Features - Figure B

Features - Figure B
中文 / English
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Mobile
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Tablet
Smartphone
E-ink Reader
Smart PC
PMP
Sports DV
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HD Tablet
13.3" Tablet
3G/4G Tablet
2G Tablet
HD Tablet
FEATURES
CPU
GPU
Screen Size
A31
A20
A10
Quad-Core
Dual-Core
Single-Core
Cortex-A7
SGX544MP2
Cortex-A7
Mali-400MP2
Cortex-A8
Mali-400
13.3”, 10.1”, 9.7”
10.1”, 9.7”
10.1”, 9.7”
1024 × 768
1024 × 768
1024 × 600
1024 × 600
2048 × 1536
Resolution
1920 × 1200
1024 × 768
Video
4K × 2K
2160P
2160P
Memory
2GB
1GB
1GB
DDR3/DDR3L/LPDDR2
DDR3/DDR3L/LPDDR2
DDR3
Wireless
WIFI+BT+GPS+3G
WIFI+BT+3G
OS
Android 4.2 or up
Android 4.2 or up
WIFI+BT+3G
Android 4.2 or
up
13.3" Tablet
FEATURES
A31
Quad-Core
CPU
GPU
Screen Size
Cortex-A7
SGX544MP2
13”
Resolution
2048×1536
Video
Memory
Wireless
OS
4K×2K
1920×1200
2GB DDR3L/LPDDR2
WIFI+BT+FM+GPS+3G
Android 4.2 or up
3G/4G Tablet
FEATURES
A31
A20
A10
CPU
Quad-Core
Dual-Core
Single-Core
Cortex-A7
Cortex-A7
Cortex-A8
GPU
SGX544MP2
Mali-400MP2
Mali-400
10.1”, 9.7”,
8”
Screen Size 13”, 10.1”, 9.7”, 8”
10.1”, 9.7”, 8”
1024×768
1920×1200
1024×768
1024×768
1024×600
1024×600
1024×768
2160P
1GB
DDR3/DDR3L/LPDDR2
WIFI+BT+3G
2160P
Wireless
4K×2K
2GB
DDR3/DDR3L/LPDDR2
WIFI+BT+GPS+3G/4G
OS
Android 4.2 or up
Android 4.2 or up
Resolution
Video
Memory
2G Tablet
1GB DDR3
WIFI+BT+3G
Android 4.2
or up
FEATURES
CPU
A31
A20
A10
A13
Quad-Core
Dual-Core
Single-Core
Single-Core
Cortex-A7
Cortex-A7
Cortex-A8
Cortex-A8
GPU
SGX544MP2
Screen
9.7”, 8”
Size
1024×768
Resolution800×600
Mali-400MP2
Mali-400
Mali-400
9.7”, 8”
9.7”, 8”
8”, 7”
1024×768
800×600
1024×768
800×600
800×600
800×480
Video
2160P
2160P
Memory 1GB DDR3
1GB DDR3
1GB DDR3
Wireless WIFI+2G
WIFI+2G
Android 4.2 or
up
WIFI+2G
Android 4.2
or up
1080P
512MB
DDR3
WIFI+2G
Android 4.2
or up
OS
4K×2K
Android 4.2 or up
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Copyright © 2013 Allwinner Technology Co., Ltd.
Just got my Gooseberry Board
Today I was surprised to wake up to a parcel from gooseberry. It was all secured in a
brown envelope with a thin rope tied around and then sealed with candle wax. I loved
how the guys at gooseberry taken the time to pack all of the parcels so no one in
between messes with the parcel. Looking back, i did get the board quite fast, i guess it
was the excitement and doubt that made it seem longer.
Here is a picture of the packaging:
Here is a picture of the board, which is almost the same as the one provided on the
website.
The holes for screws and mountings are well placed at the front, (3 In the front near the
ports) but only 1 at the back. This maybe a bit difficult to customize a case for this, but I
like the screws placements for the front end, since the front has to be sturdy if you have
to keep disconnecting and reconnecting the cables.
Once i took out the board it looked smaller and more fragile than I had imagined. I at
once wanted to attach it to my 24" LCD, since i was already using Mini-HDMI with my
PC. Once i connected, I pressed the button that says "power" but nothing happened. I
then Noticed that there was a "UBOOT" button which was labeled as the "RESET"
button in the gooseberry Images at the site.
In the picture you may have noticed the "ENTER" "HOME" and "ESC" button, i tried
The display did take a while to load in my case, and it showed an error "Hertz out of
Range" a couple of times on my LCD. It was kind of Confusing. And I couldn't tell
whether the system is on or off since the LED isn't blinking on the board. Here is a
picture of the only LED i could find which is labeled Near the MIC input and "CHG
LED" (Maybe battery charge LED).
Once the Display loads, it shows an Android Loading Screen on first boot,(wasn't ready
for a pic) And then the lockscreen of the ANDROID OS loads. However i couldn't
unlock the screen as i didnt have the mini USB converter. Another disappointment was
that the OS was in CHINESE Also no pic of that, will provide it in a while. Also if
you turn off the device and restart it, the clock goes back to 8:00. I think that's because
it doesn't have a battery to store the time and date. :S Or maybe because i haven't set up
my device properly.
Later on I did a quick run to the market and purchased an Micro SD Card and a Mini
USB MALE to USB FEMALE Converter. I expected the keyboard to show some sign
of life once i connected it and didn't expect the mouse to work, since it would be
needing some Cursor drivers or something.
The SD Card loaded and i could see the Icon on the homescreen. I tried playing around
with the buttons by using the POWER button, i think it acts like a KeyLock Button,
because through that i activate/deactivate the LCD from a Power saving state. And once
i press it for long, it gives me a screen with two options, Im assuming it asks whether i
want to shutdown or not (but i don't know chinese).
Here is The Allwinner A10 CPU. Better than the Raspberry Pi And on the left, you
can see the small white ribbon connector. That is for attaching a camera.
And the other Bigger white ribbon connector on the right is for the touchscreen/lcd
Here is the Realtek Wifi Chip on the board. As you can see, it looks much like an
Addon.
