PIM register state on a
backup Routing Engine when nonstop active routing is enabled.
clear
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
•
show pim statistics on page 524
clear pim register all on page 435
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear pim register all
user@host> clear pim register all
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
clear pim statistics
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 436
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 436
clear pim statistics
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
clear pim statistics
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Clear Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) statistics.
none—Clear PIM statistics for all family addresses, instances, and interfaces.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Clear PIM statistics for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear statistics for a specific PIM-enabled routing
instance.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Clear PIM statistics for a specific interface.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
436
The clear pim statistics command cannot be used to clear the PIM statistics on a backup
Routing Engine when nonstop active routing is enabled.
clear
•
show pim statistics on page 524
clear pim statistics on page 437
See show pim statistics for an explanation of output fields.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Sample Output
clear pim statistics
The following sample output displays PIM statistics before and after the clear pim statistics
command is entered:
user@host> show pim statistics
PIM statistics on all interfaces:
PIM Message type
Received
Sent
Hello
0
0
Register
0
0
Register Stop
0
0
Join Prune
0
0
Bootstrap
0
0
Assert
0
0
Graft
0
0
Graft Ack
0
0
Candidate RP
0
0
V1 Query
2111
4222
V1 Register
0
0
V1 Register Stop
0
0
V1 Join Prune
14200
13115
V1 RP Reachability
0
0
V1 Assert
0
0
V1 Graft
0
0
V1 Graft Ack
0
0
PIM statistics summary for all interfaces:
Unknown type
0
V1 Unknown type
0
Unknown Version
0
Neighbor unknown
0
Bad Length
0
Bad Checksum
0
Bad Receive If
0
Rx Intf disabled
2007
Rx V1 Require V2
0
Rx Register not RP
0
RP Filtered Source
0
Unknown Reg Stop
0
Rx Join/Prune no state
1040
Rx Graft/Graft Ack no state
0
...
user@host> clear pim statistics
user@host> show pim statistics
PIM statistics on all interfaces:
PIM Message type
Received
Hello
0
Register
0
Register Stop
0
Join Prune
0
Bootstrap
0
Assert
0
Graft
0
Graft Ack
0
Candidate RP
0
V1 Query
1
V1 Register
0
...
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Sent
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
437
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438
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
mtrace
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
mtrace source
<logical-system logical-system-name>
<routing-instance routing-instance-name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for SRX1400, SRX3400, SRX3600,
SRX5600, and SRX5800 devices.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for the PTX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display trace information about an IP multicast path.
source—Source hostname or address.
logical-system (logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on a logical
system.
routing-instance routing-instance-name—(Optional) Trace a particular routing instance.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
The mtrace command for multicast traffic is similar to the traceroute command used for
unicast traffic. Unlike traceroute, mtrace traces traffic backwards, from the receiver to
the source.
view
mtrace source on page 441
Table 20 on page 439 describes the output fields for the mtrace command. Output fields
are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 20: mtrace Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Mtrace from
IP address of the receiver.
to
IP address of the source.
via group
IP address of the multicast group (if any).
Querying full reverse path
Indicates the full reverse path query has begun.
number-of-hops
Number of hops from the source to the named router or switch.
router-name
Name of the router or switch for this hop.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Table 20: mtrace Output Fields (continued)
440
Field Name
Field Description
address
Address of the router or switch for this hop.
protocol
Protocol used (for example, PIM).
Round trip time
Average round-trip time, in milliseconds (ms).
total ttl of
Time-to-live (TTL) threshold.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Sample Output
mtrace source
user@host> mtrace 192.168.4.2
Mtrace from 192.168.4.2 to 192.168.1.2 via group 0.0.0.0
Querying full reverse path... * *
0 routerA.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.1.2)
-1 routerB.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.2.2) PIM thresh^ 1
-2 routerC.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.3.2) PIM thresh^ 1
-3 hostA.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.4.2)
Round trip time 2 ms; total ttl of 2 required.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
mtrace from-source
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
mtrace from-source source source
<brief | detail>
<extra-hops extra-hops>
<group group>
<interval interval>
<loop>
<max-hops max-hops>
<max-queries max-queries>
<multicast-response | unicast-response>
<no-resolve>
<no-router-alert>
<response response>
<routing-instance routing-instance-name>
<ttl ttl>
<wait-time wait-time>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display trace information about an IP multicast path from a source to this router or switch.
If you specify a group address with this command, Junos OS returns additional information,
such as packet rates and losses.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
extra-hops extra-hops—(Optional) Number of hops to take after reaching a nonresponsive
router. You can specify a number between 0 and 255.
group group—(Optional) Group address for which to trace the path. The default group
address is 0.0.0.0.
interval interval—(Optional) Number of seconds to wait before gathering statistics again.
The default value is 10 seconds.
loop—(Optional) Loop indefinitely, displaying rate and loss statistics.
max-hops max-hops—(Optional) Maximum hops to trace toward the source. The range
of values is 0 through 255. The default value is 32 hops.
max-queries max-queries—(Optional) Maximum number of query attempts for any hop.
The range of values is 1 through 32. The default is 3.
multicast-response—(Optional) Always request the response using multicast.
no-resolve—(Optional) Do not attempt to display addresses symbolically.
no-router-alert—(Optional) Do not use the router-alert IP option.
response response—(Optional) Send trace response to a host or multicast address.
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routing-instance routing-instance-name—(Optional) Trace a particular routing instance.
source source—Source hostname or address.
ttl ttl—(Optional) IP time-to-live (TTL) value. You can specify a number between 0 and
255. Local queries to the multicast group use a value of 1. Otherwise, the default
value is 127.
unicast-response—(Optional) Always request the response using unicast.
wait-time wait-time—(Optional) Number of seconds to wait for a response. The default
value is 3.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
mtrace from-source on page 444
Table 21 on page 443 describes the output fields for the mtrace from-source command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 21: mtrace from-source Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Mtrace from
IP address of the receiver.
to
IP address of the source.
via group
IP address of the multicast group (if any).
Querying full reverse path
Indicates the full reverse path query has begun.
number-of-hops
Number of hops from the source to the named router or switch.
router-name
Name of the router or switch for this hop.
address
Address of the router or switch for this hop.
protocol
Protocol used (for example, PIM).
Round trip time
Average round-trip time, in milliseconds (ms).
total ttl of
Time-to-live (TTL) threshold.
source
Source address.
Response Dest
Response destination address.
Overall
Average packet rate for all traffic at each hop.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Table 21: mtrace from-source Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Packet Statistics for Traffic
From
Number of packets lost, number of packets sent, percentage of
packets lost, and average packet rate at each hop.
Receiver
IP address receiving the multicast.
Query source
IP address sending the mtrace query.
Sample Output
mtrace from-source
user@host> mtrace from-source source 192.168.4.2 group 233.252.0.1
Mtrace from 192.168.4.2 to 192.168.1.2 via group 233.252.0.1
Querying full reverse path... * *
0 routerA.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.1.2)
-1 routerB.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.2.2) PIM thresh^ 1
-2 routerC.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.3.2) PIM thresh^ 1
-3 hostA.lab.mycompany.net (192.168.4.2)
Round trip time 2 ms; total ttl of 2 required.
Waiting to accumulate statistics...Results after 10 seconds:
Source
Response Dest
Overall
Packet Statistics For Traffic From
192.168.4.2 192.168.1.2
Packet
192.168.4.2 To 233.252.0.1
v
__/ rtt
2 ms
Rate
Lost/Sent = Pct Rate
192.168.2.1
192.168.3.2 routerC.lab.mycompany.net
v
^
ttl
2
0/0
= -0 pps
192.168.4.1
192.168.2.2
routerB.lab.mycompany.net
v
\__
ttl
3
?/0
0 pps
192.168.1.2
192.168.1.2
Receiver
Query Source
444
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
mtrace monitor
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
mtrace monitor
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Listen passively for IP multicast responses. To exit the mtrace monitor command, type
Ctrl+c.
none—Trace the master instance.
view
mtrace monitor on page 446
Table 22 on page 445 describes the output fields for the mtrace monitor command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 22: mtrace monitor Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Mtrace query at
Date and time of the query.
by
Address of the host issuing the query.
resp to
Response destination.
qid
Query ID number.
packet from...to
IP address of the query source and default group destination.
from...to
IP address of the multicast source and the response address.
via group
IP address of the group to trace.
mxhop
Maximum hop setting.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Sample Output
mtrace monitor
user@host> mtrace monitor
Mtrace query at Oct 22 13:36:14 by 192.168.3.2, resp to 233.252.0.32, qid 74a5b8
packet from 192.168.3.2 to 233.252.0.2
from 192.168.3.2 to 192.168.3.38 via group 233.252.0.1 (mxhop=60)
Mtrace query at Oct 22 13:36:17 by 192.681.3.2, resp to 233.252.0.32, qid 1d07ba
packet from 192.168.3.2 to 233.252.0.2
from 192.168.3.2 to 192.168.3.38 via group 233.252.0.1 (mxhop=60)
Mtrace query at Oct 22 13:36:20 by 192.681.3.2, resp to same, qid 2fea1d
packet from 192.168.3.2 to 233.252.0.2
from 192.168.3.2 to 192.168.3.38 via group 233.252.0.1 (mxhop=60)
Mtrace query at Oct 22 13:36:30 by 192.168.3.2, resp to same, qid 7c88ad
packet from 192.168.3.2 to 233.252.0.2
from 192.168.3.2 to 192.168.3.38 via group 233.252.0.1 (mxhop=60)
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
mtrace to-gateway
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
mtrace to-gateway gateway gateway
<brief | detail>
<extra-hops extra-hops>
<group group>
<interface interface-name>
<interval interval>
<loop>
<max-hops max-hops>
<max-queries max-queries>
<multicast-response | unicast-response>
<no-resolve>
<no-router-alert>
<response response>
<routing-instance routing-instance-name>
<ttl ttl>
<unicast-response>
<wait-time wait-time>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display trace information about a multicast path from this router or switch to a gateway
router or switch.
gateway gateway—Send the trace query to a gateway multicast address.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
extra-hops extra-hops—(Optional) Number of hops to take after reaching a nonresponsive
router or switch. You can specify a number between 0 and 255.
group group—(Optional) Group address for which to trace the path. The default group
address is 0.0.0.0.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Source address for sending the trace query.
interval interval—(Optional) Number of seconds to wait before gathering statistics again.
The default value is 10.
loop—(Optional) Loop indefinitely, displaying rate and loss statistics.
max-hops max-hops—(Optional) Maximum hops to trace toward the source. You can
specify a number between 0 and 255.. The default value is 32.
max-queries max-queries—(Optional) Maximum number of query attempts for any hop.
You can specify a number between 0 and 255. The default value is 3.
multicast-response—(Optional) Always request the response using multicast.
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no-resolve—(Optional) Do not attempt to display addresses symbolically.
no-router-alert—(Optional) Do not use the router-alert IP option.
response response—(Optional) Send trace response to a host or multicast address.
routing-instance routing-instance-name—(Optional) Trace a particular routing instance.
ttl ttl—(Optional) IP time-to-live value. You can specify a number between 0 and 225.
Local queries to the multicast group use TTL 1. Otherwise, the default value is 127.
unicast-response—(Optional) Always request the response using unicast.
wait-time wait-time—(Optional) Number of seconds to wait for a response. The default
value is 3.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
mtrace to-gateway on page 449
Table 23 on page 448 describes the output fields for the mtrace to-gateway command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 23: mtrace to-gateway Output Fields
448
Field Name
Field Description
Mtrace from
IP address of the receiver.
to
IP address of the source.
via group
IP address of the multicast group (if any).
Querying full reverse path
Indicates the full reverse path query has begun.
number-of-hops
Number of hops from the source to the named router or switch.
router-name
Name of the router or switch for this hop.
address
Address of the router or switch for this hop.
protocol
Protocol used (for example, PIM).
Round trip time
Average round-trip time, in milliseconds (ms).
total ttl of
Time-to-live (TTL) threshold.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Sample Output
mtrace to-gateway
user@host> mtrace to-gateway gateway 192.168.3.2 group 233.252.0.1 interface 192.168.1.73
brief
Mtrace from 192.168.1.73 to 192.168.1.2 via group 233.252.0.1
Querying full reverse path... * *
0 routerA.lab.mycompany.net (192.1.1.2)
-1 routerA.lab.mycompany.net (192.1.1.2) PIM thresh^ 1
-2 routerB.lab.mycompany.net (192.1.2.2) PIM thresh^ 1
-3 routerC.lab.mycompany.net (192.1.3.2) PIM thresh^ 1
Round trip time 2 ms; total ttl of 3 required.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show multicast flow-map
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 450
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 450
show multicast flow-map
<brief | detail>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast flow-map
<brief | detail>
Release Information
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display configuration information about IP multicast flow maps.
none—Display configuration information about IP multicast flow maps on all systems.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show multicast flow-map on page 451
show multicast flow-map detail on page 451
Table 24 on page 450 describes the output fields for the show multicast flow-map
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 24: show multicast flow-map Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Levels of Output
Name
Name of the flow map.
All levels
Policy
Name of the policy associated with the flow map.
All levels
Cache-timeout
Cache timeout value assigned to the flow map.
All levels
Bandwidth
Bandwidth setting associated with the flow map.
All levels
Adaptive
Whether or not adaptive mode is enabled for the flow map.
none
Flow-map
Name of the flow map.
detail
450
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 24: show multicast flow-map Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Levels of Output
Adaptive
Bandwidth
Whether or not adaptive mode is enabled for the flow map.
detail
Redundant Sources
Redundant sources defined for the same destination group.
detail
Sample Output
show multicast flow-map
user@host> show multicast flow-map
Instance: master
Name
Policy
map2
policy2
map1
policy1
Cache timeout
never
60 seconds
Bandwidth Adaptive
2000000 no
2000000 no
Sample Output
show multicast flow-map detail
user@host> show multicast flow-map detail
Instance: master
Flow-map: map1
Policy:
policy1
Cache Timeout:
600 seconds
Bandwidth:
2000000
Adaptive Bandwidth: yes
Redundant Sources: 10.11.11.11
Redundant Sources: 10.11.11.12
Redundant Sources: 10.11.11.13
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show multicast interface
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 452
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 452
show multicast interface
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast interface
Release Information
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.3.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display bandwidth information about IP multicast interfaces.
none—Display all interfaces that have multicast configured.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show multicast interface on page 453
Table 25 on page 452 describes the output fields for the show multicast interface command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 25: show multicast interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Name of the multicast interface.
Maximum bandwidth (bps)
Maximum bandwidth setting, in bits per second, for this interface.
Remaining bandwidth (bps)
Amount of bandwidth, in bits per second, remaining on the interface.
Mapped bandwidth
deduction (bps)
Amount of bandwidth, in bits per second, used by any flows that
are mapped to the interface.
NOTE: Adding the mapped bandwidth deduction value to the local
bandwidth deduction value results in the total deduction value for
the interface.
This field does not appear in the output when the no QoS
adjustment feature is disabled.
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 25: show multicast interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Local bandwidth deduction
(bps)
Amount of bandwidth, in bits per second, used by any mapped flows
that are traversing the interface.
NOTE: Adding the mapped bandwidth deduction value to the local
bandwidth deduction value results in the total deduction value for
the interface.
This field does not appear in the output when the no QoS
adjustment feature is disabled.
Reverse OIF mapping
State of the reverse OIF mapping feature (on or off).
NOTE: This field does not appear in the output when the no QoS
adjustment feature is disabled.
Reverse OIF mapping no
QoS adjustment
State of the no QoS adjustment feature (on or off) for interfaces
that are using reverse OIF mapping.
NOTE: This field does not appear in the output when the no QoS
adjustment feature is disabled.
Leave timer
Amount of time a mapped interface remains active after the last
mapping ends.
NOTE: This field does not appear in the output when the no QoS
adjustment feature is disabled.
No QoS adjustment
State (on) of the no QoS adjustment feature when this feature is
enabled.
NOTE: This field does not appear in the output when the no QoS
adjustment feature is disabled.
Sample Output
show multicast interface
user@host> show multicast interface
Interface
Maximum bandwidth (bps) Remaining bandwidth (bps)
fe-0/0/3
10000000
0
fe-0/0/3.210
10000000
–2000000
fe-0/0/3.220
100000000
100000000
fe-0/0/3.230
20000000
18000000
fe-0/0/2.200
100000000
100000000
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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show multicast mrinfo
Syntax
show multicast mrinfo
<host>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Display configuration information about IP multicast networks, including neighboring
multicast router addresses.
Options
none—Display configuration information about all multicast networks.
host—(Optional) Display configuration information about a particular host. Replace host
with a hostname or IP address.
Required Privilege
Level
view
List of Sample Output
show multicast mrinfo on page 455
Output Fields
Table 26 on page 454 describes the output fields for the show multicast mrinfo command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 26: show multicast mrinfo Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
source-address
Query address, hostname (DNS name or IP address of the source address), and multicast protocol
version or the software version of another vendor.
ip-address-1--->ip-address-2
Queried router interface address and directly attached neighbor interface address, respectively.
(name or ip-address)
Name or IP address of neighbor.
[metric/threshold/type/
flags]
Neighbor's multicast profile:
454
•
metric—Always has a value of 1, because mrinfo queries the directly connected interfaces of a device.
•
threshold—Multicast threshold time-to-live (TTL). The range of values is 0 through 255.
•
type—Multicast connection type: pim or tunnel.
•
flags—Flags for this route:
•
querier—Queried router is the designated router for the neighboring session.
•
leaf—Link is a leaf in the multicast network.
•
down—Link status indicator.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Sample Output
show multicast mrinfo
user@host> show multicast mrinfo 10.35.4.1
10.35.4.1 (10.35.4.1) [version 12.0]:
192.168.195.166 -> 0.0.0.0 (local) [1/0/pim/querier/leaf]
10.38.20.1 -> 0.0.0.0 (local) [1/0/pim/querier/leaf]
10.47.1.1 -> 10.47.1.2 (10.47.1.2) [1/5/pim]
0.0.0.0 -> 0.0.0.0 (local) [1/0/pim/down]
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show multicast next-hops
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 456
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 456
show multicast next-hops
<brief | detail | terse>
<identifier-number>
<inet | inet6>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast next-hops
<brief | detail>
<identifier-number>
<inet | inet6>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
detail option display of next-hop ID number introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for M Series
and T Series routers and EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Support for bidirectional PIM added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
terse option introduced in Junos OS Release 16.1 for the MX Series.
