Dynamic Multi-Pathing 7.0 Administrator`s Guide

Dynamic Multi-Pathing 7.0 Administrator`s Guide
Dynamic Multi-Pathing 7.0
Administrator's Guide VMware ESXi
July 2015
Dynamic Multi-Pathing Administrator's Guide
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Contents
Technical Support
Chapter 1
............................................................................................. 3
Understanding VxDMP
.................................................... 11
About Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware ..........................................
About the SmartPool feature .....................................................
How DMP works ..........................................................................
How DMP monitors I/O on paths ................................................
Load balancing ......................................................................
Multiple paths to disk arrays ...........................................................
Device discovery ..........................................................................
About DMP extended device attributes .......................................
Disk device naming in VxDMP ........................................................
About operating system-based naming .......................................
About enclosure-based naming .................................................
About configuring storage for caching with SmartPool ..........................
Chapter 2
About administering VxDMP
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.......................................... 26
Methods to administer DMP ............................................................
About roles and privileges for administering DMP ................................
About enabling and disabling I/O for controllers and storage
processors ............................................................................
About displaying DMP database information ......................................
About the DMP attributes of the paths to an enclosure .........................
About DMP attributes ...................................................................
About DMP I/O policies ............................................................
About DMP recovery options ....................................................
About the minimum redundancy level of DMP paths ......................
About the use_all_paths attribute ...............................................
About device discovery management ...............................................
How DMP claims devices ...............................................................
Disk categories ............................................................................
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Contents
Chapter 3
Administering VxDMP using the command
line ...................................................................................
About the authentication model for the VxDMP remote CLI commands
in the VMware environment ......................................................
Retrieving information about a DMP node ..........................................
Displaying consolidated information about the DMP nodes ....................
Displaying the paths to a disk ..........................................................
Displaying paths controlled by a DMP node, controller, enclosure, or
array port ..............................................................................
Displaying information about controllers ............................................
Displaying information about enclosures ...........................................
Displaying information about array ports ............................................
Displaying extended device attributes ...............................................
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics ..............................................
Displaying cumulative I/O statistics ............................................
Displaying statistics for queued or erroneous I/Os .........................
Displaying statistics for per second I/Os .....................................
Examples of using the vxdmpadm iostat command ........................
Setting the attributes of the paths to an enclosure ...............................
Displaying the redundancy level of a device or enclosure .....................
Specifying the minimum number of active paths ..................................
Displaying the I/O policy ................................................................
Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line .......................
Scheduling I/O on the paths of an Asymmetric Active/Active array
or an ALUA array .............................................................
Example of applying load balancing in a SAN ...............................
Disabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes ...............
Enabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes ...............
Configuring the response to I/O failures ............................................
Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism ...........................................
Displaying recovery option values ....................................................
Configuring DMP path restoration policies .........................................
Stopping the DMP path restoration thread .........................................
Configuring Subpaths Failover Groups (SFG) .....................................
Configuring Low Impact Path Probing (LIPP) ......................................
Displaying the status of the DMP path restoration thread ......................
Viewing array policy modules ..........................................................
Managing the SmartPool using the CLI .............................................
Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices .........................
Adding support for an array ......................................................
Removing support for an array ..................................................
DMP libraries for array support ..................................................
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Contents
Listing all supported disk arrays .................................................
Displaying details about an Array Support Library .........................
Changing the disk device naming scheme .........................................
Displaying the disk-naming scheme ...........................................
Setting customized names for DMP nodes ...................................
Regenerating persistent device names .......................................
About the Array Volume Identifier (AVID) attribute .........................
Chapter 4
Administering VxDMP using Web Client
77
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78
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81
82
.................... 84
Getting started with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing solution in vSphere
Web Client ............................................................................ 84
Working with the Connectivity Map view in VxDMP .............................. 85
About the Connectivity Map view in the VxDMP Web Client ............ 85
Viewing the attributes of an entity in the Connectivity Map view
..................................................................................... 90
Enabling or disabling entities in the Connectivity Map view .............. 91
Renaming entities in the Connectivity Map view ............................ 92
Setting the attributes of storages arrays and hosts ........................ 92
Viewing the I/O load distribution ................................................ 92
Viewing the license details in the vSphere Web Client .................... 93
Applying new license to a host using vSphere Web Client ............... 93
Managing DMP device support .................................................. 94
Working with the detailed view in VxDMP ......................................... 94
About the detailed view ............................................................ 95
Enabling or disabling entities in the detailed view ......................... 98
Renaming entities in the detailed view ...................................... 100
Setting the attributes of the paths to a storage array ..................... 100
About the I/O Statistics pane ................................................... 101
Monitoring VxDMP ...................................................................... 102
Managing the SmartPool using Web Client ...................................... 104
Accessing the SmartPool tab .................................................. 104
Adding or removing local devices ............................................. 105
Viewing the SmartPool capacity ............................................... 105
Managing the SmartDisk capacity ............................................ 105
Viewing and editing SmartDisk Configuration settings .................. 106
Working with the Veritas Storage view ............................................. 107
About the Veritas Storage view ................................................ 107
Accessing the Veritas Storage view in the Web Client .................. 107
Viewing the storage array details ............................................. 107
Viewing the LUNs details ........................................................ 108
8
Contents
Chapter 5
Administering VxDMP using vSphere Client
.......... 109
Getting started with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing solution in vSphere
Client .................................................................................
Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view ...........
About the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view ..............
Downloading the VxDMP offline bundle for ESXi .........................
Downloading the administration CLI package for a remote
host .............................................................................
Viewing the VxDMP and license compliance for hosts ..................
Viewing the license details ......................................................
Applying new license to a single host or multiple hosts using
vSphere Client ...............................................................
Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab ...................................
About the host view in the VxDMP tab .......................................
Setting the attributes of a storage entity .....................................
Setting the attributes of the paths to a storage array .....................
Enabling or disabling paths ....................................................
Renaming a storage array and LUN ..........................................
Filtering the LUNs configured for a storage array .........................
Working with the I/O Statistics pane ..........................................
Working with datacenter view in the VxDMP tab ...............................
Accessing the datacenter view in the VxDMP tab ........................
About the Host tab in the VxDMP datacenter view .......................
About the Storage tab in the VxDMP datacenter view ..................
Chapter 6
Event monitoring
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.............................................................. 141
Fabric Monitoring and proactive error detection ................................. 141
DMP event logging ...................................................................... 142
Chapter 7
Performance monitoring and tuning ........................... 144
About tuning Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) with templates ..................
DMP tuning templates .................................................................
Example DMP tuning template ......................................................
Tuning a DMP host with a configuration attribute template ...................
Managing the DMP configuration files .............................................
Resetting the DMP tunable parameters and attributes to the default
values ................................................................................
DMP tunable parameters and attributes that are supported for
templates ............................................................................
DMP tunable parameters ..............................................................
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Contents
Appendix A
VxDMP troubleshooting
................................................. 160
Troubleshooting tips ....................................................................
Collecting logs for Symantec Support ..............................................
VxDMP plugin unregistration error ..................................................
VxDMP plugin appears "Disabled" or the VxDMP tabs are not visible
at the datacenter or host level .................................................
VMware vCenter Server becomes permanently unavailable .................
Troubleshooting tips if the system panicks or hangs ..........................
Troubleshooting tips for Command Line exception errors ...................
VxDMP is unable to connect to the CIM agent ..................................
The virtual machines fail to restart when the vxcache.vmdk is
missing ...............................................................................
vSphere Storage vMotion operation fails for the datastore containing
a SmartPool device ...............................................................
After vMotion is performed on a newly added node, sfcache dg fails
to get restored ......................................................................
The SmartIO cache area in guest is unavailable when devices are
missing from the SmartPool ....................................................
Adding DMP support for a new disk array ........................................
Downgrading the array support ......................................................
About the vsphere_client_virgo.log file ......................................
Glossary
Index
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........................................................................................................... 169
.................................................................................................................. 172
10
Chapter
1
Understanding VxDMP
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware
■
How DMP works
■
Multiple paths to disk arrays
■
Device discovery
■
Disk device naming in VxDMP
■
About configuring storage for caching with SmartPool
About Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware
Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware (VxDMP) is a multi-pathing solution integrated
with VMware’s vSphere infrastructure, which brings the established and proven
enterprise-class functionality to VMware virtual environments.
VxDMP provides multi-pathing functionality for the devices that are configured on
the system. VxDMP creates DMP metadevices (also known as DMP nodes) to
represent all the device paths to the same physical LUN.
VxDMP provides the best in class availability, reliability, and performance by using
advanced path failover and load balancing for a wide range of storage arrays.
VxDMP also provides you with better visibility of the attached storage arrays, so
you can efficiently manage the storage resources directly from the VMware vCenter.
VxDMP enables you to create and manage SmartPools, which are aggregates of
SSDs and other local devices. SmartPools enable you to use SmartIO for caching
when Veritas InfoScale product component is running in the guest.
See “About the SmartPool feature” on page 12.
VxDMP solution consists of the following components:
Understanding VxDMP
About Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware
■
VxDMP binaries for the ESXi servers – The VxDMP binaries are provided as
an ESXi offline bundle.
■
Administrative UI – The UI plug-ins are registered with both vSphere Web Client
and Windows-based vSphere Client.
■
Administrative command line – The command line allows remote administration
from a Windows or Linux remote host.
Installation of VxDMP involves installing the following components:
■
VxDMP binaries on each ESXi server.
■
UI plug-in service on a Windows host.
■
Command line on a Windows or Linux remote host.
Note: VxDMP is referred as DMP in some sections of this document.
See the Dynamic Multi-Pathing Installation Guide - VMware ESXi.
About the SmartPool feature
Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware has an operating mode which enables the
pooling of locally attached devices such as SSDs at the ESXi host layer. The
aggregation of the local devices is called SmartPool. From the SmartPool, you can
provision SmartDisks to be used as caching areas by SmartIO in the ESXi guests
running Veritas InfoScale. By dividing the SmartPool into several SmartDisks, you
can share the caching storage across multiple virtual machines. Using SmartPools
gives you the flexibility to move virtual machines across ESXi hosts while SmartIO
caching is in progress. Although each host has its own SSD, you can configure
each host to have a comparable view of the SmartDisk. When you use vMotion to
migrate the virtual machines that have Veritas InfoScale running, SmartIO shuts
down the cache on the source node and restarts the cache on the target host.
SmartIO caching stays online during the migration. You can dynamically resize the
SmartPool by adding or removing storage devices to the SmartPool.
You can use this mode regardless of whether you are using DMP for VMware to
manage storage multi-pathing in the host.
The SmartPool functionality is enabled by installing DMP for VMware in the ESXi
host. For the SmartPool functionality, you do not need to have a separate license
for DMP.
To use SmartIO in the ESXi guest, you must install Veritas InfoScale in the ESXi
guest.
12
Understanding VxDMP
How DMP works
For more information, see the Veritas InfoScale Virtualization Guide for VMware
ESXi.
If you plan to use DMP for VMware for multi-pathing in the host, you must have the
appropriate license.
How DMP works
Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) provides greater availability, reliability, and
performance by using the path failover feature and the load balancing feature.
These features are available for multiported disk arrays from various vendors.
Disk arrays can be connected to host systems through multiple paths. To detect
the various paths to a disk, DMP uses a mechanism that is specific to each
supported array. DMP can also differentiate between different enclosures of a
supported array that are connected to the same host system.
See “Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices” on page 73.
The multi-pathing policy that DMP uses depends on the characteristics of the disk
array.
DMP supports the following standard array types:
Table 1-1
Array type
Description
Active/Active (A/A)
Allows several paths to be used concurrently for
I/O. Such arrays allow DMP to provide greater I/O
throughput by balancing the I/O load uniformly
across the multiple paths to the LUNs. In the event
that one path fails, DMP automatically routes I/O
over the other available paths.
Asymmetric Active/Active (A/A-A)
A/A-A or Asymmetric Active/Active arrays can be
accessed through secondary storage paths with
little performance degradation. The behavior is
similar to ALUA, except that it does not support
the SCSI commands that an ALUA array supports.
Asymmetric Logical Unit Access (ALUA) DMP supports all variants of ALUA.
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Understanding VxDMP
How DMP works
Table 1-1
(continued)
Array type
Description
Active/Passive (A/P)
Allows access to its LUNs (logical units; real disks
or virtual disks created using hardware) via the
primary (active) path on a single controller (also
known as an access port or a storage processor)
during normal operation.
In implicit failover mode (or autotrespass mode),
an A/P array automatically fails over by scheduling
I/O to the secondary (passive) path on a separate
controller if the primary path fails. This passive port
is not used for I/O until the active port fails. In A/P
arrays, path failover can occur for a single LUN if
I/O fails on the primary path.
This array mode supports concurrent I/O and load
balancing by having multiple primary paths into a
controller. This functionality is provided by a
controller with multiple ports, or by the insertion of
a SAN switch between an array and a controller.
Failover to the secondary (passive) path occurs
only if all the active primary paths fail.
Active/Passive in explicit failover mode The appropriate command must be issued to the
or non-autotrespass mode (A/PF)
array to make the LUNs fail over to the secondary
path.
This array mode supports concurrent I/O and load
balancing by having multiple primary paths into a
controller. This functionality is provided by a
controller with multiple ports, or by the insertion of
a SAN switch between an array and a controller.
Failover to the secondary (passive) path occurs
only if all the active primary paths fail.
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Understanding VxDMP
How DMP works
Table 1-1
Array type
(continued)
Description
Active/Passive with LUN group failover For Active/Passive arrays with LUN group failover
(A/PG)
(A/PG arrays), a group of LUNs that are connected
through a controller is treated as a single failover
entity. Unlike A/P arrays, failover occurs at the
controller level, and not for individual LUNs. The
primary controller and the secondary controller are
each connected to a separate group of LUNs. If a
single LUN in the primary controller’s LUN group
fails, all LUNs in that group fail over to the
secondary controller.
This array mode supports concurrent I/O and load
balancing by having multiple primary paths into a
controller. This functionality is provided by a
controller with multiple ports, or by the insertion of
a SAN switch between an array and a controller.
Failover to the secondary (passive) path occurs
only if all the active primary paths fail.
An array policy module (APM) may define array types to DMP in addition to the
standard types for the arrays that it supports.
Dynamic Multi-Pathing uses DMP metanodes (DMP nodes) to access disk devices
connected to the system. For each disk in a supported array, DMP maps one node
to the set of paths that are connected to the disk. Additionally, DMP associates the
appropriate multi-pathing policy for the disk array with the node.
Figure 1-1 shows how DMP sets up a node for a disk in a supported disk array.
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Understanding VxDMP
How DMP works
How DMP represents multiple physical paths to a disk as one
node
Figure 1-1
VMkernel
Host
vmhba1
Single DMP node
vmhba2
Mapped by DMP
DMP
Multiple paths
Multiple paths
Disk
DMP implements a disk device naming scheme that allows you to recognize to
which array a disk belongs.
Figure 1-2 shows an example where two paths, vmhba1:C0:T0:L0 and
vmhba2:C0:T0:L0, exist to a single disk in the enclosure, but VxVM uses the single
DMP node, enc0_0, to access it.
Example of multi-pathing for a disk enclosure in a SAN
environment
Figure 1-2
Host
vmhba1
VMkernel
vmhba2
enc0_0
Mapped by
DMP
Fibre Channel
switches
DMP
vmhba1:C0:T0:L0
vmhba2:C0:T0:L0
Disk enclosure
enc0
Disk is vmhba1:C0:T0:L0 or
vmhba2:C0:T0:L0 depending on the path
See “About enclosure-based naming” on page 21.
See “Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices” on page 73.
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Understanding VxDMP
How DMP works
How DMP monitors I/O on paths
DMP maintains a pool of kernel threads that are used to perform such tasks as
error processing, path restoration, statistics collection, and SCSI request callbacks.
One kernel thread responds to I/O failures on a path by initiating a probe of the host
bus adapter (HBA) that corresponds to the path. Another thread then takes the
appropriate action according to the response from the HBA. The action taken can
be to retry the I/O request on the path, or to fail the path and reschedule the I/O on
an alternate path.
The restore kernel task is woken periodically (by default, every 5 minutes) to check
the health of the paths, and to resume I/O on paths that have been restored. As
some paths may suffer from intermittent failure, I/O is only resumed on a path if the
path has remained healthy for a given period of time (by default, 5 minutes). DMP
can be configured with different policies for checking the paths.
See “Configuring DMP path restoration policies” on page 66.
The statistics-gathering task records the start and end time of each I/O request,
and the number of I/O failures and retries on each path. DMP can be configured to
use this information to prevent the SCSI driver being flooded by I/O requests. This
feature is known as I/O throttling.
See “Path failover mechanism” on page 17.
See “I/O throttling” on page 17.
Path failover mechanism
DMP enhances system availability when used with disk arrays having multiple
paths. In the event of the loss of a path to a disk array, DMP automatically selects
the next available path for I/O requests without intervention from the administrator.
DMP is also informed when a connection is repaired or restored, and when you
add or remove devices after the system has been fully booted (provided that the
operating system recognizes the devices correctly).
If required, the response of DMP to I/O failure on a path can be tuned for the paths
to individual arrays. DMP can be configured to time out an I/O request either after
a given period of time has elapsed without the request succeeding, or after a given
number of retries on a path have failed.
See “Configuring the response to I/O failures” on page 63.
I/O throttling
If I/O throttling is enabled, and the number of outstanding I/O requests builds up
on a path that has become less responsive, DMP can be configured to prevent new
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Understanding VxDMP
How DMP works
I/O requests being sent on the path either when the number of outstanding I/O
requests has reached a given value, or a given time has elapsed since the last
successful I/O request on the path. While throttling is applied to a path, the new I/O
requests on that path are scheduled on other available paths. The throttling is
removed from the path if the HBA reports no error on the path, or if an outstanding
I/O request on the path succeeds.
See “Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism” on page 64.
Subpaths Failover Group (SFG)
A subpaths failover group (SFG) represents a group of paths which could fail and
restore together. When an I/O error is encountered on a path in an SFG, DMP does
proactive path probing on the other paths of that SFG as well. This behavior adds
greatly to the performance of path failover thus improving I/O performance. Currently
the criteria followed by DMP to form the subpaths failover groups is to bundle the
paths with the same endpoints from the host to the array into one logical storage
failover group.
See “Configuring Subpaths Failover Groups (SFG)” on page 68.
Low Impact Path Probing (LIPP)
The restore daemon in DMP keeps probing the LUN paths periodically. This behavior
helps DMP to keep the path states up-to-date even when no I/O occurs on a path.
Low Impact Path Probing adds logic to the restore daemon to optimize the number
of the probes performed while the path status is being updated by the restore
daemon. This optimization is achieved with the help of the logical subpaths failover
groups. With LIPP logic in place, DMP probes only a limited number of paths within
a subpaths failover group (SFG), instead of probing all the paths in an SFG. Based
on these probe results, DMP determines the states of all the paths in that SFG.
See “Configuring Low Impact Path Probing (LIPP)” on page 69.
Load balancing
By default, DMP uses the Minimum Queue I/O policy for load balancing across
paths for all array types. Load balancing maximizes I/O throughput by using the
total bandwidth of all available paths. I/O is sent down the path that has the minimum
outstanding I/Os.
For Active/Passive (A/P) disk arrays, I/O is sent down the primary paths. If all of
the primary paths fail, I/O is switched over to the available secondary paths. As the
continuous transfer of ownership of LUNs from one controller to another results in
severe I/O slowdown, load balancing across primary and secondary paths is not
performed for A/P disk arrays unless they support concurrent I/O.
18
Understanding VxDMP
Multiple paths to disk arrays
For other arrays, load balancing is performed across all the currently active paths.
You can change the I/O policy for the paths to an enclosure or disk array. This
operation is an online operation that does not impact the server or require any
downtime.
Multiple paths to disk arrays
Some disk arrays provide multiple ports to access their disk devices. These ports,
coupled with the host bus adaptor (HBA) controller and any data bus or I/O processor
local to the array, make up multiple hardware paths to access the disk devices.
Such disk arrays are called multipathed disk arrays. This type of disk array can be
connected to host systems in many different configurations, (such as multiple ports
connected to different controllers on a single host, chaining of the ports through a
single controller on a host, or ports connected to different hosts simultaneously).
See “How DMP works” on page 13.
Device discovery
Device discovery is the term used to describe the process of discovering the disks
that are attached to a host. This feature is important for DMP because it needs to
support a growing number of disk arrays from a number of vendors. In conjunction
with the ability to discover the devices attached to a host, the Device Discovery
service enables you to add support for new disk arrays. The Device Discovery uses
a facility called the Device Discovery Layer (DDL).
About DMP extended device attributes
Device Discovery Layer (DDL) extended attributes are attributes or flags
corresponding to a DMP LUN or disk and which are discovered by DDL. These
attributes identify a LUN to a specific hardware category.
The list of categories includes:
Hardware RAID types
Displays what kind of Storage RAID Group the
LUN belongs to
Thin Provisioning discovery and
reclamation
Displays the LUN’s thin reclamation abilities
Device Media Type
Displays the type of media –whether SSD (solid
state disk )
19
Understanding VxDMP
Disk device naming in VxDMP
Storage-based Snapshot/Clone
Displays whether the LUN is a SNAPSHOT or a
CLONE of a PRIMARY LUN
Storage-based replication
Displays if the LUN is part of a replicated group
across a remote site
Transport
Displays what kind of HBA is used to connect to
this LUN (FC, SATA, iSCSI)
Each LUN can have one or more of these extended attributes. DDL discovers the
extended attributes during device discovery from the array support library (ASL).
For a list of ASLs that supports Extended Attributes, and descriptions of these
attributes, refer to the hardware compatibility list (HCL) at the following URL:
http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH170013
Disk device naming in VxDMP
Device names for disks are assigned according to the naming scheme which you
specify to VxDMP. The format of the device name may vary for different categories
of disks.
See “Disk categories” on page 35.
Device names can use one of the following naming schemes:
■
operating system-based naming.
See “About operating system-based naming” on page 21.
■
enclosure-based naming.
See “About enclosure-based naming” on page 21.
Devices with device names longer than 31 characters always use enclosure-based
names.
DMP ESXi supports both enclosure-based naming (EBN) and operating system
naming (OSN) device naming schemes.
On ESXi, the devices seen on the host are visible in the /vmfs/devices/disks/
directory or in the Configuration tab in the vSphere GUI. DMP devices appear in
these locations with the enclosure-based name.
See “Changing the disk device naming scheme” on page 78.
20
Understanding VxDMP
Disk device naming in VxDMP
About operating system-based naming
VMware device names use the format naa.<> or eui.<>, depending on the SCSI
VPD ID available for the devices. When the operating system-based naming scheme
is selected, DMP assigns the VMware's naming format to its metadevices.
By default, OS-based names are not persistent, and are regenerated if the system
configuration changes the device name as recognized by the operating system. If
you do not want the OS-based names to change after reboot, set the persistence
attribute for the naming scheme.
See “Changing the disk device naming scheme” on page 78.
About enclosure-based naming
Enclosure-based naming provides an alternative to operating system-based device
naming. In a Storage Area Network (SAN) that uses Fibre Channel switches,
information about disk location provided by the operating system may not correctly
indicate the physical location of the disks. Enclosure-based naming allows VxDMP
to access enclosures as separate physical entities. By configuring redundant copies
of your data on separate enclosures, you can safeguard against failure of one or
more enclosures.
Figure 1-3 shows a typical SAN environment where host controllers are connected
to multiple enclosures through a Fibre Channel switch.
21
Understanding VxDMP
Disk device naming in VxDMP
Figure 1-3
Example configuration for disk enclosures connected through a
Fibre Channel switch
Host
vmhba1
Fibre Channel
switch
Disk enclosures
enc0
enc1
enc2
In such a configuration, enclosure-based naming can be used to refer to each disk
within an enclosure. For example, the device names for the disks in enclosure enc0
are named enc0_0, enc0_1, and so on. The main benefit of this scheme is that it
lets you quickly determine where a disk is physically located in a large SAN
configuration.
In most disk arrays, you can use hardware-based storage management to represent
several physical disks as one LUN to the operating system. In such cases, VMware
ESXi also sees a single logical disk device rather than its component disks. For
this reason, when reference is made to a disk within an enclosure, this disk may
be either a physical disk or a LUN.
Another important benefit of enclosure-based naming is that it enables administrators
to avoid accidentally placing redundant copies of data in the same enclosure. This
is a good thing to avoid as each enclosure can be considered to be a separate fault
domain. For example, if a mirrored volume is configured on the disks in an enclosure
enc1, then a cable failure would make the entire volume unavailable.
Figure 1-4 shows a High Availability (HA) configuration where redundant-loop access
to storage is implemented by connecting independent controllers on the host to
separate switches with independent paths to the enclosures.
22
Understanding VxDMP
Disk device naming in VxDMP
Example HA configuration using multiple switches to provide
redundant loop access
Figure 1-4
Host
vmhba1
vmhba2
Fibre Channel
switches
Disk enclosures
enc0
enc1
enc2
Such a configuration protects against the failure of one of the host controllers
(vmhba1 and vmhba2), or of the cable between the host and one of the switches. In
this example, each disk is known by the same name for all of the paths over which
it can be accessed. For example, the disk device enc0_0 represents a single disk
for which two different paths are known to the operating system, such as
vmhba1:C0:T0:L0 and vmhba2:C0:T0:L0.
See “Disk device naming in VxDMP” on page 20.
See “Changing the disk device naming scheme” on page 78.
To take account of fault domains when configuring data redundancy, you can control
how mirrored volumes are laid out across enclosures.
Summary of enclosure-based naming
By default, VxDMP uses enclosure-based naming.
Enclosure-based naming operates as follows:
■
All fabric or non-fabric disks in supported disk arrays are named using the
enclosure_name_# format. For example, disks in the supported disk array,
enggdept are named enggdept_0, enggdept_1, enggdept_2 and so on.
You can use the vxdmpadm command to administer enclosure names.
23
Understanding VxDMP
About configuring storage for caching with SmartPool
See the vxdmpadm(1M) manual page.
By default, enclosure-based names are persistent, so they do not change after a
reboot.
See “Disk categories” on page 35.
See “Enclosure based naming with the Array Volume Identifier (AVID) attribute”
on page 82.
About configuring storage for caching with
SmartPool
VxDMP provides the SmartPool functionality, which allows a more efficient and
optimized mechanism to pool devices on the ESXi host to provide a caching storage
for virtual machines running Veritas InfoScale's SmartIO solution. SmartPool is an
aggregation of the solid-state drives (SSDs), hard disk drives (HDD), and other
local data storage devices attached to hosts claimed by VxDMP.
The combination of SmartPool in the host and SmartIO in the guest lets you achieve
multi-fold improvements in I/O performance for enterprise applications running on
the virtual machines.
For more information about configuring SmartIO and Veritas InfoScale in the VMware
environment, see the Veritas InfoScale Virtualization Guide for VMware ESXi.
After you create the SmartPool on the ESXi host, you assign portions of the storage
in SmartPool to virtual machines on the ESXi host. Each virtual machine accesses
the assigned portion, which is known as a SmartDisk. By dividing the SmartPool
into several SmartDisks, you can share the caching storage across multiple virtual
machines.
Using SmartPool gives you the flexibility to move virtual machines across ESXi
hosts while SmartIO caching is in progress.
A SmartPool is a ESXi host resource just like CPU or memory. The SmartPool must
be allocated or assigned to a virtual machine on each ESXi host to which the virtual
machine can potentially migrate. The SmartPool employs dynamic storage allocation,
so that the actual storage is only consumed by the SmartPool of the ESXi host
where the virtual machine currently resides. SmartPool is assigned to the virtual
machine as a physical raw device mapping (pRDM) device, so VMware requires
that the corresponding mapping file is stored on a datastore that is shared by all
the ESXi hosts. The SmartPool assign operation ensures that these constraints are
met at the time of allocating storage from it to a virtual machine which is part of a
VMware HA cluster or a stand-alone ESXi host.
