UltraProteus STEP-BY-STEP - e

UltraProteus STEP-BY-STEP - e
STEP-BY-STEP
UltraProteus
STEP-BY-STEP
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
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STEP-BY-STEP
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UltraProteus Operation Manual
STEP-BY-STEP
This chapter walks you through UltraProteus in a step-by-step manner. Although it is not possible to cover every detail of programming a synthesizer of
this complexity, these first steps will hopefully get you started in the right
direction. Before starting this chapter, please read the Programming Basics
chapter of this manual. It contains important background information, which
will help you get the most of this chapter.
• If you are new to synthesizers and electronic music, you may need more
background information than this manual provides. There are many books
dedicated to synthesizer basics and MIDI available through your local music
dealer. Magazines such as Keyboard and Electronic Musician, which are available at most newsstands, contain current information on the subject, as well as
valuable programming tips.
UltraProteus (or any synthesizer for that matter) is not really one instrument
but a collection of modules which can be connected together to create many
different instruments. In programming a synthesizer, you become an instrument builder. The more knowledge you have about music, acoustics, and
electronics, the more success you will have in constructing the sounds of your
dreams.
Learning about sound synthesis will be much easier if you learn to really
LISTEN to the sounds all around you, then try to recreate them. Listen to how
the pitch rises on that bird's chirp, or how the volume changes on that organ.
Soon you'll be hearing sounds in a whole new way. Of course, imitating natural
sounds is only a part of sound synthesis. The real fun happens when you create
a wonderful new sound that no one has ever heard before. Experimentation +
Knowledge = MAGIC!
When playing and programming UltraProteus, you're exploring new territory.
You have to explore to find what's out there! This powerful new technology is
just waiting to be tapped.
EDITING PRESETS
A good way to get acquainted with UltraProteus is by examining and editing
existing presets. If you hear an effect or a control you like, take the time to
discover how it was achieved.
Start with a preset you like and try changing it around. If you don't like the
result, simply change the preset momentarily and you'll be back to the original
sound. Changes are not made permanent until you SAVE a preset. Therefore
you can experiment all you want without worrying about losing a sound.
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STARTING FROM SCRATCH
When starting from scratch, first select the Default Preset (-defPreset-) which is
located in the factory location 127 (bank 1). A default is basically a blank preset
which is ready to program. After selecting the default preset, press the Preset
button.
The Instrument
The instrument is the basis of your sound. The instruments in UltraProteus are
digital recordings of various sounds from the simple (sine wave) to the complex
(Grand Piano). The second screen in the Preset menu selects the primary
instrument.
INSTRUMENT pri
I173 Airy Voices
Move the cursor down to the bottom line and change the primary instrument
using the data entry control. You should be hearing the instrument change as
you scroll through the instruments. A patch diagram (shown below) is useful to
visualize the connection you have just made. Press Enter when you find an
instrument you like.
R
Instrument
DCA
Pan
L
Turn the data knob one click to the right to the secondary instrument select
screen. The secondary instruments are identical to the primary instruments.
Change the secondary instrument and listen to the various combinations of the
two. What you are doing is actually a simple form of additive synthesis. You are
adding two sounds together to form a new sound.
✓ Blending two instruments together can create an ensemble effect if the
instruments are different, or a thicker sound if both instruments are the same.
Two instruments can “fuse” into one new sound if their harmonic content is
similar or if harmonic changes such as vibrato (pitch variation) occur in both
instruments simultaneously.
For the next experiment, set the primary instrument to “017 P1 AcGuitar” and
the secondary instrument to “004 Mono Grand”. Press Enter.
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Volume
Turn the data knob one click to the right to the Volume screen. This screen
adjusts the volumes of the two instruments. Refer to the block diagram on the
previous page as you adjust the volume of the DCA.
VOLUME
pri:110
sec:100
As you adjust the volume of the two instruments relative to each other, notice
how the quality of the sound changes. Whichever instrument is loudest is
perceived as the sound of both. But there is a range where the two instruments
seem to “fuse” into one unique entity, somewhat like a harpsichord. Careful
mixing can result in many beautiful timbres.
Pan
The next screen, Pan adjusts the balance between the left and right outputs.
Panning one instrument hard right (+7) and the other hard left (-7) is a good
way to keep the identities of the instruments separate. Try it and notice how the
guitar and piano instruments are distinct and separate. When you are finished,
return the pan settings to “0” and press Enter.
PAN
pri:+0
sec:+0
Transpose
Move the data knob ahead four clicks until you find the transpose screen. This
function transposes the key of the primary or secondary instrument. Each
number represents a semitone interval up or down (+ or -). To transpose an
instrument up an octave, move the cursor to the bottom line and set the number to +12. A setting of +7 would result in a perfect fifth. Try transposing the
piano and guitar sounds. When you are finished, return the settings to “0” and
press Enter.