Description
Options
Display the entries in the IP multicast next-hop table.
none—Display standard information about all entries in the multicast next-hop table for
all supported address families.
brief | detail | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output. Use terse to display
the total number of outgoing interfaces (as opposed to listing them) When you
include the detail option on M Series and T Series routers and EX Series switches,
the downstream interface name includes the next-hop ID number in parentheses,
in the form fe-0/1/2.0-(1048574), where 1048574 is the next-hop ID number.
Starting in Junos OS release 16.1, the show multicast next-hops statement shows the
hierarchical next hops contained in the top-level next hop.
identifier-number—(Optional) Show a particular next hop by ID number. The range of
values is 1 through 65,535.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display entries for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses, respectively.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
456
view
show multicast next-hops on page 457
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show multicast next-hops (Bidirectional PIM) on page 457
show multicast next-hops brief on page 458
show multicast next-hops detail on page 458
Output Fields
Table 27 on page 457 describes the output fields for the show multicast next-hops
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 27: show multicast next-hops Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Family
Protocol family (such as INET).
ID
Next-hop identifier of the prefix. The identifier is returned by the routing device's
Packet Forwarding Engine.
Refcount
Number of cache entries that are using this next hop.
KRefcount
Kernel reference count for the next hop.
Downstream
interface
Interface names associated with each multicast next-hop ID.
Incoming interface
list
List of interfaces that accept incoming traffic. Only shown for routes that do
not use strict RPF-based forwarding, for example for bidirectional PIM.
Sample Output
show multicast next-hops
user@host> show multicast next-hops
Family: INET
ID
Refcount KRefcount Downstream interface
262142
4
2 so-1/0/0.0
262143
2
1 mt-1/1/0.49152
262148
2
1 mt-1/1/0.32769
show multicast next-hops (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show multicast next-hops
Family: INET
ID
Refcount KRefcount Downstream interface
2097151
8
4 ge-0/0/1.0
Family: INET6
ID
Refcount KRefcount Downstream interface
2097157
2
1 ge-0/0/1.0
Family: Incoming interface list
ID
Refcount KRefcount Downstream interface
513
5
2 lo0.0
ge-0/0/1.0
514
5
2 lo0.0
ge-0/0/1.0
xe-4/1/0.0
515
3
1 lo0.0
ge-0/0/1.0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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544
1
xe-4/1/0.0
0 lo0.0
xe-4/1/0.0
show multicast next-hops brief
The output for the show multicast next-hops brief command is identical to that for the
show multicast next-hops command. For sample output, see show multicast next-hops
on page 457.
show multicast next-hops detail
user@host> show multicast next-hops detail
Family: INET
ID
Refcount KRefcount Downstream interface Addr
1048584
2
1 1048581
1048580
Flags 0x208 type 0x18 members 0/0/2/0/0
Address 0xb1841c4
1048591
3
2 787
747
Flags 0x206 type 0x18 members 0/0/2/0/0
Address 0xb1847f4
1048580
4
1 ge-1/1/9.0-(1048579)
Flags 0x200 type 0x18 members 0/0/0/1/0
Address 0xb184134
1048581
2
0 736
765
Flags 0x3 type 0x18 members 0/0/2/0/0
Address 0xb183dd4
1048585
18
0 787
747
Flags 0x203 type 0x18 members 0/0/2/0/0
Address 0xb184404
Family: INET6
ID
Refcount KRefcount Downstream interface Addr
1048586
4
2 1048585
1048583
Flags 0x20c type 0x19 members 0/0/2/0/0
Address 0xb1842e4
1048583
14
4 ge-1/1/9.0-(1048582)
Flags 0x200 type 0x19 members 0/0/0/1/0
Address 0xb183ef4
1048592
4
2 1048583
1048591
Flags 0x20c type 0x19 members 0/0/2/0/0
Address 0xb184644
458
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 459
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 459
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
<instance instance-name>
Release Information
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6 for EX Series switches.
instance option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.3.
instance option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.3 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Display configuration information about PIM-to-IGMP message translation, also known
as PIM-to-IGMP proxy.
Options
none—Display configuration information about PIM-to-IGMP message translation for all
routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display configuration information about PIM-to-IGMP
message translation for a specific multicast instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Configuring PIM-to-IGMP and PIM-to-MLD Message Translation
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy on page 460
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy instance on page 460
Table 28 on page 459 describes the output fields for the show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
command. Output fields are listed in the order in which they appear.
Table 28: show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Instance
Routing instance. Default instance is master (inet.0 routing table).
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Table 28: show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Proxy state
State of PIM-to-IGMP message translation, also known as
PIM-to-IGMP proxy, on the configured upstream interfaces: enabled
or disabled.
interface-name
Name of upstream interface (no more than two allowed) on which
PIM-to-IGMP message translation is configured.
Sample Output
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
user@host> show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
Instance: master Proxy state: enabled
ge-0/1/0.1
ge-0/1/0.2
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy instance
user@host> show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy instance VPN-A
Instance: VPN-A Proxy state: enabled
ge-0/1/0.1
460
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 461
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 461
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy
<instance instance-name>
Release Information
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6 for EX Series switches.
instance option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.3.
instance option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.3 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Description
Options
Display configuration information about PIM-to-MLD message translation, also known
as PIM-to-MLD proxy.
none—Display configuration information about PIM-to-MLD message translation for all
routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display configuration information about PIM-to-MLD
message translation for a specific multicast instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy on page 462
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy instance on page 462
Table 29 on page 461 describes the output fields for the show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy
command. Output fields are listed in the order in which they appear.
Table 29: show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Proxy state
State of PIM-to-MLD message translation, also known as
PIM-to-MLD proxy, on the configured upstream interfaces: enabled
or disabled.
interface-name
Name of upstream interface (no more than two allowed) on which
PIM-to-MLD message translation is configured.
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Sample Output
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy
user@host> show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy
Instance: master Proxy state: enabled
ge-0/5/0.1
ge-0/5/0.2
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy instance
user@host> show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy instance VPN-A
Instance: VPN-A Proxy state: enabled
ge-0/5/0.1
462
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show multicast route
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 463
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 463
show multicast route
<brief | detail | extensive | summary>
<active | all | inactive>
<group group>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<oif-count>
<regular-expression>
<source-prefix source-prefix>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast route
<brief | detail | extensive | summary>
<active | all | inactive>
<group group>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance name>
<regular-expression>
<source-prefix source-prefix>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Support for bidirectional PIM added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
oif-count option introduced in Junos OS Release 16.1 for the MX Series.
xxxSupport for PIM NSR support for VXLAN added in Junos OS Release 16.2.
Description
Display the entries in the IP multicast forwarding table. You can display similar information
with the show route table inet.1 command.
NOTE: On all SRX Series devices, when a multicast route is not available,
pending sessions are not torn down, and subsequent packets are queued. If
no multicast route resolve comes back, then the traffic flow has to wait for
the pending session to timed out. Then packets can trigger new pending
session create and route resolve.
Options
none—Display standard information about all entries in the multicast forwarding table
for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive | summary—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
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active | all | inactive—(Optional) Display all active entries, all entries, or all inactive entries,
respectively, in the multicast forwarding table.
group group—(Optional) Display the cache entries for a particular group.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display multicast forwarding table entries for IPv4 or IPv6 family
addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display entries in the multicast forwarding table for
a specific multicast instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
oif-count —(Optional) Display a count of outgoing interfaces rather than listing them.
regular-expression—(Optional) Display information about the multicast forwarding table
entries that match a UNIX OS-style regular expression.
source-prefix source-prefix—(Optional) Display the cache entries for a particular source
prefix.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Example: Configuring Multicast-Only Fast Reroute in a PIM Domain
show multicast route on page 466
show multicast route (Bidirectional PIM) on page 466
show multicast route brief on page 467
show multicast route detail on page 467
show multicast route extensive (Bidirectional PIM) on page 468
show multicast route instance <instance-name> extensive on page 468
show multicast route summary on page 469
show multicast route extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on master Routing
Engine) on page 469
show multicast route extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on backup Routing
Engine) on page 470
show multicast route extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on backup Routing
Engine) on page 470
Table 30 on page 464 describes the output fields for the show multicast route command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 30: show multicast route Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
family
IPv4 address family (INET) or IPv6 address family (INET6).
All levels
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 30: show multicast route Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Group
Group address.
All levels
For any-source multicast routes, for example for bidirectional PIM, the group
address includes the prefix length.
Source
Prefix and length of the source as it is in the multicast forwarding table.
All levels
Incoming interface
list
List of interfaces that accept incoming traffic. Only shown for routes that do
not use strict RPF-based forwarding, for example for bidirectional PIM.
All levels
Upstream interface
Name of the interface on which the packet with this source prefix is expected
to arrive.
All levels
Upstream rpf
interface list
When multicast-only fast reroute (MoFRR) is enabled, a PIM router propagates
join messages on two upstream RPF interfaces to receive multicast traffic on
both links for the same join request.
All levels
Downstream
interface list
List of interface names to which the packet with this source prefix is forwarded.
All levels
Number of
outgoing interfaces
Total number of outgoing interfaces for each (S,G) entry.
extensive
Session description
Name of the multicast session.
detail extensive
Statistics
Rate at which packets are being forwarded for this source and group entry (in
Kbps and pps), and number of packets that have been forwarded to this prefix.
If one or more of the kilobits per second packet forwarding statistic queries fails
or times out, the statistics field displays Forwarding statistics are not available.
detail extensive
NOTE: On QFX Series switches and OCX Series switches, this field does not
report valid statistics.
Next-hop ID
Next-hop identifier of the prefix. The identifier is returned by the routing device’s
Packet Forwarding Engine and is also displayed in the output of the show
multicast nexthops command.
detail extensive
Incoming interface
list ID
For bidirectional PIM, incoming interface list identifier.
detail extensive
Identifiers for interfaces that accept incoming traffic. Only shown for routes
that do not use strict RPF-based forwarding, for example for bidirectional PIM.
Upstream protocol
The protocol that maintains the active multicast forwarding route for this group
or source.
detail extensive
When the show multicast route extensive command is used with the
display-origin-protocol option, the field name is only Protocol and not Upstream
Protocol. However, this field also displays the protocol that installed the active
route.
Route type
Type of multicast route. Values can be (S,G) or (*,G).
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Table 30: show multicast route Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Route state
Whether the group is Active or Inactive.
summary extensive
Route count
Number of multicast routes.
summary
Forwarding state
Whether the prefix is pruned or forwarding.
extensive
Cache
lifetime/timeout
Number of seconds until the prefix is removed from the multicast forwarding
table. A value of never indicates a permanent forwarding entry. A value of forever
indicates routes that do not have keepalive times.
extensive
Wrong incoming
interface
notifications
Number of times that the upstream interface was not available.
extensive
Uptime
Time since the creation of a multicast route.
extensive
Sample Output
Starting in Junos OS Release16.1, show multicast route displays the top-level hierarchical
next hop.
show multicast route
user@host> show multicast route
Family: INET
Group: 233.252.0.0
Source: 10.255.14.144/32
Upstream interface: local
Downstream interface list:
so-1/0/0.0
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144/32
Upstream interface: local
Downstream interface list:
so-1/0/0.0
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15/32
Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
Downstream interface list:
mt-1/1/0.1081344
Family: INET6
show multicast route (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show multicast route
Family: INET
Group: 233.252.0.1/24
Source: *
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Incoming interface list:
lo0.0 ge-0/0/1.0
Downstream interface list:
ge-0/0/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.3/24
Source: *
Incoming interface list:
lo0.0 ge-0/0/1.0 xe-4/1/0.0
Downstream interface list:
ge-0/0/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.11/24
Source: *
Incoming interface list:
lo0.0 ge-0/0/1.0
Downstream interface list:
ge-0/0/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.13/24
Source: *
Incoming interface list:
lo0.0 ge-0/0/1.0 xe-4/1/0.0
Downstream interface list:
ge-0/0/1.0
Family: INET6
show multicast route brief
The output for the show multicast route brief command is identical to that for the show
multicast route command. For sample output, see show multicast route on page 466 or
show multicast route (Bidirectional PIM) on page 466.
show multicast route detail
user@host> show multicast route detail
Family: INET
Group: 233.252.0.0
Source: 10.255.14.144/32
Upstream interface: local
Downstream interface list:
so-1/0/0.0
Session description: Unknown
Statistics: 8 kBps, 100 pps, 45272 packets
Next-hop ID: 262142
Upstream protocol: PIM
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144/32
Upstream interface: local
Downstream interface list:
so-1/0/0.0
Session description: Administratively Scoped
Statistics: 0 kBps, 0 pps, 13404 packets
Next-hop ID: 262142
Upstream protocol: PIM
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15/32
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Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
Downstream interface list:
mt-1/1/0.1081344
Session description: Administratively Scoped
Statistics: 46 kBps, 1000 pps, 921077 packets
Next-hop ID: 262143
Upstream protocol: PIM
Family: INET6
show multicast route extensive (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show multicast route extensive
Family: INET
Group: 233.252.0.1/24
Source: *
Incoming interface list:
lo0.0 ge-0/0/1.0
Downstream interface list:
ge-0/0/1.0
Number of outgoing interfaces: 1
Session description: NOB Cross media facilities
Statistics: 0 kBps, 0 pps, 0 packets
Next-hop ID: 2097153
Incoming interface list ID: 585
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Forwarding
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
Group: 233.252.0.3/24
Source: *
Incoming interface list:
lo0.0 ge-0/0/1.0 xe-4/1/0.0
Downstream interface list:
ge-0/0/1.0
Number of outgoing interfaces: 1
Session description: NOB Cross media facilities
Statistics: 0 kBps, 0 pps, 0 packets
Next-hop ID: 2097153
Incoming interface list ID: 589
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Forwarding
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
Family: INET6
show multicast route instance <instance-name> extensive
user@host> show multicast route instance mvpn extensive
Family: INET
Group: 233.252.0.10
Source: 10.0.0.2/32
Upstream interface: xe-0/0/0.102
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Downstream interface list:
xe-10/3/0.0 xe-0/3/0.0 xe-0/0/0.106 xe-0/0/0.105
xe-0/0/0.103 xe-0/0/0.104 xe-0/0/0.107 xe-0/0/0.108
Session description: Administratively Scoped
Statistics: 256 kBps, 3998 pps, 670150 packets
Next-hop ID: 1048579
Upstream protocol: MVPN
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Forwarding
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 58
Uptime: 00:00:04
show multicast route summary
user@host>show multicast route summary
Instance: master Family: INET
Route type
(S,G)
(S,G)
Route state
Active
Inactive
Route count
2
3
Instance: master Family: INET6
show multicast route extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on master Routing Engine)
user@host> show multicast route extensive
Instance: master Family: INET
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 3.3.3.3/32
Upstream interface: ge-3/1/2.0
Downstream interface list:
-(593)
Number of outgoing interfaces: 1
Session description: Organisational Local Scope
Statistics: 0 kBps, 0 pps, 27 packets
Next-hop ID: 1048576
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Forwarding
<----------- Forwarding state
is set as 'Forwarding' in master RE.
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
Uptime: 00:06:38
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 10.2.1.4/32
Upstream interface: local
Downstream interface list:
ge-3/1/2.0
Number of outgoing interfaces: 1
Session description: Organisational Local Scope
Statistics: 0 kBps, 0 pps, 86 packets
Next-hop ID: 1048575
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Forwarding
<----------- Forwarding state
is set as 'Forwarding' in master RE.
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
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Uptime: 00:07:45
Instance: master Family: INET6
show multicast route extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on backup Routing Engine)
user@host> show multicast route extensive
Instance: master Family: INET
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 3.3.3.3/32
Upstream interface: ge-3/1/2.0
Number of outgoing interfaces: 0
Session description: Organisational Local Scope
Forwarding statistics are not available
Next-hop ID: 0
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Pruned
<----------- Forwarding state
is set as 'Pruned' in backup RE.
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
Uptime: 00:06:46
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 10.2.1.4/32
Upstream interface: local
Number of outgoing interfaces: 0
Session description: Organisational Local Scope
Forwarding statistics are not available
Next-hop ID: 0
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Pruned
<----------- Forwarding state
is set as 'Pruned' in backup RE.
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
Uptime: 00:07:54
Instance: master Family: INET6
show multicast route extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on backup Routing Engine)
user@host> show multicast route extensive
Instance: master Family: INET
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 3.3.3.3/32
Upstream interface: ge-3/1/2.0
Downstream interface list:
-(593)
Number of outgoing interfaces: 1
Session description: Organisational Local Scope
Statistics: 0 kBps, 0 pps, 0 packets
Next-hop ID: 1048576
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Forwarding
<----------- Forwarding state
is set as 'Forwarding' in backup RE.
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
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Uptime: 00:06:38
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 10.2.1.4/32
Upstream interface: local
Downstream interface list:
ge-3/1/2.0
Number of outgoing interfaces: 1
Session description: Organisational Local Scope
Statistics: 0 kBps, 0 pps, 0 packets
Next-hop ID: 1048575
Upstream protocol: PIM
Route state: Active
Forwarding state: Forwarding
<----------- Forwarding state
is set as 'Forwarding' in backup RE.
Cache lifetime/timeout: forever
Wrong incoming interface notifications: 0
Uptime: 00:07:45
Instance: master Family: INET6
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show multicast rpf
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 472
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 472
show multicast rpf
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<prefix>
<summary>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast rpf
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<prefix>
<summary>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display information about multicast reverse-path-forwarding (RPF) calculations.
none—Display RPF calculation information for all supported address families.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display the RPF calculation information for IPv4 or IPv6 family
addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information about multicast RPF calculations
for a specific multicast instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
prefix—(Optional) Display the RPF calculation information for the specified prefix.
summary—(Optional) Display a summary of all multicast RPF information.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
472
view
show multicast rpf on page 473
show multicast rpf inet6 on page 474
show multicast rpf prefix on page 475
show multicast rpf summary on page 475
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Output Fields
Table 31 on page 473 describes the output fields for the show multicast rpf command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 31: show multicast rpf Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Instance
Name of the routing instance. (Displayed when multicast is
configured within a routing instance.)
