Managing ProLiant Servers with Linux

Managing ProLiant Servers with Linux
HP Insight Management Agents 9.0
Managing ProLiant Servers with Linux
HOWTO
Abstract
This HOWTO provides instructions to help system administrators install, upgrade, and remove Version 8.4.0 (or later) of the
following HP Linux management software:
•
HP System Health Application and Command Line Utilities (hp-health)
•
Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant Systems (hp-snmp-agents)
•
HP OpenIPMI Device Driver (hp-OpenIPMI)
•
HP ProLiant Channel Interface Device Driver for iLO/iLO 2/iLO 3/iLO 4(hp-ilo)
•
The HP System Management Homepage (hpsmh)
•
HP System Management Homepage Templates for Linux (hp-smh-templates)
This HOWTO also provides reference links to installation instructions for HP Systems Insight Manager and HP ProLiant Essentials
Rapid Deployment Pack.
The HP ProLiant Support Pack (PSP) is a set of bundled software components for maintaining and deploying software on HP
ProLiant servers and is available for download from http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/psp/
index.html. For installing the complete set of Linux software drivers and management agents, see the appropriate PSP for Linux.
HP Part Number: 501165-005
Published: February 2012
Edition: 1.0
© Copyright 2011, 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express
warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall
not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
Confidential computer software. Valid license from HP required for possession, use or copying. Consistent with FAR 12.211 and 12.212, Commercial
Computer Software, Computer Software Documentation, and Technical Data for Commercial Items are licensed to the U.S. Government under
vendor’s standard commercial license.
Microsoft®, Windows®, Windows NT®, and Windows Server® are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.
Java is a U.S. trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Contents
1 Software architecture..................................................................................5
System Health application and Command Line utilities(hp-health) ...................................................5
Health monitor....................................................................................................................7
System temperature monitoring..........................................................................................7
System fan monitoring......................................................................................................8
Monitoring the system fault tolerant power supply................................................................8
ECC memory monitoring and advanced memory protection..................................................8
Automatic server recovery................................................................................................9
Console messages...............................................................................................................9
HP Integrated Management Logging Utility (hplog)...................................................................9
HP Unique Identifier Utility (hpuid).......................................................................................10
HP management CLI (hpasmcli)...........................................................................................10
hp ProLiant boot configuration utility (hpbootcfg)....................................................................10
Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant (hp-snmp-agents).............................................11
Server agent.....................................................................................................................11
Storage agent...................................................................................................................12
NIC agent (cmanic)...........................................................................................................13
Performance agent (cmaperfd).............................................................................................14
Data Collection agent.........................................................................................................14
Lights-Out agent.................................................................................................................14
Using the HP ProLiant BL Rack Upgrade utility........................................................................14
HP OpenIPMI Driver (hp-OpenIPMI)..........................................................................................15
HP ProLiant Channel Interface Device Driver for iLO/iLO 2/iLO 3/iLO 4(hp-ilo)..............................15
HP System Management Homepage (hpsmh).............................................................................16
HP System Management Homepage templates (hp-smh-templates).................................................16
Systems Insight Manager.........................................................................................................16
2 Manual installation...................................................................................17
Prerequisite: Installing package dependencies............................................................................17
Installing the HP OpenIPMI driver (hp-OpenIPMI)....................................................................17
Installing the HP System Health application and Command Line utilities (hp-health).....................17
Installing the HP ProLiant Channel Interface device driver for iLO/iLO 2/iLO 3/iLO 4(hp-ilo)........18
Installing the Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant Systems..................................18
Uninstalling drivers and agents.................................................................................................18
Transitioning from hpasm, hprsm, and cmanic packages..............................................................19
Updating drivers and agents....................................................................................................19
3 Customization..........................................................................................21
Configuration files..................................................................................................................21
Starting and stopping agents and services.................................................................................22
Parameters.............................................................................................................................22
Support and other resources.........................................................................24
Information to collect before contacting HP.................................................................................24
How to contact HP..................................................................................................................24
Registering for software technical support and update service.......................................................24
How to use your software technical support and update service...............................................24
Warranty information.........................................................................................................24
HP authorized resellers............................................................................................................25
Documentation feedback.........................................................................................................25
New and changed information in this edition.............................................................................25
Related information.................................................................................................................25
Typographic conventions.........................................................................................................25
Contents
3
A Error messages........................................................................................27
B Troubleshooting........................................................................................31
C hp-snmp-agents command lines and arguments............................................36
4
Contents
1 Software architecture
This section describes the features and architecture of the following HP Linux management software:
•
HP System Health Application and Command Line Utilities (hp-health)
•
Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant Systems (hp-snmp-agents)
•
HP System Management Homepage (hpsmh)
•
Descriptions for HP management consoles for Linux
System Health application and Command Line utilities(hp-health)
The System Health Application and Command Line Utilities (hp-health) package collects and
monitors important operational data on ProLiant servers. Contained within the (hp-health)
package are the following components:
•
Health Monitor
•
HP Integrated Management Logging (IML) utility (hplog)
•
HP Unique Identifier utility(hpuid)
•
HP ProLiant Boot Configuration Utility (hpbootcfg)
•
HP Management Command Line Interface (hpasmcli)
ProLiant servers are equipped with hardware sensors and firmware to monitor certain abnormal
conditions, such as temperature readings, fan failures, error correction coding (ECC) memory
errors, and so on. The Health Monitor monitors these conditions and reports them to the administrator
by printing messages on the console (preserved in /var/log/messages). The Health Monitor
also logs the conditions to the ProLiant Integrated Management Log (IML). The IML is a dedicated,
Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM) that can be viewed and maintained by the hplog application or iLO
web interface.
ProLiant servers contain an Integrated Lights-Out (iLO) controller that, with optional software, allows
secure remote management of the server including IML management and graphical remote console.
The System Health Application and Command Line Utilities (hp-health) package works with
the HP ProLiant Channel Interface Device Driver for iLO (iLO/iLO 2/iLO 3/iLO 4) package
to provide secure remote management of the server including IML management and graphical
remote console. The hp-health includes four applications (listed in Table 1 (page 5)). One of these
modules is automatically selected at startup depending on the HP ProLiant Advanced System
Management hardware available and the base packages installed.
NOTE: To determine the type of HP ProLiant Advanced System Management hardware installed,
check the ProLiant server specifications located on http://www.hp.com.
Table 1 hp-health applications
Application
Details
hpasmd
Location
/opt/hp/hp-health/bin/hpasmd
Description
The hpasmd application automatically loads on ProLiant servers that have either the ASM or the legacy
iLO hardware
hpasmxld*
Location
/opt/hp/hp-health/bin/hpasmxld
Description
The hpasmxld application automatically loads on ProLiant servers that have the HP Integrated Lights-Out
2 (iLO 2) management controller and the necessary IPMI driver support. The iLO 2 management
System Health application and Command Line utilities(hp-health)
5
Table 1 hp-health applications (continued)
Application
Details
controller contains an Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) Version 2.0 Base Management
Controller (BMC) that replaces the operating system-based software management functionality provided
by the legacy hpasmd application. The hpasmxld application is not supported on ProLiant servers
that have Integrated Lights-Out 3 (iLO 3) management controller. The corresponding hp-OpenIPMI
package for ProLiant servers is available for download for select distributions at: http://
h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Product.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&taskid=135&
prodTypeId=15351&prodCatId=241435
hpasmlited*
Location
/opt/hp/hp-health/bin/hpasmlited
Description
The hpasmlited application automatically loads on HP ProLiant servers with the iLO 2 management
controller and older versions of the in-distro OpenIPMI drivers. The hpasmlited application has the
ability to log raw IPMI messages (as does the hp-OpenIPMI package) to the /var/log/messages
file to assist with debugging IPMI BMC integration issues.
The hpasmlited package also loads on HP ProLiant servers that have an Integrated Lights-Out 3
(iLO 3)/Integrated Lights-Out 4 (iLO 4) management controller and hpilo.ko driver, if the hpilo.ko
driver is available. If the hpilo.ko driver is not available, the distribution is provided on the ipmi drivers
that do not support the message channels.
hpasmpld
Location
/opt/hp/hp-health/bin/hpasmpld
Description
The hpasmpld application automatically loads on supported 100 series HP ProLiant servers (=G6).
The 100 series G7/Gen8 servers are pre-loaded with Integrated Lights-Out 3 (iLO 3)/ Integrated
Lights-Out 4 (iLO 4). So, the hpasmpld application automatically loads on HP ProLiant servers that
have an Integrated Lights-Out 3 (iLO 3)/ Integrated Lights-Out 3 (iLO 4) management controller if the
hpilo driver is installed or the distribution provides it. If there is no hpilo driver, the hp-OpenIPMI
package is NOT installed and the distribution provided IPMI drivers DO NOT have the OEM message
channel support.
* The hpasmxld application is more efficient than the hpasmlited application as a result of leveraging the high
performance hp-OpenIPMI package, which includes support for IPMI 2.0 OEM message channels and messages.
Table 2: “Controller, health-daemon, and kernel driver combinations” details the management
controller, health-daemon and kernel driver combinations.
