qs4 manual - Ponmani International
QS4
Technical Reference Manual
P/N 3100186 • Rev 3.0 • 12AUG05
DEVELOPED BY
GE Security
8985 Town Center Parkway
Bradenton, FL 34202
(941) 739-4300
COPYRIGHT NOTICE
Copyright © 2001 – 2005 GE Security, Inc.
This manual is copyrighted by GE Security, Inc. (GE Security).
You may not reproduce, translate, transcribe, or transmit any
part of this manual without express, written permission from GE
Security.
This manual contains proprietary information intended for
distribution to authorized persons or companies for the sole
purpose of conducting business with GE Security. Unauthorized
distribution of the information contained in this manual may
violate the terms of the distribution agreement.
HyperTerminal is a registered trademark of Hilgraeve, Inc.
Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
TRADEMARKS
DOCUMENT HISTORY
Date
Revision
Reason for change
24JUN01
1.0
Original release.
12JUL01
2.0
Corrections and additions on pp 2.12, 2.24, 3.9, 4.4, 4.8, 4.10,
4.19, A.3.
12AUG05
3.0
Updated manual per software release version 1.8, standardized
format, and expanded information to include comments and
corrections received from the field.
Content
Chapter 1
Introduction • 1.1
About this manual • 1.2
Fire alarm system limitations • 1.4
Limitation of liability • 1.5
FCC compliance statement • 1.6
Industry Canada information • 1.8
Related documentation • 1.9
Chapter 2
Product description • 2.1
General description • 2.3
Minimum system requirements • 2.9
System status indicators • 2.10
Operator controls and indicators • 2.11
Optional controls and indicators • 2.13
Alphanumeric display • 2.15
Command menu organization • 2.17
Command descriptions • 2.22
Event messages • 2.26
Control panel operation • 2.29
Chapter 3
Panel components • 3.1
PS6 Power Supply Card • 3.3
SLIC Signature Loop Interface Controller • 3.11
ZB16-4 Class B Conventional Zone Card • 3.20
ZA8-2 Class A Conventional Zone Card • 3.25
ZR8 Relay Card • 3.30
DLD Dual Line Dialer Card • 3.33
NT-A (RS-485 card with QS-232 module) • 3.37
LED/switch cards • 3.40
Chapter 4
Accessories • 4.1
CDR-3 Bell Coder • 4.2
RPM Reverse Polarity Module • 4.8
2-CTM City Tie Module • 4.10
IOP3A RS-232 Isolator • 4.12
Chapter 5
Operating instructions • 5.1
Logging on to the fire alarm system • 5.2
Checking system status • 5.3
Displaying or printing maintenance reports • 5.7
Display or print a history report • 5.9
Displaying the alarm history • 5.10
Performing a lamp test • 5.11
Silencing the panel buzzer • 5.12
Resetting the fire alarm system • 5.13
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
i
Content
Silencing fire alarm signals • 5.14
Sounding an alarm • 5.15
Disabling and enabling a zone • 5.16
Disabling and enabling a device • 5.17
Switching detector alarm sensitivity • 5.18
Switching event message routes • 5.19
Changing the level 1 password • 5.20
Restarting the fire alarm system • 5.21
Chapter 6
Installation • 6.1
Installation overview • 6.2
Mounting the control panel backbox • 6.4
Pulling cables into the backbox • 6.7
Installing panel components • 6.8
Installing the PS6 card • 6.10
Installing the front panel • 6.12
Connecting mains AC • 6.15
Installing standby batteries • 6.16
Installing a QSA series remote annunciator • 6.17
Commissioning the system • 6.26
Connecting peripheral devices • 6.33
Chapter 7
Front panel programming • 7.1
Before you begin • 7.3
Programming limits • 7.10
Automatically configuring the system • 7.11
Changing level 3 and level 4 passwords • 7.12
Configuring the system automatically • 7.13
Editing system configuration settings • 7.14
Adding and deleting option cards • 7.18
Editing ZB16-4 card configuration settings • 7.20
Editing ZA8-2 card configuration settings • 7.22
Editing SLIC card configuration settings • 7.24
Adding intelligent addressable devices automatically • 7.26
Adding and deleting intelligent addressable detectors • 7.28
Editing intelligent addressable detector settings • 7.30
Adding and deleting intelligent addressable modules • 7.35
Editing intelligent addressable module settings • 7.37
Editing DLD card configuration settings • 7.40
Adding and deleting subscriber accounts • 7.43
Editing subscriber account configuration settings • 7.44
Adding and deleting output groups • 7.47
Editing an output group • 7.49
Reviewing responses in an output group • 7.53
Adding and deleting zones • 7.55
Editing zone configuration settings • 7.57
Clearing the history log • 7.63
Saving the project database • 7.64
Chapter 8
Service and troubleshooting • 8.1
Display or print a revision report • 8.2
Starting and canceling a service group test • 8.3
Disabling and enabling an AND group • 8.4
Disabling and enabling a matrix group • 8.5
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QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Content
Disabling and enabling a time control • 8.6
Disabling and enabling a switch • 8.7
Disabling and enabling an option card • 8.8
Turning an output on and off • 8.9
Turning an LED on and off • 8.11
Setting the system time and date • 8.13
Changing the level 2 password • 8.14
Clearing trouble messages • 8.15
Replacing the control panel fuse • 8.20
Using HyperTerminal • 8.21
Appendix A
System calculations • A.1
Notification appliance circuit maximum wire length • A.2
Intelligent addressable loop maximum wire length • A.3
Battery calculations • A.9
Appendix B
Barcode library • B.1
Appendix C