TRANSPOSE
pri:+12 sec:+00
✓ Transposing an instrument out of its normal range will completely change
the character of the sound. Sine waves transposed down can add a killer
bottom end to an otherwise harmless bass sound.
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
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STEP-BY-STEP
Coarse Tuning
TO HEAR HOW TRANSPOSE AND
COARSE TUNING DIFFER, TRY
THEM ON THE MULTIPERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS.
This function is related to transpose and in fact, the two work well together in
the creation of new timbres. A little background: Transpose works by shifting
the keyboard assignment of the samples (as if you were sliding the keyboard up
and down). Coarse Tuning keeps the keyboard sample placement constant and
actually tunes the samples up. With multisampled instruments such as a piano,
the timbre can change dramatically using coarse tuning. (A multisampled
sound is one that contains multiple samples placed at various points on the
keyboard.)
To hear this effect, first Coarse Tune the guitar up one octave (+12), then
Transpose it down one octave (-12). The pitch remains the same, but what a
difference in the tone! (You may want to turn the Piano instrument Off to make
it easier to hear the guitar.)
USE COARSE TUNING TO TUNE
MULTI-INSTRUMENT PERCUSSION
INSTRUMENTS.
PITCH TUNE crse
pri:+12 sec:+00
Fine Tuning
The Fine Tune control is related to the coarse tuning, but has a range of one
semitone. When both primary and secondary instruments are the same,
detuning one of the instruments slightly will create a “fat” sound useful for
strings or ensemble effects.
PITCH TUNE fine
pri:+00 sec:+00
In preparation for the next experiment, let's clean the slate. Since we haven't
SAVED the preset yet, any changes you made will be lost as soon as you change
the preset. Do that now. Simply press the Preset Edit button extinguishing the
LED, dial momentarily to another preset and then go back to the ‘-defPreset-’.
Now everything is erased. Set the primary instrument to I337 Synth Pad, press
Home/Enter, then slowly turn the data entry knob until you find the screen
shown below.
ALT VOL ENVELOPE
pri:Off sec:Off
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Alternate Volume Envelope
Turn the Alternate Volume Envelope On for the primary instrument. This
enables the next screen, the primary volume envelope.
P: A H D S R
00 00 50 99 15
Going back to the block diagram model, the preset now looks like this:
Long
Strings
R
DCA
Pan
L
Alternate
Volume
Envelope
Piano
Every sound you hear, be it a piano note, a drum, a bell or whatever, has a
characteristic volume curve or Envelope which grows louder and softer in
various ways during the course of the sound. The volume envelope of a sound is
one of the clues that our brain uses to determine what type of sound is being
produced.
Every instrument in UltraProteus has its own volume envelope which is used
when the Alternate Envelope parameter is turned Off. By turning the Alternate
Volume Envelope On, we can re-shape the instrument's natural volume envelope any way we want. By re-shaping the volume envelope, you can dramatically
change the way the sound is perceived. For example, by adjusting the envelope
parameters you can make “bowed” pianos or backwards gongs. The diagrams at
right show the volume envelopes of a few common sounds.
Set all the numbers to 00 and listen to the sound. You should only hear a little
blip. Now move the cursor under the Attack Time (A) and slowly increase the
value while playing the keyboard. The attack controls the amount of time it
takes for the sound to reach full volume when a key is pressed and held.
Set the attack to “00” and slowly increase the Decay (D) instead. Notice how
percussion-like the sound becomes. You have just created the percussion
envelope shown at the right.
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
Organ
Strings
Percussion
THE GENERALIZED VOLUME
ENVELOPE SHAPES OF A FEW
TYPES OF SOUNDS ARE SHOWN
ABOVE.
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STEP-BY-STEP
Set the Sustain (S) to 99 and slowly increase the Release time. Note the effect as
you release the note. The release time controls the time it takes for the sound to
die away when a note is released.
Practice making different volume envelopes. As you hear everyday sounds, try to
imagine what the volume envelope of these sounds might look like.
Anatomy of an Envelope
FOR MORE INFORMATION
ABOUT ENVELOPES, SEE THE
PROGRAMMING BASICS
CHAPTER IN THIS MANUAL.
THE DELAY PARAMETER IS ONLY
AVAILABLE IN THE AUXILIARY
ENVELOPE.
When a key is pressed, the envelope generator level starts to increase at the
Attack rate. When it reaches full level, it Holds at that level for the specified
Hold time. After the hold time has elapsed, the envelope begins to Decay back
down at the Decay rate until it reaches the Sustain Level. (Note that all the
other parameters are Rates, but the Sustain is a Level.) The envelope will stay at
the Sustain level for as long as the key is held. When the key is Released, the
envelope falls back down to zero at the Release rate.
