SAS RAID controllers for AIX

SAS RAID controllers for AIX
Power Systems
SAS RAID controllers for AIX
Power Systems
SAS RAID controllers for AIX
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices,” on
page 137, “Safety notices” on page vii, the IBM Systems Safety Notices manual, G229-9054, and the
IBM Environmental Notices and User Guide, Z125–5823.
This edition applies to IBM Power Systems™ servers that contain the POWER6™ processor and to all associated
models.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2007, 2009.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Contents
Safety notices
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Feature comparison of SAS RAID cards .
PCI-X SAS RAID card comparison . .
PCIe SAS RAID card comparison . .
SAS architecture . . . . . . . . .
Disk arrays . . . . . . . . . .
Supported RAID levels . . . . .
RAID 0 . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 5 . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 6 . . . . . . . . . .
RAID 10 . . . . . . . . .
Disk array capacities . . . . . .
RAID level summary . . . . . .
Stripe-unit size . . . . . . . .
Valid states for hdisks and pdisks . .
States for disk arrays (hdisks) . .
States for physical disks (pdisks) .
pdisk descriptions . . . . . .
Auxiliary write cache . . . . . .
Auxiliary write cache adapter . .
Installing the auxiliary write cache
Viewing link status information .
Chapter 2. Controller software
Controller software verification .
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. 1
. 1
. 5
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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
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. 23
Chapter 3. Common controller and disk array management tasks . . . . . . . . . . 25
Using the Disk Array Manager . . . . . .
Preparing disks for use in SAS disk arrays . .
Creating a disk array . . . . . . . . .
Migrating an existing disk array to a new RAID
Viewing the disk array configuration . . . .
Deleting a disk array . . . . . . . . .
Adding disks to an existing disk array . . .
Using hot spare disks . . . . . . . . .
Creating hot spare disks . . . . . . .
Deleting hot spare disks . . . . . . .
Viewing IBM SAS disk array settings . . . .
Viewing IBM SAS pdisk settings . . . . .
Viewing pdisk vital product data . . . . .
Viewing controller SAS addresses . . . . .
Controller SAS address attributes . . . . .
AIX command-line interface . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Possible HA configurations . .
Controller functions . . . .
Controller function attributes .
Viewing HA controller attributes
HA cabling considerations . .
HA performance considerations
HA access optimization . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
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iii
HA access characteristics within List SAS Disk Array Configuration . . . . .
Configuration and serviceability considerations for HA RAID configurations . .
Installing high availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing an HA single-system RAID configuration . . . . . . . . . .
Installing an HA two-system RAID configuration. . . . . . . . . . .
Functions requiring special attention in an HA two-system RAID configuration
Installing an HA two-system JBOD configuration . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Updating the SAS RAID controller microcode . . . . . . . . . .
Changing pdisks to hdisks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rechargeable battery maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying rechargeable battery information . . . . . . . . .
Error state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forcing a rechargeable battery error . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing a battery pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing a 572B nonconcurrent maintainable battery pack . . . .
Replacing a 57B7 concurrent maintainable battery pack . . . . . .
Replacing a 574E concurrent maintainable battery pack . . . . . .
Replacing a 572F/575C card set concurrent maintainable battery pack .
Separating the 572F/575C card set and moving the cache directory card .
Replacing the cache directory card. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing pdisks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing SAS fabric path information . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example: Using SAS fabric path information . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
SAS resource locations. . . . . . . .
Showing physical resource attributes . . .
Disk array problem identification . . . .
Service request numbers . . . . . . .
Controller maintenance analysis procedures
Examining the hardware error log . . .
MAP 3100 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3110 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3111 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3112 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3113 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3120 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3121 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3130 . . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3131 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3132 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3133 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3134 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3135 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3140 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3141 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3142 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3143 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3144 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3145 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3146 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3147 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3148 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3149 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3150 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3152 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3153 . . . . . . . . . .
MAP 3190 . . . . . . . . . .
iv
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. 83
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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Finding a service request number from an existing AIX error log .
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. 135
Appendix. Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Trademarks . . . . .
Electronic emission notices
Class A Notices. . .
Terms and conditions. .
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Contents
v
vi
Safety notices
Safety notices may be printed throughout this guide:
v DANGER notices call attention to a situation that is potentially lethal or extremely hazardous to
people.
v CAUTION notices call attention to a situation that is potentially hazardous to people because of some
existing condition.
v Attention notices call attention to the possibility of damage to a program, device, system, or data.
World Trade safety information
Several countries require the safety information contained in product publications to be presented in their
national languages. If this requirement applies to your country, a safety information booklet is included
in the publications package shipped with the product. The booklet contains the safety information in
your national language with references to the U.S. English source. Before using a U.S. English publication
to install, operate, or service this product, you must first become familiar with the related safety
information in the booklet. You should also refer to the booklet any time you do not clearly understand
any safety information in the U.S. English publications.
German safety information
Das Produkt ist nicht für den Einsatz an Bildschirmarbeitsplätzen im Sinne § 2 der
Bildschirmarbeitsverordnung geeignet.
Laser safety information
IBM® servers can use I/O cards or features that are fiber-optic based and that utilize lasers or LEDs.
Laser compliance
All lasers are certified in the U.S. to conform to the requirements of DHHS 21 CFR Subchapter J for class
1 laser products. Outside the U.S., they are certified to be in compliance with IEC 60825 as a class 1 laser
product. Consult the label on each part for laser certification numbers and approval information.
CAUTION:
This product might contain one or more of the following devices: CD-ROM drive, DVD-ROM drive,
DVD-RAM drive, or laser module, which are Class 1 laser products. Note the following information:
v Do not remove the covers. Removing the covers of the laser product could result in exposure to
hazardous laser radiation. There are no serviceable parts inside the device.
v Use of the controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than those specified herein
might result in hazardous radiation exposure.
(C026)
CAUTION:
Data processing environments can contain equipment transmitting on system links with laser modules
that operate at greater than Class 1 power levels. For this reason, never look into the end of an optical
fiber cable or open receptacle. (C027)
CAUTION:
This product contains a Class 1M laser. Do not view directly with optical instruments. (C028)
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
vii
CAUTION:
Some laser products contain an embedded Class 3A or Class 3B laser diode. Note the following
information: laser radiation when open. Do not stare into the beam, do not view directly with optical
instruments, and avoid direct exposure to the beam. (C030)
Power and cabling information for NEBS (Network Equipment-Building System)
GR-1089-CORE
The following comments apply to the IBM servers that have been designated as conforming to NEBS
(Network Equipment-Building System) GR-1089-CORE:
The equipment is suitable for installation in the following:
v Network telecommunications facilities
v Locations where the NEC (National Electrical Code) applies
The intrabuilding ports of this equipment are suitable for connection to intrabuilding or unexposed
wiring or cabling only. The intrabuilding ports of this equipment must not be metallically connected to the
interfaces that connect to the OSP (outside plant) or its wiring. These interfaces are designed for use as
intrabuilding interfaces only (Type 2 or Type 4 ports as described in GR-1089-CORE) and require isolation
from the exposed OSP cabling. The addition of primary protectors is not sufficient protection to connect
these interfaces metallically to OSP wiring.
Note: All Ethernet cables must be shielded and grounded at both ends.
The ac-powered system does not require the use of an external surge protection device (SPD).
The dc-powered system employs an isolated DC return (DC-I) design. The DC battery return terminal
shall not be connected to the chassis or frame ground.
viii
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
Find usage and maintenance information regarding controllers for the serial-attached SCSI (SAS)
Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) for the AIX® operating system. Use this information in
conjunction with your specific system unit and operating system documentation. General information is
intended for all users of this product. Service information is intended for a service representative
specifically trained on the system unit and subsystem being serviced.
The SAS RAID controllers for AIX have the following features:
v PCI-X 266 system interface or PCI Express™ (PCIe) system interface.
v Physical link (phy) speed of 3 Gbps SAS supporting transfer rates of 300 MB per second.
v Supports SAS devices and non-disk Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA) devices.
v Optimized for SAS disk configurations that use dual paths through dual expanders for redundancy
and reliability.
v Controller managed path redundancy and path switching for multiported SAS devices.
v Embedded PowerPC® RISC Processor, hardware XOR DMA Engine, and hardware Finite Field
Multiplier (FFM) DMA Engine (for Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) 6).
v Some adapters support nonvolatile write cache.
v Support for RAID 0, 5, 6, and 10 disk arrays.
v Supports attachment of other devices such as non-RAID disks, tape, and optical devices.
v RAID disk arrays and non-RAID devices supported as a bootable device.
v Advanced RAID features:
– Hot spares for RAID 5, 6, and 10 disk arrays
– Ability to increase the capacity of an existing RAID 5 or 6 disk array by adding disks
– Background parity checking
– Background data scrubbing
– Disks formatted to 528 bytes per sector, providing cyclical redundancy checking (CRC) and logically
bad block checking
– Optimized hardware for RAID 5 and 6 sequential write workloads
– Optimized skip read/write disk support for transaction workloads
v Supports a maximum of 64 advanced function disks with a total device support maximum of 255 (the
number of all physical SAS and SATA devices plus number of logical RAID disk arrays must be less
than 255 per controller).
Feature comparison of SAS RAID cards
Compare the main features of PCI-X and PCI Express (PCIe) SAS RAID cards.
These tables provides a breakdown of the main features of the SAS RAID PCI-X and PCIe controller
cards.
PCI-X SAS RAID card comparison
This table compares the main features of PCI-X SAS RAID cards.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
1
Table 1. PCI-X SAS RAID controller cards
CCIN (custom
card
identification
number)
572A
572B
572C
572F / 575C
57B8
Description
PCI-X 266 Ext
PCI-X 266 Ext
PCI-X 266 Planar PCI-X 266 Ext
Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS 3 Gb SAS Adapter Tri-x4 3 Gb SAS
Adapter
RAID Adapter
RAID Adapter
Form factor
Low profile 64-bit Long 64-bit PCI-X Planar integrated
PCI-X
Long 64-bit PCI-X, Planar RAID
double-wide card enablement
set
Adapter failing
function code
LED value
2515
2517
2502
2519 / 251D
Physical links
8 (two mini SAS
4x connectors)
8 (two mini SAS
4x connectors)
81
12 (bottom 3 mini 81
SAS 4x
connectors) and 2
(top mini SAS 4x
connector for HA
only)
RAID levels
supported
RAID 0, 54, 64, 10
RAID 0, 5, 6, 10
RAID 0
RAID 0, 5, 6, 10
RAID 0, 5, 6, 10
Up to 1.5 Gb
(compressed)
175 MB
Write cache size
175 MB
Read cache size
PCI-X 266 Planar
3 Gb SAS RAID
Adapter
2505
Up to 1.6 Gb
(compressed)
Cache battery
pack technology
LiIon
LiIon
Not applicable2
Cache battery
pack FFC
2D03
2D065
Not applicable2
Cache battery
concurrent
maintenance
No
No
No
Yes
Not applicable2
Cache data
present LED
No
No
No
No
No
Removable
cache card
No
Yes
No
No
No
Auxiliary write
cache (AWC)
support
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
High availability Yes3
(HA) two
system RAID
Yes
No
No
No
HA two system
JBOD
Yes3
No
No
No
No
HA single
system RAID
Yes3
Yes
No
No
No
Requires HA
RAID
configuration
No
Yes
No
No
No
2
Table 1. PCI-X SAS RAID controller cards (continued)
CCIN (custom
card
identification
number)
1
572A
572B
572C
572F / 575C
57B8
Some systems provide an external mini SAS 4x connector from the integrated backplane controller.
2
The controller contains battery-backed cache, but the battery power is supplied by the 57B8 controller through
the backplane connections.
3
Multi-initiator and high availability is supported on the CCIN 572A adapter except for part numbers of either
44V4266 or 44V4404 (feature code 5900).
4
The write performance of RAID 5 and RAID 6 might be poor on adapters that do not provide write cache.
Consider using an adapter that provides write cache when using RAID 5 or RAID 6.
5
The cache battery pack for both adapters is contained in a single battery FRU, which is physically located on the
575C auxiliary cache card.
Figure 1. CCIN 572A PCI-X266 External Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS adapter
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
3
Figure 2. CCIN 572B PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS RAID adapter
Figure 3. CCIN 57B8 planar RAID enablement card
4
Figure 4. CCIN 572F PCI-X266 Ext Tri-x4 3 Gb SAS RAID adapter and CCIN 575C PCI-X266 auxiliary cache adapter
PCIe SAS RAID card comparison
This table compares the main features of PCI Express (PCIe) SAS RAID cards.
Table 2. PCIe SAS RAID controller cards
CCIN (custom
card
identification
number)
57B7
57B9
Description
PCIe x1 Auxiliary
Cache Adapter
PCIe x8 Ext
PCIe x8 Ext
PCIe x8 Ext
PCIe x8 Ext
Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS
Adapter and
Adapter and
Adapter
RAID Adapter
Cable Card
Cable Card
Form factor
Planar Auxiliary
Cache
Combination PCIe Combination PCIe PCIe x8
x8 and Cable
x8 and Cable
Card
Card
PCIe x8
Adapter failing
function code
LED value
2504
2D0B
2D0B
2518
Physical links
2
4 (bottom
mini-SAS 4x
connector
required to
connect by an
external AI cable
to the top
mini-SAS 4x
Cable Card
connector)
8 (two mini SAS
8 (two mini SAS
4x connectors, one 4x connectors)
required to
connect by an
external AI cable
to the top
mini-SAS 4x
Cable Card
connector)
8 (two mini SAS
4x connectors)
RAID 0, 51, 61, 10
RAID 0, 51, 61, 10
RAID 0, 5, 6, 10
RAID levels
supported
57BA
57B3
2516
RAID 0, 51, 61, 10
574E
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
5
Table 2. PCIe SAS RAID controller cards (continued)
CCIN (custom
card
identification
number)
57B7
Write cache size
175 MB
57B9
57BA
57B3
574E
380 MB
Read cache size
Cache battery
LiIon
pack technology
LiIon
Cache battery
pack FFC
2D05
2D0E
Cache battery
concurrent
maintenance
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Cache data
present LED
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Removable
cache card
No
No
No
No
Yes
Auxiliary write
cache (AWC)
support
Yes
No
No
No
No
High availability No
(HA) two
system RAID
No
No
Yes
Yes
HA two system
JBOD
No
No
No
Yes
No
HA single
system RAID
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Requires HA
RAID
configuration
No
No
No
No
Yes
1
The write performance of RAID 5 and RAID 6 might be poor on adapters that do not provide write cache.
Consider using an adapter that provides write cache when using RAID 5 or RAID 6.
Figure 5. CCIN 57B7 Planar auxiliary cache
6
Figure 6. CCIN 57B9 PCIe x8 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS adapter and cable card
Figure 7. CCIN 57BA PCIe x8 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS adapter and cable card
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
7
Figure 8. CCIN 57B3 PCIe x8 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS adapter
Figure 9. CCIN 574E PCIe x8 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS RAID adapter
SAS architecture
Serial-attached SCSI (SAS) architecture defines a serial device interconnect and transport protocol that
defines the rules for information exchange between devices.
8
SAS is an evolution of the parallel SCSI device interface into a serial point-to-point interface. SAS
physical links (phys) are a set of four wires used as two differential signal pairs. One differential signal
transmits in one direction, while the other differential signal transmits in the opposite direction. Data can
be transmitted in both directions simultaneously. Phys are contained in SAS ports which contain one or
more phys. A port is a wide port if there are more than one phy in the port. If there is only one phy in
the port, it is a narrow port. A port is identified by a unique SAS worldwide name (also called SAS
address).
A SAS controller contains one or more SAS ports. A path is a logical point-to-point link between a SAS
initiator port in the controller and a SAS target port in the I/O device (for example a disk). A connection
is a temporary association between a controller and an I/O device through a path. A connection enables
communication to a device. The controller can communicate to the I/O device over this connection by
using either the SCSI command set or the ATA/ATAPI command set depending on the device type.
A SAS expander enables connections between a controller port and multiple I/O device ports by routing
connections between the expander ports. Only a single connection through an expander can exist at any
given time. Using expanders creates more nodes in the path from the controller to the I/O device. If an
I/O device supports multiple ports, more than one path to the device can exist when there are expander
devices included in the path.
A SAS fabric refers to the summation of all paths between all SAS controller ports and all I/O device
ports in the SAS subsystem including cables, enclosures, and expanders.
The following example SAS subsystem shows some of the concepts described in this SAS overview. A
controller is shown with eight SAS phys. Four of those phys are connected into two different wide ports.
One connector contains four phys grouped into two ports. The connectors have no significance in SAS
other than causing a physical wire connection. The four-phy connector can contain between one and four
ports depending on the type of cabling that is used. The uppermost port in the figure shows a
controller-wide port number 6 that consists of phy numbers 6 and 7. Port 6 connects to an expander,
which attaches to one of the dual ports of the I/O devices. The dashed red line indicates a path between
the controller and an I/O device. Another path runs from the controller’s port number 4 to the other port
of the I/O device. These two paths provide two different possible connections for increased reliability by
using redundant controller ports, expanders, and I/O device ports. The SCSI Enclosure Services (SES) is a
component of each expander.
Figure 10. Example SAS Subsystem
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
9
Disk arrays
Disk arrays are groups of disks that work together with a specialized array controller to take advantage
of potentially higher data transfer rates and, depending on the RAID level selected, data redundancy.
Disk arrays use RAID technology to offer data redundancy and improved data transfer rates over those
provided by single large disks. If a disk failure occurs, the disk can usually be replaced without
interrupting normal system operation.
Data redundancy
The disk array controller keeps track of how the data is distributed across the disks. RAID 5, 6, and 10
disk arrays also provide data redundancy, so that no data is lost if a single disk in the array fails. If a
disk failure occurs, the disk can usually be replaced without interrupting normal system operation.
Using arrays
Each disk array can be used by AIX in the same way as it would a single non-RAID disk. For example,
after creating a disk array, you can create a file system on the disk array or use AIX commands to make
the disk array available to the system by adding the disk array to a volume group.
hdisk
Like other disk storage units in AIX, the disk arrays are assigned names using the hdisk form. The names
are deleted when you delete the disk array. An hdisk is a disk that is formatted to 512 bytes per sector.
These disks must be formatted to 528 bytes per sector before they can be used in disk arrays.
pdisk
The individual physical disks that comprise disk arrays (or serve as candidates to be used in disk arrays)
are represented by pdisk names. A pdisk is a disk that is formatted to 528 bytes per sector.
Array management
The IBM SAS RAID controller is managed by the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager. The disk array manager
serves as the interface to the controller and I/O device configuration. It is also responsible for the
monitoring and recovery features of the controller.
Boot device
If a disk array is to be used as the boot device, you might have to prepare the disks by booting from the
IBM server hardware stand-alone diagnostics CD and creating the disk array before installing AIX. You
might want to perform this procedure when the original boot drive is to be used as part of a disk array.
Array configuration
The following figure illustrates a possible disk array configuration.
10
Figure 11. Disk array configuration
The List SAS Disk Array Configuration option in the disk array manager can be used to display the
pdisk and hdisk names, their associated location codes, and their current state of operation. The
following sample output is displayed when the List SAS Disk Array Configuration option is invoked.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
|
| -----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
| -----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| sissas0
FFFFFFFF Primary
PCI-X266 Planar 3 Gb SAS Adapter
|
|
|
| hdisk8
00FF0100 Optimal
RAID 6 Array
69.6GB
|
|
pdisk0
00040100 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk2
00040B00 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk8
00000500 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk9
00000A00 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
|
| hdisk7
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 0 Array
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk4
00040000 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
|
| hdisk13
00FF0300 Optimal
RAID 0 Array
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk5
00040300 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
|
| hdisk14
00FF0400 Failed
RAID 0 Array
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk3
00040A00 Failed
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
|
| hdisk0
00040500 Available
SAS Disk Drive
146.8GB
|
| hdisk1
00040600 Available
SAS Disk Drive
146.8GB
|
| hdisk3
00000600 Available
SAS Disk Drive
73.4GB
|
|
|
|
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
11
Related tasks
“Preparing disks for use in SAS disk arrays” on page 26
Use this information to prepare disks for use in an array.
“Viewing the disk array configuration” on page 29
Use this procedure to view SAS disk array configurations on your server.
Supported RAID levels
The RAID level of a disk array determines how data is stored on the disk array and the level of
protection that is provided.
If a part of the RAID system fails, different RAID levels help to recover lost data in different ways. With
the exception of RAID level 0, if a single drive fails within an array, the array controller can reconstruct
the data for the Failed disk by using the data stored on other hard drives within the array. This data
reconstruction has little or no impact to current system programs and users. The controller supports
RAID levels 0, 5, 6, and 10. Not all controllers support all RAID levels. Each RAID level supported by the
controller has its own attributes and uses a different method of writing data. The following information
provides details for each supported RAID level.
Related concepts
“PCI-X SAS RAID card comparison” on page 1
This table compares the main features of PCI-X SAS RAID cards.
“PCIe SAS RAID card comparison” on page 5
This table compares the main features of PCI Express (PCIe) SAS RAID cards.
RAID 0
Learn how data is written to a RAID 0 array.
RAID 0 stripes data across the disks in the array, for optimal performance. For a RAID 0 array of three
disks, data would be written in the following pattern.
Figure 12. RAID 0
RAID 0 offers a high potential I/O rate, but it is a nonredundant configuration. As a result, there is no
data redundancy available for the purpose of reconstructing data in the event of a disk failure. There is
no error recovery beyond what is normally provided on a single disk. Unlike other RAID levels, the array
12
controller never marks a RAID 0 array as Degraded as the result of a disk failure. If a physical disk fails
in a RAID 0 disk array, the disk array is marked as Failed. All data in the array must be backed up
regularly to protect against data loss.
RAID 5
Learn how data is written to a RAID 5 array.
RAID 5 stripes data across all disks in the array. RAID level 5 also writes array parity data. The parity
data is spread across all the disks. For a RAID 5 array of three disks, array data and parity information
are written in the following pattern:
Figure 13. RAID 5
If a disk fails in a RAID 5 array, you can continue to use the array normally. A RAID 5 array operating
with a single Failed disk is said to be operating in Degraded mode. Whenever data is read from a
Degraded disk array, the array controller recalculates the data on the Failed disk by using data and parity
blocks on the operational disks. If a second disk fails, the array will be placed in the Failed state and will
not be accessible.
Related concepts
“Stripe-unit size” on page 16
With RAID technology, data is striped across an array of physical disks. This data distribution scheme
complements the way that the operating system requests data.
RAID 6
Learn how data is written to a RAID 6 array.
RAID 6 stripes data across all disks in the array. RAID level 6 also writes array ″P″ and ″Q″ parity data.
The P and Q parity data, is spread across all the disks. For a RAID 6 array of four disks, array data and
parity information are written in the following pattern:
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
13
Figure 14. RAID 6
If one or two disks fail in a RAID 6 array, you can continue to use the array normally. A RAID 6 array
operating with a one or two Failed disks is said to be operating in Degraded mode. Whenever data is
read from a Degraded disk array, the array controller recalculates the data on the failed disks by using
data and parity blocks on the operational disks. A RAID 6 array with a single failed disk has similar
protection to that of a RAID 5 array with no disk failures. If a third disk fails, the array will be placed in
the Failed state and will not be accessible.
RAID 10
Learn how data is written to a RAID 10 array.
RAID 10 uses mirrored pairs to redundantly store data. The array must contain an even number of disks.
Two is the minimum number of disks needed to create a RAID 10 array. The data is striped across the
mirrored pairs. For example, a RAID 10 array of four disks would have data written to it in the following
pattern:
Figure 15. RAID 10
14
RAID 10 tolerates multiple disk failures. If one disk in each mirrored pair fails, the array will still be
functional, operating in Degraded mode. You can continue to use the array normally because for each
Failed disk, the data is stored redundantly on its mirrored pair. However, if both members of a mirrored
pair fail, the array will be placed in the Failed state and will not be accessible.
When a RAID 10 disk array is created, the controller will automatically attempt to select the disks for
each mirrored pair from a different controller connector (a different cable to a different device enclosure).
For example, if four disks selected for the disk array are located on one of the controller’s connectors and
another four disks selected are located on another of the controller’s connectors, the controller will
automatically attempt to create each mirrored pair from one disk on each controller connector. In the
event of a controller port, cable, or enclosure failure, each mirrored pair will continue to operate in a
Degraded mode. Such redundancy requires careful planning when you are determining where to place
devices.
Disk array capacities
These guidelines will help you calculate the capacity of a disk array.
The capacity of a disk array depends on the capacity of the disks used and the RAID level of the array.
To calculate the capacity of a disk array, do the following:
RAID 0
Multiply the number of disks by the disk capacity.
RAID 5
Multiply one fewer than the number of disks by the disk capacity.
RAID 6
Multiply two fewer than the number of disks by the disk capacity.
RAID 10
Multiply the number of disks by the disk capacity and divide by 2.
Note: If disks of different capacities are used in the same array, all disks are treated as if they have the
capacity of the smallest disk.
RAID level summary
Compare RAID levels according to their capabilities.
The following information provides data redundancy, usable disk capacity, read performance, and write
performance for each RAID level.
