skylane - Blade Helis

skylane - Blade Helis
S
K
Y
L
A
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INSTRUCTION MANUAL
• Ultra Covering
• Pre-Finished Fiberglass Cowl
• Highest Quality Craftsmanship
90%
PRE-BUILT
ALMOST READY-TO-FLY
Specifications
TM
WE GET PEOPLE FLYING
Wingspan: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66"
Wing Area:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 sq. in.
Weight (Approx.): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6.5 lbs.
Recommended Engines: . . . . .40–.50 2-cycle
.50–.65 4-cycle
Table of Contents
Introduction
Adhesives, Tools and Supplies Required
Kit Contents
Field Equipment Required
Optional Field Equipment
Section 1: Hinging the Ailerons
Section 2: Joining the Wing Halves
Section 3: Installing the Aileron Servos
Section 4: Installing the Aileron Linkage
Section 5: Mounting the Wing
Section 6: Installing the Tail
Section 7: Hinging the Rudder and Elevator
Section 8: Installing the Engine
Section 9: Installing the Nose Gear
Section 10: Installing the Landing Gear
Section 11: Assembling & Mounting the Wheel Pants
Section 12: Assembling & Installing the Fuel Tank
Section 13: Installing the Radio
Section 14: Installing the Linkages
Section 15: Attaching the Cowl
Section 16: Installing the Windows
Section 17: Scale Detailing
Section 18: Balancing the Cessna 182
Section 19: Control Throw Recommendation
Section 20: Flying the Cessna 182
Pre-Flight Check
Pre-Flight at the Field
AMA Safety Code
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3
4
5
6
7
8
10
13
15
17
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24
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27
28
31
34
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46
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Introduction
Throughout aviation history, select few aircraft have achieved such a level of popularity that they transcend their eras. Such is the case
of the Cessna 182. This timeless classic is perhaps even more famous today than when it was first introduced.
Hangar 9’s Cessna 182 offers traditional scale appearance in a .40 size model aircraft and can be powered with any standard .40–.50
2-cycle engine. Or, for enhanced scale realism, a .50–.65 4-cycle engine can be used to power the Cessna 182.
Hangar 9’s Cessna 182 comes 90% pre-built to a high level of craftsmanship and is pre-covered and trimmed in Ultra Covering. This
means you can have a large (66″ span) high quality scale Cessna 182 to show to your friends at the field in 20 hours or less. Best of
all, they’ll never know it’s an ARF, and chances are they’ll compliment you on your building and finishing skill. Don’t worry . . . we
won’t tell!
WARNING:
An R/C aircraft is not a toy! If misused, it can cause serious bodily harm and damage to property. Fly only in open areas, preferably
AMA (Academy of Model Aeronautics) approved flying sites, following all instructions included with your radio and engine.
Special Note: Due to changes in weather, wrinkling of the covering may occur. This is the nature of the covering film of the model
and can be easily eliminated using a heat gun or sealing iron.
In case of wrinkle: Use a heat gun or sealing iron on the wrinkled area. Then rub the surface with a soft cloth until the surface is
smooth again.
Additional Equipment Required
Radio Equipment
Engine Recommendations
4 channels (minimum)
5 standard servos
Standard 450-650 mAh receiver battery pack
Y-harness
2 servo extensions
.40–.50 2-Cycle Engines
.50–.65 4-Cycle Engines
MDS .46
Saito .56GK
Recommended JR Systems
Recommended 2-Cycle Engines
JR F400 FM
JR 642 FM
JR XP783
JR XP8103
JR PCM10SxII
MDS .46
Webra Speed .50 GT
Recommended 4-Cycle Engines
Saito .56-.65 GK
Saito .50-.65
3
Adhesives, Tools
and Supplies Required
Adhesives
Instant thin CA (Cyanoacrylate) glue
Thick CA glue
CA remover/debonder
White canopy glue (e.g., R/C 56 or Formula 560)
6-minute epoxy
12-minute epoxy
30-minute epoxy
Blue Locktite 242
Tools and Supplies
Drill
Drill bits: 1/4″, 1/8″, 1/16″, 3/32″
Small and medium Phillips screwdrivers
Z-bend pliers
Needle nose pliers
Pliers
Small round file
Adjustable wrench
Razor saw
Heat gun
Moto-Tool with sanding drum
Hobby knife with #11 blade
Mixing stick
Epoxy brush
Medium sandpaper
Masking tape
Straight edge
Measuring device (e.g., ruler, tape measure)
Scissors
Paper Towels
Wax paper
Rubbing alcohol
Pencil
Felt tipped pen
Fuel tubing
String (18–24″ long)
Radio packing foam
Antenna tube (optional)
Fueling valve (optional)
4
Kit Contents
Main Parts
Fuselage (1)
Wing (2)
Horizontal stabilizer (1)
Vertical stabilizer (1)
Accessories
Main-gear (set)-2
Nose-gear (set)-1
Rubber wheel, 51mm (2″)-1
Rubber wheel, 64mm (21⁄2″)-2
Spinner, 51mm-1
Control horn-5
Threaded rod-5
Plywood wing-brace-1
Plywood wing locking pin-1
Plywood bearing-3
Plywood liner-6
Hardwood wing strut-2
Music wire, 1.5 × 380mm (1⁄16 × 15″)-1
Music wire, 1.5 × 450mm (1⁄16 × 173⁄4″)-1
Music wire, 1.5 × 120mm (1⁄16 × 43⁄4″)-2
Nylon clevis-5
Engine mount (set)-1
Fuel tank (set)-1
Plastic cowling (set)-1
Plastic wheel pants (set)-3
Wheel: 21⁄2″ (2)
2″ (1)
Plastic wing strut (each)-2
Plastic cabin windows (set)-1
5
Field Equipment Required
6
Starter
Airplane Fuel
Propeller
Glow Driver
Glow Plug
Manual Fuel Pump
12V Sealed Battery
Glow Plug Wrench
Optional Field Equipment
4-Way Wrench
Extra Glow Plugs
Field Box
Misc. Tools
Cleaner & Towels
After-Run Fuel
Power Panel
7
Section 1: Hinging the Ailerons
Parts Needed
• Right wing panel with aileron and hinges
• Left wing panel with aileron and hinges
Important: Only use thin CA on hinges.
Note: The control surfaces, including the ailerons, elevators
and rudder, are pre-hinged with the hinges installed;
however, the hinges are not glued in place. It is
imperative that you properly adhere the hinges and
ailerons in place following the steps below using high
quality thin CA.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
• Instant thin CA glue
• CA remover/debonder
• Paper towels
Step 3: Turn the wing panel over and deflect the aileron in the
opposite direction and from the opposite side. Apply thin CA
glue to each aileron hinge, making sure the CA penetrates into
both the aileron and the wing.