Menu flow diagrams • C.1
System configuration menus • C.2
SLIC card configuration menus • C.3
ZB16-4 card configuration menus • C.6
ZA8-2 card configuration menus • C.7
DLD card configuration menus • C.8
Zone configuration menus • C.10
Output group configuration menus • C.12
Appendix D
Addresses • D.1
System addresses • D.2
Control panel CPU card addresses • D.4
Remote annunciator CPU card addresses • D.6
PS6 card addresses • D.8
SLIC card addresses • D.9
ZB16-4 card addresses • D.10
ZA8-2 card addresses • D.11
ZR8 card addresses • D.12
DLD card addresses • D.13
LED/switch card addresses • D.14
Appendix E
Contact ID event codes • E.1
Alarms • E.2
Supervisories • E.3
Troubles • E.4
Bypasses/disables • E.8
Test/miscellaneous • E.10
Z
Index • Z.1
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
iii
Content
List of figures
Figure 2-1: Fire alarm control panel front views • 2.4
Figure 2-2: QSA series remote annunciator front views • 2.6
Figure 2-3: SRA4 front view • 2.7
Figure 3-1: PS6 card front view • 3.3
Figure 3-2: Relay output wiring • 3.5
Figure 3-3: Smoke/accessory power output wiring • 3.6
Figure 3-4: RS-485 port wiring • 3.6
Figure 3-5: RS-232 port wiring • 3.7
Figure 3-6: Auxiliary power output wiring • 3.8
Figure 3-7: Standby battery wire connections • 3.9
Figure 3-8: PS6 card jumpers • 3.10
Figure 3-9: SLIC card front view • 3.11
Figure 3-10: SLIC card NAC output wiring • 3.13
Figure 3-11: Intelligent addressable loop wiring • 3.14
Figure 3-12: SLIC card address switch settings • 3.15
Figure 3-13: SLIC card jumpers • 3.16
Figure 3-14: Two-wire smoke detector application wiring • 3.17
Figure 3-15: Genesis horn/strobe application wiring • 3.19
Figure 3-16: ZB16-4 card front view • 3.20
Figure 3-17: ZB16-4 card IDC input circuit wiring • 3.21
Figure 3-18: ZB16-4 card NAC output circuit wiring • 3.23
Figure 3-19: ZB16-4 card address switch • 3.24
Figure 3-20: ZA8-2 card front view • 3.25
Figure 3-21: ZA8-2 card IDC input circuit wiring • 3.26
Figure 3-22: ZA8-2 card NAC output circuit wiring • 3.28
Figure 3-23: ZA8-2 card address switch settings • 3.29
Figure 3-24: ZR8 card front view • 3.30
Figure 3-25: ZR8 card relay output wiring • 3.31
Figure 3-26: ZR8 card address switch settings • 3.31
Figure 3-27: ZR8 card jumpers • 3.32
Figure 3-28: DLD card front view • 3.33
Figure 3-29: DLD installation wiring diagram • 3.36
Figure 3-30: RJ-31X block schematic • 3.36
Figure 3-31: RS-485 card front view • 3.37
Figure 3-32: RS-485 card jumpers • 3.38
Figure 3-33: RS-485 card wiring • 3.39
Figure 3-34: SL30 card front view • 3.41
Figure 3-35: SL30-1 card front view • 3.41
Figure 3-36: SL30L card front view • 3.42
Figure 3-37: SL20L5S card front view • 3.43
Figure 4-1: CDR-3 front view • 4.2
Figure 4-2: CDR-3 jumper settings • 4.5
Figure 4-3: Typical CDR-3 application wiring diagram • 4.7
Figure 4-4: RPM front view • 4.8
Figure 4-5: RPM wiring diagram • 4.9
Figure 4-6: 2-CTM application wiring diagram • 4.11
Figure 4-7: IOP3A front view • 4.12
Figure 4-8: IOP3A jumper settings • 4.12
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QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Content
Figure 4-9: IOP3A switch settings • 4.13
Figure 4-10: IOP3A application wiring diagram • 4.14
Figure 6-1: Control panel backbox mounting diagram • 6.4
Figure 6-2: Backbox dimensions for a QS4-5-(G/R)-(1/2) • 6.5
Figure 6-3: Backbox dimensions for a QS2-5-(G/R)-(1/2) • 6.6
Figure 6-4: Typical cable entry locations • 6.7
Figure 6-5: Cabinet layout diagram • 6.9
Figure 6-6: Power supply card installation • 6.11
Figure 6-7: Cabinet door assembly • 6.12
Figure 6-8: Front panel assembly • 6.13
Figure 6-9: Front panel ribbon cable connections • 6.14
Figure 6-10: Mains AC wiring diagram • 6.15
Figure 6-11: Standby battery installation • 6.16
Figure 6-12: Remote annunciator backbox mounting
diagram • 6.18
Figure 6-13: QSA-1-S and QSA-1-F backbox dimensions • 6.19
Figure 6-14: QSA-2-S and QSA-2-F backbox dimensions • 6.20
Figure 6-15: RAI card installation • 6.21
Figure 6-16: Remote annunciator door installation • 6.22
Figure 6-17: Remote annunciator CPU/Display Unit and
LED/switch card installation • 6.22
Figure 6-18: Key switch ground strap connection • 6.23
Figure 6-19: Remote annunciator ribbon cable
connections • 6.23
Figure 6-20: Remote annunciator power wiring • 6.24
Figure 6-21: Remote annunciator data cable connections • 6.25
Figure 6-22: Communications Selection Form dialog box • 6.31
Figure 6-23: Panel ID mismatch message box • 6.32
Figure 6-24: Laptop computer connection via the RS-232
terminals • 6.33
Figure 6-25: Serial printer connection diagram • 6.34
Figure 7-1: Combining common responses in the same output
group • 7.4
Figure 7-2: Combining response types in the same output
group • 7.5
Figure 7-3: Combining mutually exclusive responses in the same
output group • 7.5
Figure 8-1: Example revision report • 8.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
v
Content
List of tables
Table 2.1: Control panel models • 2.4
Table 2.2: Control panel option cards • 2.5
Table 2.3: QSA series remote annunciators • 2.6
Table 2.4: Control panel accessories • 2.8
Table 2.5: Minimum system requirements • 2.9
Table 2-6: System status indicator descriptions • 2.10
Table 2-7: Operator control and indicator descriptions • 2.11
Table 2-8: Optional control and indicator descriptions • 2.13
Table 2-9: Level 1 command menu organization • 2.17
Table 2-10: Level 2 command menu organization • 2.18