Table 3. RAID level summary
RAID level
Usable disk
Data redundancy capacity
Read
performance
Write
performance
Min/Max devices
per array
RAID 0
None
100%
Very good
Excellent
1/18
RAID 5
Very good
67% to 94%
Very good
Good
3/18
RAID 6
Excellent
50% to 89%
Very good
Fair to good
4/18
RAID 10
Excellent
50%
Excellent
Very good
2/18 (even
numbers only)
RAID 0
Does not support data redundancy, but provides a potentially higher I/O rate.
RAID 5
Creates array parity information so that the data can be reconstructed if a disk in the array fails.
Provides better capacity than RAID level 10 but possibly lower performance.
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
15
RAID 6
Creates array ″P″ and ″Q″ parity information so that the data can be reconstructed if one or two
disks in the array fail. Provides better data redundancy than RAID 5 but with slightly lower
capacity and possibly lower performance. Provides better capacity than RAID level 10 but
possibly lower performance.
RAID 10
Stores data redundantly on mirrored pairs to provide maximum protection against disk failures.
Provides generally better performance than RAID 5 or 6, but has lower capacity.
Note: A two-drive RAID level 10 array is equivalent to RAID level 1.
Stripe-unit size
With RAID technology, data is striped across an array of physical disks. This data distribution scheme
complements the way that the operating system requests data.
The granularity at which data is stored on one disk of the array before subsequent data is stored on the
next disk of the array is called the stripe-unit size. The collection of stripe units, from the first disk of the
array to the last disk of the array, is called a stripe.
You can set the stripe-unit size of an IBM SAS Disk Array to 16 KB, 64 KB, 256 KB, or 512 KB. You might
be able to maximize the performance of your disk array by setting the stripe-unit size to a value that is
slightly larger than the size of the average system I/O request. For large system I/O requests, use a
stripe-unit size of 256 KB or 512KB. The recommended stripe size will be identified on the screen when
you create the disk array.
Valid states for hdisks and pdisks
Disk arrays and physical disks have several operational states.
States for disk arrays (hdisks)
There are six valid states for disk arrays.
The valid states for IBM SAS Disk Arrays are Optimal, Degraded, Rebuilding, Failed, Missing, and
Unknown.
Optimal
The array is functional and fully protected (RAID 5, 6, and 10) with all array member pdisks in
the Active state.
Degraded
The array’s protection against disk failures is degraded or its performance is degraded. When one
or more array member pdisks are in the Failed state, the array is still functional but might no
longer be fully protected against disk failures. When all array member pdisks are in the Active
state, the array is not performing optimally because of a problem with the controller’s nonvolatile
write cache.
Rebuilding
Redundancy data for the array is being reconstructed. After the rebuild process has completed,
the array will return to the Optimal state. Until then, the array is not fully protected against disk
failures.
Failed The array is no longer accessible because of disk failures or configuration problems.
Missing
A previously configured disk array no longer exists.
Unknown
The state of the disk array could not be determined.
16
States for physical disks (pdisks)
There are five valid states for physical disks.
The valid states for pdisks are Active, RWProtected, Failed, Missing, and Unknown.
Active
The disk is functioning correctly.
RWProtected
The disk is unavailable because of a hardware or a configuration problem.
Failed The controller cannot communicate with the disk, or the pdisk is the cause of the disk array
being in a Degraded state.
Missing
The disk was previously connected to the controller but is no longer detected.
Unknown
The state of the disk could not be determined.
pdisk descriptions
The pdisk description indicates whether the disk is configured as an Array Member, Hot Spare, or an
Array Candidate.
For an array, the description column of the List SAS Disk Array Configuration screen indicates the
RAID level of the array. The description column for a pdisk indicates whether the disk is configured as
an Array Member, Hot Spare, or an Array Candidate.
Array Member
A 528 bytes per sector pdisk that is configured as a member of an array.
Hot Spare
A 528 bytes per sector pdisk that can be used by the controller to automatically replace a Failed
disk in a Degraded RAID 5, 6, or 10 disk array. A Hot Spare disk is useful only if its capacity is
greater than or equal to the capacity of the smallest disk in an array that becomes Degraded. For
more information about hot spare disks, see “Using hot spare disks” on page 32.
Array Candidate
A 528 bytes per sector pdisk that is a candidate for becoming an Array Member or a Hot Spare.
Auxiliary write cache
A duplicate, nonvolatile copy of write cache data can be preserved.
Auxiliary write cache adapter
The Auxiliary Write Cache (AWC) adapter provides a duplicate, nonvolatile copy of write cache data of
the RAID controller to which it is connected.
Protection of data is enhanced by having two battery-backed (nonvolatile) copies of write cache, each
stored on separate adapters. If a failure occurs to the write cache portion of the RAID controller, or the
RAID controller itself fails in such a way that the write cache data is not recoverable, the AWC adapter
provides a backup copy of the write cache data to prevent data loss during the recovery of the failed
RAID controller. The cache data is recovered to the new replacement RAID controller and then written
out to disk before resuming normal operations.
The AWC adapter is not a failover device that can keep the system operational by continuing disk
operations when the attached RAID controller fails. The system cannot use the auxiliary copy of the
cache for runtime operations even if only the cache on the RAID controller fails. The AWC adapter does
not support any other device attachment and performs no other tasks than communicating with the
attached RAID controller to receive backup write cache data. The purpose of the AWC adapter is to
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
17
minimize the length of an unplanned outage, due to a failure of a RAID controller, by preventing loss of
critical data that might have otherwise required a system reload.
It is important to understand the difference between multi-initiator connections and AWC connections.
Connecting controllers in a multi-initiator environment refers to multiple RAID controllers connected to a
common set of disk enclosures and disks. The AWC controller is not connected to the disks, and it does
not perform device media accesses.
Important: If a failure of either the RAID controller or the Auxiliary Cache occurs, the Maintenance
Analysis Procedures (MAPs) for the service request numbers (SRNs) in the AIX error log must be
followed precisely.
The RAID controller and the AWC adapter each require a PCI bus connection and are required to be in
the same partition. The two adapters are connected by an internal SAS connection. For the Planar RAID
Enablement and Planar Auxiliary Cache features, the dedicated SAS connection is integrated into the
system planar.
If the AWC adapter itself fails or the SAS link between the two adapters fails, the RAID controller will
stop caching operations, destage existing write cache data to disk, and run in a performance-degraded
mode. After the AWC adapter is replaced or the link is reestablished, the RAID controller automatically
recognizes the AWC, synchronizes the cache area, resumes normal caching function, and resumes writing
the duplicate cache data to the AWC.
The AWC adapter is typically used in conjunction with RAID protection. RAID functions are not affected
by the attachment of an AWC. Because the AWC does not control other devices over the bus and
communicates directly with its attached RAID controller over a dedicated SAS bus, it has little, if any,
performance impact on the system.
Figure 16. Example RAID and AWC controller configuration
18
Related concepts
Chapter 4, “Multi-initiator and high availability,” on page 37
You can increase availability using multi-initiator and high availability to connect multiple controllers to a
common set of disk expansion drawers.
Chapter 6, “Problem determination and recovery,” on page 83
AIX diagnostics and utilities are used to assist in problem determination and recovery tasks.
Installing the auxiliary write cache
Follow these step-by-step instructions to install the auxiliary write cache.
Note: Disk arrays can be previously configured or new arrays can be created after the auxiliary cache
environment configuration is set up.
1. Ensure that both the storage I/O adapter and AWC adapter are installed in the same partition and in
the same enclosure.
2. Update to the latest adapter microcode from the code download web site, and to the required levels
of both the AIX version and the AIX driver package for your specific adapters. See AIX software
requirements for the required code levels, and also refer to the installation information for the adapter.
3. Power on the system or partition and verify the function of adapters and disk arrays. See “Viewing
the disk array configuration” on page 29. The output displayed will be similar to the following screen
examples.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
| Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
| Before command completion, additional instructions can appear below.
|
|
|
| -----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
| -----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| sissas2
FFFFFFFF Available
PCIe x1 Auxiliary Cache Adapter
|
| sissas1 FFFFFFFF AWC linked Redundant cache protected by sissas2
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
| F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
| n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
19
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
| Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
| Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
| -----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
| -----------------------------------------------------------------------|
| sissas1 FFFFFFFF Primary
PCI-X266 Planar 3 Gb SAS RAID Adapter
|
| sissas2 FFFFFFFF AWC linked Redundant cache protection for sissas1
|
|
|
| pdisk2
00044000 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
| pdisk4
00044100 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
| pdisk3
00044200 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
| pdisk5
00044300 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
| pdisk7
00044400 Active
Array Candidate
139.6GB
|
| pdisk0
00044500 Active
Array Candidate
139.6GB
|
| pdisk1
00044600 Active
Array Candidate
139.6GB
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
| F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
| n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
4. Verify that both adapters indicate they are Available and AWC Linked to the other adapter, and that
all arrays indicate Optimal.
Viewing link status information
You can view more detailed link status information in the Change/Show SAS Controller information
screen.
1. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
4. Select the IBM SAS RAID or AWC Controller. The screen displayed will look similar to the following
screen.
20
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS Controller
|
|
|
| Type or select values in entry fields.
|
| Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
|
SAS adapter
sissas2
|
|
Description
PCIe x1 Auxilia> |
|
Status
Available
|
|
Location
06-00
|
|
Operating mode
Aux Write Cache Adapte> |
|
Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode
No Preference
|
|
Dual Initiator Configuration
Default
|
|
Serial Number
YL3126327310
|
|
World Wide ID
5005076c0702bf00
|
|
Remote HA Link Operational
No
|
|
Remote HA Serial Number
|
|
Remote HA World Wide ID
|
|
Remote AWC Link Operational
Yes
|
|
Remote AWC Serial Number
07127001
|
|
Remote AWC World Wide ID
5005076c0702f600
|
|
|
| F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
| F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
| F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Chapter 1. SAS RAID controllers for AIX overview
21
22
Chapter 2. Controller software
For the controller to be identified and configured by AIX, the requisite device support software must be
installed. The requisite software for the controller is often preinstalled during AIX installation.
It might be necessary to perform operations related to the installation, verification, and maintenance of
the AIX device software for the controller.
Software for the controller is packaged in installp format and distributed as part of the base AIX
installation media, AIX update media, and through the Web-based Fix Delivery Center for AIX. This
information is an overview of the AIX software support required for the controller. For complete
information related to the installation and maintenance of AIX, refer to the IBM System p® and AIX
Information Center Web site.
The controller runs onboard microcode. The AIX command lsmcode can be used to determine the level of
onboard microcode being used by the controller. Although a version of controller microcode might be
distributed along with AIX, this does not necessarily represent the most recent version of microcode
available for the controller.
Related tasks
“Updating the SAS RAID controller microcode” on page 59
Determine if you need to update your SAS RAID controller microcode, then download and install the
updates.
Controller software verification
Support for the controller is contained in the AIX package named devices.common.IBM.sissas.
Each controller requires an AIX package described by the following table. These device support packages
contain multiple filesets, each related to a different aspect of device support.
Attention: Ensure the adapters are updated with the latest microcode from the Microcode downloads as
part of the initial installation.
Table 4. AIX software requirements
CCIN (custom
card
identification
number)
AIX Package
Minimum Required AIX Version
572A
devices.pci.1410bd02
Refer to the PCI Adapter Information by Feature Type information at
Managing PCI adapters for the Minimum AIX level requirements.
572B
devices.pci.1410bd02
Refer to the PCI Adapter Information by Feature Type information at
Managing PCI adapters for the Minimum AIX level requirements.
572C
devices.pci.1410bd02
One of the following:
v AIX 5L™ Version 5.2 with Technology Level 10 (5200-10)
v AIX 5L Version 5.3 with Technology Level 6 (5300-06) or later
572F/575C
devices.pci.1410bd02
Refer to the PCI Adapter Information by Feature Type information at
Managing PCI adapters for the Minimum AIX level requirements.
574E
devices.pciex.14103903
Refer to the PCI Adapter Information by Feature Type information at
Managing PCI adapters for the Minimum AIX level requirements.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
23
Table 4. AIX software requirements (continued)
CCIN (custom
card
identification
number)
AIX Package
Minimum Required AIX Version
57B3
devices.pciex.14103903
Refer to the PCI Adapter Information by Feature Type information at
Managing PCI adapters for the Minimum AIX level requirements.
57B7
devices.pciex.14103903
One of the following:
v AIX Version 6.1 with Technology Level 0 (6100-00)
v AIX 5L Version 5.3 with Technology Level 7 (5300-07), or later
v AIX 5L Version 5.3 with Technology Level 6 and Service Pack 7
(5300-06-07), or later
57B8
devices.pci.1410bd02
One of the following:
v AIX Version 6.1 with Technology Level 0 (6100-00)
v AIX 5L Version 5.3 with Technology Level 7 (5300-07), or later
v AIX 5L Version 5.3 with Technology Level 6 and Service Pack 7
(5300-06-07), or later
57B9
devices.pciex.14103903
One of the following:
v AIX Version 6.1 with Technology Level 1 (6100-01)
v AIX 5L Version 5.3 with Technology Level 8 (5300-08), or later
57BA
devices.pciex.14103903
Refer to the PCI Adapter Information by Feature Type information at
Managing PCI adapters for the Minimum AIX level requirements.
To verify that the device support package for the controller is installed, type as an example:
lslpp -l devices.common.IBM.sissas
Output from this command indicates if device support software for the controller is installed, and if so,
what the corresponding levels of each fileset are.
If the output indicates that no filesets of this name are installed, you must install the appropriate package
so that the controller can be available for use. This software package is available as part of the base AIX
installation media, AIX update media, and through the Web-based Fix Delivery Center for AIX.
Over time, it might become necessary to install software updates so that you have the very latest
available level of device software support for the controller. Updates to the device support software are
packaged, distributed, and installed through the same mechanisms used for other portions of the AIX
base operating system. The standard AIX technical support procedures can be used to determine the
latest available level of device software support for the controller.
24
Chapter 3. Common controller and disk array management
tasks
You can perform various tasks to manage SAS RAID disk arrays.
Use the information in this section to manage your RAID disk arrays.
Using the Disk Array Manager
The disk array manager is the interface for performing various tasks with disk arrays.
The IBM SAS Disk Array Manager can be accessed either through the System Management Interface Tool
(SMIT), or for some tasks, the AIX command line. The Disk Array Manager can also be started from AIX
diagnostics.
To start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager, do the following:
1. At the command prompt, type smit, and press Enter.
2. Select Devices.
3. Select Disk Array.
4. Select IBM SAS Disk Array.
5. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager from the menu with options for configuring and managing the
IBM SAS RAID Controller.
The following menu for managing disk arrays is displayed.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
|
|
IBM SAS Disk Array Manager
|
|
|
|Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
|
|
|
| List SAS Disk Array Configuration
|
| Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors
|
| Create a SAS Disk Array
|
| Delete a SAS Disk Array
|
| Add Disks to an Existing SAS Disk Array
|
| Configure a Defined SAS Disk Array
|
| Change/Show Characteristics of a SAS Disk Array
|
| Reconstruct a SAS Disk Array
|
| Change/Show SAS pdisk Status
|
| Diagnostics and Recovery Options
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
You can also use a SMIT fast path to start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager. On the AIX command line,
type smit sasdam, and press Enter.
If a disk array is to be used as the boot device, you might need to prepare the disks by booting from the
IBM server hardware stand-alone diagnostics CD and creating the disk array before installing AIX. You
might want to perform this procedure when the original boot drive is to be used as part of a disk array.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
25
To start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager from the AIX diagnostics, do the following:
1. Start the AIX diagnostics, and on the Function Selection screen, select Task Selection.
2. Select RAID Array Manager and press Enter.
3. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager and press Enter.
Related concepts
“AIX command-line interface” on page 35
Many tasks used to manage the SAS RAID controller can be performed by using the AIX command line
instead of using the SAS Disk Array Manager.
Preparing disks for use in SAS disk arrays
Use this information to prepare disks for use in an array.
Before a disk can be used in a disk array, it must be a 528 bytes per sector Array Candidate pdisk. To
create an Array Candidate pdisk and format it to 528 byte sectors, do the following:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors.
3. Select the appropriate controller.
4. Select the disks that you want to prepare for use in the SAS disk arrays.
Attention: Continuing with this option will format the disks. All data on the disks will be lost. Some
disks require that their microcode be updated to the latest level before being formatted to 528 byte
sectors.
A message will display asking if you want to continue.
5. To proceed with the format, select OK or press Enter to continue. To return to the previous menu
without formatting the disks, select Cancel.
After the formatting is complete, the disks will be Array Candidate pdisks and will be ready for use in
disk arrays. This operation will also zero all the data on the disks. The controller keeps track of the disks
that have their data zeroed. These Zeroed Array Candidate pdisks can be used to create a disk array that
will be immediately protected against disk failures, and they are the only disks that can be added to an
existing disk array. An Array Candidate pdisk will lose its Zeroed state after it has been used in an array
or is unconfigured. It will also lose its Zeroed state after the system has been rebooted or the controller
has been unconfigured. To return an Array Candidate pdisk to the Zeroed state, follow the steps
previously described in this section for preparing disks for use in disk arrays. For more information, see
“Disk arrays” on page 10.
Creating a disk array
A disk array is created using a set of Active Array Candidate pdisks.
For disk arrays with data redundancy (RAID 5, 6, and 10), if all of the pdisks are in the Zeroed state, the
array will become immediately protected against failures. However, if one or more of the pdisks are not
Zeroed, the newly created array will initially be in the Rebuilding state. It will be unprotected against
disk failures until parity data on all of the disks has been recalculated. For disk arrays with no data
redundancy (RAID 0), it is of no importance whether the pdisks are in the Zeroed state.
To create a IBM SAS Disk Array, do the following:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Create a IBM SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the appropriate IBM SAS RAID Controller on which you want to create an array.
26
4. Select the RAID level for the array. For more information about selecting an appropriate RAID level,
see “Supported RAID levels” on page 12.
5. Select the stripe size in kilobytes for the array. For more information about the stripe-size parameter,
see “Stripe-unit size” on page 16.
A selection screen similar to the following representation displays. It will display a list of Array
Candidate pdisks and notes regarding array requirements. The minimum and maximum number of
supported disks will be specified, along with any other specific requirements for the array. Select the
disks that you want to use in the array according to the requirements on this screen.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Select Disks to Use in the Array
|
|
|
| Move cursor to desired item and press F7. Use arrow keys to scroll.
|
|
ONE OR MORE items can be selected.
|
| Press Enter AFTER making all selections.
|
|
|
|
# RAID 5 supports a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 18 drives.
|
|
|
|
|
|
pdisk1
00040200 Active
Array Candidate
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk3
00040900 Active
Array Candidate
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk4
00040000 Active
Array Candidate
34.8GB
|
|
pdisk5
00040300 Active
Array Candidate
34.8GB
|
|
|
| F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
|
| F7=Select
F8=Image
F10=Exit
|
| Enter=Do
/=Find
n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------+
A SMIT Dialog Screen summarizes your selections.
6. Press Enter to create the array.
You can now add the disk array to a volume group. Logical volumes and file systems can also be created.
Use standard AIX procedures to perform these tasks, and treat the array in the same way that you would
treat any hdisk.
Migrating an existing disk array to a new RAID level
The SAS RAID controller supports migrating an existing RAID 0 or 10 disk array to RAID 10 or 0,
respectively. This allows you to dynamically change the level of protection of a disk array while
preserving its existing data.
When migrating RAID 0 to RAID 10, additional disks must be included into the RAID 10 disk array in
order to provide the additional level of protection. The number of additional disks will be equal to the
number of disks in the original RAID level 0 disk array. The capacity of the disk array will remain
unchanged and the disk array remains accessible during the migration. The disk array is not protected by
RAID 10 until the migration completes.
When migrating RAID 10 to RAID 0, no additional disks are included into the RAID 0 disk array. The
number of disks in the resulting RAID 0 disk array will be reduced to half the number of disks in the
original RAID 10 disk array. The capacity of the disk array will remain unchanged and the disk array
remains accessible during the migration.
To migrate an existing array to a new level, do the following:
1. Start the SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on page
25.
2. Select Migrate an Existing SAS Disk Array to a New RAID Level.
3. Select the SAS disk array which you want to migrate to a new level.
4. Select the desired RAID level from the options shown.
Chapter 3. Common controller and disk array management tasks
27
5. Select the desired stripe size from the options shown.
6. Select additional disks to include if necessary to provide the desired level or protection. A screen will
display similar to the following:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
IBM SAS Disk Array Manager
|
|
|
|Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
|
|
|
| List SAS Disk Array Configuration
|
| Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors
|
| Create a SAS Disk Array
|
| Delete a SAS Disk Array
|
| Add Disks to an Existing SAS Disk Array
|
| Migrate an Existing SAS Disk Array to a New RAID Level
|
| +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
| |
Include Disks during an SAS Disk Array Migration
| |
| |
| |
| | Move cursor to desired item and press F7. Use arrow keys to scroll.
| |
| |
ONE OR MORE items can be selected.
| |
| | Press Enter AFTER making all selections.
| |
| |
| |
| |
# hdisk6 requires 1 additional drives (maximum of 1) for RAID 10.
| |
| |
| |
| |
pdisk24
00044000 Active
Array Candidate
139.6GB
| |
| |
| |
| | F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
| |
| | F7=Select
F8=Image
F10=Exit
| |
|F1| Enter=Do
/=Find
n=Find Next
| |
|F9+--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
7. Press Enter to perform the RAID level migration.
The migration progress percentage will be displayed next to the array being migrated.
A screen will display similar to the following.
Note: If the RAID disk array is in use, the RAID level description might not be updated until after
the next IPL.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas1
FFFFFFFF Primary
PCI Express x8 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS RAID Adapter |
|tmscsi0
00FE0000 HA Linked
Remote adapter SN 081620E4
|
|
|
|hdisk1
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 6 Array
139.5GB
|
| pdisk1
00040400 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
| pdisk2
00040800 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
| pdisk3
00040000 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
| pdisk4
00040100 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
|
|
|hdisk6
00FF0500 Rebuilding RAID 10 Array
139.6GB Migrate 8%
|
| pdisk12 00040B00 Active
Array Member
139.6GB
|
| pdisk24 00044000 Active
Array Member
139.6GB
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
28
8. After the RAID level migration is completed, run cfgmgr to update the description of the disk array.
Viewing the disk array configuration
Use this procedure to view SAS disk array configurations on your server.
To view the configuration of arrays and disks associated with a particular controller, do the following:
1. Start the Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on page 25.
2. Select List IBM SAS Disk Array Configuration.
3. Choose one or more controllers.
The output displayed will be similar to the following:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
|
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas0
FFFFFFFF Primary
PCI-X266 Planar 3 Gb SAS RAID Adapter
|
|
|
|hdisk7
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 5 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk1
00040200 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
| pdisk3
00040900 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
| pdisk4
00040000 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
|
|hdisk8
00FF0100 Rebuilding RAID 6 Array
69.7GB Rebuild 13%
|
| pdisk2
00040800 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
| pdisk7
00040B00 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
| pdisk9
00000A00 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
| pdisk11 00000900 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
|
|hdisk12
00FF0200 Optimal
RAID 0 Array
34.8GB
|
| pdisk5
00040300 Active
Array Member
34.8GB
|
|
|
|hdisk4
00FF0400 Rebuilding RAID 10 Array
69.7GB Create 8%
|
| pdisk0
00040100 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
| pdisk6
00040400 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
|
|
|*unknwn* 00000500 Active
Array Candidate
N/A
|
|pdisk19
00060A00 Failed
Array Candidate
34.8GB
|
|pdisk10
00000B00 Active
Array Candidate
34.8GB Zeroed
|
|pdisk17
00000800 RWProtected Array Candidate
69.7GB Format 8%
|
|pdisk18
00000400 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
|pdisk16
00000600 RWProtected Array Candidate
69.7GB Format 7%
|
|
|
|hdisk0
00040500 Available
SAS Disk Drive
146.8GB
|
|hdisk1
00040700 Available
SAS Disk Drive
146.8GB
|
|hdisk2
00040600 Available
SAS Disk Drive
146.8GB
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
The controller’s name, location, status, and description are displayed first. Each IBM SAS disk array hdisk
is displayed with its Array Member pdisks directly underneath it.
v The first column of output is the name of the disk array (hdisk) or physical disk (pdisk). Note the use
of *unknwn* to identify a device known by the controller but not configured in AIX.
Chapter 3. Common controller and disk array management tasks
29
v The second column of output is the device’s resource location (or simply “Resource”). This value might
also be referred to as the device’s SCSI ID in other parts of AIX software documentation. For more
information on the format of the resource value, see “SAS resource locations” on page 83.
v The third column of the preceding screen is the state of the disk array or pdisk. For information about
the possible disk array and pdisk states, see “Disk arrays” on page 10. For 512 byte/sector standalone
disks (hdisks), this column is the AIX device state (for example, Available or Defined).
v The fourth column is a description of the device. For a disk array, the description is the RAID level of
the array. For a pdisk, the description can be Array Candidate, Hot Spare, or Array Member.
v The fifth column is the capacity of the array or disk. For information about how the capacity of an
array is calculated for each RAID level, see “Disk array capacities” on page 15.
v The sixth column is the status of a long-running command issued to a disk array or pdisk. This
column is also used to indicate that an Array Candidate pdisk has had its data zeroed. If there is a
long-running command in progress, the percentage complete will be displayed after the command. The
following values might be displayed (where nn% is the command percentage complete):
Create nn%
Disk array is in process of being created.
Delete nn%
Disk array is in process of being deleted.
Rebuild nn%
Disk array is in process of being reconstructed.