Step 1: Carefully remove the aileron from one of the wing
panels. Note the position of the hinges. The Cessna 182 comes
with high quality CA-type hinges, which are manufactured in the
U.S.A.
Step 2: Replace the aileron, making sure the hinges slide in
place. Deflect the aileron and apply a few drops of thin CA glue
directly to the center of each of the hinges. The aileron’s front
surface should lightly contact the wing during this procedure.
Ideally, when the hinge is glued in place, a 1/32″ gap or less
will be maintained throughout the length of the aileron. The
hinge is constructed of a special material that allows the CA to
wick, or penetrate, and distribute throughout the hinge, securely
bonding it to the wood structure.
8
Step 4: Using CA remover/debonder and a paper towel, remove
any excess CA glue that may have accumulated on the wing or in
the aileron hinge area.
Section 1: Hinging the Ailerons
CONTINUED
Step 5: Repeat this process with the other wing panel, securely
hinging the aileron in place.
Step 6: After both ailerons are securely hinged, firmly grasp the
wing and aileron to check that the hinges are immovable. Do this
by applying medium pressure, trying to separate the aileron from
the wing.
9
Section 2: Joining the Wing Halves
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
•
Right wing panel from Section One
Left wing panel from Section One
Dihedral brace
Trim tape
Hardwood locking pin
Step 1: Locate the dihedral brace (also called the wing joiner).
Using a ruler, mark the exact center of the brace with a pencil as
shown in the photo below.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
30-minute epoxy
Masking tape
Paper towels
Rubbing alcohol
Wax paper
Ruler
Pencil
Medium sandpaper
Mixing stick
Step 3: Next, check for the correct dihedral angle. Place the
wing on a large, flat surface with one wing panel resting on the
flat surface. The opposite wing tip should be exactly 2″ from the
surface (see illustration below). If necessary, sand the dihedral
brace until this is achieved.
2″
Step 4: Mix up approximately three (3) ounces of 30-minute
epoxy.
Step 5: Smear a generous amount of epoxy into the wing joiner
cavity of one wing half. A scrap piece of wood or mixing stick is
handy here.
Step 2: Trial fit the dihedral brace into one of the wing panels. It
should insert smoothly up to the center line marked in Step 1.
Now slide the other wing half onto the dihedral brace until the
wing panels meet. If the fit is overly tight, it may be necessary to
lightly sand the dihedral brace.
10
Note: It is extremely important to use plenty of epoxy when
joining the wing halves.
Section 2: Joining the Wing Halves
CONTINUED
Step 6: Coat one half of the dihedral brace with epoxy up to the
pencil line drawn in Step 1. Note the orientation of the V side of
the dihedral brace; the V must face up. Install the epoxy-coated
side of the dihedral brace into the wing joiner cavity of the wing
half up to the center line, making sure the V of the dihedral brace
is positioned correctly.
Step 8: Now apply epoxy to all sides of the exposed area of the
dihedral brace and uniformly coat both wing roots with epoxy.
Step 9: Carefully slide the two wing halves together. Firmly
press the halves together, allowing the excess epoxy to run out.
Using rubbing alcohol and a paper towel, clean off the excess
epoxy. There should not be any gap between the wing halves.
Step 7: Apply a generous amount of epoxy into the wing cavity
of the other wing half.
Note: It is a good idea to place a sheet of wax paper under
the wing’s center joint so any excess epoxy doesn’t
adhere to the surface of the work area.
11
Section 2: Joining the Wing Halves
CONTINUED
Step 10: Apply masking tape at the wing joint to hold the wing
halves together securely. Place the wing on a large, flat surface.
With one wing panel lying flat on the surface, the opposite wing
tip should be propped up exactly 2″ from the surface. Apply
more masking tape to the center wing joint and recheck the 2″
measurement. Allow the wing joint to dry overnight.
Step 11: Install the hardwood wing locking block.
Note: Using epoxy, glue to the lower portion of the wing
cut-out, noting that it’s flush with the lower portion of
the wing cut-out. Before gluing, trial fit the wing to the
fuselage to establish how the locking pin is mounted
in relationship to the wing and the cabin top.
The diagram below shows all the parts making up
the complete wing.
Step 12: The white tape, plastic wing reinforcement and wing
hold-down bolts will be installed later in Section 5.
12
Section 3: Installing the Aileron Servos
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
Assembled wing
Two standard size servos with mounting hardware
Y-harness
Servo extensions (2)
Step 1: Now that the wing halves are joined and the epoxy has
cured, it’s time to begin installation of the aileron servos. Note
on each wing half the location of the servo. You will be able to
identify this by a solid square shape with a rectangle cut-out in
the wing under the covering. It’s roughly the size of the bottom
of your servo. Using a sharp blade in your hobby knife, trim
away the covering material where the aileron servos will be
mounted. Next, find the round holes in each wing panel, near the
wing center line. This is where the aileron extension wires will
exit the wing. Cut out the opening in each wing half as well.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Hobby knife
Small Phillips screwdriver
Drill
1/16″ drill bit
1/16″ × 36″ music wire
String
Masking tape
Scissors
Pencil
Felt tipped pen
30-minute epoxy
Step 2: Install the recommended servo hardware supplied with
your radio system onto your servos (grommets and eyelets).
Install a minimum 6″ servo extension onto each of your aileron
servos.
Hint: It is always good procedure to tape together the
extension connector and the servo lead connector to
insure that they will not become unplugged inside the
wing.
Step 3: There are several options of how you pull the servo
wires through the wing. You can feed music wire or an extra
pushrod that you may have around (or take a coat hanger and
straighten it) through the pre-cut servo opening in the wing, or
start at one of the circular openings near the center of the wing.
You will have to bend the wire at various points to feed it
through the openings. We recommend you find some string,
attach the prop nut of your engine to the one end and feed it
through the servo opening and the openings in the wing until
you can see it through the circular opening. We found this was
one of the quickest methods to thread the servo wires through
the wing.
13
Section 3: Installing the Aileron Servos
CONTINUED
Step 4: Next, take the string and tie the end to your servo
extension lead, which is also connected to the servo lead. Make
sure the connectors will not separate by temporarily using
masking tape to secure the connectors together. Now you can
feed the servo leads through the opening.
Step 5: Install the servo into the aileron servo slot.
Note: It does not matter which direction the servo is
installed into the slot; in other words, if the servo horn
is closer to the aileron. However, both wing servos
should be mounted the same way.
Step 6: Securely fasten the servo in the aileron slot with four of
the servo mounting screws supplied with your radio system.