Table 2 Controller, health-daemon, and kernel driver combinations
6
Lights-Out
Controller
Kernel
Version
(uname -r)
Red Hat
Enterprise
Linux
Hp-OpenIPMI hpilo module
installed?
available?
daemon
dev file
kernel driver
iLO
NA
NA
NA
NA
hpasmd
NA
None
iLO+embedded <2.6.30
health/iLO 2
No
No
NA
hpasmlited /dev/ipmi0 distro IPMI
iLO+embedded <2.6.30
health/iLO 2
No
Yes
NA
hpasmxld /dev/ipmi1 hp-OpenIPMI
iLO+embedded >=2.6.30
health/iLO 2
NA
NA
NA
hpasmxld /dev/ipmi1 distro IPMI
iLO+embedded NA
health/iLO 2
< Update 5.5 No
NA
hpasmlited /dev/ipmi0 distro IPMI
iLO+embedded NA
health/iLO 2
< Update 5.5 Yes
NA
hpasmxld /dev/ipmi1 hp-OpenIPMI
iLO+embedded NA
health/iLO 2
>= Update
5.5
NA
NA
hpasmxld /dev/ipmi1 distro IPMI
iLO 3
NA
NA
No
hpasmlited /dev/ipmi0 distro IPMI
Software architecture
NA
Table 2 Controller, health-daemon, and kernel driver combinations (continued)
Lights-Out
Controller
Kernel
Version
(uname -r)
Red Hat
Enterprise
Linux
Hp-OpenIPMI hpilo module
installed?
available?
daemon
iLO 3
NA
NA
NA
Yes
hpasmlited /dev/hpilo hpilo
iLO 4
NA
NA
NA
No
hpasmlited /dev/ipmi0 distro IPMI
iLO 4
NA
NA
NA
Yes
hpasmlited /dev/hpilo hpilo
dev file
kernel driver
Another source of information includes the following manpages provided with the hp-health
package:
•
hp-health
•
hpasmcli
•
hpuid
•
hplog
•
hpbootcfg
•
hp_mgmt_install
These manpages include detailed information on error messages and possible action that the
administrator can take.
Additional information about the Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant Systems is
available at the following locations:
•
http://www.hp.com/servers/manage
•
http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/agents.html
Health monitor
The Health Monitor augments the hardware features built into ProLiant servers. Basic features, such
as temperature, fan, power supply, and memory monitoring are standard on almost all ProLiant
servers. On some ProLiant servers, the Health Monitor supports features such as variable speed
fans, server lights that give a visual indication of a possible error condition, and Advanced Memory
Protection (AMP). The AMP feature allows the capability of reserving memory for failover if a Single
Bit Correctable Error (SBCE) threshold is exceeded.
NOTE: On some ProLiant servers, the entire memory subsystem can be mirrored to survive an
uncorrectable memory error. Without AMP, uncorrectable memory errors are always fatal and
cause a kernel panic. AMP allows a server to continue execution until the faulty memory can be
replaced. Mirrored AMP solutions usually allow removing the memory board with the faulty memory
dual in-line memory module (DIMM) and replacing the faulty DIMM while the server continues
execution. When the repaired AMP memory board is inserted back into the server, the AMP mirror
automatically restores. This allows mission critical 24 X 7 applications to continue execution without
interruption or downtime.
The following sections explain the features provided by the Health Monitor for the overall health
of the ProLiant server.
System temperature monitoring
A ProLiant server can contain several temperature sensors. On ProLiant servers with intelligent
temperature sensors, check the current and threshold temperatures by running hplog -t.
System Health application and Command Line utilities(hp-health)
7
If the normal operating range is exceeded for any of these sensors, the Health Monitor does the
following:
•
Displays a message on the console stating the problem
•
Makes an entry in the system health log and the operating system log
Additionally, on some servers, the fans gradually increase to full speed in an attempt to cool the
server as the external environment temperature increases. If the server exceeds the normal operating
range and does not cool down within 60 seconds, the operating system is, in most cases, shut
down to close the file systems.
TIP: On servers that do not have variable speed fans, the server is shut down unless the
ROM-Based Setup Utility (RBSU) Thermal Shutdown feature is disabled. This feature is enabled by
default. Use RBSU to control the shutdown option.
System fan monitoring
A ProLiant server can contain fan sensors. On ProLiant servers with intelligent fan sensors, check
the status of the fans by running hplog -f.
If a cooling fan fails and there is no secondary redundant fan, the Health Monitor does the following:
•
Displays a message on the console stating the problem
•
Makes an entry in the system health log and the operating system log
•
Shuts down the system (optionally) to avoid hardware damage. Use RBSU to control the
shutdown option.
If a secondary or redundant fan is present when a fan fails, the Health Monitor does the following:
•
Activates the redundant fan if not already running
•
Displays a message on the console stating the problem
•
Makes an entry in the system health log and the operating system log
Monitoring the system fault tolerant power supply
If the server contains a redundant power supply, the power load is shared equally between the
power supplies. Check the status of the power supplies by running hplog -p. If a primary power
supply fails, the server automatically switches over to a backup power supply. The Health Monitor
does the following:
•
Monitors the system for power failure and for physical presence of power supplies
•
Reports when the power supplies experience a change in shared power load
•
Displays a message on the console stating the problem
•
Makes an entry in the system health log and the operating system log
ECC memory monitoring and advanced memory protection
If a correctable ECC memory error occurs, the Health Monitor logs the error in the health log,
including the memory address causing the error. If too many errors occur at the same memory
location, the driver disables the ECC error interrupts to prevent flooding the console with warnings
(the hardware automatically corrects the ECC error).
On servers with AMP, the driver attempts to log an error if a memory board has been inserted,
removed, or incorrectly configured, and optionally if an Online Spare Switchover or Mirrored
Memory engaged event occurs.
8
Software architecture
The Health Monitor does the following:
•
Displays a message on the console stating the problem
•
Makes an entry in the system health log
This server feature is configured using RBSU. On ProLiant servers that do not support AMP mirroring,
an uncorrectable (double bit) memory error causes the operating system to halt abruptly. Logging
of the error might not be possible if the error occurs in memory used by the Health Monitor.
Automatic server recovery
Automatic Server Recovery (ASR) is configured using RBSU available during the initial boot of the
server by pressing the F9 key when prompted. This feature is implemented using a "heartbeat"
timer that continually counts down. The Health Monitor frequently reloads the counter to prevent
it from counting down to zero. If the ASR counts down to zero, it is assumed that the operating
system has locked up and the system automatically attempts to reboot. Events that can contribute
to the operating system locking up include:
•
A peripheral device, such as a Peripheral Component Interconnect Specification (PCI) adapter,
generates numerous spurious interrupts when it fails.
•
A high priority software application consumes all the available central processing unit (CPU)
cycles and does not allow the operating system scheduler to run the ASR timer reset process.
•
A software or kernel application consumes all available memory, including the virtual memory
space (for example, swap). This can cause the operating system scheduler to cease functioning.
•
A critical operating system component, such as a file system, fails and causes the operating
system scheduler to cease functioning.
•
Any event other than an ASR timeout causes a Non-Maskable Interrupt (NMI) to be generated.
The ASR feature is a hardware-based timer.
If a true hardware failure occurs, the Health Monitor might not be called, but the server resets as
if the power switch was pressed. The ProLiant ROM code might log an event to the IML when
the server reboots.
The Health Monitor is notified of an ASR timeout through an NMI. If possible, the driver attempts
to perform the following actions:
•
Displays a message on the console stating the problem
•
Makes an entry in the IML
•
Attempts to gracefully shut down the operating system to close the file systems
There is no guarantee that the operating system will gracefully shutdown. This shutdown depends
on the type of error condition (software or hardware) and its severity. The Health Monitor logs a
series of messages when an ASR event occurs. The presence or absence of these messages can
provide some insight into the reason for the ASR event. The order of the messages is important,
since the ASR event is always a symptom of another error condition.
Console messages
When events occur outside normal operations, the Health Monitor might display a console message
or log a message to the IML. Operational messages, such as fan failures or temperature violations,
are logged to the standard /var/log/messages file. Messages specific to device drivers (such
as NMI type messages) can be viewed using dmesg, if the system is not completely locked up.
The hp-health manpage documents know how to interpret the messages produced by the Health
Monitor.
HP Integrated Management Logging Utility (hplog)
The HP ProLiant Integrated Management Logging utility (hplog) allows system administrators to
view IML pages. Commands are listed in Table 3: “hplog options”.
System Health application and Command Line utilities(hp-health)
9
Table 3 hplog options
Command
Description
hplog –t
Shows the current temperature and the threshold levels of all temperature sensors
hplog –f
Shows the status of all fans
hplog –p
Shows the status of all power supplies
hplog –v
Shows the IML entries on the standard output
For more information about these components, see the online documentation by entering:
$ man hplog
HP Unique Identifier Utility (hpuid)
The HP Unique Identifier Utility (hpuid) allows local manipulation of the ProLiant Unique Identifier
(UID) blue light on selected ProLiant servers. The hpuid utility allows the light to be turned on and
off and displays the current status of the light Table 4: “hpuid options”.
Table 4 hpuid options
Command
Description
hpuid –d
Disables the UID (blue) light
hpuid –e
Enables the UID (blue) light
hpuid –s
Shows the status of the UID (blue) light
HP management CLI (hpasmcli)
hpasmcli is a scriptable command line interface for interacting with the hpasmd or hpasmxld
management daemons. It is used to view/set/modify BIOS settings such as hyperthreading, boot
control, and UID LEDs. It can be used to display hardware status, such as fans, power supplies,
etc. It can also show, repair, and clear the Integrated Management Log (IML).
The CLI supports TAB completion of command names and has a history buffer that can be accessed
using the up/down arrows. See hpasmcli(4) manpage for more info.