S
level
time
A
H
D
key
down
R
key
released
The secondary alternate volume envelope parameters perform the same functions on the secondary layer.
Double + Detune
The next screen, Double + Detune, doubles the instrument and detunes it
slightly by an adjustable amount. This acts like a chorus effect and serves to
“fatten” the sound. Try it and notice how much fuller the sound becomes.
Because this function works by using two instruments per layer, it halves the
number of available notes that can be played. Therefore you should only use this
feature when necessary to achieve the desired effect.
DOUBLE + DETUNE
pri:06 sec:Off
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Sound Delay
This function delays the onset of the note after a key is pressed and is mainly
used when a secondary instrument is also present. Go ahead and select a secondary instrument now, then come back to this screen to experiment with the
delay. A very small amount of delay can serve to give each layer its own sonic
“identity”.
SOUND DELAY
pri:000 sec:000
Applications include:
Echo Effect - Bring in a slightly softer version of the same instrument or
even a different instrument. Who says you have to have normal echoes?
Delayed Chorus - Set primary and secondary to the same instrument. Use
Double + Delay, Fine Tuning and Sound Delay on the secondary layer.
Sound Splicing - Splice the attack of one sound with the body of another
using Sound Delay and Sound Start (the next subject of our investigations). Read on.
Sound Start
Sound Start removes the beginning (attack) of the sound as the value is increased. It's probably time to clean the slate again. Change the preset momentarily then return to the default preset (-defPreset-). Set the primary instrument
to: I008 Tine Strike, which is an electric piano sample. Now flip back to the
Sound Start screen.
SOUND START
pri:000 sec:000
As you slowly increase the Sound Start, notice how the percussive attack of the
piano disappears. The sound becomes muted.
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STEP-BY-STEP
Application - Sound Splicing
Sound Splicing is an operation that uses most of the features we've gone over.
As mentioned above, Sound Splicing merges the attack of one sound with the
body of another to form a new sound. The process is illustrated below.
The alternate volume envelopes are used to fade one instrument out while
another fades in. UltraProteus also contains many digitally generated waveforms
that may be combined with sampled instruments to change the character of the
sound, perhaps to add a digital “edge” or add bass. The Sound Delay, Sound
Start, Volume and the Transpose parameters allow you to refine the splice point
between the primary and secondary instruments.
As an example, let's splice a Sax attack to a Bass Clarinet to create a sort of
“Clariphone”. Because these instruments are somewhat related in character,
they are perfect candidates for splicing. Start with the default preset again, and
change only the parameters listed below. The Tenor Sax instrument is shaped
by the Alternate Volume Envelope so that only the honking attack is heard (a
short delay and decay with the sustain set to zero).
Primary
TRY SUBSTITUTING DIFFERENT
INSTRUMENTS USING THE
EXAMPLE AT LEFT.
Secondary
Instrument: 098 Tenor Sax
Instrument: 128 Bass Clarinet
Volume: 122
Volume: 125
Transpose: +00
Transpose: +12
Alt Envelope: On
Alt Envelope: On
A
H
D
S
R
00 04 24 00 04
A
H
D
S
R
08 01 52 48 24
Sound Delay: 000
Sound Delay: 003
Sound Start: 000
Sound Start: 006
The Bass Clarinet instrument serves as the body of the sound. The Sound Delay
parameter is used to delay the onset of the Bass Clarinet until the Sax attack has
finished, The Bass Clarinet attack is removed using the Sound Start parameter.
The Attack parameter of the Secondary Alternate Envelope is set to 08 so the
Bass Clarinet will smoothly fade in as the Sax fades out. The Bass Clarinet has
also been transposed up an octave so that the pitches of the two instruments
match. Finally, the volumes of the two instruments are balanced with the
volume control.
Splicing is only of the many things you can do with UltraProteus. Think of
UltraProteus as an audio construction set, which allows you to mold the sound
as you would a piece of clay. The instruments are like your raw material and the
other parameters are the sculpting tools.
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Time to Save?
If you wanted to keep this sound, you would have to SAVE it using the Save
Preset function (the very last screen in the Preset menu). To save a preset,
simply move the cursor to the bottom line of the display, select the preset
location where you want to store it, then press Enter. That's it!
Warning: Saving a preset erases whatever preset was already stored in that
location. The default preset ( -defPreset-, 127, bank 0) is a good place to experiment, since it is only a blank preset.
If you want to re-name your preset, do so using the first screen (Preset Name),
then save the preset again to the same location.