14
Step 7: Follow Steps 1-5 for the other aileron servo.
Step 8: Plug both aileron servo connectors into a Y-harness
and feed the excess servo lead wire back into the wing.
Section 4: Installing the Aileron Linkage
Parts Needed
• Wing assembly from Section Three
• Aileron linkages, 1/16″ × 77⁄8″ (2)
• Control horns with linkages (2)
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Drill
1/16″ drill bit
Z-bend pliers (optional)
Small Phillips screwdriver
Felt tipped pen
Pencil
Masking tape
Fuel tubing (optional)
Step 1: Turn the wing upside down. From the aileron servo
control arm that is attached to your servo (if it’s not attached, do
so now), use a felt tipped pen to mark the location of the control
horn directly in-line with the control arm as shown. Remember
to locate the control horn so the holes are directly above the
hinge line of the aileron.
Step 3: Remove the control horn and drill two 1/16″ holes
through the aileron as marked.
Step 2: Place the center of the control horn on the aileron at the
mark made in the previous step. Mark the hole positions of the
control horn.
Step 5: Repeat the marking procedure for the other aileron
Step 4: Attach the aileron control horn using the hardware
provided (two long screws and back plate) and fasten it in place
using a small Phillips screwdriver
Step 6: Locate two of the short threaded rods (1/16″ x 77⁄8″).
Thread a clevis at least 16 turns onto each rod. Be sure they are
not the longer rods.
15
Section 4: Installing the Aileron Linkage
CONTINUED
Step 7: Install the clevis with the attached linkage to the aileron
control horn. Center the servo horn as shown and, using a felt
tipped pen, make a mark on the linkage where the Z-bend will be
inserted into the horn.
Step 9: Center the standard size servo horn and install the
Z-bend into the outermost hole. Do the same for the other
aileron linkage.
Step 10: Attach the linkages onto their respective aileron horns.
Step 11: With the servo arm centered as shown, adjust the
aileron linkage until the aileron is exactly in the neutral position.
Follow this procedure for both aileron linkages. Final
adjustments will be made later as you adjust the control throws
in Section 19.
Note: It is a good idea to place a piece of fuel tubing over
the clevises as shown. This will provide extra
insurance against the clevises accidentally coming
open.
Step 8: Make a Z-bend in the linkage and cut off the excess
linkage.
SE
RV
OL
EA
16
D
Section 5: Mounting the Wing
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
•
Completed wing assembly
Fuselage
Wing hold-down plate
Wing hold-down screws
Blind nuts (2)
Step 1: Trial fit the wing onto the fuselage. Be sure the wing
properly rests on the wing saddle. Place a narrow strip of
masking tape at exactly the center of the top of the fuselage just
in front of where the vertical fin will be installed later. This tape
will be used as a reference line in aligning the wing.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Drill
1/4″ drill bit
Medium Phillips screwdriver
Small round file
12-minute epoxy
Measuring device (e.g., 36″ ruler or tape measure)
Masking tape
Pliers
Note: If the wing hold-down screw blind nuts are already
installed, proceed to Step 4.
Step 3: Press the blind nuts into position below the rear wing
hold-down plate in the fuselage. Use pliers to squeeze the blind
nuts so the “teeth” penetrate the wood and stay in place.
Caution: It may be helpful to place a piece of wood on the
top side of the hold-down plate before squeezing
the pliers. This will keep the pliers from
“crushing” the rear wing hold-down plate.
Additionally, a small amount of epoxy or thick CA
will permanently attach the blind nut to the rear
wing hold-down plate.
Step 2: With the wing trial fitted in place, measure the distance
from the back of the wing tip where it meets the aileron to the
tape mark. Compare the right and left distances and adjust the
wing until both are the same.
17
Section 5: Mounting the Wing
CONTINUED
Step 4: Thread the wing hold-down screws into the bottom side
of the blind nuts such that the ends of the screws extend 1/8″ of
an inch above the wing saddle.
Step 5: Fit the wing back into position on the fuselage, carefully
sliding the leading edge hardwood locking block into the front
bulkhead slot. Align the wing by measuring the distance from the
wing tip to the center mark as in Step 2 of this section. When the
wing is properly aligned, firmly press downward on the rear center
section of the wing. The wing bolts will make an indentation in the
covering of the wing at the proper location to drill.
18
Step 6: Using a 1/4″ drill bit, drill the exact center of the
marked locations on the bottom of the wing. Be careful that the
drill bit doesn’t tear the covering when it exits through the top
surface of the wing.
Step 7: Trial fit the wing into position on the fuselage. Thread
the wing hold-down bolts into the wing and loosely tighten.
Check the alignment of the wing by measuring from a fixed point
on each wing tip to the narrow strip of tape on the fuselage as
you did in Step 2. It may be necessary to slightly enlarge the
holes with a small round file to obtain proper alignment.
Section 5: Mounting the Wing
CONTINUED
Step 8: Remove the wing. Add the white tape to hide the wing
joint seam.
Step 9: Using 12-minute epoxy, glue the wing hold-down plate
in place. Reattach the wing to the fuselage. The wing hold-down
bolts will assist in holding the wing hold-down plate in position
until dry. Also, use masking tape around the edges of the wing
hold-down plate to help hold it in place until the epoxy dries.
19
Section 6: Installing the Tail
Parts Needed
• Fuselage and wing from Section 5
• Horizontal stabilizer with elevators
• Vertical stabilizer with rudder
Step 1: On the rear of the fuselage, slots are pre-cut in the
wood structure for the horizontal and vertical stabilizers. The
covering, however, must be carefully cut away. Using a hobby
knife with a sharp #11 blade, carefully cut away the covering at
the openings for the horizontal stabilizer.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Instant thin CA glue
CA remover/debonder
30-minute epoxy
Hobby knife with #11 blade
Razor saw
Straight edge
Pencil
Masking Tape
Paper towels
Rubbing alcohol
Step 3: Using a hobby knife, trim the covering on the top rear of
the fuselage where the vertical fin inserts into the fuselage.
Step 4: Trial fit the horizontal stabilizer into place in the
fuselage. Use care in sliding the horizontal stabilizer in place —
some trimming of the slot may be required.
Step 2: Hold up the horizontal stabilizer to a strong light and
note the cut-out notch on the leading edge of the stabilizer. The
vertical fin keys into this notch when the tail is assembled. Using
a hobby knife, carefully trim the covering from this notch.
20
Section 6: Installing the Tail
CONTINUED
Step 7: Double check the horizontal stabilizer and vertical fin
alignment. It may be necessary to slightly trim the balsa wood
on the fuselage with a sharp hobby knife to achieve exact
alignment.