Table 5 hpasmcli options
Command
Description
CLEAR [IML]
Clears the specified feature
DISABLE [FEATURE]
Disables the specified feature
ENABLE [FEATURE]
Enables the specified feature
EXIT
Quit the program
NOTE [IML]
Add a maintenance note to the IML
SET [FEATURE]
Set or configure the feature as specified
SHOW [FEATURE]
Show the current status or configuration of the selected feature
hp ProLiant boot configuration utility (hpbootcfg)
The hpbootcfg utility allows an application to set which device to boot from on the next boot of
the system. This can be a permanent change or a "one time" boot change. Typically this feature
is used to boot to PXE for a remote installation. A typical usage would be "/sbin/hpbootcfg
-P -b" followed by a "/sbin/shutdown -r". This command sequence would reboot the server
to PXE boot mode and would not wait on any "F1" prompt messages.
10
Software architecture
Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant (hp-snmp-agents)
The ProLiant Insight Management Agents provide proactive notification of server events through
the HP Systems Insight Manager console. Alternatively, the ProLiant Insight Management Agents
allow the status of the server to be monitored or checked using a standard Web browser. Insight
Management Agents include the following:
•
Server Agents (consist of Server Peer Agent, Host OS Agent, Threshold Agent, Standard
Equipment Agent, and System Health Agent)
•
Storage Agent (consists of IDA, IDE, SCSI, SAS, and FCA Agents, and Event Agent)
•
Network Agent
Server agent
A Server Agent consists of the sub-agent components listed in Table 6 (page 11).
Table 6 Sub-agents of the Server Agent
Sub-agent
Description
Server Peer Agent
The Peer Agent extends the SNMP "enterprise" Management Information Base (MIB) to include
HP specific data, specifically enterprise ID 232. The Peer agent supports SNMP get, set, and
trap operations on MIB branches under "enterprises.232." At SNMP agent startup, cmaX reads
MIB information files referenced in the master file
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/mibs/cmaobjects.conf. These referenced MIB information
files are /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/mibs/cmasvrobjects.conf and
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/mibs/cmafdtnobjects.conf.
During installation, the Peer Agents are configured to start automatically when the SNMP agent
is running and should be started after the SNMP agent snmpd is started and should be killed
after snmpd is killed.
Host OS Agent
The Host OS Agent gathers data for the Host OS MIB, including:
• Server/host name and operating system version number
• Linux file system information for each mounted filesystem
• Software version information
The Host OS Agent executable is /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/bin/cmahostd
Threshold Agent
The Threshold Agent implements the Threshold MIB. Users can set thresholds on counter- or
gauge-type MIB variables. The Threshold Agent periodically samples each selected MIB variable
at a rate defined by the user.
MIB data values are compared to user-configured thresholds. If a configured threshold is
exceeded, an alarm trap is sent to the configured SNMP trap destination and to Linux email
(configurable through trapemail entries in/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/cma.conf file).
User-configured alarm thresholds are permanently saved in the data registry until deleted by
the user.
The Threshold Agent executable is /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/bin/cmathreshd.
Standard Equipment
The Standard Equipment Agent gathers data for the Standard Equipment MIB. The data includes:
Agent (cmastdeqd) • PCI slot information
• Processor and coprocessor information
• Standard peripheral information (serial ports, diskette drives, and so on)
The Standard Equipment Agent executable is
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/bin/cmastdeqd.
System Health Agent
(cmahealthd)
The System Health Agent gathers data for the Health MIB. The data collected includes critical
(NMI) errors, correctable memory (ECC) errors, system hang/panic detection, temperature
conditions, and fan failures. The System Health Agent then retrieves these errors from the Health
Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant (hp-snmp-agents)
11
Table 6 Sub-agents of the Server Agent (continued)
Sub-agent
Description
Monitor. The System Health Agent executable is
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/bin/cmahealthd.
System Rack Agent
(cmarackd)
System Rack agent gathers data for the Rack MIB for P-Class and also monitors the rack health
through system management. The data collected includes:
• Onboard Administrator
• Onboard Administrator IP address
• Enclosure Serial Number, Enclosure Product ID, Enclosure firmware revision
The System Rack Agent executable is /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/bin/cmarackd.
For more information on threshold configurations, see the HP Systems Insight Manager Help file.
This guide can be found on the HP website at http://www.hp.com/go/hpsim.
Storage agent
The Storage agent consists of IDA, IDE, SCSI, SAS and FCA Sub-agents, and Event Agent
components. The Storage agent collects information from the Fibre Channel, drive array, SCSI,
SAS, and IDE subsystems at periodic intervals, makes the collected data available to the SNMP
agent, and provides SNMP alerts.
Each Storage Data Collection Agent gathers and saves Storage MIB data to files in the Storage
Data Registry. The Data Collection Agents periodically update MIB data at configurable poll
intervals.
The agent responsible for managing the selected MIB data item performs SNMP set commands.
Data Collection Agents generate SNMP trap commands.
The Storage data registry (/var/spool/compaq/hpasm/registry) is composed of standard
Linux directories and associated files. Each file in the data registry is a logical object containing
“n” related data items.
The -p poll_time command line argument, which can be used with the Storage Agents, specifies
the number of seconds to wait between data collection intervals. The minimum allowed value is 1
second and the default value is 15 seconds.
Increasing the agent poll_time setting improves system performance but decreases the data collection
rate. Conversely, decreasing the agent poll_time setting increases the data collection rate but may
decrease system performance.
A Storage Agent consists of the sub-agent components listed in Table 7: “Sub-agents of the Storage
Agent”.
Table 7 Sub-agents of the Storage Agent
Sub-agent
Description
IDA Agent (cmaided)
The IDA Agent gathers data for the IDA MIB. The data includes:
• IDA controller information
• IDA accelerator information
• IDA logical drive information
• IDA physical drive information
The IDA Agent is located in /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/bin/cmaided.
The suggested poll_time is 15 seconds (default). The minimum recommended poll_time
is 5 seconds.
IDE Agent (cmaided)
The IDE Agent gathers data for the IDE MIB. The data includes:
• IDE/SATA host controller information
• ATA/SATA disk information
12
Software architecture
Table 7 Sub-agents of the Storage Agent (continued)
Sub-agent
Description
• ATAPI device information
• SATA devices
The IDE Agent is located in /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/bin/cmaided.
The suggested poll_time is 15 seconds (default). The minimum recommended poll_time
is 5 seconds.
FCA Agent (cmafcad)
The FCA Agent gathers data for the FCA MIB. The data includes:
• FCA host controller information
• FCA array controller information
• FCA array accelerator information
• FCA logical drive information
• FCA physical drive information
• FCA storage system chassis information
• FCA storage system power supply information
• FCA storage system fan information
• FCA storage system temperature information
• FCA storage system backplane information
The FCA Agent is located in /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/bin/cmafcad.
The suggested poll_time is 15 seconds (default). The minimum recommended poll_time
is 5 seconds.
SCSI Agent (cmascsid)
The SCSI Agent gathers data for the SCSI MIB. The data includes:
• SCSI host controller information
• SCSI disk drive information
• SCSI tape drive information
The SCSI Agent is located in /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/bin/cmascsid.
The suggested poll_time is 15 seconds. The minimum recommended poll_time is 5
seconds.
SAS Agent (cmasasd)
The SAS Agent gathers data for the SAS MIB. The data includes:
• SAS host controller information
• SAS disk drive information
• SAS tape drive information
The SAS Agent is located in /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/bin/cmasasd.
The suggested poll_time is 15 seconds. The minimum recommended poll_time is 5
seconds.
Event Daemon (cmaeventd) The Event Daemon gathers storage hardware events from the firmware and passes them
on to other agents upon request. The Event Daemon is located in
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/bin/cmaeventd.
NIC agent (cmanic)
The NIC Agent collects information from network interface controllers at periodic intervals, makes
the collected data available to the SNMP agent, and provides SNMP alerts. The NIC Agent gathers
data for the NIC MIB from supported NIC device drivers. The data includes:
•
Physical mapping and configuration data for each network interface
•
Network statistics for Ethernet interfaces. Information is provided for HP controllers. Limited
information may be provided for third-party NICs
Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant (hp-snmp-agents)
13
Performance agent (cmaperfd)
The Performance Agent Daemon (cmaperfd) collects CPU, Memory, Disk and Network Interface
Controller performance data at periodic intervals and makes the collected data available to the
HPSIM.
Data Collection agent
Data Registries are composed of standard Linux directories and associated files. Each file in the
data registry is a logical object containing "n" related data items.
The MIB items supported by the Server Data Collection Agents are listed in the
/opt/hp/hp-snmp¬agents/mibs/cmafdtnobjects.conf and
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/mibs/cmasvrobjects.conf files.
During installation, each agent is configured to start automatically after the SNMP Agent (snmpd)
is started and to stop after snmpd is stopped.
Lights-Out agent
A Lights Out Agent consists of the sub-agent components listed in Table 8 (page 14).
Table 8 Subagents of the Lights-Out Agent
Subagent
Description
Remote Insight/Integrated
Lights-Out Agent
(cmasm2d)
The Remote Insight/Integrated Lights-Out Agent (cmasm2d) gathers data for the Remote
Insight/integrated Lights-Out MIB. The data includes:
• Configuration and statistical information for the Remote Insight Board or Integrated
Lights-Out (RIB/RILOE/iLO)
• Events logged to the RIB or iLO
• Configuration and statistical information for the Remote Insight/Integrated Lights-Out
NIC
Rack Agent (cmarackd)
The Rack Agent (cmarackd) monitors the rack health through the systems management
microprocessor on the server, the microprocessor on the server enclosure and the
microprocessor on the power enclosure.