LFO Modulation
Let's investigate how modulation routings can affect the sound. For these
experiments, you use the default preset. If you just wrote over it, there is
another one stored in permanent ROM (127, bank 1). Select any primary
instrument, but leave the secondary instrument turned Off.
The LFOs (Low Frequency Oscillators) generate repeating waves which are
commonly used to animate the sound or create vibrato (a cyclic pitch change).
To create vibrato we can use an LFO to modulate the pitch. As you learned in
the Programming Basics section, Modulation requires a modulation Source and
a Destination. The LFO is the source and Pitch is the destination. The block
diagram below illustrates this connection.
Instrument
APPLYING THE SAME TYPE OF
MODULATION TO BOTH PRIMARY
AND SECONDARY INSTRUMENTS
WILL TEND TO “FUSE” THEM
INTO A NEW SOUND. APPLYING
DIFFERENT MODULATION WILL
TEND TO SEPARATE THEM.
R
DCA
Pan
Pitch
L
LFO 1
To make the connection between the LFO and the Instrument Pitch, move
through the Preset parameters until you find the screen shown below.
Source
REALTIME CTRL #0
PWhl Pitch +127
Patch Number
Modulation
Amount
YOU CAN THINK OF EACH
MODULATION PATCH AS A
“CORD”. YOU MUST CONNECT
BOTH ENDS OF A CORD FOR IT
TO WORK.
Destination
The setting shown indicates that the Pitch Wheel is connected to the Pitch, with
an amount of +127 (full). Press the right cursor button (>) twice to place the
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
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STEP-BY-STEP
cursor under the modulation source. As you slowly turn the data knob, each
possible modulation source is displayed. Select LFO 1 as the Source and press
Home/Enter.
Turn the data entry knob counter-clockwise until you find the LFO 1 parameter
screens shown below.
LFO1
SHAPE AMT
Tri
+000
LFO1
RT DLY VAR
060 000 000
Place the cursor under the Amount (AMT) parameter and set the value to +127
(you have to re-key, to hear any changes). You should be hearing lots of vibrato.
Adjust the other parameters such as Rate and Shape. Controlling pitch is an
easy way to hear the different LFO waveshapes. Delay (DLY) sets a time before
the LFO starts. Variation (VAR) makes the rate of each LFO a little different for
ensemble effects.
Triangle
Sawtooth
Sine
Random
LFO 2 IS IDENTICAL TO LFO 1.
Square
Now set the LFO Rate to about 20 and set the shape to “Saw”. Listen how the
sawtooth wave smoothly ramps up then comes abruptly down. Change the
amount to -128 and notice that it now ramps down and comes abruptly back up.
Anytime you use a negative amount (in any part of UltraProteus), you Invert
the modulation.
Negative Amount
-
Sawtooth
+
Inverted Sawtooth
In preparation for the next experiment, set the LFO waveform to “Sine” and the
rate to about “050”. Leave the amount set to “-128”. Press Enter.
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Go back to the Realtime Modulation screen and set it as shown below.
REALTIME CTRL #0
Lfo1 Pan
+127
Notice how the LFO now moves the sound from side to side. The diagram below
illustrates the connection you just made.
R
Instrument
DCA
Pan
L
LFO 1
The Realtime Control screen connects ANY realtime modulation source to
ANY realtime control destination! The amount parameter controls “how much”
modulation is applied. Change the destination to Volume and listen. The block
diagram for this connection is shown below.
R
Instrument
AN LFO MODULATING VOLUME
IS CALLED “TREMOLO”. TREMOLO
IS USEFUL FOR ORGAN, VOICE,
SURF GUITARS, ETC.
Pan
DCA
Vol
L
LFO 1
Place the cursor under the “#0” on the top line of the display. Turn the data
entry knob and notice that the lower line changes with the patch number.
There are TEN (count 'em) realtime modulation patches available per preset!
This is what sound synthesis is all about. By simultaneously controlling many
parameters, the sound is shaped in complex ways into the desired form.
✓␣ Now that you understand how to connect modulation sources to destinations,
try using the Auxiliary Envelope Generator to control pitch. You've already used
the Alternate Volume Envelope generators. The Auxiliary Envelope works
exactly the same, except that it has an initial Delay stage and it can be routed to
any realtime control destination.
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
YOU CAN THINK OF EACH
MODULATION PATCH AS A
“CORD”. YOU MUST CONNECT
BOTH ENDS OF A CORD FOR IT
TO WORK.
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STEP-BY-STEP
Modulating Modulators
Go back again to the LFO 1 screen and turn the amount to “+000”. Next turn to
the Note-On Control screen and set up the screen to look like the one below.