24
Understanding VxDMP
About configuring storage for caching with SmartPool
If you add a new host to the VMware HA cluster or add the stand-alone host to a
cluster with other nodes, SmartPool is not propagated to the new hosts. In this
case, you must perform the assign operation again so that the requirements are
met for the new collection of hosts. For a stand-alone ESXi host, if the virtual
machine with the SmartPool needs to be migrated to another stand-alone ESXi
host, then you must create a SmartPool on the target ESXi host. After the migration,
you must perform the assign operation again.
You can add or remove devices to the SmartPool from the following interfaces:
■
CLI
See “Managing the SmartPool using the CLI” on page 70.
■
vSphere Web Client
See “Managing the SmartPool using Web Client” on page 104.
25
Chapter
2
About administering
VxDMP
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Methods to administer DMP
■
About roles and privileges for administering DMP
■
About enabling and disabling I/O for controllers and storage processors
■
About displaying DMP database information
■
About the DMP attributes of the paths to an enclosure
■
About DMP attributes
■
About device discovery management
■
How DMP claims devices
■
Disk categories
Methods to administer DMP
You can administer DMP with one of the following methods:
■
Using the command line.
■
Using the graphical user interface.
About administering VxDMP
About roles and privileges for administering DMP
About roles and privileges for administering DMP
To use Dynamic Multi-Pathing (VxDMP) for VMware, you must have the appropriate
privileges.
When you are using a vSphere client, or using a remote Command Line Interface
(CLI) with vCenter Server credentials, you must have a read-only privilege or an
operation privilege assigned to your role, as follows:
■
DMP Access privilege. To view the multi-pathing information at any level in the
VxDMP configuration, you must have the 'CIM interaction' privilege. This privilege
provides read-only access.
Note: If this privilege is not present for some hosts, the VxDMP graphical view
does not display those hosts.
Note: You can provide your ESXi login name and password to view the
multi-pathing information at the host level during the session. You must enable
the 'Allow session cookies' setting for the browser, for the credentials to be
retained for the entire session. If the session expires, you must provide the
credentials again.
■
DMP Admin privilege. To perform DMP administrative operations, you must
have the 'Storage partition configuration' privilege. This privilege provides
permissions to perform administrative operations at the ESXi host level. To
perform operations at the home and datacenter levels, you must have this
privilege on all the selected hosts.
To set the privileges for your role, you can use the Roles menu option from vSphere
Client.
See the VMware vSphere Client documentation.
When you are using the remote Command Line Interface (CLI), you can also use
direct ESXi credentials to log in to a host.
About enabling and disabling I/O for controllers
and storage processors
DMP lets you to turn off I/O through a Host Bus Adapter (HBA) controller or the
array port of a storage processor so that you can perform administrative operations.
This feature can be used when you perform maintenance on HBA controllers on
the host, or array ports that are attached to disk arrays supported by VxDMP. I/O
27
About administering VxDMP
About displaying DMP database information
operations to the HBA controller or the array port can be turned back on after the
maintenance task is completed. You can accomplish these operations using the
vxdmpadm command.
For Active/Active type disk arrays, when you disable the I/O through an HBA
controller or array port, the I/O continues on the remaining paths. For Active/Passive
type disk arrays, if disabling I/O through an HBA controller or array port resulted in
all primary paths being disabled, DMP will failover to secondary paths and I/O will
continue on them.
After the administrative operation is over, use the vxdmpadm command to re-enable
the paths through the HBA controllers or array ports.
See “Disabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes” on page 61.
See “Enabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes” on page 62.
You can also perform certain reconfiguration operations dynamically online.
About displaying DMP database information
You can use the vxdmpadm command to list DMP database information and perform
other administrative tasks. This command allows you to list all controllers that are
connected to disks, and other related information that is stored in the DMP database.
You can use this information to locate system hardware, and to help you decide
which controllers need to be enabled or disabled.
The vxdmpadm command also provides useful information such as disk array serial
numbers, which DMP devices (disks) are connected to the disk array, and which
paths are connected to a particular controller, enclosure, or array port.
About the DMP attributes of the paths to an
enclosure
The DMP attributes of the paths to an enclosure or disk array specify how DMP
handles I/O on the paths. The path attributes indicate whether the path is available
for I/O.
The attributes set for the paths are persistent. The attributes are stored in the
/etc/vx/dmppolicy.info file.
You can set the following attributes:
active
Indicates an active path for an array. Set this attribute to change
the standby (failover) path to an active path.
28
About administering VxDMP
About DMP attributes
nopreferred
Restores the normal priority of a path.
preferred
[priority=N]
Specifies a path as preferred, and optionally assigns a priority
number to it. If specified, the priority number must be an integer
that is greater than or equal to one. Higher priority numbers
indicate that a path is able to carry a greater I/O load.
Note: Setting a priority for path does not change the I/O policy.
The I/O policy must be set independently.
See “Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line”
on page 57.
standby
Marks a standby (failover) path that it is not used for normal
I/O scheduling. This path is used if there are no active paths
available for I/O.
You can set the path attributes with the command line or the vSphere GUI.
See “Setting the attributes of the paths to an enclosure” on page 54.
See “Setting the attributes of the paths to a storage array” on page 122.
About DMP attributes
The following sections discuss DMP attributes that you can define for an enclosure,
array name, or array type.
DMP I/O policy
Determines how DMP schedules I/O on the paths.
See “About DMP I/O policies” on page 30.
The partitionsize attribute
Determines the size of the partition used when DMP uses
the balanced I/O policy.
See “About DMP I/O policies” on page 30.
The use_all_paths attribute
Schedule I/O on paths of a A/A-A or ALUA array.
See “About the use_all_paths attribute” on page 34.
DMP recovery options
Determine how DMP handles I/O errors.
See “About DMP recovery options” on page 32.
DMP path redundancy levels Determine the minimum number of paths required.
See “About the minimum redundancy level of DMP paths”
on page 33.
29
About administering VxDMP
About DMP attributes
The dmp_lun_retry_timeout
attribute
Specifies a retry period for handling transient errors that are
not handled by the HBA and the SCSI driver.
See “DMP tunable parameters” on page 154.
You can set DMP attributes with the command line or the vSphere GUI.
See “Setting the attributes of a storage entity” on page 122.
About DMP I/O policies
The DMP I/O policy indicates how DMP distributes I/O loads across multiple paths
to a disk array or enclosure. You can set the I/O policy for an enclosure (for example,
HDS01), for all enclosures of a particular type (such as HDS), or for all enclosures of
a particular array type (such as A/A for Active/Active, or A/P for Active/Passive).
The following policies may be set:
adaptive
This policy attempts to maximize overall I/O throughput to or
from the disks by dynamically scheduling I/O on the paths.
It is suggested for use where I/O loads can vary over time.
For example, I/O to or from a database may exhibit both long
transfers (table scans) and short transfers (random look ups).
The policy is also useful for a SAN environment where
different paths may have different number of hops. No further
configuration is possible as this policy is automatically
managed by DMP.
adaptiveminq
Similar to the adaptive policy, except that I/O is scheduled
according to the length of the I/O queue on each path. The
path with the shortest queue is assigned the highest priority.
30
About administering VxDMP
About DMP attributes
balanced
[partitionsize=size]
This policy is designed to optimize the use of caching in disk
drives and RAID controllers. The size of the cache typically
ranges from 120KB to 500KB or more, depending on the
characteristics of the particular hardware. During normal
operation, the disks (or LUNs) are logically divided into a
number of regions (or partitions), and I/O from/to a given
region is sent on only one of the active paths. Should that
path fail, the workload is automatically redistributed across
the remaining paths.
You can use the size argument to the partitionsize attribute
to specify the partition size. The partition size in blocks is
adjustable in powers of 2 from 2 up to 231. A value that is
not a power of 2 is silently rounded down to the nearest
acceptable value.
Specifying a partition size of 0 is equivalent to specifying the
default partition size.
The default value for the partition size is 512 blocks (256k).
Specifying a partition size of 0 is equivalent to the default
partition size of 512 blocks (256k).
The default value can be changed by adjusting the value of
the dmp_pathswitch_blks_shift tunable parameter.
Note: The benefit of this policy is lost if the value is set larger
than the cache size.
For example, the suggested partition size for an Hitachi HDS
9960 A/A array is from 32,768 to 131,072 blocks (16MB to
64MB) for an I/O activity pattern that consists mostly of
sequential reads or writes.
minimumq
This policy sends I/O on paths that have the minimum number
of outstanding I/O requests in the queue for a LUN. No further
configuration is possible as DMP automatically determines
the path with the shortest queue.
This is the default I/O policy for all arrays.
priority
This policy is useful when the paths in a SAN have unequal
performance, and you want to enforce load balancing
manually. You can assign priorities to each path based on
your knowledge of the configuration and performance
characteristics of the available paths, and of other aspects
of your system.
See “Setting the attributes of the paths to an enclosure”
on page 54.
31
About administering VxDMP
About DMP attributes
round-robin
This policy shares I/O equally between the paths in a
round-robin sequence. For example, if there are three paths,
the first I/O request would use one path, the second would
use a different path, the third would be sent down the
remaining path, the fourth would go down the first path, and
so on. No further configuration is possible as this policy is
automatically managed by DMP.
singleactive
This policy routes I/O down the single active path. This policy
can be configured for A/P arrays with one active path per
controller, where the other paths are used in case of failover.
If configured for A/A arrays, there is no load balancing across
the paths, and the alternate paths are only used to provide
high availability (HA). If the current active path fails, I/O is
switched to an alternate active path. No further configuration
is possible as the single active path is selected by DMP.
About DMP recovery options
You can configure how DMP responds to failed I/O requests on the paths to a
specified enclosure, disk array name, or type of array. By default, DMP is configured
to retry a failed I/O request up to five minutes on various paths of a DMP device.
The settings for handling I/O request failures can be applied to the paths to an
enclosure, array name, or array type.
The recovery options are specified as two types: retrying I/O after an error, or
throttling I/O.
The retry options limit the number of times that DMP retries an I/O request on a
path, after an error. You can use the Fixed-Retry method and the retrycount
attribute to specify the number of retries to be attempted before DMP reschedules
the I/O request on another available path, or fails the request altogether. As an
alternative to specifying a fixed number of retries, you can use the Timebound
method and the iotimeout attribute to specify the amount of time DMP allows for
handling an I/O request. If the I/O request does not succeed within that time, DMP
fails the I/O request. The default value of iotimeout is 300 seconds. For some
applications such as Oracle, it may be desirable to set iotimeout to a larger value.
The iotimeout value for DMP should be greater than the I/O service time of the
underlying operating system layers.
Note: The fixedretry and timebound settings are mutually exclusive.
Table 2-1 summarizes the possible recovery option settings for retrying I/O after
an error.
32
About administering VxDMP
About DMP attributes
Table 2-1
Recovery options for retrying I/O after an error
Recovery option
Possible settings
Description
recoveryoption=fixedretry
Fixed-Retry (retrycount)
DMP retries a failed I/O
request for the specified
number of times if I/O fails.
recoveryoption=timebound
Timebound (iotimeout)
DMP retries a failed I/O
request for the specified time
in seconds if I/O fails.
See “Configuring the response to I/O failures” on page 63.
The I/O throttling options control whether DMP uses I/O throttling. By default, DMP
is configured with I/O throttling turned off for all paths. If enabled, I/O throttling
imposes a small overhead on CPU and memory usage because of the activity of
the statistics-gathering daemon. If I/O throttling is disabled, the daemon no longer
collects statistics, and remains inactive until I/O throttling is re-enabled.
Note: The I/O throttling settings are persistent across reboots of the system.
Table 2-2 summarizes the possible recovery option settings for throttling I/O.
Table 2-2
Recovery options for I/O throttling
Recovery option
Possible settings
Description
recoveryoption=nothrottle
None
I/O throttling is not used.
recoveryoption=throttle
Timebound (iotimeout)
DMP throttles the path if an
I/O request does not return
within the specified time in
seconds.
See “Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism” on page 64.
About the minimum redundancy level of DMP paths
You can set the minimum redundancy level for a device or an enclosure. The
minimum redundancy level is the minimum number of paths that should be active
for the device or the enclosure. If the number of paths falls below the minimum
redundancy level for the enclosure, a message is sent to the system console and
also logged to the DMP log file.
33
About administering VxDMP
About device discovery management
The value set for minimum redundancy level is stored in the dmppolicy.info file,
and is persistent. If no minimum redundancy level is set, the default value is 0.
You can list the devices on a specified enclosure with fewer than a given number
of enabled paths, using the command line or the GUI.
About the use_all_paths attribute
You can specify the use_all_paths attribute in conjunction with the adaptive,
balanced, minimumq, priority and round-robin I/O policies to specify whether
I/O requests are to be scheduled on the secondary paths in addition to the primary
paths of an Asymmetric Active/Active (A/A-A) array or an ALUA array. Depending
on the characteristics of the array, the consequent improved load balancing can
increase the total I/O throughput. However, this feature should only be enabled if
recommended by the array vendor. It has no effect for array types other than A/A-A
and ALUA.
About device discovery management
DMP is used to administer multiported disk arrays.
See “How DMP works” on page 13.
DMP uses the Device Discovery Layer (DDL) to handle device discovery and
configuration of disk arrays. DDL discovers disks and their attributes that are required
for DMP operations. Use the vxddladm utility to administer the DDL.
How DMP claims devices
For fully optimized support of any array and for support of more complicated array
types, Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) requires the use of array-specific array support
libraries (ASLs), possibly coupled with array policy modules (APMs). ASLs and
APMs effectively are array-specific plug-ins that allow close tie-in of DMP with any
specific array model.
See the Hardware Compatibility List for the complete list of supported arrays.
http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH211575
During device discovery, the DDL checks the installed ASL for each device to find
which ASL claims the device.
34
About administering VxDMP
Disk categories
Disk categories
Disk arrays that have been certified for use with Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) are
supported by an array support library (ASL), and are categorized by the vendor ID
string that is returned by the disks (for example, “HITACHI”).
35
Chapter
3
Administering VxDMP
using the command line
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About the authentication model for the VxDMP remote CLI commands in the
VMware environment
■
Retrieving information about a DMP node
■
Displaying consolidated information about the DMP nodes
■
Displaying the paths to a disk
■
Displaying paths controlled by a DMP node, controller, enclosure, or array port
■
Displaying information about controllers
■
Displaying information about enclosures
■
Displaying information about array ports
■
Displaying extended device attributes
■
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
■
Setting the attributes of the paths to an enclosure
■
Displaying the redundancy level of a device or enclosure
■
Specifying the minimum number of active paths
■
Displaying the I/O policy
■
Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line
■
Disabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes
Administering VxDMP using the command line
About the authentication model for the VxDMP remote CLI commands in the VMware environment
■
Enabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes
■
Configuring the response to I/O failures
■
Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism
■
Displaying recovery option values
■
Configuring DMP path restoration policies
■
Stopping the DMP path restoration thread
■
Configuring Subpaths Failover Groups (SFG)
■
Configuring Low Impact Path Probing (LIPP)
■
Displaying the status of the DMP path restoration thread
■
Viewing array policy modules
■
Managing the SmartPool using the CLI
■
Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices
■
Changing the disk device naming scheme
About the authentication model for the VxDMP
remote CLI commands in the VMware environment
The VxDMP remote CLI comprises of vxdmpadm, vxddladm, and vxpooladm
commands. The vxdmpadm command performs DMP administrative tasks, vxddladm
command performs disk discovery tasks, and the vxpooladm command configures
and manages the SmartPool.
You can invoke these commands from a command-line prompt on a Linux or
Windows system that has the VxDMP remote CLI package installed.
You can authenticate with the remote ESXi using direct ESXi credentials or vCenter
access credentials.
When you specify vCenter access credentials, the vCenter authentication token is
cached briefly. The authentication is reused for subsequent commands, so you do
not need to specify the credentials for every command instance. Enter the password
in clear text as a command argument, or supply the password when prompted.
To use vCenter access credentials, use the following form of the command:
command vcenter=vcenter vc_user=vc_user vc_passwd=vc_pass \
[host=h1,h2...] [flag] keyword attribute=value..
37
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Retrieving information about a DMP node
where:
command represents vxdmpadm, vxddladm, or vxpooladm
vcenter represents the vCenter server.
vc_user represents the vCenter user name.
vc_passwd represents the vCenter user password.
h1, h2, ... specify hosts on which to perform the operation. Alternatively, you can
specify a list of hosts with the ESXi_HOST_NAMES environment variable.
When you use vCenter access credentials, you must have appropriate permissions
assigned to your role.
See “About roles and privileges for administering DMP” on page 27.
To use direct ESXi credentials, specify one or more ESXi host names, and the
authentication credentials (user name and password) for each host. Use commas
to separate each ESXi host name, user name, and password.
To use direct ESXi credentials, use the following form of the command:
command [host=h1,h2...
[user=u1,u2,... [passwd=p1,p2,...]]]
[flag] keyword attribute=value..
where:
command represents vxdmpadm, vxddladm, or vxpooladm
For readability, some of the examples in the sections about using the commands
do not show the credentials.
Retrieving information about a DMP node
The following command displays the Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) node that
controls a particular physical path:
# vxdmpadm getdmpnode nodename=pathname
The physical path is specified by argument to the nodename attribute, which must
be a valid path.
The command displays output similar to the following example output.
# vxdmpadm getdmpnode nodename=vmhba3:C0:T0:L2
NAME
STATE
ENCLR-TYPE
PATHS ENBL DSBL ENCLR-NAME
====================================================================
emc_clariion0_100 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 2
2
0
emc_clariion0
38
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying consolidated information about the DMP nodes
Use the enclosure attribute with getdmpnode to obtain a list of all DMP nodes for
the specified enclosure.
# vxdmpadm getdmpnode enclosure=emc_clariion0
NAME
STATE
ENCLR-TYPE
PATHS ENBL DSBL ENCLR-NAME
====================================================================
emc_clariion0_98 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 2
2
0
emc_clariion0
emc_clariion0_99 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 2
2
0
emc_clariion0
emc_clariion0_100 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 2
2
0
emc_clariion0
Use the dmpnodename attribute with getdmpnode to display the DMP information for
a given DMP node.
# vxdmpadm getdmpnode dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_100
NAME
STATE
ENCLR-TYPE
PATHS ENBL DSBL ENCLR-NAME
==================================================================
emc_clariion0_100 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 1
1
0
emc_clariion0
Displaying consolidated information about the
DMP nodes
The vxdmpadm list dmpnode command displays the detail information of a Dynamic
Multi-Pathing (DMP) node. The information includes the enclosure name, LUN
serial number, port id information, device attributes, and so on.
The following command displays the consolidated information for all of the DMP
nodes in the system:
# vxdmpadm list dmpnode all
Use the enclosure attribute with list dmpnode to obtain a list of all DMP nodes
for the specified enclosure.
# vxdmpadm list dmpnode enclosure=enclosurename
For example, the following command displays the consolidated information for all
of the DMP nodes in the enc0 enclosure.
# vxdmpadm list dmpnode enclosure=enc0
Use the dmpnodename attribute with list dmpnode to display the DMP information
for a given DMP node. The DMP node can be specified by name or by specifying
a path name. The detailed information for the specified DMP node includes path
information for each subpath of the listed DMP node.
39
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying consolidated information about the DMP nodes
40
The path state differentiates between a path that is disabled due to a failure and a
path that has been manually disabled for administrative purposes. A path that has
been manually disabled using the vxdmpadm disable command is listed as
disabled(m).
# vxdmpadm list dmpnode dmpnodename=dmpnodename
For example, the following command displays the consolidated information for the
DMP node emc_clariion0_158.
# vxdmpadm list dmpnode dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_158
Here o/p also include extra properties ao output should be as below.
dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_158
dmpdev
= emc_clariion0_158
state
= ENABLED
enclosure = emc_clariion0
cab-sno
= CK200064500510
asl
= libvxCLARiiON
vid
= DGC
pid
= RAID 0
array-name = EMC_CLARiiON
array-type = CLR-ALUA
iopolicy
= minimumq
avid
= 76
lun-sno
= 600601609B5C1C00A8A7BA652E93E011
udid
= DGC%5FRAID%200%5FCK200064500510%5F600601609B5C1C00A8A7BA652E93E011
dev-attr
= lun RAID_0
lun_type
= std
scsi3_vpd = NAA:600601609B5C1C00A8A7BA652E93E011
raid_type = RAID_0
raid_group = 00000000
media_type = hdd
replicated = no
lun_size
= 2048
num_paths = 4
###path
=name
state
type
transport
ctlr aportID aportWWN
path
vmhba3:C0:T2:L4 ENABLED(A)
PRIMARY FC
vmhba3
B0 50:06:01:68:39:a0:18:84
path
vmhba3:C0:T3:L4 ENABLED SECONDARY
FC
vmhba3
A0 50:06:01:60:39:a0:18:84
path
vmhba4:C0:T2:L4 ENABLED(A)
PRIMARY FC
vmhba4
B0 50:06:01:68:39:a0:18:84
path
vmhba4:C0:T3:L4 ENABLED SECONDARY
FC
vmhba4
A0 50:06:01:60:39:a0:18:84
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying the paths to a disk
Displaying the paths to a disk
The vxdmpadm command is used to display the multi-pathing information for a
particular metadevice. The metadevice is a device representation of a physical disk
having multiple physical paths through the system’s HBA controllers. In DMP, all
the physical disks in the system are represented as metadevices with one or more
physical paths.
To view multi-pathing information for a particular metadevice
◆
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths
The output displays the multi-pathing information for HBA controller vmhba3 in
the following example:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths ctlr=vmhba3
NAME
STATE[A]
PATH-TYPE[M] DMPNODENAME
ENCLR-NAME
CTLR
ATTRS
=====================================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_100 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T6:L2 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_100 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T5:L3 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_101 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T6:L3 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_101 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T5:L4 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_102 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T6:L4 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_102 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T5:L5 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_163 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T6:L5 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_163 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 -
Displaying paths controlled by a DMP node,
controller, enclosure, or array port
The vxdmpadm getsubpaths command lists all of the paths known to Dynamic
Multi-Pathing (DMP). The vxdmpadm getsubpaths command also provides options
to list the subpaths through a particular DMP node, controller, enclosure, or array
port. To list the paths through an array port, specify either a combination of enclosure
name and array port id, or array port worldwide name (WWN).
To list all subpaths known to DMP:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths
NAME
STATE[A]
PATH-TYPE[M] DMPNODENAME
ENCLR-NAME
CTLR
ATTRS
======================================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_100 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T6:L2 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_100 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 -
41
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying paths controlled by a DMP node, controller, enclosure, or array port
vmhba3:C0:T5:L3 ENABLED
SECONDARY
vmhba3:C0:T6:L3 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_101 emc_clariion0 vmhba3
emc_clariion0_101 emc_clariion0 vmhba3
42
-
The vxdmpadm getsubpaths command combined with the dmpnodename attribute
displays all the paths to a LUN that are controlled by the specified DMP node name.
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_100
NAME
STATE[A]
PATH-TYPE[M] CTLR-NAME ENCLR-TYPE
ENCLR-NAME
ATTRS
===================================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 ENABLED
SECONDARY
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T6:L2 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 -
For A/A arrays, all enabled paths that are available for I/O are shown as ENABLED(A).
For A/P arrays in which the I/O policy is set to singleactive, only one path is
shown as ENABLED(A). The other paths are enabled but not available for I/O. If the
I/O policy is not set to singleactive, DMP can use a group of paths (all primary
or all secondary) for I/O, which are shown as ENABLED(A).
Paths that are in the DISABLED state are not available for I/O operations.
A path that was manually disabled by the system administrator displays as
DISABLED(M). A path that failed displays as DISABLED.
You can use getsubpaths to obtain information about all the paths that are
connected to a particular HBA controller:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths ctlr=vmhba3
NAME
STATE[A]
PATH-TYPE[M] DMPNODENAME
ENCLR-TYPE
ENCLR-NAME
ATTRS
===========================================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_100 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T6:L2 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_100 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T5:L3 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_101 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T6:L3 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_101 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 -
You can also use getsubpaths to obtain information about all the paths that are
connected to a port on an array. The array port can be specified by the name of
the enclosure and the array port ID, or by the WWN identifier of the array port:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths enclosure=enclosure portid=portid
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths pwwn=pwwn
For example, to list subpaths through an array port through the enclosure and the
array port ID:
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying information about controllers
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths enclosure=emc_clariion0 portid=B4
NAME
STATE[A]PATH-TYPE[M] DMPNODENAME ENCLR-TYPE
ENCLR-NAME
ATTRS
=================================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 ENABLED SECONDARY
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T5:L3 ENABLED SECONDARY
vmhba3:C0:T5:L4 ENABLED SECONDARY
vmhba3
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 -
For example, to list subpaths through an array port through the WWN:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths pwwn=50:06:01:64:41:e0:a2:b0
NAME STATE[A] PATH-TYPE[M] CTLR-NAME ENCLR-TYPE ENCLR-NAME ATTRS
========================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 ENABLED SECONDARY vmhba3 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T5:L3 ENABLED SECONDARY vmhba3 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T5:L4 ENABLED SECONDARY vmhba3 EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 -
You can use getsubpaths to obtain information about all the subpaths of an
enclosure.
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths enclosure=enclosure_name [ctlr=ctlrname]
To list all subpaths of an enclosure:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths enclosure=emc_clariion0
NAME
STATE[A]
PATH-TYPE[M] DMPNODENAME
ENCLR-NAME
CTLR
ATTRS
=====================================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_100 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T6:L2 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_100 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T5:L3 ENABLED
SECONDARY
emc_clariion0_101 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 vmhba3:C0:T6:L3 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
emc_clariion0_101 emc_clariion0 vmhba3 -
To list all subpaths of a controller on an enclosure:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths enclosure=Disk ctlr=vmhba3
By default, the output of the vxdmpadm getsubpaths command is sorted by
enclosure name, DMP node name, and within that, path name.
See “Setting customized names for DMP nodes” on page 80.
Displaying information about controllers
The following Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) command lists attributes of all HBA
controllers on the system:
# vxdmpadm listctlr all
43
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying information about enclosures
CTLR-NAME ENCLR-TYPE
STATE
ENCLR-NAME
PATH_COUNT
==============================================================
vmhba3
Hitachi_USP-VM ENABLED hitachi_usp-vm0 1
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON
ENABLED emc_clariion0
1
The other controllers are connected to disks that are in recognized DMP categories.
All the controllers are in the ENABLED state, which indicates that they are available
for I/O operations.
The state DISABLED is used to indicate that controllers are unavailable for I/O
operations. The unavailability can be due to a hardware failure or due to I/O
operations being disabled on that controller by using the vxdmpadm disable
command.
The following forms of the command lists controllers belonging to a specified
enclosure or enclosure type:
# vxdmpadm listctlr enclosure=enc0
or
# vxdmpadm listctlr type=EMC_CLARiiON
CTLR-NAME
ENCLR-TYPE
STATE
ENCLR-NAME
PATH_COUNT
===============================================================
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON ENABLED emc_clariion0
1
The vxdmpadm getctlr command displays HBA vendor details and the Controller
ID. For iSCSI devices, the Controller ID is the IQN or IEEE-format based name.
For FC devices, the Controller ID is the WWN. The WWN shown as ‘Controller ID’
maps to the WWN of the HBA port associated with the host controller.
# vxdmpadm getctlr
LNAME PNAME
VENDOR CTLR-ID
===================================================================================
vmhba3 /proc/bus/pci/05/00.0 QLogic 10:00:00:24:ff:2f:1f:10/21:00:00:24:ff:2f:1f:10
vmhba4 /proc/bus/pci/05/00.0 QLogic 10:00:00:24:ff:2f:1f:11/21:00:00:24:ff:2f:1f:11
Displaying information about enclosures
Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) can display the attributes of the enclosures, including
the enclosure type, enclosure serial number, status, array type, number of LUNs,
and the firmware version, if available.