Rack Infrastructure
Information Service
Daemon (cpqriisd)
The Rack Infrastructure Information Service Daemon (cpqriisd) enables communication
through the Integrated Lights-Out Management component to the rack infrastructure. The
daemon opens and sustains communication with the Integrated Lights-Out management
controller.
The Communication link is vital to obtain a connection to the ProLiant BL p-Class enclosure
management controllers in the back of the rack. Without this connection, other applications
like the Rack Upgrade utility and the Rack Agent do not work.
The daemon also receives all types of alerts from the Rack Infrastructure and logs them
into the OS logging facility.
Using the HP ProLiant BL Rack Upgrade utility
The HP ProLiant BL Rack Upgrade Utility upgrades the firmware on the server blade and power
management modules in the rack. For iLO reflash and firmware upgrade information, see the
Integrated Lights-Out User Guide located at http://h18013.www1.hp.com/manage/
ilo-description.html.
Usage: cpqblru [-eql?] [-a address1,address2, . . .] [-c
chassis1,chassis2,. . .]
See Table 9: “ProLiant BL Rack Upgrade Utility parameters” for parameters and description.
14
Software architecture
Table 9 ProLiant BL Rack Upgrade Utility parameters
Parameter
Description
-a address1,address2,…
This optional parameter considers only enclosures with address1, address2, and so on.
The list of addresses must be composed of 16-bit quantities separated by commas. The
addresses can be obtained by running –q (see below). No white spaces are allowed
in between the commas and the addresses. If a no comma-separated list is given, all
possible addresses in the rack are considered.
-c chassis, chassis2,…
This optional parameter considers only enclosures with positions chassis1, chassis2,
and so on that is counted from the bottom. The list must be composed of small numbers
that are legal positions in the rack. No white spaces are allowed in between the commas
and the numbers. A list such as 1, 2, 5 signifies the bottom, second-to-bottom, and
fifth-to-bottom enclosures.
-e
This parameter disregards the local enclosure (for example, the enclosure containing
the server from which you flash) in the flashing. This parameter is given in conjunction
with –a or –c.
-l
This parameter disregards anything but the local enclosure (for example, the enclosure
containing the server from which you flash). This parameter should not be given with
–a or –c.
-q
This parameter queries the chassis positions, their serial numbers and their firmware
status, and returns their addresses.
The manpage for this utility may be viewed by entering man cpqblru at the command prompt.
Note the following while upgrading ProLiant BL p-Class enclosure management controllers:
•
During a flash upgrade, only the primary firmware image is reflashed. All controllers have a
backup image. The backup image is used for recovery purposes when a flash upgrade is
interrupted or otherwise fails. Restoring the backup firmware image is rarely needed and is
covered in the Integrated Lights-Out User Guide located at http://h18013.www1.hp.com/
manage/ilo-description.html
•
When updating enclosure management controllers in more than one enclosure, the new image
must be transmitted twice (first to the local enclosure and second to the remote enclosures
using broadcast mode). The update process can take 10 minutes or more. The update process
notifies the user if the update succeeded or failed.
•
The reflash operation consumes all bandwidth of the bus connecting the management
controllers. Consequently, other software components, such as the ProLiant Rack Agent might
not report up-to-date information during the flash upgrade.
HP OpenIPMI Driver (hp-OpenIPMI)
The hp-OpenIPMI device driver is a derivative work of the IPMI device driver that ships with the
standard Linux kernel. This driver has been enhanced to include bug fixes in addition to supporting
a PCI Base Management Controller (BMC), such as the one provided by the HP Integrated Lights-Out
2 (iLO 2) management controller. The file /opt/hp/hp-OpenIPMI/IPMI.txt is also a derivative
of the Documentation/IPMI.txt file included with the standard Linux kernel. This file has been
enhanced to document the additional parameters that can be passed to the ipmi_si.ko driver. The
hp-OpenIPMI device driver enhancements are expected to be incorporated into the OpenIPMI
device driver (http://openipmi.sourceforge.net/) and subsequently, the standard Linux kernel. This
driver can be used with other applications in addition to the HP Advanced System Management
XL (hpasmxl) application.
HP ProLiant Channel Interface Device Driver for iLO/iLO 2/iLO 3/iLO
4(hp-ilo)
The HP ProLiant Channel Interface Device Driver for iLO/iLO 2/iLO 3/iLO 4 (hp-ilo) enables
iLO data collection and integration with the ProLiant Management Agents and the rack infrastructure
HP OpenIPMI Driver (hp-OpenIPMI)
15
interface service. The driver enables communication routing of SNMP traffic from the ProLiant
Management Agents through the dedicated iLO management NIC.
For documentation on Integrated Lights-out which is supported by the iLO management interface
driver, visit http://h18013.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/remotemgmt.html. See
the QuickSpecs for each product to determine the servers and the operating systems supported.
HP System Management Homepage (hpsmh)
The HP System Management Homepage is a web-based interface that consolidates and simplifies
single system management for HP servers running Linux operating systems. The System Management
Homepage aggregates and displays data from Web Agents and other HP Web-enabled System
Management Software that includes HP Insight Diagnostics, the Array Configuration Utility, and
the HP Software Version Control Agents. The System Management Homepage enables IT
administrators to view in-depth hardware configuration and status data, performance metrics,
system thresholds, diagnostics, and software version control information using a single intuitive
interface. Additional information about Insight Management Agents is available at http://
h18013.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/agents/index.html.
Customers without automatic monitoring tools can view status information for servers that have the
HP System Management Homepage, previously called ProLiant Management Agents, installed
using a standard Web browser. The HP System Management Homepage responds to port 2381
(if the installed browser supports SSL encryption). For example, point the browser to https://
192.1.1.20:2381 or https://localhost:2381 (the "https://" portion of the address is required).
The HP System Management Homepage allows you to view subsystem and status information from
a Web browser, either locally or remotely.
TIP: To install System Management Homepage (hpsmh) you must be logged in as “root”. See
the hpsmh Installation Guide located at http://bizsupport1.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/
SupportManual/c01658588/c01658588.pdf for detailed information.
HP System Management Homepage templates (hp-smh-templates)
The information that hp-snmp-agents makes available through SNMP can be viewed in the HP
System Management Homepage. The HP System Management Homepage Templates
(hp-smh-templates) package provides the necessary files to link the SNMP data to the HP System
Management Homepage. hp-snmp-agents and hpsmh are prerequisites for installing the
hp-smh-templates.
Systems Insight Manager
HP System Insight Manager (HP SIM) combines the strengths of Insight Manager 7, HP Toptools,
and HP Servicecontrol Manager to deliver a single tool for managing HP ProLiant, Integrity, and
HP 9000 systems running Linux and other operating systems. The core HP SIM software uses WBEM
to deliver the essential capabilities required to manage all HP server platforms.
HP SIM can be extended to provide system management with plug-ins for HP clients, storage,
power, and printer products. Plug-in applications for workload management, capacity management,
virtual machine management, and partition management through the Integrity Essentials enable
you to pick the value-added software required to deliver complete lifecycle management for your
hardware assets.
For installation information, see the SIM Linux Installation and Configuration Guide available under
Install and configure section at HP Systems Insight Manager Information library http://
h18013.www1.hp.com/products/servers/management/hpsim/infolibrary.html.
16
Software architecture
2 Manual installation
This section describes how to install, upgrade, and remove HP System Health Application and
Command Line Utilities (hp-health) and Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant
Systems (hp-snmp-agents) packages. The latest versions of this software can be downloaded from
http://hp.com/go/proliantlinux
Prerequisite: Installing package dependencies
The software described in this HOWTO is distributed in standard package formats that provide
prerequisite information internally. If you attempt to install a component that does not have its
prerequisites fulfilled, the installation will abort and you will be given a list of missing prerequisites.
Any prerequisite packages not described in this HOWTO should have been provided as part of
your operating system installation media. Consult the documentation provided by your Linux
distribution for information on locating and installing the requested software, and then retry the
installation.
For full functionality, the hpsmh package requires the following components:
•
SNMP stack of the Linux distribution
•
Java Virtual Machine Version 1 .4.1 (or greater)
NOTE: If you have installed earlier versions of ProLiant manageability software such as the HP
System Health Application and Insight Management Agents (hpasm), the HP Lights-Out Driver and
Agents (hprsm), and the NIC Agents (cmanic), see “Transitioning from hpasm, hprsm and
cmanic packages” on Page 18.
Installing the HP OpenIPMI driver (hp-OpenIPMI)
The Linux kernel .config file must have IPMI support enabled for rebuilds. This is not the default
on some older Linux distributions. If a different Linux kernel, such as an errata kernel, is used in
place of the supported version of Linux, the standard Linux kernel build environment must be
installed. Error messages are displayed during the rebuild process indicating which Linux packages
are missing.
If a previous version of the hp-OpenIPMI package has been installed, it must be removed before
this package can be installed. To remove the previous version and any packages dependent on
it, enter the following:
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents stop
# /etc/init.d/hp-health stop
# rpm –e hp-OpenIPMI
To install hp-OpenIPMI RPM, enter the following:
# rpm –Uvh hp-OpenIPMI-<version>.rpm
Upon startup, the hp-health service will detect and use the hp-OpenIPMI drivers instead of the
distribution-provided drivers.