Step 5: With the wing installed, check the alignment of the
horizontal stabilizer by measuring from a fixed point on the wing
to the hinge line at the tip of the horizontal stabilizer. Both right
and left dimensions should be the same. Then sight the
stabilizer alignment from the rear of the airplane, making sure
the stabilizer is exactly level with the wing.
Step 8: When you’re satisfied with the alignment, carefully mark
the position with a pencil at the junction where the horizontal
stabilizer meets the fuselage top and bottom and where the
vertical fin meets the fuselage. The pencil should leave a light
indentation in the covering.
Step 6: Trial fit the vertical fin in position, making sure the base
of the fin keys into the notch in the leading edge of the horizontal
fin. Then carefully check the fin to be sure it is aligned 90
degrees to the horizontal stabilizer.
Note: The back of the vertical fin and the back of the horizontal
stabilizer must be even with the back of the fuselage.
21
Section 6: Installing the Tail
CONTINUED
Step 9: Remove the horizontal stabilizer and the vertical fin and
carefully cut away the covering with a sharp hobby knife inside
the lines you marked in Step 7.
Caution: Be careful not to cut into the wood as doing so
would weaken the structure. A straight edge is
helpful here.
Step 10: Insert the horizontal stabilizer into the fuselage and
position it in the approximate location. By sliding the stabilizer
slightly in and out of the opening, you can apply the epoxy. Mix
up approximately 1/4 ounce of the 30-minute epoxy and apply it
to the top and bottom of the horizontal stabilizer where the
fuselage comes in contact with the stabilizer. Wipe away any
excess epoxy with a paper towel and rubbing alcohol.
22
Step 11: Apply 30-minute epoxy to the vertical fin where the
fuselage contacts the fin. Also apply epoxy to the base of the fin
where it keys into the horizontal stabilizer. Insert the fin into the
fuselage in approximately the correct position and wipe away
any excess epoxy.
Step 12: Precisely align the horizontal stabilizer and vertical fin
as before, using masking tape to hold the stabilizer and fin in the
correct alignment. Double check the alignment and allow to fully
cure over night.
Section 7: Hinging the Rudder and Elevator
Parts Needed
• Fuselage from Section 6
• Rudder
• Rudder hinges (3)
Step 1: Trial fit the rudder in position with the three (3) hinges
in place.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
• Instant thin CA glue
• CA remover/debonder
• Paper towels
Step 3: Work the rudder right and left, checking for free
movement.
Step 4: Repeat the procedure to install the elevators to the
horizontal stabilizer.
Step 2: With the rudder properly aligned (up and down), apply
thin CA to the hinges on both sides, using the same hinging
techniques learned in Section 1, Hinging the Ailerons. After the
hinges are dry, check to be sure they are securely in place by
attempting to pull the rudder from the vertical stabilizer. There
should be a minimal gap between the rudder and the fin. Wipe
away any excess CA using CA remover and a paper towel.
23
Section 8: Installing the Engine
Parts Needed
• .40–.50 2-cycle or .50–.65 4-cycle engine (not included)
• Fuselage motor mount with hardware
Note: The Hangar 9 Cessna 182 is designed for .40–.50 size
2-cycle or .50–.65 size 4-cycle engines. For the
ultimate in scale sound and realism, we recommend
and fly the 4-cycle Saito .50GK. Another option is the
MDS .46 2-cycle engine.
Step 1: Trial fit the motor mount to the firewall on the fuselage.
Note that the proper orientation mounts the engine with the
engine’s cylinder head to the right of the airplane (as viewed
from the pilot’s perspective when sitting in the cockpit). When
you are satisfied with the fit, use a generous amount of 30minute epoxy to glue the motor mount into position on the
firewall. Be sure the motor mount is firmly pressed against the
firewall. Set this assembly aside to dry.
24
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
Drill
1/8″ drill bit
Pencil
Measuring device
30-minute epoxy
Epoxy brush
Step 2: Locate the three balsa triangle stock pieces. These are
used to reinforce the motor mount. Using 30-minute epoxy, glue
these triangular pieces in place as shown.
Step 3: Mix approximately 1/2 ounce of 30-minute epoxy.
Epoxy the small rectangular wood pins on the motor mount
beam in the slots provided.
Step 4: Using an epoxy brush, coat the firewall and the entire
motor mount with epoxy. This will fuel-proof the engine area.
Allow the epoxy to fully cure.
Section 8: Installing the Engine
CONTINUED
Step 5: Locate the engine mounting hardware included in the
bag with the motor mount. You should find four 3 x 3mm
screws, four 3mm locknuts, eight washers and two motor plates.
This system gives you the greatest versatility, allowing you to
mount many brands and sizes of engines.
Step 9: Remove the engine and mount plates. Drill four holes in
the engine mount plates for the motor.
Step 10: Now, position the engine mount plates on the motor
mount, in the position marked in Step 8. Mix 1/4 ounce of
6-minute epoxy and mount the plastic motor mount plates to the
wood motor mount.
Step 11: After the epoxy has cured, Use a 1/8” drill bit to drill
four holes through the engine mount.
Step 12: Now install the engine using the four screws, eight
washers and four locknuts.
Note: With some engines, it may be necessary to remove a
small section of the engine mount side rail to allow
clearance for the cowling at the top.
Step 6: Rest the fuselage on its side with the right side of the
fuselage facing up. Place the motor mount plates on the motor
mount as shown in the diagram on the preceeding page.
Step 13: After you have had an opportunity to trial fit your
engine, it can be removed to make it easier to complete the
following sections. It will be reinstalled in Section 14.
Step 7: Set the engine on the motor mount plates and align the
plates to properly line up with the engine flanges. The distance
from the face of the prop hub to the firewall should be
approximately 4-1⁄4 inches. Move the engine forward or
backward until this distance is achieved. Some engines may
have a large crankcase, requiring you to bevel the motor mount
plates slightly to get a good fit.
Step 8: With the engine plates properly aligned and the prop
hub to firewall distance at approximately 4 1⁄4″, mark the
location of the engine mount plates. You can also mark the
engine location by marking through the engine mount flanges
Note: The key is to mount your engine so the spinner or prop
drive shaft does not rub on the cowl. Values given are
only approximates.