Table 2-11: Level 3 command menu organization • 2.19
Table 2-12: Level 4 command menu organization • 2.20
Fire alarm inputs • 3.34
Supervisory inputs • 3.34
Trouble conditions • 3.35
Table 6-1: Suggested LED/switch card arrangements • 6.13
Table 7-1: Front panel and software configuration utility
programming limits • 7.10
Table 7.2: Default system settings • 7.14
Table 7-3: ZB16-4 card default settings • 7.20
Table 7-4: ZA8-2 card default settings • 7.22
Table 7-5: SLIC card default settings • 7.24
Table 7-6: Factory default settings for intelligent addressable
devices • 7.27
Table 8-1: Trouble messages • 8.15
Table A-1: Maximum amount of wire you can use to construct an
intelligent addressable loop • A.3
Table A-2: Longest allowable circuit path with 0 SIGA-UMs or
SIGA-MABs configured for 2-wire smoke detectors • A.5
Table A-3: Longest allowable circuit path with 1 to 5 SIGA-UMs
or SIGA-MABs configured for 2-wire smoke
detectors • A.6
Table A-4: Longest allowable circuit path with 6 to 10 SIGA-UMs
or SIGA-MABs configured for 2-wire smoke
detectors • A.7
Table A-5: Longest allowable circuit path with 11 to 15 SIGAUMs or SIGA-MABs configured for 2-wire smoke
detectors • A.8
Table A-6: Control panel current load worksheet • A.10
Table A-7: Smoke/accessory power current load worksheet • A.11
Table D-1: System addresses • D.2
Table D-2: CPU card addresses • D.4
Table D-3: Remote annunciator CPU card addresses • D.6
Table D-4: PS6 card addresses • D.8
Table D-5: SLIC card addresses • D.9
Table D-6: ZB16-4 card addresses • D.10
Table D-7: ZA8-2 card addresses • D.11
Table D-8: ZR8 card addresses • D.12
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QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Content
Table D-9: DLD card addresses • D.13
Table D-10: Annunciator card group 1 addresses • D.14
Table D-11: Annunciator card group 2 addresses • D.17
Table D-12: Annunciator card group 3 addresses • D.21
Table D-13: Annunciator card group 4 addresses • D.25
Table D-14: Annunciator card group 5 addresses • D.29
Table D-15: Annunciator card group 6 addresses • D.32
Table D-16: Annunciator card group 7 addresses • D.36
Table D-17: Annunciator card group 8 addresses • D.40
Table D-18: Annunciator card group 9 addresses • D.44
Table D-19: Annunciator card group 10 addresses • D.47
Table D-20: Annunciator card group 11 addresses • D.51
Table D-21: Annunciator card group 12 addresses • D.55
Table D-22: Annunciator card group 13 addresses • D.58
Table D-23: Annunciator card group 14 addresses • D.62
Table D-24: Annunciator card group 15 addresses • D.66
Table D-25: Annunciator card group 16 addresses • D.70
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
vii
Content
viii
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 1
Introduction
Summary
This chapter provides information about this manual and other
related documentation.
Content
About this manual • 1.2
Fire alarm system limitations • 1.4
Limitation of liability • 1.5
FCC compliance statement • 1.6
Subpart B of Part 15 • 1.6
Part 68 • 1.6
Industry Canada information • 1.8
Related documentation • 1.9
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
1.1
Introduction
About this manual
This manual provides information on how to install, program,
and operate a QuickStart multiloop intelligent addressable/
conventional life safety control panel. It is organized into the
following chapters:
Chapter 1, Introduction: This chapter provides information
about this manual and other related documentation.
Chapter 2, Product description: This chapter provides
technical descriptions of the control panel and its operation. It
also provides descriptions of the command menus.
Chapter 3, Panel components: This chapter provides technical
descriptions of the components that can be installed in the
control panel.
Chapter 4, Accessories: This chapter provides technical
descriptions of the accessories that can be connected to control
panel.
Chapter 5, Operating instructions: This chapter provides
instructions for operating the fire alarm system from the control
panel CPU/Display Unit. It is intended for those who might be
expected to operate the control panel in a fire alarm emergency.
Chapter 6, Installation: This chapter provides instructions for
installing the fire alarm system. It is intended for trained
installers who are familiar with all applicable codes and
regulations.
Chapter 7, Front panel programming: This chapter provides
instructions for programming the fire alarm system from the
control panel CPU/Display Unit. It is intended for those trained
and authorized to program the fire alarm system.
Chapter 8, Service and troubleshooting: This chapter
provides instructions for servicing and troubleshooting the fire
alarm system. It is intended for those trained and authorized to
maintain the fire alarm system.
Appendix A, System calculations: This appendix provides
worksheets for sizing standby batteries, and for calculating the
maximum wire lengths for notification appliance circuits and
intelligent addressable loops.
Appendix B, Barcode library: This appendix provides a set of
barcodes that you can use to add location descriptions to event
messages from the control panel CPU/Display Unit.
Appendix C, Menu flow diagrams: This appendix provides
menu flow diagrams to use for general reference when
programming the fire alarm system from the control panel
CPU/Display Unit.