Resync nn%
Disk array is in process of having it parity data resynchronized.
Adding nn%
Disk array is in process of having one or more disks added to it.
Format nn%
pdisk is in process of being formatted.
Zeroed
pdisk has been zeroed.
Array Candidate pdisks and Hot Spare pdisks are displayed at the bottom of this screen. The pdisk
names are displayed, along with location, state, description, capacity, and long-running command status.
Any 512 bytes per sector stand-alone disks (hdisks) are displayed, along with location, state, description,
and capacity.
Deleting a disk array
To preserve the data on the disk array, you must first back up all files in the logical volumes and file
systems on the disk array before removing the disk array from its volume group.
Attention: After a disk array is deleted, it cannot be accessed. All data will be lost. A disk array that is
currently in use or opened cannot be deleted. Also, if a disk array command (such as a disk creation
command) is in progress, that disk array cannot be deleted.
To delete the array, do the following:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Delete a IBM SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
4. Select the disk array to delete.
30
When the disk array has been deleted, any Active Array Member pdisks will become Active Array
Candidate pdisks.
Adding disks to an existing disk array
The controller supports adding disks to existing RAID level 5 or 6 disk arrays, which allows you to
dynamically increase the capacity of a disk array while preserving its existing data.
After you add disks to an existing disk array, they are protected and become part of the disk array but
will not contain parity and the data will not be restriped. Use of this feature, however, will result in a
performance penalty. The first part of the performance penalty exists because not all the drives in the
array contain parity and therefore the drives with parity are accessed more often for parity updates. The
second part of the performance penalty comes from the data not being restriped and therefore reducing
the ability to use the hardware assisted stripe write features.
An Array Candidate pdisk is not necessarily a candidate that can be added to an existing array. In
addition to being an Array Candidate, the pdisk must also be recognized by the adapter as having its
data zeroed. This situation ensures that when the disks are added to the array, the parity data will be
correct and the array will remain protected against disk failures.
To add disks to an existing array, do the following:
1. Ensure that the disks to be added are Zeroed Array Candidate pdisks. For assistance in viewing and
changing the state of the disk, see “Preparing disks for use in SAS disk arrays” on page 26 and
“Viewing the disk array configuration” on page 29.
2. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
3. Select Add Disks to an Existing SAS Disk Array.
4. Select the IBM SAS Disk Array to which you want to add disks.
A screen will display similar to the following example. If a particular disk is not included in the list, it
might not be a candidate that can be added to the array because of the following reasons:
v The disk’s capacity is less than that of the smallest disk already in the array.
v The disk has not been formatted as a 528 bytes per sector Array Candidate pdisk.
v The disk does not have its data zeroed.
For the second and third cases, the disk can be added to an array if it is first formatted using the
Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors option in the IBM SAS Disk Array
Manager.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Add Disks to an Existing SAS Disk Array
|
| Move cursor to desired item and press F7. Use arrow keys to scroll.
|
|
ONE OR MORE items can be selected.
|
| Press Enter AFTER making all selections.
|
|
|
|
# Choose up to 14 of the following disks to add to hdisk2
|
|
|
|
pdisk16
00000600 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
|
pdisk17
00000800 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
|
pdisk18
00040800 Active
Array Candidate
69.7GB Zeroed
|
|
|
|
# Note: If a disk is not listed here it is either not a candidate
|
|
# to be added to this array or it does not have its data zeroed
|
|
# Use the Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte
|
|
# Sectors option to format and zero the disk.
|
|
|
| F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
|
| F7=Select
F8=Image
F10=Exit
|
| Enter=Do
/=Find
n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Chapter 3. Common controller and disk array management tasks
31
5. Press Enter to add the disks to the array.
To enable higher level components in the system to use the increased capacity of the disk array,
additional steps might be needed.
Using hot spare disks
Hot spare disks are used to automatically replace a disk that has failed in a redundant RAID
environment.
Hot spare disks are useful only if their capacity is greater than or equal to that of the smallest capacity
disk in an array that becomes degraded.
Creating hot spare disks
Follow this procedure to create hot spare disks.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Change/Show SAS pdisk Status.
3. Select Create a Hot Spare.
4. Select the appropriate controller.
5. Select the pdisks that you want to designate as hot spares. A screen summarizes your selections.
6. Press Enter to create the hot spares.
The disk state changes to Hot Spare. On subsequent disk failures, reconstruction of failed disks will occur
automatically for RAID 5, 6, and 10 disk arrays.
Note: If there is a degraded disk array at the time that a hot spare is configured, reconstruction of the
Failed disk begins automatically.
Deleting hot spare disks
Follow this procedure to delete hot spare disks.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Change/Show SAS pdisk Status.
3. Select Delete a Hot Spare.
4. Select the appropriate controller.
5. Select the hot spares to delete. The hot spares become array candidate pdisks.
Viewing IBM SAS disk array settings
This procedure enables you to view SAS disk array attributes and settings.
To view the settings for a IBM SAS Disk Array, do the following:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select the Change/Show Characteristics of a SAS Disk Array option.
3. Select the desired IBM SAS Disk Array.
A SMIT dialog screen displays the attributes of the selected array. The output displayed will be similar to
the following:
32
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show Characteristics of a SAS Disk Array
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| Disk Array
hdisk8
|
| Description
SAS RAID 6 Disk Array
|
| Status
Available
|
| Location
05-08-00
|
| Serial Number
|
| Physical volume identifier
none
|
| Queue DEPTH
16
|
| Size in Megabytes
69797
|
| RAID Level
6
|
| Stripe Size in KB
256
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
v The Physical volume identifier field is a unique value assigned to the hdisk if the disk array is a
member of a volume group. If the disk array is not a member of a volume group, this field value is
none.
v The Queue DEPTH field is the depth of the command queue used for this disk array.
v The Size in Megabytes field represents the usable capacity of the disk array. For information about
calculating capacities for each RAID level, see “Supported RAID levels” on page 12.
v The RAID Level field is the level of protection chosen for this array.
v The Stripe Size in KB field is the number of contiguous kilobytes that will be written to a single disk
before switching to the next disk in the disk array. It provides the host with a method to tune data
striping according to the typical I/O request size.
You cannot change any of the attributes on this screen. The RAID level and stripe size must be specified
when the array is created.
Viewing IBM SAS pdisk settings
This procedure enables you to view SAS pdisk attributes and settings.
To view the SAS pdisk settings, do the following steps:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Change/Show SAS pdisk Status.
3. Select Change/Show SAS pdisk.
4. Select a pdisk from the list.
The following attributes are displayed:
Chapter 3. Common controller and disk array management tasks
33
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS pdisk
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| Disk
pdisk11
|
| Description
Physical SAS Disk Driv> |
| Status
Available
|
| Location
05-08-00
|
| Serial Number
00100DE3
|
| Vendor and Product ID
IBM
HUS151436VLS30> |
| Service Level
|
| Size in Megabytes
34898
|
| Format Timeout in minutes
[180]
+#|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
The Size in Megabytes field represents the capacity of the pdisk.
Viewing pdisk vital product data
You can display a pdisk’s vital product data (VPD).
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Change/Show SAS pdisk Status.
3. Select Display pdisk Vital Product Data.
4. Select the appropriate controller.
5. Select the pdisk that you want to view.
Viewing controller SAS addresses
View SAS addresses (worldwide IDs) associated with each of the controllers ports.
To view the serial-attached SCSI (SAS) addresses for each controller port, complete the following steps:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by following the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager” on
page 25.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select a SAS controller from the list.
For information about the resulting display, see “Controller SAS address attributes.”
Controller SAS address attributes
Interpret the results of viewing the controller SAS addresses.
34
After you perform the procedure described in “Viewing controller SAS addresses” on page 34,
information similar to the following is displayed:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions can appear below.
|
|
|
|Adapter Port
SAS Address
|
|---------------------|
|00
5005076c07447c01
|
|01
5005076c07447c02
|
|02
5005076c07447c03
|
|03
5005076c07447c04
|
|04
5005076c07447c05
|
|05
5005076c07447c06
|
|06
5005076c07447c07
|
|07
5005076c07447c08
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
The SAS address is displayed for each adapter port as if each SAS port were a narrow port (in other
words, the port consists of a single phy). Each SAS cable contains four phys that are typically organized
into either a single 4x SAS wide port or two 2x SAS wide ports.
When using cables that create wide ports, the SAS address for the wide port will be the SAS address of
the lowest-numbered adapter port in the wide port. For example, if the controller depicted in the
preceding screen is connected with a 4x cable such as the AE cable, the SAS address of the controller on
that wide port would be either 5005076c07447c01 or 5005076c07447c05, depending on which connector is
used.
Note: Any single phy in a wide port can fail and might not be included as part of the wide port if the
adapter is reset. This can result in the controller reporting a different SAS address from what was
previously reported.
For example, a 4x wide port that contains ports 0 through 3 could respond to any of the SAS addresses
listed for the adapter port, depending on which phys failed. Therefore, all addresses in the wide port are
considered as possible controller addresses when managing access control using SAS zoning.
AIX command-line interface
Many tasks used to manage the SAS RAID controller can be performed by using the AIX command line
instead of using the SAS Disk Array Manager.
The following table summarizes the commands used in the command line interface.
Table 5. AIX Commands
Task
Command
General Help
sissasraidmgr -h
Viewing the Disk Array Configuration
sissasraidmgr -Ll controller name -j1
Preparing Disks for Use in SAS Disk Arrays
sissasraidmgr -P -z disk list (For example, sissasraidmgr
-P -z hdisk1 hdisk2 pdisk3 pdisk4)
Changing pdisks to hdisks
sissasraidmgr -U -z pdisk list
Chapter 3. Common controller and disk array management tasks
35
Table 5. AIX Commands (continued)
Task
Command
Creating a SAS Disk Array
sissasraidmgr -C -r raid level -s stripe size -z pdisk list
Deleting a SAS Disk Array
sissasraidmgr -D -l controller name -d array name
Adding Disks to an Existing Disk Array
sissasraidmgr -A -l array name -z pdisk list
Creating Hot Spare Disks
sissasraidmgr -H -z pdisk list
Deleting Hot Spare Disks
sissasraidmgr -I -z pdisk list
Displaying Rechargeable Battery Information
sissasraidmgr -M -o0 -l adapter name
Forcing a Rechargeable Battery Error
sissasraidmgr -M -o1 -l adapter name
Recovering from Disk Failures
sissasraidmgr -R -z pdisk list
Viewing the SAS device resource locations
sissasraidmgr -Z –o0 –j3 -l adapter name
Viewing the SAS device resource information
sissasraidmgr -Z –o1 –j3 -l adapter name
Viewing the SAS path information for the attached
device
sissasraidmgr -T –o1 –j3 -l device name
Viewing the SAS path information graphically for the
attached device
sissasraidmgr -T –o0 –j3 -l device name
36
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
You can increase availability using multi-initiator and high availability to connect multiple controllers to a
common set of disk expansion drawers.
The terms multi-initiator and high availability (HA) refer to connecting multiple controllers (typically two
controllers) to a common set of disk expansion drawers for the purpose of increasing availability. This is
commonly done in either of the following configurations:
HA two-system configuration
An HA two-system configuration provides a high-availability environment for system storage by
enabling two systems or partitions to have access to the same set of disks and disk arrays. This
feature is typically used with the IBM PowerHA™ for AIX. The IBM PowerHA for AIX software
provides a commercial computing environment that ensures that mission-critical applications can
recover quickly from hardware and software failures.
The HA two-system configuration is intended for using disk arrays. The disks must be formatted
to 528 bytes per sector. Any RAID level, or combination of RAID levels, can be used.
Use of disks without RAID (referred to as JBOD) is also possible. The disks must be formatted to
512 bytes per sector. This JBOD alternative is supported only on particular controllers and
requires unique setup and cabling. See “Installing an HA two-system JBOD configuration” on
page 55.
HA single-system configuration
An HA single-system configuration provides for redundant controllers from a single system to
the same set of disks and disk arrays. This feature is typically used with multipath I/O (MPIO).
MPIO support is part of AIX and can be used to provide a redundant IBM SAS RAID controller
configuration with RAID protected disks.
When using an HA single-system configuration, the disks must be formatted to 528 bytes per
sector and used in one or more disk array. Any RAID level, or combination of RAID levels, might
be used. Disks formatted to 512 bytes per sector are not supported in an HA single-system
configuration.
Not all controllers support all configurations. See the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards
to look for controllers that have HA two-system RAID, HA two-system JBOD, or HA single-system RAID
marked as Yes for the configuration that you want.
Related concepts
“PCI-X SAS RAID card comparison” on page 1
This table compares the main features of PCI-X SAS RAID cards.
“PCIe SAS RAID card comparison” on page 5
This table compares the main features of PCI Express (PCIe) SAS RAID cards.
Possible HA configurations
Compare RAID and JBOD features as used with single- and two-system HA configurations.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
37
Table 6. SAS RAID and JBOD HA configurations
Multi-initiator configuration
RAID (disks formatted 528 bytes per
sector)
HA two system (for example
PowerHA for AIX)
HA single system (for example
MPIO)
v Maximum of two controllers
v Maximum of two controllers
v Both controllers must have same
write cache capability and write
cache sizes
v Both controllers must have same
write cache capability and write
cache sizes
v Both controllers must support “HA v Both controllers must support “HA
single-system RAID”
two-system RAID”
v Controllers are in different systems v Controllers are in the same system
or partition
or partitions
JBOD (disks formatted 512 bytes per
sector)
v Maximum of two controllers
v Both controllers must support HA
two-system JBOD
v Controllers are in different systems
or partitions
v Requires unique setup and cabling
The following figures illustrate an example of each configuration.
38
v Not supported
Controller functions
Consider these factors when using multi-initiator and HA functions.
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
39
Use of the multi-initiator and HA functions require controller and AIX software support. Controller
support is shown in the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards. Look for controllers that
have HA two-system RAID, HA two-system JBOD, or HA single-system RAID marked as Yes for the
configuration that you want. The AIX software levels required for multi-initiator support are identified in
the AIX software requirements table.
Specific controllers are intended only to be used in either an HA two-system RAID or HA single-system
RAID configuration. Use the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards to look for controllers
that have Requires HA RAID configuration marked as Yes. This type of controller cannot be used in an
HA two-system JBOD or a stand-alone configuration.
Controllers connected in a RAID configuration must have the same write cache size (given they support
write cache). A configuration error will be logged if the controllers’ write caches are not the same size.
When configuring a controller for an HA two-system RAID or HA single-system RAID configuration, no
mode jumpers or special configuration settings are needed. However, when configuring a controller for
an HA two-system JBOD configuration, the Dual Initiator Configuration must be changed to a value of
JBOD HA Single Path.
For all HA RAID configurations, one controller functions as the primary controller. Primary controllers
perform management of the physical devices, such as creating a disk array, downloading SES microcode
and downloading disk microcode. The other controller functions as the secondary and is not capable of
physical device management.
If the secondary controller detects the primary controller going offline, it will switch roles to become the
primary controller. When the original primary controller comes back online, it will become the secondary
controller. The exception to this case is if the original primary controller was previously designated as the
preferred primary controller.
Both controllers are capable of performing direct I/O accesses (read and write operations) to the disk
arrays. At any given time, only one controller in the pair is optimized for the disk array. The controller
optimized for a disk array is the one that directly accesses the physical devices for I/O operations. The
controller that is not optimized for a disk array will forward read and write requests, through the SAS
fabric, to the optimized controller.
The primary controller logs most errors that are related to problems with a disk array. Disk array errors
might also be logged on the secondary controller if a disk array is optimized on the secondary controller
at the time the error occurred.
Typical reasons for the primary and secondary controllers to switch roles from what was expected or
preferred are as follows:
v Controllers will switch roles for asymmetric reasons. For example, one controller detects more disk
drives than the other. If the secondary controller is able to find devices that are not found by the
primary controller, an automatic transition (failover) occurs. The controllers will communicate with
each other, compare device information, and switch roles.
v Powering off the primary controller or the system that contains the primary controller causes an
automatic transition (failover) to occur.
v Failure of primary controller or the system that contains the primary controller causes an automatic
transition (failover) to occur.
v If the preferred primary controller is delayed in becoming active, the other controller assumes the role
of primary controller. After the preferred primary controller becomes active, an automatic transition
(failover) occurs.
v If the primary controller loses contact with the disks that are also accessible by the secondary
controller, an automatic transition (failover) occurs.
40
v Downloading controller microcode might cause an automatic transition (failover) to occur.
For all JBOD configurations, both controllers function only as stand-alone controllers and do not
communicate directly with each other.
Users and their applications are responsible to ensure orderly read and write operations to the shared
disks or disk arrays, for example, by using device reservation commands (persistent reservation is not
supported).
Related concepts
“PCI-X SAS RAID card comparison” on page 1
This table compares the main features of PCI-X SAS RAID cards.
“PCIe SAS RAID card comparison” on page 5
This table compares the main features of PCI Express (PCIe) SAS RAID cards.
“HA access optimization” on page 43
HA access characteristics can balance the controller workload.
Related tasks
“Installing an HA two-system JBOD configuration” on page 55
Use this procedure to help you to install an HA two-system JBOD configuration.
Controller function attributes
Compare important attributes of controller functions.
Table 7. SAS controller functions
HA two-system RAID
configuration
HA two-system JBOD
configuration
HA single-system
RAID configuration
512 bytes per sector disks
supported
No1
Yes
No1
528 bytes per sector disks
supported
Yes
No
Yes
Controller functions
Mirrored write cache between Yes
controllers (for controllers
which have write cache)
Yes
Mirrored RAID parity
Yes
footprints between controllers
Yes
Dual paths to disks
Yes
No
Yes
Target mode initiator device
support
Yes
No
No
Only IBM qualified disk
drives supported
Yes
Yes
Yes
Only IBM qualified disk
expansion drawer supported
Yes
Yes
Yes
Tape or optical devices
supported
No
No
No
Boot support
No
No
2
Yes
3
Primary adapter or
secondary adapter3
Stand-alone adapter
Preferred dual initiator
operating mode2
No preference or primary3
No preference3
No preference or
primary3
Dual initiator configuration2
Default3
JBOD HA single path3
Default3
Operating mode
Primary adapter or
secondary adapter3
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
41
Table 7. SAS controller functions (continued)
Controller functions
Manage HA access
characteristics4
HA two-system RAID
configuration
HA two-system JBOD
configuration
HA single-system
RAID configuration
Yes
No
Yes
1. 512 bytes per sector disks are not to be used functionally, but will be available to be formatted to 528 bytes per
sector.
2. Can be viewed by using the Change/Show SAS Controller screen.
3. This option can be set by using the Change/Show SAS Controller screen.
4. For information on managing the HA access characteristics for a disk array, see “HA access optimization” on
page 43.
Viewing HA controller attributes
For HA configuration-related information, use the Change/Show SAS Controller screen.
1. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
4. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller. The screen displayed will look similar to the following example.
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS Controller
|
|
|
| Type or select values in entry fields.
|
| Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
|
SAS adapter
sissas2
|
|
Description
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3> |
|
Status
Available
|
|
Location
06-00
|
|
Operating mode
Primary Adapter
+ |
|
Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode
No Preference
+ |
|
Preferred HA Access State Setting
Preserve
+ |
|
Dual Initiator Configuration
Default
|
|
Serial Number
YL3126327310
|
|
World Wide ID
5005076c0702bf00
|
|
Remote HA Link Operational
Yes
|
|
Remote HA Serial Number
07127001
|
|
Remote HA World Wide ID
5005076c0702f600
|
|
Remote AWC Link Operational
No
|
|
Remote AWC Serial Number
|
|
Remote AWC World Wide ID
|
|
|
|
|
| F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
| F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
| F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Note: For additional details on how to set up a configuration, see “Installing an HA single-system
RAID configuration” on page 48 or “Installing an HA two-system JBOD configuration” on page 55.
HA cabling considerations
There are different types of cables to consider with high availability.
42
Correct cabling is one of the most important aspects of planning for a multi-initiator and HA
configuration. For RAID configurations with disk expansion drawers, using X cables provides the
redundancy of two wide SAS ports between each controller and the disk expansion drawer, along with
two narrow SAS ports for each disk drive. For RAID configurations with internal SAS disk slots, using
YR cables provides the redundancy of two narrow SAS ports between each controller and the internal
disk enclosure, along with two narrow SAS ports for each disk drive. For JBOD configurations, using AE
cables provides one wide SAS port between each controller and the disk expansion drawer, along with
one narrow SAS port for each disk drive. Thus there is better SAS fabric redundancy for RAID
configurations versus JBOD configurations.
To see examples of how to cable HA configurations, refer to the section entitled Serial attached SCSI cable
planning. Look for the following sections for examples of how to cable HA configurations:
v Two SAS adapters to disk expansion drawer – RAID
v Two SAS adapters to disk expansion drawer – JBOD
HA performance considerations
Controller failures can impact performance.
The controller is designed to minimize performance impacts when running in an HA configuration. When
using RAID 5, 6, and 10, parity footprints are mirrored between the controller’s nonvolatile memory,
which causes only a slight impact to performance. For controllers with write cache, all cache data is
mirrored between the controller’s nonvolatile memories, which also causes only a slight impact to
performance.
If one controller fails in an HA configuration, the remaining controller will disable write caching and
begin to keep an additional copy of parity footprints on disk. This can significantly impact performance,
particularly when using RAID 5 and RAID 6.
HA access optimization
HA access characteristics can balance the controller workload.
Important: Update each controller to the latest SAS controller microcode from the code download Web
site. See Updating the SAS RAID controller microcode. This update must be performed to obtain the
latest, critical fixes to ensure correct operation.
With either of the HA RAID configurations, maximum performance might be achieved by defining HA
access characteristics for each disk array such that the workload is balanced between the two controllers.
Setting the HA access characteristics for a disk array specifies which controller is preferred to be
optimized for the disk array and perform direct read and write operations to the physical devices.
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
43
Figure 17. HA access optimization
View the HA access characteristics by completing the following steps.
1. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25
2. Select Manage HA Access Characteristics of a SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID controller.
HA access characteristics are displayed on the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager screen, similar to the
following screen.
44
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
IBM SAS Disk Array Manager
|
|
|
|Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
|
|
|
| List SAS Disk Array Configuration
|
| Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors
|
| Create a SAS Disk Array
|
| Delete a SAS Disk Array
|
| Add Disks to an Existing SAS Disk Array
|
| Migrate an Existing SAS Disk Array to a New RAID Level
|
| Configure a Defined SAS Disk Array
|
| +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
| |
HA Access Characteristics of a SAS Disk Array
| |
| |
|
|
| | Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
| |
| |
|
|
| |
hdisk3
Current=Optimized
Preferred=Non Optimized
| |
| |
hdisk4
Current=Non Optimized
Preferred=Non Optimized
| |
| |
hdisk5
Current=Optimized
Preferred=Optimized
| |
| |
hdisk6
Current=Optimized
Preferred=Optimized
| |
| |
|
|
| | F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
| |
| | F8=Image
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
| |
|F1| /=Find
n=Find Next
| |
|F9+--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
This display shows the HA access characteristics for the disk arrays with respect to the controller that
was selected. For each disk array listed, the current and preferred HA access characteristics are indicated.
The current value shows how the disk array is currently accessed from the controller that was selected.
The preferred value is the desired access state that is saved with the disk array configuration. Selecting
the remote controller would show the opposite settings for the current and preferred access states.
The following access state settings are valid.
Optimized
The selected controller performs direct access for this disk array. This gives I/O operations that
are performed on selected controller optimized performance compared to the remote controller.
Non Optimized
The selected controller performs indirect access for this disk array. This gives I/O operations that
are performed on selected controller nonoptimized performance compared to the remote
controller.
Cleared
Neither an Optimized nor Non Optimized access state has been set for this disk array. By default
the disk array is optimized on the primary controller.
The HA access characteristic can be displayed on either the primary or secondary controller. However, as
with all other disk array management, the HA access characteristics can only be changed from the
primary controller. Setting the preferred HA access characteristic is accomplished by selecting one of the
disk arrays. This will bring up the Change/Show HA Access Characteristics of a SAS Disk Array screen.
The Preferred Access state can be changed when the disk array is selected from the primary controller.
The Preferred Access state cannot be changed if the disk array is selected from the secondary controller.
If this is attempted, an error message is displayed. Changing the Preferred Access state from the primary
controller stores the settings in the disk array and automatically shows the opposite settings when
viewed from the secondary controller.
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
45
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show HA Access Characteristics of a SAS Disk Array
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| Disk Array
hdisk4
|
| Controller
sissas0
|
| Current Access
Optimized
|
| Preferred Access
Cleared
+ |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
The controller always tries to switch the Current® Access state of the disk array to match the Preferred
Access state. This switching is done in the background by the controller; therefore, you might experience
delays between setting the Preferred Access state and seeing Current Access state switch. Situations in
which the controller does not switch HA access characteristics involve configuration errors, failed
components, and certain RAID configuration activities.
By default all disk arrays are created with a Preferred Access state of Cleared. To maximize performance,
when appropriate, create multiple disk arrays and optimize them equally between the controller pair.
This is accomplished by setting the Preferred Access to Optimized for half of the disk arrays and Non
Optimized to the other half.
The HA access characteristics can also be altered by the Preferred HA Access State Setting in the
Change/Show SAS RAID controller screen. This field gives the option to either Preserve or Clear the
Preferred Access settings for all disk arrays on the controller pair.