25
Section 9: Installing the Nose Gear
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
Tools and Adhesives Needed
Nose gear
Suspension spring
Steering arm
Wheel collar with screws (2)
• Medium Phillips screwdriver
• Blue Locktite 242
Step 2: Insert the nose gear assembly from Step 1 onto the
nose gear mount (attached to the front of the fuselage). Be sure
the spring stays in position and rests against the nose gear
mount. Install the steering arm on the landing gear flush with the
landing gear, and secure it into position with a screw and the
Blue Locktite 242. You will remove one of the steering arms
later, after you have determined the location where the steering
rod exits the firewall.
ng
No
se
Ge
ar
Co
llar
aci
Sp
Ste
eri
ng
Arm
Step 1: The nose gear mount is pre-assembled onto the front
firewall of the fuselage. Locate the nose gear and, on the straight
end, slide on the collar (note the orientation as shown in the
photo). Use Blue Locktite 242 and a medium Phillips
screwdriver to secure the collar in place. Next, install the
suspension spring.
Note: The wheel and the wheel pants will be attached later
in Section 11.
26
Section 10: Installing the Landing Gear
Parts Needed
• Aluminum landing gear
• Landing gear hardware
Step 1: Locate the main aluminum landing gear. Remove the
balsa block on the fuselage bottom and trial fit the landing gear.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Medium Phillips screwdriver
30-minute epoxy
Hobby knife
Mixing stick
Rubbing alcohol
Paper towels
Pencil
Step 3: Attach the main aluminum landing gear using the two
wood screws provided.
Step 2: With the main aluminum landing gear in position, use a
pencil to mark the screw holes.
Step 4: Using your hobby knife, remove the plastic covering
from the ends of the landing gear block so the epoxy will adhere.
You will need to trim the balsa block to ensure a smooth fit. Mix
up a 1/4 cup of 30-minute epoxy and apply it to the block. Insert
the block into the cavity. Wipe off any excess epoxy using
rubbing alcohol and a paper towel.
27
Section 11: Assembling and Mounting
the Wheel Pants
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
Tools and Adhesives Needed
Wheel pants (3)
Foam wheels (3)
Wheel collars with screws (3)
Wheel pant decal sheet
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Step 1: Locate the three wheel pants. Note that of the three, two
are main wheel pants and one is the nose wheel pant.
Main Wheel Pants
Nose Wheel Pant
Step 2: Mark the center of the wheel opening of the pant as a
reference point, then determine which side you want to attach the
aluminum main gear to. From that reference mark, measure up
28
Drill
5/32″ drill bit
1/16″ drill bit
Medium Phillips screwdriver
Blue Locktite 242
Ruler
Pencil
approximately 1/4″ and use that as the point where you’ll drill
the hole for the axle. Use that point as a guide for drilling a hole
through the wheel pants with a 5/32″ drill bit.
Section 11: Assembling and Mounting
the Wheel Pants
Step 3: Using a 1/16″ bit, drill a second hole 7/16″ above the
axle hole.
CONTINUED
Step 7: The wheel can be centered in the wheel pant by making
adjustments to the two sets of “double” nuts, which is the means
of locking the nuts in position. One double nut set secures the
wheel pant to the main gear, whereas the second set of double
nuts helps position the wheel in the wheel pant cavity. Refer to
the figure provided below for the parts sequence.
main
wheel pant
main landing gear
wheel
plywood
nut
wheel pant bolt
nut
axle bolt
2 1/2″ Wheel
nut
Step 4: Locate the plywood rectangles used as reinforcement
for the wheel pants. Mix up 1/4 ounce of 6-minute epoxy and
epoxy one rectangle inside one of the main wheel pants. Use the
same procedure to install the plywood rectangle in the other
main wheel pant. Allow the epoxy to cure completely before
proceeding to the next step.
Step 5: Drill out the plywood for the axle and support screw
holes.
washer
washer
Step 8: The nose gear wheel pant and parts are shown below.
Step 6: Position the wheel pant next to the main gear and
proceed to mount the wheel inside the wheel pant. Screw the
axle bolt into the wheel pant approximately 1/2″, then thread two
bolts and washer on the axle. Continue to thread the axle into the
wheel pant and attach the main wheel. Continue to screw the
axle into the wheel pant, and as the axle protrudes from the
wheel, attach the last washer and the two remaining nuts.
2″ wheel
Collar
Metal clip and two wood screws
Plywood spacer
29
Section 11: Assembling and Mounting
the Wheel Pants
Step 9: Epoxy the plywood spacer to the inside of the pant, on
either side of the indentation in the nose wheel pant.
CONTINUED
Step 11: Measure up approximately 1/4″ in the groove of the
nose wheel pant and mark the location.
Step 12: Drill a 5/32″ hole in the wheel pant.
Step 13: Attach the wheel pant, with the wheel inside, to the
nose gear. As the gear is threaded through to the wheel pant,
attach the wheel collar to the axle. Once the wheel is centered in
the opening, tighten the wheel collar screw. Use Blue Locktite
242 to secure it.
Step 14: The metal clip and screws are used to hold the nose
wheel pant in the proper position. Place the clip over the nose
gear and mark the holes so they are on either side of the gear.
Drill 1/16″ holes and attach the screws. Be sure the orientation
of the wheel pant is parallel to the ground and that the wheels
turn freely.
Step 10: Once the epoxy has cured, mark the center line of the
wheel opening by trial fitting the nose wheel in the opening of
the wheel pant.
30
Section 12: Assembling and Installing
the Fuel Tank
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brass clunk (fuel pickup)
Cooper tube, long (vent)
Cooper tube, short (pickup)
Cooper tube, long (optional fill tube)
Plastic caps (2)
Rubber stopper
3mm screw and 3mm locknut
Step 1: Locate the black rubber stopper. Insert the short copper
tube into one of the open holes in the stopper so an equal
amount of tube extends from each side. This tube will be the fuel
tank pickup tube.
Step 2: Locate the long copper tube and bend it using your
fingers as shown. This tube will be the fuel tank vent tube.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
• Hobby knife
• Small Phillips screwdriver
Step 3: Slide this tube into the other open hold of the stopper
as shown.
Step 4: Slide the two white plastic caps over the copper tubes
as shown. Note the orientation of the caps — the small inside
cap and the three “pegs” face away from the black rubber
stopper, the large outside cap and the “raised center” face away
from the black rubber stopper.
31
Section 12: Assembling and Installing
the Fuel Tank
Step 5: Locate the small diameter fuel tubing and cut it to 3″ in
length. This tubing will be used for the fuel pickup inside the
fuel tank. Insert the brass clunk into one end of the fuel tubing.
CONTINUED
Step 8: Carefully insert the assembly into the fuel tank. Note the
position of the vent tube; it must be at the top of the fuel tank to
function properly.
Step 9: Insert a 3mm screw into the center hole of the stopper
and tighten.
Step 6: Install the open tube end of the clunk and tubing
assembly on the short copper tubing.
Step 7: Press the 3mm nut between the three pegs on the inside
white plastic cap as shown.
32
Important: Remember which tube is the fuel pickup and
which is the vent so that you can properly
connect the fuel tank to the engine.