Source prefix
Prefix and length of the source as it exists in the multicast forwarding
table.
Protocol
How the route was learned.
Interface
Upstream RPF interface.
NOTE: The displayed interface information does not apply to
bidirectional PIM RP addresses. This is because the show multicast
rpf command does not take into account equal-cost paths or the
designated forwarder. For accurate upstream RPF interface
information, always use the show pim join extensive command when
bidirectional PIM is configured.
Neighbor
Upstream RPF neighbor.
NOTE: The displayed neighbor information does not apply to
bidirectional PIM. This is because the show multicast rpf command
does not take into account equal-cost paths or the designated
forwarder. For accurate upstream RPF neighbor information, always
use the show pim join extensive command when bidirectional PIM
is configured.
Sample Output
show multicast rpf
user@host> show multicast rpf
Multicast RPF table: inet.0, 12 entries
0.0.0.0/0
Protocol: Static
10.255.14.132/32
Protocol: Direct
Interface: lo0.0
10.255.245.91/32
Protocol: IS-IS
Interface: so-1/1/1.0
Neighbor: 192.168.195.21
172.16.0.1/32
Inactive172.16.0.0/12
Protocol: Static
Interface: fxp0.0
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Neighbor: 192.168.14.254
192.168.0.0/16
Protocol: Static
Interface: fxp0.0
Neighbor: 192.168.14.254
192.168.14.0/24
Protocol: Direct
Interface: fxp0.0
192.168.14.132/32
Protocol: Local
192.168.195.20/30
Protocol: Direct
Interface: so-1/1/1.0
192.168.195.22/32
Protocol: Local
192.168.195.36/30
Protocol: IS-IS
Interface: so-1/1/1.0
Neighbor: 192.168.195.21
show multicast rpf inet6
user@host> show multicast rpf inet6
Multicast RPF table: inet6.0, 12 entries
::10.255.14.132/128
Protocol: Direct
Interface: lo0.0
::10.255.245.91/128
Protocol: IS-IS
Interface: so-1/1/1.0
Neighbor: 2001:db8::2a0:a5ff:fe28:2e8c
::192.168.195.20/126
Protocol: Direct
Interface: so-1/1/1.0
::192.168.195.22/128
Protocol: Local
::192.168.195.36/126
Protocol: IS-IS
Interface: so-1/1/1.0
Neighbor: 2001:db8::2a0:a5ff:fe28:2e8c
::192.168.195.76/126
Protocol: Direct
Interface: fe-2/2/0.0
::192.168.195.77/128
Protocol: Local
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2001:db8::/64
Protocol: Direct
Interface: so-1/1/1.0
2001:db8::290:69ff:fe0c:993a/128
Protocol: Local
2001:db8::2a0:a5ff:fe12:84f/128
Protocol: Direct
Interface: lo0.0
2001:db8::2/128
Protocol: PIM
2001:db8::d/128
Protocol: PIM
show multicast rpf prefix
user@host> show multicast rpf 2001:db8::/16
Multicast RPF table: inet6.0, 13 entries
2001:db8::2/128
Protocol: PIM
2001:db8::d/128
Protocol: PIM
...
show multicast rpf summary
user@host> show multicast rpf summary
Multicast RPF table: inet.0, 16 entries
Multicast RPF table: inet6.0, 12 entries
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show multicast scope
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 476
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 476
show multicast scope
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast scope
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display administratively scoped IP multicast information.
none—Display standard information about administratively scoped multicast information
for all supported address families in all routing instances.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display scoped multicast information for IPv4 or IPv6 family
addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display administratively scoped information for a
specific multicast instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show multicast scope on page 477
show multicast scope inet on page 477
show multicast scope inet6 on page 477
Table 32 on page 476 describes the output fields for the show multicast scope command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 32: show multicast scope Output Fields
476
Field Name
Field Description
Scope name
Name of the multicast scope.
Group Prefix
Range of multicast groups that are scoped.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 32: show multicast scope Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Interface that is the boundary of the administrative scope.
Resolve Rejects
Number of kernel resolve rejects.
Sample Output
show multicast scope
user@host> show multicast scope
Scope name
233-net
local
local
larry
Group Prefix
Interface
233.252.0.0/16
fe-0/0/0.1
233.252.0.1/16
fe-0/0/0.1
2001:db8::/16
fe-0/0/0.1
2001:db8::1234/128
fe-0/0/0.1
Resolve
Rejects
0
0
0
0
show multicast scope inet
user@host> show multicast scope inet
Scope name
233-net
local
Group Prefix
233.252.0.0/16
233.252.0.0/16
Interface
fe-0/0/0.1
fe-0/0/0.1
Resolve
Rejects
0
0
show multicast scope inet6
user@host> show multicast scope inet6
Scope name
local
larry
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Group Prefix
Interface
2001:db8::/16
fe-0/0/0.1
2001:db8::1234/128
fe-0/0/0.1
Resolve
Rejects
0
0
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show multicast sessions
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 478
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 478
show multicast sessions
<brief | detail | extensive>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<regular-expression>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast sessions
<brief | detail | extensive>
<regular-expression>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Display information about announced IP multicast sessions.
NOTE: On all SRX Series devices, only 100 packets can be queued during
pending (S, G) route. However, when multiple multicast sessions enter the
route resolve process at the same time, buffer resources are not sufficient
to queue 100 packets for each session.
Options
none— Display standard information about all multicast sessions for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
regular-expression—(Optional) Display information about announced sessions that match
a UNIX-style regular expression.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show multicast sessions on page 479
show multicast sessions regular-expression detail on page 479
Table 33 on page 478 describes the output fields for the show multicast sessions command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 33: show multicast sessions Output Fields
478
Field Name
Field Description
session-name
Name of the known announced multicast sessions.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Sample Output
show multicast sessions
user@host> show multicast sessions
1-Department of Biological Sciences, LSU
...
Monterey Bay - DockCam
Monterey Bay - JettyCam
Monterey Bay - StandCam
Monterey DockCam
Monterey DockCam / ROV cam
...
NASA TV (MPEG-1)
...
UO Broadcast - NASA Videos - 25 Years of Progress
UO Broadcast - NASA Videos - Journey through the Solar System
UO Broadcast - NASA Videos - Life in the Universe
UO Broadcast - NASA Videos - Nasa and the Airplane
UO Broadcasts OPB's Oregon Story
UO DOD News Clips
UO Medical Management of Biological Casualties (1)
UO Medical Management of Biological Casualties (2)
UO Medical Management of Biological Casualties (3)
...
376 active sessions.
show multicast sessions regular-expression detail
user@host> show multicast sessions "NASA TV" detail
SDP Version: 0 Originated by: -@10.223.83.33
Session: NASA TV (MPEG-1)
Description: NASA television in MPEG-1 format, provided by Private University.
Please contact the UO if you have problems with this feed.
Email: Your Name Here <multicast@lists.private.edu>
Phone: Your Name Here <888/555-1212>
Bandwidth: AS:1000
Start time: permanent
Stop time: none
Attribute: type:broadcast
Attribute: tool:IP/TV Content Manager 3.4.14
Attribute: live:capture:1
Attribute: x-iptv-capture:mp1s
Media: video 54302 RTP/AVP 32 31 96 97
Connection Data: 233.252.0.45 ttl 127
Attribute: quality:8
Attribute: framerate:30
Attribute: rtpmap:96 WBIH/90000
Attribute: rtpmap:97 MP4V-ES/90000
Attribute: x-iptv-svr:video 10.223.91.191 live
Attribute: fmtp:32 type=mpeg1
Media: audio 28848 RTP/AVP 14 0 96 3 5 97 98 99 100 101 102 10 11 103 104 105 106
Connection Data: 224.2.145.37 ttl 127
Attribute: rtpmap:96 X-WAVE/8000
Attribute: rtpmap:97 L8/8000/2
Attribute: rtpmap:98 L8/8000
Attribute: rtpmap:99 L8/22050/2
Attribute: rtpmap:100 L8/22050
Attribute: rtpmap:101 L8/11025/2
Attribute: rtpmap:102 L8/11025
Attribute: rtpmap:103 L16/22050/2
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
479
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Attribute: rtpmap:104 L16/22050
1 matching sessions.
480
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show multicast usage
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 481
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 481
show multicast usage
<brief | detail>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show multicast usage
<brief | detail>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Display usage information about the 10 most active Distance Vector Multicast Routing
Protocol (DVMRP) or Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) groups.
Options
none—Display multicast usage information for all supported address families for all
routing instances.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display usage information for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses,
respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information about the most active DVMRP
or PIM groups for a specific multicast instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show multicast usage on page 482
show multicast usage brief on page 482
show multicast usage instance on page 482
show multicast usage detail on page 483
Table 34 on page 482 describes the output fields for the show multicast usage command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
481
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 34: show multicast usage Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Instance
Name of the routing instance. (Displayed when multicast is configured within
a routing instance.)
Group
Group address.
Sources
Number of sources.
Packets
Number of packets that have been forwarded to this prefix. If one or more of
the packets forwarded statistic queries fails or times out, the packets field
displays unavailable.
Bytes
Number of bytes that have been forwarded to this prefix. If one or more of the
packets forwarded statistic queries fails or times out, the bytes field displays
unavailable.
Prefix
IP address.
/len
Prefix length.
Groups
Number of multicast groups.
Sample Output
show multicast usage
user@host> show multicast usage
Group
Sources Packets
233.252.0.0
1
52847
233.252.0.1
2
13450
Prefix
10.255.14.144
10.255.70.15
/len Groups Packets
/32 2
66254
/32 1
43
Bytes
4439148
1125530
Bytes
5561304
3374...
show multicast usage brief
The output for the show multicast usage brief command is identical to that for the show
multicast usage command. For sample output, see show multicast usage on page 482.
show multicast usage instance
user@host> show multicast usage instance VPN-A
Group
Sources Packets
233.252.0.254
1
5538
233.252.0.39
1
13
233.252.0.40
1
13
Prefix
192.168.195.34
10.255.14.30
482
/len Groups Packets
/32 1
5538
/32 1
13
Bytes
509496
624
624
Bytes
509496
624
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
10.255.245.91
...
/32
1
13
624
show multicast usage detail
user@host> show multicast usage detail
Group
Sources Packets
Bytes
233.252.0.0
1
53159
4465356
Source: 10.255.14.144
/32 Packets: 53159 Bytes: 4465356
233.252.0.1
2
13450
1125530
Source: 10.255.14.144
/32 Packets: 13407 Bytes: 1122156
Source: 10.255.70.15
/32 Packets: 43 Bytes: 3374
Prefix
/len Groups Packets
Bytes
10.255.14.144
/32 2
66566
5587512
Group: 233.252.0.0
Packets: 53159 Bytes: 4465356
Group: 233.252.0.1
Packets: 13407 Bytes: 1122156
10.255.70.15
/32 1
43
3374
Group: 233.252.0.1
Packets: 43 Bytes: 3374
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
483
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show pim bootstrap
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 484
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 484
show pim bootstrap
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show pim bootstrap
<instance instance-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
instance option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
For sparse mode only, display information about Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
bootstrap routers.
none—Display PIM bootstrap router information for all routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information about bootstrap routers for a
specific PIM-enabled routing instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show pim bootstrap on page 485
show pim bootstrap instance on page 485
Table 35 on page 484 describes the output fields for the show pim bootstrap command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 35: show pim bootstrap Output Fields
484
Field Name
Field Description
Instance
Name of the routing instance.
BSR
Bootstrap router.
Pri
Priority of the routing device as elected to be the bootstrap router.
Local address
Local routing device address.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 35: show pim bootstrap Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Pri
Local routing device address priority to be elected as the bootstrap
router.
State
Local routing device election state: Candidate, Elected, or Ineligible.
Timeout
How long until the local routing device declares the bootstrap router
to be unreachable, in seconds.
Sample Output
show pim bootstrap
user@host> show pim bootstrap
Instance: PIM.master
BSR
Pri Local address
Pri State
Timeout
None
0 10.255.71.46
0 InEligible
0
2001:db8:1:1:1:0:aff:785c 34 2001:db8:1:1:1:0:aff:7c12
0 InEligible
0
show pim bootstrap instance
user@host> show pim bootstrap instance VPN-A
Instance: PIM.VPN-A
BSR
None
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Pri Local address
Pri State
Timeout
0 192.168.196.105
0 InEligible
0
485
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show pim interfaces
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 486
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 486
show pim interfaces
<inet | inet6>
<instance (instance-name | all)>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show pim interfaces
<inet | inet6>
<instance (instance-name | all)>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Commmand introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Support for bidirectional PIM added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Support for the instance all option added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display information about the interfaces on which Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM)
is configured.
none—Display interface information for all family addresses for the main instance.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display interface information for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses,
respectively.
instance (instance-name | all)—(Optional) Display information about interfaces for a
specific PIM-enabled routing instance or for all routing instances.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show pim interfaces on page 487
Table 36 on page 486 describes the output fields for the show pim interfaces command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 36: show pim interfaces Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Instance
Name of the routing instance.
Name
Interface name.
486
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 36: show pim interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
State
State of the interface. The state also is displayed in the show interfaces command.
Mode
PIM mode running on the interface:
•
B—In bidirectional mode, multicast groups are carried across the network over bidirectional shared
trees. This type of tree minimizes PIM routing state, which is especially important in networks with
numerous and dispersed senders and receivers.
•
S—In sparse mode, routing devices must join and leave multicast groups explicitly. Upstream routing
devices do not forward multicast traffic to this routing device unless this device has sent an explicit
request (using a join message) to receive multicast traffic.
•
Dense—Unlike sparse mode, where data is forwarded only to routing devices sending an explicit
request, dense mode implements a flood-and-prune mechanism, similar to DVMRP (the first
multicast protocol used to support the multicast backbone). (Not supported on QFX Series.)
•
Sparse-Dense—Sparse-dense mode allows the interface to operate on a per-group basis in either
sparse or dense mode. A group specified as dense is not mapped to a rendezvous point (RP).
Instead, data packets destined for that group are forwarded using PIM-Dense Mode (PIM-DM)
rules. A group specified as sparse is mapped to an RP, and data packets are forwarded using
PIM-Sparse Mode (PIM-SM) rules.
When sparse-dense mode is configured, the output includes both S and D. When bidirectional-sparse
mode is configured, the output includes S and B. When bidirectional-sparse-dense mode is
configured, the output includes B, S, and D.
IP
Version number of the address family on the interface: 4 (IPv4) or 6 (IPv6).
V
PIM version running on the interface: 1 or 2.
State
State of PIM on the interface:
•
Active—Bidirectional mode is enabled on the interface and on all PIM neighbors.
•
DR—Designated router.
•
NotCap—Bidirectional mode is not enabled on the interface. This can happen when bidirectional
PIM is not configured locally, when one of the neighbors is not configured for bidirectional PIM, or
when one of the neighbors has not implemented the bidirectional PIM protocol.
•
NotDR—Not the designated router.
•
P2P—Point to point.
NbrCnt
Number of neighbors that have been seen on the interface.
JoinCnt(sg)
Number of (s,g) join messages that have been seen on the interface.
JointCnt(*g)
Number of (*,g) join messages that have been seen on the interface.
DR address
Address of the designated router.
Sample Output
show pim interfaces
user@host> show pim interfaces
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
487
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Stat = Status, V = Version, NbrCnt = Neighbor Count,
S = Sparse, D = Dense, B = Bidirectional,
DR = Designated Router, P2P = Point-to-point link,
Active = Bidirectional is active, NotCap = Not Bidirectional Capable
Name
ge-0/3/0.0
ge-0/3/3.50
ge-0/3/3.51
pe-1/2/0.32769
488
Stat
Up
Up
Up
Up
Mode IP V State
NbrCnt JoinCnt(sg/*g)
S
4 2 NotDR,NotCap
1 0/0
S
4 2 DR,NotCap
1 9901/100
S
4 2 DR,NotCap
1 0/0
S
4 2 P2P,NotCap
0 0/0
DR address
40.0.0.3
50.0.0.2
51.0.0.2
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show pim join
List of Syntax
Syntax on page 489
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 489
Syntax
show pim join
<brief | detail | extensive | summary>
<bidirectional | dense | sparse>
<downstream-count>
<exact>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<range>
<rp ip-address/prefix | source ip-address/prefix>
<sg | star-g>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show pim join
<brief | detail | extensive | summary>
<dense | sparse>
<exact>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<range>
<rp ip-address/prefix | source ip-address/prefix>
<sg | star-g>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
summary option introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Support for bidirectional PIM added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Multiple new filter options introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
downstream-count option introduced in Junos OS Release 16.1.
Support for PIM NSR support for VXLAN added in Junos OS Release 16.2
Description
Display information about Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) groups for all PIM
modes.
For bidirectional PIM, display information about PIM group ranges (*,G-range) for each
active bidirectional RP group range, in addition to each of the joined (*,G) routes.