HA access characteristics within List SAS Disk Array Configuration
You can view the current and preferred access states in the Description column for the disk arrays.
The List SAS Disk Array Configuration option in the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager will display the
current and preferred access states in the Description column for the disk arrays. The current and
preferred access states will be displayed after the description of the disk array (similar to the display HA
access optimization) where the entries in the two descriptive columns indicate O for Optimized and N
for Non Optimized. The following sample output is displayed when the List SAS Disk Array
Configuration option is selected.
Note: The HA access characteristics are only displayed for disk arrays with a Preferred Access state
other than Cleared. Disk arrays with a Cleared Preferred Access state, by default, are optimized on the
primary adapter.
46
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions can appear below.
|
|
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas1
FFFFFFFF Secondary
PCIe x8 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS RAID Adapter |
|tmscsi0
00FE0000 HA Linked
Remote adapter SN 081630F1
|
|
|
|hdisk3
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 5 Array (O/N)
139.5GB
|
| pdisk4
00000000 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk5
00000200 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk7
00000400 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|hdisk4
00FF0100 Optimal
RAID 6 Array (N/N)
139.5GB
|
| pdisk13 00000100 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk6
00000300 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk8
00000500 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk14 00000700 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|hdisk5
00FF0200 Optimal
RAID 10 Array (O/O)
139.5GB
|
| pdisk9
00000600 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk11 00000900 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|hdisk6
00FF0700 Optimal
RAID 0 Array (O/O)
69.7GB
|
| pdisk12 00000B00 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Related tasks
“Viewing the disk array configuration” on page 29
Use this procedure to view SAS disk array configurations on your server.
Configuration and serviceability considerations for HA RAID
configurations
There are configuration and serviceability differences between the primary and secondary controllers.
There are configuration and serviceability differences between the primary controller (which performs
direct management of the physical devices) and the secondary controller (which runs as a client of the
primary controller). This functional difference requires many of the configuration and serviceability
functions to be performed on the primary controller because it is the only controller with that can
perform the commands. Attempting these commands on a secondary controller is not recommended and
might return unexpected results.
The following are common System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) tasks within the IBM SAS Disk
Array Manager that must be performed from the primary controller:
v Under the SMIT menu option titled IBM SAS Disk Array Manager:
– Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors
– Create a SAS Disk Array
– Delete a SAS Disk Array
– Add Disks to an Existing SAS Disk Array
– Reconstruct a SAS Disk Array
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
47
v Under the SMIT menu option titled Change/Show SAS pdisk Status:
– Create a Hot Spare
– Delete a Hot Spare
– Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors
– Delete an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 512 Byte Sectors
v Under the SMIT menu option titled Diagnostics and Recovery Options:
– Certify Physical Disk Media
– Download Microcode to a Physical Disk
– Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk)
– SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager
– Reclaim Controller Cache Storage
v Under the SMIT menu option titled Show SAS Controller Physical Resources:
– Show Fabric Path Graphical View
– Show Fabric Path Data View
Perform other SMIT functions not listed in the preceding lists (for example, Controller Rechargeable
Battery Maintenance) on the appropriate controller.
Installing high availability
Use the procedures in this section when performing HA installations.
Installation procedures are described for an HA two-system RAID configuration, an HA single-system
RAID configuration, and an HA two-system JBOD configuration.
Installing an HA single-system RAID configuration
Use this procedure to help you to install an HA single-system RAID configuration.
To avoid problems during installation, follow the steps exactly as written.
Attention: Disk Arrays can be created either before or after the HA RAID configuration is set up. See
“Configuration and serviceability considerations for HA RAID configurations” on page 47 for important
considerations.
1. Install and update the AIX SAS controller package on each system or partition. See Chapter 2,
“Controller software,” on page 23 for more information.
Attention: If you believe the controller might have been used in a JBOD HA Single Path Dual
Initiator configuration, do not attach cables in any HA RAID configuration. Disconnect all cables and
change the controller’s Dual Initiator Configuration to Default before using the controller in an HA
RAID configuration.
2. Install the SAS controllers into the system or partition. Do not attach any cables to the SAS controllers
at this time.
3. Update each controller to the latest SAS controller microcode from the code download Web site. See
“Updating the SAS RAID controller microcode” on page 59.
4. To prevent errors while connecting the cables, unconfigure the SAS controller on each system or
partition:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available SAS RAID controller.
48
Note: In some environments, it might not be possible to unconfigure the controllers. To perform
an error-free installation in these environments, perform a normal shutdown of the system or
partition before you attach the cables.
5. Attach an X cable from the shared disk expansion drawer to the same SAS connector on each
controller. To see examples of how to cable the HA configurations, see Serial attached SCSI cable
planning.
6. Configure the SAS controllers (or power on system or partition if powered off earlier):
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined SAS RAID controller.
7. Verify that the cabling and functioning of the controllers are correct by using the Change/Show SAS
Controller screen. Each controller should show an operational Remote HA Link to the other SAS
controller. View the HA RAID link status by using the Change/Show SAS Controller screen:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
d. Select the desired IBM SAS controller. The Change/Show SAS Controller information screen
displays information similar to the following examples:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS Controller
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| SAS adapter
sissas0
|
| Description
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3> |
| Status
Available
|
| Location
0E-08
|
| Operating mode
Primary Adapter
|
| Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode
No Preference
|
| Dual Initiator Configuration
Default
|
| Serial Number
YL3027093770
|
| World Wide ID
5005076c07040200
|
| Remote HA Link Operational
Yes
|
| Remote HA Serial Number
07199172
|
| Remote HA World Wide ID
5005076c07079300
|
| Remote AWC Link Operational
|
| Remote AWC Serial Number
|
| Remote AWC World Wide ID
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
49
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS Controller
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| SAS adapter
sissas0
|
| Description
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3> |
| Status
Available
|
| Location
03-08
|
| Operating mode
Secondary Adapter
|
| Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode
No Preference
|
| Dual Initiator Configuration
Default
|
| Serial Number
YL3027199172
|
| World Wide ID
5005076c07079300
|
| Remote HA Link Operational
Yes
|
| Remote HA Serial Number
07093770
|
| Remote HA World Wide ID
5005076c07040200
|
| Remote AWC Link Operational
|
| Remote AWC Serial Number
|
| Remote AWC World Wide ID
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
A summarized version of the link status information is available from the List SAS Disk Array
Configuration output from the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions can appear below.
|
|
|
|[TOP]
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas0
FFFFFFFF Primary
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Adapter
|
| sissas1 FFFFFFFF HA Linked
Remote adapter SN 07199172
|
|
|
|hdisk2
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 0 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk4
00000400 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
|
|
|hdisk3
00FF0100 Optimal
RAID 10 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk1
00000100 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
| pdisk5
00000800 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
|
|
|[MORE...17]
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
50
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions can appear below.
|
|
|
|[TOP]
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas1
FFFFFFFF Secondary
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Adapter
|
| sissas0 FFFFFFFF HA Linked
Remote adapter SN 07093770
|
|
|
|hdisk0
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 0 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk7
00000400 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|hdisk1
00FF0100 Optimal
RAID 10 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk4
00000100 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk12 00000800 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|[MORE...17]
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
8. Optional: Set the Preferred Primary mode. You might want to configure one of the controllers in the
HA single-system RAID configuration to be the Preferred Primary controller. This can be done for
performance and usability reasons such as disk configuration changes. If neither controller is
configured as the Preferred Primary controller, the controllers will default to primary or secondary
through a negotiation process during boot.
Things to consider when determining the Preferred Primary controller:
v Because all disk array access must go through the primary controller, performance will be better for
disk I/O operations from the system or partition containing the primary controller.
v All disk array configuration changes must be done on the system or partition containing the
primary controller.
v Most disk service including error log analysis will be performed from the system or partition
containing the primary controller. However, errors might also be presented by the secondary
controller that might require actions on the system or partition containing the secondary controller.
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
d. Select the desired IBM SAS controller.
e. Select Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode and choose Primary Adapter.
Installing an HA two-system RAID configuration
Use this procedure to help you to install an HA two-system RAID configuration.
To avoid problems during installation, follow the steps exactly as written.
Attention: Disk arrays can be created either before or after the HA RAID configuration is set up. See
“Configuration and serviceability considerations for HA RAID configurations” on page 47 and “Functions
requiring special attention in an HA two-system RAID configuration” on page 55 for important
considerations.
1. Install and update the AIX SAS controller package on each system or partition. See Chapter 2,
“Controller software,” on page 23 for more information.
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
51
Attention: If you believe the controller might have been used in an HA Two-System JBOD
configuration, do not attach cables in any HA RAID configuration. Disconnect all cables and change
the controller’s Dual Initiator Configuration to Default before using the controller in an HA RAID
configuration.
2. Install the SAS controllers into the system or partition. Do not attach any cables to the SAS controllers
at this time.
3. Update each controller to the latest SAS controller microcode from the code download Web site. See
“Updating the SAS RAID controller microcode” on page 59.
4. To prevent errors while connecting the cables, unconfigure the SAS controller on each system or
partition:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available SAS RAID controller.
Note: In some environments, it might not be possible to unconfigure the controllers. To perform
an error-free installation in these environments, perform a normal shutdown of the system or
partition before you attach the cables.
5. Attach an X cable from the shared disk expansion drawer to the same SAS connector on each
controller. To see examples of how to cable HA configurations, see Serial attached SCSI cable
planning.
6. Configure the SAS controllers, or power on the system or partition if it was powered off earlier:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined SAS RAID controller.
7. View the HA RAID link status (to verify that the cabling and functioning of the controllers are correct)
by using the Change/Show SAS Controller screen. Each system or partition should show an
operational Remote HA Link to the other SAS controller in the remote system or partition.
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
d. Select the IBM SAS controller that you want. The Change/Show SAS Controller screen displays
information similar to the following examples:
52
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS Controller
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| SAS adapter
sissas0
|
| Description
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3> |
| Status
Available
|
| Location
0E-08
|
| Operating mode
Primary Adapter
|
| Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode
No Preference
|
| Dual Initiator Configuration
Default
|
| Serial Number
YL3027093770
|
| World Wide ID
5005076c07040200
|
| Remote HA Link Operational
Yes
|
| Remote HA Serial Number
07199172
|
| Remote HA World Wide ID
5005076c07079300
|
| Remote AWC Link Operational
|
| Remote AWC Serial Number
|
| Remote AWC World Wide ID
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS Controller
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| SAS adapter
sissas0
|
| Description
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3> |
| Status
Available
|
| Location
03-08
|
| Operating mode
Secondary Adapter
|
| Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode
No Preference
|
| Dual Initiator Configuration
Default
|
| Serial Number
YL3027199172
|
| World Wide ID
5005076c07079300
|
| Remote HA Link Operational
Yes
|
| Remote HA Serial Number
07093770
|
| Remote HA World Wide ID
5005076c07040200
|
| Remote AWC Link Operational
|
| Remote AWC Serial Number
|
| Remote AWC World Wide ID
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
A summarized version of the link status information is available from the List SAS Disk Array
Configuration output from the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager:
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
53
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|[TOP]
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas0
FFFFFFFF Primary
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Adapter
|
| tmscsi0 00FE0000 HA Linked
Remote adapter SN 07199172
|
|
|
|hdisk2
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 0 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk4
00000400 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
|
|
|hdisk3
00FF0100 Optimal
RAID 10 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk1
00000100 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
| pdisk5
00000800 Active
Array Member
69.7GB
|
|
|
|[MORE...17]
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|[TOP]
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource State
Description
Size
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas0
FFFFFFFF Secondary
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3 Gb SAS Adapter
|
| tmscsi0 00FE0000 HA Linked
Remote adapter SN 07093770
|
|
|
|hdisk0
00FF0000 Optimal
RAID 0 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk7
00000400 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|hdisk1
00FF0100 Optimal
RAID 10 Array
69.7GB
|
| pdisk4
00000100 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
| pdisk12 00000800 Unknown
Array Member
N/A
|
|
|
|[MORE...17]
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
8. Optional: Configure one of the controllers in the HA two-system RAID configuration to be the
Preferred Primary controller. This might be done for performance and usability reasons such as disk
configuration changes. If neither controller is configured as the Preferred Primary controller, the
controllers will default to primary or secondary through a negotiation process during boot.
Things to consider when determining the Preferred Primary controller:
v Because all disk array access must go through the primary controller, performance will be better for
disk I/O operations from the system or partition containing the primary controller.
v All disk array configuration changes must be done on the system or partition containing the
primary controller.
54
v Most disk service including error log analysis will be performed from the system or partition
containing the primary controller. However, errors might also be presented by the secondary
controller that might require actions on the system or partition containing the secondary controller.
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
d. Select the desired IBM SAS controller.
e. Select Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode and choose Primary Adapter.
Functions requiring special attention in an HA two-system RAID
configuration
Manual intervention might be required on the system or partition containing secondary controller to get
visibility to the new configuration.
Many configuration and serviceability functions need to be performed on the system or partition
containing the primary controller. Any functions performed on the system or partition containing the
primary controller might also require some manual intervention on the system or partition containing
secondary controller to get visibility to the new configuration.
The following table lists some of the common functions and the required steps to perform on the
secondary controller:
Table 8. Configuration steps for the secondary controller
Function performed on primary controller
Required configuration on secondary controller
Create pdisk (Format to 528 Byte Sectors)
If device was previously a JBOD hdisk: rmdev –dl hdiskX
Then configure new pdisk device: cfgmgr –l sissasX
Delete pdisk (Format to 512 Byte Sectors)
Remove pdisk device: rmdev –dl pdiskX
Then configure new hdisk device: cfgmgr –l sissasX
Create Disk Array
Configure new hdisk device: cfgmgr –l sissasX
Delete Disk Array
Remove array hdisk device: rmdev –dl hdiskX
Add disks to Disk Array
No configuration steps needed
Reconstruct Disk Array
No configuration steps needed
Create/Delete Hot Spare disk
No configuration steps needed
Add disk (Hot Plug Manager)
Configure new disk device: cfgmgr –l sissasX
Remove disk (Hot Plug Manager)
Remove disk device: rmdev –dl pdiskX
Reclaim Controller Cache Storage
No configuration steps needed
Installing an HA two-system JBOD configuration
Use this procedure to help you to install an HA two-system JBOD configuration.
To avoid problems during installation, follow the steps exactly as written.
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
55
Attention:
1. Consider using an HA RAID configuration rather than an HA JBOD configuration due to the
increased redundancy, performance, and reliability provided by the RAID subsystem.
2. Both controllers must have the Dual Initiator Configuration option set to JBOD HA Single Path
before being connected to the disk drives, all of the disk drives must be formatted to JBOD (512 bytes
per sector) format, and the correct cabling must be used. Remove any devices from the disk expansion
drawer that are not set to JBOD or reformat them to JBOD 512 bytes per sector.
3. It is normal for errors to be logged when updating SAS expander microcode due to the fact that there
is only a single path to the expander in this configuration.
1. Install and update the AIX SAS controller package on each system or partition. See Chapter 2,
“Controller software,” on page 23 for more information.
2. Install the SAS controllers into the system or partition. Do not attach any cables to the SAS controllers
at this time.
3. Update each controller to the latest SAS controller microcode from the code download Web site. See
“Updating the SAS RAID controller microcode” on page 59.
4. Set the Dual Initiator Configuration mode. Before connecting the AE cables to either controller, change
the Dual Initiator Configuration to JBOD HA Single Path on each controller in each system.
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
d. Select the IBM SAS controller you want.
e. Select Dual Initiator Configuration and choose JBOD HA Single Path.
5. To prevent errors while connecting the cables, unconfigure the SAS controller on each system or
partition:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available SAS RAID controller.
Note: In some environments, it might not be possible to unconfigure the controllers. To perform
an error-free installation in these environments, perform a normal shutdown of the system or
partition before you attach the cables.
6. Attach an AE cable from the shared disk expansion drawer to the same SAS connector on each
controller. To see examples of how to cable the HA configurations, see Serial attached SCSI cable
planning.
7. Configure the SAS controllers, or power on system or partition if powered off earlier:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined SAS RAID controller.
8. Verify that the cabling and functioning of the controllers are correct by using the Change/Show SAS
Controller information screen. Each system or partition should show the SAS controller in an
Operating Mode of Standalone and a Dual Initiator Configuration of JBOD HA Single Path.
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Change/Show SAS RAID controller.
56
d. Select the IBM SAS controller that you want. The Change/Show SAS Controller screen displays
information similar to the following example:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Change/Show SAS Controller
|
|
|
|Type or select values in entry fields.
|
|Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
|
|
|
|
[Entry Fields]
|
| SAS adapter
sissas0
|
| Description
PCI-X266 Ext Dual-x4 3> |
| Status
Available
|
| Location
04-08
|
| Operating mode
Standalone Adapter
|
| Preferred Dual Initiator Operating mode
No Preference
+ |
| Dual Initiator Configuration
JBOD HA Single Path
+ |
| Serial Number
YL3087087597
|
| World Wide ID
5005076c0703e900
|
| Remote HA Link Operational
No
|
| Remote HA Serial Number
|
| Remote HA World Wide ID
|
| Remote AWC Link Operational
|
| Remote AWC Serial Number
|
| Remote AWC World Wide ID
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F4=List
|
|F5=Reset
F6=Command
F7=Edit
F8=Image
|
|F9=Shell
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Chapter 4. Multi-initiator and high availability
57
58
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
Ensure optimal performance of your controller by using these maintenance procedures.
To help avoid controller and disk array problems, use the following tips:
v Always perform a normal system shutdown before physically replacing or moving the RAID controller
or members of disk arrays. A normal shutdown of the system will flush the controller’s write cache
and remove dependencies between the controller and the pdisks. Unconfiguring the controller by using
the rmdev command (for example, rmdev -Rl sissas3) has the same effect as it would on a single
controller when the system shutdown command is used.
Note: pdisks that are a Failed member of a Degraded disk array can be replaced and the disk array
reconstructed while the system continues to run. No system shutdown is required.
v You can physically move pdisks from one controller to another. However, if the pdisks are members of
a disk array, be sure to move all the disks in the array as a group. Prior to attempting a disk
movement, ensure that the disk array is not in a Degraded state because of a disk failure, and the
controllers are unconfigured.
v When physically removing pdisks that are members of a disk array and there is no need to preserve
data and no intent to use the disk array again, delete the disk array before removing the disks. This
action avoids disk-array-related problems the next time that these disks are used.
v Always use the SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager to remove and replace a pdisk. For
instructions on how to remove and replace a disk, see “Replacing pdisks” on page 75.
v If a disk array is being used as a boot device and the system fails to boot because of a suspected disk
array problem, boot using the Standalone Diagnostic media. Error Log Analysis, AIX error logs, the
IBM SAS Disk Array Manager, and other tools are available on the Standalone Diagnostics media to
help determine and resolve the problem with the disk array.
v Do not attempt to correct problems by swapping controllers and disks unless you are directed to do so
by the service procedures. Use Error Log Analysis to determine what actions to perform, and when
appropriate, follow the appropriate MAPs for problem determination. If multiple errors occur at
approximately the same time, look at them as a whole to determine if there is a common cause. For
additional information regarding problem determination, see Problem Determination and Recovery.
v Do not confuse the cache directory card, which is a small rectangular card with round, button-shaped
batteries, for a removable cache card. The nonvolatile write cache memory is integrated into the
controller. The write cache memory itself is battery-backed by the large, rechargeable cache battery
pack. The cache directory card contains only a secondary copy of the write cache directory and no
cache data. Do not remove this card except under very specific recovery cases as described in the
Maintenance Analysis Procedures (MAPs).
v Do not unplug or exchange a cache battery pack without following the procedures as outlined in this
section or in the MAPs. Failure to follow these procedures might result in data loss.
v When invoking diagnostic routines for a controller, use the Problem Determination (PD) mode instead
of System Verification (SV) mode unless there is a specific reason to use SV mode (for example, you
were directed to run SV mode by a MAP).
v After diagnostic routines for a controller are run in SV mode, run diagnostics in PD mode to ensure
that new errors are analyzed. These actions should be performed especially when using Standalone
Diagnostic media.
Updating the SAS RAID controller microcode
Determine if you need to update your SAS RAID controller microcode, then download and install the
updates.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
59
To determine if an update is needed for your controller, follow the directions at Microcode downloads. If
updates are needed, download instructions are also located at that Web address.
To
1.
2.
3.
install the update to a controller, do the following steps:
Type smit and press Enter.
Select Devices.
Select Disk Array.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Select IBM SAS Disk Array.
Select Download Microcode to a SAS Controller.
Select the controller that you want.
Follow the instructions to complete the update.
Changing pdisks to hdisks
To change array candidate pdisks (528 bytes per sector) to standalone hdisks (512 bytes/sector), you must
delete and format the pdisks.
Note: You cannot change pdisks that are members of a disk array or are hot spares to standalone hdisks.
To change the pdisks to standalone hdisks, do the following:
1. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps in “Using the Disk Array Manager”
on page 25.
2. Select Change/Show SAS pdisk Status.
3. Select Delete an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 512 Byte Sectors.
4. Select the appropriate SAS RAID controller.
5. Select the 528 bytes/sector pdisks to be formatted to 512 bytes per sector standalone hdisks.
Attention: Continuing with this option will format the disks. All data on the disks will be lost.
When the format is completed, the pdisk will be deleted and replaced by an hdisk.
Rechargeable battery maintenance
Rechargeable battery maintenance tasks include displaying rechargeable battery information, forcing a
rechargeable battery error, and replacing the rechargeable cache battery pack.
Attention: These procedures should only be performed if directed from an isolation procedure or a
maintenance analysis procedure (MAP).
Displaying rechargeable battery information
Use this procedure to display information about the controller’s rechargeable battery.
1. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Controller Rechargeable Battery Maintenance.
4. Select Display Controller Rechargeable Battery Information.
5. Select the controller. The screen displayed will look similar to the following Command Status screen.
60
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions may appear below.
|
|
|
|RAID Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . : sissas0
|
|Battery Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . : Lithium Ion (LiIon)
|
|Battery State . . . . . . . . . . . . . : No battery warning/error
|
|Power-on time (days) . . . . . . . . . : 139
|
|Adjusted power-on time (days) . . . . . : 152
|
|Estimated time to warning (days) . . . : 751
|
|Estimated time to error (days) . . . . : 834
|
|Concurrently maintainable battery pack. : Yes
|
|Battery pack can be safely replaced . . : No
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
The following are the fields displayed on the rechargeable battery information screen:
RAID Adapter
The name of the selected controller.
Battery Type
The type of rechargeable cache battery pack.
Battery State
Indicates if an error condition currently exists related to the rechargeable cache battery pack.
The possible values for this field are:
No battery warning/error
No warning or error condition currently exists.
Warning condition
A warning condition currently exists and an error has been logged.
Error condition
An error condition currently exists and an error has been logged.
Unknown
Information is not available to determine whether a warning or error condition
currently exists.
Power-on time (days)
Indicates the raw power-on time, in units of days, of the rechargeable cache battery pack.
Adjusted power-on time (days)
Indicates the adjusted (prorated) power-on time, in units of days, of the rechargeable cache
battery pack.
Note: Some rechargeable cache battery packs are negatively affected by higher temperatures
and thus are prorated based on the amount of time that they spend at various ambient
temperatures.
Estimated time to warning (days)
Estimated time, in units of days, until a message is issued indicating that the replacement of
the rechargeable cache battery pack should be scheduled.
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
61
Estimated time to error (days)
Estimated time, in units of days, until an error is reported indicating that the rechargeable
cache battery pack must be replaced.
Concurrently maintainable battery pack
Indicates if the rechargeable cache battery pack can be replaced while the controller continues
to operate.
Battery pack can be safely replaced
Indicates if the controller’s write cache has been disabled and the rechargeable cache battery
pack can be safely replaced.
Error state
The cache battery pack should be in an error state before you replace it.
To prevent possible data loss, ensure that the cache battery pack is in an error state before replacing it.
This will ensure all cache data is written to disk before battery replacement. Forcing the battery error will
result in the following:
v The system logs an error.
v Data caching becomes disabled on the selected controller.
v System performance could become significantly degraded until the cache battery pack is replaced on
the selected controller.
v The Battery pack can be safely replaced field on the controller rechargeable battery information screen
indicates Yes.
v Cache data present LED stops flashing.
This error state requires replacement of the cache battery. Ensure that you have the correct type and
quantity of cache battery packs to do the replacement. To resume normal operations, replace the cache
battery pack.
The cache battery pack for the 572F storage I/O adapter and the 575C auxiliary cache adapter is
contained in a single battery field replacement unit (FRU) that is physically located on the 575C auxiliary
cache adapter. The functions of forcing a battery pack error and starting the adapter cache on either
adapter in the card set results in the same function automatically being performed on the other adapter
in the card set.
Forcing a rechargeable battery error
Use this procedure to place the controller’s rechargeable battery into an error state.
1. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps found in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Controller Rechargeable Battery Maintenance.
4. Select Force Controller Rechargeable Battery Error.
5. Select the controller whose battery you want to replace.
Note: Using this option places the battery into the error state, which requires it to be replaced.
6. Press Enter.
7. Determine that it is safe to replace the cache battery pack. Refer to “Displaying rechargeable battery
information” on page 60. When Yes is displayed next to Battery pack can be safely replaced, it is safe
to replace the cache battery pack. You might need to redisplay the rechargeable battery information
multiple times as it could take several minutes before it is safe to replace the cache battery pack.