Section 12: Assembling and Installing
the Fuel Tank
Step 10: Note that the fuel stopper is mounted closer to one
edge of the tank than the other. This “closer edge” is the top of
the tank. Slide the tank into the fuselage stopper first, making
sure the top of the tank is positioned toward the top of the
fuselage.
CONTINUED
Step 12: Plumb the fuel tank and the engine accordingly.
Connect the vent tube from the fuel tank to the muffler pressure
fitting. The remaining tube should be attached to the carburetor
fitting.
Step 11: Press the tank into position until the stopper inserts
into the hole in the firewall.
33
Section 13: Installing the Radio
Parts Needed
• 4-channel radio system with three remaining servos and
hardware (not included)
• Fuselage
• Radio packing foam (not included)
• Antenna tube (optional, not included)
Step 1: Locate the remaining three servos and install the
grommets and eyelets in all three per the instructions included
with the radio. Place the servos in the servo tray in the fuselage
as shown, noting the position of the output horns. Using a
pencil, mark the 12 servo mounting hole positions.
Step 2: Remove the servos and drill twelve (12) 1/16″ holes
where marked. Re-install the servos noting the position of the
output horns. Screw the servos in place using the twelve screws
included with the servos. Be sure to install the rubber grommets
and brass eyelets before you mount the servos.
34
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
Drill
1/16” drill bit
Small Phillips screwdriver
Hobby Knife
Pencil
Step 3: Use radio packing foam (available at your local hobby
dealer) when you install the receiver and battery. Using a sharp
hobby knife, cut a solid layer of foam the size of the
compartment that’s in front of the servo tray. Cut out another
layer of foam that’s the same size, only this time cut out an open
area in the center to accept a battery pack. Place another solid
layer of foam on top. Cut an open area in the next layer of foam
to accept the receiver. Top off with a final solid layer of foam
which holds everything in place.
Step 4: Place the pre-cut layers of foam with the battery and
receiver in place in the front compartment of the fuselage. Route
the antenna back through the fuselage using an antenna tube (not
included) or route it outside the fuselage back to the vertical fin.
Section 13: Installing the Radio
CONTINUED
Step 5: The switch can be installed in the left side of the
fuselage (typical installation). Or a cut-out is provided in the
radio tray, allowing you to mount the switch internally and
permitting a small wire to extend through the fuselage side for
an improved scale appearance.
Step 6: Hook up the servos and switch harness to the receiver
and the battery pack as per the instructions included with your
radio system. Turn on your transmitter and receiver and center
the trims on your transmitter. Turn off the receiver and then turn
off the transmitter, in that order.
Step 7: Reposition your servo horns so they are 90° to the
center line of the fuselage. This will allow you to mark your
control rods, knowing your servos are at their electrical center
position.
35
Section 14: Installing the Linkages
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Balsa dowels
Fuselage
Heat shrink tubing
1/16” threaded rod (4)
1/16” plain rod (2)
Plastic clevis (4)
Control horns with hardware (3)
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Thick CA glue
Drill
1/8″ and 1/16″ drill bit
Heat gun
Hobby knife
Needle nose pliers
Z-bend pliers
Felt tipped pen
Pencil
Small Phillips screwdriver
Measuring device
Step 1: Turn the fuselage upside down and measure over 3/4″
from the rudder. At this point, make a mark on the elevator with a
felt tipped pen. Mark the other elevator half in the same way,
3/4″ from the rudder. This marks the center position of the
elevator control horn.
Step 3: Attach the elevator control horn using the hardware
provided (two screws and a back plate) and fasten it in place
using a small Phillips screwdriver.
Step 2: Place the control horn on the elevator at the mark made
in Step 1, exactly in the center of the control horn. Mark the hole
positions of the control horn with a pencil and drill two 1/16″
holes in each elevator half. The control horns should be
positioned so the holes are over the center line of the hinge line.
36
Section 14: Installing the Linkages
CONTINUED
Step 4: Attach the other control horn to the opposite elevator
half using the same method.
Step 5: Next, install the rudder control horn on the left side of
the rudder. Place a mark with a felt tipped pen 1/4” from the
bottom of the rudder (left side) as shown. This mark represents
where the center of the control horn will be located.
Step 7: Drill these holes with a 1/16″ drill bit and install the
rudder control horn using the two screws and back plate
provided.
Step 8: Locate the two balsa dowel pushrods (dowel pushrods
are 19-1⁄2″ long).
Step 9: Using either a pencil or felt tipped pen, mark 1″ from
each end of both balsa dowel rods (4 places).
Step 6: Center the control horn over the mark you just made
and, using a pencil, mark the mounting hold locations through
both holes onto the rudder. Make sure the horn is centered over
the hinge line.
37
Section 14: Installing the Linkages
CONTINUED
Step 10: Drill a 1/16″ hole through the balsa dowel at the four
marked positions as shown.
Step 13: Locate the following rods:
A) Four 7-7⁄8″ Threaded
B) One 12″ Threaded
C) Two 4-3⁄4″ Non-Threaded
D) One 13-3⁄4″ Threaded
E) One 17-3⁄4″ Threaded
Step 11: Select one of the dowels, and at one end, make a
second mark 13⁄4″ from the end.
Step 14: Find the two 4 3⁄4″ non-threaded rods. Using needle
nose pliers, bend a 90° angle 1/4″ from one end on each of the
rods. Find the two 7 7⁄8″ threaded rods and bend a 90° angle in
the unthreaded end.
Step 15: Using the pattern provided as a reference, bend the
two threaded 77⁄8″ rods the degrees the diagram shows. These
are approximate angles and final adjustment will be made when
fitting the control rods to the control horns. Locate the balsa
pushrod that has the two holes in one end. One 77⁄8″ rod is
inserted into each hole (refer to pattern).
Step 12: Drill a 1/16″ hole at this mark. This end of the dowel
will be used as the pushrod for the split elevator and will require
two threaded rods to be installed in this end.
38
Section 14: Installing the Linkages
CONTINUED
Step 16: Saturate the balsa with thick CA glue where the
threaded rods contact the balsa pushrod.
Step 17: Slide a piece of the heat shrink tubing over the end of
the balsa dowel and, using a heat gun, shrink it in place as
shown.
Step 18: Locate one of the unthreaded rods and insert the 90degree angle into the opposite end of the balsa dowel. Using
thick CA, adhere the rod to the balsa dowel and heat shrink it in
place using a heat gun.
Step 19: Repeat this process to complete the rudder pushrod.
Observe that only one threaded rod is necessary. Use the rudder
pushrod diagram as a reference.