Here is the Motherboard model: A721 along with the revision: v 4.2.0 and the BUILD
date: 26.03.2012
Here are The Hynix Ram Chips. I think they are 4 128MB DDR3 Chips.
This is the 4GB Micron Flash Memory Chip:
I Don't know what the "MOTO" is for, but there is an outlet for a speaker, along with
the Battery Supply and LED pinout
---EDIT: It's for the motor / vibrator
Here are the rest of the pin outs That could be used to attach other hardware and stuff,
more on the developer and modification side i guess.
I Still can't believe this board is so tiny, and i Can't wait to get a proper system running
completely fine on this board. Looking forward to Ubuntu on this board.
Here is a picture of it from a tablet:
You guys may find the following links helpful:
http://rhombus-tech.net/allwinner_a10/
http://elinux.org/Hack_A10_devices
http://www.shainde.org/tablettes
http://www.lyxfsz.com/en/products_view.htm?id=25
http://www.lyxfsz.com/en/index.htm
Have any of you guys any tips to get the Keyboard/Mouse Working??
I hope we can start helping each other build our systems
----EDIT: I have got the Mouse working, it worked really well on the first shot once i
modified my USB cable to be a proper OTG cable Managed to change the language
to English
Here are some pictures
Last edited by ryandigweed on Tue Jul 31, 2012 8:37 pm, edited 3 times in tot
Rhombus-Tech/ allwinner a10
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Allwinner A10 - ARM Cortex A8 SoC
The Allwinner A10 CPU has been developed in, and is sold in, the People's Republic of
China. Its mass-volume price is around $7, yet it is a 400-pin highly feature-rich 1.2ghz
ARM Cortex A8 with a MALI400 GPU. It has the distinction of having the highest
bang-per-buck ratio of any SoC available at the time of writing, by quite a margin. Its
price and features is causing massive disruption of the tablet market in China (a minor
recession was caused by widespread cancellation of prior committments to other
SoCs!), as every factory in Shenzen scrambles to compete with hundreds of other
factories for the same end-user market: tablets and PVRs.
For comparison: TI has brought out a new $5 ARM Cortex A8, but it is limited to
500mhz and it is extra cost for the version with a PowerVR 3D GPU. Ingenic's jz4770 is
about $7 in mass-volume but it is a 1ghz MIPS with a Vivante GC600 3D GPU. Details
are harder to get hold of regarding the jz4770, but its interfaces are known not as
feature-rich as the Allwinner (no HDMI output for example). AMLogic's Cortex A9 is
$13 in mass-volume, but is limited to 800mhz and a maximum of 512mb of RAM.
Preorders
If you would like to register your interest in an EOMA-68 CPU card with an Allwinner
A10 CPU, please follow the instructions at the orders page. Developers can find out
more details of the Open Hardware Project progress on the pcb page.
News
Updates are available at the news page. Latest is that the owner of the Factory in China
has reviewed the draft component layout for the EOMA-68 CPU module, to doublecheck that everything will fit in the available space.
Features
Features of the Allwinner A10 include:
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1.2ghz Cortex A8 ARM Core
MALI400MP OpenGL ES 2.0 GPU
DDR3 Controller 800MHz 1GB max
2160p Hardware-accelerated Video playback (4x the resolution of 1080p)
2D Accelerated Graphics (G2D) Engine
a NAND Flash Controller that is capable of 8-way concurrent DMA (8 NAND
ICs)
4 SDIO interfaces (SD 3.0, UHI class)
USB 2.0 Host as well as a 2nd USB-OTG Interface (USB-OTG can be
reconfigured as USB 2.0 Host, automatically)
24-pin RGB/TTL as well as simultaneous HDMI out
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SATA-II 3gb/sec
10/100 Ethernet (MII compatible)
a 2nd 24-pin RGB/TTL interface that is multiplexed (shared) on the same pins
for a standard IDE (PATA) interface.
GPIO, I2C, PWM, Keyboard Matrix (8x8), built-in Resistive Touchscreen
Controller, and much more.
Unsurprisingly, this CPU has been chosen as the first CPU for an EOMA-68 CPU
module. The critical decisive factor however was the immediate support of Allwinner's
Board of Directors for releasing full GPL Source Code, to help the RHT Initiative to
foster better relations and closer ties with Free Software Developers.
Getting Involved
EOMA-68 CPU card is an open source software and hardware project that relies on the
community participation. You can get involved in several ways:
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Joining arm-netbooks@lists.phcomp.co.uk mailing list for discussions or
questions (registration required at
http://lists.phcomp.co.uk/mailman/listinfo/arm-netbook)
Contributing to the source code (kernel, bootloader, ...)
Downloading and trying Linux images available at Allwinner A10 images. You
can also download the nightly build images, If you want to test the latest U-boot
and/or Kernel images.
Reporting bugs / features requests in github issue tracker, see source code page
for links to corresponding repositories.
Adding information to the Wiki (these pages) mainly for how-tos, news and
general description of the project
Digging out register programming information from the u-boot and kernel
sources and add to A10 register guide
Preliminary Device Installation
Instructions
This is still TBD. In the meantime, information is available on elinux.org on Hacking
A10 Devices. Also there is a tool for reversing the "fex" format of the boot-up stage:
https://github.com/amery/sunxi-tools. Also there is a page describing the A10
Boot Process and A10 MMC Boot, including a link to the tool for packing a bootloader
application. There is also a page containing Allwinner A10 images of prebuilt
filesystems, a page on Building Debian From Source Code for Mele and a page about
Scripts to build source code and generate a bootable SD card
Pin Connections for the Module
This section is in note-form
SPI2 and JTAG0
pads, multiplex2, multiplex3 function, required to have one SD/MMC become a JTAG
port:
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PB13 SPI2_CS1 NC
PB14 SPI2_CS0 JTAG_MS0
PB15 SPI2_CLK JTAG_CK0
PB16 SPI2_MOSI JTAG_DO0
PB17 SPI2_MISO JTAG_DI0
Power Consumption (Mele A1000 A10)
u-boot idle, 0.23A@5V = 1.15W
Android idle. 0.34A@5V = 1.7W
Android busy navigating some web page: 0.55A@5V = 2.75W
Android 2.3.3 + youtube + video 720p = ~4.6W
Android 2.3.3 + SATA HDD + video 1280p = ~7.3W
Ubuntu 12.04 (headless) + SATA HDD + deluge (torrent client) +
minidlna (dlna server) = ~5.0W-6.5W (sometimes max 7.8W)
Forums and links to products with the
Allwinner A10
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http://tabletrepublic.com/forum/cortex-a8-allwinner-a10/
http://www.wits-tech.com/pages/board.jsp wits-tech developer
kit (page
is in chinese)
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http://www.cnx-software.com/category/processors/allwinner-a1xa10-a13/
https://www.miniand.com/forums/forums/2
http://forum.doozan.com/list.php?6
http://liliputing.com/2012/07/linux-distributions-that-can-runon-an-mk802-mini-pc.html
http://www.bitsandchips.it/13-mobile/1639-sistem-on-a-chipanalisi-della-piattaforma-ultra-low-cost-allwinner-a10
hacking the mele a1000
http://git.rhombus-tech.net/?