44
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying information about array ports
To display the attributes of a specified enclosure, use the following DMP command:
# vxdmpadm listenclosure emc_clariion0
ENCLR_NAME
ENCLR_TYPE
ENCLR_SNO
STATUS
ARRAY_TYPE LUN_COUNT FIRMWARE
================================================================================
emc_clariion0 EMC_CLARiiON CK200080300687 CONNECTED CLR-A/PF
13
0324
To display the attrtibutes for all enclosures in a system, use the following DMP
command:
# vxdmpadm listenclosure all
ENCLR_NAME
ENCLR_TYPE
ENCLR_SNO
STATUS
ARRAY_TYPE LUN_COUNT FIRMWARE
=====================================================================================
hitachi_usp-vm0 Hitachi_USP-VM 25847
CONNECTED A/A
5
6008
emc_clariion0
EMC_CLARiiON
CK200080300687 CONNECTED CLR-A/PF
13
5875
Displaying information about array ports
Use the Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) commands in this section to display
information about array ports. The information displayed for an array port includes
the name of its enclosure, its ID, and its worldwide name (WWN) identifier.
To display the attributes of an array port that is accessible through a path, DMP
node or HBA controller, use one of the following commands:
# vxdmpadm getportids path=path_name
# vxdmpadm getportids dmpnodename=dmpnode_name
# vxdmpadm getportids ctlr=ctlr_name
The following form of the command displays information about all of the array ports
within the specified enclosure:
# vxdmpadm getportids enclosure=enclr_name
The following example shows information about the array port that is accessible
through DMP node emc_clariion0_100:
# vxdmpadm getportids dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_100
NAME
ENCLR-NAME
ARRAY-PORT-ID pWWN
===================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T5:L2 emc_clariion0 A4
50:06:01:64:41:e0:a2:b0
vmhba3:C0:T6:L2 emc_clariion0 B4
50:06:01:6c:41:e0:a2:b0
45
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying extended device attributes
46
Displaying extended device attributes
The vxdmpadm list dmpnode command displays DDL extended attributes. For
example, the following command shows attributes of “std”, “fc”, and “RAID_0” for
this LUN:
# vxdmpadm list dmpnode dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_100
Here o/p also include extra properties ao output should be as below.
dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_158
dmpdev
= emc_clariion0_158
state
= ENABLED
enclosure
= emc_clariion0
cab-sno
= CK200064500510
asl
= libvxCLARiiON
vid
= DGC
pid
= RAID 0
array-name
= EMC_CLARiiON
array-type
= CLR-ALUA
iopolicy
= minimumq
avid
= 76
lun-sno
= 600601609B5C1C00A8A7BA652E93E011
udid
= DGC%5FRAID%200%5FCK200064500510%5F600601609B5C1C00A8A7BA652E93E011
dev-attr
= lun RAID_0
lun_type
= std
scsi3_vpd
= NAA:600601609B5C1C00A8A7BA652E93E011
raid_type
= RAID_0
raid_group
media_type
replicated
lun_size
num_paths
###path
path
path
path
path
= 00000000
= hdd
= no
= 2048
= 4
=name
vmhba3:C0:T2:L4
vmhba3:C0:T3:L4
vmhba4:C0:T2:L4
vmhba4:C0:T3:L4
state
type
ENABLED(A)
PRIMARY
ENABLED SECONDARY
ENABLED(A)
PRIMARY
ENABLED SECONDARY
transport
FC vmhba3
FC vmhba3
FC vmhba4
FC vmhba4
B0
A0
B0
A0
ctlr aportID aportWWN
50:06:01:68:39:a0:18:84
50:06:01:60:39:a0:18:84
50:06:01:68:39:a0:18:84
50:06:01:60:39:a0:18:84
For a list of ASLs that supports Extended Attributes, and descriptions of these
attributes, refer to the hardware compatibility list (HCL) at the following URL:
http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH170013
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
You can use the vxdmpadm iostat command to gather and display I/O statistics
for a specified DMP node, enclosure, path, port, controller, or virtual machine.
The statistics displayed are the CPU usage and amount of memory per CPU used
to accumulate statistics, the number of read and write operations, the number of
kilobytes read and written, and the average time in milliseconds per kilobyte that
is read or written.
To enable the gathering of statistics, enter this command:
# vxdmpadm iostat start [memory=size]
The memory attribute limits the maximum amount of memory that is used to record
I/O statistics for each CPU. The default limit is 32k (32 kilobytes) per CPU.
To reset the I/O counters to zero, use this command:
# vxdmpadm iostat reset
To display the accumulated statistics at regular intervals, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm iostat show {filter} [interval=seconds [count=N]]
The above command displays I/O statistics for the devices specified by the filter.
The filter is one of the following:
■
all
■
vm=vmname
■
ctlr=ctlr-name [vm=vmname]
■
dmpnodename=dmp-node [vm=vmname]
■
enclosure=enclr-name [portid=array-portid ] [ctlr=ctlr-name]
[vm=vmname]
■
pathname=path-name [vm=vmname]
■
pwwn=array-port-wwn[ctlr=ctlr-name] [vm=vmname]
Use the interval and count attributes to specify the interval in seconds between
displaying the I/O statistics, and the number of lines to be displayed. The actual
interval may be smaller than the value specified if insufficient memory is available
to record the statistics.
DMP also provides a groupby option to display cumulative I/O statistics, aggregated
by the specified criteria.
See “Displaying cumulative I/O statistics” on page 48.
47
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
To disable the gathering of statistics, enter this command:
# vxdmpadm iostat stop
Displaying cumulative I/O statistics
The vxdmpadm iostat command provides the ability to analyze the I/O load
distribution across various I/O channels or parts of I/O channels. Select the
appropriate filter to display the I/O statistics for the DMP node, controller, array
enclosure, path, port, or virtual machine. Then, use the groupby clause to display
cumulative statistics according to the criteria that you want to analyze. If the groupby
clause is not specified, then the statistics are displayed per path.
When you combine the filter and the groupby clause, you can analyze the I/O load
for the required use case scenario. For example:
■
To compare I/O load across HBAs, enclosures, array ports, or virtual machines,
use the groupby clause with the specified attribute.
■
To analyze I/O load across a given I/O channel (HBA to array port link), use
filter by HBA and PWWN or enclosure and array port.
■
To analyze I/O load distribution across links to an HBA, use filter by HBA and
groupby array port.
Use the following format of the iostat command to analyze the I/O loads:
# vxdmpadm [-u unit] iostat show [groupby=criteria] {filter}
\
[interval=seconds [count=N]]
The above command displays I/O statistics for the devices specified by the filter.
The filter is one of the following:
■
all
■
vm=vmname
■
ctlr=ctlr-name [vm=vmname]
■
dmpnodename=dmp-node [vm=vmname]
■
enclosure=enclr-name [portid=array-portid ] [ctlr=ctlr-name]
[vm=vmname]
■
pathname=path-name [vm=vmname]
■
pwwn=array-port-wwn[ctlr=ctlr-name] [vm=vmname]
You can aggregate the statistics by the following groupby criteria:
■
arrayport
48
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
■
ctlr
■
dmpnode
■
enclosure
■
vm
By default, the read/write times are displayed in milliseconds up to 2 decimal places.
The throughput data is displayed in terms of BLOCKS, and the output is scaled,
meaning that the small values are displayed in small units and the larger values
are displayed in bigger units, keeping significant digits constant. You can specify
the units in which the statistics data is displayed. The -u option accepts the following
options:
h or H
Displays throughput in the highest possible unit.
k
Displays throughput in kilobytes.
m
Displays throughput in megabytes.
g
Displays throughput in gigabytes.
bytes| b
Displays throughput in exact number of bytes.
us
Displays average read/write time in microseconds.
To group by DMP node:
# vxdmpadm [-u unit] iostat show groupby=dmpnode \
[all | dmpnodename=dmpnodename | enclosure=enclr-name]
To group by controller:
# vxdmpadm [-u unit] iostat show groupby=ctlr [ all | ctlr=ctlr ]
For example:
# vxdmpadm iostat show groupby=ctlr ctlr=vmhba3
cpu usage = 194us per cpu memory = 8192b
OPERATIONS
BLOCKS
AVG TIME(ms)
CTLRNAME READS
WRITES READS WRITES READS
WRITES
vmhba3
5916
0
36k
0k
0.825074 0.000000
To group by arrayport:
# vxdmpadm [-u unit] iostat show groupby=arrayport [ all \
| pwwn=array_pwwn | enclosure=enclr portid=array-port-id ]
49
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
For example:
# vxdmpadm -uk iostat show groupby=arrayport enclosure=emc_clariion0
cpu usage = 203us per cpu memory = 8192b
PORTIDS
emc_clariion0:A4
emc_clariion0:A5
emc_clariion0:B4
emc_clariion0:B5
OPERATIONS
READS WRITES
0
0
0
0
3295 0
2621 0
BYTES
READS WRITES
0k
0k
0k
0k
14k
0k
22k
0k
AVG TIME(ms)
READS
WRITES
0.000000 0.000000
0.000000 0.000000
0.799070 0.000000
0.857763 0.000000
To group by enclosure:
# vxdmpadm [-u unit] iostat show groupby=enclosure [ all \
| enclosure=enclr ]
For example:
# vxdmpadm -uh iostat show groupby=enclosure
cpu usage = 220us per cpu memory = 8192b
OPERATIONS
BLOCKS
ENCLOSURENAME READS WRITES READS WRITES
emc_clariion0 5916
0
72
0
AVG TIME(ms)
READS
WRITES
0.825074 0.000000
To group by virtual machine:
# vxdmpadm [-u unit] iostat show groupby=vm [ all \
| pwwn=array_pwwn | enclosure=enclr portid=array-port-id ]
For example:
# vxdmpadm host=host user=root passwd=passwd \
iostat show groupby=vm
cpu usage = 392us
per cpu memory = 8192b
OPERATIONS
BLOCKS
AVG TIME(ms)
VIRTUAL MACHINE READS WRITES READS WRITES READS
WRITES
vm200
85
7
8545
12
12.61
2.82
<VMKernel>
18615 24691 179943 14702
1.20
1.84
The <VMKernel> denotes the VMKernel generated I/O stats.
You can also filter out entities for which all data entries are zero. This option is
especially useful in a cluster environment that contains many failover devices. You
can display only the statistics for the active paths.
To filter all zero entries from the output of the iostat show command:
50
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
# vxdmpadm [-u unit] -z iostat show [all|ctlr=ctlr_name |
dmpnodename=dmp_device_name | enclosure=enclr_name [portid=portid] |
pathname=path_name|pwwn=port_WWN][interval=seconds [count=N]]
For example:
# vxdmpadm -z iostat show dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_160
cpu usage = 239us per cpu memory = 8192b
OPERATIONS
BLOCKS
AVG TIME(ms)
PATHNAME
READS WRITES READS WRITES READS
WRITES
vmhba3:C0:T0:L8 333
0
3
0
0.220270 0.000000
vmhba3:C0:T1:L8 323
0
5
0
0.227632 0.000000
To display average read/write times in microseconds.
# vxdmpadm -uus iostat show pathname=vmhba3:C0:T0:L6
cpu usage = 246us per cpu memory = 8192b
OPERATIONS
BLOCKS
AVG TIME(ms)
PATHNAME
READS WRITES READS WRITES READS
WRITES
vmhba3:C0:T0:L6 377
0
4
0
0.173711 0.000000
Displaying statistics for queued or erroneous I/Os
Use the vxdmpadm iostat show command with the -q option to display the I/Os
queued in Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) for a specified DMP node, or for a specified
path or controller. For a DMP node, the -q option displays the I/Os on the specified
DMP node that were sent to underlying layers. If a path or controller is specified,
the -q option displays I/Os that were sent to the given path or controller and not
yet returned to DMP.
See the vxdmpadm(1m) manual page for more information about the vxdmpadm
iostat command.
To display queued I/O counts on a DMP node:
# vxdmpadm -q iostat show [filter] [interval=n [count=m]]
For example:
# vxdmpadm -q iostat show dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_12
QUEUED I/Os
DMPNODENAME
READS WRITES
emc_clariion0_12 2
15
Pending I/Os
30
51
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
To display the count of I/Os that returned with errors on a DMP node, path, or
controller:
# vxdmpadm -e iostat show [filter] [interval=n [count=m]]
For example, to show the I/O counts that returned errors on a path:
# vxdmpadm -e iostat show pathname=vmhba3:CO:TO:L8
cpu usage = 656us
PATHNAME
vmhba3:CO:TO:L8
per cpu memory = 49152b
ERROR I/Os
READS
WRITES
0
0
Displaying statistics for per second I/Os
The vxdmpadm iostat CLI when used with -s option provides the I/O statistics in
form of operations per second and blocks per second in addition to the average
response time. You can now analyze the rate of I/O traffic flow across any entity,
which is specified in the filter and the group by criteria similar to cumulative I/O
statistics.
For example, to obtain the flow rate across various virtual machines on the system
through a particular controller use:
# vxdmpadm -s iostat show groupby=vm ctlr=vmhba4
cpu usage = 272us
VIRTUAL MACHINE
vm51
vm55
vMA
<VMKernel>
0
0
4
per cpu memory = 8192b
READS
0
0
0
0
WRITES
32
9
176
0
OPERATIONS/SEC
READS
WRITES
0
1.16
0
2.74
0
0.25
7
0
BLOCKS/SEC
AVG TIME(ms)
READS
WRITES
0.00
4.98
0.00
4.36
1.37
For example, to obtain the flow rate of I/O traffic across various enclosures through
a specific controller, use:
# vxdmpadm -s iostat show groupby=enclosure ctlr=vmhba4
ENCLOSURENAME
emc_clariion0
emc0
hitachi_usp-vm0
cpu usage = 284us
OPERATIONS/SEC
READS
WRITES
7
0
0
0
0
0
per cpu memory = 8192b
BLOCKS/SEC
AVG TIME(ms)
READS
WRITES
READS
WRITES
27
0
0.14
0.00
0
0
1.05
1.37
9
0
6.80
0.00
52
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Gathering and displaying I/O statistics
xiv0
xiv0
0
0
0
0
0
12
0
0
2.26
4.21
0.00
4.98
Examples of using the vxdmpadm iostat command
Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) enables you to gather and display I/O statistics with
the vxdmpadm iostat command. This section provides an example session using
the vxdmpadm iostat command.
The first command enables the gathering of I/O statistics:
# vxdmpadm iostat start
The next command displays the current statistics including the accumulated total
numbers of read and write operations, and the kilobytes read and written, on all
paths.
# vxdmpadm -uk iostat show all
PATHNAME
vmhba3:C0:T0:L0
vmhba3:C0:T0:L1
vmhba3:C0:T0:L2
vmhba3:C0:T0:L3
cpu usage = 143us
per cpu memory = 8192b
OPERATIONS
BYTES
AVG TIME(ms)
READS WRITES
READS
WRITES
READS
WRITES
362
0
1k
0k
0.143356 0.000000
377
0
2k
0k
0.138427 0.000000
368
0
1k
0k
0.141810 0.000000
356
0
1k
0k
5.364421 0.000000
The following command changes the amount of memory that vxdmpadm can use to
accumulate the statistics:
# vxdmpadm iostat start memory=4096
The displayed statistics can be filtered by path name, DMP node name, and
enclosure name (note that the per-CPU memory has changed following the previous
command):
# vxdmpadm -uk iostat show pathname=vmhba3:C0:T0:L6
cpu usage = 152us per cpu memory = 4096b
OPERATIONS
BYTES
AVG TIME(ms)
PATHNAME
READS WRITES
READS WRITES READS
WRITES
vmhba3:C0:T0:L6 375
0
2k
0k
0.173720 0.000000
# vxdmpadm -uk iostat show dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_160
cpu usage = 161us per cpu memory = 4096b
OPERATIONS
BYTES
AVG TIME(ms)
PATHNAME
READS WRITES
READS WRITES READS
WRITES
vmhba3:C0:T0:L8 331
0
1k
0k
0.220807 0.000000
53
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Setting the attributes of the paths to an enclosure
vmhba3:C0:T1:L8 323
vmhba3:C0:T2:L8 0
vmhba3:C0:T3:L8 0
0
0
0
2k
0k
0k
0k
0k
0k
0.227632 0.000000
0.000000 0.000000
0.000000 0.000000
# vxdmpadm -uk iostat show enclosure=emc_clariion0
PATHNAME
vmhba3:C0:T0:L0
vmhba3:C0:T0:L1
vmhba3:C0:T0:L2
vmhba3:C0:T0:L3
cpu usage = 171us per cpu memory = 4096b
OPERATIONS
BYTES
AVG TIME(ms)
READS WRITES
READS WRITES READS
WRITES
362
0
1k
0k
0.143356 0.000000
379
0
2k
0k
0.138588 0.000000
368
0
1k
0k
0.141810 0.000000
357
0
1k
0k
5.367361 0.000000
You can also specify the number of times to display the statistics and the time
interval. Here the incremental statistics for a path are displayed twice with a 2-second
interval:
# vxdmpadm -uk iostat show pathname=vmhba3:C0:T0:L6 interval=2
cpu usage = 176us per cpu memory = 4096b
OPERATIONS
BYTES
AVG TIME(ms)
PATHNAME
READS WRITES READS WRITES READS
WRITES
vmhba3:C0:T0:L6 375
0
2k
0k
0.173720 0.000000
vmhba3:C0:T0:L6 375
0
0k
0k
0.000000 0.000000
Setting the attributes of the paths to an enclosure
You can use the vxdmpadm setattr command to set the attributes of the paths to
an enclosure or disk array.
The attributes set for the paths are persistent and are stored in the
/etc/vx/dmppolicy.info file.
To set the attributes for the paths
◆
To set the attributes for the paths, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm setattr path vmhba3:C0:T1:L2 pathtype=pathtype
Where pathtype is:
See “About the DMP attributes of the paths to an enclosure” on page 28.
Specifies a path as preferred, and optionally assigns a priority number to it. If
specified, the priority number must be an integer that is greater than or equal to
one. Higher priority numbers indicate that a path is able to carry a greater I/O load.
54
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying the redundancy level of a device or enclosure
55
Note: Setting a priority for path does not change the I/O policy. The I/O policy must
be set independently.
See “Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line” on page 57.
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc0 \
iopolicy=priority
# vxdmpadm setattr path vmhba3:C0:T1:L2 pathtype=preferred \
priority=2
Displaying the redundancy level of a device or
enclosure
Use the vxdmpadm getdmpnode command to list the devices with less than the
required redundancy level.
To list the devices on a specified enclosure with fewer than a given number of
enabled paths, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm getdmpnode enclosure=encl_name redundancy=value
For example, to list the devices with fewer than 3 enabled paths, use the following
command:
# vxdmpadm getdmpnode enclosure=EMC_CLARiiON0 redundancy=3
NAME
STATE
ENCLR-TYPE
PATHS ENBL DSBL ENCLR-NAME
=====================================================================
emc_clariion0_162 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 3
2
1
emc_clariion0
emc_clariion0_182 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 2
2
0
emc_clariion0
emc_clariion0_184 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 3
2
1
emc_clariion0
emc_clariion0_186 ENABLED EMC_CLARiiON 2
2
0
emc_clariion0
To display the minimum redundancy level for a particular device, use the vxdmpadm
getattr command, as follows:
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure|arrayname|arraytype \
component-name redundancy
For example, to show the minimum redundancy level for the enclosure
HDS9500-ALUA0:
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure HDS9500-ALUA0 redundancy
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Specifying the minimum number of active paths
ENCLR_NAME DEFAULT CURRENT
=============================================
HDS9500-ALUA0
0
4
Specifying the minimum number of active paths
You can use the vxdmpadm setattr command to set the minimum redundancy
level.
To specify the minimum number of active paths
◆
Use the vxdmpadm setattr command with the redundancy attribute as follows:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure|arrayname|arraytype component-name
redundancy=value
where value is the number of active paths.
For example, to set the minimum redundancy level for the enclosure
HDS9500-ALUA0:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure HDS9500-ALUA0 redundancy=2
Displaying the I/O policy
To display the current and default settings of the I/O policy for an enclosure, array,
or array type, use the vxdmpadm getattr command.
The following example displays the default and current setting of iopolicy for the
emc_clariion0 enclosure:
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure emc_clariion0 iopolicy
ENCLR_NAME
DEFAULT
CURRENT
--------------------------------------emc_clariion0
MinimumQ
Balanced
The next example displays the setting of partitionsize for the enclosure enc0,
on which the balanced I/O policy with a partition size of 2MB has been set:
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure enc0 partitionsize
ENCLR_NAME
DEFAULT
CURRENT
--------------------------------------enc0
512
4096
56
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line
Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the
command line
You can use the vxdmpadm setattr command to change the I/O policy for
distributing I/O load across multiple paths to a disk array or enclosure. You can set
policies for an enclosure (for example, HDS01), for all enclosures of a particular type
(such as HDS), or for all enclosures of a particular array type (such as A/A for
Active/Active, or A/P for Active/Passive).
The following example sets the adaptive I/O policy for the enclosure enc1:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc1 \
iopolicy=adaptive
The following example sets the balanced I/O policy with a partition size of 4096
blocks (2MB) on the enclosure enc0:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc0 \
iopolicy=balanced partitionsize=4096
The following example sets the I/O policy to minimumq:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure Disk \
iopolicy=minimumq
The following example sets the I/O policy to priority for all SENA arrays:
# vxdmpadm setattr arrayname SENA \
iopolicy=priority
The next example sets the I/O policy to round-robin for all Active/Active arrays:
# vxdmpadm setattr arraytype A/A \
iopolicy=round-robin
The following example sets the I/O policy to singleactive for JBOD disks:
# vxdmpadm setattr arrayname Disk \
iopolicy=singleactive
Scheduling I/O on the paths of an Asymmetric Active/Active array
or an ALUA array
You can specify the use_all_paths attribute in conjunction with the adaptive,
balanced, minimumq, priority and round-robin I/O policies to specify whether
57
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line
I/O requests are to be scheduled on the secondary paths in addition to the primary
paths of an Asymmetric Active/Active (A/A-A) array or an ALUA array. Depending
on the characteristics of the array, the consequent improved load balancing can
increase the total I/O throughput. However, this feature should only be enabled if
recommended by the array vendor. It has no effect for array types other than A/A-A
and ALUA.
For example, the following command sets the balanced I/O policy with a partition
size of 4096 blocks (2MB) on the enclosure enc0, and allows scheduling of I/O
requests on the secondary paths:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc0 iopolicy=balanced \
partitionsize=4096 use_all_paths=yes
The default setting for this attribute is use_all_paths=no.
You can display the current setting for use_all_paths for an enclosure, arrayname
or arraytype. To do this, specify the use_all_paths option to the vxdmpadm
gettattr command.
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure HDS9500-ALUA0 use_all_paths
ENCLR_NAME
ATTR_NAME
DEFAULT CURRENT
===========================================
HDS9500-ALUA0 use_all_paths no
yes
The use_all_paths attribute only applies to A/A-A arrays and ALUA arrays. For
other arrays, the above command displays the message:
Attribute is not applicable for this array.
Example of applying load balancing in a SAN
This example describes how to configure load balancing in a SAN environment
where there are multiple primary paths to an Active/Passive device through several
SAN switches.
58
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line
59
To apply load balancing in a SAN
1
Display the paths of the device. This sample output from the vxdmpadm
getsubpaths command shows that the device has two primary paths:
# vxdmpadm getsubpaths dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_160
NAME
STATE[A]
PATH-TYPE[M] CTLR-NAME ENCLR-TYPE
ENCLR-NAME
ATTRS
===================================================================================
vmhba3:C0:T0:L8 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T1:L8 ENABLED(A) PRIMARY
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T2:L8 ENABLED
SECONDARY
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 vmhba3:C0:T3:L8 ENABLED
SECONDARY
vmhba3
EMC_CLARiiON emc_clariion0 -
2
Enable the gathering of DMP statistics:
# vxdmpadm iostat start
3
Initiate I/O load on the device. To do this, map the device using physical Raw
Device Mapping to a Virtual Machine, and then start the I/O load on the virtual
disk corresponding to the device.
4
Run the vxdmpadm iostat command to display the DMP statistics for the
device. In this example, all I/O is being directed to one path, vmhba3:C0:T0:L8:
# vxdmpadm iostat show dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_160 \
interval=5 count=2
.
.
.
PATHNAME
vmhba3:C0:T0:L8
vmhba3:C0:T1:L8
vmhba3:C0:T2:L8
vmhba3:C0:T3:L8
cpu usage
OPERATIONS
READS WRITES
333
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
= 230us per cpu
KBYTES
READS WRITES
1k
0k
0k
0k
0k
0k
0k
0k
memory = 8192b
AVG TIME(ms)
READS
WRITES
0.220270 0.000000
0.000000 0.000000
0.000000 0.000000
0.000000 0.000000
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Specifying the VxDMP I/O policy with the command line
5
Display the I/O policy for the enclosure that contains the device:
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure emc_clariion0 iopolicy
ENCLR_NAME
DEFAULT
CURRENT
=============================================
emc_clariion0
MinimumQ
Single-Active
In this example, the policy for the enclosure is set to singleactive, which
explains why all the I/O is taking place on one path.
6
To balance the I/O load across the multiple primary paths, set the policy to
round-robin as shown here:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure emc_clariion0 iopolicy=round-robin
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure emc_clariion0 iopolicy
ENCLR_NAME
DEFAULT
CURRENT
============================================
emc_clariion0
MinimumQ
Round-Robin
7
Reset the DMP statistics:
# vxdmpadm iostat reset
8
With the workload still running, you can now see the effect of changing the I/O
policy to balance the load across the primary paths.
# vxdmpadm iostat show dmpnodename=emc_clariion0_160 \
interval=5 count=2
.
.
.
PATHNAME
vmhba3:C0:T0:L8
vmhba3:C0:T1:L8
vmhba3:C0:T2:L8
vmhba3:C0:T3:L8
9
cpu usage = 230us per cpu memory = 8192b
OPERATIONS
KBYTES
AVG TIME(ms)
READS WRITES
READS WRITES READS
WRITES
333
0
1k
0k
0.220270 0.000000
323
0
2k
0k
0.227632 0.000000
0
0
0k
0k
0.000000 0.000000
0
0
0k
0k
0.000000 0.000000
If required, return the enclosure to the single active I/O policy by entering the
following command:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure emc_clariion0 iopolicy=singleactive
60
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Disabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes
Disabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports,
or DMP nodes
Disabling I/O through a path, HBA controller, array port, or Dynamic Multi-Pathing
(DMP) node prevents DMP from issuing I/O requests through the specified path,
or the paths that are connected to the specified controller, array port, or DMP node.
If the specified paths have pending I/Os, the vxdmpadm disable command waits
until the I/Os are completed before disabling the paths.
DMP does not support the operation to disable I/O for the controllers that use
Third-Party Drivers (TPD) for multi-pathing.
To disable I/O for one or more paths, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm [-c|-f] disable path=path_name1[,path_name2,path_nameN]
To disable I/O for the paths connected to one or more HBA controllers, use the
following command:
# vxdmpadm [-c|-f] disable ctlr=ctlr_name1[,ctlr_name2,ctlr_nameN]
To disable I/O for the paths connected to an array port, use one of the following
commands:
# vxdmpadm [-c|-f] disable enclosure=enclr_name portid=array_port_ID
# vxdmpadm [-c|-f] disable pwwn=array_port_WWN
where the array port is specified either by the enclosure name and the array port
ID, or by the array port’s worldwide name (WWN) identifier.
The following examples show how to disable I/O on an array port:
# vxdmpadm disable enclosure=HDS9500V0 portid=1A
# vxdmpadm disable pwwn=20:00:00:E0:8B:06:5F:19
To disable I/O for a particular path, specify both the controller and the portID, which
represent the two ends of the fabric:
# vxdmpadm [-c|-f] disable ctlr=ctlr_name enclosure=enclr_name \
portid=array_port_ID
To disable I/O for a particular DMP node, specify the DMP node name.