8. Verify that the cache data present light emitting diode (LED) is no longer flashing before replacing the
cache battery pack as described in “Replacing a battery pack” on page 63. See the feature comparison
62
tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards and the figures in the replacement procedures in this section to
determine if your adapter has a cache data present LED and the LED’s location.
Replacing a battery pack
Follow these guidelines before replacing your battery pack.
Note: When replacing the cache battery pack, the battery must be disconnected for at least 60 seconds
before connecting the new battery. This is the minimum amount of time needed for the card to recognize
that the battery has been replaced.
Note: The battery is a lithium ion battery. To avoid possible explosion, do not burn. Exchange only with
the IBM-approved part. Recycle or discard the battery as instructed by local regulations. In the United
States, IBM has a process for the collection of this battery. For information, call 1-800-426-4333. Have the
IBM part number for the battery unit available when you call.
Attention: To prevent data loss, if the cache battery pack is not already in the error state, follow the
steps described in “Forcing a rechargeable battery error” on page 62 before proceeding. If the cache data
present LED is flashing, do not replace the cache battery pack or data will be lost. See the feature
comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards and the following information to determine whether your
adapter has a cache present LED and the LED’s location.
Attention: Static electricity can damage this device and your system unit. To avoid damage, keep this
device in its antistatic protective bag until you are ready to install it. To reduce the possibility of
electrostatic discharge, read the following precautions:
v Limit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around you.
v Handle the device carefully, holding it by its edges or its frame.
v Do not touch solder joints, pins, or exposed printed circuitry.
v Do not leave the device where others can handle and possibly damage the device.
v While the device is still in its antistatic package, touch it to an unpainted metal part of the system unit
for at least two seconds. (This drains static electricity from the package and from your body.)
v Remove the device from its package and install it directly into your system unit without setting it
down. If it is necessary to set the device down, place it on its static-protective package. (If your device
is a controller, place it component-side up.) Do not place the device on your system unit cover or on a
metal table.
v Take additional care when handling devices during cold weather, as heating reduces indoor humidity
and increases static electricity.
Replacing a 572B nonconcurrent maintainable battery pack
Use this procedure to replace the nonconcurrent maintainable battery pack on adapter type CCIN 572B.
Attention: Before continuing with this procedures, determine that it is safe to replace the cache battery
pack. Refer to “Displaying rechargeable battery information” on page 60. It is safe to replace the cache
battery pack when Yes is displayed next to Battery pack can be safely replaced.
Complete the following steps to replace a nonconcurrent maintainable battery pack.
1. Remove the controller from the system. See your system documentation for instructions.
2. Place the controller on a surface that is electrostatic-discharge protected.
3. Unplug the battery connector B from its connector on the adapter, squeezing the retaining latch
while gently pulling on the plug. The plug connects to the board in only one way, so it cannot be
inserted incorrectly during the replacement procedure.
Note: Ensure that the cache battery pack is disconnected for at least 60 seconds before connecting the
new battery. This is the minimum amount of time needed for the adapter to recognize that the battery
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
63
has been replaced.
Figure 18. Removing the cache battery
A Cache battery pack
B Battery connector
C Plastic rivet
D Plastic pin
4. Locate the two plastic rivets C that hold the cache battery pack in place. From the back of the
adapter, remove the two pins D that are installed inside of the rivets.
5. Release the push rivets C that secure the battery assembly to the adapter. Push the rivets through
the back of the adapter and remove the battery pack A from the adapter. If the rivets C cannot be
pushed through the back of the adapter, follow these steps to push the rivets out with a ballpoint pen:
a. Locate a retractable ballpoint pen.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Note: A medium-sized retractable ballpoint pen is preferred, or an equivalent item with a small
opening can be used. The small opening must be large enough so that the pen (or equivalent) will
go around the tip of the rivet, but small enough that it does not slide over the rivet and make
contact with the battery assembly bracket.
Slide the card off the edge of the work area just enough so rivet C can be pushed out of the back
of the adapter.
Hold the pen with the ballpoint retracted, place the pen on top of rivet C, and gently push
straight down until rivet C pushes out.
Repeat steps 5b and 5c for the other rivet C.
Remove the cache battery pack A from the adapter.
Turn the adapter over and push the rivets C back into the adapter.
6. Install the new battery pack A onto the push rivets C of the adapter.
7. Reinsert the pins D into the rivets from the back of the adapter.
64
8. Connect the cache battery pack connector B to the adapter. The plug connects to the adapter in only
one way, so it cannot be inserted incorrectly.
9. Reinstall the adapter.
Replacing a 57B7 concurrent maintainable battery pack
Use this procedure to replace the concurrent maintainable battery pack on adapter type CCIN 57B7.
Attention: Before continuing with this procedure, determine that it is safe to replace the cache battery
pack. Refer to “Displaying rechargeable battery information” on page 60. It is safe to replace the cache
battery pack when Yes is displayed next to Battery pack can be safely replaced. If the cache data present
LED is flashing, do not replace the cache battery pack or data will be lost. See the feature comparison
tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards and the following figures to determine whether your adapter has a cache
data present LED and its location.
Complete the following steps to replace a 57B7 concurrent maintainable battery pack.
1. Using the following illustration to locate the battery’s components, verify that the cache data present
LED C is not flashing. If it is flashing, do not continue; return to “Forcing a rechargeable battery
error” on page 62.
A Cache battery lever
B Cache battery pack
C Cache present LED
Figure 19. Removing the 57B7 cache battery
2. Move the cache battery lever A away from the connector to disengage the battery from the
connector.
3. Continue to slide the cache battery pack out of the mounting guides and remove it from the
controller.
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
65
Note: Ensure that the cache battery pack is disconnected for at least 60 seconds before connecting the
new battery. This is the minimum amount of time needed for the card to recognize that the battery
has been replaced.
4. Using the following illustration to locate the battery’s components, move the lever to the unlatched
position (away from the connector).
Figure 20. Replacing the 57B7 cache battery
A Cache battery lever
B Cache battery pack
C Cache battery connector
5. Slide the new cache battery pack into the mounting guides on the controller until it is seated in the
battery connector.
6. After the battery is seated in the connector, move the lever to the latched position to fully seat the
battery into the connector.
7. Restart the adapter’s write cache by doing the following:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
66
Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
Select Controller Rechargeable Battery Maintenance.
Select Start Adapter Cache.
Select the controller with the battery you just replaced.
Press Enter.
Replacing a 574E concurrent maintainable battery pack
Use this procedure to replace the concurrent maintainable battery pack on adapter type CCIN 574E.
Attention: Before continuing with this procedure, determine that it is safe to replace the cache battery
pack. See “Displaying rechargeable battery information” on page 60. It is safe to replace the cache battery
pack when Yes is displayed next to Battery pack can be safely replaced. If the cache data present LED is
flashing, do not replace the cache battery pack or data will be lost. See the feature comparison tables for
PCIe and PCI-X cards and the following figures to determine whether your adapter has a cache data
present LED and its location.
Complete the following steps to replace a 574E concurrent maintainable battery pack.
1. Using the following illustration to locate the battery’s components, verify that the cache data present
LED C is not flashing. If it is flashing, do not continue; return to “Forcing a rechargeable battery
error” on page 62.
Figure 21. Replacing the 574E cache battery
B Cache battery pack
C Cache data present LED
D Cache battery tab
E Cache battery tab
2. Squeeze tab D against tab E to disengage the battery retaining tab, pull the cache battery pack B
out, and remove it from the controller.
Note: Ensure that the cache battery pack is disconnected for at least 60 seconds before connecting the
new battery. This is the minimum amount of time needed for the card to recognize that the battery
has been replaced.
3. Install the new cache battery pack by reversing this procedure. Ensure the replacement cache battery
back is fully seated.
4. Restart the adapter’s write cache by performing the following steps:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
67
c.
d.
e.
f.
Select Controller Rechargeable Battery Maintenance.
Select Start Adapter Cache.
Select the controller with the battery you just replaced.
Press Enter.
Replacing a 572F/575C card set concurrent maintainable battery pack
Use this procedure to replace the concurrent maintainable battery pack on adapter type CCIN 572F/575C
card set.
Attention: Before continuing with this procedure, determine that it is safe to replace the cache battery
pack. See “Displaying rechargeable battery information” on page 60. It is safe to replace the cache battery
pack when Yes is displayed next to Battery pack can be safely replaced. If the cache data present LED is
flashing, do not replace the cache battery pack or data will be lost. See the feature comparison tables for
PCIe and PCI-X cards and the following figures to determine whether your adapter has a cache data
present LED and its location.
Complete the following steps to replace a 572F/575C concurrent maintainable battery pack.
1. Using the following illustration to locate the battery’s components, locate the metal cover A that
holds the battery pack. Pull out on the push-rivet B to release the metal cover A.
Figure 22. Replacing the 572F/575C cache battery
A Metal cover
B Push-rivet
C Tab
2. Remove the battery unit by pulling on tab C.
Note: Ensure that the cache battery pack is disconnected for at least 60 seconds before connecting the
new battery. This is the minimum amount of time needed for the card to recognize that the battery
has been replaced.
68
3. Install the new cache battery pack by reversing this procedure. Ensure that the replacement cache
battery pack is fully seated.
4. Restart the adapter’s write cache by performing the following steps:
a. Navigate to the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager by using the steps in “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Controller Rechargeable Battery Maintenance.
d. Select Start Adapter Cache.
e. Select the controller with the battery you just replaced.
f. Press Enter.
Separating the 572F/575C card set and moving the cache directory
card
When the maintenance procedures direct you to separate the 572F/575C card set and move the cache
directory card on a 572F controller for recovery purposes, carefully follow this procedure.
Important: To avoid loss of cache data, do not remove the cache battery during this procedure.
Notes:
v This procedure should only be performed if directed from an isolation procedure or a maintenance
analysis procedure (MAP).
v If you are removing the adapter from a double-wide cassette, go to the procedures in your system
unit’s service information for removing a double-wide adapter from a double-wide cassette.
Attention: All cards are sensitive to electrostatic discharge. See Handling static-sensitive devices before
beginning this procedure.
To separate the 572F/575C card set and move the cache directory card, complete the following steps.
1. Label both sides of the card before separating them.
2. Place the 572F/575C card set adapter on an ESD protective surface and orient it as shown in
Figure 23.
Figure 23. 572F/575C card set adapter
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
69
3. To prevent possible card damage, loosen all five retaining screws C before removing any of them.
After all five retaining screws have been loosened, remove the screws C from the 572F storage
adapter.
Important: Failure to loosen all five retaining screws prior to removing any of the screws can result
in damage to the card.
Figure 24. Location of screws on the 572F/575C card set adapter
C Screws
4. Grasp the 572F and 575C adapters close to the interconnect connector A, as shown in the following
figure, and carefully pull the connector apart; then, set the adapters on the ESD protective surface.
70
Figure 25. Location of interconnect connector on the 572F/575C card set adapter
A Interconnect connector
5. Turn the 572F storage adapter over so the components are facing up. Locate the cache directory card
D on the 572F storage adapter. The cache directory card is the small rectangular card mounted on
the I/O card.
Figure 26. Cache directory card
D Cache directory card
6. Unseat the connector on the cache directory card by wiggling the two corners that are farthest from
the mounting pegs. To disengage the mounting pegs, pivot the cache directory card back over the
mounting pegs.
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
71
Figure 27. Unseating the connector
7. Move the cache directory card to the replacement 572F storage adapter and seat it on the connector
and mounting pegs.
8. To reassemble the cards, perform the preceding procedure in reverse order. When connecting the two
adapters together, carefully align guide pins B on each side of the interconnect connector A. After
the connector is seated correctly, apply pressure to completely squeeze the connector together. To
prevent possible card damage, insert all five screws C before tightening any of them.
Figure 28. Reassembling the cards
AInterconnect connector
BGuide pins
72
CScrews
9. Cassette installations only: If you are installing the 572F/575C card set adapter into a cassette,
perform the following steps:
a. Remove the adapter handle B as shown in Figure 29.
Figure 29. Cassette adapter handle attachment
APush-rivets
BAdapter handle
b. If you removed the double-wide PCI adapter from a cassette in the beginning of this procedure,
reinstall the adapter into the double-wide cassette to complete the installation. See the procedures
in your system unit’s service information for installing a double-wide adapter in a double-wide
cassette.
10. Return to the procedure that sent you here. This ends this procedure.
Replacing the cache directory card
When the maintenance procedures direct you to replace the cache directory card, carefully follow this
procedure.
Attention: Perform this procedure only if you are directed from an isolation procedure or a maintenance
analysis procedure (MAP).
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
73
Attention: Static electricity can damage this device and your system unit. To avoid damage, keep this
device in its antistatic protective bag until you are ready to install it. To reduce the possibility of
electrostatic discharge, read the following precautions:
Limit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around you.
Handle the device carefully, holding it by its edges or its frame.
Do not touch solder joints, pins, or exposed printed circuitry.
Do not leave the device where others can handle and possibly damage the device.
While the device is still in its antistatic package, touch it to an unpainted metal part of the system unit
for at least two seconds. (This drains static electricity from the package and from your body.)
v Remove the device from its package and install it directly into your system unit without setting it
down. If it is necessary to set the device down, place it on its static-protective package. (If your device
is a controller, place it component-side up.) Do not place the device on your system unit cover or on a
metal table.
v Take additional care when handling devices during cold weather, as heating reduces indoor humidity
and increases static electricity.
v
v
v
v
v
To replace the cache directory card, complete the following steps:
1. Remove the controller using the remove procedures for the model or expansion unit on which you are
working.
2. Locate the cache directory card A.
3. Unseat the connector on the cache directory card by wiggling the two corners over the connector,
using a rocking motion. Then lift the cache directory card off the connector and out of the guides on
the plastic support rail.
4. Install the replacement cache directory card A by inserting it into the guides on the plastic support
rail and then seating it on the connector.
74
5. Install the controller using the installation procedures for the model or expansion unit on which you
are working.
Replacing pdisks
Replace failed pdisks as soon as possible, even if a reconstruction was initiated with a hot spare by the
controller. The Replace/Remove a Device Attached to an SCSI Hot Swap Enclosure Device option in the
SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager can be used to replace failed pdisks. The IBM SAS Disk Array
Manager provides a shortcut to the SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager.
Attention: Perform this procedure only if you are directed from an isolation procedure or a maintenance
analysis procedure (MAP).
Note: The replacement disk should have a capacity that is greater than or equal to that of the smallest
capacity disk in the degraded disk array.
Attention: Always use the SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager for devices attached to an IBM SAS
RAID Controller. Do not use utilities intended for other RAID products, such as RAID Hot Plug Devices.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options .
3. Select SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager.
4. Select Identify a Device Attached to an SCSI Hot Swap Enclosure Device.
5. Choose the slot corresponding to the pdisk. The visual indicator on the device will blink at the
Identify rate.
6. If you are removing a device, select Replace/Remove a Device Attached to an SCSI Hot Swap
Enclosure Device. The visual indicator on the device will blink at the Remove rate. Remove the
device.
7. If you are installing a device, select Attach a Device to an SCSI Hot Swap Enclosure Device. The
visual indicator on the device will blink at the Remove rate. Insert the device.
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
75
Viewing SAS fabric path information
Use the disk array manager to view details of the SAS fabric information.
Note: Details of the SAS fabric information of all the nodes on the path between the controller and
device can be viewed under Show Fabric Path Data View and Show Fabric Path Graphical View. The
only difference between the two menus is the format of the output. The same data is displayed for each
choice.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start the diagnostics program and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View or Show Fabric Path Data View.
5. Select the IBM SAS RAID controller. The screen displayed will look similar to the following example:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Show SAS Controller Physical Resources
|
|
|
| +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
| |
Show SAS Controller Physical Resources
| |
| |
| |
| | Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
| |
| |
| |
| | [TOP]
| |
| |
pdisk5
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk0
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk1
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk2
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk6
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk3
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk7
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk11
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk8
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk4
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk9
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| | [MORE...4]
| |
| |
| |
| | F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
| |
| | F8=Image
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
| |
| | /=Find
n=Find Next
| |
| +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Selecting a device will display the details of all the nodes on each path between the controller and the
device. Following is an example for Show Fabric Path Data View.
76
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|[TOP]
|
|
|
|
|
|Adapter
Adapter Port Path Active Path State Device
|
|--------- ------------ ----------- ----------- -------|
|sissas0
4
Yes
Operational pdisk0
|
|
|
|Node SAS Address
Port Type
Phy Status
Info
|
|---- ---------------- ------------ ---- ---------------- ----------|
|1
5005076C07037705 Adapter
4
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|2
5FFFFFFFFFFFF000 Expander
14
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|3
5FFFFFFFFFFFF000 Expander
1
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|4
5000C50001C72C29 Device
0
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|5
5000C50001C72C2B LUN
1
Operational
LUN_ID 000
|
|[MORE...14]
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
The possible status values for the Show Fabric Path Data View and the Show Fabric Path Graphical
View follow.
Status
Description
Operational
No problem detected
Degraded
The SAS node is degraded
Failed
The SAS node is failed
Suspect
The SAS node is suspect of contributing to a failure
Missing
The SAS node is no longer detected by controller
Not valid
The SAS node is incorrectly connected
Unknown
Unknown or unexpected status
Example: Using SAS fabric path information
This data becomes helpful in determining the cause of configuration or SAS fabric problems.
The following example assumes a cascaded disk enclosure with a broken connection on one path between
the cascaded enclosures.
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
77
The state of all paths to all devices displays information similar to the following.
78
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
Show SAS Controller Physical Resources
|
|
|
|Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
|
|
|
| Show Physical Resource Locations
|
| Show Physical Resource Information
|
| Show Fabric Path Graphical View
|
| Show Fabric Path Data View
|
| +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
| |
Show SAS Controller Physical Resources
| |
| |
| |
| | Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
| |
| |
| |
| |
pdisk0
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk1
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk2
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk3
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk4
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk5
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk6
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk7
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk8
Path 1: Operational Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk9
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk10
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk11
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk12
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk13
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk14
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk15
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
pdisk16
Path 1: Failed
Path 2: Operational
| |
| |
ses0
Path 1: Operational
| |
| |
ses1
Path 1: Operational
| |
| |
ses2
Path 1: Operational
| |
| |
ses3
Path 1: Operational
| |
| |
ses4
Path 1: Operational
| |
| |
| |
| | F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
| |
| | F8=Image
F10=Exit
Enter=Do
| |
| | /=Find
n=Find Next
| |
| +--------------------------------------------------------------------------+ |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
For Show Fabric Path Data View, choosing one of the devices with a Failed path will display
information similar to the following.
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
79
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|Adapter
Adapter Port Path Active Path State Device
|
|--------- ------------ ----------- ----------- -------|
|sissas0
4
No
Failed
pdisk9
|
|
|
|Node SAS Address
Port Type
Phy
Status
Info
|
|---- ---------------- ------------ ---- ---------------- ----------|
|1
5005076C0701CD05 Adapter
4
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|2
500A0B8257CC9000 Expander
16
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|3
0000000000000000 Expander
FF
Missing
Status 0
|
|4
5000CCA003100DF3 LUN
40
Missing
Status 0
|
|
|
|
|
|Adapter
Adapter Port Path Active Path State Device
|
|--------- ------------ ----------- ----------- -------|
|sissas0
6
Yes
Operational pdisk9
|
|
|
|Node SAS Address
Port Type
Phy
Status
Info
|
|---- ---------------- ------------ ---- ---------------- ----------|
|1
5005076C0701CD07 Adapter
6
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|2
500A0B8257CEA000 Expander
16
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|3
500A0B8257CEA000 Expander
10
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|4
500A0B81E18E7000 Expander
10
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|5
500A0B81E18E7000 Expander
0
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|6
5000CCA003900DF3 Device
1
Operational
3.0 GBPS
|
|7
5000CCA003100DF3 LUN
40
Operational
LUN_ID 000
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
For Show Fabric Path Graphical View, choosing one of the devices with a Failed path will display
information similar to the following.
80
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
| Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
| Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
| ***********************************************************************
|
| Path(s) from sissas0 to the pdisk9.
|
| ***********************************************************************
|
| +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
| |Path Active: No
Adapter
Path Active: Yes
|
|
| |Path State : Failed
sissas0
Path State : Operational |
|
| +---------------------------+-------------+---------------------------+
|
| |SAS Addr: 5005076C0701CD05 |
|SAS Addr: 5005076C0701CD07 |
|
| |Port
: 4
|
|Port
: 6
|
|
| |Status : Operational
|
|Status : Operational
|
|
| |Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|
| +---------------------------+
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
||
|
|
\/
\/
|
| +---------------------------+
+---------------------------+
|
| |
Expander : 1
|
|
Expander : 1
|
|
| +---------------------------+
+---------------------------+
|
| |SAS Addr: 500A0B8257CC9000 |
|SAS Addr: 500A0B8257CEA000 |
|
| |Port
: 16
|
|Port
: 16
|
|
| |Status : Operational
|
|Status : Operational
|
|
| |Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|
| +---------------------------+
+---------------------------+
|
| |SAS Addr: 0000000000000000 |
|SAS Addr: 500A0B8257CEA000 |
|
| |Port
: FF
|
|Port
: 10
|
|
| |Status : Missing
|
|Status : Operational
|
|
| |Info
: Status 0
|
|Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|
| +---------------------------+
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
||
|
|
||
\/
|
|
||
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
|
Expander : 2
|
|
|
||
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
|SAS Addr: 500A0B81E18E7000 |
|
|
||
|Port
: 10
|
|
|
||
|Status : Operational
|
|
|
||
|Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|
|
||
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
|SAS Addr: 500A0B81E18E7000 |
|
|
||
|Port
: 0
|
|
|
||
|Status : Operational
|
|
|
||
|Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|
|
||
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
||
|
|
||
\/
|
|
||
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
|
Device
|
|
|
||
+---------------------------+
|
|
||
|SAS Addr: 5000CCA003900DF3 |
|
|
||
|Port
: 1
|
|
|
||
|Status : Operational
|
|
|
\/
|Info
: 3.0 GBPS
|
|
| +---------------------------+-------------+---------------------------+
|
| |SAS Addr: 5000CCA003100DF3 | Device Lun |SAS Addr: 5000CCA003100DF3 |
|
| |Status : Missing
| pdisk9
|Status : Operational
|
|
| |Info
: LUN_ID 000
|
|Info
: LUN_ID 000
|
|
| +---------------------------+-------------+---------------------------+
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Chapter 5. SAS RAID controller maintenance
81
82
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
AIX diagnostics and utilities are used to assist in problem determination and recovery tasks.
Note: The procedures contained in this section are intended for service representatives specifically
trained on the system unit and subsystem that is being serviced. Additionally, some of the service actions
in this topic might require involvement of the system administrator.
If a problem arises related to disk arrays and associated pdisks, use the following to identify the problem:
v Information presented by the error log analysis
v Hardware error logs viewed using the Display Hardware Error Report diagnostic task
v Disk array hdisk and pdisk status, viewed using the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager
Error log analysis analyzes errors presented by the adapter, and recommends actions that need to be
performed to correct the errors. It is sometimes recommended that you perform a maintenance analysis
procedure (MAP) to further determine what actions should be taken to resolve the problem.
The MAPs contained in this topic are intended to address only problems directly related to disk arrays
and SAS problem isolation. MAPs related to other device or adapter problems, when applicable, are
located in other system documentation.
Read the following before using these problem determination and recovery procedures:
v If a disk array is being used as a boot device and the system fails to boot because of a suspected
disk-array problem, boot using the Standalone Diagnostic media. Error log analysis, AIX error logs, the
IBM SAS Disk Array Manager, and other tools are available on the Standalone Diagnostics to help
determine and resolve the problem with the disk array.
v When invoking diagnostic routines for a controller, use the Problem Determination (PD) mode instead
of System Verification (SV) mode unless there is a specific reason to use SV mode (for example, you
were directed to run SV mode by a MAP).
v After diagnostic routines for a controller are run in SV mode, run the diagnostics in PD mode to ensure
that new errors are analyzed. Perform these actions especially when using Standalone Diagnostic
media.
SAS resource locations
Many hardware error logs identify the location of a physical device, such as a SAS disk, using what is
called a resource location (or simply resource).
The resource format is: 00cceell where:
v cc identifies the controller’s port to which the device, or device enclosure, is attached.
v ee is the expander’s port to which the device is attached. When a device is not connected to a SAS
expander, for example, the device is directly connected, the expander port is set to zero.
Typically, the expander port will be in a range of 00 to 3F hex. A value greater than 3F indicates there
are two expanders (for example, cascaded expanders) between the controller and device. For example,
a device connected through a single expander might show an expander port of 1A, while a device
connected through a cascaded expander might show an expander port of 5A (that is, a value of 40 hex
added to the expander port indicates the presence of a cascaded expander), but in both cases, the
device is connected off port 1A of the expander.
A value of FF indicates the expander port is not known.
v ll is the logical unit number (LUN) of the device.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
83
A value of FF indicates the LUN is not known.
The resource location is also used to identify a disk array. For a disk array, the resource format is:
00FFnn00 where:
v nn is the controller disk array identifier.
A resource can identify a physical device, a disk array, or it can identify other SAS components. For
example:
v 00FFFFFF indicates the identity of the device is not known.
v
v
v
v
v
00ccFFFF identifies only a controller’s SAS port.
00cceell identifies the controller port, expander port, and LUN of an attached device.
00FE0000 indicates a remote SAS initiator
00FFnn00 indicates a disk array
FFFFFFFF indicates a SAS RAID controller.