NOTE-ON CTRL
#0
Vel Lfo1Amt +080
The connection you just made is shown below.
R
Instrument
DCA
Pan
Volume
-
L
+
Amount
Key
Velocity
LFO 1
Play the keyboard hard and then softly. The key velocity is controlling the
amount of LFO applied to the volume. The harder you play, the more LFO
modulation is applied. The modulation wheel (Realtime Control screen) can
also be routed to control the LFO 1 amount, or the LFO rate or the Pan position, or all of the above. There can be ten Note-On modulations and ten
Realtime modulations in each preset.
You can probably see why patch diagrams are important (even if they only exist
in your mind). They allow you to visualize how the connections are being made
inside UltraProteus.
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The UltraProteus Filter
This is what a lot of you have been waiting for. This incredible filter is what puts
the Ultra in UltraProteus. If you have not read the section on the Z-Plane
Filter in the Preset Programming section, please do so before proceeding,
since it contains important background information. Now we can add the
Z-Plane filter to our block diagram.
Instrument
Pitch
Sample
Start
Tone
Z-Plane Filter
Morph
Freq
Trk
Trans
2
R
DCA
Pan
L
Volume
Function
Gen.
Aux.
DAHDSR
Velocity
Key
Position
Volume
AHDSR
Possible
Modulation
Sources
Let's examine the filter controls more closely. The vertical arrows in the diagram below, indicate controls that can be modulated. The Morph Offset is the
only filter control that can be modulated continuously by a Realtime Control
source.
Filter Type
Filter
Level
Morph
Offset
Reverse
Freq. Transform
Track
2
The filter has an input level control called the Filter Level which controls how
much signal is presented to the filter. This control (like most of the controls in
UltraProteus) has an initial amount and can also be controlled from a note-on
modulation source. Certain UltraProteus filters are designed to distort the
signal as a musical effect. The Filter Level allows you to control the amount of
distortion produced by these special filter types.
The action of the Morph Offset varies from filter to filter. Because it can be
continuously varied, it can be thought of as the main filter control. See the
section on UltraProteus Filters in the Reference Section of this manual for
specific information on each filter.
The Frequency Tracking control changes the frequency of the filter on many of
the filter types. This would correspond to Fc or the cutoff frequency of a traditional lowpass filter, You can connect the keyboard to this control (in the noteon Control screen) with an amount setting of “64” if you want the filter
frequency to track the keyboard.
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
FREQUENCY TRACKING DOES
NOT ALWAYS CONTROL
FREQUENCY AS THE NAME
WOULD IMPLY. SEE THE Z-PLANE
FILTER DESCRIPTIONS IN THE
REFERENCE SECTION FOR
DETAILS ON EACH FILTER TYPE.
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STEP-BY-STEP
NOTE: FILTER FREQUENCY
TRACKING IS TRANSFORM 1.
Key tracking is used to keep the timbre of the sound constant as you play up
and down the keyboard. Of course, you can route any Note-On controller to
control Frequency Tracking.
Like the Morph control, the effect of Transform 2 varies from filter to filter and
in many cases it is not used at all. On a simple lowpass filter, Transform 2 might
be used as a Q (or resonance) control. On a flanger, it might control the depth
of the notches. The Z-plane filter descriptions in the Reference Section give
specific information on the function of Transform 2 in each filter.
Just Do It!
MANY OF THE Z-PLANE
FILTERS DO NOT USE
TRANSFORM 2.
OK. Let's start experimenting with the filters. First, we should connect the
modulation wheel to control Morph so that it will be easy to hear the effect of
this important parameter. Start with a clean slate by selecting the default preset
again. Enter the Preset menu and select an instrument rich in harmonics such
as “I049 P2 Strings 1”.
The mod wheel is usually transmitted on MIDI controller 01. UltraProteus
Controller A is set to controller 01 by default. So if you have not changed this
parameter in the Master menu, Controller A is the mod wheel. We want to route
Controller A (the mod wheel) to Morph. Go to the Realtime Modulation Control
screen and set it as shown below.
REALTIME CTRL #1
CtlA Morph +127
INFORMATION ON
CONNECTING MIDI
CONTROLLERS CAN BE FOUND
AT THE END OF THE
PROGRAMMING BASICS
SECTION.
Note: A good way to verify that the mod wheel is connected is to set the
destination (in the screen above) to “Pitch” instead of “Morph”. Move the
wheel to verify that the pitch varies with the wheel. If so, change the destination back to “Morph”.
Move to the “Primary Filter Type” screen and scroll though the various filters as
you play the keyboard. Move the modulation wheel and verify that the wheel is
controlling the morph parameter. For this experiment, set the filter type to
“F029 Vocal Cube”. This is an interesting filter and since it is a “cube”, it has
three parameters to adjust.