# vxdmpadm [-c|-f] disable dmpnodename=dmpnode
You can use the -c option to check if there is only a single active path to the disk.
61
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Enabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or DMP nodes
The last path disable operation fails with -f option irrespective whether the device
is in use or not.
The disable operation fails if it is issued to a controller that is connected to the
root disk through a single path, and there are no root disk mirrors configured on
alternate paths. If such mirrors exist, the command succeeds. The disable operation
fails if it is issued to a controller that is connected to the swap device through a
single path.
Enabling I/O for paths, controllers, array ports, or
DMP nodes
Enabling a controller allows a previously disabled path, HBA controller, array port,
or Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) node to accept I/O again. This operation succeeds
only if the path, controller, array port, or DMP node is accessible to the host, and
I/O can be performed on it. When connecting Active/Passive disk arrays, the enable
operation results in failback of I/O to the primary path. The enable operation can
also be used to allow I/O to the controllers on a system board that was previously
detached.
Note: This operation is supported for controllers that are used to access disk arrays
on which cluster-shareable disk groups are configured.
DMP does not support the operation to enable I/O for the controllers that use
Third-Party Drivers (TPD) for multi-pathing.
To enable I/O for one or more paths, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm enable path=path_name1[,path_name2,path_nameN]
To enable I/O for the paths connected to one or more HBA controllers, use the
following command:
# vxdmpadm enable ctlr=ctlr_name1[,ctlr_name2,ctlr_nameN]
To enable I/O for the paths connected to an array port, use one of the following
commands:
# vxdmpadm enable enclosure=enclr_name portid=array_port_ID
# vxdmpadm enable pwwn=array_port_WWN
where the array port is specified either by the enclosure name and the array port
ID, or by the array port’s worldwide name (WWN) identifier.
The following are examples of using the command to enable I/O on an array port:
62
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Configuring the response to I/O failures
# vxdmpadm enable enclosure=HDS9500V0 portid=1A
# vxdmpadm enable pwwn=20:00:00:E0:8B:06:5F:19
To enable I/O for a particular path, specify both the controller and the portID, which
represent the two ends of the fabric:
# vxdmpadm enable ctlr=ctlr_name enclosure=enclr_name \
portid=array_port_ID
To enable I/O for a particular DMP node, specify the DMP node name.
# vxdmpadm enable dmpnodename=dmpnode
Configuring the response to I/O failures
You can configure how Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) responds to failed I/O requests
on the paths to a specified enclosure, disk array name, or type of array. By default,
DMP is configured to retry a failed I/O request up to five minutes on various active
paths.
To display the current settings for handling I/O request failures that are applied to
the paths to an enclosure, array name, or array type, use the vxdmpadm getattr
command.
See “Displaying recovery option values” on page 66.
To set a limit for the number of times that DMP attempts to retry sending an I/O
request on a path, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm setattr \
{enclosure enc-name|arrayname name|arraytype type} \
recoveryoption=fixedretry retrycount=n
The value of the argument to retrycount specifies the number of retries to be
attempted before DMP reschedules the I/O request on another available path, or
fails the request altogether.
As an alternative to specifying a fixed number of retries, you can specify the amount
of time DMP allows for handling an I/O request. If the I/O request does not succeed
within that time, DMP fails the I/O request. To specify an iotimeout value, use the
following command:
# vxdmpadm setattr \
{enclosure enc-name|arrayname name|arraytype type} \
recoveryoption=timebound iotimeout=seconds
63
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism
The default value of iotimeout is 300 seconds. For some applications such as
Oracle, it may be desirable to set iotimeout to a larger value. The iotimeout value
for DMP should be greater than the I/O service time of the underlying operating
system layers.
Note: The fixedretry and timebound settings are mutually exclusive.
The following example configures time-bound recovery for the enclosure enc0, and
sets the value of iotimeout to 360 seconds:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc0 recoveryoption=timebound \
iotimeout=360
The next example sets a fixed-retry limit of 10 for the paths to all Active/Active
arrays:
# vxdmpadm setattr arraytype A/A recoveryoption=fixedretry \
retrycount=10
Specifying recoveryoption=default resets DMP to the default settings for recovery.
For example, the following command sets the default settings:
# vxdmpadm setattr arraytype A/A recoveryoption=default
For PCI devices, the default settings are recoveryoption=fixedretry
retrycount=5.
For all other devices, the default settings are recoveryoption=timebound
iotimeout=300
Specifying recoveryoption=defaultalso has the effect of configuring I/O throttling
with the default settings.
See “Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism” on page 64.
Note: The response to I/O failure settings is persistent across reboots of the system.
Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism
By default, Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) is configured with I/O throttling turned off
for all paths. To display the current settings for I/O throttling that are applied to the
paths to an enclosure, array name, or array type, use the vxdmpadm getattr
command.
64
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Configuring the I/O throttling mechanism
See “Displaying recovery option values” on page 66.
If enabled, I/O throttling imposes a small overhead on CPU and memory usage
because of the activity of the statistics-gathering daemon. If I/O throttling is disabled,
the daemon no longer collects statistics, and remains inactive until I/O throttling is
re-enabled.
To turn off I/O throttling, use the following form of the vxdmpadm setattr command:
# vxdmpadm setattr \
{enclosure enc-name|arrayname name|arraytype type} \
recoveryoption=nothrottle
The following example shows how to disable I/O throttling for the paths to the
enclosure enc0:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc0 recoveryoption=nothrottle
The vxdmpadm setattr command can be used to enable I/O throttling on the paths
to a specified enclosure, disk array name, or type of array:
# vxdmpadm setattr \
{enclosure enc-name|arrayname name|arraytype type}\
recoveryoption=throttle [iotimeout=seconds]
If the iotimeout attribute is specified, its argument specifies the time in seconds
that DMP waits for an outstanding I/O request to succeed before invoking I/O
throttling on the path. The default value of iotimeout is 10 seconds. Setting
iotimeout to a larger value potentially causes more I/O requests to become queued
up in the SCSI driver before I/O throttling is invoked.
The following example sets the value of iotimeout to 60 seconds for the enclosure
enc0:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc0 recoveryoption=throttle \
iotimeout=60
Specify recoveryoption=default to reset I/O throttling to the default settings, as
follows:
# vxdmpadm setattr arraytype A/A recoveryoption=default
The above command configures the default behavior, corresponding to
recoveryoption=nothrottle. The above command also configures the default
behavior for the response to I/O failures.
See “Configuring the response to I/O failures” on page 63.
65
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Displaying recovery option values
Note: The I/O throttling settings are persistent across reboots of the system.
Displaying recovery option values
To display the current settings for handling I/O request failures that are applied to
the paths to an enclosure, array name, or array type, use the following Dynamic
Multi-Pathing (DMP) command:
# vxdmpadm getattr \
{enclosure enc-name|arrayname name|arraytype type} \
recoveryoption
The following example shows the vxdmpadm getattr command being used to
display the recoveryoption option values that are set on an enclosure.
# vxdmpadm getattr enclosure HDS9500-ALUA0 recoveryoption
ENCLR-NAME
RECOVERY-OPTION DEFAULT[VAL]
CURRENT[VAL]
===============================================================
HDS9500-ALUA0 Throttle
Nothrottle[0] Nothrottle[0]
HDS9500-ALUA0 Error-Retry
Timebound[300] Timebound[300]
The command output shows the default and current policy options and their values.
See “About DMP recovery options” on page 32.
Configuring DMP path restoration policies
Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) maintains a kernel task that re-examines the condition
of paths at a specified interval. The type of analysis that is performed on the paths
depends on the checking policy that is configured.
Note: The DMP path restoration task does not change the disabled state of the
path through a controller that you have disabled using vxdmpadm disable.
When configuring DMP path restoration policies, you must stop the path restoration
thread, and then restart it with new attributes.
See “Stopping the DMP path restoration thread” on page 68.
Use the vxdmpadm settune dmp_restore_policy command to configure one of
the following restore policies. The policy remains in effect until the restore thread
is stopped or the values are changed using the vxdmpadm settune command.
■
check_all
66
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Configuring DMP path restoration policies
The path restoration thread analyzes all paths in the system and revives the
paths that are back online, as well as disabling the paths that are inaccessible.
The command to configure this policy is:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_restore_policy=check_all
■
check_alternate
The path restoration thread checks that at least one alternate path is healthy.
It generates a notification if this condition is not met. This policy avoids inquiry
commands on all healthy paths, and is less costly than check_all in cases
where a large number of paths are available. This policy is the same as
check_all if there are only two paths per DMP node. The command to configure
this policy is:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_restore_policy=check_alternate
■
check_disabled
This is the default path restoration policy. The path restoration thread checks
the condition of paths that were previously disabled due to hardware failures,
and revives them if they are back online. The command to configure this policy
is:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_restore_policy=check_disabled
■
check_periodic
The path restoration thread performs check_all once in a given number of
cycles, and check_disabled in the remainder of the cycles. This policy may
lead to periodic slowing down (due to check_all) if a large number of paths are
available. The command to configure this policy is:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_restore_policy=check_periodic
The default number of cycles between running the check_all policy is 10.
The dmp_restore_interval tunable parameter specifies how often the path
restoration thread examines the paths. For example, the following command sets
the polling interval to 400 seconds:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_restore_interval=400
The settings are immediately applied and are persistent across reboots. Use the
vxdmpadm gettune command to view the current settings.
See “DMP tunable parameters” on page 154.
67
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Stopping the DMP path restoration thread
68
If the vxdmpadm start restore command is given without specifying a policy or
interval, the path restoration thread is started with the persistent policy and interval
settings previously set by the administrator with the vxdmpadm settune command.
If the administrator has not set a policy or interval, the system defaults are used.
The system default restore policy is check_disabled. The system default interval
is 300 seconds.
Warning: Decreasing the interval below the system default can adversely affect
system performance.
Stopping the DMP path restoration thread
Use the following command to stop the Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) path
restoration thread:
# vxdmpadm stop restore
Warning: Automatic path failback stops if the path restoration thread is stopped.
Configuring Subpaths Failover Groups (SFG)
The Subpaths Failover Groups (SFG) feature can be turned on or off using the
tunable dmp_sfg_threshold. The default value of the tunable is 1, which represents
that the feature is on.
To turn off the feature, set the tunable dmp_sfg_threshold value to 0:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_sfg_threshold=0
To turn on the feature, set the dmp_sfg_threshold value to the required number
of path failures that triggers SFG.
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_sfg_threshold=N
To see the Subpaths Failover Groups ID, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm getportids {ctlr=ctlr_name | dmpnodename=dmp_device_name \
| enclosure=enclr_name | path=path_name}
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Configuring Low Impact Path Probing (LIPP)
Configuring Low Impact Path Probing (LIPP)
The Low Impact Path Probing (LIPP) feature can be turned on or off using the
vxdmpadm settune command:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_low_impact_probe=[on|off]
Path probing will be optimized by probing a subset of paths connected to the same
HBA and array port. The size of the subset of paths can be controlled by the
dmp_probe_threshold tunable. The default value is set to 5.
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_probe_threshold=N
Displaying the status of the DMP path restoration
thread
Use the vxdmpadm gettune command to display the tunable parameter values that
show the status of the Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) path restoration thread. These
tunables include:
dmp_restore_state the status of the automatic path restoration kernel thread.
dmp_restore_interval the polling interval for the DMP path restoration thread.
dmp_restore_policy the policy that DMP uses to check the condition of paths.
To display the status of the DMP path restoration thread
◆
Use the following commands:
# vxdmpadm gettune dmp_restore_state
# vxdmpadm gettune dmp_restore_interval
# vxdmpadm gettune dmp_restore_policy
Viewing array policy modules
An array policy module (APM) is a dynamically loadable kernel module (plug-in for
DMP) for use in conjunction with an array. An APM defines array-specific procedures
and commands to:
■
Select an I/O path when multiple paths to a disk within the array are available.
■
Select the path failover mechanism.
69
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Managing the SmartPool using the CLI
■
Select the alternate path in the case of a path failure.
■
Put a path change into effect.
■
Respond to SCSI reservation or release requests.
DMP supplies default procedures for these functions when an array is registered.
An APM may modify some or all of the existing procedures that are provided by
DMP or by another version of the APM.
You can use the following command to display all the APMs that are configured for
a system:
# vxdmpadm listapm all
The output from this command includes the file name of each module, the supported
array type, the APM name, the APM version, and whether the module is currently
loaded and in use. To see detailed information for an individual module, specify the
module name as the argument to the command:
# vxdmpadm listapm module_name
Managing the SmartPool using the CLI
The vxpooladm command enables you to manage the SmartPool, which is created
on an ESXi host running DMP.
See “About configuring storage for caching with SmartPool” on page 24.
You can add or remove local devices (SSDs or local HDDs) using the vxpooladm
command.
Create the SmartPool
◆
To create a SmartPool or add local disks to an existing SmartPool, use the
following command:
# vxpooladm add device=device1 [,device2[,device3. . .]]
70
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Managing the SmartPool using the CLI
71
View the devices
◆
To list the devices that can be added to SmartPool, use the following command:
# vxpooladm list
The output displays as in the following example:
# vxpooladm list
NAME
STATE
MEDIA-TYPE
CAPACITY
IN_POOL
==================================================================
intel_ssd0_0
ENABLED
ssd
186GB
Yes
intel_ssd0_1
ENABLED
ssd
186GB
Yes
Remove the local device
◆
To remove a local device from SmartPool, use the following command:
# vxpooladm remove device=device1 [,device2. . .]]
When you remove all the devices, the SmartPool gets deleted from the ESXi
host.
Assign, unassign, or resize the SmartDisk
◆
To assign, unassign, or resize the SmartDisk for a virtual machine, use the
following command:
# vxpooladm assign vm=VM-Name size=size [stripesz=stripe_sz]
Note: Before creating a SmartDisk make sure that the virtual machine is turned
off.
You can use the vxpooladm assign command to:
■
Create a SmartDisk by specifying a size, if it is not already associated to a
virtual machine.
■
Grow or shrink an already associated SmartDisk capacity.
■
Remove the SmartDisk associated with the virtual machine by specifying
the size as 0.
If a SmartDisk is not assigned for a virtual machine, then you can specify a
new SmartDisk from the pool.
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Managing the SmartPool using the CLI
Note: To reduce the allocated SmartDisk size, you must shrink the cache area
from the guest and then use the vxpooladm assign command. Similarly, to
increase the cache area, grow the allocated SmartDisk using the vxpooladm
assign command and then resize the cache area from the guest.
By default, the stripe size is set to 64k, which can be altered using the stripesz
option.
Note: The valid stripe sizes are in power of 2.
Display the SmartPool utilization details
◆
To display the SmartPool utilization details at the SSD level, use the following
command:
# vxpooladm status [groupby={device|vm}]
The output displays as in the following examples:
# vxpooladm status
POOL_NAME
vxcache
TOTAL_SPACE
300GB
FREE_SPACE
200GB
DEVICE_COUNT
2
VM_COUNT
8
# vxpooladm status groupby=device
DEVICE
intel0
intel0
intel0
intel0
intel1
intel1
intel1
intel1
TOTAL_SPACE
100GB
100GB
100GB
100GB
200GB
200GB
200GB
200GB
FREE_SPACE
0
0
0
0
200GB
200GB
200GB
200GB
VM_NAME
Win2k12-1
Win2k12-2
testvm
vmr710-vm
Win2k12-1
Win2k12-2
testvm
vmr710-vm
ALLOCATED_SPACE
40GB
15GB
10GB
35GB
40GB
15GB
10GB
35GB
# vxpooladm status groupby=vm
VM_NAME
VM_STATE
DEVICE STRIPE_SIZE ASSIGNED_SPACE ALLOCATED_SPACE
=================================================================================
RHEL-6.4-VM16
OFF
512KB
20GB
-
72
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices
Discovering and configuring newly added disk
devices
When you physically connect new disks to a host or when you zone new fibre
channel devices to a host, use the ESXi esxcfg-rescan command to make the
ESXi see the newly added devices and to update the DMP internal database to
reflect the new state of the system.
DMP uses array support libraries (ASLs) to provide array-specific support for
multi-pathing. An array support library (ASL) is a dynamically loadable module. The
ASL implements hardware-specific logic to discover device attributes during device
discovery. DMP provides the device discovery layer (DDL) to determine which ASLs
should be associated to each disk array.
Adding support for an array
You can add support for arrays that are under DMP.
73
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices
To add support for an array
1
Validate if VxDMP support exists for the VID and PID, using the following
command:
# vxddladm listsupport
The following is the sample output:
LIBNAME
STATE
VID
PID
======================================================================
ddl3par
Active
3PARdata
VV
ddlCLARiiON
Active
DGC
All
ddlInvista
Active
EMC
Invista
ddlemc
Active
EMC
SYMMETRIX
ddlibmds8k
Not-Active
IBM
2107
ddlibmds8k
Not-Active
IBM
2107900
ddlibmsvc
Not-Active
IBM
2145
ddlxiv
Not-Active
IBM
NEXTRA
ddlxiv
Not-Active
IBM
2810XIV
ddlintel
Active
INTEL(R)
All
ddlnetapp
Not-Active
NETAPP
All
ddlstec
Active
STEC
All
ddlxiv
Not-Active
XIV
NEXTRA
ddlxiv
Not-Active
XIV
2810XIV
....
....
See “DMP libraries for array support” on page 75.
2
Add support for an array by specifying the VID and PID values, using the
vxddladm addsupport command:
# vxddladm addsupport vid=vid1[,vid2[,vid3]...]
# vxddladm addsupport vid=vid1 pid=pid1
# vxddladm addsupport vid=all
Removing support for an array
You can remove support for an array that is under VxDMP.
74
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices
To remove support for an array
1
Validate if VxDMP support exists for the VID and PID, using the following
command:
# vxddladm listsupport
See “DMP libraries for array support” on page 75.
2
Remove VxDMP support for the VID and PID, using the vxddladm rmsupport
command:
# vxddladm rmsupport vid=vid1[,vid2[,vid3]...]
# vxddladm rmsupport vid=vid1 pid=pid1
# vxddladm rmsupport vid=all
DMP libraries for array support
Table 3-1 lists the libraries that DMP uses to support arrays with the specified
Vendor ID (VID) and PID.
For the latest list of supported hardware and storage arrays, see the following URL:
https://sort.symantec.com
DMP libraries for array support
Table 3-1
S.No
VID
PID
State
LIBNAME
1.
3PARdata
VV
Not-Active
ddl3par
2.
COMPAQ
HSV101
Not-Active
ddlhpalua
HP
HSV111
Not-Active
ddlcompellent
HSV200
HSV210
HSV300
HSV400
HSV450
HSV340
HSV360
3.
COMPELNT
Compellent Vol
75
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices
DMP libraries for array support (continued)
Table 3-1
S.No
VID
PID
State
LIBNAME
4.
DGC
All
Not-Active
ddlCLARiiON
5.
EMC
Invista
Not-Active
ddlInvista
6.
EMC
SYMMETRIX
Active
ddlemc
7.
FUJITSU
E4000
Not-Active
ddlFJTSYe8k
Not-Active
ddlfjtsye2k
Not-Active
ddlhdsalua
E8000
ETERNUS_DX400
ETERNUS_DX8000
ETERNUS_DXM
8.
FUJITSU
E2000
ETERNUS_DXL
9.
HITACHI
DF600
DF600-V
DF600F
DF600F-V
10.
HITACHI
All
Not-Active
ddlhdsusp
11.
HP
All
Not-Active
ddlxp12k
12.
IBM
2107
Not-Active
ddlibmds8k
2107900
13.
IBM
2145
Not-Active
ddlibmsvc
14.
IBM
NEXTRA
Not-Active
ddlxiv
XIV
2810XIV
15.
INTEL(R)
All
Active
ddlintel
16.
NETAPP
All
Not-Active
ddlnetapp
17.
NVMe
All
Active
ddlintelnvme
18.
STEC
All
Active
ddlstec
76
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Discovering and configuring newly added disk devices
DMP libraries for array support (continued)
Table 3-1
S.No
VID
PID
State
LIBNAME
19
FUSIONIO
IODRIVE
Active
ddlfio
Note: You
must download
the appropriate
ESXi driver for
FusionIO from
the VMware
website and
install it on the
system.
Listing all supported disk arrays
Use this procedure to obtain values for the vid and pid attributes that are used
with other forms of the vxddladm command.
To list all supported disk arrays
◆
Use the following command:
# vxddladm listsupport all
Displaying details about an Array Support Library
Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) enables you to display details about the Array Support
Libraries (ASL).
77
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Changing the disk device naming scheme
To display details about an Array Support Library
◆
Type the following command:
# vxddladm listsupport libname=library_name
This command displays the vendor IDs (VIDs), product IDs (PIDs) for the arrays,
array types (for example, A/A or A/P), and array names. The following is sample
output.
# vxddladm listsupport libname=ddlemc
ATTR_NAME
ATTR_VALUE
===================================
LIBNAME
ddlemc
STATE
Active
VID
EMC
PID
SYMMETRIX
ARRAY_TYPE
A/A
ARRAY_NAME
EMC
IS_CERTIFIED
TRUE
Changing the disk device naming scheme
You can either use enclosure-based naming for disks or the operating system’s
naming scheme. DMP commands display device names according to the current
naming scheme.
The default naming scheme is enclosure-based naming (EBN).
78
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Changing the disk device naming scheme
To change the disk-naming scheme
◆
Change the naming scheme from the command line. Use the following
command to select enclosure-based naming:
# vxddladm set namingscheme=ebn [persistence={yes|no}] \
[use_avid={yes|no}] [lowercase={yes|no}]
Use the following command to select operating system-based naming:
# vxddladm set namingscheme=osn [persistence={yes|no}
[use_avid={yes|no}] [lowercase={yes|no}]
The optional persistence argument allows you to select whether the names
of disk devices that are displayed by VxDMP remain unchanged after disk
hardware has been reconfigured and the system rebooted. By default,
enclosure-based naming is persistent. Operating system-based naming is not
persistent by default.
To change only the naming persistence without changing the naming scheme,
run the vxddladm set namingscheme command for the current naming scheme,
and specify the persistence attribute.
By default, the names of the enclosure are converted to lowercase, regardless
of the case of the name specified by the ASL. The enclosure-based device
names are therefore in lowercase. Set the lowercase=no option to suppress
the conversion to lowercase.
For enclosure-based naming, the use_avid option specifies whether the Array
Volume ID is used for the index number in the device name. By default,
use_avid=yes, indicating the devices are named as enclosure_avid. If use_avid
is set to no, DMP devices are named as enclosure_index. The index number
is assigned after the devices are sorted by LUN serial number.
The change is immediate whichever method you use.
See “Regenerating persistent device names” on page 81.
Displaying the disk-naming scheme
In Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP), disk naming can be operating system-based
naming or enclosure-based naming.
The following command displays whether the VxDMP disk-naming scheme is
currently set. It also displays the attributes for the disk naming scheme, such as
whether persistence is enabled.
To display the current disk-naming scheme and its mode of operations, use the
following command:
79
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Changing the disk device naming scheme
# vxddladm get namingscheme
NAMING_SCHEME
PERSISTENCE LOWERCASE USE_AVID
===============================================
Enclosure Based Yes
Yes
Yes
See “Disk device naming in VxDMP” on page 20.
Setting customized names for DMP nodes
The Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) node name is the metadevice name that
represents the multiple paths to a disk. The Device Discovery Layer (DDL) generates
the DMP node name from the device name according to the Dynamic Multi-Pathing
(VxDMP) naming scheme.
See “Disk device naming in VxDMP” on page 20.
You can specify a customized name for a DMP node. User-specified names are
persistent even if names persistence is turned off.
You cannot assign a customized name that is already in use by a device. However,
if you assign names that follow the same naming conventions as the names that
the DDL generates, a name collision can potentially occur when a device is added.
If the user-defined name for a DMP device is the same as the DDL-generated name
for another DMP device, the vxdmpadm list dmpnode command output displays
one of the devices as 'error'.
To specify a custom name for a DMP node
◆
Use the following command:
# vxdmpadm setattr dmpnode dmpnodename name=name
You can also assign names from an input file. This enables you to customize the
DMP nodes on the system with meaningful names.
To specify a custom name for an enclosure
◆
Use the following command:
# vxdmpadm setattr enclosure enc_name name=custom_name
80
Administering VxDMP using the command line
Changing the disk device naming scheme
To assign DMP nodes from a file
1
To obtain a file populated with the names of the devices in your configuration,
use the following command:
# vxddladm -l assign names
> filename
The sample file shows the format required and serves as a template to specify
your customized names.
2
Modify the file as required. Be sure to maintain the correct format in the file.
3
To assign the names, specify the name and path of the file to the following
command:
# vxddladm assign names file=pathname
To clear custom names
◆
To clear the names, and use the default operating system-based naming or
enclosure-based naming, use the following command:
# vxddladm -c assign names
Regenerating persistent device names
The persistent device naming feature makes the names of disk devices persistent
across system reboots. The Device Discovery Layer (DDL) assigns device names
according to the persistent device name database.
If operating system-based naming is selected, each disk name is usually set to the
name of one of the paths to the disk. After hardware reconfiguration and a
subsequent reboot, the operating system may generate different names for the
paths to the disks. Therefore, the persistent device names may no longer correspond
to the actual paths. This does not prevent the disks from being used, but the
association between the disk name and one of its paths is lost.
Similarly, if enclosure-based naming is selected, the device name depends on the
name of the enclosure and an index number. If a hardware configuration changes
the order of the LUNs exposed by the array, the persistent device name may not
reflect the current index.
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Administering VxDMP using the command line
Changing the disk device naming scheme
To regenerate persistent device names
◆
To regenerate the persistent names repository, use the following command:
# vxddladm [-c] assign names
The -c option clears all user-specified names and replaces them with
autogenerated names.
If the -c option is not specified, existing user-specified names are maintained,
but operating system-based and enclosure-based names are regenerated.
About the Array Volume Identifier (AVID) attribute
DMP assigns enclosure-based names to DMP metadevices using an array-specific
attribute called the Array Volume ID (AVID). The AVID is a unique identifier for the
LUN that is provided by the array. The Array Support Library (ASL) corresponding
to the array provides the AVID property. Within an array enclosure, DMP uses the
Array Volume Identifier (AVID) as an index in the DMP metanode name. The DMP
metanode name is in the format enclosureID_AVID.
The VxDMP utilities such as vxdmpadm getdmpnode display the DMP metanode
name, which includes the AVID property. Use the AVID to correlate the DMP
metanode name to the LUN displayed in the array management interface (GUI or
CLI) .
If the ASL does not provide the array volume ID property, then DMP generates an
index number. DMP sorts the devices seen from an array by the LUN serial number
and then assigns the index number. In this case, the DMP metanode name is in
the format enclosureID_index.
Enclosure based naming with the Array Volume Identifier
(AVID) attribute
By default, Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) assigns enclosure-based names to DMP
metadevices using an array-specific attribute called the Array Volume ID (AVID).
The AVID provides a unique identifier for the LUN that is provided by the array. The
ASL corresponding to the array provides the AVID property. Within an array
enclosure, DMP uses the Array Volume Identifier (AVID) as an index in the DMP
metanode name. The DMP metanode name is in the format enclosureID_AVID.
With the introduction of AVID to the enclosure-based naming (EBN) naming scheme,
identifying storage devices becomes much easier. The array volume identifier (AVID)
enables you to have consistent device naming across multiple nodes connected to
the same storage. The disk access name never changes, because it is based on
the name defined by the array itself.
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Changing the disk device naming scheme
If DMP does not have access to a device’s AVID, it retrieves another unique LUN
identifier called the LUN serial number. DMP sorts the devices based on the LUN
Serial Number (LSN), and then assigns the index number. All hosts see the same
set of devices, so all hosts will have the same sorted list, leading to consistent
device indices across the cluster. In this case, the DMP metanode name is in the
format enclosureID_index.