Figure 30. Example SAS subsystem resource locations
Showing physical resource attributes
Use this procedure to determine attributes of the device such as physical location, hdisk name, pdisk
name, serial number, or worldwide ID.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start the diagnostics program and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
84
4. Select Show Physical Resource Locations or Show Physical Resource Information. The Show
Physical Resource Locations screen and Show Physical Resource Information screen look similar to the
following screens.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Resource Physical Location
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas0 FFFFFFFF U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P1-T3
|
|
|
|hdisk2
00FF0000 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P1-T3-LFF0000-L0
|
| pdisk0 00000400 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P3-D3
|
|
|
|hdisk0
00000200 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P3-D1
|
|hdisk1
00000300 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P3-D2
|
|ses0
00080000 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P4
|
|ses1
00000A00 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P3
|
|ses2
00020A00 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P3
|
|cd0
00040000 U789D.001.DQDVXHA-P4-D1
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|
COMMAND STATUS
|
|
|
|Command: OK
stdout: yes
stderr: no
|
|
|
|Before command completion, additional instructions might appear below.
|
|
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|Name
Location Resource World Wide ID
Serial Number
|
|-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
|sissas0 07-08
FFFFFFFF 5005076C0301C700
|
|
|
|hdisk2
07-08-00 00FF0000 n/a
84A40E3D
|
| pdisk0 07-08-00 00000400 5000CCA00336D2D9 0036D2D9
|
|
|
|hdisk0
07-08-00 00000200 5000cca00336f5db
|
|hdisk1
07-08-00 00000300 5000cca00336d2d4
|
|ses0
07-08-00 00080000 5005076c06028800
|
|ses1
07-08-00 00000A00 5005076c0401170e
|
|ses2
07-08-00 00020A00 5005076c0401178e
|
|cd0
07-08-00 00040000
|
|
|
|
|
|F1=Help
F2=Refresh
F3=Cancel
F6=Command
|
|F8=Image
F9=Shell
F10=Exit
/=Find
|
|n=Find Next
|
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Disk array problem identification
Use service request numbers (SRNs), posted by the AIX diagnostics, to identify problems in disk arrays.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
85
A disk array problem is uniquely identified by an SRN. An SRN is in the format nnnn - rrrr, where the
first four digits of the SRN preceding the dash (-) is known as the failing function code (FFC, for example
2502) and the last four digits of the SRN following the dash (-) is known as the reason code. The reason
code indicates the specific problem that has occurred and must be obtained in order to determine which
maintenance analysis procedure (MAP) to use.
An SRN is provided by error log analysis, which directs you to the MAPs contained in this topic. To
obtain the reason code (last 4 digits of the SRN) from an AIX error log, see “Finding a service request
number from an existing AIX error log” on page 135.
The SRN describes the problem that has been detected and should be considered the primary means of
identifying a problem. However, the List SAS Disk Array Configuration option within the IBM SAS Disk
Array Manager is also useful in identifying a problem or confirming a problem described by error log
analysis. For additional information about the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager, see “Using the Disk Array
Manager” on page 25.
Obtain the SRN and proceed to the next section to obtain a more detailed description of the problem and
to determine which MAP to use.
Service request numbers
With a service request number (SRN) obtained from error log analysis or from the AIX error log, use the
following table to determine which MAP to use.
The following table includes only SRNs that are associated with maintenance analysis procedures
contained in this document. The following table includes only SRNs that are associated with maintenance
analysis procedures contained in this document.
Table 9. SRN to MAP index
SRN
Description
MAP
nnnn – 101
Controller configuration error
MAP 210 – replace controller
nnnn – 710
nnnn – 713
Controller failure
MAP 210 – replace controller
nnnn – 720
Controller device bus configuration error
“MAP 3150” on page 125
nnnn – 102E
Out of alternate disk storage for storage
MAP 210 – replace disk
nnnn – 3002
Addressed device failed to respond to selection
MAP 210 – replace device
nnnn – 3010
Disk returned wrong response to controller
MAP 210 – replace disk
nnnn
nnnn
nnnn
nnnn
Various errors requiring SAS fabric problem isolation
“MAP 3150” on page 125
nnnn - 4010
Configuration error, incorrect connection between
cascaded enclosures
“MAP 3142” on page 113
nnnn - 4020
Configuration error, connections exceed controller design “MAP 3143” on page 114
limits
nnnn - 4030
Configuration error, incorrect multipath connection
“MAP 3144” on page 115
nnnn - 4040
Configuration error, incomplete multipath connection
between controller and enclosure detected
“MAP 3144” on page 115
nnnn - 4041
Configuration error, incomplete multipath connection
between enclosures and device detected
“MAP 3146” on page 120
nnnn - 4050
Attached enclosure does not support required multipath
function
“MAP 3148” on page 124
86
-
3020
3100
3109
3110
Table 9. SRN to MAP index (continued)
SRN
Description
MAP
nnnn - 4060
Multipath redundancy level got worse
“MAP 3153” on page 131
nnnn - 4100
Device bus fabric error
“MAP 3152” on page 128
nnnn - 4101
Temporary device bus fabric error
“MAP 3152” on page 128
nnnn - 4110
Unsupported enclosure function detected
“MAP 3145” on page 119
nnnn – 4150
nnnn – 4160
PCI Bus error detected by controller
MAP 210 – replace controller, if the
problem is not fixed, replace the
planar or backplane
nnnn – 7001
Temporary disk data error
MAP 210 – replace disk
nnnn – 8150
nnnn – 8157
Controller Failure
MAP 210 – replace controller
nnnn - 9000
nnnn - 9001
nnnn - 9002
Controller detected device error during configuration
discovery
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9008
Controller does not support function expected for one or
more disk
“MAP 3130” on page 99
nnnn – 9010
Cache data associated with attached disks cannot be
found
“MAP 3120” on page 96
nnnn - 9011
Cache data belongs to disks other than those attached
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9020
nnnn - 9021
nnnn - 9022
Two or more disks are missing from a RAID 5 or RAID 6 “MAP 3111” on page 91
Disk Array
nnnn - 9023
One or more disk array members are not at required
physical locations
“MAP 3112” on page 92
nnnn - 9024
Physical location of disk array members conflict with
another disk array
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9025
Incompatible disk installed at degraded disk location in
disk array
“MAP 3110” on page 89
nnnn - 9026
Previously degraded disk in disk array not found at
required physical location
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9027
Disk array is or would become degraded and parity data “MAP 3113” on page 94
is out of synchronization
nnnn - 9028
Maximum number of functional disk arrays has been
exceeded
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9029
Maximum number of functional disk array disks has
been exceeded
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9030
Disk array is degraded due to missing/failed disk
“MAP 3110” on page 89
nnnn - 9031
Automatic reconstruction initiated for Disk Array
“MAP 3110” on page 89
nnnn - 9032
Disk array is degraded due to a missing or failed disk
“MAP 3110” on page 89
nnnn - 9041
Background disk array parity checking detected and
corrected errors
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9042
Background disk array parity checking detected and
corrected errors on specified disk
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn – 9050
Required cache data can not be located for one or more
disks
“MAP 3131” on page 101
nnnn - 9051
Cache data exists for one or more missing or failed disks “MAP 3132” on page 105
nnnn - 9052
Cache data exists for one or more modified disks
“MAP 3190” on page 134
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
87
Table 9. SRN to MAP index (continued)
SRN
Description
MAP
nnnn - 9054
RAID controller resources not available due to previous
problems
“MAP 3121” on page 99
nnnn - 9060
One or more disk pairs are missing from a RAID 10 disk
array
“MAP 3111” on page 91
nnnn - 9061
nnnn - 9062
One or more disks are missing from a RAID 0 disk array “MAP 3111” on page 91
nnnn - 9063
Maximum number of functional disk arrays has been
exceeded
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9073
Multiple controllers connected in an invalid
configuration
“MAP 3140” on page 111
nnnn - 9074
Multiple controllers not capable of similar functions or
controlling same set of devices
“MAP 3141” on page 112
nnnn - 9075
Incomplete multipath connection between controller and
remote controller
“MAP 3149” on page 125
nnnn - 9076
Missing remote controller
“MAP 3147” on page 123
nnnn - 9081
nnnn - 9082
Controller detected device error during internal media
recovery
“MAP 3190” on page 134
nnnn - 9090
Disk has been modified after last known status
“MAP 3133” on page 107
nnnn - 9091
Incorrect disk configuration change has been detected
“MAP 3133” on page 107
nnnn - 9092
Disk requires format before use
“MAP 3134” on page 107
nnnn – FF3D
Temporary controller failure
MAP 210 – replace controller
nnnn - FFF3
Disk media format bad
“MAP 3135” on page 111
nnnn – FFF4
nnnn – FFF6
nnnn – FFFA
Disk error
MAP 210 – replace disk
nnnn - FFFE
Various errors requiring SAS fabric problem isolation
“MAP 3150” on page 125
Controller maintenance analysis procedures
These procedures are intended to resolve adapter, cache, or disk array problems associated with a
controller.
See “Service request numbers” on page 86 to identify which MAP to use.
Examining the hardware error log
The AIX hardware error log is where the operating system keeps records about hardware errors,
including disk arrays.
Note: Run diagnostics in Problem Determination (PD) mode to ensure that new errors are analyzed.
These actions should be performed especially when using standalone diagnostic media.
1. Start the diagnostics program and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Display Hardware Error Report.
3. Select Display Hardware Errors for IBM SAS RAID Adapters.
4. Select the adapter resource, or select all adapters resources if the adapter resource is not known.
5. On the Error Summary screen, look for an entry with a SRN corresponding to the problem which sent
you here and select it. If multiple entries exist for the SRN, some entries could be older versions or a
88
problem has occurred on multiple entities (such as adapters, disk arrays, and devices). Older entries
can be ignored, however, the MAP might need to be used multiple times if the same problem has
occurred on multiple entities.
6. Return to the MAP that sent you here and continue with the steps in that MAP.
MAP 3100
Use this MAP to resolve the following problems:
v A permanent cache battery pack failure occurred (SRN nnnn - 8008)
v Impending cache battery pack failure (SRN nnnn - 8009)
Step 3100-1
Prior to replacing the cache battery pack, it must be forced into an error state. This will ensure that write
caching is stopped prior to replacing the battery pack thus preventing possible data loss.
1. Follow the steps described in “Forcing a rechargeable battery error” on page 62.
2. Go to “Step 3100-2.”
Step 3100-2
Follow the actions recommended in “Replacing a battery pack” on page 63.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3110
Use this MAP to resolve the following problems:
v Incompatible disk installed at the degraded disk location in the disk array (SRN nnnn - 9025)
v Disk array is degraded due to a missing or failed disk (SRN nnnn - 9030)
v Automatic reconstruction initiated for a disk array (SRN nnnn - 9031)
v Disk array is degraded due to a missing or failed disk (SRN nnnn - 9032)
Step 3110-1
Identify the disk array by examining the hardware error log.
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. This error log displays the following disk array information
under the heading Array Information : Resource, S/N (serial number), and RAID Level.
3. Go to “Step 3110-2.”
Step 3110-2
View the current disk array configuration as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select List SAS Disk Array Configuration.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller identified in the hardware error log.
4. Go to Step “Step 3110-3” on page 90.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
89
Step 3110-3
Does a disk array have a state of Degraded?
No
Go to “Step 3110-4.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3110-5.”
Step 3110-4
The affected disk array should have a state of either Rebuilding or Optimal due to the use of a hot spare
disk.
Identify the failed disk, which is no longer a part of the disk array, by finding the pdisk listed at the
bottom of the screen that has a state of either Failed or RWProtected. Using appropriate service
procedures, such as use of the SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager, remove the failed disk and
replace it with a new disk to use as a hot spare. Refer to the “Replacing pdisks” on page 75 section for
this procedure, and then continue here.
Return to the List SAS Disk Array Configuration screen in the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager. If the new
disk is not listed as a pdisk, it might first need to be prepared for use in a disk array. Do the following:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Create an Array Candidate pdisk and Format to 528 Byte Sectors.
3. Select the appropriate IBM SAS RAID Controller.
4. Select the disks from the list that you want to prepare for use in the disk arrays.
In order to make the new disk usable as a hot spare, do the following:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Change/Show SAS pdisk Status.
3. Select Create a Hot Spare.
4. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
5. Select the pdisk that you want to designate as a hot spare.
Note: Hot spare disks are useful only if their capacity is greater than or equal to that of the smallest
capacity disk in a disk array that becomes Degraded.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3110-5
Identify the failed disk by finding the pdisk listed for the degraded disk array that has a state of Failed.
Using appropriate service procedures, such as the SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager, remove the
failed disk and replace it with a new disk to use in the disk array. Refer to the “Replacing pdisks” on
page 75 section for this procedure, and then continue here.
90
Note: The replacement disk should have a capacity that is greater than or equal to that of the smallest
capacity disk in the degraded disk array.
To bring the disk array back to a state of Optimal, do the following:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Reconstruct a SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the failed pdisk to reconstruct.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3111
Use this MAP to resolve the following problems:
v Two or more disks are missing from a RAID 5 or RAID 6 disk array (SRN nnnn - 9020 / nnnn - 9021 /
nnnn - 9022)
v One or more disk pairs are missing from a RAID 10 disk array (SRN nnnn - 9060)
v One or more disks are missing from a RAID 0 disk array (SRN nnnn - 9061 / nnnn - 9062)
Step 3111-1
Identify the disks missing from the disk array by examining the hardware error log. The hardware error
log can be viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. Viewing the hardware error log, the missing disks are those
listed under Array Member Information with an Actual Resource of *unkwn*.
3. Go to “Step 3111-2.”
Step 3111-2
Perform only one of the following options, listed in the order of preference:
Option 1
Locate the identified disks and install them in the correct physical locations (that is the Expected
Resource) in the system. Refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to understand how to
locate a disk using the Expected Resource field.
After installing the disks in the Expected Resource locations, perform only one of the following
options:
v Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter:
1. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
v Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
91
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
v Perform an IPL of the system or logical partition.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 2
Delete the disk array, as follows:
Attention:
All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Delete a SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
4. Select the disk array to delete.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 3
Format the remaining members of the disk array, as follows:
Attention: All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk).
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3112
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: One or more disk array members are not at required
physical locations (SRN nnnn - 9023)
92
Step 3112-1
Identify the disks which are not at their required physical locations by examining the hardware error log.
The hardware error log can be viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view.
Viewing the hardware error log, the disks which are not at their required locations are those listed
under Array Member Information with an Expected Resource and Actual Resource which do not
match.
An Actual Resource of *unkwn* is acceptable, and no action is needed to correct it. This *unkwn*
location should only occur for the disk array member that corresponds to the Degraded Disk S/N.
3. Go to “Step 3112-2.”
Step 3112-2
Perform only one of the following options, listed in the order of preference:
Option 1
Locate the identified disks and install them in the correct physical locations (that is the Expected
Resource) in the system. Refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to understand how to
locate a disk using the Expected Resource field.
After installing the disks in the Expected Resource locations, perform only one of the following
options:
v Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter:
1. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
v Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
v Perform an IPL of the system or logical partition.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 2
Delete the disk array, as follows:
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
93
Attention: All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Delete a SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
4. Select the disk array to delete.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 3
Format the remaining members of the disk array, as follows:
Attention: All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk).
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3113
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Disk array is or would become degraded and parity data
is out of synchronization (SRN nnnn - 9027)
Step 3113-1
Identify the adapter and disks by examining the hardware error log. The hardware error log can be
viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. Viewing the hardware error log, if the disk array member
which corresponds to the Degraded Disk S/N has an Actual Resource of *unkwn* and is not
physically present, it can be helpful to find this disk.
3. Go to “Step 3113-2.”
Step 3113-2
Have the adapter or disks been physically moved recently?
No
Contact your hardware service provider.
Yes
Go to “Step 3113-3.”
Step 3113-3
Perform only one of the following options, listed in the order of preference:
94
Option 1
Restore the adapter and disks back to their original configuration. Refer to “SAS resource
locations” on page 83 to understand how to locate a disk using the Expected Resource and
Actual Resource field.
After restoring the adapter and disks to their original configuration, perform only one of the
following:
v Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter:
1. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
v Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
v Perform an IPL of the system or logical partition.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 2
Delete the disk array, as follows:
Attention: All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Delete a SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
4. Select the disk array to delete.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 3
Format the remaining members of the disk array, as follows:
Attention:
All data on the disk array will be lost.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
95
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk).
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3120
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Cache data associated with attached disks cannot be
found (SRN nnnn - 9010)
Step 3120-1
Is the adapter connected in an HA RAID configuration (that is, two adapters connected to the same set of
disks)?
No
Go to “Step 3120-2.”
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3120-2
Has the server been powered off for several days?
No
Go to “Step 3120-3.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3120-8” on page 97.
Step 3120-3
Are you working with a 572F/575C card set?
No
Go to “Step 3120-5” on page 97.
Yes
Go to “Step 3120-4.”
Step 3120-4
Note: Label all parts (original and new) before moving them.
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the 572F/575C card set. Create and install the new card
set that has the following parts installed on it:
v The new replacement 572F storage I/O adapter
v The cache directory card from the original 572F storage I/O adapter
v The original 575C auxiliary cache adapter
Note: See “Separating the 572F/575C card set and moving the cache directory card” on page 69 to locate
the parts in the preceding list.
Go to “Step 3120-6” on page 97.
96
Step 3120-5
Note: Label all parts (original and new) before moving them.
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the I/O adapter. Install the new replacement storage
I/O adapter with the following parts installed on it:
v The cache directory card from the original storage I/O adapter. Refer to “Replacing the cache directory
card” on page 73.
v The removable cache card from the original storage I/O adapter, if the original adapter contained a
removable cache card. This applies only to certain adapters that have a removable cache card. Verify
that the storage I/O adapter is listed in the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards as
having Yes in the column for Removable Cache Card.
Step 3120-6
Has a new SRN of nnnn-9010 or nnnn-9050 occurred?
No
Go to “Step 3120-9” on page 98.
Yes
Go to “Step 3120-7.”
Step 3120-7
Was the new SRN nnnn-9050?
No
The new SRN was nnnn-9010. Reclaim the controller cache storage as follows:
Attention: Data might be lost. When an auxiliary cache adapter connected to the RAID
controller logs a nnnn - 9055 SRN in the hardware error log, the reclaim process does not result in
lost sectors. Otherwise, the reclaim process does result in lost sectors.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2.
3.
4.
5.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
Select Reclaim Controller Cache Storage.
Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
Confirm that you wish to proceed.
Note: On the Reclaim Controller Cache Storage results screen, the number of lost sectors is
displayed. If the number is 0, there is no data loss. If the number is not 0, data has been lost
and the system operator might want to restore data after this procedure is completed.
6. Go to “Step 3120-9” on page 98.
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3120-8
If the server has been powered off for several days after an abnormal power-down, the cache battery
pack might be depleted. Do not replace the adapter or the cache battery pack. Reclaim the controller
cache storage as follows:
Attention: Data might be lost. When an auxiliary cache adapter connected to the RAID controller logs a
nnnn - 9055 SRN in the hardware error log, the reclaim process does not result in lost sectors. Otherwise,
the reclaim process does result in lost sectors.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
97
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Reclaim Controller Cache Storage.
4. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
5. Confirm that you wish to proceed.
Note: On the Reclaim Controller Cache Storage results screen, the number of lost sectors is displayed.
If the number is 0, there is no data loss. If the number is not 0, data has been lost and the system
operator might want to restore data after this procedure is completed.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3120-9
Are you working with a 572F/575C card set?
No
Go to “Step 3120-11.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3120-10.”
Step 3120-10
Note: Label all parts (original and new) before moving them.
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the 572F/575C card set. Create and install the new card
set that has the following parts installed on it:
v The new replacement 572F storage I/O adapter
v The cache directory card from the new replacement 572F storage I/O adapter
v The new 575C auxiliary cache adapter
Note: See the figure at “Separating the 572F/575C card set and moving the cache directory card” on page
69 to find the locations of the parts in the preceding list.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3120-11
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the I/O adapter. Install the new replacement storage
I/O adapter with the following parts installed on it:
v The cache directory card from the new storage I/O adapter. Refer to “Replacing the cache directory
card” on page 73.
v The removable cache card from the new storage I/O adapter, if the new adapter contains a removable
cache card. This applies only to certain adapters that have a removable cache card. Verify that the
storage I/O adapter is listed in the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards as having Yes
in the column for Removable Cache Card.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
98
MAP 3121
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: RAID controller resources not available due to previous
problems (SRN nnnn - 9054)
Step 3121-1
Remove any new or replacement disks that have been attached to the adapter, either using the SCSI and
SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager or by powering off the system.
Perform only one of the following options:
Option 1
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
Select Run Diagnostics.
Select the adapter resource.
Select System Verification.
Option 2
Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager
1) Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
Option 3
Perform an IPL of the system or logical partition.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3130
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Controller does not support function expected by one or
more disk (SRN nnnn - 9008)
Step 3130-1
Identify the affected disks by examining the hardware error log. View the hardware error log as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
99
Viewing the hardware error log, the Device Errors Detected field indicates the total number of disks
which are affected. The Device Errors Logged field indicates the number of disks for which detailed
information is provided. Under the Original Device heading, the Resource, Vendor/Product ID, S/N,
and World Wide ID are provided for up to three disks. Additionally, the Original Controller Type,
S/N, and World Wide ID for each of these disks indicates the adapter to which the disk was last
attached when it was operational. Refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to understand how to
locate a disk using the Resource field.
3. Go to “Step 3130-2.”
Step 3130-2
Have the adapter or disks been physically moved recently or were the disks previously used by the IBM i
operating system?
No
Contact your hardware service provider.
Yes
Go to “Step 3130-3.”
Step 3130-3
Perform only one of the following options, listed in the order of preference:
Option 1
Restore the adapter and disks back to their original configuration. Perform only one of the
following:
v Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter:
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
v Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter:
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter:
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
v Perform an IPL of the system or logical partition.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 2
100
Format the disks, as follows:
Attention:
All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk).
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3131
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Required cache data cannot be located for one or more
disks (SRN nnnn - 9050)
Step 3131-1
Did you just exchange the adapter as the result of a failure?
No
Go to “Step 3131-6” on page 102.
Yes
Go to Step “Step 3131-2.”
Step 3131-2
Is the adapter connected in an HA RAID configuration (that is, two adapters connected to the same set of
disks)?
No
Go to “Step 3131-3.”
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3131-3
Are you working with a 572F/575C card set?
No
Go to “Step 3131-5” on page 102.
Yes
Go to Step “Step 3131-4.”
Step 3131-4
Note: Label all parts (original and new) before moving them.
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the 572F/575C card set. Create and install the new card
set that has the following parts installed on it:
v The new replacement 572F storage I/O adapter
v The cache directory card from the original 572F storage I/O adapter
v The original 575C auxiliary cache adapter
Note: See the figures at “Separating the 572F/575C card set and moving the cache directory card” on
page 69 to locate the relevant parts of the card.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
101
Go to “Step 3131-11” on page 104
Step 3131-5
Notes:
1. The failed adapter that you have just exchanged contains cache data that is required by the disks that
were attached to that adapter. If the adapter that you just exchanged is failing intermittently,
reinstalling it and IPLing the system might allow the data to be successfully written to the disks. After
the cache data is written to the disks and the system is powered off normally, the adapter can be
replaced without data being lost. Otherwise, continue with this procedure.
2. Label all parts (old and new) before moving them.
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the I/O adapter. Install the new replacement storage
I/O adapter with the following parts installed on it:
v The cache directory card from the original storage I/O adapter. See the figures at “Replacing the cache
directory card” on page 73 to identify the relevant locations on the card.
v The removable cache card from the original storage I/O adapter, if the original storage I/O adapter has
a removable cache card. Verify that the storage I/O adapter is listed in the feature comparison tables
for PCIe and PCI-X cards as having Yes in the Removable Cache Card column.
Go to “Step 3131-11” on page 104.
Step 3131-6
Identify the affected disks by examining the hardware error log. The hardware error log can be viewed as
follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view.
Viewing the hardware error log, the Device Errors Detected field indicates the total number of disks
which are affected. The Device Errors Logged field indicates the number of disks for which detailed
information is provided. Under the Original Device heading, the Resource, Vendor/Product ID, S/N,
and World Wide ID are provided for up to three disks. Additionally, the Original Controller Type,
S/N, and World Wide ID for each of these disks indicates the adapter to which the disk was last
attached when it was operational. Refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to understand how to
locate a disk using the Resource field.
3. Go to “Step 3131-7.”
Step 3131-7
Have the adapter or disks been physically moved recently?
No
Contact your hardware service provider
Yes
Go to “Step 3131-8”
Step 3131-8
Is the data on the disks needed for this or any other system?
No
Go to “Step 3131-10” on page 103
Yes
Go to “Step 3131-9” on page 103
102
Step 3131-9
The adapter and disks, identified previously, must be reunited so that the cache data can be written to
the disks.
Restore the adapter and disks back to their original configuration. Once the cache data is written to the
disks and the system is powered off normally, the adapter and/or disks can be moved to another
location.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3131-10
Perform only one of the following options, listed in the order of preference:
Option 1
Reclaim controller cache storage by performing the following:
Attention:
All data on the disk array will be lost.
Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
1.