For more information about these components, see the online documentation by entering:
$ man hp-OpenIPMI
Installing the HP System Health application and Command Line utilities (hp-health)
To install hp-health, login as the root user, and then enter:
# rpm –Uvh hp-health-<version>.<distribution>.<platform>.rpm
For more information about this component, see the online documentation by entering:
Prerequisite: Installing package dependencies
17
$ man hp-health
NOTE: The version number for the RPM file varies depending on the supported systems and
functionality. The distribution refers to the Linux distribution supported by the RPM. The platform
refers to the processor architecture the RPM was built to support. The RPM file has a binary compiled
for the supported distribution with the default kernel.
After the installation process, the health service is configured to automatically start each time your
system boots. To start the service without rebooting, type:# /etc/init.d/hp-health start
Or
# service hp-health start
Installing the HP ProLiant Channel Interface device driver for iLO/iLO 2/iLO 3/iLO
4(hp-ilo)
To install hp-iLO RPM, enter the following:
# rpm –Uvh hp-ilo-<version>.rpm
This driver automatically loads upon system startup, or manually by entering:
# /etc/init.d/hp-ilo start
Or
# service hp-ilo start
For more information about this component, see the online documentation by entering:
$ man hp-ilo
Installing the Insight Management SNMP Agents for HP ProLiant Systems
To install hp-snmp-agents, login as the root user, and then enter:
# rpm –Uvh hp-snmp-agents-<ver>.<dist>.<platform>.rpm
1.
To configure and activate agents, execute the following command as root:
# /sbin/hpsnmpconfig
Provide basic Simple Network Protocol (SNMP) information, when prompted. The drivers and
agents are inserted immediately.
2.
To start hp-snmp-agents, execute the following command as root:
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents start
Or
# service hp-snmp-agents start
3.
3. To check if the agents are loaded properly, enter the following command:
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents status
Or
# service hp-snmp-agents start
For more information about these components, see the online documentation by entering:
$ man hp-snmp-agents
Uninstalling drivers and agents
Table 10: Uninstall drivers and agents commandslists the commands for uninstalling the entire
contents of the HP Linux management software.
18
Manual installation
Table 10 Uninstall drivers and agents commands
Command
Description
# rpm –e hp-snmp-agents
Removes the hp-snmp-agents package from your system
# rpm –e hp-ilo
Removes the hp-ilo package from your system
# rpm –e hp-health
Removes the hp-health package from your system
# rpm –e hp-OpenIPMI
Removes the hp-OpenIPMI package from your system
CAUTION: If a service is running when the corresponding package is removed, it is automatically
shut down during the removal process.
Transitioning from hpasm, hprsm, and cmanic packages
Prior to the 8.1.0 release, the functionality and files provided by hp-health and
hp-snmp-agents were distributed in alternate packages.
If you have a version of the HP System Health Application and Insight Management Agent (hpasm),
the HP Lights-Out Drivers and Agents (hprsm), or the NIC Agents (cmanic) installed, you must
uninstall these components before installing the new RPM files.
NOTE: If you have any local customizations to the /etc/hpasmrc file, save a copy of that file
before removing the hpasm component. After installing hp-snmp-agents, you can make the
same modifications to the /etc/hp-snmp-agents.conf file.
To determine if these components are loaded, enter the command listed in the To verify installation
column in Table 11: Loaded components. To remove the component, enter the command shown
in the To remove column.
Table 11 Loaded components
Component
To verify installation
To remove
HP System Health Application and
Insight Management Agents
$ rpm –q hpasm
# rpm –e hpasm
HP Lights-Out Drivers and Agents
$ rpm –q hprsm
# rpm –e hprsm
HP OpenIPMI Device Driver
$ rpm –q hp-OpenIPMI
# rpm –e hp-OpenIPMI
NIC Agents
$ rpm –q cmanic
# rpm –e cmanic
NOTE: Remove cmanic and hprsm components before removing hpasm because of driver
dependencies.
If concurrent access on the RPM database is attempted, the following messages can result:
•
rpmQuery: rpmdbOpen() failed
•
cannot get shared lock on database
•
rpmQuery: rpmdbOpen() failed
Updating drivers and agents
The following section provides information on updating the HP ProLiant Management Software for
Linux. Note that these instructions are only appropriate when upgrading from software with a
version greater than 8.1.0. For information on transitioning from pre-8.1.0 versions, see
“Transitioning from hpasm, hprsm, and cmanic packages” on “Transitioning from hpasm, hprsm,
and cmanic packages” (page 19).
Transitioning from hpasm, hprsm, and cmanic packages
19
RPM provides the -U option to upgrade a package. For example, to upgrade hp-health to a
newer version you could use the command:
# rpm –Uvh hp-health-<ver>.<dist>.<platform>.rpm
See the rpm manpage in your Linux distribution for more information:
$ man rpm
20
Manual installation
3 Customization
This section includes advanced topics on data center customization.
Configuration files
The ProLiant Management Agents Configuration file /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/cma.conf
is shared by all HP ProLiant Management Agents. Currently, exclude directives, taint directives,
trap interface, trap email notification configuration, and base socket number (used by cmaX) are
supported. The agents are capable of sending email notifications in addition to SNMP traps. The
trapemail entries in /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/cma.conf configure the email commands,
which are then read by the Peers software during their initialization.
The exclude directives allow customization of which agents to start automatically. Any drivers and
agents included on this line will not be started by the run level scripts.
The exclude entries can be modified using the /sbin/hpsnmpconfig command.
If trapemail entries are edited, the Peers software must be restarted before the configuration
modification is effective. The command to restart the SNMP agents is:
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents restart
Or
# service hp-snmp-agents restart
The syntax of the trapemail lines is:
trapemail mail_command
The keyword "trapemail" indicates that the rest of the line is the command for sending trap email.
In mail_command, you must provide the full path of your email command, the subject, and the
recipients.
Multiple trapemail lines can be defined in /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/cma.conf. A default
line is added during installation if none exists:
trapemail /bin/mail –s ‘HP Insight Management Agents Trap Alarm’ root
The mail_command can be any Linux command that reads standard input. For example, using
trapemail /usr/bin/logger will log trap messages to the system log file (/var/log/
messages).
The cmaXSocketBase entry in configuration file /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/cma.conf
configures the starting socket port used for communications between cmaX and Peers. The entry
is not needed unless the "bind() failed!" message displays in the Agents log file /var/log/
hp-snmp-agents/cma.log.
This entry should be listed in the configuration file as follows:
cmaXSocketBase 12345
The trapIf entry in configuration file /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/cma.conf can be used to
configure the IP address used by the SNMP daemon when sending traps. For example, to send
traps using the IP address of the eth1 interface you would add:
trapIf eth1
If the cmaXSocket Base entry is edited, the snmpd and Peers software must be restarted before
the configuration modification is effective. You can do this by entering the following commands:
# /etc/init.d/snmpd restart
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents restart
Or
# service snmpd restart
Configuration files
21
# service hp-snmp-agents restart
You can also manipulate the /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/cma.conf file which contains one
or more exclude directives. Any string after the exclude keyword is interpreted as an agent name
that should not be started. Examples include:
exclude cmahealthd
exclude cmastdeqd
These two lines exclude two agents from the startup: the Health Agent (cmahealthd) and the
Standard Equipment Agent (cmastdeqd).
Starting and stopping agents and services
After the initial installation, both the ProLiant Management Agents and the Health Monitor are
loaded. Upon a reboot, the initscripts /etc/init.d/hp-health and /etc/init.d/
hp-snmp-agents reload the Health Monitor and SNMP agents and drivers, even if a different
kernel was used for the new run.
To start and stop the hp-health service at runtime, type:
# /etc/init.d/hp-health stop
# /etc/init.d/hp-health start
Or
# service hp-health stop
# service hp-health start
To start and stop the hp-snmp-agents at runtime, type:
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents stop
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents start
Or
# service hp-snmp-agents stop
# service hp-snmp-agents start
Parameters
This section lists parameters for various agents and services.
Table 12: Parameters for NIC agents includes the command line arguments that can be passed to
the NIC agents (cmanicd) from the /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/nic/etc/cmanicd script.
Table 12 Parameters for NIC agents
Parameter
Description
-p poll_time
This parameter specifies the number of seconds between data caching and poll
intervals. NIC drivers are only queried when a request comes in and the cached
information is older than the specified poll interval. The default value is 20 seconds.
The minimum poll time is 10 seconds.
-s set_state
This parameter specifies whether SNMP set commands are allowed for this agent. A
set_state of OK (default) means that SNMP set commands are allowed. A set_state of
NOT_OK means that SNMP set commands are not allowed.
-t trap_state
This parameter specifies whether the NIC Agent is allowed to send traps or not. A
trap_state of OK (default) indicates the NIC Agent can send SNMP traps. A trap_state
of NOT_OK means that the NIC Agent is not allowed to send traps.
For example, to set the poll interval to 30 seconds and prevent traps, change PFLAGS= to PFLAGS="p30 -t NOT_OK" in the /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/nic/etc/cmanicd script.
22
Customization
Traps are configured using the standard SNMP configuration file (snmpd.conf). See the
snmpd.conf manual page for the most current configuration information. When the snmpd.conf
or snmpd.local.conf configuration files are changed or when the SNMPCONFPATH environment
variable is changed, the cmanic daemon must be restarted.