The VxDMP utilities such as vxdmpadm getdmpnode display the DMP metanode
name, which includes the AVID property. Use the AVID to correlate the DMP
metanode name to the LUN displayed in the array management interface (GUI or
CLI) .
The following sample output shows the DMP metanode names:
# vxdmpadm getdmpnode
NAME
STATE
ENCLR-TYPE
PATHS ENBL DSBL ENCLR-NAME
============================================================================
hitachi_uspvm0_061a ENABLED Hitachi_USP-VM 1
1
0
hitachi_usp-vm0
hitachi_uspvm0_061b ENABLED Hitachi_USP-VM 1
1
0
hitachi_usp-vm0
hitachi_uspvm0_061c ENABLED Hitachi_USP-VM 1
1
0
hitachi_usp-vm0
hitachi_uspvm0_061d ENABLED Hitachi_USP-VM 1
1
0
hitachi_usp-vm0
hitachi_uspvm0_0619 ENABLED Hitachi_USP-VM 1
1
0
hitachi_usp-vm0
# vxddladm get namingscheme
NAMING_SCHEME
PERSISTENCE
LOWERCASE
USE_AVID
==========================================================
Enclosure Based
Yes
Yes
Yes
83
Chapter
4
Administering VxDMP
using Web Client
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Getting started with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing solution in vSphere Web Client
■
Working with the Connectivity Map view in VxDMP
■
Working with the detailed view in VxDMP
■
Monitoring VxDMP
■
Managing the SmartPool using Web Client
■
Working with the Veritas Storage view
Getting started with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing
solution in vSphere Web Client
Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware vSphere is enhanced to provide you with the
ability to administer DMP using VMware vSphere's Web Client, a browser-based
interface.
The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware vSphere Web Client's Connectivity Map
and detailed view enables you:
■
View the storage and the connectivity configuration for a selected host.
■
Configure the attributes for the storage entities.
■
View the distribution of I/O load across the entities.
■
Manage the I/O statistics of the entities.
Administering VxDMP using Web Client
Working with the Connectivity Map view in VxDMP
■
Manage the SmartPool.
■
Manage devices claimed by DMP.
■
View the storage array and LUNs, which DMP manages across various hosts,
virtual machines, and datastores.
Working with the Connectivity Map view in VxDMP
The following topics provide information about working with the Dynamic
Multi-Pathing for VMware vSphere Connectivity Map view:
■
About the Connectivity Map view in the VxDMP Web Client
■
Accessing the Connectivity Map view
Use the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware vSphere Connectivity Map view to
perform the following tasks:
■
Viewing the attributes of an entity in the Connectivity Map view
■
Enabling or disabling entities in the Connectivity Map view
■
Renaming entities in the Connectivity Map view
■
Setting the attributes of storages arrays and hosts
■
Viewing the I/O load distribution
■
Managing DMP device support
To manage the licenses, perform the following tasks:
■
Viewing the license details in the vSphere Web Client
■
Applying new license to a host using vSphere Web Client
About the Connectivity Map view in the VxDMP Web Client
The Connectivity Map view provides an interactive diagrammatic representation of
the array ports, storage arrays, virtual machines, host, LUNs, and local devices that
are connected in the vSphere environment. The content area in the Connectivity
Map view contains collapsible panes providing a graphical representation of the
load distribution across the HBAs and storage arrays. The collapsible panes also
provide details about the number of connected storage devices, HBAs, and the
licenses applied.
Figure 4-1 shows the elements of the VxDMP tab.
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Figure 4-1
Elements of the VxDMP tab
Table 4-1 describes the elements of the VxDMP tab in detail.
Table 4-1
Elements of the VxDMP tab in detail
Label
Element
Description
1
VxDMP tab
Displays the Connectivity Map and entity attributes.
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Table 4-1
Elements of the VxDMP tab in detail (continued)
Label
Element
Description
2
Connectivity Map
Displays the host, and list of HBAs, storage arrays, array
ports, and the connected LUNs available in the selected
vCenter server.
To view LUNs and array ports, click storage array.
The connections use the following color coding to display
the connection status:
■
Gray: Disabled connection
■
Green: Enabled connection
■
Gray dots: Disconnected connection
See “Navigating through the Connectivity Map ”
on page 89.
3
Local device pane
Displays the locally attached devices (SSD or HDD) and
the associated HBA.
4
Filter by selected Filters the Connectivity Map view based on the selected
entity check box
entity. For example, if you select an HBA and check this
check box, then the view displays only the selected HBA
and the connected virtual machines and storage arrays.
5
Reset icon
Resets the Connectivity Map view.
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Table 4-1
Elements of the VxDMP tab in detail (continued)
Label
Element
Description
6
Collapsible panes
Displays details about the attributes of a selected entity:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
For hosts, the displayed attributes are: number of
storages, number of HBAs, and license status. The
pane also displays the load shared across the HBA
and storage array for a host.
From this pane, you can also change the host settings.
For virtual machines, the displayed attributes are: total
LUNs, UUID, and a graphical representation of the
load that is shared across the LUN.
For HBA, the displayed attributes are: HBA ID, Vendor
ID, HBA state, storage arrays connected, and transport
details. The pane also displays the load shared across
the virtual machines and storage array.
From this pane, you can also enable or disable an
HBA.
For connections, the displayed attributes are: Port ID,
and HBA details. And, load across LUN and virtual
machines. From this pane, you can also enable or
disable a path.
For storage, the displayed attributes are: state, I/O
policy, storage array type, product ID, storage array
name, serial number, and vendor ID details. And, load
across HBA and virtual machine.
You can also change the attributes, rename the
storage, and enable or disable a storage.
For LUN, the displayed attributes are: state, LUN type,
media type, serial number, disabled paths, size,
enabled paths, and RAID type details. And, load
across virtual machine.
You can also enable or disable a LUN.
For virtual machines, a LUN Mapping pane is added
from DMP for VMware 7.0 release onwards. The LUN
Mapping pane shows the mapping of LUNs and
VMDKs used by the virtual machine you selected.
You can choose to show or hide the collapsible pane
using the Expand/Collapse icons.
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Table 4-1
Elements of the VxDMP tab in detail (continued)
Label
Element
Description
7
Details icon
Lets you modify the storage array, LUN, HBA, and other
entity's attribute value.
The detailed view displays the attributes of the selected
entities and the collapsible I/O statistics pane.
The I/O statistics pane provides a tabular view and a
graphical view of the load distribution across the selected
entity. You can view the I/O statistics in a cumulative order
or based on the operations that are performed per second.
8
Logs icon
Enables you to view and analyze the debug logs.
9
Events icon
Enables you to view and analyze the event logs.
10
Help icon
Enables you to view the online Help topics for VxDMP.
Accessing the Connectivity Map view
You can access Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware vSphere Connectivity Map view
from the vCenter in the vSphere Web Client.
To access Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware vSphere
1
Go to:
https://vCenter_IP_address:vSphere_web_client_port
number/vsphere–client.
2
Log in to the vSphere Web Client using your vCenter credentials.
3
From Home > vCenter.
4
Select a host.
5
In the content area, click Manage > VxDMP tab.
Navigating through the Connectivity Map
In the Connectivity Map, you can select an entity and view the associated connected
entities. For example, if you select storage array, you can view the associated
connection, HBA, and virtual machine. The view displays only the selected storage
array details.
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Figure 4-2
VxDMP navigation trail
To navigate using the breadcrumbs trail
1
In the Connectivity Map view, ensure that the Filter by selected entity check
box is checked.
2
Click an entity.
The selected entity tab appears and the Connectivity Map displays a view
with the associated entities. For every selection a new tab appears.
For example, if you have filtered a storage array, LUN, and HBA, then the
navigation trail has three tabs. To filter the view such that only the LUN-specific
entities are displayed, close the HBA tab. The Connectivity Map now displays
the entities that are associated with the storage array and LUN.
Note: Before selecting a connection, ensure to select a storage array.
See “About the Connectivity Map view in the VxDMP Web Client” on page 85.
Viewing the attributes of an entity in the Connectivity Map view
The Dynamic Multi-Pathing Web Client solution enables you to view the connection
status of the virtual machines, HBAs, hosts, storage arrays, array ports, and the
connected LUNs.
To view the attributes of an entity
◆
In the Connectivity Map view, select an entity, and view the attributes in the
Attributes pane.
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Note: To view the attributes of a LUN, array port, or connection, click the storage,
and select the next entity in the hierarchy. The Attributes pane displays the
corresponding attribute values.
Enabling or disabling entities in the Connectivity Map view
From the Connectivity Map view, you can enable or disable a connection, array
port, storage array, local storage array, local controller, HBA, SSD, HDD, and LUN.
To enable or disable a connection
1
In the Connectivity Map, click a connection.
2
In the content area > Actions pane, click Enable or Disable.
3
In the Confirmation window, click OK.
Note: The connections are clickable only when you expand the storage array.
To enable or disable an array port
1
In the Connectivity Map, click an array port.
2
In the content area > Actions pane, click Enable or Disable
3
In the Enable or Disable window, select the check box to select an HBA. You
can select one or more HBAs at a time.
Note: You can forcefully disable the last path that was created, by checking
the Force disable the last path check box.
To enable or disable an HBA
1
In the Connectivity Map, click an HBA.
2
In the content area > Actions pane, click Enable or Disable.
3
In the Enable HBA or Disable HBA window, select the check box to select an
array port. You can select one or more array ports at a time.
Note: You can forcefully disable the last path that was created, by checking
the Force disable the last path check box.
4
Click OK.
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To enable or disable a LUN
1
In the Connectivity Map, click the storage array to view the LUN.
2
Click a LUN.
3
In the content area > Actions pane, click Enable or Disable.
4
In the Confirmation window, click OK.
See “Enabling or disabling entities in the detailed view ” on page 98.
Renaming entities in the Connectivity Map view
From the Connectivity Map view, you can rename a storage array and LUN to assign
a meaningful name instead of the default name.
To rename a storage array and LUN
1
In the Connectivity Map view, select an entity.
2
In the Actions pane, click Rename. A confirmation message appears.
3
In the New name field, type the new name.
4
Click OK.
Setting the attributes of storages arrays and hosts
From the Connectivity Map view, you can set the attributes for DMP on a host, and
storage arrays.
To set the attributes for DMP on a host, and storage arrays
1
In the Connectivity Map view > Actions pane, click Change attributes.
The Change attributes window opens.
2
Set the appropriate attributes.
3
Click OK.
See “Adding or removing local devices” on page 105.
Viewing the I/O load distribution
From the Connectivity Map view, you can view and analyze the I/O load that is
distributed across the LUN, storage array, HBA, and virtual machine.
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To view the I/O load distribution
1
In the Connectivity Map, click an entity.
2
In the content area, expand the corresponding load distribution pane to view
the graphical representation of the load shared.
For example, if you click a virtual machine, expand the Load across LUN pane
to view the I/O load shared by the virtual machine.
Note: To view the numerical information of the load shared, hover the mouse
on the graphical representation.
Viewing the license details in the vSphere Web Client
The Connectivity Map enables you to view the license details for one or more hosts.
To view the license details
1
From the vSphere Web Client > vCenter, select a host.
2
In the content area, click Manage > VxDMP tab.
3
In the Actions pane, click Apply License.
The Apply License window appears displaying the key, type, status, and the
validity period.
Applying new license to a host using vSphere Web Client
You can apply the VxDMP license to a host from Connectivity Map in the vSphere
Web Client.
To apply license to a host using vSphere Connectivity Map view
1
From the vSphere Web Client > vCenter, select a host.
2
In the content area, click Manage > VxDMP tab.
3
In the Connectivity Map, select the host.
4
In the Actions pane, click Apply License.
The Apply License window appears.
5
In the License Key field, specify the key.
6
Select the license agreement check box.
7
Click Add.
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Managing DMP device support
The Connectivity Map in the vSphere Web Client enables you to control DMP from
supporting devices.
To add or remove the DMP support
1
From the vSphere Web Client > vCenter, select a host.
2
In the content area, click Manage > VxDMP tab.
3
In the Actions pane, click Manage device support.
The Manage Device Support window appears.
4
From the Vendor drop-down list, select the vendor.
5
From the Product drop-down list, select the product.
6
Click Add.
In the table, the last rows contain the recently added devices.
7
8
In the Managed column, select the devices as appropriate.
■
To enable DMP to support devices, select the corresponding check box.
By default, the check boxes are selected for some devices that are already
supported by DMP.
■
To remove the DMP support for a device, clear the corresponding check
box.
Click OK.
Working with the detailed view in VxDMP
The following topics provide information for working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing
for VMware vSphere Web Client’s detailed view.
■
About the detailed view
■
Accessing the detailed view in the Web Client
■
About the I/O Statistics pane
Use the detailed view to perform the following tasks:
■
Enabling or disabling entities in the detailed view
■
Renaming entities in the detailed view
■
Setting the attributes of the paths to a storage array
Use the I/O statistics pane to perform the following tasks:
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■
Viewing the I/O statistics
■
Enabling or disabling the I/O statistics collection
■
Managing the I/O statistics pane
■
Resetting the I/O statistics collection
About the detailed view
The detailed view enables you to configure and administer DMP from the VMware
vSphere’s Web Client environment.
The detailed view lets you administer the following DMP entities:
■
Storage arrays
■
LUNs
■
HBAs
■
Array ports
■
Paths
The detailed view displays an attributes table for the selected entity, and the
collapsible I/O statistics pane.
Figure 4-3 shows the elements of the detailed view.
Figure 4-3
Elements of VxDMP detailed view
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Table 4-2 describes the elements of the detailed view
Table 4-2
Elements of the detailed view
Label
Element
Description
1
Summary bar
Displays information about licenses and number
of entities connected.
2
Attributes table
Displays the details of the attributes for the
selected storage arrays, LUNs, HBAs, array ports,
and paths.
The view displays the following attributes for the
selected entity:
For storage array, the attributes displayed are:
storage array name, state, HBAs connected, total
LUNs, vendor ID, product ID, and serial number
details. Additionally, you can modify the attributes,
rename, and enable ore disable the storage array.
For LUN, the attributes displayed are: LUN name,
state, enabled paths, disabled paths, media, RAID,
type, snapshot, size, and serial number details.
Additionally, you can rename and enable or
disable a LUN.
You can search for a LUN, using the search box.
For HBA, the attributes displayed are: HBA name,
state, storage arrays connected, HBA ID, transport,
and vendor details. Additionally, you rename and
enable or disable an HBA.
For array ports, the attributes displayed are: array
port ID, state, and HBA's connected. Additionally,
you can enable or disable an array port.
3
Settings icon
Opens the Settings window that lets you set the
DDL tunable, DMP daemon control, DMP error
recovery, and other options.
Note: The Setting icon is available only for
storage array and host.
4
Refresh icon
Lets you refresh all the attributes of the selected
entity and display its latest status.
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Table 4-2
Elements of the detailed view (continued)
Label
Element
Description
5
I/O Statistics pane
Displays the details of I/O load distribution across
storage array, HBAs, LUNs, array ports, and paths
in terms of number of read or write operations,
blocks, and average time.
You can view the information in a tabular view or
a graphical view. To switch between the views,
use the corresponding icon.
The Export icon enables you to export the I/O
statistics as a .csv file.
The tabular view enables you to view the number
of read or write operations, blocks, and average
time at a glance. You can also compare the
numeric details for multiple storage arrays.
The graphical view displays a bar chart for number
of read or write operations, blocks, and average
time. The views enable you to visually compare
the I/O loads for multiple storage arrays.
In graphical and tabular view, you can view the
I/O statistics in a cumulative order or based on the
operations that are performed per second.
With the Auto Refresh feature, you can set the
duration after which the I/O statistics are
automatically refreshed.
From the DMP for VMware 7.0 release onwards,
I/O rate is displayed using line graph. By default,
the Cumulative radio button is selected. To view
the line graph, you must select the Rate radio
button. After you click the Rate radio button, you
can set the auto-refresh interval. For example, if
you set the auto-refresh interval to 15 seconds,
the line graph refreshes every 15 seconds. If you
set the auto-refresh interval to None, the line graph
is not displayed. In the line graph, for each object,
a separate line is displayed. Total I/O traffic is
displayed for each line (read IO + write IO). The
tabular view of the I/O rate shows only the I/O rate
of the last interval.
You can choose to show or hide the collapsible
pane using the Expand/Collapse icons.
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Table 4-2
Elements of the detailed view (continued)
Label
Element
Description
6
Logs icon
Enables you to view and analyze the debug logs.
7
Events icon
Enables you to view and analyze the event logs.
8
Help icon
Enables you to view the online Help topics for
VxDMP.
Accessing the detailed view in the Web Client
You can access the VMware vSphere Web Client detailed view from the VMware
vSphere’s Web Client environment.
To access the VMware vSphere Web Client detailed view from the VMware
vSphere’s Web Client environment
1
Log in to the vSphere Web Client using your vSphere Client credentials.
2
From Home > vCenter.
3
Click Hosts and from the list of hosts, select a host.
4
To access the detailed view, select the following entities from the Connectivity
Map:
5
■
For storage array and HBA, select a host.
■
For LUN, array port, select a storage array.
■
For paths, select a LUN.
Click the Details icon.
A new tab appears next to the Connectivity Map tab. The tab contains the
entity attributes and a collapsible I/O statistics pane.
Note: If the selected entity does not support the detailed view, then the Details
icon is not available.
The VxDMP detailed view appears.
Enabling or disabling entities in the detailed view
From the detailed view, you can enable or disable array ports of the selected storage
array, HBA, storage array, and paths.
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To enable or disable an array port
1
In the Connectivity Map, click a storage array.
2
Click the Details icon. A new tab appears and the detailed view opens.
3
In the Array Ports tab, click Enable or Disable.
4
In the Confirmation window, select the HBAs.
5
Click OK.
To enable or disable a storage array
1
In the Connectivity Map, select a host.
2
Click the Details icon. A new tab appears and the detailed view opens.
3
In the Storage tab, select a storage array, and click Enable or Disable.
4
In the Confirmation window, click OK.
To enable or disable an HBA
1
In the Connectivity Map, select a host.
2
Click the Details icon. A new tab appears and the detailed view opens.
3
In the HBA tab, select an HBA and click Enable or Disable.
Note: For local HBA, a confirmation window appears.
4
In the Enable HBA or Disable HBA window, check the array ports.
Note: You can forcefully disable the last path that was created, by checking
the Force disable the last path check box.
5
Click OK.
To enable or disable a path
1
In the Connectivity Map, select a storage array.
2
Check the Filter by selected entity check box.
3
Select a LUN.
4
Click the Details icon. A new tab appears and the detailed view opens.
5
Click Enable or Disable.
Note: You can enable or disable one or more paths.
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6
In the Confirmation window, click OK
Note: You can forcefully disable the last path that was created, by checking
the Force disable the last path check box.
7
Click OK.
See “Enabling or disabling entities in the Connectivity Map view” on page 91.
Renaming entities in the detailed view
From the detailed view, you can rename a storage of the selected host, and LUN
of the selected storage to apply a customized name.
To rename a storage array
1
In the Connectivity Map, click a host.
2
Click the Details icon. A new tab appears and the detailed view opens.
3
In the Storage tab, select the storage, and click Rename.
4
In the Rename Storage Array window, type the new storage array name.
5
Click OK.
To rename a LUN
1
In the Connectivity Map, click a storage.
2
Click the Details icon. A new tab appears and the detailed view opens.
3
In the LUNs tab > LUN, and click Rename.
4
In the Rename LUN window, type the new LUN name.
5
Click OK.
Setting the attributes of the paths to a storage array
From the detailed view, you can set the attributes of a path to a storage array.
To set the attributes of a path
1
In the Connectivity Map, select a storage.
2
Select a LUN.
3
Click the Details icon. A new tab appears and the detailed view opens.
4
Select an entity in the table.
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5
Click Set Active, Set Standby, Set Preferred, or Set Nonpreferred.
The confirmation window appears.
Note: To set the priority of a path, click Set Preferred.
6
Click OK.
About the I/O Statistics pane
You can use the I/O statistics pane to gather and display the read or the write
operations for the storage arrays, LUNs, HBAs, array ports, and paths. The I/O
statistics pane displays the statistics in a graphical and tabular view.
You can also collect the I/O statistics in a cumulative order or based on the
operations that are performed per second.
To navigate to the I/O Statistics pane
1
In the Connectivity Map view, click the Details icon.
2
Select the entity-specific tab.
For example, to view the I/O statics for a storage array, click the Storage tab
and expand the I/O statistics pane.
Viewing the I/O statistics
You can view and analyze the I/O statistics in a tabular view or a graphical view at
a glance.
To view the I/O statistics
1
In the detailed view, expand the I/O statistics pane.
2
Click Graphical view and select Operations, Blocks, or Avg Time (ms), to
view the corresponding bar chart of the read or write operation.
3
Click Tabular view. This view provides the entity name, number of read, or
write operations and blocks, and the average time that is used to complete the
read or write operation.
Enabling or disabling the I/O statistics collection
From the detailed view, you can stop the I/O statistics collection process.
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Monitoring VxDMP
To enable or disable the I/O statistics collection
1
In the VxDMP detailed view > I/O statistics pane, click Enable or Disable. A
confirmation message appears.
2
Click OK. The I/O statistics collection process starts or stops for the selected
DMP entity.
Managing the I/O statistics pane
The I/O statistics pane lets you view the I/O stats in graphical or tabular view, reset
and disable the I/O statistics collection process, and export the I/O statistics in a
.csv file. Additionally, you can set the duration to automatically refresh I/O statistics
to view the latest statistics.
Using the I/O statistics pane you can perform the following tasks:
■
Viewing the I/O statistics
■
Resetting the I/O statistics collection
■
Enabling or disabling the I/O statistics collection
Resetting the I/O statistics collection
You can reset the I/O statistics collection process to include the latest statistics.
From the detailed view, you can reset the collected I/O statistics to zero, and start
collecting the I/O details.
To reset the I/O statistics collection
1
In the detailed view, expand the I/O statistics pane.
2
Click Reset. A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK.
Monitoring VxDMP
With the Monitor tab, you can view and analyze the load shared across the storage
arrays, HBAs, array ports, LUNs, and virtual machines through the DMP VMware
vSphere Web Client.
The I/O statistics pane displays the number of read or write operations, blocks, and
average time in graphical and tabular view. In graphical and tabular view, you can
view the I/O statistics in a cumulative order or based on the operations that are
performed per second. You can set the time interval after which the displayed I/O
statistics is automatically refreshed.
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Monitoring VxDMP
You can save the I/O statistics on your local computer by exporting the I/O statistics
in a .csv file.
From the DMP for VMware 7.0 release onwards, I/O rate is displayed using line
graph. By default, the Cumulative radio button is selected. To view the line graph,
you must select the Rate radio button. After you click the Rate radio button, you
can set the auto-refresh interval. For example, if you set the auto-refresh interval
to 15 seconds, the line graph refreshes every 15 seconds. If you set the auto-refresh
interval to None, the line graph is not displayed.
In the line graph, for each object, a separate line is displayed. Total I/O traffic is
displayed for each line (read IO + write IO). The tabular view of the I/O rate shows
only the I/O rate of the last interval.
Figure 4-4
VxDMP monitor tab view
To view the I/O load distribution
1
Log in to the vSphere Web Client using your vCenter credentials.
2
From Home > vCenter > Hosts, select a host.
3
In the content area, click Monitor > Performance > VxDMP tab.
4
In the For field, select an ESXi host or a virtual machine that you need to
monitor.
When you select a virtual machine, the list of associated virtual machines is
automatically populated.
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Managing the SmartPool using Web Client
5
In the Across field, select a storage array, array port, LUN, HBA, or virtual
machine across which the I/O statistics need to be monitored.
Note: If you have selected a virtual machine in step 4, then the virtual machine
is not available for selection.
6
To narrow down the selection, specify one of more filters such as storage array,
array port, HBA, LUN, or virtual machine. Based on the selected filter options,
the appropriate values are populated in the corresponding fields.
The values for the second and third filter options are based on the value that
is selected for the first filter.
7
Click Go.
Managing the SmartPool using Web Client
For providing the flexibility in managing the SmartPool capacity, VxDMP provides
an administration interface from the vSphere Web Client.
The following topics provide information about working with SmartPool:
■
Accessing the SmartPool tab
■
Adding or removing local devices
■
Viewing the SmartPool capacity
■
Managing the SmartDisk capacity
See “About configuring storage for caching with SmartPool” on page 24.
Accessing the SmartPool tab
You can access the SmartPool tab from the vCenter in the vSphere Web Client.
To access the SmartPool tab
1
Log in to the vSphere Web Client using your vCenter credentials.
2
From Home > vCenter.
3
Select a host.
4
In the content area, click Manage > SmartPool tab.
The SmartPool tab view appears.
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Managing the SmartPool using Web Client
Adding or removing local devices
You can add and remove local devices from a SmartPool for a host.
To add or remove local devices
1
In the SmartPool tab, click Edit.
Or
From the Connectivity Map view > host > Actions > Manage SmartPool
capacity.
2
In the Manage SmartPool capacity window, to add the local devices to the
SmartPool, select the devices.
By default, the Manage SmartPool capacity window may have some devices
selected. These devices are already added to the SmartPool.
Note: The devices that are added to the SmartPool contain a check mark
symbol in the Connectivity Map view.
To remove the devices from the SmartPool, clear the check boxes that are
associated to the devices.
3
Click OK.
Viewing the SmartPool capacity
The Monitor tab enables you to analyze and determine the amount of SmartPool
capacity used by each virtual machine and the available storage capacity. The tab
also displays a graphical representation of storage consumed from each local
device.
To view the SmartPool capacity
1
From Home > vCenter > host.
2
In the workspace area, click the Monitor > Performance tab.
3
On the left pane, click SmartPool.
The content area displays a graphical representation of the available and used
memory in the SmartPool and the individual local devices.
Managing the SmartDisk capacity
You can efficiently manage the SmartDisk capacity using the SmartDisk
Configuration portlet. The portlet displays the SmartDisk capacity and the stripe
size that is assigned to a virtual machine. The portlet enables you to assign, resize,
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Managing the SmartPool using Web Client
and remove the SmartDisk capacity to a virtual machine. Additionally, you can
optimize the performance of the SmartDisk by setting the stripe size, which has the
default size as 64k.
To manage the SmartDisk capacity
1
From Home > vCenter > virtual machines.
Or
From Manage > SmartPool tab.
2
In the workspace area, click the Summary tab.
3
In the SmartDisk Configuration portlet, click Manage.
The Manage SmartDisk Capacity dialog box appears.
4
Select the stripe size for the virtual machine.
5
In the SmartDisk Capacity field, specify the size for the virtual machine.
Note: Before assigning the SmartDisk capacity, make sure that the virtual
machine is turned off.
Alternatively, drag the slider to assign, unassign, and resize the capacity.
To remove the assigned capacity, specify the capacity size as 0.
Note: The stripe size cannot be changed after the SmartDisk capacity is
assigned.
Viewing and editing SmartDisk Configuration settings
The SmartPool portlet displays the SmartDisk configuration settings. You can also
edit the SmartDisk configuration settings from this portlet.
To view or edit SmartDisk configuration settings:
1
Go to Home > Hosts and Clusters > Host > Summary
Or
Go to Home > Hosts and Clusters > Host > Manage > Settings > SmartPool
2
To edit the configuration settings, click Edit Settings.
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Working with the Veritas Storage view
Working with the Veritas Storage view
The following topics provide information for working with the Veritas Storage view.
■
About the Veritas Storage view
■
Accessing the Veritas Storage view in the Web Client
■
Viewing the storage array details
■
Viewing the LUNs details
About the Veritas Storage view
DMP on ESXi provides a bidirectional representation of the relationship between
the DMP discovered entities in the vSphere environment and the vSphere entities.