p=eoma.git;a=blob;f=pcb/allwinner_a10/library/allwinner.lib
KiCAD library for the Allwinner A10 processor
Tags: cpus
Links: evaluated cpus
Last edited Thu Nov 8 14:58:58 2012
List of tablets powered by Allwinner A10 processor
This new processor is becoming very popular among tablet manufacturers, as its low
price, high performance and, low power consumption.
I would like to list all tablets powered by Allwinner A10 processor, anyone is welcome
to help.
Allwinner A10 Tablets
AllDro Speed
Ainol Novo 7 Advanced
Ainol Novo 7 Advanced II
Ainol Novo Elf
Ainol Novo Aurora
AirPad 7p
Allview AllDro Speed
Audemars Piguet PC741
Aura LY-F1
Ampe A90
Benss B7
BRONCHO A710
Bmorn V9 plus
Bmorn V11
Bmorn V11 Extreme
CherryPad Edwin C807
Cougar Box Chip A10R
Cougar Box Chip A10C
Dropad A8HD
Eken MB1001
Eken T01A
Eken t10a
Eken A90
Eneoze 7 inch or 10 inch
Gemei G9
Gemei G2
GOCLEVER TAB A73
Gpad GA10
Hyundai A7
ICOO D90W
Icoo D70W
Iview 760TPC
LY-F1 (Netpad A10, TPGA-7AWN, A710)
Leoxsys Leopad i7-1500
Mobiitab 7 Momo11 Bird
Moonpad2
newman P81
OEM Novo 7 Advanced
Onda VX610W
Onda Vi20W
Onda Vi10 deluxe edition
Onda Vi20W deluxe
Onda Vi30W deluxe
Onda Vx610w
Onda VX580W Deluxe Edition
Onda Vi40
Onda Vi10 elite
Ployer Momo8
Ployer Momo9
Ployer Momo15
Primux BORA 7”
Qware Pro3
Rexing V7
Sanei N70 N71 N72 N73 N80 N81
Saycool A710
Scroll Excel
Sigotech V700
Skypad Alpha 2
Sumvision Cyclon Astro
Teclast P76 Resistive
Teclast P76ti
Teclast P85
Teclast A10t
Tracer OVO
Visual Land Connect
Visual Land Prestige 7
VitalASC Center-ST0716
***** A7
List of Allwinner A1X devices
this entry has 17 Comments in ARM, Hardware by admin
May 29, 2012
Considering all Allwinner A1x devices can boot from a special prepared sd-card and the
upcomming development of Linux and XBMC on these devices, I thought it would be
nice to create a list with potentional devices. Most of them don’t have easy access to
UART consoles and such, so are not really suitable for development purposes, but as
soon as more and more sd-card images are getting released, you might not have to use
any development tools. Just enjoying all the goods.
I will divide the list into four sections. The first one are the tablets, which is the biggest
list. The second would be any settop box like device like the Mele A1000 and A2000,
but also the MK802 HDMI dongle type. The third one are the handheld devices as
nicely pointed out by “onthebridge: and the fourth one are the devices which are
planned or announched, but not yet available. This are devices like the EOMA68 card
from Rhombus-tech.
Here comes the list, I will try to keep it up to date.
Allwinner A10 Tablets
AllDro Speed
Ainol Novo 7 Advanced
Ainol Novo 7 Advanced II
Ainol Novo Elf
Ainol Novo Aurora
AirPad 7p
Allview AllDro Speed
Audemars Piguet PC741
Aura LY-F1
Ampe A90
Benss B7
BRONCHO A710
Bmorn V9 plus
Bmorn V11
Bmorn V11 Extreme
CherryPad Edwin C807
Cougar Box Chip A10R
Cougar Box Chip A10C
Dropad A8HD
Eken MB1001
Eken T01A
Eken t10a
Eken A90
Eneoze 7 inch or 10 inch
Gemei G9
Gemei G2
GOCLEVER TAB A73
Gpad GA10
Hyundai A7
Momo11 Bird
Moonpad2
newman P81
OEM Novo 7 Advanced
Onda VX610W
Onda Vi20W
Onda Vi10 deluxe edition
Onda Vi20W deluxe
Onda Vi30W deluxe
Onda Vx610w
Onda VX580W Deluxe Edition
Onda Vi40
Onda Vi10 elite
Ployer Momo8
Ployer Momo9
Ployer Momo15
Primux BORA 7”
Qware Pro3
Rexing V7
Sanei N70 N71 N72 N73 N80 N81
Saycool A710
Scroll Excel
Sigotech V700
Skypad Alpha 2
Sumvision Cyclon Astro
Teclast P76 Resistive
Teclast P76ti
Teclast P85
Teclast A10t
ICOO D90W
Icoo D70W
Iview 760TPC
LY-F1 (Netpad A10, TPGA-7AWN, A710)
Leoxsys Leopad i7-1500
Mobiitab 7
Tracer OVO
Visual Land Connect
Visual Land Prestige 7
VitalASC Center-ST0716
WoPad A7
Settop boxes
Mele A1000
Mele A2000
MINI-X
MK802
PineRiver H24
Handhelds
iGame
Yinlips YDPG16
Yinlips YDPG18A
Planned or Announched
A13-OLinuXino
Hyston Google TV box
Rhombus-Tech EOMO68 A10
Sunlike UMPC-1021
If you guys know of more out there, please post them into the comments and I will
update the list.