1.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Introduction
Appendix D, Addresses: This appendix provides a
comprehensive list of addresses to use for general reference.
Appendix E, Contact ID event codes: Provides a complete list
of Contact ID event codes that you can use when programming
dialer strings.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
1.3
Introduction
Fire alarm system limitations
The purpose of an automatic fire alarm system is to provide early
detection and warning of a developing fire. There are a number
of uncontrollable factors that can prevent or severely limit the
ability of an automatic fire alarm system to provide adequate
protection. As such, an automatic fire alarm system cannot
guarantee against loss of life or loss of property.
Two main causes of system failures are improper installation and
poor maintenance. The best way to minimize these types of
system failures is to have only a trained fire alarm system
professional design, install, test, and maintain your fire alarm
system in accordance with national and local fire codes.
Fire alarm systems will not operate without electrical power. As
fires frequently cause power interruption, we suggest that you
discuss ways to safeguard the electrical system with your local
fire protection specialist.
1.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Introduction
Limitation of liability
This product has been designed to meet the requirements of
NFPA Standard 72; Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., Standard
864; and Underwriters Laboratories of Canada, Inc., Standard
ULC S527. Installation in accordance with this manual,
applicable codes, and the instructions of the Authority Having
Jurisdiction is mandatory.
EST shall not under any circumstances be liable for any
incidental or consequential damages arising from loss of
property or other damages or losses owing to the failure of EST
products beyond the cost of repair or replacement of any
defective products. EST reserves the right to make product
improvements and change product specifications at any time.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
1.5
Introduction
FCC compliance statement
Subpart B of Part 15
This equipment can generate and radiate radio frequency energy.
If this equipment is not installed in accordance with this manual,
it may cause interference to radio communications. This
equipment has been tested and found to comply within the limits
for Class A computing devices pursuant to Subpart B of Part 15
of the FCC rules. These rules are designed to provide reasonable
protection against such interference when this equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this
equipment is likely to cause interference, in which case the user,
at their expense, will be required to take whatever measures
necessary to correct the interference.
Part 68
The DLD card complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. The DLD
card’s FCC registration number and the ringer equivalence
number (REN) are on the back of the DLD card. This
information must be provided to the telephone company, if
requested.
The DLD card connects to the public switched telephone
network using an RJ31X or RJ38X jack, which must also
comply with FCC Part 68 rules.
The REN is used to determine the quantity of devices that may
be connected to the telephone line. Excessive RENs on the
telephone line may result in the devices not ringing in response
to an incoming call. In most, but not all areas, the sum of RENs
should not exceed five (5). To be certain the number of devices
that may be connected to a line, as determined by the total RENs,
contact the local telephone company.
If the DLD card causes harm to the telephone network, the
telephone company will notify you in advance that temporary
discontinuance of service may be required. If advance notice is
not practical, the telephone company will notify you as soon as
possible. You will also be advised of your right to file a
complaint with the FCC, if you believe it is necessary.
The telephone company may make changes in its facilities,
equipment, operations, or procedures that could affect the
operation of the DLD card. If this happens, the telephone
company will provide advance notice in order for you to make
necessary modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
If trouble is experienced with the DLD card, for repair or
warranty information, contact Edwards Systems Technology,
6411 Parkland Drive, Sarasota, Florida, USA 34243 Telephone:
1.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Introduction
1-800-655-4497. If the DLD is causing harm to the telephone
network, the telephone company may request that you
disconnect the DLD until the problem is resolved.
The DLD card contains no user-serviceable parts. It must be
returned to the factory for repairs.
The DLD card can’t be used on a public coin telephone or party
line service provided by the telephone company.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
1.7
Introduction
Industry Canada information
Note: The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment.
This certification means that the equipment meets certain
telecommunications network protective, operational, and safety
requirements. Industry Canada does not guarantee the equipment
will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is
permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local
telecommunications company. The equipment must also be
installed using an acceptable method of connection. The
customer should be aware that compliance with the above
conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some
situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be coordinated by a
representative designated by the supplier. Any repairs or
alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment
malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause
to request the user disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical
ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines, and
internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected
together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural
areas.
Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections
themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric inspection
authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
Note: The ringer equivalence number (REN) assigned to each
terminal device provides an indication of the maximum number
of terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface.
The termination on an interface may consist of any combination
of devices subject only to the requirement that the sum of the
ringer equivalence numbers of all the devices does not exceed
five.
1.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Introduction
Related documentation
National Fire Protection
Association
1 Batterymarch Park
P.O. Box 9101
Quincy, MA 02269-9101
NFPA 11 Low-Expansion Foam Systems
NFPA 11A Medium- and High-Expansion Foam Systems
NFPA 12 Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 13 Sprinkler Systems
NFPA 15 Water Spray Fixed Systems for Fire Protection
NFPA 16 Deluge Foam-Water Sprinkler and Foam-Water
Spray Systems
NFPA 17 Dry Chemical Extinguishing Systems
NFPA 70 National Electric Code
NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm Code
Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.