Using the VMware vSphere Web Client’s related object navigator, you can view a
tabular representation of the DMP discovered storage arrays and LUNs, and vSphere
entities such as hosts, virtual machines, and datastores. The tabular representation
displays the DMP entities as part of the inventory list, or in relation to the selected
vSphere entity along with the associated attributes.
Accessing the Veritas Storage view in the Web Client
The Veritas Storage view is integrated in the VMware vSphere’s Web Client object
navigator.
To access the Veritas Storage view
1
Log in to the vSphere Web Client using your vSphere Client credentials.
2
In the object navigator, select Home > vCenter Inventory Lists > Veritas
Storage.
Viewing the storage array details
From the Veritas Storage view, you can view the storage array details, and the
connected hosts. You can also view the hosts and LUNs related to the selected
storage array.
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Working with the Veritas Storage view
To view the storage array details
1
From Home > vCenter Inventory Lists > Veritas Storage > Storage Arrays.
The table displays Name, Vendor ID, Product ID, Serial Number, and Type.
2
From the storage array inventory, select a storage array to view the related
objects.
3
Click the Host or LUNs tab to view the associated attributes.
Viewing the LUNs details
From the Veritas Storage view, you can view the LUNs and the associated attribute
details in a tabular format. You may also view the hosts, virtual machines, datastores,
and storage arrays that are related to the selected LUN.
To view the LUN details
1
From Home > vCenter Inventory Lists > Veritas Storage > LUNs.
The table displays Name, Media, RAID, Type, Snapshot, Size, Serial Number,
and Attributes.
2
From the LUNs inventory, select a LUN to view the related objects.
The Related Objects tab displays the associated entities.
3
Click the appropriate tab to view the details.
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Chapter
5
Administering VxDMP
using vSphere Client
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Getting started with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing solution in vSphere Client
■
Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
■
Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
■
Working with datacenter view in the VxDMP tab
Getting started with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing
solution in vSphere Client
Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware provides a vCenter Plugin. This plugin enables
you to manage DMP in the vSphere environment, using VMware vSphere Client
as the graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI appears as the Dynamic Multi-Pathing
solution's home view, and also as the VxDMP tab for the host and datacenter
components of the inventory.
Administering VxDMP using vSphere Client
Getting started with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing solution in vSphere Client
Figure 5-1
Dynamic Multi-Pathing solution in vSphere Client
The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view enables you to:
■
Manage the licenses for the hosts.
■
Obtain the DMP offline bundle for ESXi.
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Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
■
Obtain the administration command line interface (CLI) for remote machines.
See “Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view” on page 111.
The host view in the VxDMP tab enables you to:
■
View the storage and connectivity configuration for a selected host.
■
Configure the attributes for the storage entities.
■
Manage the distribution of I/O load for a selected host.
See “Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab” on page 117.
The datacenter view in the VxDMP tab enables you to:
■
View the list of storage arrays in the datacenter.
■
View the list of hosts issuing I/O requests to a storage array for a selected
datacenter.
■
View the distribution of I/O load across various ports of a storage.
■
View the I/O statistics and details of virtual machines for a LUN.
■
Manage the array ports.
■
View the hosts common to the selected LUNs.
See “Working with datacenter view in the VxDMP tab ” on page 127.
Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for
VMware home view
The following topics provide information for working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing
for VMware home view.
See “About the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view” on page 112.
See “Accessing the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view” on page 112.
Use the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view to perform the following
tasks:
To manage the licenses for the hosts.
See “Viewing the VxDMP and license compliance for hosts” on page 115.
See “Viewing the license details” on page 116.
See “Applying new license to a single host or multiple hosts using vSphere Client”
on page 116.
To download the DMP offline bundle for ESXi.
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Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
See “Downloading the VxDMP offline bundle for ESXi” on page 113.
To download the administration CLI package for remote hosts.
See “Downloading the administration CLI package for a remote host” on page 114.
About the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view displays the Getting Started tab and
the License Management tab. You can view a diagrammatic representation of the
VxDMP configuration on the Getting Started tab.
Figure 5-2
VxDMP home view
See “Accessing the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view” on page 112.
Accessing the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home
view
You can access the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view from the vCenter
Home in vSphere Client.
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Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
To access Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home
1
Log in to vSphere Client.
2
From vCenter Home > Solutions and Applications, click Dynamic
Multi-Pathing. The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view with
Getting Started tab appears.
You can also access the License Management tab from the home view.
Downloading the VxDMP offline bundle for ESXi
You can use the vSphere Client GUI to download the DMP offline bundle for ESXi.
Note: To be able to download the offline bundle from the home view, make sure
that for the logged in user, the IE Enhanced Security setting is set to "Off".
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Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
To download the installer from vSphere Client
1
Log in to vSphere Client.
2
From vCenter Home > Solutions and Applications, click Dynamic
Multi-Pathing. The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view with
Getting Started tab appears.
3
From Downloads, click the link to download the ESXi bundle for an ESXi
server. The File Download window appears.
4
Click Save to save the .zip file in your system.
Note: See Dynamic Multi-Pathing Installation Guide for the procedure to install the
DMP offline bundle for ESXi.
Downloading the administration CLI package for a remote host
You can administer DMP from remote physical or virtual machines, by installing
the administration CLIs on the remote machine. VxDMP CLIs are available for both
Windows and Linux operating systems.
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Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
You can use the vSphere Client GUI to download the administration CLI package
for a remote host.
To download the administration CLI package for a remote host
1
Log in to vSphere Client.
2
From vCenter Home > Solutions and Applications, click Dynamic
Multi-Pathing. The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view with
Getting Started tab appears.
3
From Downloads, click the link to download the CLI package.
Note: See Dynamic Multi-Pathing Installation Guide for the procedure to install the
CLI package.
Viewing the VxDMP and license compliance for hosts
The Dynamic Multi-Pathing solution enables you to view the percentage of your
host inventory that uses VxDMP. You can also check the percentage for which the
license is applied already.
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Working with the Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view
To view the VxDMP and license compliance for hosts
1
From vCenter Home > Solutions and Applications, click Dynamic
Multi-Pathing. The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view with
Getting Started tab appears.
2
Click the License Management tab.
3
In the DMP Managed Hosts Licensing Statistics section, view the following
information:
■
Percentage of hosts not under VxDMP
■
Percentage of hosts using VxDMP without license
■
Percentage of hosts using VxDMP with license
Viewing the license details
The VxDMP solution enables you to view the license details for one or more hosts.
To view the license details
1
From vCenter Home > Solutions and Applications, click Dynamic
Multi-Pathing. The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view with
Getting Started tab appears.
2
Click the License Management tab. The table displays the list of hosts with
their licensing details.
Applying new license to a single host or multiple hosts using vSphere
Client
You can apply the VxDMP license to a host, from vSphere Client's Dynamic
Multi-Pathing for VMware home view.
To apply license to a single host or multiple hosts using VMware home view
1
From vCenter Home > Solutions and Applications, click Dynamic
Multi-Pathing. The Dynamic Multi-Pathing for VMware home view with
Getting Started tab appears.
2
Click the License Management tab.
3
From the list of hosts, select one or more hosts.
Note: To select multiple hosts, hold the Ctrl key, and click the host names.
4
To apply the license key, click Apply.
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Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
5
The Add New License window appears. Enter the license key.
6
Select the check box to accept the license agreement.
7
Click Apply.
Note: An error message appears, if any of the license keys are not applied.
Select the hosts and apply the correct license keys.
Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
The following topics provide information for working with the VxDMP host view.
See “About the host view in the VxDMP tab” on page 117.
See “Accessing the host view in the VxDMP tab” on page 121.
Use the VxDMP host view to perform the following tasks:
See “Setting the attributes of a storage entity” on page 122.
See “Setting the attributes of the paths to a storage array” on page 122.
See “Enabling or disabling paths ” on page 123.
See “Working with the I/O Statistics pane” on page 126.
See “Renaming a storage array and LUN” on page 125.
About the host view in the VxDMP tab
The VxDMP tab enables you to configure and administer DMP for a host in the
VMware vSphere environment.
The VxDMP tab lets you administer the following entities:
■
Storage arrays
■
HBAs
■
LUNs
■
Array ports
■
Paths
The work area displays an attributes table for the selected entity, and the collapsible
I/O statistics pane.
The following figure illustrates the work area:
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Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
Figure 5-3
VxDMP host view
Table 5-1 describes the elements of the VxDMP tab in detail:
Table 5-1
Elements of the VxDMP host view
Label Element
shown
in
figure
Description
1
Displays the host, the storage arrays, and the LUNs in a
hierarchical manner. For example, if you select a host, you can
view the attributes and I/O statistics of the configured storage
arrays across the host. You can drill down to a storage array and
view the aggregate statistics and attributes of configured LUNs
in that storage array. You can further drill down to an individual
LUN and view the statistics and attributes of the paths to that
LUN.
VxDMP
Configuration
pane
This is a collapsible pane. You can choose to show or hide it
using the Expand/Collapse icons.
See “Navigating through the storage configuration hierarchy
using the breadcrumbs trail” on page 121.
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Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
Table 5-1
Elements of the VxDMP host view (continued)
Label Element
shown
in
figure
Description
2
Displays information about the entity you select from the VxDMP
Configuration tree. For example, if you select a host, the summary
bar displays the number of connected, disconnected, and
degraded storage arrays and HBAs. For a selected storage array,
this displays the number of connected LUNs and array ports. For
a selected LUN, this displays the number of connected paths.
Summary bar
You can also view other information such as the I/O policy, media
type, size, and so on, at a glance. A horizontal scroll bar appears
if the text exceeds the available space.
The summary bar also enables you to view the multi-pathing
state of the selected entity, using the following color coding:
■
■
■
3
Attributes table
Green icon: For the selected entity, all paths are properly
connected or enabled.
Yellow icon: The selected entity is in a degraded state, as
one or more paths are disconnected or disabled.
Red icon: For the selected entity, all paths are disconnected.
Displays the details of the attributes for the selected entity:
■
■
■
■
■
For storage, the attributes displayed are: storage array name,
state, HBAs connected, total LUNs, vendor, product ID, serial
number, and type.
For HBA, the attributes displayed are: HBA name, state,
storage arrays connected, HBA ID, vendor and transport
details for the storage array.
For LUN, the attributes displayed are: LUN name, state,
enabled paths, disabled paths, media, RAID type, snapshot,
size, serial number, and attributes.
For array port, the attributes displayed are: port name, state,
port ID, and HBAs connected.
For path, the attributes displayed are: path name, state, type,
attribute, HBA, and array port.
See “Customizing the attributes table” on page 122.
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Table 5-1
Elements of the VxDMP host view (continued)
Label Element
shown
in
figure
Description
4
Displays the details of I/O load distribution across storage, HBAs,
LUNs, array ports, and paths in terms of number of read or write
operations, blocks, and average time.
I/O Statistics
pane
You can view the information in a tabular view or a graphical
view. To switch between the views, use the corresponding icon.
The tabular view enables you to view the number of read or write
operations, blocks, and average time at a glance. You can also
compare the numeric details for multiple storage arrays. The
Export icon enables you to export the I/O statistics as a .csv file.
The graphical view displays separate bar charts for number of
read or write operations, blocks, and average time. This enables
you to visually compare the I/O loads for multiple storage arrays.
In graphical and tabular view, you can view the I/O statistics in
a cumulative order or based on the operations that are performed
per second.
This is a collapsible pane. You can choose to show or hide it
using the Expand/Collapse icons.
5
DMP events log Opens the DMP Events Log window. This window enables you
icon
to remotely view the events and issues on a host, using the
vSphere Client.
From the VxDMP Configuration pane, select a host to view
events at all levels. Select an HBA to view the HBA and DMP
device specific events. Select a LUN to view only the DMP device
and path level events.
6
Settings icon
Opens a window where you can configure the settings for the
selected host or storage array.
7
Refresh icon
Lets you refresh all the entities, to display their latest status.
8
Logs icon
Enables you to view the GUI debug logs.
9
Help icon
Enables you to view the online Help topics for VxDMP. You can
also access the online Help from Help > VxDMP Help.
See “Accessing the host view in the VxDMP tab” on page 121.
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Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
Accessing the host view in the VxDMP tab
You can access the VxDMP tab's host view from vCenter Home in vSphere Client.
To access the host view in the VxDMP tab
1
Log in to vSphere Client.
2
From vCenter Home > Inventory, click Hosts and Clusters. The Getting
Started tab appears in the Hosts and Clusters view.
3
From the inventory tree, select a host. The VxDMP tab appears.
4
Click the VxDMP tab. The VxDMP host view for the selected host appears.
Note: If the VxDMP components are not installed or running for the selected
host, an error message appears.
Navigating through the storage configuration hierarchy
using the breadcrumbs trail
The breadcrumbs trail displays the VxDMP Configuration hierarchy, Host > Storage
array > LUN, for the selected entity in the hierarchy.
The trail helps you easily navigate up the storage hierarchy you have expanded,
also letting you skip an intermediate level. For example, from the LUN level, you
can navigate directly to the host level, without going back to the storage array level.
The breadcrumbs trail is especially useful, when you hide the collapsible VxDMP
Configuration pane, or if the inventory tree is very long.
You cannot navigate down a breadcrumbs trail, once you are back at the host level.
You must navigate using the VxDMP Configuration tree.
Figure 5-4
VxDMP breadcrumbs trail
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Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
To navigate using the breadcrumbs trail
◆
In the breadcrumbs trail, click the storage level you want to navigate to. The
details for the selected device at that level appear in the work area.
Customizing the attributes table
From the host view, you can customize the attributes table for the selected storage
entity.
To sort the table rows
◆
Click the arrow icon next to the heading of a column.
For example, if you want to sort the storage attributes table according to the
state, click the State column.
To rearrange the columns
◆
Click the heading of a column, and drag and drop it to the left or right, as
desired.
Setting the attributes of a storage entity
From the host view, you can set the attributes for a host or a storage array.
To set the attributes of a storage entity
1
In the VxDMP host view, from the VxDMP Configuration tree, select a storage
entity.
2
Click the Settings icon. The Settings window appears.
Note: For a storage array that is listed in the attributes table for a host, you
can also use the right-click menu Change attributes, to access the Settings
window.
3
Set the desired setting values.
4
Click OK.
Setting the attributes of the paths to a storage array
From the host view, you can set the attributes of the paths to a storage array.
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Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
To set the attribute value of the path
1
Right-click the path name.
2
Click the required attribute value. Possible values are Set Active, Set Standby,
Set Preferred, and Set Non-Preferred. A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK.
Enabling or disabling paths
From the host view, you can enable or disable the paths for the storage entities.
Refer to the following information to enable or disable paths:
■
To a storage array
■
From HBA to array port
■
To a LUN
■
From array port to HBA
To enable or disable the paths connected to a storage array
1
In the attributes table, select the storage array, and right-click. The context
menu appears.
2
Click Enable or Disable. A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK.
To enable or disable the paths from an HBA to an array port
1
In the attributes table, select the HBA, and right-click. The context menu
appears.
2
Click Enable or Disable.
3
Select the check box to select an array port you want to enable or disable. You
can select one or more array ports at a time.
4
Click OK.
To enable or disable the paths to a LUN
1
In the attributes table, select a LUN, and right-click. The context menu appears.
2
Click Enable or Disable. A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK.
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Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab
To enable or disable the paths connected from array port to HBA
1
In the attributes table, select the array port, and right-click. The context menu
appears.
2
Click Enable or Disable.
3
Select the check box to select an HBA you want to enable or disable. You can
select one or more HBAs at a time.
4
Click OK.
To enable or disable a path
1
In the attributes table, select the path, and right-click. The context menu
appears.
2
Click Enable or Disable. A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK.
Note: You can enable or disable one or more paths at a time.
See “Disabling an array port, HBA, or path by force” on page 124.
Disabling an array port, HBA, or path by force
From the host view, you can disable the HBAs connected to an array port. Refer
to the following information to disable the last path by force.
To force disable the HBAs connected to the array port
1
In the attributes table, select the port, and right-click. The context menu appears.
2
Click Disable.
3
Select the HBAs to be disabled.
4
Check the HBA Name check box.
5
Check the Force disable the last path check box. Selecting this check box
forcibly disables the last path.
6
Click OK.
To force disable a path
1
In the attributes table, select the path, and right-click. The context menu
appears.
2
Click Disable.
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3
Check the Force Disable the last path check box. A confirmation message
appears.
4
Click OK.
Renaming a storage array and LUN
From the host view, you can rename an storage array and LUN to assign meaningful
names instead of the default names.
To rename an storage array
1
In the VxDMP host view, from the VxDMP Configuration tree, select a host.
2
In the Storage tab, right-click a storage array. The context menu appears.
3
Click Rename.
4
In the Rename Storage Array window, type the new storage array name.
5
Click OK.
To rename a LUN
1
In the VxDMP host view, from the VxDMP Configuration tree, select a storage.
2
In the attributes table, right-click a LUN. The context menu appears.
3
Click Rename.
4
In the Rename LUN window, type the new LUN name.
5
Click OK.
Note: If you renamed a LUN, which is in use, then the new name is effective
only after a restart.
Filtering the LUNs configured for a storage array
From the host view, you can customize the attributes table for a storage array. The
filter menu enables you to dynamically filter the LUNs that are displayed in the
attributes table.
To filter the LUNs displayed in the attributes table of a storage array
1
In the VxDMP host view, navigate to the required storage array. The LUNs tab
appears.
2
To select the filtering criteria, click the arrow button next to the search box.
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3
In the filter menu box, select the check boxes for the criteria by which you want
to filter the LUNs.
4
Click OK. The selected filter criteria are listed next to the search box.
5
In the search box, provide the values to filter a LUN.
The attributes table displays the filtered list of LUNs and the associated details,
such as State, Enabled Paths, and Disabled Paths. The table is empty if none
of the LUNs meet the filter and search criteria.
Working with the I/O Statistics pane
You can use the I/O statistics pane to gather and display I/O statistics for a specified
storage array, HBA, LUN, array port, or path.
See “Resetting the I/O Statistics collection” on page 126.
See “Setting the time interval for automatic refresh of I/O statistics” on page 127.
See “Working with the host view in the VxDMP tab” on page 117.
Enabling or disabling the collection of I/O statistics
From the host view, you can enable or disable the collection of I/O statistics.
To enable or disable the collection of I/O statistics
1
In the VxDMP host view, expand the I/O statistics pane.
2
To start collecting the I/O statistics, click the Enable link.
To stop collecting the I/O statistics, click the Disable link.
A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK. The I/O statistics collection starts or stops as selected.
Resetting the I/O Statistics collection
From the host view, you can reset the collected I/O statistics to zero, and start
collecting the I/O details afresh.
To reset the I/O Statistics collection
1
In the VxDMP host view, expand the I/O statistics pane.
2
Click the Reset link. A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK. This resets the statistics that is collected for all the DMP entities.
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Setting the time interval for automatic refresh of I/O
statistics
From the host view, you can set the time interval after which the displayed I/O
statistics is automatically refreshed.
To set the time interval for automatic refresh of I/O statistics
1
In the VxDMP host view, expand the I/O statistics pane.
2
In the Auto Refresh box, select the required time interval in seconds. The I/O
statistics is refreshed after the selected time interval.
Note: The Auto Refresh interval is set to the value none by default.
Note: You can view the I/O statistics in a cumulative order or based on the
operations that are performed per second.
Working with datacenter view in the VxDMP tab
The VxDMP datacenter view displays the Host tab and the Storage tab. The following
topics provide information for working with the datacenter view.
See “About the Host tab in the VxDMP datacenter view” on page 128.
See “About the Storage tab in the VxDMP datacenter view ” on page 132.
See “Accessing the datacenter view in the VxDMP tab” on page 128.
Use the Host tab to perform the following tasks for a selected host:
See “Saving a DMP tuning template” on page 130.
See “Applying a DMP tuning template” on page 130.
See “Saving customized names for DMP device ” on page 131.
See “Retrieving device names for customization ” on page 131.
Use the Storage tab to perform the following tasks for a selected storage array:
See “Renaming a storage array” on page 140.
From the Load Distribution tab,
See “Viewing the I/O load distribution across hosts for a storage array” on page 136.
See “Viewing the I/O statistics for a LUN” on page 137.
See “Resetting the I/O statistics for all hosts” on page 138.
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See “Managing the array ports” on page 138.
From the LUNs tab,
See “Viewing the hosts common to the selected LUNs ” on page 139.
Accessing the datacenter view in the VxDMP tab
You can access the VxDMP tab's datacenter view from the vCenter Home in vSphere
Client.
To access the datacenter view in the VxDMP tab
1
Log in to vSphere Client.
2
From vCenter Home > Inventory, click Hosts and Clusters. The Getting
Started tab appears in the Hosts and Clusters view.
3
From the Inventory tree, select a datacenter. The VxDMP tab appears.
4
Click the VxDMP tab. The VxDMP datacenter view for the selected datacenter
appears. The Host tab is selected.
5
Click the Storage tab to select it.
About the Host tab in the VxDMP datacenter view
The datacenter Host tab displays details about the hosts, and enables you to save
or apply the tuning template or the naming template to a single host or multiple
hosts.
The following figure illustrates the work area:
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Figure 5-5
VxDMP datacenter view: Host tab
Table 5-2 describes the elements of the datacenter view in detail.
Table 5-2
Elements of the datacenter Host tab
Label Element
shown
in
figure
Description
1
Summary bar
Displays the name of the datacenter, the number of hosts on
which the license is installed or not installed, and the number
of storage arrays. A horizontal scroll bar appears if the text
exceeds the available space.
2
Refresh icon
Lets you refresh all the storage arrays to display their latest
information.
3
Logs icon
Enables you to view the GUI debug logs.
4
Help icon
Enables you to view the online Help topics for VxDMP. You can
also access the online Help from Help > VxDMP Help.
5
Host tab
Displays information about the hosts, and enables you to save
and apply the tuning templates.
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Table 5-2
Elements of the datacenter Host tab (continued)
Label Element
shown
in
figure
Description
6
Displays the following information for each host in the
datacenter:
Attributes table
■
Host name.
■
DMP version installed on the host.
■
Tuning template name.
■
License Status, active or inactive.
See “Accessing the datacenter view in the VxDMP tab” on page 128.
Saving a DMP tuning template
From the datacenter view Host tab, you can save a DMP tuning template of a host,
and apply it to other hosts.
To save a DMP tuning template
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Host, in the attributes table, click a host name. The
row is selected.
2
Right-click the selected row. The context menu appears.
3
Click Save Tuning Template. The Save Tuning Template window appears.
4
Click Save. The Select location for download by host name window appears.
5
Navigate to the desired folder, and click Save. The template is saved.
Applying a DMP tuning template
From the datacenter view Host tab, you can apply the selected DMP tuning template
to one or more hosts.
To apply a DMP tuning template
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Host, in the attributes table, click one or more host
names. The row(s) is/are selected.
2
Right-click the selected row(s). The context menu appears.
3
Click Apply Tuning Template. The Select file to upload by host name
window appears.
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4
Navigate to the desired location and select the tuning template you want to
apply.
5
Click Open. The Apply Tuning Template window appears. By default, the
check box(es) for the selected host(s) appears selected.
Note:
You can deselect a check box if you do not want to apply the template to a
host in the Selected host(s) list.
6
Click Apply. The template is applied to the selected host(s). The Tuning
Template column displays the name of the applied template for the selected
host(s) row(s).
Note: In case of an error to apply the template to a host, the Tuning Template
column on the Host tab displays an error icon for the host. Hovering the mouse
over the error icon displays the ToolTip, showing the reason for the failure to
apply the template.
See “About the Host tab in the VxDMP datacenter view” on page 128.
Saving customized names for DMP device
From the datacenter view Host tab, you can save a DMP naming template of a
host, and apply it to other hosts.
To save a DMP naming template
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Host, in the attributes table, click a host name. The
row is selected.
2
Right-click the selected row. The context menu appears.
3
Click Fetch names. The Fetch names window appears.
4
Click Save. The Select location for download by host name window appears.
5
Navigate to the desired folder, and click Save. The template is saved.
Retrieving device names for customization
From the datacenter view Host tab, you can apply the selected DMP naming
template to one or more hosts.
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To apply a DMP naming template
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Host, in the attributes table, click one or more host
names. The row(s) is/are selected.
2
Right-click the selected row(s). The context menu appears.
3
Click Assign names. The Select file to upload by host name window
appears.
4
Navigate to the desired location and select the naming template you want to
apply.
5
Click Open. The Assign names window appears. By default, the check box(es)
for the selected host(s) appears selected.
Note: You can deselect a check box if you do not want to apply the template
to a host in the Selected host(s) list.
6
Click Apply. The template is applied to the selected host(s).
See “Disk device naming in VxDMP” on page 20.
About the Storage tab in the VxDMP datacenter view
The datacenter Storage tab displays the list of storage arrays controlled by DMP,
the load distribution (I/O Statistics) details for the selected storage array, and the
load distribution of blocks for each port. The Storage tab also enables you to manage
the array ports.
The following figure illustrates the work area:
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Figure 5-6
VxDMP datacenter view: Stotage tab
Table 5-3 describes the elements of the datacenter view in detail.
Table 5-3
Elements of the datacenter Storage tab
Label
shown
in
figure
Element
Description
1
Summary bar
Displays the name of the datacenter, the number of hosts
and the number of storage arrays.
2
Refresh icon
Refreshes the datacenter view.
3
Logs icon
Enables you to view the GUI debug logs.
4
Help icon
Enables you to view the online Help topics for VxDMP. You
can also access the online Help from Help > VxDMP Help.
5
Storage tab
Displays information about the storage arrays, and load
distribution.
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Table 5-3
Elements of the datacenter Storage tab (continued)
Label
shown
in
figure
Element
Description
6
Attributes table
Displays the following information for each storage array:
■
Vendor ID displays the name of the vendor
■
Product ID.
■
Serial number of the storage array.
■
Number of DMP-managed hosts that are connected to
a storage array. Roll the mouse over the Information icon
to see the mapping of the host and associated storage
array name on that host.
Note: The table does not display any hosts the vCenter
Server is not able to connect to.
You can resize the table to show more or less rows, by
dragging up, or down, the bottom edge of the table.
7
I/O statistics
grouped by array
ports pane
Displays a pie chart showing the number of blocks that are
transferred across all the ports of the selected storage array,
for which I/O is in progress.
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Table 5-3
Elements of the datacenter Storage tab (continued)
Label
shown
in
figure
Element
Description
8
Load Distribution
tab
Displays the details about the load distribution across the
storage in terms of number of read or write operations,
blocks, and average time per operation, in milliseconds.
If the I/O statistics collection for one or more hosts has been
disabled, the I/O statistics pane does not display the host/s
in the view. You can find the names of such hosts by
hovering the mouse over the I/O statistics stopped on
host(s) link.
You can view the information in a tabular view or a graphical
view. To switch between the views, use the corresponding
button.
The tabular view enables you to view the number of read or
write operations, blocks, and average time, per host at a
glance. You can also compare the numeric details for
multiple hosts. The table can be filtered using the storage
processor and the port level. The Export icon enables you
to export the I/O statistics as a .csv file.
The graphical view displays separate bar charts for the
number of read or write operations, blocks, and average
time, per host. This enables you to visually compare the I/O
loads for multiple hosts. Each bar also enables you to launch
a window to display the load distribution by LUNs for the
host, and the virtual machine statistics along with the LUN
I/O statistics. Additionally, the window displays the LUN
mapping for the LUNs from the host issuing I/O to the
selected array storage processor port.
The hosts are sorted in the descending order with respect
to the load distribution. The top 10 hosts are displayed in
the graphical view and all hosts are displayed in the tabular
view.
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Table 5-3
Elements of the datacenter Storage tab (continued)
Label
shown
in
figure
Element
Description
9
LUNs tab
Displays an attributes table, summarizing the following
information for each LUN: LUN name, media, type, tier, size,
connected hosts, and so on. The Export icon enables you
to export the I/O statistics as a .csv file.