Options
none—Display the standard information about PIM groups for all supported family
addresses for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive | summary—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
bidirectional | dense | sparse—(Optional) Display information about PIM bidirectional
mode, dense mode, or sparse and source-specific multicast (SSM) mode entries.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
489
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
downstream-count—(Optional) Display the downstream count instead of a list.
exact—(Optional) Display information about only the group that exactly matches the
specified group address.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display PIM group information for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses,
respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information about groups for the specified
PIM-enabled routing instance only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
range—(Optional) Address range of the group, specified as prefix/prefix-length.
rp ip-address/prefix | source ip-address/prefix—(Optional) Display information about the
PIM entries with a specified rendezvous point (RP) address and prefix or with a
specified source address and prefix. You can omit the prefix.
sg | star-g—(Optional) Display information about PIM (S,G) or (*,G) entries.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
490
view
•
clear pim join on page 432
•
Example: Configuring Multicast-Only Fast Reroute in a PIM Domain
•
Example: Configuring Bidirectional PIM
•
Example: Configuring PIM State Limits
show pim join summary on page 494
show pim join (PIM Sparse Mode) on page 494
show pim join (Bidirectional PIM) on page 494
show pim join inet6 on page 495
show pim join inet6 star-g on page 495
show pim join instance <instance-name> on page 496
show pim join instance <instance-name> downstream-count on page 496
show pim join instance <instance-name> downstream-count extensive on page 496
show pim join detail on page 497
show pim join extensive (PIM Sparse Mode) on page 497
show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM) on page 498
show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM with a Directly Connected Phantom
RP) on page 499
show pim join instance <instance-name> extensive on page 499
show pim join extensive (Ingress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for
Point-to-Multipoint LSPs) on page 500
show pim join extensive (Egress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for
Point-to-Multipoint LSPs) on page 501
show pim join summary on page 503
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show pim join (PIM Sparse Mode) on page 503
show pim join (Bidirectional PIM) on page 504
show pim join inet6 on page 504
show pim join inet6 star-g on page 505
show pim join instance <instance-name> on page 505
show pim join detail on page 505
show pim join extensive (PIM Sparse Mode) on page 506
show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM) on page 507
show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM with a Directly Connected Phantom
RP) on page 508
show pim join <ip-address> extensive sg (Multipoint LDP with Multicast-Only Fast
Reroute) on page 508
show pim join extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on master Routing
Engine) on page 508
show pim join extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on backup Routing
Engine) on page 509
Output Fields
Table 37 on page 491 describes the output fields for the show pim join command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 37: show pim join Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Instance
Name of the routing instance.
brief detail extensive summary none
Family
Name of the address family: inet (IPv4) or inet6 (IPv6).
brief detail extensive summary none
Route type
Type of multicast route: (S,G) or (*,G).
summary
Route count
Number of (S,G) routes and number of (*,G) routes.
summary
R
Rendezvous Point Tree.
brief detail extensive none
S
Sparse.
brief detail extensive none
W
Wildcard.
brief detail extensive none
Group
Group address.
brief detail extensive none
Bidirectional group
prefix length
For bidirectional PIM, length of the IP prefix for RP group ranges.
All levels
Source
Multicast source:
brief detail extensive none
RP
•
* (wildcard value)
•
ipv4-address
•
ipv6-address
Rendezvous point for the PIM group.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
brief detail extensive none
491
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 37: show pim join Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Flags
PIM flags:
brief detail extensive none
Upstream interface
•
bidirectional—Bidirectional mode entry.
•
dense—Dense mode entry.
•
rptree—Entry is on the rendezvous point tree.
•
sparse—Sparse mode entry.
•
spt—Entry is on the shortest-path tree for the source.
•
wildcard—Entry is on the shared tree.
RPF interface toward the source address for the source-specific state (S,G)
or toward the rendezvous point (RP) address for the non-source-specific
state (*,G).
brief detail extensive none
For bidirectional PIM, RP Link means that the interface is directly connected
to a subnet that contains a phantom RP address.
A pseudo multipoint LDP (M-LDP) interface appears on egress nodes in
M-LDP point-to-multipoint LSPs with inband signaling.
Upstream neighbor
Information about the upstream neighbor: Direct, Local, Unknown, or a
specific IP address.
extensive
For bidirectional PIM, Direct means that the interface is directly connected
to a subnet that contains a phantom RP address.
The multipoint LDP (M-LDP) root appears on egress nodes in M-LDP
point-to-multipoint LSPs with inband signaling.
Active upstream
interface
When multicast-only fast reroute (MoFRR) is configured in a PIM domain,
the upstream interface for the active path. A PIM router propagates join
messages on two upstream RPF interfaces to receive multicast traffic on
both links for the same join request. Preference is given to two paths that
do not converge to the same immediate upstream router. PIM installs
appropriate multicast routes with upstream neighbors as RPF next hops
with two (primary and backup) interfaces.
extensive
Active upstream
neighbor
On the MoFRR primary path, the IP address of the neighbor that is directly
connected to the active upstream interface.
extensive
MoFRR Backup
upstream interface
The MoFRR upstream interface that is used when the primary path fails.
extensive
When the primary path fails, the backup path is upgraded to primary, and
traffic is forwarded accordingly. If there are alternate paths available, a
new backup path is calculated and the appropriate multicast route is
updated or installed.
492
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 37: show pim join Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Upstream state
Information about the upstream interface:
extensive
•
Join to RP—Sending a join to the rendezvous point.
•
Join to Source—Sending a join to the source.
•
Local RP—Sending neither join messages nor prune messages toward
the RP, because this routing device is the rendezvous point.
•
Local Source—Sending neither join messages nor prune messages toward
the source, because the source is locally attached to this routing device.
•
No Prune to RP—Automatically sent to RP when SPT and RPT are on the
same path.
•
Prune to RP—Sending a prune to the rendezvous point.
•
Prune to Source—Sending a prune to the source.
NOTE: RP group range entries have None in the Upstream state field because
RP group ranges do not trigger actual PIM join messages between routing
devices.
Downstream
neighbors
Information about downstream interfaces:
•
extensive
Interface—Interface name for the downstream neighbor.
A pseudo PIM-SM interface appears for all IGMP-only interfaces.
A pseudo multipoint LDP (M-LDP) interface appears on ingress root
nodes in M-LDP point-to-multipoint LSPs with inband signaling.
•
Interface address—Address of the downstream neighbor.
•
State—Information about the downstream neighbor: join or prune.
•
Flags—PIM join flags: R (RPtree), S (Sparse), W (Wildcard), or zero.
•
Uptime—Time since the downstream interface joined the group.
•
Time since last Join—Time since the last join message was received from
the downstream interface.
•
Time since last Prune—Time since the last prune message was received
from the downstream interface.
Number of
downstream
interfaces
Total number of outgoing interfaces for each (S,G) entry.
extensive
Assert Timeout
Length of time between assert cycles on the downstream interface. Not
displayed if the assert timer is null.
extensive
Keepalive timeout
Time remaining until the downstream join state is updated (in seconds). If
the downstream join state is not updated before this keepalive timer reaches
zero, the entry is deleted. If there is a directly connected host, Keepalive
timeout is Infinity.
extensive
Uptime
Time since the creation of (S,G) or (*,G) state. The uptime is not refreshed
every time a PIM join message is received for an existing (S,G) or (*,G) state.
extensive
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Table 37: show pim join Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Bidirectional
accepting
interfaces
Interfaces on the routing device that forward bidirectional PIM traffic.
extensive
The reasons for forwarding bidirectional PIM traffic are that the interface
is the winner of the designated forwarder election (DF Winner), or the
interface is the reverse path forwarding (RPF) interface toward the RP
(RPF).
Sample Output
show pim join summary
user@host> show pim join summary
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
Route type
(s,g)
(*,g)
Route count
2
1
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
show pim join (PIM Sparse Mode)
user@host> show pim join
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show pim join
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
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Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.2
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Group: 233.252.0.3
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.4
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join inet6
user@host> show pim join inet6
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 2001:db8::e000:101
Source: *
RP: ::46.0.0.13
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 2001:db8::e000:101
Source: ::1.1.1.1
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: unknown (no neighbor)
Group: 2001:db8::e800:101
Source: ::1.1.1.1
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: unknown (no neighbor)
Group: 2001:db8::e800:101
Source: ::1.1.1.2
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: unknown (no neighbor)
show pim join inet6 star-g
user@host> show pim join inet6 star-g
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 2001:db8::e000:101
Source: *
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RP: ::46.0.0.13
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
show pim join instance <instance-name>
user@host> show pim join instance VPN-A
Instance: PIM.VPN-A Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: *
RP: 10.10.47.100
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.195.74
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: at-0/3/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.195.169
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: so-1/0/1.0
Instance: PIM.VPN-A Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join instance <instance-name> downstream-count
user@host> show pim join instance VPN-A downstream-count
Instance: PIM.SML_VRF_4 Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.11.11.6
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: mt-1/2/10.32813
Number of downstream interfaces: 4
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.1.1.1
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/3.5
Number of downstream interfaces: 5
show pim join instance <instance-name> downstream-count extensive
user@host> show pim join instance VPN-A downstream-count extensive
Instance: PIM.SML_VRF_4 Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.11.11.6
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: mt-1/2/10.32813
Upstream neighbor: 10.2.2.7 (assert winner)
Upstream state: Join to RP
Uptime: 02:51:41
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Number of downstream interfaces: 4
Number of downstream neighbors: 4
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.1.1.1
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/3.5
Upstream neighbor: 10.1.1.17
Upstream state: Join to Source, Prune to RP
Keepalive timeout: 0
Uptime: 02:51:42
Number of downstream interfaces: 5
Number of downstream neighbors: 7
show pim join detail
user@host> show pim join detail
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join extensive (PIM Sparse Mode)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 00:03:49
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: so-1/0/0.0
10.111.10.2 State: Join Flags: SRW Timeout: 174
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Join: 00:01:49
Interface: mt-1/1/0.32768
10.10.47.100 State: Join Flags: SRW Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Join: 00:01:49
Number of downstream interfaces: 2
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Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local Source, Local RP
Keepalive timeout: 344
Uptime: 00:03:49
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: so-1/0/0.0
10.111.10.2 State: Join Flags: S Timeout: 174
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Interface: mt-1/1/0.32768
10.10.47.100 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Number of downstream interfaces: 2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.111.10.2
Upstream state: Local RP, Join to Source
Keepalive timeout: 344
Uptime: 00:03:49
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-GMP
fe-0/0/0.0 fe-0/0/1.0 fe-0/0/3.0
Interface: so-1/0/0.0 (pruned)
10.111.10.2 State: Prune Flags: SR Timeout: 174
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Interface: mt-1/1/0.32768
10.10.47.100 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Number of downstream interfaces: 3
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.0
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.10.1.2
Upstream state: None
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Number of downstream interfaces: 0
Group: 233.252.0.1
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Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.10.1.2
Upstream state: None
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: lt-1/0/10.24
10.0.24.4 State: Join
RW Timeout: 185
Interface: lt-1/0/10.23
10.0.23.3 State: Join
RW Timeout: 184
Number of downstream interfaces: 2
Group: 233.252.0.2
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Interface: xe-4/1/0.0
(DF Winner)
Number of downstream interfaces: 0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM with a Directly Connected Phantom RP)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.0
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Interface: xe-4/1/0.0
(DF Winner)
Number of downstream interfaces: 0
show pim join instance <instance-name> extensive
user@host> show pim join instance VPN-A extensive
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Instance: PIM.VPN-A Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: *
RP: 10.10.47.100
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 00:03:49
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: mt-1/1/0.32768
10.10.47.101 State: Join Flags: SRW Timeout: 156
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Join: 00:01:49
Number of downstream interfaces: 1
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.195.74
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: at-0/3/1.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.111.30.2
Upstream state: Local RP, Join to Source
Keepalive timeout: 156
Uptime: 00:14:52
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.195.169
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: so-1/0/1.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.111.20.2
Upstream state: Local RP, Join to Source
Keepalive timeout: 156
Uptime: 00:14:52
show pim join extensive (Ingress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for Point-to-Multipoint LSPs)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 192.168.219.11
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: fe-1/3/1.0
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:27:55
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-MLDP
Interface: lt-1/2/0.25
10.2.5.2 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:27:55 Time since last Join: 11:27:55
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.219.11
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: fe-1/3/1.0
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local Source
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Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:27:41
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-MLDP
Group: 233.252.0.3
Source: 192.168.219.11
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: fe-1/3/1.0
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:27:41
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-MLDP
Group: 233.252.0.22
Source: 10.2.7.7
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: lt-1/2/0.27
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:27:25
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-MLDP
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 2001:db8::1:2
Source: 2001:db8::1:2:7:7
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: lt-1/2/0.27
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:27:26
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-MLDP
show pim join extensive (Egress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for Point-to-Multipoint LSPs)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.0
Source: *
RP: 10.1.1.1
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 11:31:33
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: fe-1/3/0.0
192.168.209.9 State: Join Flags: SRW Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:33 Time since last Join: 11:31:32
Group: 233.252.0.1
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Source: 192.168.219.11
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream protocol: MLDP
Upstream interface: Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor: MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
Upstream state: Join to Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:31:32
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: so-0/1/3.0
192.168.92.9 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:30 Time since last Join: 11:31:30
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: fe-1/3/0.0
192.168.209.9 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:32 Time since last Join: 11:31:32
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.219.11
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream protocol: MLDP
Upstream interface: Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor: MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
Upstream state: Join to Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:31:32
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: so-0/1/3.0
192.168.92.9 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:30 Time since last Join: 11:31:30
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: lt-1/2/0.14
10.1.4.4 State: Join Flags: S Timeout: 177
Uptime: 11:30:33 Time since last Join: 00:00:33
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: fe-1/3/0.0
192.168.209.9 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:32 Time since last Join: 11:31:32
Group: 233.252.0.3
Source: 192.168.219.11
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream protocol: MLDP
Upstream interface: Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor: MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
Upstream state: Join to Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:31:32
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: fe-1/3/0.0
192.168.209.9 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:32 Time since last Join: 11:31:32
Group: 233.252.0.22
Source: 10.2.7.7
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream protocol: MLDP
Upstream interface: Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor: MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
Upstream state: Join to Source
Keepalive timeout:
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Uptime: 11:31:30
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: so-0/1/3.0
192.168.92.9 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:30 Time since last Join: 11:31:30
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 2001:db8::1:2
Source: 2001:db8::1:2:7:7
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream protocol: MLDP
Upstream interface: Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor: MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
Upstream state: Join to Source
Keepalive timeout:
Uptime: 11:31:32
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: fe-1/3/0.0
2001:db8::21f:12ff:fea5:c4db State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 11:31:32 Time since last Join: 11:31:32
Sample Output
show pim join summary
user@host> show pim join summary
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
Route type
(s,g)
(*,g)
Route count
2
1
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
show pim join (PIM Sparse Mode)
user@host> show pim join
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
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show pim join (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show pim join
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.0
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.1
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Group: 233.252.0.2
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.3
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join inet6
user@host> show pim join inet6
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 2001:db8::e000:101
Source: *
RP: ::46.0.0.13
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 2001:db8::e000:101
Source: ::1.1.1.1
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: unknown (no neighbor)
Group: 2001:db8::e800:101
Source: ::1.1.1.1
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: unknown (no neighbor)
Group: 2001:db8::e800:101
Source: ::1.1.1.2
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Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: unknown (no neighbor)
show pim join inet6 star-g
user@host> show pim join inet6 star-g
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 2001:db8::e000:101
Source: *
RP: ::46.0.0.13
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
show pim join instance <instance-name>
user@host> show pim join instance VPN-A
Instance: PIM.VPN-A Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: *
RP: 10.10.47.100
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.195.74
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: at-0/3/1.0
Group: 233.252.0.2
Source: 192.168.195.169
Flags: sparse
Upstream interface: so-1/0/1.0
Instance: PIM.VPN-A Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join detail
user@host> show pim join detail
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
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Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join extensive (PIM Sparse Mode)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: *
RP: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 00:03:49
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: so-1/0/0.0
10.111.10.2 State: Join Flags: SRW Timeout: 174
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Join: 00:01:49
Interface: mt-1/1/0.32768
10.10.47.100 State: Join Flags: SRW Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Join: 00:01:49
Number of downstream interfaces: 2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.14.144
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local Source, Local RP
Keepalive timeout: 344
Uptime: 00:03:49
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: so-1/0/0.0
10.111.10.2 State: Join Flags: S Timeout: 174
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Interface: mt-1/1/0.32768
10.10.47.100 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Number of downstream interfaces: 2
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.255.70.15
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: so-1/0/0.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.111.10.2
Upstream state: Local RP, Join to Source
Keepalive timeout: 344
Uptime: 00:03:49
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-GMP
fe-0/0/0.0 fe-0/0/1.0 fe-0/0/3.0
Interface: so-1/0/0.0 (pruned)
10.111.10.2 State: Prune Flags: SR Timeout: 174
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Interface: mt-1/1/0.32768
10.10.47.100 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 00:03:49 Time since last Prune: 00:01:49
Number of downstream interfaces: 3
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Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.0
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.10.1.2
Upstream state: None
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Number of downstream interfaces: 0
Group: 233.252.0.1
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.13.2
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.10.1.2
Upstream state: None
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: lt-1/0/10.24
10.0.24.4 State: Join
RW Timeout: 185
Interface: lt-1/0/10.23
10.0.23.3 State: Join
RW Timeout: 184
Number of downstream interfaces: 2
Group: 233.252.0.2
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Interface: xe-4/1/0.0
(DF Winner)
Number of downstream interfaces: 0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
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show pim join extensive (Bidirectional PIM with a Directly Connected Phantom RP)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.0
Bidirectional group prefix length: 24
Source: *
RP: 10.10.1.3
Flags: bidirectional,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-0/0/1.0 (RP Link)
Upstream neighbor: Direct
Upstream state: Local RP
Uptime: 00:03:49
Bidirectional accepting interfaces:
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
(RPF)
Interface: lo0.0
(DF Winner)
Interface: xe-4/1/0.0
(DF Winner)
Number of downstream interfaces: 0
show pim join <ip-address> extensive sg (Multipoint LDP with Multicast-Only Fast Reroute)
user@host> show pim join 233.252.0.1 extensive sg
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 233.252.0.1
Source: 10.0.0.1
Flags: sparse,spt
Active upstream interface: fe-1/2/13.0
Active upstream neighbor: 10.0.0.9
MoFRR Backup upstream interface: fe-1/2/14.0
MoFRR Backup upstream neighbor: 10.0.0.21
Upstream state: Join to Source, No Prune to RP
Keepalive timeout: 354
Uptime: 00:00:06
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: fe-1/2/15.0
10.0.0.13 State: Join Flags: S
Timeout: Infinity
Uptime: 00:00:06 Time since last Join: 00:00:06
Number of downstream interfaces: 1
show pim join extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on master Routing Engine)
user@host> show pim join extensive
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: *
RP: 10.2.1.3
Flags: sparse,rptree,wildcard
Upstream interface: ge-3/1/2.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.1.4.1 (assert winner)
Upstream state: Join to RP
Uptime: 00:07:40
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-VXLAN
Number of downstream interfaces: 1
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Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 3.3.3.3
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: ge-3/1/2.0
Upstream neighbor: 10.1.4.1
Upstream state: Join to Source, No Prune to RP
Keepalive timeout: 315
Uptime: 00:06:34
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: Pseudo-VXLAN
Number of downstream interfaces: 1
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 10.2.1.4
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local Source, Prune to RP
Keepalive timeout: 315
Uptime: 00:07:41
Downstream neighbors:
Interface: ge-3/1/2.0 (assert winner)
10.1.4.1 State: Join Flags: S Timeout: 165
Uptime: 00:06:44 Time since last Join: 00:00:44
Assert Winner: 10.1.4.2 Metric: 0 Pref: 0 Timeout: 23
Interface: Pseudo-VXLAN
Number of downstream interfaces: 2
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
show pim join extensive (PIM NSR support for VXLAN on backup Routing Engine)
user@host> show pim join extensive
mirroring of pim joins for Pseudo-VXLAN interface, So, (*,g) state is not created.