333 Pfingsten Road
Northbrook, IL 60062-2096
UL 38 Manually Actuated Signaling Boxes
UL 217 Smoke Detectors, Single & Multiple Station
UL 228 Door Closers/Holders for Fire Protective Signaling
Systems
UL 268 Smoke Detectors for Fire Protective Signaling
Systems
UL 268A Smoke Detectors for Duct Applications
UL 346 Waterflow Indicators for Fire Protective Signaling
Systems
UL 464 Audible Signaling Appliances
UL 521 Heat Detectors for Fire Protective Signaling
Systems
UL 864 Standard for Control Units for Fire Protective
Signaling Systems
UL 1481 Power Supplies for Fire Protective Signaling
Systems
UL 1638 Visual Signaling Appliances
UL 1971 Visual Signaling Appliances
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
1.9
Introduction
Underwriters Laboratories of
Canada
7 Crouse Road
Scarborough, ON
Canada M1R 3A9
CSA C22.1-02 Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1
ULC S524 Standard for the Installation of Fire Alarm
Systems
ULC S527 Standard for Control Units for Fire Alarm
Systems
ULC S536 Standard for the Inspection and Testing of Fire
Alarm Systems
ULC S537 Standard for the Verification of Fire Alarm
Systems
ULC ORD-C693-1994 Central Station Fire Protective
Signaling System and Services
Edwards Systems Technology
6411 Parkland Drive
Sarasota, FL 34243
2-CTM City Tie Module Installation Sheet (P/N 270496)
CDR-3 Bell Coder Installation Sheet (P/N 3100023)
DLD Dual Inline Dialer Installation Sheet (P/N 3100187)
IOP3A Isolator RS-232 Card Installation Sheet (P/N
270758)
PS6 Power Supply Card Installation Sheet (P/N 3100201)
QSA-1(X), QSA-2(X) Remote Annunciator Cabinet
Installation Sheet (P/N 3100295)
QS-CPU(X) CPU/Display Unit Installation Sheet (P/N
3100276)
SL30, SL30-1, SL30L, SL20L5S LED/Switch Card
Installation Sheet (P/N 3100193)
SLIC Signature Intelligent Controller Card Installation
Sheet (P/N 3100192)
RS485 (NT-A) Card and QS-232 UART Module Installation
Sheet (P/N 3100191)
ZA8-2 Class A Zone Card Installation Sheet (P/N
3100189)
ZB16-4 Class B Zone Card Installation Sheet (P/N
3100188)
ZR8 Relay Card Installation Sheet (P/N 3100190)
SIGA-APS Auxiliary Power Supply Installation Sheet (P/N
387342)
Signature Series Intelligent Smoke and Heat Detectors
Applications Bulletin (P/N 270145)
Signature Series Component Installation Manual (P/N
270497)
EST Strobe Applications Guide (P/N 85000-0049)
QuickStart Online Help Utility (P/N 7350047)
QuickStart ULI and ULC Compatibility Lists (P/N 3100335)
1.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 2
Product description
Summary
This chapter provides technical descriptions of the control panel
and its operation. It also provides descriptions of the command
menus.
Content
General description • 2.3
System hardware capabilities • 2.3
Programmable features • 2.3
Control panel • 2.4
Option cards • 2.5
QSA series remote annunciators • 2.6
SRA4 remote annunciators • 2.7
Envoy graphic annunciators • 2.7
Accessories • 2.8
Minimum system requirements • 2.9
System status indicators • 2.10
Operator controls and indicators • 2.11
Optional controls and indicators • 2.13
Alphanumeric display • 2.15
System Normal display screen • 2.15
Event Message display screen • 2.15
Details display screen • 2.16
Command menu organization • 2.17
Level 1 command menus • 2.17
Level 2 command menus • 2.17
Level 3 command menus • 2.18
Level 4 command menus • 2.20
Command descriptions • 2.22
Main menu • 2.22
Status menu • 2.22
Reports menu • 2.22
Test menu • 2.24
Enable menu • 2.24
Disable menu • 2.25
Activate menu • 2.25
Restore menu • 2.25
Event messages • 2.26
Event message queues • 2.26
Fire alarm event messages • 2.26
Supervisory event messages • 2.27
Trouble event messages • 2.27
Monitor event messages • 2.28
Control panel operation • 2.29
Normal state • 2.29
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.1
Product description
Alarm state • 2.29
Supervisory state • 2.30
Trouble state • 2.30
Monitor state • 2.31
Disable state • 2.32
Test state • 2.33
2.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
General description
This topic provides a general description of the system hardware
capabilities, control panel, electronic subassemblies, and remote
annunciator panels.
System hardware capabilities
System hardware capabilities vary with cabinet size and
hardware configuration but generally include:
•
Up to 4 Class A or Class B intelligent addressable loops with
up to 250 devices on each
•
Up to 40 Class A or up to 48 Class B IDC input circuits.
Combination systems can’t exceed a total of 40 IDC input
circuits.
•
Up to 16 Class A or 20 Class B NAC output circuits
•
Up to two LED/switch cards
•
An alphanumeric display that provides supplemental
information related to the current functional condition of the
fire alarm system
•
Up to 96 dry contact relay outputs
•
Up to 4.5 amps of 24 Vfwr (full wave rectified) power for
operating notification appliances
•
A battery charger circuit capable of charging standby
batteries rated up to 40 Ah. Maximum battery size for ULC
applications is 30 Ah.
•
Up to eight fully supervised mirrored or customized remote
annunciator panels
Programmable features
The fire alarm system includes a number of programmable
features as listed below.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Zones
Service groups
AND groups
Matrix groups
Custom event messages
User labels
Automatic alarm signal silence timer
Alarm signal silence/reset inhibit timer
AC power fault delay timer
Panel silence resound timer
Waterflow silence
Zone resound inhibit
2.3
Product description
•
•
•
•
•
Two-stage timer
Fault reminder
Message routing
Message filtering
Time controls
Control panel
The control panel consists of a cabinet backbox and door, a
transformer, a PS6 power supply card, and a CPU/Display Unit.
The cabinet, PS6 card, and CPU/Display Unit are assembled in
the field. Optionally, the control panel can include 5 or 12
single-space option cards depending on the size of the cabinet
and 1 or 2 LED/switch cards.
The control panel is available in two cabinet sizes as shown in
Figure 2-1 and described in Table 2.1.