Want to know what you can do with the Allwinner devices; What about Ubuntu? or
What about OpenELEC / XBMC
(sources; Slatedroid, XBMC Forum, Gathering of Tweakers)
Open ARM GPU Drivers FOSDEM 2013 Video and Call to ARM
Management
February 14th, 2013 cnxsoft 2 comments
As I previously wrote, FOSDEM organizers are slowly uploading FOSDEM 2013
videos. One of the most interesting talk “Open ARM GPU Drivers” is now available.
I’ve also uploaded it to YouTube (embedded below) to give it more exposure. Luc
Verhaegen has also written a recent blog post entitled “Hey ARM!” where he
announces the release of the modified source for Quake 3 Arena demo, and asks ARM
to join them in making an open source driver.
Open ARM GPU Drivers @ FOSDEM2013
This session covers the following key points:
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Problem – Binary drivers are mainly designed to run in Android, and it’s very
difficult to have proper GPU drivers for Linux, and companies are not interested
to release open source drivers or even just documentation, as they are not
convinced it will benefit them in any way.
Legal – This is actually the main issue, as open sourcing existing driver is a legal
nightmare, and may cost a lot of money.
ARM Mali Overview – Mali-200/400, 450 & T6xx
Lima Project Status – No big secrets left in command-stream, compiler is tough
due to Mali architecture, and actual driver work will start after FOSDEM. Full
GNU/linux systems available.
Qualcomm Adreno Overview – Adreno 2xx/3xx
Freedreno Project Status – WIP driver. Command-stream and Shader
architecture is mostly known. WIP xf86 (exa), mesa (gallium) drivers available.
No proper GNU/linux available (The developer is currently using Android)
Nvidia Geforce ULP (Tegra) Overview
Tegra-re Project Status – Early research, early shader disassembler and early
command stream capture. Limited availability of GNU/linux systems (AC-100,
Trimslice).
Vivante GCxxxx Overview
Etnaviv project Status – Early research: Slowly prying apart command stream,
full command stream capture and replay, and shader disassembler and
assembler.
Broadcom Videocore Overview
The Raspberry Pi is a closed platform – “Open source” driver release by the
Raspberry Pi foundation is just a shim (message-passing interface between
ARM and the GPU), and the GPU itself runs a RTOS that handles the real
processing.
Videocore Project Status – Research stage: documentation,
assembler/disassembler., compiler work started,
scalar processor fully reverse engineered, and some some “Hello World” code is
available for booting the Raspberry Pi. 9 people are currently working on this
project.
Imagination PowerVR SGX Overview – PowerVR SGX (5xx), and Rogue (6xx)
in the future
Open Source Project Status (from the slides):
Lima driver demos on Mele A1000 – Cube demos and Quake 3 Arena
timedemo.
You can also download the presentation slides for his sessions
Quake 3 Arena Time Demo Source Code for Lima and Limare
Driver
As I just mentioned, part of the session was a demo of Quake 3 Arena running on top of
Lima drivers in Mele A1000 set-top box running Linux. Luc has now made the source
code available on github, and you can get it as follows:
git clone git://github.com/libv/ioquake3-mali_fb.git
You can them compile it natively in any AllWinner A10 device:
make ARCH=arm
You’ll also need to get a full Quake 3 Arena version first as the binary data files (paks
files) must be copied to ~/ioquake3/baseq3 (NB: Those files can not be redistributed,
as they belong to ID Software), and edit demofour.cfg as follows:
cg_drawfps 1
timedemo 1
set demodone "quit"
set demoloop1 "demo four; set nextdemo vstr demodone"
vstr demoloop1
You can now run the game demo with (I haven’t tried, so I’m not sure of the quake
binary name):
ioquake3.arm +exec demofour.cfg
The full games is not playable yet, and Luc welcomes fixes for input support, sound, or
even for the missing GLES2 shaders.
Call to ARM Management to Work with Open Source
Developers
Luc Verhaegen claims “Absolutely nothing stops us now from delivering an open
source driver that broadly matches the binary driver in performance! And this is exactly
what we will be doing next!”, and calls upon ARM to join them:
We are not going away, we are here to stay. We cannot be silenced or stopped anymore,
and we are becoming harder and harder to ignore.
It is only a matter of time before we produce an open source graphics driver stack which
rivals your binary in performance. And that time is measured in weeks and months now.
The requests from your own customers, for support for this open source stack, will only
grow louder and louder.
So please, stop fighting us. Embrace us. Work with us. Your customers and
shareholders will love you for it.
Open source developers are not the only ones to ask for this, if you’ve ever wanted to
use Linux with proper 2D/3D GPU drivers on ARM, you are in the same boat, and even
Linaro engineers complain about this (Linaro is an organization working on open source
software for ARM SoCs, and ARM is obviously a core member), because those need to
be updated for each kernel version, and it’s a nightmare as they have to go through the
GPU company’s FAE which talks to the engineer and back. This wastes a lot of time
(and money), as a task that could be done within a few hours/days with open source
drivers, may instead take days or weeks because of binary blobs. An example is Linux
Mali-400 support on Hardkernel ODROID-X/U2, they announced their intention to
provide hardware GPU acceleration months ago, last month they released an Ubuntu
image which can support GPU drivers (but not the driver), and they could only release
the drivers yesterday (I’ll have to try that). The point is that it could have taken a much
shorter time with open source drivers.
I understand there must be complicated legal issues, but there must certainly be a way to
provide open source drivers, as it would just benefit everyone (from end users to
engineers to SoC companies). Since Lima developers have now proven they can match
the performance binary drivers for their “research” driver, and seem to be committed to
deliver a proper open source driver for Mali-400, that should be a sufficient reason for
ARM to cooperate with open source developers, even if it is only by releasing the GPU
documentation.