You can select one or more LUNs. Using the right-click
menu, you can view the list of hosts connected to the
selected LUNs, along with the port, storage processor, virtual
machines, and virtual disks.
See “Accessing the datacenter view in the VxDMP tab” on page 128.
See “About the Host tab in the VxDMP datacenter view” on page 128.
Viewing the I/O load distribution across hosts for a storage
array
From the datacenter view Storage tab, you can view the I/O load that is distributed
across hosts for:
■
A selected storage array
■
A selected storage processor
■
A selected array port
To view the I/O statistics for a storage array connected to a number of hosts
◆
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage, in the attributes table, click the storage array
name.
The row is selected, and the I/O statistics pane displays the I/O load distribution
per host, for the storage array.
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To view the I/O statistics for a selected storage processor connected to a
number of hosts
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage, in the attributes table, click the storage array
name.
The row is selected, and the I/O statistics pane displays the I/O load distribution
per host, for the storage array.
2
In the Storage Processor box, select the required storage processor.
The I/O statistics pane displays the I/O load distribution per host, for the storage
processor.
To view the I/O statistics for a selected array port connected to a number of
hosts
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage, in the attributes table, click the storage array
name.
The row is selected, and the I/O statistics pane displays the I/O load distribution
per host, for the storage array.
2
In the Storage Processor box, select the storage processor of the array port.
3
In the Array Ports box, select the array port.
The I/O statistics pane displays the I/O load distribution per host, for the array
port.
Viewing the I/O statistics for a LUN
From the datacenter view Storage tab, you can view the I/O statistics and the
mapping of virtual machines on a LUN.
To view the I/O statistics and the details of virtual machines on a LUN
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage, in the attributes table, click the required
storage array. The I/O statistics for the selected storage array appears in the
I/O statistics pane.
2
In the I/O statistics pane, select the graphical view. The load distribution is
displayed in a bar graph. Each bar represents the Read or Write load for a
host.
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3
To select a host, click a bar for the host. A window displaying the load
distribution by LUNs for the host appears.
The window also displays the mapping of virtual machines and virtual disks
for the LUNs.
To view the information in a bar chart, click the Graphical view icon. Click the
respective links to view the separate bar charts for the number of read or write
operations, blocks, and average time.
To view the information in a table, click the Tabular view icon.
The tabular view provides the I/O load shared across LUNs and the connected
Virtual machines. To view the virtual machine-specific stats, click the LUN.
Note: In the I/O statistics pane, if you filter the load distribution for storage
processors or array ports, then only the LUNs from those storage processors
are displayed for the selected host.
4
Click Close to close the window.
Resetting the I/O statistics for all hosts
From the datacenter view Storage tab, you can reset the I/O statistics.
To reset the I/O statistics for all hosts connected to a storage array
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage, in the attributes table, click the required
storage array. The I/O statistics for the selected storage array appears in the
I/O statistics pane.
2
Click the Reset I/O Statistics link. A confirmation message appears.
3
Click OK. This resets the I/O statistics for all the DMP entities of all hosts that
are connected to the storage array.
Managing the array ports
From the datacenter view Storage tab, you can access the Manage Array Ports
window. This window helps you to enable or disable the array ports connected to
one or more hosts.
To manage an array port
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage, in the attributes table, click the storage array
name. The row is selected.
2
Right-click. The context menu appears.
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3
Click Manage Array Ports. The Manage Array Ports window appears.
4
To select an array port, click the column heading of the array port column. The
column is selected, indicating that the array port is selectd for all the hosts.
The Enable Port and the Disable Port buttons are activated.
5
To deselect a host, press the Ctrl key, and click the array port cell for the host.
You can deselect the array port for one or more hosts at a time.
6
To enable the array port, click the Enable Port button.
To disable an array port, click the Disable Port button
Note: To manage more than one array port, select each array port column,
and follow the same procedure. You can select only one column at a time.
7
Click Close, to close the window.
Viewing the hosts common to the selected LUNs
From the datacenter view Storage tab, you can select LUNs and view information
about the hosts common to the selected LUNs.
To view the hosts common to the selected LUNs
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage, in the attributes table, click the storage array
name. The row is selected.
2
Click the LUNs tab. The LUNs table displays information about the LUNs in
the selected storage.
3
To select a LUN, click its name.
To select more than one LUN, press the Ctrl key, and click the LUN names.
The rows are selected.
4
Right-click. The context menu appears.
5
Click Show Hosts Connected. The Show Hosts Connected window appears.
6
Select a host from the list of Host(s) common to all selected LUN(s). The
information about LUNs and virtual machines connected to the selected host
appears in the tables.
7
Click Close, to close the window.
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Renaming a storage array
From the datacenter view, you can rename a storage array instead of the traditional
default name. By default, when you rename a storage, the storage arrays connected
to all the host are also renamed.
To rename a storage array
1
In VxDMP datacenter > Storage.
2
In the attributes table, right-click the required storage array, and click Rename
Storage.
3
In the Rename Storage window, type the new storage name.
4
Click OK.
Note: To view the storage array name, hover the mouse on the information icon in
the host connected column.
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Chapter
6
Event monitoring
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Fabric Monitoring and proactive error detection
■
DMP event logging
Fabric Monitoring and proactive error detection
DMP takes a proactive role in detecting errors on paths.
DMP checks devices that are suspect based on the information from the SAN
events, even if there is no active I/O. New I/O is directed to healthy paths while
DMP verifies the suspect devices.
During startup, DMP queries the HBA to obtain the SAN topology. DMP determines
the Port World Wide Names (PWWN) that correspond to each of the device paths
that are visible to the operating system. After DMP obtains the topology and registers
with the HBA for SAN event notification. If LUNs are disconnected from a SAN, the
HBA notifies DMP of the SAN event, specifying the PWWNs that are affected. DMP
uses this event information and correlates it with the previous topology information
to determine which set of device paths have been affected.
When the path is marked as suspect, DMP does not send new I/O to the path unless
it is the last path to the device. In the background, the DMP restore task checks
the accessibility of the paths on its next periodic cycle using a SCSI inquiry probe.
If the SCSI inquiry fails, DMP disables the path to the affected LUNs, which is also
logged in the event log.
If the LUNs are reconnected at a later time, DMP captures the SAN HBA events.
When the DMP restore task runs its next test cycle, the disabled paths are checked
with the SCSI probe and re-enabled if successful.
Event monitoring
DMP event logging
Note: If DMP receives an HBA LINK UP event, the DMP restore task is restarted
and the SCSI probes run immediately, without waiting for the next periodic cycle.
When the DMP restore task is restarted, it starts a new periodic cycle. If the disabled
paths are not accessible by the time of the first SCSI probe, they are re-tested on
the next cycle (300s by default).
The fabric monitor functionality is enabled by default. The value of the
dmp_monitor_fabric tunable is persistent across restarts.
To display the current value of the dmp_monitor_fabric tunable, use the following
command:
# vxdmpadm gettune dmp_monitor_fabric
To disable the Fabric Monitoring functionality, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_monitor_fabric=off
To enable the Fabric Monitoring functionality, use the following command:
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_monitor_fabric=on
DMP event logging
The DMP Multi-Pathing Plug-in is a multi-pathing driver for DMP ESXi. DMP receives
the HBA events and based on these events it takes the appropriate action.
DMP notifies major events, and logs these events in a log file
(/etc/vx/dmpevents.log). The major events include:
■
Marking paths or dmpnodes enabled
■
Marking paths or dmpnodes disabled
■
Throttling of paths
■
I/O error analysis
■
HBA and SAN events
The log file is located in /etc/vx/dmpevents.log. When the file reaches 10,000
lines, the log is rotated. That is, dmpevents.log is renamed dmpevents.log.X and
a new dmpevents.log file is created.
You can change the level of detail that is displayed in the system or console log
about the DMP events. Use the tunable dmp_log_level. Valid values are 1 through
9. The default level is 1.
# vxdmpadm settune dmp_log_level=X
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Event monitoring
DMP event logging
The current value of dmp_log_level can be displayed with:
# vxdmpadm gettune dmp_log_level
143
Chapter
7
Performance monitoring
and tuning
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About tuning Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) with templates
■
DMP tuning templates
■
Example DMP tuning template
■
Tuning a DMP host with a configuration attribute template
■
Managing the DMP configuration files
■
Resetting the DMP tunable parameters and attributes to the default values
■
DMP tunable parameters and attributes that are supported for templates
■
DMP tunable parameters
About tuning Dynamic Multi-Pathing (DMP) with
templates
Dynamic Multi-Pathing has multiple tunable parameters and attributes that you can
configure for optimal performance. DMP provides a template method to update
several tunable parameters and attributes with a single operation. The template
represents a full or partial DMP configuration, showing the values of the parameters
and attributes of the host.
To view and work with the tunable parameters, you can dump the configuration
values of the DMP tunable parameters to a file. Edit the parameters and attributes,
Performance monitoring and tuning
DMP tuning templates
if required. Then, load the template file to a host to update all of the values in a
single operation.
You can load the configuration file to the same host, or to another similar host. The
template method is useful for the following scenarios:
■
Configure multiple similar hosts with the optimal performance tuning values.
Configure one host for optimal performance. After you have configured the host,
dump the tunable parameters and attributes to a template file. You can then
load the template file to another host with similar requirements. Symantec
recommends that the hosts that use the same configuration template have the
same operating system and similar I/O requirements.
■
Define multiple specialized templates to handle different I/O load requirements.
When the load changes on a host, you can load a different template for the best
performance. This strategy is appropriate for predictable, temporary changes
in the I/O load. As the system administrator, after you define the system's I/O
load behavior, you can customize tuning templates for particular loads. You can
then automate the tuning, since there is a single load command that you can
use in scripts or cron jobs.
At any time, you can reset the configuration, which reverts the values of the tunable
parameters and attributes to the DMP default values.
You can manage the DMP configuration file with the vxdmpadm config commands.
See the vxdmpadm(1m) man page.
DMP tuning templates
The template mechanism enables you to tune DMP parameters and attributes by
dumping the configuration values to a file, or to standard output.
DMP supports tuning the following types of information with template files:
■
DMP tunable parameters.
■
DMP attributes defined for an enclosure, array name, or array type.
■
Symantec naming scheme parameters.
The template file is divided into sections, as follows:
DMP Tunables
Applied to all enclosures and arrays.
Namingscheme
Applied to all enclosures and arrays.
Arraytype
Use to customize array types. Applied to all
of the enclosures of the specified array type.
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Performance monitoring and tuning
DMP tuning templates
Arrayname
Use if particular arrays need customization;
that is, if the tunables vary from those applied
for the array type.
Attributes in this section are applied to all of
the enclosures of the specified array name.
Enclosurename
Applied to the enclosures of the specified Cab
serial number and array name.
Use if particular enclosures need
customization; that is, if the tunables vary
from those applied for the array type and
array name.
Loading is atomic for the section. DMP loads each section only if all of the attributes
in the section are valid. When all sections have been processed, DMP reports the
list of errors and warns the user. DMP does not support a partial rollback. DMP
verifies the tunables and attributes during the load process. However, Symantec
recommends that you check the configuration template file before you attempt to
load the file. Make any required corrections until the configuration file validates
correctly.
The attributes are given priority in the following order when a template is loaded:
Enclosure Section > Array Name Section > Array Type Section
If all enclosures of the same array type need the same settings, then remove the
corresponding array name and enclosure name sections from the template. Define
the settings only in the array type section. If some of the enclosures or array names
need customized settings, retain the attribute sections for the array names or
enclosures. You can remove the entries for the enclosures or the array names if
they use the same settings that are defined for the array type.
When you dump a configuration file from a host, that host may contain some arrays
which are not visible on the other hosts. When you load the template to a target
host that does not include the enclosure, array type, or array name, DMP ignores
the sections.
You may not want to apply settings to non-shared arrays or some host-specific
arrays on the target hosts. Be sure to define an enclosure section for each of those
arrays in the template. When you load the template file to the target host, the
enclosure section determines the settings. Otherwise, DMP applies the settings
from the respective array name or array type sections.
146
Performance monitoring and tuning
Example DMP tuning template
Example DMP tuning template
This section shows an example of a DMP tuning template.
# DMP settings are saved into this template file on
# Jul 13, 2012 at 09:38:25
#
# Template Format:
# <section 1>
# <tab><attribute 1>=<value>
# <tab><attribute 2>=<value>
# <section 2>
# <tab><attribute 1>=<value>
# <tab><attribute 2>=<value>
DMP Tunables
# The number of kernel threads that are available
# for servicing error handling, path restoration
# and other DMP administrative tasks is equal to
# the value of 'dmp_daemon_count'.
dmp_daemon_count=10
# Set the time interval in seconds for which DMP
# needs to delay the error processing in case the
# device is found to be busy.
dmp_delayq_interval=5
# Start the kernel thread that implement DMP path
# restoration activity if set to on.
dmp_restore_state=enabled
# Set the time period in seconds for which a path
# must stay healthy. If path's state changes back
# to disabled within this time period then DMP
# marks the path as intermittently failing and
# does not re-enable the path for I/O until
# 'dmp_path_age' seconds elapse.
dmp_health_time=60
# Set the level of detail to which DMP console
# messages are displayed.
dmp_log_level=1
# Set low impact path probing feature to on/off.
dmp_low_impact_probe=on
# Set retry period for handling transient errors.
# If set to a nonzero value, I/Os to a disk with
# all failed paths will be retried until the
# specified interval or until I/O succeeds on one
147
Performance monitoring and tuning
Example DMP tuning template
# of the paths, whichever happens first.
dmp_lun_retry_timeout=60
# Set time for which intermittently failing path
# needs to be monitored before DMP marks the path
# as healthy and, again attempts to schedule I/O
# requests on it.
dmp_path_age=300
# Set the default number of contiguous I/O blocks
# (as integer exponent of a power of 2 e.g., 11
# represents 2048 blocks) that are sent along DMP
# path to an array before switching to the next
# available path.
dmp_pathswitch_blks_shift=9
# Controls the activity of the path restoration
# kernel thread. Idle LUNs are also probed when
# set to on.
dmp_probe_idle_lun=on
# Set number of paths which will be probed by the
# restore daemon in order to determine idle/failed
# subset within a subpaths failover group(SFG).
dmp_probe_threshold=5
# Set the number of cycles between running the
# check_all policy, when the restore policy is
# check_periodic.
dmp_restore_cycles=10
# Set time interval in seconds for restore daemon
# to analyzes the condition of paths.
dmp_restore_interval=300
# Set DMP path restoration policy.
dmp_restore_policy=check_disabled
# Set maximum number of retries to attempt on
# the path if there is an I/O error.
dmp_retry_count=5
# Set the timeout value for any SCSI command
# that is sent via DMP.
dmp_scsi_timeout=30
# Set the status of the subpaths failover group
# (SFG) feature. The feature is turned off on
# setting to 0.
dmp_sfg_threshold=1
# Set the time interval between gathering
# DMP statistics.
dmp_stat_interval=1
148
Performance monitoring and tuning
Example DMP tuning template
# Enable monitoring of dynamic change in
# LUN ownership.
dmp_monitor_ownership=on
# Controls the use of SINA (Storage Networking
# Industry Association) HBA API for ESD. This
# API allows DDL to improve the performance of
# failover by collecting information about the
# SAN topology and by monitoring fabric events
# when set to on.
dmp_monitor_fabric=on
# Set native support feature to on/off.
dmp_native_support=off
The 'namingscheme' attribute can be set to either EBN or OSN.
The EBN namingscheme sets the DMP meta node names based on the
enclosure name whereas OSN namingscheme sets the DMP meta node
names as same as operating system device names.
#
#
#
#
#
# The 'persistence' attribute specifies whether the names of disk
# devices that are displayed by DMP remain unchanged after disk
# hardware has been reconfigured and/or the system rebooted.
#
# The 'lowercase' attribute is yes by default. The name of the
# enclosure is converted to lowercase, regardless of the case of
# the name specified by the ASL. To suppress the conversion to
# lowercase, use lowercase=no option.
#
# The 'use_avid' attribute is yes by default. For EBN scheme, the
# Array Volume ID (AVID) is used together with the enclosure name
# for the DMP meta node name.
Namingscheme
namingscheme=ebn
persistence=yes
lowercase=yes
use_avid=yes
# The Arraytype/Arrayname/Enclosure sections contains following
# attributes. These attributes can be set for the all paths to an
# enclosure, for the paths to all enclosures of a particular type
# (for example EVA4K6K) and for the paths to all enclosures of a
# particular array type (for example A/A). The priority are given
# in following order while loading below mentioned attributes:
#
#
Enclosure Section > Arrayname Section > Arraytype Section
#
149
Performance monitoring and tuning
Example DMP tuning template
#
# iopolicy The I/O load is balanced based on the
#
policy across multiple paths to a disk
#
array or enclosure in a system.
#
# partitionsize This is an optional attribute which is
#
specified with adaptive | adaptiveminq
#
| balanced iopolicy only. It determines
#
the size of the track cache. The size
#
is in blocks and should be power of 2.
#
If the specified size is not a power of
#
2, it is rounded down to the nearest
#
power of 2.
#
# use_all_paths This is also an optional attribute which
#
controls whether the secondary paths in
#
an Asymmetric Active/Active(A/A-A) or an
#
ALUA array are used for for scheduling
#
I/O requests in addition to the primary
#
paths or not.
#
# recoveryoption It determines how DMP handles throttling
#
and error recovery.
#
# dmp_lun_retry_timeout Set retry period for handling transient
#
errors. If set to a nonzero value, I/Os
#
to a disk with all failed paths will be
#
retried until the specified interval or
#
until I/O succeeds on one of the paths,
#
whichever happens first. This is valid
#
for Enclosure section only.
Arraytype
arraytype=A/A
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
recoveryoption=nothrottle
recoveryoption=timebound iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
Arrayname
arrayname=Hitachi_USP-VM
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
recoveryoption=nothrottle
150
Performance monitoring and tuning
Example DMP tuning template
recoveryoption=timebound iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
Arrayname
arrayname=Hitachi_VSP
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
recoveryoption=nothrottle
recoveryoption=timebound iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
Arrayname
arrayname=EMC
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
recoveryoption=nothrottle
recoveryoption=timebound iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
Enclosure
serial=25847
arrayname=Hitachi_USP-VM
arraytype=A/A
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
recoveryoption=nothrottle
recoveryoption=timebound
iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
dmp_lun_retry_timeout=60
Enclosure
serial=54332
arrayname=Hitachi_VSP
arraytype=A/A
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
recoveryoption=nothrottle
recoveryoption=timebound iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
dmp_lun_retry_timeout=60
Enclosure
serial=000290301188
arrayname=EMC
arraytype=A/A
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
151
Performance monitoring and tuning
Tuning a DMP host with a configuration attribute template
recoveryoption=nothrottle
recoveryoption=timebound iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
dmp_lun_retry_timeout=60
Enclosure
serial=000292601383
arrayname=EMC
arraytype=A/A
iopolicy=minimumq
partitionsize=512
recoveryoption=nothrottle
recoveryoption=timebound
iotimeout=300
redundancy=0
dmp_lun_retry_timeout=60
Tuning a DMP host with a configuration attribute
template
You can use a template file to upload a series of changes to the DMP configuration
to the same host or to another similar host.
Symantec recommends that you load the DMP template to a host that is similar to
the host that was the source of the tunable values.
To configure DMP on a host with a template
1
Dump the contents of the current host configuration to a file.
# vxdmpadm config dump file=filename
2
Edit the file to make any required changes to the tunable parameters in the
template.
The target host may include non-shared arrays or host-specific arrays. To avoid
updating these with settings from the array name or array type, define an
enclosure section for each of those arrays in the template. When you load the
template file to the target host, the enclosure section determines the settings.
Otherwise, DMP applies the settings from the respective array name or array
type sections.
152
Performance monitoring and tuning
Managing the DMP configuration files
3
Validate the values of the DMP tunable parameters.
# vxdmpadm config check file=filename
DMP displays no output if the configuration check is successful. If the file
contains errors, DMP displays the errors. Make any required corrections until
the configuration file is valid. For example, you may see errors such as the
following:
VxVM vxdmpadm ERROR V-5-1-0 Template file 'error.file' contains
following errors:
Line No: 22
Line No: 44
non-digits
Line No: 64
the limit of
Line No: 76
Line No: 281
4
'dmp_daemon_count' can not be set to 0 or less
Specified value for 'dmp_health_time' contains
Specified value for 'dmp_path_age' is beyond
its value
'dmp_probe_idle_lun' can be set to either on or off
Unknown arraytype
Load the file to the target host.
# vxdmpadm config load file=filename
During the loading process, DMP validates each section of the template. DMP
loads all valid sections. DMP does not load any section that contains errors.
Managing the DMP configuration files
You can display the name of the template file most recently loaded to the host. The
information includes the date and time when DMP loaded the template file.
To display the name of the template file that the host currently uses
◆
# vxdmpadm config show
TEMPLATE_FILE
DATE
TIME
==================================================
machinename@/tmp/myconfig Feb 09, 2011 11:28:59
153
Performance monitoring and tuning
Resetting the DMP tunable parameters and attributes to the default values
Resetting the DMP tunable parameters and
attributes to the default values
DMP maintains the default values for the DMP tunable parameters and attributes.
At any time, you can restore the default values to the host. Any changes that you
applied to the host with template files are discarded.
To reset the DMP tunables to the default values
◆
Use the following command:
# vxdmpadm config reset
DMP tunable parameters and attributes that are
supported for templates
DMP supports tuning the following tunable parameters and attributes with a
configuration template.
DMP tunable parameters
See “DMP tunable parameters” on page 154.
DMP attributes defined for an enclosure, array ■
name, or array type.
■
Naming scheme attributes:
iopolicy
partitionsize
■
use_all_paths
■
■
recoveryoption attributes ( retrycount or
iotimeout)
redundancy
■
dmp_lun_retry_timeout
■
naming scheme
■
persistence
■
lowercase
■
use_avid
DMP tunable parameters
DMP provides various parameters that you can use to tune your environment.
Table 7-1 shows the DMP parameters that can be tuned. You can set a tunable
parameter online, without a reboot.
154
Performance monitoring and tuning
DMP tunable parameters
Table 7-1
DMP parameters that are tunable
Parameter
Description
dmp_daemon_count
The number of kernel threads that are available for
servicing path error handling, path restoration, and
other DMP administrative tasks.
The default number of threads is 10.
dmp_delayq_interval
How long DMP should wait before retrying I/O after an
array fails over to a standby path. Some disk arrays
are not capable of accepting I/O requests immediately
after failover.
The default value is 5 seconds.
dmp_health_time
DMP detects intermittently failing paths, and prevents
I/O requests from being sent on them. The value of
dmp_health_time represents the time in seconds
for which a path must stay healthy. If a path’s state
changes back from enabled to disabled within this time
period, DMP marks the path as intermittently failing,
and does not re-enable the path for I/O until
dmp_path_age seconds elapse.
The default value is 60 seconds.
A value of 0 prevents DMP from detecting intermittently
failing paths.
dmp_log_level
The level of detail that is displayed for DMP console
messages. The following level values are defined:
1 — Displays all DMP log messages that are critical.
2 — Displays level 1 messages plus messages that
relate to path or disk addition or removal, SCSI errors,
IO errors and DMP node migration.
3 — Displays level 1 and 2 messages plus messages
that relate to path throttling, suspect path, idle path and
insane path logic.
4 — Displays level 1, 2 and 3 messages plus messages
that relate to setting or changing attributes on a path
and tunable related changes.
The default value is 2.
155
Performance monitoring and tuning
DMP tunable parameters
Table 7-1
DMP parameters that are tunable (continued)
Parameter
Description
dmp_low_impact_probe
Determines if the path probing by restore daemon is
optimized or not. Set it to on to enable optimization
and off to disable. Path probing is optimized only
when restore policy is check_disabled or during
check_disabled phase of check_periodic policy.
The default value is on.
dmp_lun_retry_timeout
Specifies a retry period for handling transient errors
that are not handled by the HBA and the SCSI driver.
If the value of the dmp_lun_retry_timeout tunable
parameter is 0, the paths are checked for connectivity
only once. When all paths to a disk fail, DMP fails the
I/Os to the application. The default value of the
dmp_lun_retry_timeout tunable parameter is 60.
In special cases when DMP needs to handle the
transient errors, configure DMP to delay failing the I/Os
to the application for a short interval. Set the
dmp_lun_retry_timeout tunable parameter to a
non-zero value to specify the interval. If all of the paths
to the LUN fail and I/Os need to be serviced, then DMP
probes the paths every five seconds for the specified
interval. If the paths are restored within the interval,
DMP detects this and retries the I/Os. DMP does not
fail I/Os to a disk with all failed paths until the specified
dmp_lun_retry_timeout interval or until the I/O
succeeds on one of the paths, whichever happens first.
dmp_monitor_fabric
Determines if DMP should register for HBA events from
VMkernel. These events improve the failover
performance by proactively avoiding the I/O paths that
have impending failure.
dmp_monitor_ownership
Determines whether the ownership monitoring is
enabled for ALUA arrays. When this tunable is set to
on, DMP polls the devices for LUN ownership changes.
The polling interval is specified by the
dmp_restore_interval tunable. The default value is on.
When the dmp_monitor_ownership tunable is off,
DMP does not poll the devices for LUN ownership
changes.
156
Performance monitoring and tuning
DMP tunable parameters
Table 7-1
DMP parameters that are tunable (continued)
Parameter
Description
dmp_path_age
The time for which an intermittently failing path needs
to be monitored as healthy before DMP again tries to
schedule I/O requests on it.
The default value is 300 seconds.
A value of 0 prevents DMP from detecting intermittently
failing paths.
dmp_pathswitch_blks_shift
The default number of contiguous I/O blocks that are
sent along a DMP path to an array before switching to
the next available path. The value is expressed as the
integer exponent of a power of 2; for example 9
represents 512 blocks.
This parameter only affects the behavior of the
balanced I/O policy. A value of 0 disables
multi-pathing for the policy unless the vxdmpadm
command is used to specify a different partition size
for an array.
dmp_probe_idle_lun
If DMP statistics gathering is enabled, set this tunable
to on (default) to have the DMP path restoration thread
probe idle LUNs. Set this tunable to off to turn off this
feature. (Idle LUNs are VM disks on which no I/O
requests are scheduled.) The value of this tunable is
only interpreted when DMP statistics gathering is
enabled. Turning off statistics gathering also disables
idle LUN probing.
The default value is on.
dmp_probe_threshold
If the dmp_low_impact_probe is turned on,
dmp_probe_threshold determines the number of paths
to probe before deciding on changing the state of other
paths in the same subpath failover group.
The default value is 5.
dmp_restore_cycles
If the DMP restore policy is check_periodic, the
number of cycles after which the check_all policy
is called.
The default value is 10.
See “Configuring DMP path restoration policies”
on page 66.
157
Performance monitoring and tuning
DMP tunable parameters
Table 7-1
DMP parameters that are tunable (continued)
Parameter
Description
dmp_restore_interval
The interval attribute specifies how often the path
restoration thread examines the paths. Specify the time
in seconds.
The default value is 300.
The value of this tunable can also be set using the
vxdmpadm start restore command.
See “Configuring DMP path restoration policies”
on page 66.
dmp_restore_policy
The DMP restore policy, which can be set to one of
the following values:
■
check_all
■
check_alternate
■
check_disabled
■
check_periodic
The default value is check_disabled
The value of this tunable can also be set using the
vxdmpadm start restore command.
See “Configuring DMP path restoration policies”
on page 66.
dmp_restore_state
If this parameter is set to enabled, it enables the path
restoration thread to be started.
See “Configuring DMP path restoration policies”
on page 66.
If this parameter is set to disabled, it stops and
disables the path restoration thread.
If this parameter is set to stopped, it stops the path
restoration thread until the next device discovery cycle.