PRESS ZONE FOR INFORMATION
PRESS ZONE FOR INFORMATION
ALA RM
ALA RM
Superv isory
Superv isory
Dis able/ Test
Dis able/ Test
Monitor
Monitor
Trouble
Trouble
Ground Fault
Ground Fault
CPU Fault
CPU Fault
Pow er
Help
Pow er
Stat us
Help
Panel Silence/
Ackno wledge d
MENU
Del
Stat us
Panel Silence/
Ackno wledge d
Panel Silenced
Off
Enter
MENU
Del
Panel Silenced
Off
Enter
On
System
Reset
Alar m
Silence
Drill
1
2
3
On
Enable Controls
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
System
Reset
Alar m
Silence
Drill
1
2
3
Enable Controls
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
QS4-5
QS4-12
Figure 2-1: Fire alarm control panel front views
Table 2.1: Control panel models
2.4
Model
Description
QS4-5-(G/R)-(1/2)
Multiloop intelligent
addressable/conventional control panel, 5
option card spaces, gray (G) or red (R),
finish, 115 V (1) or 230 V (2) transformer
QS4-12-(G/R)-(1/2)
Multiloop intelligent
addressable/conventional control panel,
12 option card spaces, gray (G) or red (R),
finish, 115 V (1) or 230 V (2) transformer
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Control panels can be mounted directly on the finished wall
surface (surface mount) or partially recessed in a wall cavity
(semiflush mount). Semiflush mounted cabinets may require a
trim ring kit, ordered separately.
Option cards
The option cards that you can install in the control panel are
described in Table 2.2. Option cards are ordered separately and
installed in the field.
Table 2.2: Control panel option cards
Model
Description
NT-A
RS-485 card and QS-232 UART module. The NT-A
provides an additional communication channel for
Class A remote annunciators. Requires 1 card
space.
ZB16-4
Class B Conventional Zone Card. The ZB16-4 card
provides 16 IDC input circuits, 4 of which can be
used as NAC output circuits. Requires 2 card
spaces.
ZA8-2
Class A Conventional Zone Card. The ZA8-2 card
provides 8 IDC input circuits, 2 of which can be used
as NAC output circuits. Requires 2 card spaces.
ZR8
Relay Card. The ZR8 card provides 8 unsupervised
dry contact relay outputs. Requires 1 card space.
SLIC
Signature Loop Interface Controller. The SLIC card
provides 2 NAC output circuits and 1 signaling line
circuit interface (loop). Requires 1 card space.
DLD
Dual Line Dialer. The DLD card provides two
telephone line connections for transmitting status
changes to a central monitoring station. Requires 1
card space.
SL30
LED/switch card. The SL30 provides 30 groups of
LEDs and switches for zone or point annunciation.
The switches are numbered 1 to 30.
SL30-1
LED/switch card. The SL30-1 provides 30 groups of
LEDs and switches for zone or point annunciation.
The switches are numbered 31 to 60.
SL30L
LED/switch card. The SL30L provides 30 groups of
LEDs for zone or point annunciation. Card inserts
are provided for custom labeling.
SL20L5S
LED/switch card. The SL20L5S provides 20 groups
of LEDs, and 5 groups of LEDs and switches. Card
inserts are provided for custom labeling.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.5
Product description
For more information, see Chapter 3, “Panel components.”
QSA series remote annunciators
QSA series remote annunciators provide system controls and
annunciation of event messages and system status at remote
locations throughout the protected premises.
QSA series remote annunciators consist of a cabinet backbox
and door, a CPU/Display Unit, and a remote annunciator
interface (RAI) card. Optionally, a QSA series remote
annunciator can include one or two LED/switch cards depending
on the cabinet size. The cabinet and CPU/Display Unit are
ordered separately and assembled in the field.
The QSA series remote annunciators that you can connect to a
control panel are shown in Figure 2-2 and described in Table 2.3.
PRESS ZONE FOR INFORMATION
PRESS ZO NE FO R INFORMATION
A LA RM
A LA RM
Supervis ory
1
6
11
16
21
26
2
7
12
17
22
27
3
8
13
18
23
28
Supervis ory
Monit or
Ground F ault
Ground F ault
C PU Fault
C PU Fault
Po w er
Po w er
4
9
14
19
24
29
5
10
15
20
25
30
Help
Statu s
Pan el Silen ce/
Ackno wled ged
MENU
Del
Pane l Silence /
Ackno wledg ed
Alar m
Silenc e
Drill
1
2
3
MENU
Off
5
6
7
8
21
26
31
36
41
46
51
56
17
22
27
32
37
42
47
52
57
13
18
23
28
33
38
43
48
53
58
4
9
14
19
24
29
34
39
44
49
54
59
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
Del
60
Off
Ente r
On
Ena ble C ontr ols
4
16
12
8
Pane l Silence d
On
Syste m
Res et
11
7
3
Statu s
Pan el Silen ced
Ente r
6
2
Trouble
Trouble
Help
1
D isable/Test
D isable/Test
Monit or
9
0
30-zone remote annunciator
System
Rese t
Alarm
Silence
Drill
1
2
3
Enab le Co ntro ls
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
60-zone remote annunciator
Figure 2-2: QSA series remote annunciator front views
Table 2.3: QSA series remote annunciators
Model
Description
QSA-1-S
Surface mount cabinet for QS4-CPU-1
QSA-1-F
Semiflush mount cabinet for QS4-CPU-1
QSA-2-S
Surface mount cabinet for QS4-CPU-2
QSA-2-F
Semiflush mount cabinet for QS4-CPU-2
QS4-CPU-1 Multiloop intelligent addressable/conventional
CPU/Display Unit with 1 LED/switch card mounting
space. Includes RAI card.
QS4-CPU-2 Multiloop intelligent addressable/conventional
CPU/Display Unit with 2 LED/switch card mounting
spaces. Includes RAI card.