Categories: AllWinner A1X, Android, Freescale i.MX, Graphics, Ingenic JZ74xx,
Linux, Marvell Armada, NVidia Tegra 3, NVidia Tegra 4, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4,
Rockchip RK30xx, Samsung Exynos, Testing, Texas Instruments OMAP 4, Texas
Instruments OMAP 5, Video Tags: arm, fosdem 2013, gpu, imagination, lima, mali,
nvidia, open source, qualcomm, raspberry pi, videocore, vivante
Headless Connected Oscilloscope based on Cubieboard or
Beaglebone
February 8th, 2013 cnxsoft 3 comments
Warsaw ELHEP (Electronics for High Eenergy Physics Experiments) Group is
currently working on MMS (Mobile Measurement System) Project. This project
features what I would call a “headless connected oscilloscope”, which can be detected
on the network via SSDP, send the data via Websocket, and display it on iOS, Android,
or Windows Phone devices. This oscilloscope does not feature any screen, and
receives/transmits data via Ethernet, Wi-Fi, or Bluetooth.
ARM SCOPE Board Connected to Cubieboard
The original hardware is based on three main boards:
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CTI-VMAX – ARM9 with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Ethernet connectivity.
ARM SCOPE v1.0.1 with 8 channel ADC.
ARM SCOPE v1.0.2 with 4 high speed ADC (100MSPS).
The ELHEP researchers have been looking at replacing CTI-VMAX with low cost
boards, and after considering several options, they chose to design two versions of their
oscilloscope: one based on Cubieboard, and the other on the Beaglebone.
Beaglebone with Oscilloscope CAPE and ARM SCOPE Boards
So they designed expansions boards for the Cubieboard and Beaglebone in order to
connect the ARM SCOPEs.
This project involved hardware development, software development (Linux firmware in
Beaglebone/Cubieboard, MMS protocol, and app development), and once everything is
setup you can see the waveform on a mobile device as shown below.
MMS Project on the iPhone
Their mobile app first discovers the measurement equipment on the network (left),
remotely configures the device (middle), and displays the waveform (right).
The researchers/students are still working on perfecting the project. You can find out
more on MMS Project page (in Polish).
Categories: AllWinner A1X, Android, Hardware, Linux, Testing, Texas Instruments
Sitara Tags: Android, Linux, beaglebone, cubieboard, elhep, ios, oscilloscope, windows
phone
Quake 3 Arena Demo Using Lima Driver is (Slightly) Faster than
Mali-400 Binary Driver
February 7th, 2013 cnxsoft 4 comments
As mentioned previously, Luc Verhaegen was to give a talk about the status of Lima
driver (reverse-engineered Mali-200/400 GPU driver), as well as other GPU open
source implementation, at FOSDEM 2013. This is now done, and part of the talk
included a demo of Quake 3 Arena (q3a timedemo) running on tablet featuring
AllWinner A10 SoC (Cortex A8 @ 1Ghz, Mali-400MP1 GPU @ 320 Mhz, and DDR3
memory @ 360MHz), and a 1024×600 LCD. The fact it works is already a great
achievement in itself, but this demo runs at 47.2fps with Lima driver (limare), whereas
it can be rendered at 46.2fps using the binary driver. In his blog, Luc also explains that
apart from being 2% faster, it also uses 3% less cpu than the binary driver! Take that
binary blobs!
There’s still more work to do however, as this Quake 3 Arena port is not playable yet
for 2 reasons:
1. There’s no input support via the touchscreen driver yet.
2. Luc only included the shaders needed to run the timedemo, but the full game
requires more shaders.
He goes on to explain that Lima is not fully open source just yet, as they are still using
the binary shader compiler, but he will push Q3A demo source code soon. If you want
to learn more of the steps he and others went through to reverse-engineer Mali-400
driver, and optimize it for Q3A timedemo, read “Quake 3 Arena timedemo on top of the
lima driver!“
Categories: AllWinner A1X, Graphics, Linux Tags: driver, fosdem 2013, gpu, lima,
open source
Smallart U-Host AllWinner A10 mini PC is Available for $20
January 3rd, 2013 cnxsoft 37 comments
Last July, I reviewed Smallart U-Host (U1A), an Android TV stick based on AllWinner
A10 with 1GB RAM and 4GB RAM. At the time, I had a positive opinion of the device
as the Android firmware was stable, and mostly did it was supposed, and it was feasible
to run Linux distributions on the device. At that time, it was sold for $70, but this
morning, Clint, one of my reader, informed me he spotted an AllWinner A10 device
selling for $20.50 on Dealextreme.
This device and the user interface resembles very much to Smallart U-Host, but the
model name reported on Dealextreme is U2. According to Smallart U2 page, this device
is based on Rockchip RK3066, so it’s just another naming mistake on DealExtreme.
The rest of the specs are identical to Smallart U-Host:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SoC – Allwinner A10 (Cortex A8) @ 1.5GHZ
System Memory – 1GB DDR3 RAM
Storage – 4GB NAND flash + microSD slot (upt to 32GB)
Video Output – HDMI + mini USB OTG
Video Format – AVI, RM/RMVB, MKV, WMV and MOV
USB – USB 2.0 host port
WiFi – 802.11 b/g/n
Dimensions – 9.7 cm x 4.1 cm x 1.2 cm
Weight – 38g
The device is sold with a power adapter, a 8cm HDMI cable (8cm), a USB cable (80cm)
and an English user manual, exactly the same accessories I received with Smallart UHost (aka Oval Elephant).
The $20 price tag is either a mistake, or the device does not sell that well and they want
to get rid of existing stock.
Categories: AllWinner A1X, Android, Hardware, Linux Tags: Android, Linux, ics,
mini-pc, smallart
Top 10 Posts of 2012 on CNXSoft Blog
December 31st, 2012 cnxsoft 5 comments
This is the last day of the year, so it’s probably a good time to look back and see what
interested people on this blog. This has been a banner year for low cost ARM devices
and boards starting with the Raspberry Pi, then MK802 and the new mini PCs / HDMI
TV dongles / PCs-on-a-stick (whatever you want to call them) that came after, always
cheaper and faster. Those low cost devices have in turn made people really interested in
ARM Linux, and lots of development on those little devices and boards started.
The top 10 posts of 2012, according to page views, reflect just those trends:
1. 74 USD AllWinner A10 Android 4.0 Mini PC (May 2012) – MK802 started the
whole “low cost mini PCs” craze, and drove the most traffic to this blog this
year. People got excited about the price, form factor, and the possibility to run
both Android and other Linux based operating systems.