FILTER TYPE pri
F029 Vocal Cube
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Move to the “Filter Frequency Tracking” screen and adjust the primary offset
while playing the keyboard. (You must re-key the keyboard to hear the results of
changing this value.) As specified, this parameter changes the frequency of the
filter, making it brighter as the value is increased. Feel free to adjust the morph
parameter as you adjust frequency tracking.
FILT FREQ TRACK
pri:127 sec:000
Next we'll adjust “Filter Transform 2”. On this filter, Transform 2 increases the
size of the peaks in the vocal formant. The effect of increasing the peaks is a
pronounced “nasal” quality which is quite dramatic.
FEEL FREE TO CHANGE THE
INSTRUMENT AT ANY TIME
DURING THESE EXPERIMENTS.
THEY ARE JUST THAT,
EXPERIMENTS!
FILT TRANSFORM 2
pri:127 sec:000
Now that you've explored the three main filter parameters, let's go back and
connect the keyboard to “Filter Frequency Tracking”. The keyboard is a NoteOn control. A setting of “064” is the proper setting for accurate key tracking
where the timbre will remain more or less constant up and down the keyboard.
NOTE-ON CTRL #0
Key FrqTrk +064
As long as we're programming Note-On Controls, go ahead and connect Velocity
to Transform 2. The screen is shown below.
NOTE-ON CTRL #1
Vel Trans2 +127
The timbre of the sound should now change as the keyboard is played hard and
soft. Transform 2, Frequency Tracking, and the Morph are all highly interactive,
so a fair amount of adjustment may be required to get the sound just right.
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STEP-BY-STEP
Filter Filosophy
The Instrument and the Filter work together to determine the harmonic
content of the final sound. You can think of the instrument like clay which is
being squeezed through a die, the filter. The filter tries to impress its structure
on the harmonics of the instrument.
Filter
Frequency
Response of
Instrument
Instrument's
Response
Shaped by
Filter
Of course, the filter cannot amplify or attenuate frequencies which do not exist
in the original instrument. The Filter Frequency Tracking control can be used
to “tune in” the filter to match the instrument.
Filter
Response
Amplitude
Instrument
Spectrum
40
80
160
360
720
1440
2880
Frequency
The Filter can only act on frequencies that are present in the Instrument. Use the
Filter Frequency Tracking control to “fine tune” the filter to the instrument. No sound
would be output from the example above because the filter's frequency response and
the harmonic spectrum of the instrument do not coincide.
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Amplitude
Original
Instrument
Spectrum
40
80
160
360
720
1440
2880
Frequency
Amplitude
Filter
Response
40
80
160
Instrument
Through
Filter
360
720
1440
2880
Amplitude
Frequency
Resulting
Frequency
Spectrum
40
80
160
360
720
1440
2880
Frequency
The Filter imposes its response on the harmonic spectrum of the Instrument.
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
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To illustrate the point, let's create a complete sound from scratch as an example
of how the various parameters combined with the Z-plane filter can radically
alter an instrument. In this case we'll try running a saxophone through a
clarinet and oboe filter using only the primary layer. As in previous experiments, start with the default preset and change only the parameters listed.
Saxobo (pri only)
Instrument: 105 Tenor Sax
Note-On Ctrl
Alt Envelope: On
0 Key -> Freq. Trk +064
A
S
R
1 Vel -> Trans2
00 00 00 99
03
2 Vel -> VolumeP +049
H
D
+080
Filter Type: 083 Clr>Oboe
3 CtrlA -> Attack
+007
Morph Offset: 000
4 CtrlA -> Freq Trk -020
Filter Freq. Track: 103
Realtime Ctrl
Transform 2: 210
1 Ctl A -> Morph +050
The Tenor Saxophone is an instrument rich in harmonics, making it ideal for
filtering. The Alternate Volume Envelope has been adjusted for a fast attack and
release. The filter type is 083 Clarinet->Oboe, which models the resonance
characteristics of a clarinet and morphs into the resonance of an oboe. On this
particular filter, Transform 2 controls a lowpass filter and increases the volume
slightly (more T2 equals brighter and louder). The Morph Offset is turned down
to 000 so that it can be turned back up using Controller A (which defaults to the
Mod Wheel of your keyboard.). Control A has been routed to control the filter
Morph in the Realtime Modulation Control.
Now to the Note-On modulation. The Key Number has been routed to Key
Tracking with the standard setting of +064. This keeps the tone constant as you
play up and down the keyboard. Velocity has been routed to Transform 2, which
will make the sound brighter and louder as you play harder. Velocity increases
the Volume as you play harder.