3. Select Reclaim Controller Cache Storage.
4. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
5. Confirm that you will Allow Unknown Data Loss.
6. Confirm that you wish to proceed.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 2
If the disks are members of a disk array, delete the disk array by doing the following:
Attention:
All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager as follows:
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Delete a SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
4. Select the disk array to delete.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 3
Format the disks, as follows:
Attention:
All data on the disk array will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager as follows:
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
103
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk).
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3131-11
Has a new SRN nnnn-9010 or nnnn-9050 occurred?
No
Go to “Step 3131-13”
Yes
Go to “Step 3131-12”
Step 3131-12
Was the new SRN nnnn-9050?
No
The new SRN was nnnn-9010.
Reclaim the controller cache storage as follows:
Attention: Data might be lost. When an auxiliary cache adapter connected to the RAID controller
logs an nnnn - 9055 SRN in the hardware error log, the reclaim process does not result in lost
sectors. Otherwise, the reclaim process does result in lost sectors.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
Select Reclaim Controller Cache Storage.
Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
Confirm that you wish to proceed.
Note: On the Reclaim Controller Cache Storage results screen, the number of lost sectors is
displayed. If the number is 0, there is no data loss. If the number is not 0, data has been lost
and the system operator might want to restore data after this procedure is completed.
6. Go to “Step 3131-13”
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3131-13
Are you working with a 572F/575C card set?
No
Go to “Step 3131-15” on page 105
Yes
Go to “Step 3131-14”
Step 3131-14
Note: Label all parts (original and new) before moving them.
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the 572F/575C card set. Create and install the new card
set that has the following parts installed on it:
104
v The new 572F storage I/O adapter
v The cache directory card from the new replacement 572F storage I/O adapter
v The new 575C auxiliary cache adapter
Note: See the figures at “Separating the 572F/575C card set and moving the cache directory card” on
page 69 to locate the parts appearing in the preceding list.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3131-15
Using the appropriate service procedures, remove the I/O adapter. Install the new replacement storage
I/O adapter with the following parts installed on it:
v The cache directory card from the new storage I/O adapter. Refer to “Replacing the cache directory
card” on page 73.
v The removable cache card from the new storage I/O adapter. This only applies to certain adapters
which have a removable cache card. Verify that the storage I/O adapter is listed in the feature
comparison tables for PCI Express and PCI-X cards as having Yes in column for Removable Cache
Card.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3132
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Cache data exists for one or more missing or failed disks
(SRN nnnn - 9051)
The possible causes are:
v One or more disks have failed on the adapter.
v One or more disks were either moved concurrently or were removed after an abnormal power off.
v The adapter was moved from a different system or a different location on this system after an
abnormal power off.
v The cache of the adapter was not cleared before it was shipped to the customer.
Step 3132-1
Identify the affected disks by examining the hardware error log. The hardware error log can be viewed as
follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. Viewing the hardware error log, the Device Errors Detected
field indicates the total number of disks which are affected. The Device Errors Logged field indicates
the number of disks for which detailed information is provided. Under the Original Device heading,
the Vendor/Product ID, S/N, and World Wide ID are provided for up to three disks. Additionally, the
Original Controller Type, S/N, and World Wide ID for each of these disks indicates the adapter to
which the disk was last attached when it was operational.
3. Go to “Step 3132-2.”
Step 3132-2
Are there other disk or adapter errors that have occurred at approximately the same time as this error?
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
105
No
Go to “Step 3132-3.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3132-6.”
Step 3132-3
Is the data on the disks (and thus the cache data for the disks) needed for this or any other system?
No
Go to “Step 3132-7.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3132-4.”
Step 3132-4
Have the adapter card or disks been physically moved recently?
No
Contact your hardware service provider.
Yes
Go to “Step 3132-5.”
Step 3132-5
The adapter and disks must be reunited so that the cache data can be written to the disks.
Restore the adapter and disks back to their original configuration.
After the cache data is written to the disks and the system is powered off normally, the adapter or disks
can be moved to another location.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3132-6
Take action on the other errors that have occurred at the same time as this error.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3132-7
Reclaim the Controller Cache Storage by performing the following:
Attention:
Data will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Reclaim Controller Cache Storage.
4. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
5. Confirm that you will Allow Unknown Data Loss.
6. Confirm that you wish to proceed.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
106
MAP 3133
Use this MAP to resolve the following problems:
v Disk has been modified after last known status (SRN nnnn - 9090)
v Incorrect disk configuration change has been detected (SRN nnnn - 9091)
Step 3133-1
Perform only one of the following options:
Option 1
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter:
1. Start AIX Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Option 2
Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
Option 3
Perform an IPL of the system or logical partition:
Step 3133-2
Take action on any other errors which are now occurring.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3134
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Disk requires Format before use (SRN nnnn - 9092)
The possible causes are:
v Disk is a previously failed disk from a disk array and was automatically replaced by a hot spare disk.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
107
v Disk is a previously failed disk from a disk array and was removed and later reinstalled on a different
adapter or different location on this adapter.
v Appropriate service procedures were not followed when replacing disks or reconfiguring the adapter,
such as not using the SCSI and SCSI RAID Hot Plug Manager when concurrently removing or
installing disks, or not performing a normal power off of the system prior to reconfiguring disks and
adapters.
v Disk is a member of a disk array, but was detected subsequent to the adapter being configured.
v Disk has multiple or complex configuration problems.
Step 3134-1
Identify the affected disks by examining the hardware error log. The hardware error log might be viewed
as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view.
Viewing the hardware error log, the Device Errors Detected field indicates the total number of disks
that are affected. The Device Errors Logged field indicates the number of disks for which detailed
information is provided. Under the Original Device heading, the Resource, Vendor/Product ID, S/N,
and World Wide ID are provided for up to three disks. Additionally, the Original Controller Type,
S/N, and World Wide ID for each of these disks indicates the adapter to which the disk was last
attached when it was operational. Refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to understand how to
locate a disk using the Resource field.
3. Go to “Step 3134-2.”
Step 3134-2
Are there other disk or adapter errors that have occurred at about the same time as this error?
No
Go to “Step 3134-3.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3134-5.”
Step 3134-3
Have the adapter card or disks been physically moved recently?
No
Go to “Step 3134-4.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3134-6” on page 109.
Step 3134-4
Is the data on the disks needed for this or any other system?
No
Go to “Step 3134-7” on page 110.
Yes
Go to “Step 3134-6” on page 109.
Step 3134-5
Take action on the other errors that have occurred at the same time as this error.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
108
Step 3134-6
Perform only one of the following options that is most applicable to your situation:
Option 1
Perform only one of the following to cause the adapter to rediscover the disks and then take
action on any new errors:
v Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter
1. Start AIX Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
v Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
v Perform an IPL on the system or logical partition
Take action on any other errors which are now occurring.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 2
Restore the adapter and disks to their original configuration. Once this has been done, perform
only one of the following options:
v Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter
1. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
v Unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter by performing the following:
1. Unconfigure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
109
c. Select Unconfigure an Available IBM SAS RAID Controller.
2. Configure the adapter.
a. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
1) Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2) Select RAID Array Manager.
3) Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
b. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
c. Select Configure a Defined IBM SAS RAID Controller.
v Perform an IPL of the system or logical partition
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 3
Remove the disks from this adapter.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3134-7
Perform only one of the following options.
Option 1
If the disks are members of a disk array, delete the disk array by doing the following:
Attention:
All data on the disk array will be lost.
Note: In some rare scenarios, deleting the disk array will not have any effect on a disk and the
disk must be formatted instead.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Delete a SAS Disk Array.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller.
4. Select the disk array to delete.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Option 2
Do the following to format the disks:
Attention: All data on the disks will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start AIX diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options..
3. Select the Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk).
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system
unit on which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
110
MAP 3135
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Disk media format bad (SRN nnnn - FFF3)
The possible causes are:
v Disk was being formatted and was powered off during this process.
v Disk was being formatted and was reset during this process.
Step 3135-1
Identify the affected disk by examining the hardware error log. View the hardware error log as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. Viewing the hardware error log, under the Disk Information
heading, the Resource, Vendor/Product ID, S/N, and World Wide ID are provided for the disk. Refer
to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to understand how to locate a disk using the Resource field.
3. Go to “Step 3135-2.”
Step 3135-2
Format the disk by doing the following:
Attention: All data on the disks will be lost.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Format Physical Disk Media (pdisk).
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3140
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Multiple controllers connected in an invalid
configuration (SRN nnnn - 9073)
The possible causes are:
v Incompatible adapters are connected to each other. Such an incompatibility includes invalid adapter
combinations such as the following situations. See the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X
cards for a list of the supported adapters and their attributes.
– An adapter is CCIN 572A but has a part number of either 44V4266 or 44V4404 (feature code 5900),
which does not support multi-initiator and high availability
– Adapters with different write cache sizes
– One adapter is not supported by AIX
– An adapter that does not support auxiliary cache is connected to an auxiliary cache adapter
– An adapter that supports multi-initiator and high availability is connected to another adapter which
does not have the same support
– Adapters connected for multi-initiator and high availability are not both operating in the same Dual
Initiator Configuration, for example both are not set to Default or both are not set to JBOD HA
Single Path.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
111
– Greater than 2 adapters are connected for multi-initiator and high availability
– Adapter microcode levels are not up to date or are not at the same level of functionality
v One adapter, of a connected pair of adapters, is not operating under the AIX operating system.
Connected adapters must both be controlled by AIX. Additionally, both adapters must be in the same
system partition if one adapter is an auxiliary cache adapter.
v Adapters connected for multi-initiator and high availability are not cabled correctly. Each type of high
availability configuration requires specific cables be used in a supported manner.
Step 3140-1
Determine which of the possible causes applies to the current configuration and take the appropriate
actions to correct it. If this does not correct the error, contact your hardware service provider.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3141
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Multiple controllers not capable of similar functions or
controlling same set of devices (SRN nnnn - 9074)
Step 3141-1
This error relates to adapters connected in a Multi Initiator and High Availability configuration. To obtain
the reason or description for this failure, you must find the formatted error information in the AIX error
log. This should also contain information about the attached adapter (Remote Adapter fields).
Display the hardware error log. View the hardware error log as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. Viewing the hardware error log, the Detail Data section
contains the REASON FOR FAILURE and the Remote Adapter Vendor ID, Product ID, Serial
Number, and World Wide ID.
3. Go to “Step 3141-2.”
Step 3141-2
Find the REASON FOR FAILURE and information for the attached adapter (remote adapter) shown in
the error log, and perform the action listed for the reason in the following table:
Table 10. RAID array reason for failure
Reason for Failure
Description
Secondary does not support Secondary adapter detected
RAID level being used by
that the primary has a
primary.
RAID array with a RAID
level that the secondary
does not support.
Action
Customer needs to upgrade
the type of secondary
adapter or change the
RAID level of the array on
the primary to a level that
is supported by the
secondary.
Secondary does not support Secondary adapter detected Customer might need to
disk function being used by a device function that it
upgrade the adapter
primary.
does not support.
microcode or upgrade the
type of secondary adapter.
112
Adapter on which to
perform the action
Physically change the type
of adapter that logged the
error. Change RAID level
on primary adapter (remote
adapter indicated in the
error log).
Adapter that logged the
error.
Table 10. RAID array reason for failure (continued)
Reason for Failure
Description
Adapter on which to
perform the action
Action
Secondary is unable to find Secondary adapter cannot
Verify the connections to
devices found by the
discover all the devices that the devices from the
primary.
the primary has.
adapter logging the error.
Adapter that logged the
error.
View the disk array
configuration screens to
determine the SAS port
with the problem.
Secondary found devices
not found by the primary.
Secondary adapter has
discovered more devices
than the primary. After this
error is logged, an
automatic failover will
occur.
Verify the connections to
Remote adapter indicated
the devices from the remote in the error log.
adapter as indicated in the
error log.
View the disk array
configuration screens to
determine the SAS port
with the problem.
Secondary port not
connected to the same
numbered port on primary.
Verify connections and
Either adapter.
SAS connections from the
re-cable SAS connections as
adapter to the devices are
necessary.
incorrect. Common disk
expansion drawers must be
attached to the same
numbered SAS port on
both adapters.
Primary lost contact with
disks accessible by
secondary.
Link failure from primary
adapter to devices. An
automatic failover will
occur.
Verify cable connections
from the adapter which
logged the error. Possible
disk expansion drawer
failure.
Other
Not currently defined.
Contact your hardware
service provider.
Adapter that logged the
error.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3142
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Configuration error, incorrect connection between
cascaded enclosures (SRN nnnn - 4010).
The possible causes are:
v Incorrect cabling of cascaded device enclosures
v Use of an unsupported device enclosure
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
Step 3142-1
Identify the adapter SAS port associated with the problem by examining the hardware error log. View the
hardware error log as follows:
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
113
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Obtain the Resource field from the Detail Data / PROBLEM DATA section as illustrated in the
following example:
Detail Data
PROBLEM DATA
0000 0800 0004 FFFF 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1910 00F0 0408 0100 0101 0000
^
|
Resource is 0004FFFF
Using the Resource found in the previous step, refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to
understand how to identify the controller’s port that the device, or device enclosure, is attached.
For example, if the Resource were equal to 0004FFFF, port 04 on the adapter is used to attach the device
or device enclosure, which is experiencing the problem.
Step 3142-2
Review the device enclosure cabling and correct the cabling as required. To see example device
configurations with SAS cabling, see Serial attached SCSI cable planning.
If unsupported device enclosures are attached, then either remove or replace them with supported device
enclosures.
Step 3142-3
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Referring to the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88, did the error reoccur?
No
Go to “Step 3142-4.”
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3142-4
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3143
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Configuration error, connections exceed controller design
limits (SRN nnnn – 4020)
The possible causes are:
v Unsupported number of cascaded device enclosures
v Improper cabling of cascaded device enclosures
Considerations:
114
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
Step 3143-1
Identify the adapter SAS port associated with the problem by examining the hardware error log. The
hardware error log might be viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Obtain the Resource field from the Detail Data / PROBLEM DATA section as illustrated in the following
example:
Detail Data
PROBLEM DATA
0000 0800 0004 FFFF 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1910 00F0 0408 0100 0101 0000
^
|
Resource is 0004FFFF
Using the Resource found in the previous step, refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to
understand how to identify the controller’s port that the device, or device enclosure, is attached.
For example, if the Resource were equal to 0004FFFF, port 04 on the adapter is used to attach the device
or device enclosure that is experiencing the problem.
Step 3143-2
Reduce the number of cascaded device enclosures. Device enclosures might only be cascaded one level
deep, and only in certain configurations.
Review the device enclosure cabling and correct the cabling as required. To see example device
configurations with SAS cabling, see Serial attached SCSI cable planning.
Step 3143-3
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
Select Run Diagnostics.
Select the adapter resource.
Select System Verification.
Referring to the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88, did the error reoccur?
No
Go to “Step 3143-4.”
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3143-4
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3144
Use this MAP to resolve the following problems:
v Configuration error, incorrect multipath connection (SRN nnnn – 4030)
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
115
v Configuration error, incomplete multipath connection between controller and enclosure detected (SRN
nnnn – 4040)
The possible causes are:
v Incorrect cabling to device enclosure.
Note: Pay special attention to the requirement that a Y0-cable, YI-cable, or X-cable must be routed
along the right side of the rack frame (as viewed from the rear) when connecting to a disk expansion
drawer. Review the device enclosure cabling and correct the cabling as required. To see example device
configurations with SAS cabling, see Serial attached SCSI cable planning.
v A failed connection caused by a failing component in the SAS fabric between, and including, the
controller and device enclosure.
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
v Some systems have SAS and PCI-X or PCIe bus interface logic integrated onto the system boards and
use a pluggable RAID Enablement Card (a non-PCI form factor card) for these integrated buses. See
the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards. For these configurations, replacement of the
RAID Enablement Card is unlikely to solve a SAS-related problem because the SAS interface logic is on
the system board.
v Some systems have the disk enclosure or removable media enclosure integrated in the system with no
cables. For these configurations the SAS connections are integrated onto the system boards and a failed
connection can be the result of a failed system board or integrated device enclosure.
v Some configurations involve a SAS adapter connecting to internal SAS disk enclosures within a system
using a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card. Keep in mind that when the MAP refers to an device enclosure,
it could be referring to the internal SAS disk slots or media slots. Also, when the MAP refers to a cable,
it could include a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card.
v When using SAS adapters in either an HA Two System RAID or HA Single System RAID
configuration, ensure that the actions taken in this MAP are against the Primary adapter and not the
Secondary adapter.
v Before executing the system verification action in this map, reconstruct any degraded disk arrays if
possible. This will help avoid potential data loss resulting from the adapter reset performed during
system verification action taken in this map.
Attention: Obtain assistance from your Hardware Service Support organization before you replace
RAID adapters when SAS fabric problems exist. Because the adapter might contain nonvolatile write
cache data and configuration data for the attached disk arrays, additional problems can be created by
replacing an adapter when SAS fabric problems exist.
Step 3144-1
Was the SRN nnnn-4030?
No
Go to “Step 3144-5” on page 117.
Yes
Go to “Step 3144-2.”
Step 3144-2
Identify the adapter SAS port associated with the problem by examining the hardware error log. The
hardware error log might be viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
116
2. Obtain the Resource field from the Detail Data / PROBLEM DATA section as illustrated in the
following example:
Detail Data
PROBLEM DATA
0000 0800 0004 FFFF 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1910 00F0 0408 0100 0101 0000
^
|
Resource is 0004FFFF
Using the Resource found in the previous step, refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to
understand how to identify the controller’s port that the device, or device enclosure, is attached.
For example, if the Resource were equal to 0004FFFF, port 04 on the adapter is used to attach the device
or device enclosure, which is experiencing the problem.
Step 3144-3
Review the device enclosure cabling and correct the cabling as required. To see example device
configurations with SAS cabling, see ″Serial attached SCSI cable planning.
Step 3144-4
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Referring to the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88, did the error reoccur?
No
Go to “Step 3144-10” on page 119.
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3144-5
The SRN is nnnn-4040.
Determine if a problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3144-6” on page 118.
Yes
Go to “Step 3144-10” on page 119.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
117
Step 3144-6
Run diagnostics in System Verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Note: At this point, ignore any problems found and continue with the next step.
Step 3144-7
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
5. Select a device with a path which is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about
the full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on
page 76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3144-8.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3144-10” on page 119.
Step 3144-8
After the problem persists, some corrective action is needed to resolve the problem. Proceed by doing the
following:
1. Power off the system or logical partition.
2. Perform only one of the corrective actions listed below, which are listed in the order of preference. If
one of the corrective actions has previously been attempted, then proceed to the next one in the list.
Note: Prior to replacing parts, consider using a complete shutdown and power off of the entire
system, including any external device enclosures, to provide a reset of all possible failing components.
This might correct the problem without replacing parts.
v Reseat cables on adapter and device enclosure.
v Replace cable from adapter to device enclosure.
v Replace the internal device enclosure or refer to the service documentation for an external
expansion drawer.
v Replace the adapter.
v Contact your hardware service provider.
3. Power on the system or logical partition.
118
Note: In some situations, it might be acceptable to unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter instead of
powering off and powering on the system or logical partition.
Step 3144-9
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
5. Select a device with a path that is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about the
full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on page
76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3144-8” on page 118.
Yes
Go to “Step 3144-10.”
Step 3144-10
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3145
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Unsupported enclosure function detected (SRN nnnn 4110)
The possible causes are:
v Device enclosure or adapter microcode levels are not up to date
v Unsupported type of device enclosure or device
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
Step 3145-1
Identify the adapter SAS port associated with the problem by examining the hardware error log. The
hardware error log might be viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Obtain the Resource field from the Detail Data / PROBLEM DATA section as illustrated in the
following example:
Detail Data
PROBLEM DATA
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
119
0000 0800 0004 FFFF 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1910 00F0 0408 0100 0101 0000
^
|
Resource is 0004FFFF
Using the Resource found in the previous step, refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to
understand how to identify the controller’s port that the device, or device enclosure, is attached.
For example, if the Resource were equal to 0004FFFF, port 04 on the adapter is used to attach the device
or device enclosure, which is experiencing the problem.
Step 3145-2
Ensure device enclosure or adapter microcode levels are up to date.
If unsupported device enclosures or devices are attached, then either remove or replace them with
supported device enclosures or devices.
Review the device enclosure cabling and correct the cabling as required. To see example device
configurations with SAS cabling, see Serial attached SCSI cable planning.
Step 3145-3
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Referring to the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88, did the error reoccur?
No
Go to “Step 3145-4.”
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3145-4
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3146
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Configuration error, incomplete multipath connection
between enclosures and device detected (SRN nnnn - 4041)
The possible cause is a failed connection caused by a failing component within the device enclosure,
including the device itself.
Note: The adapter is not a likely cause of this problem.
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
120
v Some systems have the disk enclosure or removable media enclosure integrated in the system with no
cables. For these configurations, the SAS connections are integrated onto the system boards and a
failed connection can be the result of a failed system board or integrated device enclosure.
v Some configurations involve a SAS adapter connecting to internal SAS disk enclosures within a system
using a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card. Keep in mind that when the MAP refers to an device enclosure,
it could be referring to the internal SAS disk slots or media slots. Also, when the MAP refers to a cable,
it could include a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card.
v When using SAS adapters in either an HA Two System RAID or HA Single System RAID
configuration, ensure that the actions taken in this MAP are against the Primary adapter and not the
Secondary adapter.
v Before executing the system verification action in this map, reconstruct any degraded disk arrays if
possible. This will help avoid potential data loss resulting from the adapter reset performed during
system verification action taken in this map.
Attention: Removing functioning disks in a disk array is not recommended without assistance from
your Hardware Service Support organization. A disk array might become degraded or failed if
functioning disks are removed and additional problems might be created.
Step 3146-1
Determine if a problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3146-2.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3146-6” on page 123.
Step 3146-2
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Note: At this point, disregard any problems found, and continue with the next step.
Step 3146-3
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
121
2.
3.
4.
5.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
Select a device with a path that is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about the
full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on page
76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
Yes
Go to “Step 3146-6” on page 123.
No
Go to “Step 3146-4.”
Step 3146-4
Because the problem persists, some corrective action is needed to resolve the problem. Proceed by doing
the following:
1. Power off the system or logical partition.
2. Perform only one of the corrective actions listed below, which are listed in the order of preference. If
one of the corrective actions has previously been attempted, then proceed to the next one in the list.
Note: Prior to replacing parts, consider using a complete shutdown to power off the entire system,
including any external device enclosures, to provide a reset of all possible failing components. This
might correct the problem without replacing parts.
v Review the device enclosure cabling and correct the cabling as required. To see example device
configurations with SAS cabling, see Serial attached SCSI cable planning.
v Reseat cables on adapter and device enclosure.
v Replace cable from adapter to device enclosure.
v Replace the internal device enclosure or refer to the service documentation for an external
expansion drawer.
v Replace the adapter.
v Contact your hardware service provider.
3. Power on the system or logical partition.
Note: In some situations, it might be acceptable to unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter instead of
powering off and powering on the system or logical partition.
Step 3146-5
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
122
5. Select a device with a path which is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about
the full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on
page 76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3146-4” on page 122.
Yes
Go to “Step 3146-6.”
Step 3146-6
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3147
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Missing remote controller (SRN nnnn - 9076)
Step 3147-1
An adapter attached in either an auxiliary cache or multi initiator and high availability configuration was
not discovered in the allotted time. To obtain additional information about the configuration involved,
locate the formatted error information in the AIX error log.
Display the hardware error log. View the hardware error log as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. Viewing the hardware error log, the Detail Data section
contains the Link Type that describes the configuration. If the Link Type is AWC then an auxiliary
cache configuration is involved. If the Link Type is HA then a multi-initiator and high availability
configuration is involved.
3. Go to “Step 3147-2.”
Step 3147-2
Determine which of the following is the cause of your specific error and take the appropriate actions
listed. If this does not correct the error, contact your hardware service provider.
The possible causes are:
v An attached adapter for the configuration is not installed or is not powered on. Some adapters are
required to be part of an HA RAID configuration. Verify this requirement in the feature comparison
tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards. Ensure that both adapters are properly installed and powered on.
v If this is an Auxiliary Cache or HA Single System RAID configuration, then both adapters might not be
in the same partition. Ensure that both adapters are assigned to the same partition.
v An attached adapter does not support the desired configuration. Verify whether such configuration
support exists by reviewing the the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards to see whether
the entries for Auxiliary write cache (AWC) support, HA two system RAID, HA two system JBOD, or
HA single system RAID support have Yes in the column for the desired configuration.
v An attached adapter for the configuration is failed. Take action on the other errors that have occurred
at the same time as this error.
v Adapter microcode levels are not up to date or are not at the same level of functionality. Ensure that
the microcode for both adapters is at the latest level.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
123
Note: The adapter that is logging this error will run in a performance degraded mode, without caching,
until the problem is resolved.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3148
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Attached enclosure does not support required multipath
function (SRN nnnn – 4050)
The possible cause is the use of an unsupported device enclosure.
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
Step 3148-1
Identify the adapter SAS port associated with the problem by examining the hardware error log. The
hardware error log might be viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Obtain the Resource field from the Detail Data / PROBLEM DATA section as illustrated in the
following example:
Detail Data
PROBLEM DATA
0000 0800 0004 FFFF 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1910 00F0 0408 0100 0101 0000
^
|
Resource is 0004FFFF
Using the Resource found in the previous step, refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to
understand how to identify the controller’s port that the device, or device enclosure, is attached.