The default is enabled.
See “Stopping the DMP path restoration thread”
on page 68.
dmp_scsi_timeout
Determines the timeout value to be set for any SCSI
command that is sent via DMP. If the HBA does not
receive a response for a SCSI command that it has
sent to the device within the timeout period, the SCSI
command is returned with a failure error code.
158
Performance monitoring and tuning
DMP tunable parameters
Table 7-1
DMP parameters that are tunable (continued)
Parameter
Description
dmp_sfg_threshold
Determines the minimum number of paths that should
be failed in a failover group before DMP starts
suspecting other paths in the same failover group. The
value of 0 disables the failover logic based on subpath
failover groups.
The default value is 1.
dmp_stat_interval
The time interval between gathering DMP statistics.
The default and minimum value are 1 second.
See “Changing the disk device naming scheme” on page 78.
159
Appendix
A
VxDMP troubleshooting
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Troubleshooting tips
■
Collecting logs for Symantec Support
■
VxDMP plugin unregistration error
■
VxDMP plugin appears "Disabled" or the VxDMP tabs are not visible at the
datacenter or host level
■
VMware vCenter Server becomes permanently unavailable
■
Troubleshooting tips if the system panicks or hangs
■
Troubleshooting tips for Command Line exception errors
■
VxDMP is unable to connect to the CIM agent
■
The virtual machines fail to restart when the vxcache.vmdk is missing
■
vSphere Storage vMotion operation fails for the datastore containing a SmartPool
device
■
After vMotion is performed on a newly added node, sfcache dg fails to get
restored
■
The SmartIO cache area in guest is unavailable when devices are missing from
the SmartPool
■
Adding DMP support for a new disk array
■
Downgrading the array support
■
About the vsphere_client_virgo.log file
VxDMP troubleshooting
Troubleshooting tips
Troubleshooting tips
Use the information in this section to diagnose the installation or operation problems
that you might encounter.
Troubleshooting issues require looking at the log files created by the various
components.
The following files may be required to determine the source of a problem:
■
For installation issues: Refer to the VxDMP Console installation log file.
%AllUsersProfile%\Veritas\VPI\log\date_timestamp\
■
For ESXi server issues: Refer to the ESXi log files from the following locations.
Logs for provider: /var/log/syslog.log
Logs for DMP for ESXi 5.x host: /var/log/vmkernel.log
■
For DMP Console-related issues: Refer to the vxdmplib file.
%AllUsersProfile%\Symantec\DMP\Logs\vxcmd.log.number
■
For VxDMP Plugin-related issues: Refer to the VIPluginRegistration file.
%AllUsersProfile%\Symantec\DMP\Logs\VIPluginRegistration.log.number
■
For VxDMP tab issues at the host or datacenter level, and home view:
In the VxDMP tab, click the View Log icon.
Here, %AllUsersProfile% is the Windows variable that typically expands to:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users
On Windows 2008 and 2008 R2, it typically expands to:
C:\ProgramData
In the Web Client view, Manage > SmartPool or Monitor > SmartPool, click the
Log icon.
For the vSphere Web Client server issues: Refer to the log files from the following
locations:
%AllUsersProfile%\Symantec\DMP\Logs\vxdmplib.log.number
%AllUsersProfile%\Symantec\DMP\Logs\vxcmd.log
Collecting logs for Symantec Support
In case of any issues, use the vxexplorer support tool on the ESXi server. The
vxexplorer tool collects the information required for Symantec Support to
troubleshoot the issue.
161
VxDMP troubleshooting
VxDMP plugin unregistration error
The tool collects the logs and displays the name of the log file. Provide the log file
to Symantec Support.
To use the vxexplorer tool
◆
Use the following command:
# vxexplorer
VxDMP plugin unregistration error
VxDMP plugin unregistration may fail during the DMP Console uninstallation.
Resolution: Use the registerPlugin.bat utility to unregister the plugin. Run this
utility on the host where DMP Console is installed, using the same user account
that was used for DMP Console installation.
You can run the utility from:
DMP Console install directory\DMP\bin>registerPlugin.bat
You can run the utility as follows:
registerPlugin DMPConsole_IP vCenterServer_IP vCenterServerSDK_Port
vCenterServer_Username vCenterServer_Password
register|unregister|verify
[AppServerConfigFileName]
Make sure that the vCenter Server user, vCenterServer_Username in the above
usage statement, has the extension registration privileges on vCenter Server, to
run the registerPlugin.bat utility.
VxDMP plugin appears "Disabled" or the VxDMP
tabs are not visible at the datacenter or host level
VxDMP plugin appears disabled in vCenter Server Plug-in Manager if vCenter
Server fails to access the DMP Console server IP. Since the plugin is disabled, the
VxDMP tab is not available at the host and the datacenter level.
Alternately, the VxDMP tab in vSphere Client may display an HTTP 404 Not Found
error.
Resolution: Verify the following conditions and then refresh the tab in vSphere
Client.
■
Verify that the DMP Console host is running and is accessible over the network.
162
VxDMP troubleshooting
VMware vCenter Server becomes permanently unavailable
■
Verify that the 'VxDMP Console server ' service is running on the DMP Console
server .
■
Verify that the VMware Web Service is running on the vCenter Server.
■
Verify that ports, 14241 and 14242, are not blocked by a firewall on DMP Console
server .
■
Log out of vSphere Client and log in again. Then, verify that the VxDMP plugin
is installed and enabled.
If the plugin is still in the disabled state, use the registerPlugin.bat to unregister the
plugin, and then register it again. While registering the plugin again, specify a DMP
Console server IP address that is accessible over the network from vCenter Server.
For information to run the registerPlugin.bat utility:
See “ VxDMP plugin unregistration error” on page 162.
For prerequisite settings before you verify the installation, see Dynamic Multi-Pathing
Installation Guide.
VMware vCenter Server becomes permanently
unavailable
The VMware vCenter Server may be unavailable either due to a server crash or
because you want to set up a new server altogether.
Resolution: Perform the following steps to set up the new server.
To set up a new server
1
Create a new vCenter Server. Refer to the VMware documentation for
instructions. VxDMP supports the VMware vCenter version 5.0.
2
Move all the VMware ESXi hosts to the new vCenter Server you created. Refer
to the VMware documentation for instructions.
3
Register the VxDMP plugin for vCenter Server.
4
Exit vSphere Client, launch it again, and then log in to the new vCenter Server
where you moved all the ESXi hosts, to view the VxDMP tabs.
Troubleshooting tips if the system panicks or
hangs
See the Known issues and Software limitations sections in this document.
Obtain and send the following files to Symantec:
163
VxDMP troubleshooting
Troubleshooting tips for Command Line exception errors
■
vmkernel core file in the /var/core directory of ESXi 5.0
■
/var/log/vmkernel* and /var/log/messages log files
Troubleshooting tips for Command Line exception
errors
See the Known issues and Software limitations sections in this document.
Obtain and send the following files to Symantec:
■
CLI output
■
/var/log/messages log file
VxDMP is unable to connect to the CIM agent
VxDMP displays an error when it is unable to connect to the CIM agent.
Resolution: In the vSphere client, perform the following steps to troubleshoot the
problem and connect to the CIM agent.
■
Start the sfcbd-watchdog service on the ESXi host.
■
Verify that ESXi 5.0 Update 1 or later is installed.
■
Change the firewall setting of VxDMP to unblock a connection to CIM Secure
Server.
To start the sfcbd-watchdog service
1
Log on to the ESXi host.
2
Execute the following command:
/etc/init.d/sfcbd-watchdog restart
To verify the installed ESXi version
1
Log in as a root.
2
Execute the following command:
uname -a
164
VxDMP troubleshooting
The virtual machines fail to restart when the vxcache.vmdk is missing
To change the firewall setting
1
For the connected host, click Configuration > Software > Security Profile >
Services > Properties, enable CIM Server service.
2
In Firewall > Properties, enable CIM Secure Server to unblock the CIM
communication to remote clients.
The virtual machines fail to restart when the
vxcache.vmdk is missing
If the vxcache.vmdk file is missing, the virtual machines with the vxcache device
fail to restart. The vxcache.vmdk file could be missing because it was inadvertently
deleted, or because the device is removed using the virtual machine's editing
options.
Resolution:
To restore the vxcache.vmdk file
1
Run the following command on ESXi:
# cd datastore
Where datastore is the location where the file existed earlier.
2
If the vxcache-rdmp.vmdk file exists, then remove it using the following
command:
# rm -f vxcache-rdmp.vmdk
3
Restore the vxcache.vmdk file, using the following command:
# vmkfstools -z /vmfs/devices/disks/vxcache vxcache.vmdk
vSphere Storage vMotion operation fails for the
datastore containing a SmartPool device
Storage vMotion is not supported for a virtual machine associated with a datastore
that contains a raw device mapping (RDM) device in multi-writer mode, such as
the SmartPool device.
Resolution:
165
VxDMP troubleshooting
After vMotion is performed on a newly added node, sfcache dg fails to get restored
Use the following workaround
1
Remove the SmartPool device from the virtual machine.
2
Perform Storage vMotion.
3
Reassign the SmartPool device to the virtual machine.
After vMotion is performed on a newly added
node, sfcache dg fails to get restored
When a new ESXi host is added to a VMware cluster that contains virtual machines
with active SmartPool, vMotion to the new ESXi host fails for these virtual machines.
Resolution:
Use the following workaround
1
Create a SmartPool on the new ESXi using the available devices on the host.
2
Re-run the SmartPool assignment operation on the virtual machines in the
VMware cluster.
The SmartIO cache area in guest is unavailable
when devices are missing from the SmartPool
When single or multiple devices are disabled from the SmartPool, the cache area
in guest becomes unavailable.
Resolution:
Use the following workaround
1
Disassociate the SmartDisk device from the guest using the following command:
vxpooladm assign vm=<vmname> size=0
2
Reassign the SmartDisk device using the following command:
Vxpooladm assign vm=<vmname> size=<size>
3
Recreate the cache area.
166
VxDMP troubleshooting
Adding DMP support for a new disk array
Adding DMP support for a new disk array
You can add support for a new type of disk array. The support comes in the form
of Array Support Libraries (ASLs) that are developed by Symantec. Symantec
provides support for new disk arrays through updates to the vxaslapm package.
To determine if an updated vxaslapm package is available for download, refer to
the hardware compatibility list tech note. The hardware compatibility list provides
a link to the latest package for download and instructions for installing the
vxaslapm.vib package.
To access the hardware compatibility list, go to the following URL:
http://www.symantec.com/docs/TECH211575
Each vxaslapm.vib is specific for the Dynamic Multi-Pathing version. Be sure to
install the vxaslapm.vib that supports the installed version of Dynamic Multi-Pathing.
If you need to remove the latest vxaslapm.vib, you can revert to the previously
installed version. For the detailed procedure, refer to the VxDMP Troubleshooting
section.
Downgrading the array support
The array support is available in a single package, VRTSaslapm, that includes Array
Support Libraries (ASLs) and Array Policy Modules (APMs). Each major release
of Dynamic Multi-Pathing includes the supported VRTSaslapm package, which is
installed as part of the product installation. Between major releases, Symantec may
provide additional array support through updates to the VRTSaslapm package.
If you have issues with an updated VRTSaslapm package, Symantec may recommend
that you downgrade to a previous version of the ASL/APM package. You can only
revert to a package that is supported for the installed release of Dynamic
Multi-Pathing. To perform the downgrade while the system is online, do not remove
the installed package. Instead, you can install the previous version of the package
over the new package. This method prevents multiple instances of the VRTSaslapm
package from being installed.
Use the following method to downgrade the VRTSaslapm package.
About the vsphere_client_virgo.log file
Troubleshooting issues require looking at the log files. The
vsphere_client_virgo.log file contains plugin-related information and it also logs
exceptions specific to storage arrays and LUN custom objects.
167
VxDMP troubleshooting
About the vsphere_client_virgo.log file
The following table lists the location of the vsphere_client_virgo.log file:
vSphere Web Client
version
Location
vSphere Web Client 6.0
%PROGRAMDATA%\VMware\vCenterServer\logs
\vsphere-client\logs\vsphere_client_virgo.log
vSphere Web Client 5.5 and
5.5.2
%PROGRAMDATA%\VMware\vSphere Web Client
\serviceability\logs\vsphere_client_virgo.log
168
Glossary
Active/Active disk
arrays
Active/Passive disk
arrays
This type of multi-pathed disk array allows you to access a disk in the disk array
through all the paths to the disk simultaneously, without any performance
degradation.
This type of multipathed disk array allows one path to a disk to be designated as
primary and used to access the disk at any time. Using a path other than the
designated active path results in severe performance degradation in some disk
arrays.
device name
In a SAN environment, it is more convenient to use enclosure-based naming, which
forms the device name by concatenating the name of the enclosure (such as enc0)
with the disk’s number within the enclosure, separated by an underscore (for
example, enc0_2). The term disk access name can also be used to refer to a device
name.
disabled path
A path to a disk that is not available for I/O. A path can be disabled due to real
hardware failures or if the user has used the vxdmpadm disable command on that
controller.
disk
A collection of read/write data blocks that are indexed and can be accessed fairly
quickly. Each disk has a universally unique identifier.
disk access name
An alternative term for a device name.
disk array
A collection of disks logically arranged into an object. Arrays tend to provide benefits
such as redundancy or improved performance.
disk array serial
This is the serial number of the disk array. It is usually printed on the disk array
cabinet or can be obtained by issuing a vendor- specific SCSI command to the
disks on the disk array. This number is used by the DMP subsystem to uniquely
identify a disk array.
number
disk controller
In the multi-pathing subsystem of VxVM, the controller (host bus adapter or HBA)
or disk array connected to the host, which the operating system represents as the
parent node of a disk.
disk enclosure
An intelligent disk array that usually has a backplane with a built-in Fibre Channel
loop, and which permits hot-swapping of disks.
disk ID
A universally unique identifier that is given to each disk and can be used to identify
the disk, even if it is moved.
Glossary
disk name
A logical or administrative name chosen for a disk that is under the control of VxVM,
such as disk03. The term disk media name is also used to refer to a disk name.
enabled path
A path to a disk that is available for I/O.
enclosure
See disk enclosure.
enclosure-based
See device name.
naming
fabric mode disk
A disk device that is accessible on a Storage Area Network (SAN) via a Fibre
Channel switch.
Fibre Channel
A collective name for the fiber optic technology that is commonly used to set up a
Storage Area Network (SAN).
file system
The organization of files on storage devices. The term file system can refer either
to the entire file system or to a subsection of that file system, contained within a
disk section or a logical volume that can be mounted or unmounted from that tree.
multi-pathing
Where there are multiple physical access paths to a disk connected to a system,
the disk is called multi-pathed. Any software residing on the host, (for example, the
DMP driver) that hides this fact from the user is said to provide multi-pathing
functionality.
path
When a disk is connected to a host, the path to the disk consists of the HBA (Host
Bus Adapter) on the host, the SCSI or fibre cable connector and the controller on
the disk or disk array. These components constitute a path to a disk. A failure on
any of these results in DMP trying to shift all I/O for that disk onto the remaining
(alternate) paths.
primary path
In Active/Passive disk arrays, a disk can be bound to one particular controller on
the disk array or owned by a controller. The disk can then be accessed using the
path through this particular controller.
RAID (redundant array A disk array set up with part of the combined storage capacity used for storing
of independent disks) duplicate information about the data stored in that array. This makes it possible to
regenerate the data if a disk failure occurs.
secondary path
In Active/Passive disk arrays, the paths to a disk other than the primary path are
called secondary paths. A disk is supposed to be accessed only through the primary
path until it fails, after which ownership of the disk is transferred to one of the
secondary paths.
SAN (storage area
network)
A networking paradigm that provides easily reconfigurable connectivity between
any subset of computers, disk storage and interconnecting hardware such as
switches, hubs and bridges.
SmartDisk
The storage area that is assigned to a virtual machine.
170
Glossary
SmartPool
The storage pool consisting of the Solid-State Drives (SSDs), Hard Disk Drives
(HDD), and other local data storage devices attached to hosts that are claimed by
Veritas DMP. SmartPool provides a caching storage for virtual machines running
Symantec Storage Foundation’s SmartIO solution.
171
Index
A
A/A disk arrays 13
A/A-A disk arrays 13
A/P disk arrays 14
A/P-C disk arrays 14–15
A/PF disk arrays 14
A/PG disk arrays 15
access port 14
active path attribute 28
active paths
devices 55–56
Active/Active disk arrays 13
Active/Passive disk arrays 14
adaptive load-balancing 30
adaptiveminq policy 30
Add New License 116
APM
configuring 69
array policy module (APM)
configuring 69
Array Ports
gathering I/O statistics 136
array ports
disabling for DMP 61
displaying information about 45
enabling for DMP 62
managing 138
array support library (ASL) 35
Array Volume ID
device naming 79
arrays
DMP support 73
ASL
array support library 35, 73
Asymmetric Active/Active disk arrays 13
attributes
active 28, 122
nopreferred 29
preferred priority 29
setting for paths 28, 54, 56
standby 29, 122
attributes table
datacenter Host 128
datacenter Storage 132
filtering the LUN view 125
host view 117
sorting 122
Auto Refresh 127
autotrespass mode 14
B
balanced path policy 31
breadcrumbs trail 121
C
categories
disks 35
Change attributes
host view 122
check_all policy 67
check_alternate policy 67
check_disabled policy 67
check_periodic policy 67
CLI package
about 11
downloading from GUI 114
configuring attributes
host view
path 122
storage array 122
Configuring DMP
using templates 144
configuring new disks 73
Connectivity map 85
Controller ID
displaying 44
controllers
disabling for DMP 61
disabling in DMP 28
displaying information about 43
enabling for DMP 62
Index
customized naming
DMP nodes 80
D
datacenter view
accessing 128
Host tab 128
Load Distribution
Array Ports 136
Storage Array 136
Storage Processor 136
Reset I/O Statistics link 138
Storage tab 132
DDL 19
device claiming 94
device discovery
introduced 19
Device Discovery Layer (DDL) 19
device names
configuring persistent 81
user-specified 80
devices
JBOD 34
path redundancy 55–56
Disable 126
Disable Port 138
disk arrays
A/A 13
A/A-A 13
A/P 14
A/P-G 15
A/PF 14
Active/Active 13
Active/Passive 14
Asymmetric Active/Active 13
JBOD devices 34
listing supported 77
multipathed 19
supported with DMP 77
disk discovery 73
disk names
configuring persistent 81
disks
array support library 35
categories 35
changing naming scheme 78
configuring newly added 73
configuring persistent names 81
discovery of by DMP 73
disks (continued)
displaying naming scheme 79
enclosures 21
naming schemes 20
displaying
DMP nodes 39
HBA information 44
redundancy levels 55
supported disk arrays 77
displaying statistics
erroneous I/Os 51
queued I/Os 51
DMP
check_all restore policy 67
check_alternate restore policy 67
check_disabled restore policy 67
check_periodic restore policy 67
configuring DMP path restoration policies 66
configuring I/O throttling 33, 64
configuring response to I/O errors 32, 63, 66
disabling array ports 61
disabling controllers 61
disabling paths 61
disk discovery 73
displaying DMP database information 28
displaying DMP node for a path 38
displaying DMP node for an enclosure 39
displaying DMP nodes 39
displaying information about array ports 45
displaying information about controllers 43
displaying information about enclosures 45
displaying information about paths 41
displaying paths for a controller 42
displaying paths for an array port 42
displaying recoveryoption values 66
displaying status of DMP path restoration
thread 69
dynamic multi-pathing 13
enabling array ports 62
enabling controllers 62
enabling paths 62
enclosure-based naming 16
gathering I/O statistics 47
load balancing 18
logging levels 155
path aging 155
path failover mechanism 17
path-switch tunable 157
restore policy 66
173
Index
DMP (continued)
scheduling I/O on secondary paths 34, 58
setting the DMP restore polling interval 67
stopping the DMP restore daemon 68
tuning with templates 144
DMP bundle
downloading from GUI 113
DMP nodes
displaying consolidated information 39
setting names 80
DMP support
JBOD devices 34
dmp_daemon_count tunable 155
dmp_delayq_interval tunable 155
dmp_health_time tunable 155
dmp_log_level tunable 155
dmp_low_impact_probe 156
dmp_monitor_ownership tunable 156
dmp_path_age tunable 157
dmp_pathswitch_blks_shift tunable 157
dmp_probe_idle_lun tunable 157
dmp_probe_threshold tunable 157
dmp_restore_cycles tunable 157
dmp_restore_interval tunable 158
dmp_restore_state tunable 158
dmp_scsi_timeout tunable 158
dmp_sfg_threshold tunable 159
dmp_stat_interval tunable 159
Dynamic Multi-Pathing
solution 109
E
Enable 126
Enable Port 138
enclosure-based naming 21, 23, 78
DMP 16
enclosures 21
displaying information about 45
path redundancy 55–56
setting attributes of paths 28, 54, 56
entity attributes
viewing 90
erroneous I/Os
displaying statistics 51
esxcfg-rescan command 73
eui based naming scheme 21
explicit failover mode 14
F
failover mode 14
Force
disabling the last path 124
G
Getting Started
tab 112
H
HBA
disabling by force 124
HBA information
displaying 44
home
vCenter 109
VxDMP for VMware 109, 112
Host
tab 128
host
applying VxDMP license 116
common to LUNs 139
setting attributes 122
view 117
viewing license details 116
Host names
assigning customized names 131
setting customized names 131
Host tab
datacenter view 128
host view
accessing 121
Auto Refresh 127
breadcrumbs trail 121
customizing 122, 125
Disable link 126
disabling
last path 124
disabling or enabling
paths 123
Enable link 126
filtering the LUN view 125
Reset link 126
setting attributes of
host 122
path 122
174
Index
I
I/O
gathering statistics for
disabling or enabling 126
resetting from datacenter view 138
resetting from host view 126
setting automatic refresh time 127
gathering statistics for DMP 47
scheduling on secondary paths 34, 58
throttling 17
I/O policy
displaying 56
example 59
specifying 30, 57
I/O Statistics
Array Ports 136
disabling the collection 101
Storage Array 136
Storage Processor 136
I/O statistics
managing 102
resetting the collection 102
viewing 101
I/O Statistics pane
about 101
I/O throttling 33, 64
I/O throttling options
configuring 33
idle LUNs 157
implicit failover mode 14
J
JBOD
DMP support 34
L
License
adding 93
applying new
vSphere Web Client 93
viewing
vSphere Web Client 93
License Management
applying license 116
applying license in Web Client 93
tab 112
viewing host license details 116
viewing license compliance 115
listing
DMP nodes 39
supported disk arrays 77
load balancing 13
displaying policy for 56
specifying policy for 30, 57
Load Distribution
tab 132
logical units 14
LUN 14
related objects 108
Viewing I/O statistics for 137
LUN group failover 15
LUNs
idle 157
tab 132, 139
M
Manage Array Ports 138
managing array ports 138
minimum queue load balancing policy 31
minimum redundancy levels
displaying for a device 55
specifying for a device 56
monitoring VxDMP 102
mrl
keyword 55
multi-pathing
displaying information about 41
N
naa based naming scheme 21
naming
DMP nodes 80
naming scheme
changing for disks 78
displaying for disks 79
naming schemes
for disks 20
non-autotrespass mode 14
nopreferred path attribute 29
P
pane
host I/O statistics 117
VxDMP Configuration 117
partition size
displaying the value of 56
175
Index
partition size (continued)
specifying 31
path aging 155
path failover in DMP 17
paths
disabling by force 124
disabling for DMP 61, 123
enabling for DMP 62, 123
setting attributes of 28, 54, 56, 122
performance
load balancing in DMP 18
persistence
device naming option 79
persistent device name database 81
persistent device naming 81
polling interval for DMP restore 67
preferred priority path attribute 29, 122
primary path 14
priority load balancing 31
Q
queued I/Os
displaying statistics 51
R
recovery option values
configuring 66
redundancy levels
displaying for a device 55
specifying for a device 56
redundant-loop access 22
Renaming
LUN 100
SSD 100
storage 100
Reset 126
Reset I/O Statistics 138
restore policy
check_all 67
check_alternate 67
check_disabled 67
check_periodic 67
retry option values
configuring 66
round-robin
load balancing 32
S
scanning disks 73
secondary path 14
Set Active
host view 122
Set Non-Preferred
host view 122
Set Preferred
host view 122
Set Standby
host view 122
setting
path redundancy levels 56
Settings
host view 122
Show Hosts Connected 139
single active path policy 32
SmartDisk
adding 105
removing 105
resizing 105
SmartPool
about 24
accessing 104
adding and removing 105
caching storage 24
managing through CLI 70
storage capacity 105
vewing the utilization 105
specifying
redundancy levels 56
standby path attribute 29, 122
statistics gathering 17
Storage Array
gathering I/O statistics 136
Storage array
related objects
hosts and LUNs 107
storage array
setting attributes 122
Storage Processor
gathering I/O statistics 136
storage processor 14
Storage tab
datacenter view 132
T
tab
datacenter Host 128
176
Index
tab (continued)
datacenter Storage 132
Load Distribution 132
LUNs 132
Getting Started 112
License Management 112
Load Distribution 136
VxDMP 109
throttling 17
tunables
dmp_daemon_count 155
dmp_delayq_interval 155
dmp_health_time 155
dmp_log_level 155
dmp_low_impact_probe 156
dmp_monitor_ownership 156
dmp_path_age 157
dmp_pathswitch_blks_shift 157
dmp_probe_idle_lun 157
dmp_probe_threshold 157
dmp_restore_cycles 157
dmp_restore_interval 158
dmp_restore_state 158
dmp_scsi_timeout 158
dmp_sfg_threshold 159
dmp_stat_interval 159
Tuning DMP
using templates 144
tuning template
applying 130
saving 130
U
use_all_paths attribute 34, 58
use_avid
vxddladm option 79
user-specified device names 80
V
Veritas Storage
viewing storage array 107
viewng LUNs 108
Veritas Storage view
about 107
overview 107
VMware vSphere Web Client Connectivity Map view
accessing 89
VMware vSphere Web Client detailed view
About the detailed view 98
vSphere Web Client 84
vxddladm
changing naming scheme 79
displaying the disk-naming scheme 79
listing supported disk arrays 77
vxdiskadm
changing the disk-naming scheme 78
VxDMP
tab 109
viewing hosts using license 115
VxDMP bundle
about 11
VxDMP Configuration
diagramatic representation 112
pane 117
VxDMP Console
about 11
VxDMP detailed view 95
renaming a storage 100
VxDMP for VMware
about home view 112
accessing home view 112
home view 109
VxDMP Inventory List 85
VxDMP tab
datacenter Host tab 128
datacenter Storage tab 132
host view 117
VxDMP Web Client
Connectivity Map view 85
vxdmpadm
configuring I/O throttling 33, 64
configuring response to I/O errors 32, 63, 66
disabling controllers in DMP 28
disabling I/O in DMP 61
displaying APM information 70
displaying DMP database information 28
displaying DMP node for a path 38
displaying DMP node for an enclosure 39
displaying I/O error recovery settings 66
displaying I/O policy 56
displaying I/O throttling settings 66
displaying information about controllers 43
displaying information about enclosures 45
displaying multi-pathing information 41
displaying partition size 56
displaying paths controlled by DMP node 42
177
Index
vxdmpadm (continued)
displaying status of DMP restoration thread 69
enabling I/O in DMP 62
gathering I/O statistics 47
listing information about array ports 45
setting I/O policy 31, 57
setting path attributes 54
setting restore polling interval 67
specifying DMP path restoration policy 66
stopping DMP restore daemon 68
vxdmpadm list
displaying DMP nodes 39
W
Web Client Connectivity Map view
enabling or disabling 91
renaming storage array and LUN 92
setting storage attributes 92
Web Client detail view
enabling or disabling array ports 98
Web Client detailed view
about 95
worldwide name identifiers 20
WWN identifiers 20
178
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