2. MK802 II Mini PC Now Costs as Much as Raspberry Pi Model B. Let’s
Compare Them! (December 2012) – This post features the 2 stars of 2012: the
Raspberry Pi and MK802 II HDMI TV donglwe (MK802 with 1GB RAM). As
both device can now be bought for $35, and allow you to do very similar things,
it’s was time for a head-to-head comparison. I’ve just written about it last week,
and it got Slashdotted.
3. WM8850-MID Android 4.0 Tablet Unboxing and Review (June 2012) – At the
time, this Eken W70 clone featuring Wondermedia WM8850 Cortex A9
processor was a real bargain for $72 (including shipping). The firmware has a
few issues however, and that’s what drove people to this post: looking for
solutions.
4. AllWinner A10/A1X Processor Resources, Development Board and SDK
(December 2011) – This post was written just about one year ago, but traffic was
steady all year, as people want to find out how to hack their AllWinner A10
tablets, media players and mini PCs.
5. Mele A1000: AllWinner A10 (Cortex A8) Based Hackable Android STB
(March 2012) – The Mele A1000 was my first Android device, and it got
popular thanks to its relatively low cost, available ports (3x USB, SATA, VGA,
HDMI…), and serial port which made it ideal for development of U-boot and
the kernel. I still think it’s a good platform, but since then low cost development
boards such as the Cubieboard has made it a little less attractive, and interest has
somewhat faded in the last few months.
6. Valueplus Tizzbird Stick N1: Android 4.0 HDMI/USB Media Player Dongle
(March 2012) - The Tizzbird Stick N1 was one the first mini PCs, and was
showcased at CeBit 2012 several months before MK802. Unfortunately, it took
many more months to finalize the design, and the product never took off, as
other cheaper Telechips TCC892x based mini PCs appeared on the market. The
only reason it got traffic is because I mentioned it in the $74 MK802 post at the
top of this list.
7. Mele A1000 Android 2.3 STB Unboxing and Review (April 2012) – In March, I
was still waiting for the Raspberry Pi launch, but I noticed Barry Kauler (Puppy
Linux) bought the Mele A1000 to keep him busy while he was also waiting for
his Pi, and seeing the development around AllWinner A10, I decided to buy one
as well. Apparently, I was not the only one interested as many people came here
to read my review of this nice hackable media player.
8. Mele A2000 Android 2.3 Media Player Powered by AllWinner A10 (April
2012) – The Mele A2000 is the little sister of the Mele A1000, which the same
hardware, just a difference casing.
9. Linaro Android Puts Stock Android To Shame on TI Pandaboard (OMAP4430)
(June 2012) – Linaro showcased a demo showing an optimized version of
Android could deliver twice the performance of stock Android on a particular
benchmark running in Pandaboard. Bero commented on my post with details,
and the post quickly became viral as developers wanted to give it a try. It turned
out the improvement is actually more like 15 to 20%, but this is enough to
double the framerate of this benchmark due to Vsync synchronization. It may
also work in real games.
10. Raspberry Pi Emulator in Ubuntu with Qemu (October 2011) – In 2011 and
early 2012, the Raspberry Pi foundation promised much in terms of schedule,
but initially failed to deliver, and many people get desperate enough to check the
instructions to emulate an ARMv6 device and run Debian in QEMU to get
started with development, before the Raspberry Pi hardware is available.
That will be the last post of 2012, so the “hardware team” (pictured below) and I would
like to wish you a very happy and prosperous new year 2013, which I’m sure will be as
exciting as 2012 for Linux/Android gadgets and boards, and we should see the first
big.LITTLE processors and corresponding devices, ever cheaper tablets, smartphones
and mini PCs, an interesting Intel vs. ARM fight for mobile devices, a proper XBMC
ARM set-top box close to $50, new mobile OSes based on Linux (Tizen, Sailfish OS,
Firefox OS…), and more…
Categories: AllWinner A1X, Android, Graphics, Hardware, Linux, Telechips
TCC89XX, Texas Instruments OMAP 4, WonderMedia WM8XXX Tags: Android,
Linux, debian, development board, linaro, mele, mini-pc, mk802, pandaboard, qemu,
raspberry pi, sdk, tablet, ubuntu, valueplus
MK802 II Mini PC Now Costs as Much as Raspberry Pi Model B.
Let’s Compare Them!
December 26th, 2012 cnxsoft 32 comments
MK802 mini PC quickly went viral as it launched in May 2012 for $74 US, and since
then many Chinese manufacturers have jumped into the market bringing both new faster
devices, and the price down. AllWinner A10s, a low cost version of AllWinner A10
used in MK802, was also launched specifically for this market to bring costs even
lower. Today, I’ve been informed an HDMI TV dongle based on AllWinner A10s that
sells for $36.55 on Tinydeal.com which is a very good price, but decided to check on
Aliexpress to look for comparable deals, and found one shop selling MK802 II for
$34.91 including shipping via China Post, which makes it cheaper than the Raspberry Pi
model B selling for $35 excluding shipping.
Raspberry Pi vs MK802 II
NB: Devices are not shown at the same scale.
Both products target 2 different markets, as MK802 is oriented to the consumer market,
and Raspberry Pi targets the educational market, but in practice, it appears people may
use the device for similar purpose, for example as a media player or a platform for
tinkering with Linux.
Since both products have the same price, and software support & availability have
improved since their launch, I’ve just created a side-by-side comparison below.
MK802 II
SoC
RAM
Storage
USB
Ethernet
AllWinner A10
CPU: Cortex A8 @ 1.5GHz
GPU: Mali-400
Raspberry Pi Model B
Broadcom BCM2835
CPU: ARM11 @ 700MHz (OC: 1
GHz)
GPU: Videocore IV
512 MB
SD card slot
1 GB
4GB NAND Flash + microSD slot
1x USB 2.0 Host + 2x USB OTG
2x USB 2.0 Host ports
(One USB OTG is reserved for power)
N/A (via USB dongle only)
10/100 Mbit
Wi-Fi
Video Output
Audio Output
802.11 b/g/n
HDMI
HDMI
Expansion Headers N/A
Size
Casing
9.7 x 2.8 x 1.2cm
Yes
HDMI Cable
USB Cable
OTG Cable
User Manual
Included
Accessories
Video Codecs
(HW)
Linux Support
Android Support
Community
Support
N/A (via USB dongle only)
HDMI and Composite
HDMI and 3.5mm stereo out jack
Yes. Provide access to GPIO, I2C, SPI,
etc…
DSI (for LCD display) and CSI-2 (for
camera) interfaces are also available
8.56 x 5.6 x 2.1cm (Board only)
No (Cases can be ordered separately)
N/A
H.264 only.