39
Section 14: Installing the Linkages
CONTINUED
Step 20: Carefully cut away the covering at the tail of the
fuselage where the pushrods exit. Note there are two cut-outs on
the left side and the right side for the elevator and one cut-out on
the top of the fuselage, to the left side of rudder as you look at
the aircraft from the rear.
Step 21: Spread the two threaded pushrods apart
approximately 11⁄2–2″. Insert the elevator pushrod into the
fuselage so that each threaded rod comes out the elevator
pushrod exit.Thread a clevis 16 turns onto each of the threaded
rods. Attach the clevis to the outermost hole in the elevator
control horns. As extra insurance, it’s a good idea to place a
piece of fuel tubing over the clevis to prevent the clevis from
accidentally coming open.
Step 22: Insert the rudder pushrod into the fuselage, threaded
end first. The threaded rod exits the fuselage at the top left
opening in the fuselage. Thread a clevis onto the threaded rod
16 full turns, then attach the clevis to the rudder control horn at
the second to the outermost hole.
Step 23: Center the elevators and rudder and, using a felt
tipped pen, place a mark on the unthreaded end of the pushrods
where they pass the respective servo arms. If you have
inadvertently moved the servo horns, recenter your servos as per
Section 13 Step 6.
Step 24: Using Z-bend pliers, make a Z-bend at the marked
locations on both the elevator and rudder pushrods. Cut off the
excess rod.
40
Section 14: Installing the Linkages
CONTINUED
Step 25: Insert the Z-bend into the servo arm as shown. It may
be necessary to enlarge the holes in the servo arm slightly to
accept the Z-bend.
Step 27: To install the steering pushrod, locate the 12″ nonthreaded rod.
Step 28: Carefully position the rod over the rudder servo arm
and determine the appropriate exit through the firewall. Drill a
1/16″ hole in the firewall where the pushrod will exit.
Step 29: Insert the steering pushrod through its respective
1/16″ guidance holes in the fuselage and firewall.
Step 30: Bend the rod 90 degrees and insert it through the
horn.
Note: If you removed your engine in Section 8, reinstall it
prior to completing Step 26.
Step 26: Install the throttle pushrod (17 3⁄4”) using the same
method.
Note: It will be necessary to drill a 1/8″ hole in the firewall
in the correct position to allow the pushrod to
reattach to the throttle arm. Be careful not to drill into
the fuel tank when you drill this hole.
41
Section 15: Attaching the Cowl
Parts Needed
• Fiberglass cowl
• Sheet metal screws (4)
• Fuselage
Step 1: Using a Moto-Tool, grind out the prop and cooling
openings in the front of the cowl as marked.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Moto-Tool with sanding drum
Small Phillips screwdriver
Drill
1/16″ drill bit
Masking tape
Felt tipped pen
Ruler
Step 3: Tape the cowl securely into position and check that it
fits correctly. There should be ample clearance (1/8″) around the
engine and muffler. Also check that the prop hub is centered in
the opening in the cowl and that the prop hub extends
approximately 3/16″ forward of the cowl.
Step 2: Slide the cowl onto the fuselage.
Note: It may be necessary to remove the muffler and needle
valve to position the cowling in the proper position.
With the cowling temporarily in position, you must
now determine the openings for your cylinder head,
needle valve and muffler. The photo in Step 3 can be
used as a reference, however exact location depends
upon the engine you use. We suggest you grind out
these openings before you drill the cowl mounting
holes.
42
Step 4: Drill four 1/16″ holes, two on each side of the cowl.
Step 5: Remove the tape and attach the cowl to the fuselage
using the four sheet metal screws provided.
Section 16: Installing the Windows
Parts Needed
• Windshield and windows (6 pieces total)
• Fuselage
• Screws (4)
Step 1: Using scissors, trim on the cut line etched in the
windshield.
Step 2: Trial fit the windshield and side windows in place. It
may be necessary to slightly trim the edges of the windows so
they fit properly. When you are satisfied with the fit, run a small
bead of canopy glue around the side windows. Tape them in
place until dry.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
•
•
•
•
Canopy glue (e.g., R/C 56 or Pacer Formula 560)
Scissors
Masking tape
Small Phillips screwdriver
Step 3: The front and rear windshields are further secured by
using the screws provided. Holding the windshields in place
with masking tape may be helpful.
Note: Be sure the canopy glue has cured completely before
attaching the screws.
43
Section 17: Scale Detailing
Parts Needed
•
•
•
•
•
Pre-covered wing struts
Sheet metal screws (4)
Metal tabs (4)
Clevis (4)
Short threaded rods
Note: Two pre-covered wing struts are included in the
Cessna 182 kit. The struts are for aesthetics only; they
are not a structural member of the airframe. You can
choose to fly with them attached for a more true scale
appearance, or you can choose to fly without them for
convenience.
Tools and Adhesives Needed
• Small Phillips screwdriver
• Drill
• 1/16″ Drill bit
Step 4: The attachment point for the wing strut mounts in the
metal tab approximately 1 1⁄2″ from the leading edge of the wing
in a line parallel to the servo opening. The clevis will be attached
to the metal tab.
Step 1: Insert one Clevis on a short threaded rod,
approximately 12 turns. Repeat the process for the other rod.
Step 5: The wing struts are mounted just forward 3 3⁄4″ of the
landing gear on the fuselage parallel to the center line of the
aircraft with a sheet metal screw.
Step 2: Drill a 11⁄16″ hole, centered, in one end of each wing
strut.
Step 3: Mix 1/4 ounce of 6-minute epoxy. Apply epoxy to one
end of threaded rod and insert it into the wing strut. Repeat this
proceedure for the other threaded rod. Allow the epoxy to cure
completely before attempting to connect the clevis to the wing
metal tabs utilized for mounting the wing strut.
44
Section 18: Balancing the Cessna 182
An important part of preparing any aircraft for flight is properly
balancing the model. Don’t inadvertently forget this crucial step.
The recommended C.G. (Center of Gravity) location for the first
flights with the Cessna 182 is 3″ to 33⁄4″ from the leading edge.
With the Saito .50 installed, very little, if any, additional weight
will be needed to balance the model. If you’re using a lighter
2-cycle engine, expect to add weight. Stick-on weights are
available at your local hobby shop and work well for this
purpose.
Section 19: Control Throw Recommendation
The control throws at right offer gentle response and are a good
place to start. After you’re more comfortable with the flight
characteristics, adjust the control throws to meet your style of
flying.
Aileron: 1/2″ up, 1/2″ down
Elevator: 3/4″ up, 3/4″ down
Rudder: 1″ right, 1″ left
Section 20: Flying the Cessna 182
If you can successfully solo a trainer-type airplane, you’ll feel
right at home with the Cessna 182. Its generous 579 square inch
wing area offers excellent, nearly stall-proof slow speed stability.