QSA series remote annunciators communicate with the control
panel and up to seven other remote annunciators via the control
panel’s RS-485 riser. Operating power can come from one of the
following sources:
•
•
•
2.6
The smoke/accessory output on a PS6 card
A BPS series booster power supply
A SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Note: The PS6 card’s smoke/accessory output can supply power
to only one QSA series remote annunciator. If more than one
QSA series remote annunciator is installed, you must use an
auxiliary power supply. Use the same supply to power each
remote annunciator.
SRA4 remote annunciators
The SRA4 (see Figure 2-3) provides system controls and
annunciation of event messages and system status at remote
locations throughout the protected premises.
Reset
Power
Alarm
Signal
Silence
Supervisory
Gnd Fault
Trouble
Ack/
Silence
Drill
Del
Ent
Enable
Controls
Lamp Test
On
Off
Figure 2-3: SRA4 front view
The SRA4 communicates with the control panel and up to seven
other remote annunciators via the control panel’s RS-485 riser.
Operating power can come from one of the following sources:
•
•
•
The smoke/accessory output on a PS6 card
A BPS series booster power supply
A SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply
The PS6 card’s smoke/accessory output can supply power to one
or two SRA4 remote annunciators. If more than two SRA4
remote annunciators are installed, you must use an auxiliary
power supply. Use the same supply to power each remote
annunciator.
Note: The SRA4 does not provide ground fault isolation.
Envoy graphic annunciators
Envoy graphic annunciators display system alarm, supervisory,
monitor, and trouble events using an SRA4 remote annunciator
and the protected premises’ building, floor, or site map. LEDs
behind the map indicate the location of interest while the SRA4
displays specific information about the active device.
Envoy graphic annunciators are built per customer specifications
and can include up to 144 LED indicators and 72 switches.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.7
Product description
An Envoy graphic annunciator communicates with the control
panel and up to seven other remote annunciators via the control
panel’s RS-485 riser. Operating power can come from one of the
following sources:
•
•
•
The smoke/accessory output on a PS6 card
A BPS series booster power supply
A SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply
Accessories
Table 2.4 lists the accessories you can connect to the control
panel.
Table 2.4: Control panel accessories
2.8
Model
Description
QS-Cable12
Expansion cable for 12-option cabinets
Trim-5
Trim ring kit for a QS4-5-G-1
Trim-5R
Trim ring kit for a QS4-5-R-1
Trim-12
Trim ring kit for a QS4-12-G-1
Trim-12R
Trim ring kit for a QS4-12-R-1
QS-CU
QuickStart configuration utility
QS-Scan
QuickStart barcode scanner and programming
guide
PT-1S
Desktop serial dot matrix printer
BC-1(R)
Battery cabinet that holds one 40 Ah battery or
two 24 Ah batteries
MFC-A
Multifunction cabinet for mounting accessory
modules
IOP3A
RS-232 Isolator Module
RPM
Reverse Polarity Module
CDR-3
Bell Coder Module
2-CTM
City Tie Module
BPS6(A)
6.5-amp Booster Power Supply, 110 V
BPS10(A)
10-amp Booster Power Supply, 110 V
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Minimum system requirements
Table 2.5 lists the minimum hardware requirements for each type
of system that the control panel is listed.
Table 2.5: Minimum system requirements
System
Equipment needed
Protected Premises (Local) Fire A control panel consisting of a cabinet enclosure, a
Alarm System
CPU/Display Unit, and a PS6 card
Appropriately sized standby batteries
A SLIC card, ZB16-4 card, or ZA8-2 card with at least one
alarm input and one audible output
Auxiliary Fire Alarm System,
Local Energy Type
A control panel consisting of a cabinet enclosure, a
CPU/Display Unit, and a PS6 card
Appropriately sized standby batteries
A SLIC card with at least one alarm input and a SIGA-CC1
configured as a common alarm output device type
A 2-CTM module
Remote Supervising Station
Fire Alarm System
A control panel consisting of a cabinet enclosure, a
CPU/Display Unit, and a PS6 card
Appropriately sized standby batteries
A SLIC card, ZB16-4 card, or ZA8-2 card with at least one
alarm input
A DLD card or an RPM module
Central Station Fire Alarm
System
A control panel consisting of a cabinet enclosure, a
CPU/Display Unit, and a PS6 card
Appropriately sized standby batteries
A SLIC card, ZB16-4 card, or ZA8-2 card with at least one
alarm input
A DLD card or an RPM module
Releasing Service
A control panel consisting of a cabinet enclosure, a
CPU/Display Unit, and a PS6 card
Appropriately sized standby batteries
A SLIC card with at least one alarm input and one audible
output
A SIGA-REL module
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.9
Product description
System status indicators
PRESS ZONE FOR INFORMATION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
ALARM
Supervisory
Disable/Test
Monitor
Optional controls
and indicators
Trouble
Ground Fault
Optional controls
and indicators
CPU Fault
Power
Help
Status
Panel Silence/
Acknowledge
MENU
Del
Panel Silenced
Off
Enter
On
System
Reset
Alarm
Silence
Drill
1
2
3
Enable Controls
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
Table 2-6: System status indicator descriptions
No.
Indicator
Description
1
Alarm LED
Red LED that indicates an active fire alarm input (flashing = new
fire alarm event, steady = all current fire alarm events have been
acknowledged)
2
Supervisory LED
Yellow LED that indicates an active supervisory input (flashing =
new supervisory event, steady = all current supervisory events
have been acknowledged)
3
Disable/Test LED
Yellow LED that indicates the control panel is in the disabled
state or in the test state.
Note: The disabled state has priority over the test state.