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
Group: 239.1.1.1
Source: 10.2.1.4
Flags: sparse,spt
Upstream interface: Local
Upstream neighbor: Local
Upstream state: Local Source
Keepalive timeout: 358
Uptime: 00:07:51
Downstream neighbors:
Number of downstream interfaces: 0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
R = Rendezvous Point Tree, S = Sparse, W = Wildcard
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show pim neighbors
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 510
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 510
show pim neighbors
<brief | detail>
<inet | inet6>
<instance (instance-name | all)>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show pim neighbors
<brief | detail>
<inet | inet6>
<instance (instance-name | all)>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Support for bidirectional PIM added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Support for the instance all option added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display information about Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) neighbors.
none—(Same as brief) Display standard information about PIM neighbors for all supported
family addresses for the main instance.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display information about PIM neighbors for IPv4 or IPv6 family
addresses, respectively.
instance (instance-name | all)—(Optional) Display information about neighbors for the
specified PIM-enabled routing instance or for all routing instances.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
510
view
show pim neighbors on page 512
show pim neighbors brief on page 512
show pim neighbors instance on page 512
show pim neighbors detail on page 512
show pim neighbors detail (With BFD) on page 513
Table 38 on page 511 describes the output fields for the show pim neighbors command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 38: show pim neighbors Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Instance
Name of the routing instance.
All levels
Interface
Interface through which the neighbor is reachable.
All levels
Neighbor addr
Address of the neighboring PIM routing device.
All levels
IP
IP version: 4 or 6.
All levels
V
PIM version running on the neighbor: 1 or 2.
All levels
Mode
PIM mode of the neighbor: Sparse, Dense, SparseDense, or Unknown. When the
neighbor is running PIM version 2, this mode is always Unknown.
All levels
Option
Can be one or more of the following:
brief none
•
B—Bidirectional Capable.
•
G—Generation Identifier.
•
H—Hello Option Holdtime.
•
L—Hello Option LAN Prune Delay.
•
P—Hello Option DR Priority.
•
T—Tracking bit.
Uptime
Time the neighbor has been operational since the PIM process was last initialized,
in the format dd:hh:mm:ss ago for less than a week and nwnd:hh:mm:ss ago for
more than a week.
All levels
Address
Address of the neighboring PIM routing device.
detail
BFD
Status and operational state of the Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD)
protocol on the interface: Enabled, Operational state is up, or Disabled.
detail
Hello Option
Holdtime
Time for which the neighbor is available, in seconds. The range of values is
0 through 65,535.
detail
Hello Default
Holdtime
Default holdtime and the time remaining if the holdtime option is not in the
received hello message.
detail
Hello Option DR
Priority
Designated router election priority. The range of values is 0 through 255.
detail
Hello Option
Generation ID
9-digit or 10-digit number used to tag hello messages.
detail
Hello Option
Bi-Directional PIM
supported
Neighbor can process bidirectional PIM messages.
detail
Hello Option LAN
Prune Delay
Time to wait before the neighbor receives prune messages, in the format delay
nnn ms override nnnn ms.
detail
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Table 38: show pim neighbors Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Join Suppression
supported
Neighbor is capable of join suppression.
detail
Rx Join
Information about joins received from the neighbor.
detail
•
Group—Group addresses in the join message.
•
Source—Address of the source in the join message.
•
Timeout—Time for which the join is valid.
Sample Output
show pim neighbors
user@host> show pim neighbors
Instance: PIM.master
B = Bidirectional Capable, G = Generation Identifier,
H = Hello Option Holdtime, L = Hello Option LAN Prune Delay,
P = Hello Option DR Priority, T = Tracking bit
Interface
so-1/0/0.0
IP V Mode
4 2
Option
HPLG
Uptime Neighbor addr
00:07:10 10.111.10.2
show pim neighbors brief
The output for the show pim neighbors brief command is identical to that for the show
pim neighbors command. For sample output, see show pim neighbors on page 512.
show pim neighbors instance
user@host> show pim neighbors instance VPN-A
Instance: PIM.VPN-A
B = Bidirectional Capable, G = Generation Identifier,
H = Hello Option Holdtime, L = Hello Option LAN Prune Delay,
P = Hello Option DR Priority, T = Tracking bit
Interface
at-0/3/1.0
mt-1/1/0.32768
so-1/0/1.0
IP
4
4
4
V Mode
2
2
2
Option
HPLG
HPLG
HPLG
Uptime
00:07:54
00:07:22
00:07:50
Neighbor addr
10.111.30.2
10.10.47.101
10.111.20.2
show pim neighbors detail
user@host> show pim neighbors detail
Instance: PIM.master
Interface: ge-0/0/1.0
Address: 10.10.1.1, IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: SparseDense, sg Join Count: 0, tsg
Join Count: 2
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 2053759302
Hello Option Bi-Directional PIM supported
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Address: 10.10.1.2, IPv4, PIM v2, sg Join Count: 0, tsg Join Count: 2
BFD: Disabled
Hello Option Holdtime: 105 seconds 93 remaining
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 1734018161
Hello Option Bi-Directional PIM supported
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
Interface: lo0.0
Address: 10.255.179.246,
IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: SparseDense, sg Join Count:
0, tsg Join Count: 0
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 1997462267
Hello Option Bi-Directional PIM supported
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Join Suppression supported
show pim neighbors detail (With BFD)
user@host> show pim neighbors detail
Instance: PIM.master
Interface: fe-1/0/0.0
Address: 192.168.11.1,
IPv4, PIM v2, Mode: Sparse
Hello Option Holdtime: 65535 seconds
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 836607909
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Address: 192.168.11.2,
IPv4, PIM v2
BFD: Enabled, Operational state is up
Hello Default Holdtime: 105 seconds 104 remaining
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 1907549685
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
Interface: fe-1/0/1.0
Address: 192.168.12.1,
IPv4, PIM v2
BFD: Disabled
Hello Default Holdtime: 105 seconds 80 remaining
Hello Option DR Priority: 1
Hello Option Generation ID: 1971554705
Hello Option LAN Prune Delay: delay 500 ms override 2000 ms
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show pim rps
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 514
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 514
show pim rps
<brief | detail | extensive>
<group-address>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show pim rps
<brief | detail | extensive>
<group-address>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Support for bidirectional PIM added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display information about Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) rendezvous points
(RPs).
none—Display standard information about PIM RPs for all groups and family addresses
for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
group-address—(Optional) Display the RPs for a particular group. If you specify a group
address, the output lists the routing device that is the RP for that group.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display information for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information about RPs for a specific
PIM-enabled routing instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
514
view
•
Example: Configuring Bidirectional PIM
show pim rps on page 517
show pim rps brief on page 517
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show pim rps <group-address> on page 517
show pim rps <group-address> on page 517
show pim rps <group-address> (Bidirectional PIM) on page 518
show pim rps <group-address> (PIM Dense Mode) on page 518
show pim rps <group-address> (SSM Range Without asm-override-ssm
Configured) on page 518
show pim rps <group-address> (SSM Range With asm-override-ssm Configured and
a Sparse-Mode RP) on page 518
show pim rps <group-address> (SSM Range With asm-override-ssm Configured and
a Bidirectional RP) on page 518
show pim rps instance on page 518
show pim rps extensive (PIM Sparse Mode) on page 519
show pim rps extensive (Bidirectional PIM) on page 519
show pim rps extensive (PIM Anycast RP in Use) on page 519
Output Fields
Table 39 on page 515 describes the output fields for the show pim rps command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 39: show pim rps Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Instance
Name of the routing instance.
All levels
Family or Address
family
Name of the address family: inet (IPv4) or inet6 (IPv6).
All levels
RP address
Address of the rendezvous point.
All levels
Type
Type of RP:
brief none
•
auto-rp—Address of the RP known through the Auto-RP protocol.
•
bootstrap—Address of the RP known through the bootstrap router protocol
(BSR).
•
embedded—Address of the RP known through an embedded RP (IPv6).
•
static—Address of RP known through static configuration.
Holdtime
How long to keep the RP active, with time remaining, in seconds.
All levels
Timeout
How long until the local routing device determines the RP to be unreachable,
in seconds.
All levels
Groups
Number of groups currently using this RP.
All levels
Group prefixes
Addresses of groups that this RP can span.
brief none
Learned via
Address and method by which the RP was learned.
detail extensive
Mode
The PIM mode of the RP: bidirectional or sparse.
All levels
If a sparse and bidirectional RPs are configured with the same RP address, they
appear as separate entries in both formats.
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Table 39: show pim rps Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Time Active
How long the RP has been active, in the format hh:mm:ss.
detail extensive
Device Index
Index value of the order in which Junos OS finds and initializes the interface.
detail extensive
For bidirectional RPs, the Device Index output field is omitted because
bidirectional RPs do not require encapsulation and de-encapsulation interfaces.
Subunit
Logical unit number of the interface.
detail extensive
For bidirectional RPs, the Subunit output field is omitted because bidirectional
RPs do not require encapsulation and de-encapsulation interfaces.
Interface
Either the encapsulation or the de-encapsulation logical interface, depending
on whether this routing device is a designated router (DR) facing an RP router,
or is the local RP, respectively.
detail extensive
For bidirectional RPs, the Interface output field is omitted because bidirectional
RPs do not require encapsulation and de-encapsulation interfaces.
Group Ranges
Addresses of groups that this RP spans.
detail extensive
group-address
Active groups using
RP
Number of groups currently using this RP.
detail extensive
total
Total number of active groups for this RP.
detail extensive
Register State for
RP
Current register state for each group:
extensive
•
Group—Multicast group address.
•
Source—Multicast source address for which the PIM register is sent or received,
depending on whether this router is a designated router facing an RP router,
or is the local RP, respectively:
•
First Hop—PIM-designated routing device that sent the Register message
(the source address in the IP header).
•
RP Address—RP to which the Register message was sent (the destination
address in the IP header).
•
State:
On the designated router:
•
Send—Sending Register messages.
•
Probe—Sent a null register. If a Register-Stop message does not arrive in
5 seconds, the designated router resumes sending Register messages.
•
•
On the RP:
•
Anycast-PIM rpset
516
Suppress—Received a Register-Stop message. The designated router is
waiting for the timer to resume before changing to Probe state.
Receive—Receiving Register messages.
If anycast RP is configured, the addresses of the RPs in the set.
extensive
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 39: show pim rps Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Anycast-PIM local
address used
If anycast RP is configured, the local address used by the RP.
extensive
Anycast-PIM
Register State
If anycast RP is configured, the current register state for each group:
extensive
•
Group—Multicast group address.
•
Source—Multicast source address for which the PIM register is sent or received,
depending on whether this routing device is a designated router facing an RP
router, or is the local RP, respectively.
•
RP selected
Origin—How the information was obtained:
•
DIRECT—From a local attachment
•
MSDP—From the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP)
•
DR—From the designated router
For sparse mode and bidirectional mode, the identity of the RP for the specified
group address.
group-address
Sample Output
show pim rps
user@host> show pim rps
Instance: PIM.master
Address-family INET
RP address
Type
10.100.100.100 auto-rp
Mode
sparse
10.200.200.200 auto-rp
sparse
Holdtime Timeout Groups Group prefixes
150
146
0 233.252.0.0/8
233.252.0.1/24
150
146
0 233.252.0.2/4
address-family INET6
show pim rps brief
The output for the show pim rps brief command is identical to that for the show pim rps
command. For sample output, see show pim rps on page 517.
show pim rps <group-address>
user@host> show pim rps 233.252.0.0
Instance: PIM.master
Instance: PIM.master
RP selected: 10.100.100.100
show pim rps <group-address>
user@host> show pim rps 233.252.0.0
Instance: PIM.master
Instance: PIM.master
RP selected: 10.100.100.100
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show pim rps <group-address> (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show pim rps 233.252.0.1
Instance: PIM.master
233.252.0.0/16
10.4.12.75 (Bidirectional)
RP selected: 10.4.12.75
show pim rps <group-address> (PIM Dense Mode)
user@host> show pim rps 233.252.0.1
Instance: PIM.master
Dense Mode active for group 233.252.0.1
show pim rps <group-address> (SSM Range Without asm-override-ssm Configured)
user@host> show pim rps 233.252.0.1
Instance: PIM.master
Source-specific Mode (SSM) active for group 233.252.0.1
show pim rps <group-address> (SSM Range With asm-override-ssm Configured and a Sparse-Mode RP)
user@host> show pim rps 233.252.0.1
Instance: PIM.master
Source-specific Mode (SSM) active with Sparse Mode ASM override for group
233.252.0.1
233.252.0.0/16
10.4.12.75
RP selected: 10.4.12.75
show pim rps <group-address> (SSM Range With asm-override-ssm Configured and a Bidirectional RP)
user@host> show pim rps 233.252.0.1
Instance: PIM.master
Source-specific Mode (SSM) active with Sparse Mode ASM override for group
233.252.0.1
233.252.0.0/16
10.4.12.75 (Bidirectional)
RP selected: (null)
show pim rps instance
user@host> show pim rps instance VPN-A
Instance: PIM.VPN-A
Address family INET
RP address
Type
Holdtime Timeout Groups Group prefixes
10.10.47.100
static
0
None
1 233.252.0.0/4
Address family INET6
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Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show pim rps extensive (PIM Sparse Mode)
user@host> show pim rps extensive
Instance: PIM.master
Family: INET
RP: 10.255.245.91
Learned via: static configuration
Time Active: 00:05:48
Holdtime: 45 with 36 remaining
Device Index: 122
Subunit: 32768
Interface: pd-6/0/0.32768
Group Ranges:
233.252.0.0/4, 36s remaining
Active groups using RP:
233.252.0.1
total 1 groups active
Register State for RP:
Group
Source
FirstHop
RP Address
State
Timeout
233.252.0.1
192.168.195.78 10.255.14.132
10.255.245.91
Receive
0
show pim rps extensive (Bidirectional PIM)
user@host> show pim rps extensive
Instance: PIM.master
Address family INET
RP: 10.10.1.3
Learned via: static configuration
Mode: Bidirectional
Time Active: 01:58:07
Holdtime: 150
Group Ranges:
233.252.0.0/24
233.252.0.01/24
RP: 10.10.13.2
Learned via: static configuration
Mode: Bidirectional
Time Active: 01:58:07
Holdtime: 150
Group Ranges:
233.252.0.3/24
233.252.0.4/24
show pim rps extensive (PIM Anycast RP in Use)
user@host> show pim rps extensive
Instance: PIM.master
Family: INET
RP: 10.10.10.2
Learned via: static configuration
Time Active: 00:54:52
Holdtime: 0
Device Index: 130
Subunit: 32769
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Interface: pimd.32769
Group Ranges:
233.252.0.0/4
Active groups using RP:
233.252.0.10
total 1 groups active
Anycast-PIM rpset:
10.100.111.34
10.100.111.17
10.100.111.55
Anycast-PIM local address used: 10.100.111.1
Anycast-PIM Register State:
Group
Source
233.252.0.1
10.10.95.2
233.252.0.2
10.10.95.2
233.252.0.3
10.10.70.1
233.252.0.4
10.10.70.1
233.252.0.5
10.10.71.1
Origin
DIRECT
DIRECT
MSDP
MSDP
DR
Address family INET6
Anycast-PIM rpset:
ab::1
ab::2
Anycast-PIM local address used: cd::1
Anycast-PIM Register State:
Group
Source
::224.1.1.1
::10.10.95.2
::224.1.1.2
::10.10.95.2
::224.20.20.1
::10.10.71.1
520
Origin
DIRECT
DIRECT
DR
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
show pim source
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 521
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 521
show pim source
<brief | detail>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<source-prefix>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show pim source
<brief | detail>
<inet | inet6>
<instance instance-name>
<source-prefix>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display information about the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) source reverse path
forwarding (RPF) state.
none—Display standard information about the PIM RPF state for all supported family
addresses for all routing instances.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display information for IPv4 or IPv6 family addresses, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information about the RPF state for a specific
PIM-enabled routing instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
source-prefix—(Optional) Display the state for source RPF states in the given range.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
view
show pim source on page 522
show pim source brief on page 522
show pim source detail on page 522
show pim source (Egress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for
Point-to-Multipoint LSPs) on page 523
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Output Fields
Table 40 on page 522 describes the output fields for the show pim source command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 40: show pim source Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Instance
Name of the routing instance.
Source
Address of the source or reverse path.
Prefix/length
Prefix and prefix length for the route used to reach the RPF address.
Upstream Protocol
Protocol toward the source address.
Upstream interface
RPF interface toward the source address.
A pseudo multipoint LDP (M-LDP) interface appears on egress nodes in M-LDP
point-to-multipoint LSPs with inband signaling.
Upstream Neighbor
Address of the RPF neighbor used to reach the source address.
The multipoint LDP (M-LDP) root appears on egress nodes in M-LDP
point-to-multipoint LSPs with inband signaling.