If your operating system has an active firewall configuration, external SNMP requests might be
rejected by the system, which prevents remote management operation. Your system must be
configured to allow udp connections on port 161 from any hosts that need to be able to send
SNMP requests. There are significant security implications to configuring a firewall. Consider the
iptables, ipchains, iptables-save, and iptables-restore manpages and the
documentation for any firewall configuration application in use as mandatory reading before
making any change to the firewall configuration.
The Rack Infrastructure Interface Service is contained in an executable called cpqriisd which
resides in the /sbin directory. It can be invoked by using the commands in Table 13: Command
options for the Rack Infrastructure Information Service daemon.
Table 13 Command options for the Rack Infrastructure Information Service daemon
Option
Description
-F
This option will "daemonize" the process and start the daemon in a production level
environment. Usage is recommended. An easier way to accomplish this task is to execute
the hp-snmp-agents run-level script.
-D
This option starts the service in a debug environment. stdin and stdout go to the console;
typing "e" will stop the daemon. Alerts are logged in to the same text console.
-V
This option enables the verbosity of the output. The default behavior is to output to both
/var/log/ messages and tty1 - tty10.
-?
This option reports the version of the service and informs the user of other available options.
Parameters
23
Support and other resources
Information to collect before contacting HP
Be sure to have the following information available before you contact HP:
•
Software product name
•
Hardware product model number
•
Operating system type and version
•
Applicable error message
•
Third-party hardware and software
•
Technical support registration number (if applicable)
How to contact HP
Use the following methods to contact HP technical support:
•
In the United States, see the Customer Service / Contact HP United States website for contact
options:
http://welcome.hp.com/country/us/en/contact_us.html
•
In the United States, call 1-800-HP-INVENT (1-800-474-6836) to contact HP by telephone.
This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. For continuous quality improvement,
conversations might be recorded or monitored.
•
In other locations, see the Contact HP Worldwide website for contact options:
http://welcome.hp.com/country/us/en/wwcontact.html
Registering for software technical support and update service
HP Insight Management includes one year of 24 x 7 HP Software Technical Support and Update
Service. This service provides access to HP technical resources for assistance in resolving software
implementation or operations problems.
The service also provides access to software updates and reference manuals in electronic form as
they are made available from HP. Customers who purchase an electronic license are eligible for
electronic updates only.
With this service, Insight Management customers benefit from expedited problem resolution as
well as proactive notification and delivery of software updates. For more information about this
service, see the following website:
http://www.hp.com/services/insight
Registration for this service takes place following online redemption of the license certificate.
How to use your software technical support and update service
After you have registered, you will receive a service contract in the mail containing the Customer
Service phone number and your Service Agreement Identifier (SAID). You need your SAID when
you contact technical support. Using your SAID, you can also go to the Software Update Manager
(SUM) web page at to view your contract online.
Warranty information
HP will replace defective media for a period of 90 days from the date of purchase. This warranty
applies to all Insight Management products.
24
HP authorized resellers
For the name of the nearest HP authorized reseller, see the following sources:
•
In the United States, see the HP U.S. service location website:
http://www.hp.com/service_locator
•
In other locations, see the Contact HP worldwide website:
http://welcome.hp.com/country/us/en/wwcontact.html
Documentation feedback
HP welcomes your feedback. To make comments and suggestions about product documentation,
send a message to:
mailto:docsfeedback@hp.com
Include the document title and manufacturing part number in your message. All submissions become
the property of HP.
New and changed information in this edition
•
Support for the next-generation ProLiant (Gen8) servers
•
Support for integrated Lights Out version 4 (iLO4)
•
New support for installing HP Insight Management Agents through the on-board HP Intelligent
Provisioning software, for ProLiant Gen8 servers and later versions only
Related information
HP ProLiant Servers:
•
ProLiant BL BladeSystem servers:
http://www.hp.com/go/blades
•
ProLiant DL series rack mount servers:
http://www.hp.com/servers/dl
•
ProLiant ML series tower servers:
http://www.hp.com/servers/ml
•
ProLiant SL series scalable system servers:
http://h18004.www1.hp.com/products/servers/sl/index.html
Typographic conventions
This document uses the following typographical conventions:
Book title
The title of a book. On the web, this can be a hyperlink to the
book itself.
Command
A command name or command phrase, for example ls -a.
Computer output
Information displayed by the computer.
Ctrl+x or Ctrl-x
A key sequence that indicates you must hold down the keyboard
key labeled Ctrl while you press the letter x.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLE
The name of an environment variable, for example, PATH.
Key
The name of a keyboard key. Return and Enter both see the same
key.
HP authorized resellers
25
26
Term
A term or phrase that is defined in the body text of the document,
not in a glossary.
User input
Indicates commands and text that you type exactly as shown.
Replaceable
The name of a placeholder that you replace with an actual value.
[]
In command syntax statements, these characters enclose optional
content.
{}
In command syntax statements, these characters enclose required
content.
|
The character that separates items in a linear list of choices.
...
Indicates that the preceding element can be repeated one or more
times.
WARNING
An alert that calls attention to important information that, if not
understood or followed, results in personal injury.
CAUTION
An alert that calls attention to important information that, if not
understood or followed, results in data loss, data corruption, or
damage to hardware or software.
IMPORTANT
An alert that calls attention to essential information.
NOTE
An alert that contains additional or supplementary information.
TIP
An alert that provides helpful information.
A Error messages
Messages logged if an ASR event occurs are listed in Table 14 (page 27).
Table 14 Error messages
Message Number Details
Message 1
Message 2
Message 3
Message 4
NMI-Automatic Server Recovery timer expiration – Hour %d-%d/%d/%d
Description
This message indicates that the Health Monitor detected an ASR timeout and is
attempting to gracefully shut down the Operating System. Absence of this
message can indicate a critical hardware failure (such as a non-correctable ECC
error on a memory DIMM) or some other severe event. This is the first of a series
of messages displayed to the console. This message is not logged to the IML
and most likely not listed in any system logs.
Recommended
action
Review all the messages logged to the IML to see if any previous errors have
been logged. For example, a corrected single-bit memory error might have been
logged.
ASR Lockup Detected: %s
Description
This message indicates that the Health Monitor detected an ASR timeout and is
attempting to gracefully shut down the Operating System. Absence of this
message can indicate a critical hardware failure (such as a non-correctable ECC
error on a memory DIMM) or some other severe event. This is the first ASR
message logged to the IML, if logging is possible.
Recommended
action
Review all the messages logged to the IML to see if any previous errors have
been logged.
casm: ASR performed a successful OS shutdown
Description
This ASR message indicates that the Health monitor detected an ASR timeout
and has gracefully shut down the Operating System. Absence of this message
can indicate a critical hardware failure (such as a non-correctable ECC error
on a memory DIMM), a high priority process consuming all the available CPU
cycles (software failure), or a device such as a storage or a network controller
flooding the system with interrupts. This is the second ASR message logged to
the IML, if logging is possible.
Recommended
action
This ASR message usually indicates a software error such as a high priority
process consuming all the available CPU cycles. Linux tools such as “sar” (system
activity report) can be used in conjunction with the ASR facility to locate the
process causing the problem.
ASR Detected by System ROM
Description
This message indicates that the ProLiant Server ROM detected an ASR timeout.
This message is almost always present in the IML when an ASR timeout occurs.
If this is the only ASR message logged to the IML, this can indicate a hardware
failure such as a non-correctable ECC error on a memory DIMM. The ASR feature
on a ProLiant server resets the server when the timeout expires with no software
intervention required.
Recommended
action
If this is the only ASR message present, this usually indicates a hardware error
(such as an unrecoverable memory error). Try moving the server memory DIMMs
to different slots to see if more information can be logged. Review all IML
messages that previously occurred to see if any other component has given an
indication of failure or temperature limits that might have exceeded normal
operating thresholds.
The cpqriisd service acts as an enabler for other ProLiant value-add software, such as the Rack
Agent and the Rack Upgrade Utility. This service is only applicable for p-Class blade systems.
If the service goes away after a few seconds, there is a failure to initiate communication with the
iLO management controller. The failure reason is logged in the message log. If the service is
27
stopped, dependent applications like the Rack Firmware Upgrade Utility terminate as well.
Table 15 (page 28)lists possible issues.
Table 15 cpqriisd messages
Message Number
Details
Message 1
Could not setup server semaphores
Could not destroy server semaphores
Up sem: Ioctl Failure!
Down sem: Ioctl Failure!
Get sem: Ioctl Failure!
Set sem: Ioctl Failure!
Message 2
Description
These messages indicate that the synchronization objects called
“semaphores”, cannot be set up correctly. This issue most likely
occurs because the iLO driver is absent.
Recommended action
Install the iLO driver
Warning: Shared Memory Segment exists
Killing process %s pid
%dpgid %d
Message 3
Message 4
Message 5
Description
These messages indicate that the daemon encountered a shared
memory segment that was not cleaned up properly.
Recommended action
No action is required since this message in informational. This
warning will be removed in a later version of the Rack Infrastructure
Interface Service.
Multiple copies of this daemon may be running – exiting…
Description
This message indicates an issue with Rack Infrastructure Interface
Service Version 1.0.0 which disallows the starting of two copies
of the service.
Recommended action
Only one copy of the daemon should be running at any time.
Setup Shared Memory failed!
Description
This message indicates that a common OS resource, “shared
memory”, is not available. This issue could be due to high
utilization; but most likely a memory segment from an earlier version
of this service was left behind erroneously.