As you increase Control A, three things happen:
1) The filter Morphs to the Oboe filter.
2) The Attack of the sound becomes just slightly longer (Ctrl A ->Attack).
3) The Frequency Tracking amount decreases slightly (Ctrl A ->Freq Trk -050).
This was done to balance the tone of the sounds.
This is just a simple example to get you started. To learn more about how great
presets are constructed, examine the factory presets in detail and discover their
secrets. Interesting and expressive sounds have many different controls occurring simultaneously. Genius is in the details. Take the time to fine tune and
polish your creation!
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STEP-BY-STEP
Morphology
The best and ultimately the only way to choose filters is to try them out.
UltraProteus is no mere mortal synthesizer with a single filter. UltraProteus has
288 filter types to choose from. Think of the filters as you do instruments:
entities which have a particular sound. As you learn what the instrument and
the filters sound like, you can mix and match them to suit your needs.
A flanger filter (which is a parametric EQ with closely-spaced notches)
sounds like a traditional flanger when swept. If the frequency of the flanger
is controlled by key velocity and not swept, the flanger can simulate
different plucks on a string or strikes on a surface such as a cymbal.
The need for Keyboard Tracking is reduced when using a parametric EQ
since the high frequencies are preserved (unlike a lowpass filter).
Time-variant filter sweeps are good for traditional synthesizer effects such
as resonant sweeps, flanges, phasing, stereo panning, vowels, etc. Timeinvariant filters are useful for distortion, simulating instrument resonances, plucked strings, cymbals strikes, etc.
Correlate the DCA envelope to emphasize or minimize parallel filter
attack and release characteristics.
Try using vibrato (LFO to pitch) with vocal filters for more realistic vocal
simulations.
Velocity and Key Number generally alter the timbre in expressive presets.
Also, Harder (faster) usually equals Brighter.
Natural sounds tend to use low Q filters.
Fixed Formant Filters:
Can reduce the unwanted effect of pitch shifting the samples
(munchkinization).
Simulate instrument body resonances
Simulate cymbal strikes, with variation in the stick position
Simulate woodwind instrument resonance
Simulate guitar and string plucks with variation in pick position
Swept Filters:
Simulate flangers
Can be used for traditional synthesizer lowpass filter effects
Can pick individual harmonics out of complex sounds
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
157
STEP-BY-STEP
USING ULTRAPROTEUS WITH A SEQUENCER
We thought you’d never ask. UltraProteus was designed from its conception
with multi-timbral sequencing in mind. Just take a look at the main screen.
C01 VOL127 PAN=P
000 Program Name
The preset for each MIDI channel is selected from the main screen or from the
Midimap menu which stores sixteen (32 with a RAM card installed) complete
16-channel MIDI setups. The Main Screen settings are the same settings in the
currently selected Midimap and any changes you make will be reflected in either
screen. Press the cursor button to move the cursor up so that it is underneath
the channel number.
C01 VOL127 PAN=P
000 Program Name
Turn the data entry control and you will see that every MIDI channel has a
preset assigned to it. Just select a preset or hyperpreset for each of the MIDI
channels. It’s simple! If you want to store the sixteen channel MIDI setup, press
the Midimap button and turn the data entry control to the last screen, “Save
Midimap to”. Then select a location and press Enter.
In order to respond to multiple MIDI channels, UltraProteus must be in MultiMode. Multi-Mode is selected in the Master menu. Press the Master menu
button and use the data entry control to scroll through the screens until you
find MIDI MODE.
MIDI MODE
Multi
ID
00
Move the cursor down to the second line and change the mode to Multi as
shown. UltraProteus will now respond to multiple MIDI channels.
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UltraProteus Operation Manual
STEP-BY-STEP
MORE ADVANCED SEQUENCING
Pre-Sequence Setup
Suppose that you want to have your sequencer set up everything for you before
the start of the song. Good idea. This will make the UltraProteus setup procedure automatic and prevent the wrong presets from playing.
The basic idea of a pre-sequence setup is to send out a Midimap Select command just before the start of the song. Your pre-programmed Midimap will
select all the proper presets, adjust the mix and effects settings as well as the
pan positions of each preset.
Most computer-based MIDI sequencers have the ability to send MIDI SysEx data.
The ONLY way to select a Midimap remotely is to use a SysEx message. Consult
your sequencer operation manual for information on sending SysEx messages.
Note: UltraProteus setup information should be transmitted from the sequencer
before the song actually starts, perhaps during a lead-in measure or countdown.
DO NOT send setup information just before the first beat of the song or MIDI
timing errors could result.