Sample Output
show pim source
user@host> show pim source
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
Source 10.255.14.144
Prefix 10.255.14.144/32
Upstream interface Local
Upstream neighbor Local
Source 10.255.70.15
Prefix 10.255.70.15/32
Upstream interface so-1/0/0.0
Upstream neighbor 10.111.10.2
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
show pim source brief
The output for the show pim source brief command is identical to that for the show pim
source command. For sample output, see show pim source on page 522.
show pim source detail
user@host> show pim source detail
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
Source 10.255.14.144
Prefix 10.255.14.144/32
Upstream interface Local
522
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Upstream neighbor Local
Active groups:233.252.0.0
233.252.0.1
233.252.0.1
Source 10.255.70.15
Prefix 10.255.70.15/32
Upstream interface so-1/0/0.0
Upstream neighbor 10.111.10.2
Active groups:233.252.0.1
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
show pim source (Egress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for Point-to-Multipoint LSPs)
user@host> show pim source
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
Source 10.1.1.1
Prefix 10.1.1.1/32
Upstream interface Local
Upstream neighbor Local
Source 10.2.7.7
Prefix 10.2.7.0/24
Upstream protocol MLDP
Upstream interface Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
Source 192.168.219.11
Prefix 192.168.219.0/28
Upstream protocol MLDP
Upstream interface Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
Source 2001:db8::1:2:7:7
Prefix 2001:db8::1:2:7:0/120
Upstream protocol MLDP
Upstream interface Pseudo MLDP
Upstream neighbor MLDP LSP root <10.1.1.2>
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show pim statistics
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 524
Syntax (EX Series Switch and the QFX Series) on page 524
show pim statistics
<inet |inet6)>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Syntax (EX Series
Switch and the QFX
Series)
show pim statistics
<inet |inet6)>
<instance instance-name>
<interface interface-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
inet6 and instance options introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Support for bidirectional PIM added in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Options
Display Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) statistics.
none—Display PIM statistics.
inet | inet6—(Optional) Display IPv4 or IPv6 PIM statistics, respectively.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display statistics for a specific routing instance
enabled by Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM).
interface interface-name—(Optional) Display statistics about the specified interface.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
524
view
•
clear pim statistics on page 436
show pim statistics on page 531
show pim statistics inet interface <interface-name> on page 533
show pim statistics inet6 interface <interface-name> on page 533
show pim statistics instance <instance-name> on page 534
show pim statistics interface <interface-name> on page 535
Table 41 on page 525 describes the output fields for the show pim statistics command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Instance
Name of the routing instance.
This field only appears if you specify an interface, for example:
Family
•
inet interface interface-name
•
inet6 interface interface-name
•
interface interface-name
Output is for IPv4 or IPv6 PIM statistics. INET indicates IPv4
statistics, and INET6 indicates IPv6 statistics.
This field only appears if you specify an interface, for example:
•
inet interface interface-name
•
inet6 interface interface-name
•
interface interface-name
PIM statistics
PIM statistics for all interfaces or for the specified interface.
PIM message type
Message type for which statistics are displayed.
Received
Number of received statistics.
Sent
Number of messages sent of a certain type.
Rx errors
Number of received packets that contained errors.
V2 Hello
PIM version 2 hello packets.
V2 Register
PIM version 2 register packets.
V2 Register Stop
PIM version 2 register stop packets.
V2 Join Prune
PIM version 2 join and prune packets.
V2 Bootstrap
PIM version 2 bootstrap packets.
V2 Assert
PIM version 2 assert packets.
V2 Graft
PIM version 2 graft packets.
V2 Graft Ack
PIM version 2 graft acknowledgment packets.
V2 Candidate RP
PIM version 2 candidate RP packets.
V2 State Refresh
PIM version 2 control messages related to PIM dense mode
(PIM-DM) state refresh.
State refresh is an extension to PIM-DM. It not supported in Junos
OS.
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Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields (continued)
526
Field Name
Field Description
V2 DF Election
PIM version 2 send and receive messages associated with
bidirectional PIM designated forwarder election.
V1 Query
PIM version 1 query packets.
V1 Register
PIM version 1 register packets.
V1 Register Stop
PIM version 1 register stop packets.
V1 Join Prune
PIM version 1 join and prune packets.
V1 RP Reachability
PIM version 1 RP reachability packets.
V1 Assert
PIM version 1 assert packets.
V1 Graft
PIM version 1 graft packets.
V1 Graft Ack
PIM version 1 graft acknowledgment packets.
AutoRP Announce
Auto-RP announce packets.
AutoRP Mapping
Auto-RP mapping packets.
AutoRP Unknown type
Auto-RP packets with an unknown type.
Anycast Register
Auto-RP announce packets.
Anycast Register Stop
Auto-RP announce packets.
Global Statistics
Summary of PIM statistics for all interfaces.
Hello dropped on neighbor
policy
Number of hello packets dropped because of a configured neighbor
policy.
Unknown type
Number of PIM control packets received with an unknown type.
V1 Unknown type
Number of PIM version 1 control packets received with an unknown
type.
Unknown Version
Number of PIM control packets received with an unknown version.
The version is not version 1 or version 2.
Neighbor unknown
Number of PIM control packets received (excluding PIM hello)
without first receiving the hello packet.
Bad Length
Number of PIM control packets received for which the packet size
does not match the PIM length field in the packet.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Bad Checksum
Number of PIM control packets received for which the calculated
checksum does not match the checksum field in the packet.
Bad Receive If
Number of PIM control packets received on an interface that does
not have PIM configured.
Rx Bad Data
Number of PIM control packets received that contain data for TCP
Bad register packets.
Rx Intf disabled
Number of PIM control packets received on an interface that has
PIM disabled.
Rx V1 Require V2
Number of PIM version 1 control packets received on an interface
configured for PIM version 2.
Rx V2 Require V1
Number of PIM version 2 control packets received on an interface
configured for PIM version 1.
Rx Register not RP
Number of PIM register packets received when the routing device
is not the RP for the group.
Rx Register no route
Number of PIM register packets received when the RP does not
have a unicast route back to the source.
Rx Register no decap if
Number of PIM register packets received when the RP does not
have a de-encapsulation interface.
Null Register Timeout
Number of NULL register timeout packets.
RP Filtered Source
Number of PIM packets received when the routing device has a
source address filter configured for the RP.
Rx Unknown Reg Stop
Number of register stop messages received with an unknown type.
Rx Join/Prune no state
Number of join and prune messages received for which the routing
device has no state.
Rx Join/Prune on upstream
if
Number of join and prune messages received on the interface used
to reach the upstream routing device, toward the RP.
Rx Join/Prune for invalid
group
Number of join or prune messages received for invalid multicast
group addresses.
Rx Join/Prune messages
dropped
Number of join and prune messages received and dropped.
Rx sparse join for dense
group
Number of PIM sparse mode join messages received for a group
that is configured for dense mode.
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Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields (continued)
528
Field Name
Field Description
Rx Graft/Graft Ack no state
Number of graft and graft acknowledgment messages received for
which the router or switch has no state.
Rx Graft on upstream if
Number of graft messages received on the interface used to reach
the upstream routing device, toward the RP.
Rx CRP not BSR
Number of BSR messages received in which the PIM message type
is Candidate-RP-Advertisement, not Bootstrap.
Rx BSR when BSR
Number of BSR messages received in which the PIM message type
is Bootstrap.
Rx BSR not RPF if
Number of BSR messages received on an interface that is not the
RPF interface.
Rx unknown hello opt
Number of PIM hello packets received with options that Junos OS
does not support.
Rx data no state
Number of PIM control packets received for which the routing device
has no state for the data type.
Rx RP no state
Number of PIM control packets received for which the routing device
has no state for the RP.
Rx aggregate
Number of PIM aggregate MDT packets received.
Rx malformed packet
Number of PIM control packets received with a malformed IP unicast
or multicast address family.
No RP
Number of PIM control packets received with no RP address.
No register encap if
Number of PIM register packets received when the first-hop routing
device does not have an encapsulation interface.
No route upstream
Number of PIM control packets received when the routing device
does not have a unicast route to the the interface used to reach the
upstream routing device, toward the RP.
Nexthop Unusable
Number of PIM control packets with an unusable nexthop. A path
can be unusable if the route is hidden or the link is down.
RP mismatch
Number of PIM control packets received for which the routing device
has an RP mismatch.
RP mode mismatch
RP mode (sparse or bidirectional) mismatches encountered when
processing join and prune messages.
RPF neighbor unknown
Number of PIM control packets received for which the routing device
has an unknown RPF neighbor for the source.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Rx Joins/Prunes filtered
The number of join and prune messages filtered because of
configured route filters and source address filters.
Tx Joins/Prunes filtered
The number of join and prune messages filtered because of
configured route filters and source address filters.
Embedded-RP invalid addr
Number of packets received with an invalid embedded RP address
in PIM join messages and other types of messages sent between
routing domains.
Embedded-RP limit exceed
Number of times the limit configured with the maximum-rps
statement is exceeded. The maximum-rps statement limits the
number of embedded RPs created in a specific routing instance.
The range is from 1 through 500. The default is 100.
Embedded-RP added
Number of packets in which the embedded RP for IPv6 is added.
The following receive events trigger extraction of an IPv6 embedded
RP address on the routing device:
•
Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) report for an embedded RP
multicast group address
•
PIM join message with an embedded RP multicast group address
•
Static embedded RP multicast group address associated with
an interface
•
Packets sent to an embedded RP multicast group address
received on the DR
An embedded RP node discovered through these receive events is
added if it does not already exist on the routing platform.
Embedded-RP removed
Number of packets in which the embedded RP for IPv6 is removed.
The embedded RP is removed whenever all PIM join states using
this RP are removed or the configuration changes to remove the
embedded RP feature.
Rx Register msgs filtering
drop
Number of received register messages dropped because of a filter
configured for PIM register messages.
Tx Register msgs filtering
drop
Number of register messages dropped because of a filter configured
for PIM register messages.
Rx Bidir Join/Prune on
non-Bidir if
Error counter for join and prune messages received on
non-bidirectional PIM interfaces.
Rx Bidir Join/Prune on
non-DF if
Error counter for join and prune messages received on
non-designated forwarder interfaces.
V4 (S,G) Maximum
Maximum number of (S,G) IPv4 multicast routes accepted for the
VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) routing instance. If this number
is met, additional (S,G) entries are not accepted.
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Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields (continued)
530
Field Name
Field Description
V4 (S,G) Accepted
Number of accepted (S,G) IPv4 multicast routes.
V4 (S,G) Threshold
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of
the maximum number of (S,G) IPv4 multicast routes accepted by
the device).
V4 (S,G) Log Interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
V6 (S,G) Maximum
Maximum number of (S,G) IPv6 multicast routes accepted for the
VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) routing instance. If this number
is met, additional (S,G) entries are not accepted.
V6 (S,G) Accepted
Number of accepted (S,G) IPv6 multicast routes.
V6 (S,G) Threshold
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of
the maximum number of (S,G) IPv6 multicast routes accepted by
the device).
V6 (S,G) Log Interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
V4 (grp-prefix, RP)
Maximum
Maximum number of group-to-rendezvous point (RP) IPv4 multicast
mappings accepted for the VRF routing instance. If this number is
met, additional mappings are not accepted.
V4 (grp-prefix, RP)
Accepted
Number of accepted group-to-RP IPv4 multicast mappings.
V4 (grp-prefix, RP)
Threshold
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of
the maximum number of group-to-RP IPv4 multicast mappings
accepted by the device).
V4 (grp-prefix, RP) Log
Interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
V6 (grp-prefix, RP)
Maximum
Maximum number of group-to RP IPv6 multicast mappings
accepted for the VRF routing instance. If this number is met,
additional mappings are not accepted.
V6 (grp-prefix, RP)
Accepted
Number of accepted group-to-RP IPv6 multicast mappings.
V6 (grp-prefix, RP)
Threshold
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of
the maximum number of group-to-RP IPv6 multicast mappings
accepted by the device).
V6 (grp-prefix, RP) Log
Interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Table 41: show pim statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
V4 Register Maximum
Maximum number of IPv4 PIM registers accepted for the VRF routing
instance. If this number is met, additional PIM registers are not
accepted.
You configure the register limits on the RP.
V4 Register Accepted
Number of accepted IPv4 PIM registers.
V4 Register Threshold
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of
the maximum number of IPv4 PIM registers accepted by the device).
V4 Register Log Interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
V6 Register Maximum
Maximum number of IPv6 PIM registers accepted for the VRF routing
instance. If this number is met, additional PIM registers are not
accepted.
You configure the register limits on the RP.
V6 Register Accepted
Number of accepted IPv6 PIM registers.
V6 Register Threshold
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of
the maximum number of IPv6 PIM registers accepted by the device).
V6 Register Log Interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
(*,G) Join drop due to SSM
range check
PIM join messages that are dropped because the multicast
addresses are outside of the SSM address range of 232.0.0.0
through 232.255.255.255. You can extend the accepted SSM address
range by configuring the ssm-groups statement.
Sample Output
show pim statistics
user@host> show pim statistics
PIM Message type
Received
V2 Hello
15
V2 Register
0
V2 Register Stop
483
V2 Join Prune
18
V2 Bootstrap
0
V2 Assert
0
V2 Graft
0
V2 Graft Ack
0
V2 Candidate RP
0
V2 State Refresh
0
V2 DF Election
0
V1 Query
0
V1 Register
0
V1 Register Stop
0
V1 Join Prune
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Sent
32
362
0
518
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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V1 RP Reachability
V1 Assert
V1 Graft
V1 Graft Ack
AutoRP Announce
AutoRP Mapping
AutoRP Unknown type
Anycast Register
Anycast Register Stop
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Global Statistics
Hello dropped on neighbor policy
Unknown type
V1 Unknown type
Unknown Version
ipv4 BSR pkt drop due to excessive rate
ipv6 BSR pkt drop due to excessive rate
Neighbor unknown
Bad Length
Bad Checksum
Bad Receive If
Rx Bad Data
Rx Intf disabled
Rx V1 Require V2
Rx V2 Require V1
Rx Register not RP
Rx Register no route
Rx Register no decap if
Null Register Timeout
RP Filtered Source
Rx Unknown Reg Stop
Rx Join/Prune no state
Rx Join/Prune on upstream if
Rx Join/Prune for invalid group
Rx Join/Prune messages dropped
Rx sparse join for dense group
Rx Graft/Graft Ack no state
Rx Graft on upstream if
Rx CRP not BSR
Rx BSR when BSR
Rx BSR not RPF if
Rx unknown hello opt
Rx data no state
Rx RP no state
Rx aggregate
Rx malformed packet
Rx illegal TTL
Rx illegal destination address
No RP
No register encap if
No route upstream
Nexthop Unusable
RP mismatch
RP mode mismatch
RPF neighbor unknown
Rx Joins/Prunes filtered
Tx Joins/Prunes filtered
Embedded-RP invalid addr
Embedded-RP limit exceed
Embedded-RP added
532
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Embedded-RP removed
Rx Register msgs filtering drop
Tx Register msgs filtering drop
Rx Bidir Join/Prune on non-Bidir if
Rx Bidir Join/Prune on non-DF if
(*,G) Join drop due to SSM range check
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sample Output
show pim statistics inet interface <interface-name>
user@host> show pim statistics inet interface ge-0/3/0.0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
PIM Interface statistics for ge-0/3/0.0
PIM Message type
V2 Hello
V2 Register
V2 Register Stop
V2 Join Prune
V2 Bootstrap
V2 Assert
V2 Graft
V2 Graft Ack
V2 Candidate RP
V1 Query
V1 Register
V1 Register Stop
V1 Join Prune
V1 RP Reachability
V1 Assert
V1 Graft
V1 Graft Ack
AutoRP Announce
AutoRP Mapping
AutoRP Unknown type
Anycast Register
Anycast Register Stop
Received
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sent
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sample Output
show pim statistics inet6 interface <interface-name>
user@host> show pim statistics inet6 interface ge-0/3/0.0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
PIM Interface statistics for ge-0/3/0.0
PIM Message type
V2 Hello
V2 Register
V2 Register Stop
V2 Join Prune
V2 Bootstrap
V2 Assert
V2 Graft
V2 Graft Ack
V2 Candidate RP
Anycast Register
Anycast Register Stop
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Received
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sent
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show pim statistics instance <instance-name>
user@host> show pim statistics instance VPN-A
PIM Message type
Received
Sent Rx errors
V2 Hello
31
37
0
V2 Register
0
0
0
V2 Register Stop
0
0
0
V2 Join Prune
0
16
0
V2 Bootstrap
0
0
0
V2 Assert
0
0
0
V2 Graft
0
0
0
V2 Graft Ack
0
0
0
V2 Candidate RP
0
0
0
V2 State Refresh
0
0
0
V2 DF Election
0
0
0
V1 Query
0
0
0
V1 Register
0
0
0
V1 Register Stop
0
0
0
V1 Join Prune
0
0
0
V1 RP Reachability
0
0
0
V1 Assert
0
0
0
V1 Graft
0
0
0
V1 Graft Ack
0
0
0
AutoRP Announce
0
0
0
AutoRP Mapping
0
0
0
AutoRP Unknown type
0
Anycast Register
0
0
0
Anycast Register Stop
0
0
0
Global Statistics
Hello dropped on neighbor policy
Unknown type
V1 Unknown type
Unknown Version
Neighbor unknown
Bad Length
Bad Checksum
Bad Receive If
Rx Bad Data
Rx Intf disabled
Rx V1 Require V2
Rx V2 Require V1
Rx Register not RP
Rx Register no route
Rx Register no decap if
Null Register Timeout
RP Filtered Source
Rx Unknown Reg Stop
Rx Join/Prune no state
Rx Join/Prune on upstream if
Rx Join/Prune for invalid group
Rx Join/Prune messages dropped
Rx sparse join for dense group
Rx Graft/Graft Ack no state
Rx Graft on upstream if
Rx CRP not BSR
Rx BSR when BSR
Rx BSR not RPF if
Rx unknown hello opt
Rx data no state
534
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Operational Commands (PIM)
Rx RP no state
Rx aggregate
Rx malformed packet
Rx illegal TTL
Rx illegal destination address
No RP
No register encap if
No route upstream
Nexthop Unusable
RP mismatch
RP mode mismatch
RPF neighbor unknown
Rx Joins/Prunes filtered
Tx Joins/Prunes filtered
Embedded-RP invalid addr
Embedded-RP limit exceed
Embedded-RP added
Embedded-RP removed
Rx Register msgs filtering drop
Tx Register msgs filtering drop
Rx Bidir Join/Prune on non-Bidir if
Rx Bidir Join/Prune on non-DF if
V4 (S,G) Maximum
V4 (S,G) Accepted
V4 (S,G) Threshold
V4 (S,G) Log Interval
V6 (S,G) Maximum
V6 (S,G) Accepted
V6 (S,G) Threshold
V6 (S,G) Log Interval
V4 (grp-prefix, RP) Maximum
V4 (grp-prefix, RP) Accepted
V4 (grp-prefix, RP) Threshold
V4 (grp-prefix, RP) Log Interval
V6 (grp-prefix, RP) Maximum
V6 (grp-prefix, RP) Accepted
V6 (grp-prefix, RP) Threshold
V6 (grp-prefix, RP) Log Interval
V4 Register Maximum
V4 Register Accepted
V4 Register Threshold
V4 Register Log Interval
V6 Register Maximum
V6 Register Accepted
V6 Register Threshold
V6 Register Log Interval
(*,G) Join drop due to SSM range check
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
28
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
9
80
80
8
8
50
100
100
5
80
10
20
0
90
20
100
10
80
10
20
0
90
20
0
Sample Output
show pim statistics interface <interface-name>
user@host> show pim statistics interface ge-0/3/0.0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET
PIM Interface statistics for ge-0/3/0.0
PIM Message type
V2 Hello
V2 Register
V2 Register Stop
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Received
0
0
0
Sent
3
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
V2 Join Prune
V2 Bootstrap
V2 Assert
V2 Graft
V2 Graft Ack
V2 Candidate RP
V1 Query
V1 Register
V1 Register Stop
V1 Join Prune
V1 RP Reachability
V1 Assert
V1 Graft
V1 Graft Ack
AutoRP Announce
AutoRP Mapping
AutoRP Unknown type
Anycast Register
Anycast Register Stop
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sent
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Rx errors
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Instance: PIM.master Family: INET6
PIM Interface statistics for ge-0/3/0.0
PIM Message type
V2 Hello
V2 Register
V2 Register Stop
V2 Join Prune
V2 Bootstrap
V2 Assert
V2 Graft
V2 Graft Ack
V2 Candidate RP
Anycast Register
Anycast Register Stop
536
Received
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 24
Operational Commands (MSDP)
•
clear msdp cache
•
clear msdp statistics
•
show msdp
•
show msdp source
•
show msdp source-active
•
show msdp statistics
•
test msdp
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
537
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
clear msdp cache
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
clear msdp cache
<all>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<peer peer-address>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Clear the entries in the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) source-active cache.