Its wide stance tricycle landing gear provides excellent stable
ground handling.
offers excellent visibility and presence in flight. Stalls are very
soft with no tendencies to drop a tip. After you gain some
experience, you will be able to do touch and go’s. Mild
aerobatics, such as loops, rolls and even inverted flight, are
quite easy if the control throws are increased.
If you’re a first-time pilot, it’s imperative that you seek out an
experienced flier to help you with your first flights—you should
do this with any R/C aircraft. Your local hobby shop should be
able to suggest pilots who can assist you.
We hope you enjoy your Cessna 182 as much as we enjoy ours.
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Horizon
Service Center at:
When set up as per the instructions, control response gives a
gentle roll and pitch control, while the Cessna 182’s large size
4105 Fieldstone Road
Champaign, IL 61821
(217) 355-9511
45
Pre-Flight Check
Step 1: Check that all control functions move in the correct
direction. If not, use the respective reversing switch to correct
the direction.
CARBURETOR
ELEVATOR
1/16”
THROTTLE
RUDDER
ELEVATOR
AILERON
AILERON
RUDDER
Step 2: Check that each clevis is securely snapped into
position.
AILERON
Step 3: Check that all servo horn screws are tight.
Note: Mode II Transmitter shown in diagrams
Step 4: Charge the transmitter and receiver battery per the
instructions included with the radio system.
Step 5: Read and follow all instructions included with the
engine and follow the recommended break-in procedure.
Pre-Flight at the Field
Range Testing Your Radio
Adjusting the Engine
Step 1: Before each flying session be sure to range check your
radio. This is accomplished by turning on your transmitter with
the antenna collapsed. Turn on the radio in your airplane. With
your airplane on the ground, you should be able to walk 30
paces away from your airplane and still have complete control of
all functions. If not, do not attempt to fly! Have your radio
equipment checked out by the manufacturer.
Step 1: Completely read the instructions included with your
engine and follow the recommended break-in procedure. At the
field, adjust the engine to a slightly rich setting at full throttle
and adjust the idle and low speed needle so that a consistent
idle is achieved. Before you fly, be sure that your engine reliably
idles, transitions and runs at all throttle settings. Only when this
is achieved should any plane be considered ready for flight.
Step 2: Double check that all controls (aileron, elevator throttle,
and rudder) move in the correct direction.
Step 3: Be sure that your batteries are fully charged per the
instructions included with your radio.
46
AMA Safety Code
1994 Official AMA National Model Aircraft Safety Code
Effective January 1, 1994
Model flying must be in accordance with this Code in
order for AMA liability protection to apply
9.
General
1.
I will not fly my model aircraft in sanctioned events, air shows, or
model flying demonstrations until it has been proven to be airworthy
by having been previously, successfully flight tested.
2.
I will not fly my model higher than approximately 400 feet within 3
miles of an airport without notifying the airport operator. I will give
right-of-way and avoid flying in the proximity of full-scale aircraft.
Where necessary, an observer shall be utilized to supervise flying to
avoid having models fly in the proximity of full-scale aircraft.
3.
Where established, I will abide by the safety rules for the flying site I
use, and I will not willfully and deliberately fly my models in a
careless, reckless and/or dangerous manner.
4.
At all flying sites a straight or curved line(s) must be established in
front of which all flying takes place with the other side for spectators.
Only those persons essential to the flight operations are to be
permitted on the flying side of the line; all others must be on the
spectator side. Flying over the spectator side of the line is prohibited,
unless beyond the control of the pilot(s). In any case, the maximum
permissible takeoff weight of the models is 55 pounds.
5.
At air shows or model flying demonstrations a single straight line
must be established, one side of which is for flying, with the other
side for spectators. Only those persons accredited by the contest
director or other appropriate official as necessary for flight operations
or as having duties or functions relating to the conduct of the show or
demonstration are to be permitted on the flying side of the line. The
only exceptions which my be permitted to the single straight line
requirements, under special circumstances involving consideration of
side conditions and model size, weight, speed, and power, must be
jointly approved by the AMA President and the Executive Director.
6.
Under all circumstances, if my model weighs over 20 pounds, I will
fly it in accordance with paragraph 5 of this section of the AMA Safety
Code.
7.
I will not fly my model unless it is identified with my name and
address or AMA number, on or in the model. Note: This does not
apply to models flown indoors.
8.
I will not operate models with metal-bladed propellers or with
gaseous boosts, in which gases other than air enter their internal
combustion engine(s); nor will I operate models with extremely
hazardous fuels such as those containing tetranitromethane or
hydrazine.
I will not operate models with pyrotechnics (any device that explodes,
burns, or propels a projectile of any kind) including, but not limited
to, rockets, explosive bombs dropped from models, smoke bombs, all
explosive gases (such as hydrogen-filled balloons), ground mounted
devices launching a projectile. The only exceptions permitted are
rockets flown in accordance with the National Model Rocketry Safety
Code or those permanently attached (as per JATO use); also those
items authorized for Air Show Team use as defined by AST Advisory
Committee (document available from AMA HQ). In any case, models
using rocket motors as primary means of propulsion are limited to a
maximum weight of 3.3 pounds and a G series motor. Note: A model
aircraft is defined as an aircraft with or without engine, not able to
carry a human being.
10. I will not operate any turbo jet engine (axial or centrifugal flow) unless
I have obtained a special waiver for such specific operations from the
AMA President and Executive Director and I will abide by any
restriction(s) imposed for such operation by them. (Note: This does
not apply to ducted fan models using piston engines or electric
motors.)
11. I will not consume alcoholic beverages prior to, nor during,
participation in any model operations.
Radio Control
1.
I will have completed a successful radio equipment ground range
check before the first flight of a new or repaired model.
2.
I will not fly my model aircraft in the presence of spectators until I
become a qualified flier, unless assisted by an experienced helper.
3.
I will perform my initial turn after takeoff away from the pit or spectator
areas, and I will not thereafter fly over pit or spectator areas, unless
beyond my control.
4.
I will operate my model using only radio control frequencies currently
allowed by the Federal Communications Commission. (Only properly
licensed Amateurs are authorized to operate equipment on Amateur
Band frequencies.) Further, any transmitters that I use at a sanctioned
event must have a certified R/CMA-AMA gold sticker affixed
indicating that it was manufactured or modified for operation at 20
kHz frequency separation (except 27 MHz and 53 MHz).
5.
I will not knowingly operate an R/C system within 3 miles of a preexisting model club flying site without a frequency sharing agreement
with that club.
47
© Copyright 1998, Horizon Hobby Distributors, Inc.
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