For example, if the Resource were equal to 0004FFFF, port 04 on the adapter is used to attach the device
or device enclosure, which is experiencing the problem.
Step 3148-2
If unsupported device enclosures are attached, then either remove or replace them with supported device
enclosures.
Step 3148-3
Run diagnostics in System Verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Referring to the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88, did the error recur?
No
124
Go to “Step 3148-4” on page 125.
Yes
Contact your hardware service provider.
Step 3148-4
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3149
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Incomplete multipath connection between controller and
remote controller (SRN nnnn - 9075)
The possible cause is incorrect cabling between SAS RAID controllers.
Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate, to
prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
Step 3149-1
Review the device enclosure cabling and correct the cabling as required. To see example device
configurations with SAS cabling, see Serial attached SCSI cable planning.
Step 3149-2
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3150
Use the following to perform SAS fabric problem isolation.
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
v Some systems have SAS and PCI-X or PCIe bus interface logic integrated onto the system boards and
use a pluggable RAID enablement card (a non-PCI form factor card) for these integrated-logic buses,
See the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards. For these configurations, replacement of
the RAID enablement card is unlikely to solve a SAS-related problem because the SAS interface logic is
on the system board.
v Some systems have the disk enclosure or removable media enclosure integrated in the system with no
cables. For these configurations, the SAS connections are integrated onto the system boards and a
failed connection can be the result of a failed system board or integrated device enclosure.
Attention: When SAS fabric problems exist, obtain assistance from your hardware service provider:
v Before you replace a RAID adapter. Because the adapter might contain nonvolatile write cache data
and configuration data for the attached disk arrays, additional problems can be created by replacing an
adapter.
v Before you remove functioning disks in a disk array. A disk array might become degraded or failed
and additional problems might be created if functioning disks are removed from a disk array.
Attention: Removing functioning disks in a disk array is not recommended without assistance from
your hardware service support organization. A disk array might become degraded or might fail if
functioning disks are removed, and additional problems might be created.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
125
Step 3150-1
Was the SRN nnnn-3020?
No
Go to “Step 3150-3.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3150-2.”
Step 3150-2
The possible causes are:
v More devices are connected to the adapter than the adapter supports. Change the configuration to
reduce the number of devices below what is supported by the adapter.
v A SAS device has been improperly moved from one location to another. Either return the device to its
original location or move the device while the adapter is powered off or unconfigured.
v A SAS device has been improperly replaced by a SATA device. A SAS device must be used to replace a
SAS device.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3150-3
Determine if any of the disk arrays on the adapter are in a Degraded state as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select List SAS Disk Array Configuration.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller identified in the hardware error log.
Does any disk array have a state of Degraded?
No
Go to “Step 3150-5.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3150-4.”
Step 3150-4
Other errors should have occurred related to the disk array being in a Degraded state. Take action on
these errors to replace the failed disk and restore the disk array to an Optimal state.
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3150-5
Have other errors occurred at the same time as this error?
No
Go to “Step 3150-7” on page 127.
Yes
Go to “Step 3150-6.”
Step 3150-6
Take action on the other errors that have occurred at the same time as this error.
126
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3150-7
Was the SRN nnnn-FFFE?
No
Go to “Step 3150-10.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3150-8.”
Step 3150-8
Ensure device, device enclosure, and adapter microcode levels are up to date.
Did you update to newer microcode levels?
No
Go to “Step 3150-10.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3150-9.”
Step 3150-9
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
Step 3150-10
Identify the adapter SAS port associated with the problem by examining the hardware error log. The
hardware error log might be viewed as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view. Viewing the hardware error log, under the Disk Information
heading, the Resource field can be used to identify which controller port the error is associated with.
Note: If you do not see the Disk Information heading in the error log, obtain the Resource field from the
Detail Data / PROBLEM DATA section as illustrated in the following example:
Detail Data
PROBLEM DATA
0000 0800 0004 FFFF 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1910 00F0 0408 0100 0101 0000
^
|
Resource is 0004FFFF
Go to “Step 3150-11.”
Step 3150-11
Using the resource found in the previous step, refer to “SAS resource locations” on page 83 to understand
how to identify the controller’s port to which the device, or device enclosure, is attached.
For example, if the resource were equal to 0004FFFF, port 04 on the adapter is used to attach the device,
or device enclosure that is experiencing the problem.
The resource found in the previous step can also be used to identify the device. To identify the device,
you can attempt to match the Rresource with one found on the screen, which is displayed by completing
the following steps.
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager:
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
127
a. Start the diagnostics program and select Task Selection from the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Physical Resource Locations.
Step 3150-12
Because the problem persists, some corrective action is needed to resolve the problem. Using the port or
device information found in the previous step, proceed by doing the following steps.
1. Power off the system or logical partition.
2. Perform only one of the corrective actions listed below, which are listed in the order of preference. If
one of the corrective actions has previously been attempted, then proceed to the next one in the list.
Note: Prior to replacing parts, consider using a complete power down of the entire system, including
any external device enclosures, to provide a reset of all possible failing components. This might
correct the problem without replacing parts.
v Reseat cables on adapter and device enclosure.
v Replace cable from adapter to device enclosure.
v Replace the device.
Note: If there are multiple devices with a path that is not Operational, then the problem is not
likely to be with a device.
v Replace the internal device enclosure or refer to the service documentation for an external
expansion drawer.
v Replace the adapter.
v Contact your hardware service provider.
3. Power on the system or logical partition.
Note: In some situations, it might be acceptable to unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter instead of
powering off and powering on the system or logical partition.
Step 3150-13
Does the problem still occur after performing the corrective action?
No
Go to “Step 3150-14.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3150-12.”
Step 3150-14
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3152
Use this MAP to resolve the following problems:
v Device bus fabric error (SRN nnnn – 4100)
v Temporary device bus fabric error (SRN nnnn – 4101)
The possible causes are:
128
v A failed connection caused by a failing component in the SAS fabric between, and including, the
adapter and device enclosure.
v A failed connection caused by a failing component within the device enclosure, including the device
itself.
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
v Some systems have SAS and PCI-X or PCIe bus interface logic integrated onto the system boards and
use a pluggable RAID enablement card (a non-PCI form factor card) for such integrated-logic buses.
See the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards. For these configurations, replacement of
the RAID enablement card is unlikely to solve a SAS-related problem because the SAS interface logic is
on the system board.
v Some systems have the disk enclosure or removable media enclosure integrated in the system with no
cables. For these configurations the SAS connections are integrated onto the system boards and a failed
connection can be the result of a failed system board or integrated device enclosure.
v Some configurations involve a SAS adapter connecting to internal SAS disk enclosures within a system
using a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card. Keep in mind that when the MAP refers to an device enclosure,
it could be referring to the internal SAS disk slots or media slots. Also, when the MAP refers to a cable,
it could include a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card.
v When using SAS adapters in either an HA Two System RAID or HA Single System RAID
configuration, ensure that the actions taken in this MAP are against the Primary adapter (i.e. not the
Secondary adapter).
v Before executing the system verification action in this map, reconstruct any degraded disk arrays if
possible. This will help avoid potential data loss resulting from the adapter reset performed during
system verification action taken in this map.
Attention: When SAS fabric problems exist, obtain assistance from your hardware service provider:
v Before you replace a RAID adapter. Because the adapter might contain nonvolatile write cache data
and configuration data for the attached disk arrays, additional problems can be created by replacing an
adapter.
v Before you remove functioning disks in a disk array. A disk array might become degraded or failed
and additional problems might be created if functioning disks are removed from a disk array.
Step 3152-1
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter which logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3152-2” on page 130.
Yes
Go to “Step 3152-6” on page 131.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
129
Step 3152-2
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Note: Disregard any trouble found for now, and continue with the next step.
Step 3152-3
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter which logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
5. Select a device with a path which is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about
the full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on
page 76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3152-4.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3152-6” on page 131.
Step 3152-4
Because the problem persists, some corrective action is needed to resolve the problem. Proceed by doing
the following:
1. Power off the system or logical partition.
2. Perform only one of the corrective actions listed below, which are listed in the order of preference. If
one of the corrective actions has previously been attempted, then proceed to the next one in the list.
Note: Prior to replacing parts, consider doing a power off of the entire system, including any
external device enclosures, to provide a reset of all possible failing components. This might correct the
problem without replacing parts.
v Reseat cables on adapter and device enclosure
v Replace cable from adapter to device enclosure
v Replace the device
Note: If there are multiple devices with a path that is not Operational, then the problem is not
likely to be with a device.
v Replace the internal device enclosure or refer to the service documentation for an external
expansion drawer.
v Replace the adapter.
130
v Contact your hardware service provider.
3. Power on the system or logical partition.
Note: In some situations, it might be acceptable to unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter instead of
powering off and powering on the system or logical partition.
Step 3152-5
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
5. Select a device with a path which is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about
the full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on
page 76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3152-4” on page 130.
Yes
“Step 3152-6.”
Step 3152-6
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3153
Use this MAP to resolve the following problem: Multipath redundancy level got worse (SRN nnnn - 4060)
The possible causes are:
v A failed connection caused by a failing component in the SAS fabric between, and including, the
adapter and device enclosure.
v A failed connection caused by a failing component within the device enclosure, including the device
itself.
Note: The failed connection was previously working, and might have already recovered.
Considerations:
v Remove power from the system before connecting and disconnecting cables or devices, as appropriate,
to prevent hardware damage or erroneous diagnostic results.
v Some systems have SAS and PCI-X or PCIe bus interface logic integrated onto the system boards and
use a pluggable RAID enablement card (a non-PCI form factor card) for such integrated-logic buses.
See the feature comparison tables for PCIe and PCI-X cards. For these configurations, replacement of
the RAID enablement card is unlikely to solve a SAS-related problem because the SAS interface logic is
on the system board.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
131
v Some systems have the disk enclosure or removable media enclosure integrated in the system with no
cables. For these configurations the SAS connections are integrated onto the system boards and a failed
connection can be the result of a failed system board or integrated device enclosure.
v Some configurations involve a SAS adapter connecting to internal SAS disk enclosures within a system
using a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card. Keep in mind that when the MAP refers to a device enclosure, it
could be referring to the internal SAS disk slots or media slots. Also, when the MAP refers to a cable, it
could include a FC3650 or FC3651 cable card.
v When using SAS adapters in either an HA Two System RAID or HA Single System RAID
configuration, ensure that the actions taken in this MAP are against the Primary adapter and not the
Secondary adapter.
v Before executing the system verification action in this map, reconstruct any degraded disk arrays if
possible. This will help avoid potential data loss resulting from the adapter reset performed during
system verification action taken in this map.
Attention: When SAS fabric problems exist, obtain assistance from your hardware service provider:
v Before you replace a RAID adapter. Because the adapter might contain nonvolatile write cache data
and configuration data for the attached disk arrays, additional problems can be created by replacing an
adapter.
v Before you remove functioning disks in a disk array. A disk array might become degraded or failed
and additional problems might be created if functioning disks are removed from a disk array.
Step 3153-1
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3153-2.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3153-6” on page 134.
Step 3153-2
Run diagnostics in system verification mode on the adapter to rediscover the devices and connections.
1. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
2. Select Run Diagnostics.
3. Select the adapter resource.
4. Select System Verification.
Note: Disregard any trouble found for now, and continue with the next step.
Step 3153-3
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter which logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
132
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
3. Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
4. Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
5. Select a device with a path that is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about the
full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on page
76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3153-4.”
Yes
Go to “Step 3153-6” on page 134.
Step 3153-4
Since the problem persists, some corrective action is needed to resolve the problem. Proceed by doing the
following:
1. Power off the system or logical partition.
2. Perform only one of the corrective actions listed below, which are listed in the order of preference. If
one of the corrective actions has previously been attempted, then proceed to the next one in the list.
Note: Prior to replacing parts, consider using a complete powerdown of the entire system, including
any external device enclosures, to provide a reset of all possible failing components. This might
correct the problem without replacing parts.
v Reseat cables on adapter and device enclosure.
v Replace cable from adapter to device enclosure.
v Replace the device.
Note: If there are multiple devices with a path which is not Operational, then the problem is not
likely to be with a device.
v Replace the internal device enclosure or refer to the service documentation for an external
expansion drawer.
v Replace the adapter.
v Contact your hardware service provider.
3. Power on the system or logical partition.
Note: In some situations, it might be acceptable to unconfigure and reconfigure the adapter instead of
powering off and powering on the system or logical partition.
Step 3153-5
Determine if the problem still exists for the adapter that logged this error by examining the SAS
connections as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
133
2.
3.
4.
5.
Select Diagnostics and Recovery Options.
Select Show SAS Controller Physical Resources.
Select Show Fabric Path Graphical View.
Select a device with a path which is not Operational (if one exists) to obtain additional details about
the full path from the adapter port to the device. Refer to “Viewing SAS fabric path information” on
page 76 for an example of how this additional detail can be used to help isolate where in the path the
problem exists.
Do all expected devices appear in the list and are all paths marked as Operational?
No
Go to “Step 3153-4” on page 133.
Yes
Go to “Step 3153-6.”
Step 3153-6
When the problem is resolved, see the removal and replacement procedures topic for the system unit on
which you are working and do the ″Verifying the repair″ procedure.
MAP 3190
The problem that occurred is uncommon or complex to resolve. Gather information and obtain assistance
from your Hardware Service Support organization.
Step 3190-1
Record the hardware error log. View the hardware error log as follows:
1. Follow the steps in “Examining the hardware error log” on page 88 and return here.
2. Select the hardware error log to view.
3. Go to “Step 3190-2.”
Step 3190-2
Collect any hardware error logged about the same time for the adapter.
Step 3190-3
Collect the current disk array configuration. The disk array configuration can be viewed as follows:
1. Start the IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
a. Start Diagnostics and select Task Selection on the Function Selection screen.
b. Select RAID Array Manager.
c. Select IBM SAS Disk Array Manager.
2. Select List SAS Disk Array Configuration.
3. Select the IBM SAS RAID Controller identified in the hardware error log.
4. Go to the next step.
Step 3190-4
Contact your hardware service provider.
Exit this procedure.
134
Finding a service request number from an existing AIX error log
Typically, error log analysis examines the error logs and presents a service request number (SRN) to the
user as appropriate, but you can also determine an SRN from an existing AIX error log.
1. Display the error log using the AIX errpt command (for example errpt for a summary followed by
errpt -a -s timestamp or errpt -a -N resource_name).
2. Ensure that the Error ID is of the form SISSAS_xxxx (for example SISSAS_ARY_DEGRADED). Only
Error IDs of the form SISSAS_xxxx are potentially related to disk arrays.
3. Locate the SENSE DATA in the Detail Data.
4. Identify the bytes 40-43 of the SENSE DATA from the 64 bytes shown. Use the Sample AIX error log
to help you identify bytes 40-43. The first 4 digits of the SRN, known as the failing function code
(FFC), can be found in the following table:
CCIN (bytes 40-41) of SENSE DATA
Failing function code (FFC)
572A
2515
572C
2502
57B7
2504
57B8
2505
572B
2516
57B9
2D0B
The second 4 digits of the SRN, known as the reason code, is equal to bytes 42-43 of the SENSE
DATA.
For the Sample AIX error log:
v Bytes 40-43 of the SENSE DATA are 572C 9030.
v The first 4 digits of the SRN, using 572C in the preceding table, is 2502.
v The second 4 digits of the SRN is 9030.
v The SRN is therefore 2502 - 9030.
Chapter 6. Problem determination and recovery
135
Sample AIX error log (Error ID = SISSAS_ARY_DEGRADED)
This is a sample AIX error log.
LABEL:
IDENTIFIER:
SISSAS_ARY_DEGRADED
4529BEB6
Date/Time:
Sequence Number:
Machine Id:
Node Id:
Class:
Type:
Resource Name:
Resource Class:
Resource Type:
Location:
VPD:
Wed Sep 6 10:36:38 CDT 2006
233
00CFCC1E4C00
x1324p1
H
TEMP
sissas0
adapter
1410c202
U787F.001.0026273-P1-C6-T1
Product Specific.( ).......PCI-X266 Planar 3 Gb SAS RAID Adapter
Part Number.................39J0180
FRU Number..................39J0180
Serial Number...............YL3126088109
Manufacture ID..............0012
EC Level....................1
ROM Level.(alterable).......01200019
Product Specific.(CC).......572C
Product Specific.(Z1).......1
Description
DISK ARRAY PROTECTION SUSPENDED
Recommended Actions
PERFORM PROBLEM DETERMINATION PROCEDURES
Detail Data
PROBLEM DATA
0000 0800 00FF FFFF 0000
0120 0019 0000 0014 572C
^
|
CCIN of Controller |
(bytes 24-25)
0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 1910 00F0 066B 0200 0101 0000
9030 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
^
|
| Last 4-digits of SRN
(bytes 26-27)
ARRAY INFORMATION
Resource S/N
RAID Level
00FF0100 0561513F 5
DEGRADED DISK
S/N
World Wide ID
00C8D7FA 5000CCA00308D7FA
ARRAY MEMBER INFORMATION
Expected Actual
Vendor/
Resource Resource Product
00000700 00000700 IBM
00000300 00000300 IBM
00000400 00000400 IBM
ADDITIONAL HEX
E210 0080 1400
FFFF FFFF 1705
3036 3038 3831
4953 494F 4120
00FF 0100 3035
4855 5331 3531
3433 3342 0000
3330 3020 3030
4942 4D20 2020
5000 CCA0 0308
136
DATA
0000
3003
3039
2020
3631
3437
0700
4345
2020
D7FA
0D00
4942
5005
3036
3531
3356
0000
4136
4855
3433
ID
HUS15147
HUS15143
HUS15143
0003
4D20
076C
3038
3346
4C53
0700
4130
5331
3341
2F8F
2020
0003
3831
3500
3330
4942
5000
3531
0000
S/N
0017CDE5
00CEA6A0
00C8D7FA
10E5
2020
0700
3039
0000
3020
4D20
CCA0
3433
0400
0000
3537
4942
5005
0000
3030
2020
030E
3656
0000
World Wide ID
5000CCA00317CDE5
5000CCA0030EA6A0
5000CCA00308D7FA
0000
3242
4D20
076C
0000
3137
2020
A6A0
4C53
0400
0000
3030
2020
0003
0000
4344
4855
3433
3330
0000
0468
3153
2020
0700
0003
4535
5331
3341
3020
0000
066B
4953
3537
0000
4942
5000
3531
0000
3030
0000
0200
494F
3242
0002
4D20
CCA0
3433
0300
4338
0000
00FF
4120
3030
0000
2020
0317
3656
0000
4437
0000
FFFF
2020
3153
0001
2020
CDE5
4C53
0300
4641
0000
Appendix. Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.
The manufacturer may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other
countries. Consult the manufacturer’s representative for information on the products and services
currently available in your area. Any reference to the manufacturer’s product, program, or service is not
intended to state or imply that only that product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally
equivalent product, program, or service that does not infringe any intellectual property right of the
manufacturer may be used instead. However, it is the user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the
operation of any product, program, or service.
The manufacturer may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in
this document. The furnishing of this document does not grant you any license to these patents. You can
send license inquiries, in writing, to the manufacturer.
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where such
provisions are inconsistent with local law: THIS INFORMATION IS PROVIDED “AS IS” WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain
transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically
made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication.
The manufacturer may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s)
described in this publication at any time without notice.
Any references in this information to Web sites not owned by the manufacturer are provided for
convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at
those Web sites are not part of the materials for this product and use of those Web sites is at your own
risk.
The manufacturer may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes
appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled environment. Therefore, the
results obtained in other operating environments may vary significantly. Some measurements may have
been made on development-level systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements will be the
same on generally available systems. Furthermore, some measurements may have been estimated through
extrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their
specific environment.
Information concerning products not produced by this manufacturer was obtained from the suppliers of
those products, their published announcements or other publicly available sources. This manufacturer has
not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other
claims related to products not produced by this manufacturer. Questions on the capabilities of products
not produced by this manufacturer should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.
All statements regarding the manufacturer’s future direction or intent are subject to change or withdrawal
without notice, and represent goals and objectives only.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007, 2009
137
The manufacturer’s prices shown are the manufacturer’s suggested retail prices, are current and are
subject to change without notice. Dealer prices may vary.
This information is for planning purposes only. The information herein is subject to change before the
products described become available.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate
them as completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and
products. All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an
actual business enterprise is entirely coincidental.
If you are viewing this information in softcopy, the photographs and color illustrations may not appear.
The drawings and specifications contained herein shall not be reproduced in whole or in part without the
written permission of the manufacturer.
The manufacturer has prepared this information for use with the specific machines indicated. The
manufacturer makes no representations that it is suitable for any other purpose.
The manufacturer’s computer systems contain mechanisms designed to reduce the possibility of
undetected data corruption or loss. This risk, however, cannot be eliminated. Users who experience
unplanned outages, system failures, power fluctuations or outages, or component failures must verify the
accuracy of operations performed and data saved or transmitted by the system at or near the time of the
outage or failure. In addition, users must establish procedures to ensure that there is independent data
verification before relying on such data in sensitive or critical operations. Users should periodically check
the manufacturer’s support websites for updated information and fixes applicable to the system and
related software.
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Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be
trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at
Copyright and trademark information at www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml.
Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
Electronic emission notices
Class A Notices
The following Class A statements apply to the IBM servers that contain the POWER6 processor.
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) statement
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with
the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this
equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be
required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Properly shielded and grounded cables and connectors must be used in order to meet FCC emission
limits. IBM is not responsible for any radio or television interference caused by using other than
138
recommended cables and connectors or by unauthorized changes or modifications to this equipment.
Unauthorized changes or modifications could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Industry Canada Compliance Statement
This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Avis de conformité à la réglementation d’Industrie Canada
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
European Community Compliance Statement
This product is in conformity with the protection requirements of EU Council Directive 2004/108/EC on
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This product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class A Information Technology
Equipment according to European Standard EN 55022. The limits for Class A equipment were derived for
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European Community contact:
IBM Technical Regulations
Pascalstr. 100, Stuttgart, Germany 70569
Tele: 0049 (0)711 785 1176
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E-mail: tjahn@de.ibm.com
Warning: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio
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VCCI Statement - Japan
The following is a summary of the VCCI Japanese statement in the box above:
This is a Class A product based on the standard of the VCCI Council. If this equipment is used in a
domestic environment, radio interference may occur, in which case, the user may be required to take
corrective actions.
Appendix. Notices
139
Japanese Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA)
Confirmed Harmonics Guideline (products less than or equal to 20 A per phase)
Japanese Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA)
Confirmed Harmonics Guideline with Modifications (products greater than 20 A per
phase)
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Statement - People’s Republic of China
Declaration: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio
interference in which case the user may need to perform practical action.
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Statement - Taiwan
The following is a summary of the EMI Taiwan statement above.
Warning: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference
in which case the user will be required to take adequate measures.
IBM Taiwan Contact Information:
140
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Statement - Korea
Please note that this equipment has obtained EMC registration for commercial use. In the event that it
has been mistakenly sold or purchased, please exchange it for equipment certified for home use.
Germany Compliance Statement
Deutschsprachiger EU Hinweis: Hinweis für Geräte der Klasse A EU-Richtlinie zur
Elektromagnetischen Verträglichkeit
Dieses Produkt entspricht den Schutzanforderungen der EU-Richtlinie 2004/108/EG zur Angleichung der
Rechtsvorschriften über die elektromagnetische Verträglichkeit in den EU-Mitgliedsstaaten und hält die
Grenzwerte der EN 55022 Klasse A ein.
Um dieses sicherzustellen, sind die Geräte wie in den Handbüchern beschrieben zu installieren und zu
betreiben. Des Weiteren dürfen auch nur von der IBM empfohlene Kabel angeschlossen werden. IBM
übernimmt keine Verantwortung für die Einhaltung der Schutzanforderungen, wenn das Produkt ohne
Zustimmung der IBM verändert bzw. wenn Erweiterungskomponenten von Fremdherstellern ohne
Empfehlung der IBM gesteckt/eingebaut werden.
EN 55022 Klasse A Geräte müssen mit folgendem Warnhinweis versehen werden:
″Warnung: Dieses ist eine Einrichtung der Klasse A. Diese Einrichtung kann im Wohnbereich
Funk-Störungen verursachen; in diesem Fall kann vom Betreiber verlangt werden, angemessene
Maßnahmen zu ergreifen und dafür aufzukommen.″
Deutschland: Einhaltung des Gesetzes über die elektromagnetische Verträglichkeit von Geräten
Dieses Produkt entspricht dem “Gesetz über die elektromagnetische Verträglichkeit von Geräten
(EMVG)“. Dies ist die Umsetzung der EU-Richtlinie 2004/108/EG in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland.
Zulassungsbescheinigung laut dem Deutschen Gesetz über die elektromagnetische Verträglichkeit von
Geräten (EMVG) (bzw. der EMC EG Richtlinie 2004/108/EG) für Geräte der Klasse A.
Dieses Gerät ist berechtigt, in Übereinstimmung mit dem Deutschen EMVG das EG-Konformitätszeichen
- CE - zu führen.
Verantwortlich für die Konformitätserklärung nach des EMVG ist die IBM Deutschland GmbH, 70548
Stuttgart.
Appendix. Notices
141
Generelle Informationen:
Das Gerät erfüllt die Schutzanforderungen nach EN 55024 und EN 55022 Klasse A.
Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Statement - Russia
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