Recommended action
Install the latest version of this service.
Semaphore %s interrupted in %s
Local Semaphore %s
interrupted in %s
Message 6
Description
This type of message will be logged if the service is terminated
abruptly, for example, through the “kill” command.
Recommended action
No action is required, since this message is informational.
Alert only seems to reach %d out of %d client applications
Description
The alerts coming from the infrastructure seem to be dispatched to
a subset of registered
clients only. Most likely a client terminated suddenly without properly
deregistering itself.
Recommended action
28
Error messages
This message does not indicate a problem with the Rack
Infrastructure Interface Service. However, there might be a problem
Table 15 cpqriisd messages (continued)
Message Number
Details
with the HP ProLiant Rack Daemon (cmarackd). Restart cmarackd.
If the problem persists, contact your HP field service engineer.
Message 7
iLO exceeded the number of allotted back offs, is it stuck?
Description
iLO responds with a “backoff” command indicating a busy state,
which is a temporary
condition. If this condition lasts too long (5000 tries), the message
appears.
Recommended action
Message 8
Message 9
Verify that iLO is not under extreme network load, such as a ping
flood. Otherwise, contact your HP field service engineer.
Data returned is too short for any transaction
Description
Data corruption from iLO has occurred. The data received is
ignored.
Recommended action
Reboot iLO by navigating to the Network Settings tab in the iLO
Web interface and clicking Apply. If you continue to see this
message, contact your HP field service Engineer.
watchdog sees no dispatch threads
cpqci watchdog: close channel!
cpqci watchdog: reopen channel!
Message 10
Description
These messages indicate that iLO was reset and that the service is
trying to reopen communication.
Recommended action
No action is required, since this message is informational.
Problems setting up shared memory
Problems setting up semaphores
Problems setting up local semaphore
Problems setting up watchdog thread
Problems setting up IPMI channel
Problems setting up dispatch thread
Problems setting up secondary dispatch thread
Problems setting up dispatch threads
Did not receive initial handshake
Problem pushing IPMI traffic over channel!
Problems setting up dispatch data
Problems setting up stats data
Problems setting up dynamic mem allocator!
Problems setting up hash table!
Problems setting up communication over channel!
Problems setting up watchdog thread!
29
Table 15 cpqriisd messages (continued)
Message Number
Details
Description
These messages indicate a problem that occurred during
initialization of the service. The main reasons for failure include:
• Absence of the iLO driver
• iLO encountered problems and is in an undefined state
• The operating system is running out of resources (for example,
memory, threads, semaphores, and so on)
Recommended action
Message 11
Message 12
Message 13
Message 14
Verify that the iLO Driver is installed and reboot the server.
start failed. started and stopped. – failed.
Description
This message indicates that the service terminated itself because of
problems.
Recommended action
Install Version 1 .1 .0-2 of the service. Verify that the iLO driver is
installed and reboot the server. If the problem persists, contact your
HP field service Engineer.
Dispatcher still sees %d clients...
Description
A client does not respond properly to impending shut down.
Consequently the service waits for approximately 5 seconds, outputs
this message, and exits.
Recommended action
No action is required, since this message is informational. However,
this message could also indicate that the HP ProLiant Rack Daemon
(cmarackd) has died.
Checksum on EEPROM %2.2x do not match for header (%2.2x)
Description
This message indicates that the EEPROMs in the infrastructure are
corrupt.
Recommended action
Contact your HP field service engineer for resolution.
Error: copy ipmb response with negative length %d
Error: copy ipmb response with excessive length %d
30
Error messages
Description
These messages indicate that a corrupt response from the
infrastructure was received.
Recommended action
Reboot the HP ProLiant Power Module.
B Troubleshooting
This section describes common problems that might occur during installation and operation of the
HP ProLiant Management Software for Linux.
Table 16 (page 31) describes issues and workarounds for the hp-health and hp-snmp-agents
packages. Any problems reported to HP should include the following files:
•
/var/log/messages
•
/var/log/boot.log (for Red Hat Linux distributions)
•
/var/log/warn (for SuSE LINUX distributions)
•
/var/log/hp-snmp-agents/cma.log
•
/var/log/hp-health/hpasmd.log
Table 16 Issues and workarounds for the hp-health and hp-snmp-agents packages
Issue Number
Details
Issue 1
Non-certified machine / Unsupported ProLiant Server
Symptom
When the hp-health rpm is installed, following message is displayed:
HP System Health Application will not be loaded
Cause
The Health Monitor cannot be initialized due to a conflict in ROM internal
tables, or the server is not supported. This driver is only supported on servers
that have the ProLiant Advanced Server Management (ASM) ASIC (PCI identifier
0x0e11a0f0, the Integrated Lights-Out Management ASIC (PCI identifier
0x0e11b203)) or the Integrated Lights-Out 2 ASIC (PCI identifier0x103c3302).
No other HP ProLiant servers are supported.
Workaround
Verify that the appropriate ASM ASIC is present. Use the following commands
to perform the check:
cat /proc/bus/pci/devices | grep –I 0e11a0f0
cat /proc/bus/pci/devices | grep –I 0e11b203
cat /proc/bus/pci/devices | grep –I 103c3302
cat /proc/bus/pci/devices | grep –I 103c3307
One of these commands should succeed and return information. Also, check
to see if a later ROM version is available for this server.
Issue 2
No console messages
Symptom
No console messages appear on the text screens (for instance, Ctrl+Alt+F1),
but the error messages get logged properly in /var/log/ messages.
If you run KDE or Gnome, xterms do not show the console messages
originating from the Health Monitor
Cause
The syslogd daemon is configured somewhat differently than other
distributions; the system messages do not appear on the lower digit terminals
(tty1-9).
Workaround
If you do not want the message to be logged on the system, configure it
differently by modifying /etc/syslog.conf in the following way:
# Log all kernel messages to the console.
# Logging much else clutters up the screen. kern.*
/dev/console
# Log anything (except mail) of level info or higher.
31
Table 16 Issues and workarounds for the hp-health and hp-snmp-agents packages (continued)
Issue Number
Details
# Don’t log private authentication messages!
* . info;mail .none;news .none;authpriv.none
/var/log/messages
After sending a HUP signal to syslogd process ID as shown below, you should
see your kernel messages appearing on all consoles:
kill -1 <pid of syslogd>
Issue 3
Superuser only
Symptom
You experience the following problems:
• Commands like insmod, modprobe, rmmod or rpm not available
• The RPM install fails because file permissions are being denied (see below)
Failed to open //var/lib/rpm/packages.rpm error: cannot
open //var/lib/rpm/packages.rpm
Issue 4
Cause
Preparing a driver install necessitates access to system administrator rights
Workaround
Be sure to log in as "root" before you attempt the driver install
The agents do not seem to expose their data through SNMP; my management console does not see
any status
Symptom
Through SNMP browsers or other management software, the servers appear
dead. No SNMP traffic is available through them.
Cause
This can be caused by many things. Here is a checklist of the most common
problems:
• snmpd is not running
• The agents and/or drivers have not started properly
• The snmpd.conf file is misconfigured
◦ rwcommunity is undefined for either localhost or the management console
◦ community string mismatches the one from the management console
◦ trapsink or trapcommunity is undefined; trapcommunity may be undefined
for localhost
• Firewalling software is enabled on the system and set up to block SNMP
traffic
• The cmaX extension is absent from the SNMP stack
Workaround
• Restart snmpd if it is not running
• Start hp-health and hp-snmp-agents typing “/etc/init.d/
hp-health restart” and “/etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents
restart”
• Configure snmpd.conf file appropriately for your environment. See “man
snmpd.conf” for more information
• Ensure SNMP traffic is allowed through firewall
• Ensure cmaX extension is included in the SNMP stack. See “man
hp-snmp-agents” for more information.
Table 17 (page 33) describes common problems that might occur during installation and operation
of the Host OS Agent, the Standard Equipment Agent, the SCSI Agent, the System Health Agent,
the Threshold Agent, and the Peer Agents. In most cases, a workaround is available.
32
Troubleshooting
Table 17 Known issues with agents
Issue Number
Details
Issue 1
Cannot manage server from Systems Insight Manager, grayed-out utilization button, or missing file
system space used information in the mass storage window
Workaround To work around this issue, complete the following steps:
1. Check if the network is reachable by pinging the server from the system running
Systems Insight Manager
2. Be sure that Systems Insight Manager is using the correct community string, which
is defined in the server’s snmpd.conf file
3. Be sure that post-installation configurations have been performed properly, if needed
4. Check the Host OS Agent status with the Linux command “ps –ef | grep
cmahostd”
If the agent is not running, start the Host OS Agent manually using the following
command:
# /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmahostd start
If the Host OS Agent is running but not reporting data, or if it was correctly started but
is no longer running, check the file /var/log/hp-snmp-agents/cma.log for error
messages. You must be logged in as “root” to access this file.
Issue 2
Grayed-out system board, expansion boards or configuration buttons
Workaround Check the Standard Equipment Agent status with the Linux command “ps –ef | grep
cmastdeqd”.
If the agent is not running, start the Standard Equipment Agent manually using the
following command:
# /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmastdeqd start
If the agent is running but not reporting data, or if it was correctly started but is no
longer running, check the file /var/log/hp-snmp-agents/cma.log for error
messages. You must be logged in as “root” to access this file.
Issue 3
Missing SCSI drive information in the mass storage window
Workaround Check the SCSI Agent status with the command “ps –ef | grep cmascsid”.