MPEG-2 and VC1 can be added by
purchasing corresponding licenses
Good.
Very good.
Stable bootloader and kernel, with SD Several distributions are available for
images provided by the community, but the platform, and Debian is officially
no official distro support
supported (Raspbian)
Poor (for now)
Very good.
Android 2.3 without GPU acceleration
Android 4.0 ICS
Android 4.0 in progress
No official community support, but
several (seller) sites provides forums
for MK802 such as miniand, and sunxi- Very large community via Raspberry Pi
linux.org community works on
Forums.
AllWinner Linux development in the
open.
H.264, MPEG 1/2/4, VC-1, VP8, and
AVS
If you just look at the hardware specs, there’s no comparison, and MK802 II provides
much better value than the Raspberry Pi with a much faster CPU, more RAM, internal
storage and more. Only the GPU processing power may be subject to debate, but I don’t
really have data to make a proper comparison. So if you just want to run the device as a
media player for example, I’d just go with MK802 II since you’ll get a smoother
experience and more video codecs are supported. The only caveat is that you’ll have to
use Android (and see the status bar during video playback), as although Linux video
support is available, it’s not ready for prime time, and never will.
However, the Raspberry Pi is still a better solution for several use cases:
•
•
•
Hardware “hacking” – You need to make use of the “GPIO” headers to control
external devices.
Connection to old TV – The Raspberry Pi has a composite video output which
allows it to be connected to older TV lacking HDMI
Beginners – If you’re not familiar with Linux, using AllWinner A10 devices
may prove challenging, and it’s much easier with the Raspberry Pi thanks to
official Linux distributions, and the Raspberry Pi community.
Categories: AllWinner A1X, Android, Hardware, Linux Tags: Android, Linux, mini-pc,
mk802, raspberry pi
Olimex A13-OLinuXino-MICRO Development Board Unboxing
And Review
December 21st, 2012 cnxsoft 2 comments
Every Friday, Olimex organizes an online competition where they give away one of
their board. They’ll ask a (usually simple) technical question on their twitter account at
22h00 (GMT+7), and all you have to do is to reply to their tweet with the correct
answer within one hour. The winner is then selected randomly with random.org. There
are usually 50 to 100 respondents so the odds are pretty good.
I played a few times, and finally, I was lucky enough to win an A13-OLinuXinoMICRO development board at the beginning of December. I received it yesterday, after
UPS took a whooping 15 days to deliver the board (Way to go UPS!). The board can be
purchased on Olimex for 35 Euros plus shipping and taxes, or even lower if you order
larger quantities.
A13-OLinuXino-MICRO is a stripped down version of A13-OLinuXino-WIFI with the
following specs:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SoC – AllWinner A13 Cortex A8 processor at 1GHz with Mali400 GPU
System Memory – 256 MB RAM (128Mbit x 16)
Storage – microSD card slot for booting the Linux image
Video Output – VGA video output. LCD signals are available on connector.
Audio I/O – 3.5mm headphone jack + Microphone input pads (no connector)
USB – 1x USB host +1x USB OTG which can power the board
UEXT connector – To connect UEXT modules like Zigbee, Bluetooth, Relays,
etc
3 “GPIO” connectors (2x 40-pin and 1x 10-pin) – Those give access to NAND
flash, GPIOs, I2C, UARTs and SDIO2 signals, as well as 5 system pins: +5V,
+3.3V, GND, RESET, NMI.
LCD Connector – You can connect an optional 7″ LCD provided by Olimex, or
connect your own.
Misc – 1 reset key, 1 U-boot/FEL key, 2 LEDs, 4 mounting holes, UART1
header and pads for JTAG and UART0.
•
•
Power – 5V DC input power supply
Dimensions – 100 x 85 mm
As usual, I will first post some unboxing pictures, then try Linux on the board, and give
some kind of review.
A13-OLinuXino-MICRO Unboxing
The board comes in a small Olimex branded package, and as is the case for the
Raspberry Pi, the only item in the package is the board.
Let’s have a look at the top of the board first, where all the components and connectors
are placed.
Top of A13-OLinuXino-MICRO Board (Click to Enlarge)
The back of the board shows markings for the GPIO connectors, VGA, UARTs, JTAG
and some test points for the different voltages on the board.
Bottom of A13-OLinuXino-MICRO Board (Click to Enlarge)
I’ve also taken a picture of the Olimex board with two other well-known low cost
boards…
Raspberry Pi vs Cubieboard vs A13-OLinuxino-MICRO
A13-OLinuXino is larger than the Cubieboard and almost twice as big as the Raspberry
Pi.
Getting Started with Olimex A13-OLinuXino-MICRO
First you’ll need to get some external accessories such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A power supply – A 5V/2A power supply to connect to the 5+ jack or the
miniUSB port. A microUSB port might have been preferably since most mobile
phones used this type of USB connector.
A USB hub – This is optional but since there’s only a USB Host port, it is
required unless you only plan to connect one USB device (e.g. USB keyboard).
USB to Serial Board – Again, this is optional but it is really useful for
debugging purpose in case there’s an issue with the bootloader and/or kernel, or
you simply don’t want/need to plug the board to a VGA monitor.
Display – VGA monitor or LCD
Keyboard and mouse
Wi-Fi / Ethernet USB Dongle – Optional
a microSD for Linux and storage
One good thing with Olimex is that they have free user’s manuals for their boards. That
may seem trivial, but the Cubieboard simply do not have one, and the Raspberry Pi does
have one, but you need to pay for it. Of course, all boards have some free resources
online, but it’s still nice to have most of what you need in one document.