all— Clear all MSDP source-active cache entries in the master instance.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear entries for a specific MSDP instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
peer peer-address—(Optional) Clear the MSDP source-active cache entries learned from
a specific peer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show msdp source-active on page 544
clear msdp cache all on page 538
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear msdp cache all
user@host> clear msdp cache all
538
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: Operational Commands (MSDP)
clear msdp statistics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
clear msdp statistics
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<peer peer-address>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Clear Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) peer statistics.
none—Clear MSDP statistics for all peers.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear statistics for the specified instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
peer peer-address—(Optional) Clear the statistics for the specified peer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show msdp statistics on page 547
clear msdp statistics on page 539
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear msdp statistics
user@host> clear msdp statistics
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
539
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show msdp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show msdp
<brief | detail>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<peer peer-address>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) information.
none—Display standard MSDP information for all routing instances.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified instance only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
peer peer-address—(Optional) Display information about the specified peer only,
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
show msdp source on page 542
•
show msdp source-active on page 544
•
show msdp statistics on page 547
show msdp on page 541
show msdp brief on page 541
show msdp detail on page 541
Table 42 on page 540 describes the output fields for the show msdp command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 42: show msdp Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Peer address
IP address of the peer.
All levels
Local address
Local address of the peer.
All levels
State
Status of the MSDP connection: Listen, Established, or Inactive.
All levels
Last up/down
Time at which the most recent peer-state change occurred.
All levels
540
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: Operational Commands (MSDP)
Table 42: show msdp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Peer-Group
Peer group name.
All levels
SA Count
Number of source-active cache entries advertised by each peer that were
accepted, compared to the number that were received, in the format
number-accepted/number-received.
All levels
Peer Connect Retries
Number of peer connection retries.
detail
State timer expires
Number of seconds before another message is sent to a peer.
detail
Peer Times out
Number of seconds to wait for a response from the peer before the peer is
declared unavailable.
detail
SA accepted
Number of entries in the source-active cache accepted from the peer.
detail
SA received
Number of entries in the source-active cache received by the peer.
detail
Sample Output
show msdp
user@host> show msdp
Peer address
Local address
198.32.8.193
198.32.8.195
198.32.8.194
198.32.8.195
198.32.8.196
198.32.8.195
198.32.8.197
198.32.8.195
198.32.8.198
198.32.8.195
State
Last up/down Peer-Group
Established 5d 19:25:44 North23
Established 3d 19:27:27 North23
Established 5d 19:39:36 North23
Established 5d 19:32:27 North23
Established 3d 19:33:04 North23
SA Count
120/150
300/345
10/13
5/6
2305/3000
show msdp brief
The output for the show msdp brief command is identical to that for the show msdp
command. For sample output, see show msdp on page 541.
show msdp detail
user@host> show msdp detail
Peer: 10.255.70.15
Local address: 10.255.70.19
State: Established
Peer Connect Retries: 0
State timer expires: 22
Peer Times out: 49
SA accepted: 0
SA received: 0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
541
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show msdp source
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show msdp source
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<source-address>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display multicast sources learned from Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP).
none—Display standard MSDP source information for all routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified instance only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
source-address—(Optional) IP address and optional prefix length. Display information
for the specified source address only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
542
view
•
show msdp on page 540
•
show msdp source-active on page 544
•
show msdp statistics on page 547
show msdp source on page 543
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: Operational Commands (MSDP)
Output Fields
Table 43 on page 543 describes the output fields for the show msdp source command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 43: show msdp source Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Source address
IP address of the source.
/Len
Length of the prefix for this IP address.
Type
Discovery method for this multicast source:
•
Configured—Source-active limit explicitly configured for this
source.
•
Dynamic—Source-active limit established when this source was
discovered.
Maximum
Source-active limit applied to this source.
Threshold
Source-active threshold applied to this source.
Exceeded
Number of source-active messages received from this source
exceeding the established maximum.
Sample Output
show msdp source
user@host> show msdp source
Source address /Len
Type
Maximum
Threshold
0.0.0.0
/0
Configured
5
none
10.1.0.0
/16
Configured
500
none
10.1.1.1
/32
Configured
10000
none
10.1.1.2
/32
Dynamic
6936
none
10.1.5.5
/32
Dynamic
500
none
10.2.1.1
/32
Dynamic
2
none
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Exceeded
0
0
0
0
123
0
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show msdp source-active
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show msdp source-active
<brief | detail>
<group group>
<instance instance-name>
<local>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<originator originator>
<peer peer-address>
<source source-address>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display the Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) source-active cache.
none—Display standard MSDP source-active cache information for all routing instances.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
group group—(Optional) Display source-active cache information for the specified group.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified instance.
local—(Optional) Display all source-active caches originated by this router.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
originator originator—(Optional) Display information about the peer that originated the
source-active cache entries.
peer peer-address—(Optional) Display the source-active cache of the specified peer.
source source-address—(Optional) Display the source-active cache of the specified source.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
544
view
•
show msdp on page 540
•
show msdp source on page 542
•
show msdp statistics on page 547
show msdp source-active on page 545
show msdp source-active brief on page 546
show msdp source-active detail on page 546
show msdp source-active source on page 546
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: Operational Commands (MSDP)
Output Fields
Table 44 on page 545 describes the output fields for the show msdp source-active
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 44: show msdp source-active Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Global active
source limit
exceeded
Number of times all peers have exceeded configured active source limits.
Global active
source limit
maximum
Configured number of active source messages accepted by the device.
Global active
source limit
threshold
Configured threshold for applying random early discard (RED) to drop some
but not all MSDP active source messages.
Global active
source limit
log-warning
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of the number of
active source messages accepted by the device).
Global active
source limit log
interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
Group address
Multicast address of the group.
Source address
IP address of the source.
Peer address
IP address of the peer.
Originator
Router ID configured on the source of the rendezvous point (RP) that originated
the message, or the loopback address when the router ID is not configured.
Flags
Flags: Accept, Reject, or Filtered.
Sample Output
show msdp source-active
user@host> show msdp source-active
Group address
Source address Peer address
230.0.0.0
192.168.195.46 local
230.0.0.1
192.168.195.46 local
230.0.0.2
192.168.195.46 local
230.0.0.3
192.168.195.46 local
230.0.0.4
192.168.195.46 local
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Originator
10.255.14.30
10.255.14.30
10.255.14.30
10.255.14.30
10.255.14.30
Flags
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
545
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show msdp source-active brief
The output for the show msdp source-active brief command is identical to that for the
show msdp source-active command. For sample output, see show msdp source-active
on page 545.
show msdp source-active detail
The output for the show msdp source-active detail command is identical to that for the
show msdp source-active command. For sample output, see show msdp source-active
on page 545.
show msdp source-active source
user@host> show msdp source-active source 192.168.215.246
Global active source limit exceeded: 0
Global active source limit maximum: 25000
Global active source limit threshold: 24000
Global active source limit log-warning: 100
Global active source limit log interval: 0
Group address
226.2.2.1
226.2.2.3
226.2.2.4
226.2.2.5
226.2.2.7
226.2.2.10
226.2.2.11
226.2.2.13
226.2.2.14
226.2.2.15
546
Source address
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
192.168.215.246
Peer address
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
Originator
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
10.255.182.140
Flags
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Accept
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: Operational Commands (MSDP)
show msdp statistics
Syntax
show msdp statistics
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<peer peer-address>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Display statistics about Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) peers.
Options
none—Display statistics about all MSDP peers for all routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display statistics about a specific MSDP instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
peer peer-address—(Optional) Display statistics about a particular MSDP peer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear msdp statistics on page 539
show msdp statistics on page 549
show msdp statistics peer on page 549
Table 45 on page 547 describes the output fields for the show msdp statistics command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 45: show msdp statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Global active source limit
exceeded
Number of times all peers have exceeded configured active source
limits.
Global active source limit
maximum
Configured number of active source messages accepted by the
device.
Global active source limit
threshold
Configured threshold for applying random early discard (RED) to
drop some but not all MSDP active source messages.
Global active source limit
log-warning
Threshold at which a warning message is logged (percentage of
the number of active source messages accepted by the device).
Global active source limit
log interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
547
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 45: show msdp statistics Output Fields (continued)
548
Field Name
Field Description
Peer
Address of peer.
Last State Change
How long ago the peer state changed.
Last message received from
the peer
How long ago the last message was received from the peer.
RPF Failures
Number of reverse path forwarding (RPF) failures.
Remote Closes
Number of times the remote peer closed.
Peer Timeouts
Number of peer timeouts.
SA messages sent
Number of source-active messages sent.
SA messages received
Number of source-active messages received.
SA request messages sent
Number of source-active request messages sent.
SA request messages
received
Number of source-active request messages received.
SA response messages sent
Number of source-active response messages sent.
SA response messages
received
Number of source-active response messages received.
SA messages with zero
Entry Count received
Entry Count is a field within SA message that defines how many
source/group tuples are present in the SA message. The counter is
incremented each time an SA with an Entry Count of zero is received.
Active source exceeded
Number of times this peer has exceeded configured source-active
limits.
Active source Maximum
Configured number of active source messages accepted by this
peer.
Active source threshold
Configured threshold on this peer for applying random early discard
(RED) to drop some but not all MSDP active source messages.
Active source log-warning
Configured threshold on this peer at which a warning message is
logged (percentage of the number of active source messages
accepted by the device).
Active source log-interval
Time (in seconds) between consecutive log messages on this peer.
Keepalive messages sent
Number of keepalive messages sent.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: Operational Commands (MSDP)
Table 45: show msdp statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Keepalive messages
received
Number of keepalive messages received.
Unknown messages
received
Number of unknown messages received.
Error messages received
Number of error messages received.
Sample Output
show msdp statistics
user@host> show msdp statistics
Global active source limit exceeded: 0
Global active source limit maximum: 10
Global active source limit threshold: 8
Global active source limit log-warning: 60
Global active source limit log interval: 60
Peer: 10.255.245.39
Last State Change: 11:54:49 (00:24:59)
Last message received from peer: 11:53:32 (00:26:16)
RPF Failures: 0
Remote Closes: 0
Peer Timeouts: 0
SA messages sent: 376
SA messages received: 459
SA messages with zero Entry Count received: 0
SA request messages sent: 0
SA request messages received: 0
SA response messages sent: 0
SA response messages received: 0
Active source exceeded: 0
Active source Maximum: 10
Active source threshold: 8
Active source log-warning: 60
Active source log-interval 120
Keepalive messages sent: 17
Keepalive messages received: 19
Unknown messages received: 0
Error messages received: 0
show msdp statistics peer
user@host> show msdp statistics peer 10.255.182.140
Peer: 10.255.182.140
Last State Change: 8:19:23 (00:01:08)
Last message received from peer: 8:20:05 (00:00:26)
RPF Failures: 0
Remote Closes: 0
Peer Timeouts: 0
SA messages sent: 17
SA messages received: 16
SA request messages sent: 0
SA request messages received: 0
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
549
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SA response messages sent: 0
SA response messages received: 0
Active source exceeded: 20
Active source Maximum: 10
Active source threshold: 8
Active source log-warning: 60
Active source log-interval: 120
Keepalive messages sent: 0
Keepalive messages received: 0
Unknown messages received: 0
Error messages received: 0
550
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: Operational Commands (MSDP)
test msdp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
test msdp (dependent-peers prefix | rpf-peer originator)
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Find Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP) peers.
dependent-peers prefix—Find downstream dependent MSDP peers.