If the agents are not running, they must be started. (See the start/stop documentation
for appropriate agent).
If the agent is running but not reporting data, or if it was correctly started but is no
longer running, check the file /var/log/hp-snmp-agents/cma.log for error
messages. You must be logged in as “root” to access this file.
Issue 4
Added SCSI devices do not appear
Workaround To minimize system overhead, the cmascsid process does not search for new hardware
every poll_time. There is a delay of up to 32 times the poll interval, which is normally
every 30 seconds, up to 16 minutes in the default case before new SCSI devices are
discovered by cmascsid and reported to the ProLiant Management Console. Once
the hardware has been discovered, its status is checked each poll_time and reported
to ProLiant Management Console when it has changed.
Issue 5
Missing or 0-value SCSI hard drive serial number or capacity
Workaround Most SCSI hard drives do not make this information available to the host when the drive
media is not spinning. Hot-pluggable drives do not start spinning until the Operating
System attempts to open them. Obtaining this information requires access to the drive.
After the drive is first opened, to minimize system overhead, there can be a delay of
up to 32 times the poll_time of the cmascsid process before updated information is
available to the ProLiant Management Console.
Issue 6
Grayed-out button for a SCSI controller
33
Table 17 Known issues with agents (continued)
Issue Number
Details
Workaround Information about the configuration of the device indicates that a SCSI controller is
installed, but no further information is available. Several conditions result in a grayed-out
button:
• The SCSI agent process “cmascsid” might not be running
• The SCSI controller might have been disabled by the System Configuration Utility
• This might be an unsupported controller
Issue 7
Missing or grayed-out storage controllers in the mass storage window
Workaround Check the Mass Storage Agent status with the Linux command “ps –ef | grep
cma”. See the entries for cmaidad, cmafcad, cmascsid, cmasasd and cmaided.
• If the agent is not running, it must be started. (See the start/stop documentation for
the appropriate agent).
• If the agent is running but not reporting data, or if it was correctly started but is no
longer running, check the file /var/log/hp-snmp-agents/cma.log for error
messages. You must be logged in as “root” to access this file.
Issue 8
Grayed-out Recovery button in the Device View window, grayed-out Auto Recovery button in the
Recovery window or grayed-out Environment button in the Recovery window
Workaround To work around this issue, complete the following steps:
1. Be sure your system supports the System Health Agent features. These features are
supported only on HP ProLiant servers
2. Check the System Health Agent status with the Linux command “ps –ef | grep
cmahealthd”. If the agent is not running, it must be started. (See the start/stop
documentation for the appropriate agent).
Issue 9
Grayed-out Remote Insight button in the Recovery window
Workaround A grayed-out Remote Insight button can be caused by one of the following:
• The Remote Insight Controller might not be configured properly
• The Remote Insight driver might not be installed
• The Remote Insight Agent cmasm2d might not be running
Issue 10
Unable to change any values on the managed server or no SNMP traps/alarms are received
Workaround To work around this issue, complete the following steps:
1. Be sure that the SNMP agent, the Peer agent and the agent processing the set are
all running
2. Check the agent command line arguments in the agent start script files
3. Verify that either the argument “-s OK” is present or that the default set_state is “OK”
for the agent. This process enables SNMP sets for this agent only
4. Verify that the server SNMP community string defined in your snmpd.conf (using
“rwcommunity” keyword) matches the community string defined at the Management
Console.
If you are using Systems Insight Manager, the community string can be set in the
Device Setup window. For more information see the section on community strings in
the Systems Insight Manager User Guide Help file.
If you changed the snmpd.conf file, you need to refresh snmpd and agents with
the following commands:
# /etc/init.d/snmpd restart
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents restart
5. Test the traps by setting a threshold on an item that will cause a trap using the Set
Threshold feature of Systems Insight Manager. See the section “Set Threshold” in
the Systems Insight Manager User Guide for more information.
If traps still do not function, have your Linux device send traps to itself. Run the Linux
SNMP trap receiving utility “snmptrapd –P”.
34
Troubleshooting
Table 17 Known issues with agents (continued)
Issue Number
Details
Next, generate a trap to localhost using the Linux “snmptrap” utility. The Linux
command “snmptrapd –f –Le” should display the trap. Note that the recent
versions of snmptrapd will not accept incoming notifications by default. See
snmptrapd.conf(5) manpage for information on configuring access control
settings to enable incoming notifications.
Issue 11
Unable to set thresholds on MIB items or no user-defined SNMP traps are received
Workaround Check the Threshold Agent status with the Linux command “ps –ef | grep
cmathreshd”. If the agent is not running, start the Threshold Agent using the following
command:
# /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmasthreshd start
If the agent is running but not reporting data, or if the agent was correctly started but
is no longer running, check the file /var/log/hp-snmp-agents/cma.log for error
messages. You must be logged in as “root” to access this file. Verify that the server
SNMP community string defined in your snmpd.conf (using rwcommunity keyword)
matches the community string defined at the management console. If you are using
Systems Insight Manager, the community string can be set in the Device Setup window.
For more information see the section on community strings in the Systems Insight Manager
User Guide Help file.
If the “threshold sets” still do not work, perform the following procedure:
1. Stop the Threshold agent and delete previous alarm threshold files using the following
command:
# /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmasthreshd stop
2. Start the Threshold agent using the following command:
# /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmasthreshd start
Issue 12
Disabling SNMP sets for a specific agent
Workaround Stop the agent associated with the desired MIB. Change the agent command line
argument set switch to “-s NOT_OK” in the corresponding /opt/hp/
hp-snmp-agents/<agent>/etc/<subagent> file. This disables the SNMP sets
for this agent only. Restart the agent for the changes to take effect.
Issue 13
Disabling SNMP traps for a specific agent
Workaround Stop the agent. Change the agent command line argument trap switch to “-t NOT_OK”
in the /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/<agent>/etc/<subagent> file. This disables
SNMP traps for this agent only. Restart the stopped agent for the changes to take effect.
Issue 14
Disabling remote reboot
Workaround Stop the server Standard Equipment Agent with the following command:
# /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmastdeqd stop
Edit /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmastdeqd and change the
cmastdeqd agent command line reboot switch to “-r NOT_OK”. This disables SNMP
reboots for this device only. Restart the Standard Equipment Agent for the new changes
to take effect.
Issue 15
Peer Agents will not run
Workaround Check the /var/log/hp-snmp-agents/cma.log file for messages. If it is caused
by not running snmpd, then configure snmpd to start automatically during boot. If you
changed the snmpd.conf files, you must restart snmpd and agents with the following
commands:
# /etc/init.d/snmpd restart
# /etc/init.d/hp-snmp-agents restart
35
C hp-snmp-agents command lines and arguments
Table 18 (page 36) lists the command lines and Table 19 (page 37) lists the command arguments
for hp-snmp-agents.
Table 18 Command lines for hp-snmp-agents
Component
Description
Command
cmahostd
Host daemon to collect data about
installed software, firmware and agent
conditions
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmahostd
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmapeerd
Host daemon collected data made
available to SNMP requesters
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmapeerd
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmathreshold
Daemon to monitor MIB items to exceed
a certain threshold
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmathreshd
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmahealthd
Host daemon to collect temperature, fan, /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmahealthd
power supply and memory subsystem
{start|stop|restart|status}
status
cmastdeqd
Host daemon to collect PCI/EISA slot
information
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmastdeqd
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmaperfd
Daemon to collect performance data for
CPU, Memory, Disk and NIC
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmaperfd
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmasm2d
Agent to collect data from iLO 4/iLO
3/iLO 2/iLO/RILOE
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmasm2d
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmarackd
Agent to collect data from the ICE
infrastructure
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/server/etc/cmarackd
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmaeventd
This agent is the storage interface for
logging events to the IML
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/etc/cmaeventd
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmaidad
Agent to collect data from cciss/cpqarray /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/etc/cmaidad
drivers
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmaided
Agent to collect data from IDE/SATA
devices
cmafcad
Agent to collect data from the cpqfc driver /opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/etc/cmafcad
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmascsid
Agent to collect data from SCSI storage
devices
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/etc/cmascsid
{start|stop|restart|status}
cmasasd
Agent to collect data from SAS storage
devices
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/etc/cmasasd
{start|stop|restart|status}
Agent to collect data from network
interfaces
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/nic/etc/cmanicd
{start|stop|restart|status}
Server Agents
Storage Agents
/opt/hp/hp-snmp-agents/storage/etc/cmaided
{start|stop|restart|status}
Network Agents
cmanicd
36
hp-snmp-agents command lines and arguments
NOTE:
•
All agents support –p, –s and –t as startup parameters
•
Each agent has an associated run level script which is located in /opt/hp/
hp-snmp-agents/<agent>/etc/<subagent>. All important settings such as poll time
arguments are contained in these individual scripts.
Table 19 Command line arguments for hp-snmp-agents
Command line argument
Description
-p poll_time
Specifies the number of seconds to wait between data collection intervals.
The minimum allowed value is 1 second and the default value is 60 seconds.
-s set_state
Specifies whether SNMP set commands are allowed for this agent. A
set_state of OK (default) means that SNMP set commands are allowed. A
set_state of NOT_OK means that SNMP set commands are not allowed.
-t trap_state
Specifies whether SNMP trap commands are allowed for this agent. A
trap_state of OK (default) means that SNMP trap commands are allowed.
A trap_state of NOT_OK means that SNMP trap commands are not allowed.
37
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