So let’s download A13-OLinuXino-MICRO user’s manual first. It a 30-page PDF
document that gives you an overview of the board, explains how to get started with the
board, and gives a detailed hardware description of the board (pin and connectors
descriptions), some information about AllWinner A13 SoC, and some links to the
design files (schematics & PCB layout in PDF and Eagle format).
Since the board does not have flash, you need to load a Linux image to a microSD card
first. Olimex currently just has a preliminary Debian image for the board
(A13_Micro_Debian_first_preliminary_release-06122012.rar – 737 MB). This is a
compressed SD card image, so simply uncompress it, and dump it to a microSD card
with dd (Linux) or Win32DiskImager (Windows).
Time to connect the board. I’ve inserted by Debian SD card, and connected a USB
keyboard, the serial to USB adapter I use with the Mele A1000 to UART1, a VGA cable
to my monitor and a power supply to the microUSB port.
Everything looks fine, I can see U-Boot and the kernel output in putty and the VGA
monitors light, but the boots take over 2 minutes, as it’s stuck in udev, as it apparently
tries to find another USB host that does not exists, and times out after 120 seconds.
Waiting for /dev to be fully populated...
udevadm settle - timeout of 120 seconds reached, the event queue
contains:
/sys/devices/platform/sw-ohci.1/usb3 (581)
/sys/devices/platform/sw-ohci.1/usb3/3-0:1.0 (582)
/sys/devices/platform/sw-ohci.1/usb3/usb_device/usbdev3.1 (583)
Finally, I can login (Username: root | Password: password), and check a few things
about the board in the serial terminal:
Debian GNU/Linux wheezy/sid A13Micro ttyS0
A13Micro login: root
Password:
Last login: Thu Jan 1 00:17:25 UTC 1970 on ttyS0
Linux A13Micro 3.0.52+ #10 PREEMPT Wed Dec 5 16:01:52 EET 2012 armv7l
The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free
software;
the exact distribution terms for each program are described in the
individual files in /usr/share/doc/*/copyright.
Debian GNU/Linux comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, to the extent
permitted by applicable law.
root@A13Micro:~# uname -a
Linux A13Micro 3.0.52+ #10 PREEMPT Wed Dec 5 16:01:52 EET 2012 armv7l
GNU/Linux
root@A13Micro:~# free -mh
total
used
free
shared
buffers
cached
Mem:
165M
32M
133M
0B
4.0M
12M
-/+ buffers/cache:
16M
149M
Swap:
0B
0B
0B
root@A13Micro:~# df -h
Filesystem
Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
rootfs
1.8G 729M 992M 43% /
/dev/root
1.8G 729M 992M 43% /
devtmpfs
83M
0
83M
0% /dev
tmpfs
17M 120K
17M
1% /run
tmpfs
5.0M
tmpfs
34M
tmpfs
34M
root@A13Micro:~#
0
0
0
5.0M
34M
34M
0% /run/lock
0% /tmp
0% /run/shm
So there’s 165 MB available for Linux, as the rest of the 256MB RAM is mainly
reversed for A13 GPU, and the rootfs is 1.8GB with 729 MB used. Since I’ve got a
4GB microSD card, let’s increase the rootfs size to make full use of the available space
on the microSD:
1. Run fdisk to delete and re-create the rootfs partition (p2)
fdisk /dev/mmcblk0
2. Reboot the board, and resize the partition:
resize2fs /dev/mmcblk0p2
3. Enjoy the extra space:
4. df -h
5. Filesystem
rootfs
Size
3.6G
Used Avail Use% Mounted on
731M 2.7G 22% /
When I’ve then tried to login via the VGA screen, I realize the USB keyboard did not
work at all with this board, which could explain the many USB debug message I could
see in the serial terminal…
If you want to use LCD instead of VGA, the script files to do so are in
script_GPIO_LCD_800x480 directory in the FAT partition of the microSD card.
More Information and Technical Support
If you prefer to build u-boot & the kernel yourself, and use your own rootfs, you can
follow the instructions in Building bootable SD-card with Debian Linux Image for A13OLinuXino. Those are the instructions for A13-OLinuXino, so you may have to adapt
the instructions for A13-OLinuXino-MICRO.
If you want to use/test the latest kernel and bootloader, there’s an easier method using
sunxi-linux nightly builds. If you don’t want to keep the rootfs but update the kernel and
U-boot you can do as follows:
wget https://github.com/linux-sunxi/sunxibsp/raw/master/scripts/sunxi-media-create.sh
chmod 755 sunxi-media-create.sh
wget http://dl.linux-sunxi.org/amery/sunxi3.0/latest/a13_olinuxino_hwpack.tar.xz
/sunxi-media-create.sh /dev/sdX a13_olinuxino_hwpack.tar.xz norootfs
This will create an image for A13-OLinuXino board (512MB RAM), and if you try
directly the system will crash at boot time. So until a13_olinuxino-micro_hwpack.tar.xz
becomes available, you’ll need to copy the script.bin file from the Debian image to the
FAT partition.
You can get hardware and software support on Olimex Forums and consult A13OLinuXino-MICRO Wiki (In construction). If you are modifying the the kernel or uboot source code or find bugs related to the kernel/u-boot, contacting sunxi-linux
mailing-list may be a better option.
Conclusion
If I just look at the board specifications and compare it to other low cost boards such as
the Raspberry Pi or Cubieboard, Olimex A13-OLinuXino may not look the best value at
35 Euro + shipping, and Debian is not really stable on this board right now, although
I’m pretty sure it will eventually be.
One of the advantage of the Olimex board is the VGA connector which is missing on
the other 2 boards aforementioned. A13-OLinuXino-MICRO also has 4 expansion
headers, including the UEXT connector that gives you access to over 20 low cost
modules. This can make the board very attractive for embedded projects as it’s
relatively straightforward to add some features such as GSM/GPRS, sensors, GPS. RF
connectivity…
Finally, all Olimex boards are open source hardware, which means you’ll get access to
hardware design files (and not only PDF) and source code, which is not fully the case
for most other boards, especially for the schematics in original format and PCB layout.
Read more: http://www.cnx-software.com/category/processors/allwinner-a1x-a10a13/#ixzz2L8MGkT1H
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