TO CHANGE PROGRAM BANKS
VIA MIDI SYSEX, SEND:
Bn 00 00 20 ll Cn pp
n = MIDI chan. number (0-F)
ll = Bank number (00-04)
pp = Preset in the new bank (00-7F)
Initial Setup
1) Program a Midimap exactly the way you want it, with Channels to Preset/
Hyper, MIDI Enables and Effect Settings. Be sure to name your Midimap
so you can recognize it later.
2) SAVE the Midimap in one of the sixteen internal locations or one of the
sixteen RAM card locations.
3) Make sure the Device ID (MIDI Mode in the Master menu) is set to 00.
Otherwise UltraProteus will simply ignore the SysEx messages.
NOTE: DEVICE ID 00 IS ONLY
NECESSARY FOR THE EXAMPLE
SHOWN BELOW. DEVICE ID's ARE
USED TO DIFFERENTIATE MULTIPLE
ULTRAPROTEUS UNITS ON THE
MIDI CABLE.
Before the Sequence Starts
Send the following MIDI SysEx messages exactly as listed.
1) Turn On Multi-Mode - Send: F0 18 0C 00 03 08 02 02 00 F7
2) Select the Midimap - Send: F0 18 0C 00 03 40 02 02 00 F7
Midimap Number
Use the chart at right to find the proper “Hex” number (in Bold) to insert into
the MIDI string. For example, to select Midimap 10, you would insert the
hexadecimal number “0A” in the position shown above.
Now your song will play perfectly every time according to the parameters in the
Midimap. In addition, programs, volumes and pan positions (or anything else
for that matter) can be adjusted in realtime during the song using standard
MIDI controllers. Note: If the wrong programs are being selected, check the
MIDI Program Change Map.
Chapter 10: Step-by-Step
Map Hx
00 = 00
01 = 01
02 = 02
03 = 03
04 = 04
05 = 05
06 = 06
07 = 07
08 = 08
09 = 09
10 = 0A
11 = 0B
12 = 0C
13 = 0D
14 = 0E
15 = 0F
16 = 10
17 = 11
18 = 12
19 = 13
20 = 14
21 = 15
22 = 16
23 = 17
24 = 18
25 = 19
26 = 1A
27 = 1B
28 = 1C
29 = 1D
30 = 1E
31 = 1F
159
STEP-BY-STEP
Using the 32 Channels
TO CONSERVE AUDIO
CHANNELS, USE THE EFFECTS
SECTION TO “FATTEN” THE
SOUND INSTEAD OF
“DOUBLE+DETUNE” IN THE
PRESET MENU.
As stated earlier, UltraProteus has 32 independent audio channels which are
utilized dynamically. With 32 channels and hundreds of sounds, you have a
universe of sonic textures at your disposal. You may have noticed that many of
the very “big” sounding hyperpresets in UltraProteus are constructed using
layered presets or they may use Double+Detune. While this is fine when the
hyper is played solo, you may begin to run out of channels when UltraProteus is
played multi-timbrally. Layered hyperpresets and the Double+Detune function
cause extra output channels to be used. Learn to “budget” your output channels
for maximum efficiency.
Channel Ripoff
USE LONG NOTE DURATIONS
WHEN SEQUENCING DRUM
TRACKS. THIS TECHNIQUE FREES
UP THE CHANNELS FASTER AND
CAN HELP PREVENT “CHANNEL
RIPOFF”.
When UltraProteus uses up all its 32 channels and needs more, it steals a
channel from the key that has been held the longest. This is commonly known
as “channel rip-off”. You will most commonly encounter this “rip-off” when
using UltraProteus in multi-timbral mode or when using massive hyperpresets.
Long Alternate Envelope attack and release rates can also cause this problem.
Since UltraProteus dynamically allocates channels as needed, you must either,
play fewer notes, shorten the release rates, use simpler sounds, or turn off
Double+Detune to eliminate channel rip-off.
Using External Processing
Don't be afraid to use external processing on specific sounds if you feel the urge.
The submix sends and returns on UltraProteus are there for a reason. In certain
instances, a little external signal processing will be just the thing an instrument
needs to give it a distinct identity. Incidentally, a real guitar or bass amp can
work wonders on the guitar and bass sounds. If you think about it, playing these
sounds through an instrument amp is much closer to the way they are normally
processed. Because the
OUTPUTS
submix outputs are programmable, only selected
presets or MIDI channels
R - SUB2 - L
R - SUB1 - L
R - MAIN - L
MONO
STEREO
will be routed to the
guitar amp.
R - SUB1 - L
OR…
Tip
Tip
Ring
Tip
Ring
Stereo
Effect Unit
Guitar Amp
Using the programmable outputs and returns, specific presets can be routed through
outboard processors without using up precious mixer channels.
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UltraProteus Operation Manual
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