rpf-peer originator—Find the MSDP reverse-path-forwarding (RPF) peer for the originator.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Find MDSP peers for the specified routing instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
test msdp dependent-peers on page 551
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
test msdp dependent-peers
user@host> test msdp dependent-peers 10.0.0.1/24
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
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Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 2
Index
•
Index on page 555
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
553
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
554
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
Symbols
#, comments in configuration statements....................xx
( ), in syntax descriptions.....................................................xx
< >, in syntax descriptions....................................................xx
[ ], in configuration statements.........................................xx
{ }, in configuration statements.........................................xx
| (pipe), in syntax descriptions...........................................xx
A
accept-remote-source statement
usage guidelines...........................................................222
accounting statement
IGMP.................................................................................238
IGMP interface..............................................................238
active-source-limit statement........................................368
usage guidelines...........................................................224
address statement
anycast RPs...................................................................287
usage guidelines.........................................172, 230
local RPs.........................................................................288
static RPs.......................................................................289
usage guidelines..................................................168
addresses
multicast...........................................................................28
administrative scoping.........................................................28
algorithm statement
BFD authentication....................................................290
all statement
IGMP snooping.............................................................264
anycast RP...............................................................................178
overview.............................................................................171
anycast-pim statement......................................................291
usage guidelines..................................................172, 230
asm-override-ssm statement................................239, 361
assert (tracing flag)............................................................354
assert timeout
configuring.....................................................................208
assert-timeout statement................................................292
usage guidelines..........................................................208
authentication configuration
BFD....................................................................................120
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
authentication statement
BFD...................................................................................295
BFD protocol.................................................................293
authentication-key statement
MSDP...............................................................................369
auto-RP
overview............................................................................181
auto-rp statement...............................................................294
usage guidelines............................................................181
B
BFD
authentication configuration...................................120
protocol.............................................................................119
BFD authentication
algorithm statement..................................................290
authentication statement........................................293
key-chain statement..................................................320
loose-check statement.............................................323
bfd-liveness-detection statement
PIM...........................................................................295, 301
minimum-interval...............................................327
threshold................................................................352
transmit-interval.................................................353
usage guidelines...................................................119
bootstrap (tracing flag).....................................................354
bootstrap messages............................................................187
bootstrap routers
overview...........................................................................187
bootstrap routers, displaying..........................................484
bootstrap statement..........................................................296
bootstrap-export statement............................................297
bootstrap-import statement..........................................298
bootstrap-priority statement..........................................299
braces, in configuration statements.................................xx
brackets
angle, in syntax descriptions......................................xx
square, in configuration statements........................xx
BSR
policy, import..................................................................314
C
cache (tracing flag).............................................................354
CBT
defined...............................................................................33
issues................................................................................109
clear igmp membership command..............................390
clear igmp statistics command......................................393
clear igmp-snooping membership command...........414
555
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
clear igmp-snooping statistics command..................415
clear msdp cache command...........................................538
clear msdp statistics command.....................................539
clear multicast bandwidth-admission
command............................................................................427
clear multicast scope command...................................429
clear multicast sessions command..............................430
clear multicast statistics command..............................431
clear pim join command....................................................432
clear pim register command............................................434
clear pim statistics command........................................436
comments, in configuration statements........................xx
conventions
text and syntax...............................................................xix
Core Based Trees See CBT
curly braces, in configuration statements......................xx
customer support...................................................................xxi
contacting JTAC..............................................................xxi
D
data-encapsulation statement......................................370
usage guidelines...........................................................224
default-peer statement.......................................................371
usage guidelines...........................................................224
dense-groups statement..................................................300
usage guidelines...........................................................145
designated router..................................................................130
detection-time statement
PIM.....................................................................................301
disable statement
IGMP.................................................................................239
usage guidelines....................................................65
IGMP snooping.............................................................265
MLD
usage guidelines..................................................105
MSDP................................................................................372
PIM family......................................................................302
PIM interfaces...............................................................302
PIM protocol..................................................................302
distribution trees
RPT....................................................................................199
shared...............................................................................199
documentation
comments on..................................................................xxi
dr-election-on-p2p statement.......................................303
PIM
usage guidelines...................................................118
dr-register-policy statement...........................................303
usage guidelines............................................................197
556
DVMRP
defined...............................................................................32
groups, displaying........................................................481
dynamic IGMP statements
promiscuous-mode
interface..................................................................251
E
embedded-rp statement..................................................304
enable IGMP static group membership.........................53
enable MLD static group membership...........................95
event recording
IGMP...................................................................................59
MLD...................................................................................102
exclude statement
IGMP.................................................................................240
usage guidelines....................................................53
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
export statement
MSDP................................................................................373
PIM.........................................................................305, 306
configuring.............................................................194
PIM RP
usage guidelines...................................................187
F
family statement
bootstrap........................................................................307
local RP...........................................................................309
PIM interfaces..............................................................308
PIM protocol.................................................................308
font conventions.....................................................................xix
forwarding table
multicast information, displaying.........................463
frames
multicast snooping........................................................29
G
graceful restart
PIM
sparse-dense mode...........................................145
graft (tracing flag)
PIM....................................................................................354
group joins
limiting.......................................................................61, 104
group membership
SSM maps.......................................................................159
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
group statement
IGMP..................................................................................241
usage guidelines....................................................53
IGMP snooping.............................................................265
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
MSDP................................................................................374
PIM RPF selection........................................................310
group-count statement
IGMP.................................................................................242
usage guidelines....................................................53
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
group-increment statement
IGMP.................................................................................242
usage guidelines....................................................53
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
group-limit statement
configuring.........................................................................61
IGMP interface..............................................................243
IGMP snooping.............................................................266
MLD
usage guidelines..................................................104
group-policy statement
IGMP.................................................................................244
usage guidelines....................................................49
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................92
group-ranges statement.....................................................311
usage guidelines...........................................................168
groups
DVMRP, displaying.......................................................481
IGMP membership, displaying...............................395
PIM
general information, displaying....................489
usage information, displaying........................481
SSM..................................................................................363
H
hello (tracing flag)
PIM....................................................................................354
hello-interval statement
PIM.....................................................................................312
usage guidelines....................................................113
hold-time statement
PIM.....................................................................................313
host-only-interface statement........................................267
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
I
IGMP.........................................................................................399
configuration statements...........................................43
configuring........................................................................43
disabling............................................................................65
enabling...................................................................44, 245
event recording...............................................................59
group membership
SSM maps for different groups to different
sources................................................................159
group membership, displaying...............................395
host-query message interval...........................46, 252
interface group limit...................................................243
interfaces, displaying..................................................401
last-member query interval..............................47, 253
overview..............................................................................41
PIM-to-IGMP message translation information,
displaying...................................................................459
query response interval.......................................51, 254
robustness variable..............................................51, 255
static group membership............................................53
statistics, displaying...................................................405
tracing operations.........................................................64
version......................................................................45, 262
IGMP snooping
configure the switch to be an IGMP
querier...........................................................................271
enabling..........................................................................268
group limit......................................................................266
group statement..........................................................265
host-only interface......................................................267
host-query message interval...................................273
last-member query interval.....................................274
query response interval.............................................275
source address..............................................................277
static statement..........................................................265
igmp statement....................................................................245
usage guidelines.............................................................44
IGMP statements
promiscuous-mode
interface..................................................................251
igmp-querier statement...........................................267, 278
igmp-snooping statement...............................................268
IGMPv3........................................................................................42
interoperability with older versions.........................42
557
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
immediate-leave statement
IGMP..................................................................................247
usage guidelines....................................................48
IGMP snooping.............................................................269
MLD
usage guidelines.....................................................91
import statement
bootstrap.........................................................................314
usage guidelines...................................................187
MSDP................................................................................375
PIM.....................................................................................315
usage guidelines..................................................195
infinity statement..................................................................316
usage guidelines...........................................................210
interface lists.............................................................................31
interface statement
IGMP.................................................................................248
usage guidelines....................................................44
IGMP snooping.....................................................270, 271
MLD
usage guidelines...................................................88
PIM......................................................................................317
usage guidelines..................................................144
Internet Group Management Protocol See IGMP
IP multicast
announced sessions, displaying............................478
bandwidth admission
clearing....................................................................427
flow map information, displaying.........................450
forwarding table, displaying....................................463
interface information, displaying...........................452
network information, displaying............................454
next-hop table, displaying.......................................456
PIM-to-IGMP message translation information,
displaying...................................................................459
PIM-to-MLD message translation information,
displaying....................................................................461
RPF calculations, displaying....................................472
scope, clearing..............................................................429
scoped information, displaying..............................476
sessions, clearing........................................................430
statistics
clearing....................................................................431
tracing routes
from the receiver to the source.....................439
from the source to the gateway
router...................................................................447
from the source to the receiver.....................442
listen for responses...........................................445
558
J
join (tracing flag)..................................................................354
join states, clearing PIM.....................................................432
join-load-balance statement...........................................318
usage guidelines............................................................131
join-prune-timeout statement........................................319
K
keepalive (tracing flag)
MSDP...............................................................................385
key-chain statement
BFD authentication....................................................320
L
l2-querier statement
IGMP snooping...............................................................271
leave (tracing flag)
IGMP................................................................................260
load balancing
for PIM join........................................................................131
local statement
PIM.....................................................................................321
usage guidelines..................................................166
local-address statement
MSDP group...................................................................376
MSDP peer.....................................................................376
PIM.....................................................................................322
loose-check statement
BFD authentication.....................................................323
M
manuals
comments on..................................................................xxi
mapping-agent-election statement.............................324
usage guidelines............................................................181
mappings
SSM..................................................................................365
maximum statement
MSDP................................................................................377
usage guidelines..................................................224
maximum-rps statement..................................................325
maximum-transmit-rate statement
IGMP.................................................................................249
usage guidelines....................................................53
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................94
mesh groups
MSDP...............................................................................224
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
minimum-interval
PIM.....................................................................................327
minimum-interval statement
PIM....................................................................................326
usage guidelines...................................................119
minimum-receive-interval statement
PIM..........................................................................295, 328
usage guidelines...................................................119
MLD
disabling..........................................................................105
event recording.............................................................102
group membership
SSM maps for different groups to different
sources................................................................159
host-query message interval....................................89
immediate-leave host removal
configuring................................................................91
last-member query interval.......................................90
overview......................................................................81, 84
PIM-to-MLD message translation information,
displaying....................................................................461
query response interval...............................................90
robustness variable.......................................................93
static group membership...........................................95
mld
enabling............................................................................88
MLD snooping
host-query message interval...................................273
mld statement
usage guidelines.....................................................87, 88
mode statement
MSDP...............................................................................378
usage guidelines..................................................224
PIM....................................................................................328
usage guidelines.........................................130, 145
MOSPF, defined.......................................................................32
MSDP
active source limit.......................................................368
maximum...............................................................377
per-source.............................................................383
threshold...............................................................384
authentication..............................................................369
cache entries, clearing...............................................538
configuration statements..........................................218
configuring......................................................................218
data-encapsulation....................................................370
default peer...........................................................224, 371
enabling...........................................................................379
general information, displaying.............................540
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
groups...............................................................................374
local address.................................................................376
message source information, displaying............542
mode................................................................................378
peer statistics
clearing...................................................................539
displaying...............................................................547
policy, routing.......................................................373, 375
routing tables................................................................382
source-active cache, displaying............................544
tracing operations.......................................................220
msdp statement...................................................................379
mt (tracing flag)...................................................................354
mtrace (tracing flag)
IGMP...................................................................................64
mtrace command................................................................439
mtrace from-source command......................................442
mtrace monitor command...............................................445
mtrace to-gateway command........................................447
multicast
addresses..........................................................................28
administrative scoping.................................................28
anycast RP........................................................................171
auto-RP.............................................................................181
bootstrap router............................................................187
defined...............................................................................23
Layer 2 frames.................................................................29
leaf and branch...............................................................28
packet replication..........................................................35
protocols
group membership...............................................39
reverse-path forwarding (RPF).................................27
routing protocols............................................................32
compared, table....................................................34
shortest-path tree (SPT)............................................27
snooping............................................................................29
SSM groups...................................................................363
SSM mapping...............................................................365
terminology......................................................................26
uses.....................................................................................25
multicast filters.......................................................................191
MAC filters.......................................................................192
MSDP SA messages...................................................220
RP/DR register messages..........................................192
configuring..............................................................197
multicast group joins
limiting.......................................................................61, 104
Multicast Listener Discovery See MLD
Multicast Open Shortest Path First See MOSPF
559
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Multicast Source Discovery Protocol See MSDP
multicast-router-interface statement
IGMP snooping..............................................................272
multiplier statement
PIM..........................................................................295, 329
usage guidelines...................................................119
N
neighbor-policy statement...............................................329
usage guidelines...........................................................193
next hops
multicast entries, displaying...................................456
no-accounting statement
IGMP.................................................................................238
no-adaptation
PIM....................................................................................330
no-multicast-echo statement
PIM
usage guidelines...................................................114
nsr-synchronization (tracing flag).................................355
O
oif-map statement
IGMP.................................................................................249
override-interval
PIM.....................................................................................331
override-interval statement
usage guidelines...........................................................135
P
packets (tracing flag)
IGMP..................................................................................261
PIM....................................................................................355
parentheses, in syntax descriptions.................................xx
passive statement
IGMP.................................................................................250
peer statement
MSDP................................................................................381
PIM
anycast RP............................................................291, 346
assert timeout....................................................292, 349
configuring............................................................208
background....................................................................109
BFD....................................119, 295, 326, 328, 329, 357
bidirectional mode
defined.......................................................................32
bootstrap messages import and export..............187
bootstrap routers..........................................................187
bootstrap routers, displaying.................................484
560
configuring........................................................................113
dense mode............................................................141, 144
defined......................................................................33
designated router.........................................................130
embedded RP..............................................................304
enabling...........................................................................332
filters See multicast filters
graceful restart
sparse-dense mode...........................................145
groups
general information, displaying....................489
usage information, displaying........................481
hello interval....................................................................113
hold-time period...........................................................313
incoming join filter policy, applying.......................195
interfaces
displaying..............................................................486
join load balancing
configuring...............................................................131
join states, clearing.....................................................432
join suppression
configuring..............................................................135
join-prune-timeout......................................................319
maximum RPs..............................................................325
mixing modes.................................................................143
neighbors, displaying..................................................510
network components...................................................112
outgoing join filter policy, applying........................194
overview..........................................................................109
PIM-to-IGMP message translation information,
displaying...................................................................459
PIM-to-MLD message translation information,
displaying....................................................................461
policy, routing.................................................................315
prune states, clearing.................................................432
register
clearing...................................................................434
remote source...............................................................222
rendezvous point tree...............................................200
routing tables................................................................342
RPF, displaying source state.....................................521
RPs......................................129, 166, 181, 199, 340, 343
anycast....................................................................291
anycast RP...............................................................171
displaying................................................................514
embedded............................................................304
mapping options..................................................129
maximum...............................................................325
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
source registration..............................................201
SPT cutover control..........................................208
sparse mode..........................................................127, 130
defined......................................................................33
sparse-dense mode..........................................143, 300
defined......................................................................33
SSM.................................................................148, 149, 156
statistics
clearing...................................................................436
displaying...............................................................524
version............................................................113, 130, 358
pim statement.......................................................................332
usage guidelines............................................................113
PIM-RP
SPT
configuring threshold cutover policy............210
policer, single-rate two-color
example...........................................................................159
policy statement
SSM map........................................................................362
policy, import
BSR....................................................................................314
policy, routing
MSDP......................................................................373, 375
PIM.....................................................................................315
PIM join filter.........................................................194, 195
prefix-list statement
PIM RPF selection.......................................................335
priority
PIM RPs...........................................................................338
priority statement
bootstrap........................................................................336
PIM.....................................................................................337
usage guidelines....................................................117
usage guidelines...........................................................187
promiscuous-mode statement
IGMP
interface..................................................................251
usage guidelines....................................................50
propagation-delay statement.........................................339
usage guidelines...........................................................135
Protocol Independent Multicast See PIM
protocols
group membership........................................................39
multicast routing............................................................32
compared, table....................................................34
prune (tracing flag)
PIM....................................................................................355
prune states, clearing PIM.................................................432
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Q
query-interval statement
IGMP.................................................................................252
usage guidelines....................................................46
IGMP snooping..............................................................273
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................89
MLD snooping...............................................................273
query-last-member-interval statement
IGMP.................................................................................253
usage guidelines....................................................47
IGMP snooping..............................................................274
MLD
usage guidelines...................................................90
query-response-interval statement
IGMP.................................................................................254
usage guidelines.....................................................51
IGMP snooping..............................................................275
MLD
usage guidelines...................................................90
R
real-time monitoring
IP multicast paths.......................................................439
register (tracing flag)..........................................................355
register-probe-time statement......................................340
regular expressions
IP multicast scope
clearing...................................................................429
IP multicast sessions
clearing...................................................................430
displaying...............................................................478
rendezvous points See RPs See PIM and RP
replication
multicast packet.............................................................35
report (tracing flag)
IGMP..................................................................................261
reset-tracking-bit statement............................................341
usage guidelines...........................................................135
reverse path forwarding See RPF
reverse-path forwarding See RPF
rib-group statement
MSDP...............................................................................382
PIM....................................................................................342
usage guidelines..................................................144
561
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
robust-count statement....................................................276
IGMP.................................................................................255
usage guidelines.....................................................51
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................93
route (tracing flag)
MSDP...............................................................................385
routing solutions
multicast administrative scoping............................28
multicast reverse-path forwarding (RPF).............27
multicast shortest-path tree (SPT)........................27
routing tables
MSDP...............................................................................382
PIM....................................................................................342
RP
anycast.............................................................................291
embedded.....................................................................304
rp (tracing flag).....................................................................355
rp statement..........................................................................343
rp-register-policy statement...........................................345
usage guidelines............................................................197
rp-set statement..................................................................346
usage guidelines..................................................172, 230
RPF
calculations, displaying.............................................472
PIM source state, displaying.....................................521
RPF (reverse-path forwarding)
description........................................................................27
rpf-selection statement
PIM.....................................................................................347
RPs
displaying........................................................................514
maximum.......................................................................325
RPT.............................................................................................199
S
scoping, administrative........................................................28
shared trees............................................................................199
shortest-path tree...................................................................27
shortest-path trees.............................................................204
See also SPT
show igmp group command...........................................395
show igmp interface command......................................401
show igmp statistics command.....................................405
show igmp-snooping membership command..........416
show igmp-snooping route command.........................419
show igmp-snooping statistics command.................421
show igmp-snooping vlans command........................423
show msdp command......................................................540
562
show msdp source command.........................................542
show msdp source-active command..........................544
show msdp statistics command....................................547
show multicast flow-map command..........................450
show multicast interface command.............................452
show multicast mrinfo command.................................454
show multicast next-hops command.........................456
show multicast pim-to-igmp-proxy
command...........................................................................459
show multicast pim-to-mld-proxy command...........461
show multicast route command....................................463
show multicast rpf command.........................................472
show multicast scope command...................................476
show multicast sessions command.............................478
show multicast usage command...................................481
show pim bootstrap command.....................................484
show pim interfaces command.....................................486
show pim join command..................................................489
show pim neighbors command......................................510
show pim rps command.....................................................514
show pim source command..............................................521
show pim statistics command........................................524
show protocols igmp command....................................399
show system statistics igmp command.....................408
snooping
IGMP and VLANs............................................................73
multicast...........................................................................29
source filtering..........................................................................42
source statement
IGMP.................................................................................256
usage guidelines....................................................53
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
MSDP...............................................................................383
PIM RPF selection.............................................330, 348
SSM
usage guidelines...................................................153
source-active (tracing flag).............................................385
source-active-request (tracing flag)............................385
source-active-response (tracing flag).........................385
source-address statement
IGMP snooping..............................................................277
source-count statement
IGMP..................................................................................257
usage guidelines....................................................53
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index
source-increment statement
IGMP.................................................................................258
usage guidelines....................................................53
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
source-specific multicast See SSM
SPT............................................................................................204
configuring threshold cutover policy....................210
cutover control.............................................................208
SPT (shortest-path tree).....................................................27
spt-threshold statement..................................................349
usage guidelines...........................................................210
SSM...................................................................................148, 156
configuring.......................................................................151
domains...........................................................................153
mapping...........................................................................153
SSM maps...............................................................................159
example...........................................................................159
SSM maps for different groups to different
sources..................................................................................159
ssm-groups statement......................................................363
usage guidelines...........................................................156
ssm-map statement
IGMP.................................................................................364
usage guidelines...................................................153
MLD
usage guidelines...................................................153
SSM..................................................................................365
usage guidelines...................................................153
ssm-map-policy statement
IGMP interface..............................................................366
static statement
IGMP.................................................................................259
usage guidelines....................................................53
IGMP snooping...................................................265, 279
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................95
PIM....................................................................................350
usage guidelines..................................................168
support, technical See technical support
syntax conventions................................................................xix
T
technical support
contacting JTAC..............................................................xxi
test msdp command...........................................................551
threshold
PIM............................................................................351, 352
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
threshold statement
MSDP...............................................................................384
usage guidelines..................................................224
traceoptions statement
IGMP................................................................................260
usage guidelines....................................................64
IGMP snooping.............................................................280
MSDP...............................................................................385
usage guidelines.................................................220
PIM....................................................................................354
usage guidelines....................................................115
tracing flags
assert...............................................................................354
bootstrap........................................................................354
cache, PIM......................................................................354
graft
PIM...........................................................................354
hello
PIM...........................................................................354
join.....................................................................................354
keepalive
MSDP......................................................................385
leave
IGMP........................................................................260
mt......................................................................................354
mtrace
IGMP..........................................................................64
nsr-synchronization....................................................355
packets
IGMP.........................................................................261
PIM...........................................................................355
prune
PIM...........................................................................355
register.............................................................................355
report
IGMP.........................................................................261
route
MSDP......................................................................385
rp........................................................................................355
source-active................................................................385
source-active-request...............................................385
source-active-response............................................385
tracing IP multicast path
from receiver to source.............................................439
from router to gateway..............................................447
from server to router..................................................442
563
Multicast Protocols Feature Guide for the QFX Series
tracing operations
IGMP.........................................................................64, 260
MSDP.....................................................................220, 385
PIM....................................................................................354
tracing routes
from the receiver to the source..............................439
from the source to the gateway router................447
from the source to the receiver..............................442
monitoring......................................................................445
transmit-interval
PIM....................................................................................353
V
version statement
BFD....................................................................................357
IGMP.................................................................................262
usage guidelines....................................................45
MLD
usage guidelines....................................................89
PIM....................................................................................358
usage guidelines...................................113, 119, 130
vlan statement
IGMP snooping.............................................................283
usage guidelines....................................................73
VLANs
IGMP snooping................................................................73
W
wildcard-source statement
PIM RPF selection.......................................................359
564
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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