4
Monitor LED
Yellow LED that indicates an active monitor input (flashing = new
monitor event, steady = all current monitor events have been
acknowledged)
5
Trouble LED
Yellow LED that indicates the control panel is in the trouble state
(flashing = new trouble event, steady = all current trouble events
have been acknowledged)
6
Ground Fault LED
Yellow LED that indicates there is a ground fault somewhere in
the system
7
CPU Fault LED
Yellow LED that indicates an unexpected interruption or failure
with the microprocessor
8
Power LED
Green LED that indicates the control panel is energized
2.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Operator controls and indicators
10
9
PRESS ZONE FOR INFORMATION
ALARM
Supervisory
1
Disable/Test
Monitor
Optional controls
and indicators
Trouble
Ground Fault
Optional controls
and indicators
CPU Fault
Power
2
Help
Status
3
4
5, 6, 7
8
Panel Silence/
Acknowledge
MENU
Del
Panel Silenced
Off
Enter
On
System
Reset
Alarm
Silence
Drill
1
2
3
Enable Controls
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
11 12 13, 14, 15
Table 2-7: Operator control and indicator descriptions
No.
Control/Indicator
Description
1
Alphanumeric display
Provides supplemental information relevant to the current
functional condition of the control panel
2
Left and right cursor
switches
On command menus, moves the cursor left or right one
character at a time in a data entry field
On event message screens, selects the previous or next event
message queue
3
Help switch
Displays additional information about the selected event
message
4
Status switch
Displays the Status menu from which you can identify system
components that are active, disabled, or in the test state
5
System Reset switch
Restores the system to the normal state provided that no inputs
are latched in the active state. The LED next to the switch
indicates the function is active. Requires the level 2 password
or enable controls key to operate.
6
Alarm Silence switch
Turns off (silences) all active audible and common alarm output
device types, and if configured, all visible device types.
Pressing the switch again turns them on. The LED next to the
switch indicates the function is active. Requires the level 2
password or the enable controls key to operate.
7
Drill switch
Turns on all audible, visible, and common alarm output device
types. Pressing the switch again turns them off. The LED next
to the switch indicates the function is active. Requires the level
2 password to operate.
8
Numeric keypad
Enters the number or selects the menu item shown on the
button face
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.11
Product description
No.
Control/Indicator
Description
9
Panel Silence/
Acknowledge switch
Silences the panel buzzer and acknowledges all current events.
The LED next to the switch indicates the function is active.
10
Up and down cursor
switches
On command menus, moves the cursor up or down one line at
a time
On event message screens, scrolls through the messages in
the selected event message queue
11
Barcode jack
Used to connect a compatible barcode wand for entering
location description text or to connect a download cable (model
no. PROGCABLE-1, ordered separately) for downloading or
retrieving the project database
12
Enable Controls switch
Gives the operator immediate access to level 2 command
menus and control switches without entering a password
13
Menu switch
Displays the system command menus from which you can
operate, maintain, and program the fire alarm system
14
Delete switch
Backspaces the cursor or returns the operator to the previous
menu
15
Enter switch
Processes commands or accepts data from the operator
2.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Optional controls and indicators
1
2
3
PR ESS ZON E FOR INF ORM AT ION
ALARM
Supervisory
1
6
11
16
21
26
31
36
41
46
51
56
2
7
12
17
22
27
32
37
42
47
52
57
3
8
13
18
23
28
33
38
43
48
53
58
4
9
14
19
24
29
34
39
44
49
54
59
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
Disabled/Test
Monitor
Trouble
Ground Fault
CPU Fault
Power
H elp
Status
Panel Silence/
Ack now ledge
M ENU
D el
Panel Silenced
Off
Enter
On
System
R es et
Silenc e
Alarm
Drill
1
2
3
Enable Controls
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
Table 2-8: Optional control and indicator descriptions
No.
Indicator
Description
1
Zone display/select
switch
Displays the location description, if programmed, for the
corresponding zone. When enabling or disabling a zone, pressing
the switch selects the corresponding zone in the zone list.
Note: This switch is not available on all LED/switch card models.
2
Active LED
Red or yellow LED that indicates the corresponding zone is active
(red = fire alarm zone, yellow = supervisory or monitor zone)
3
Trouble LED
Yellow LED that indicates the corresponding zone is in a trouble
state
Optional control and indicators are provided using LED/switch
cards. Typically, LED/switch cards are used for zone
annunciation but can be used for point annunciation or manual
override controls as well. For more information, see the topic
“LED/switch cards” in Chapter 3.
Zones are automatically mapped to LED/switch cards as shown
in the table below. By default, the LED/switch card positioned
closest to the alphanumeric display is assigned to Annunciator
Group 1 and the next LED/switch card is assigned to
Annunciator Group 2.
Annunciator group
Zones
1
1 to 30
2
31 to 60
3
61 to 90
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.13
Product description
2.14
Annunciator group
Zones
4
91 to 120
5
121 to 150
6
151 to 180
7
181 to 210
8
211 to 240
9
241 to 270
10
271 to 300
11
301 to 330
12
331 to 360
13
361 to 390
14
391 to 420
15
421 to 450
16
451 to 480
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Alphanumeric display
In addition to the system status indicators, the CPU/Display Unit
uses an alphanumeric display to provide supplemental
information related to the current functional condition of the
control panel.
System Normal display screen
The alphanumeric display shows the System Normal display
screen when the control panel is in the normal (quiescent) state.
1
2
05:45:00
06/21
System
Normal
Your Building
3
Alarm History:
0000
1. Time and date field: Displays the system time in 24-hour
format and system date in MM/DD format, where:
•
•
MM is the month’s number (e.g., 06 is June)
DD is the date
2. Banner window: Displays “System Normal” and, if
programmed, the facility name
3. Alarm history field: Displays how many times the control
panel has entered the alarm state
Event Message display screen
The alphanumeric display shows the Event Message display
screen when the control panel enters the fire alarm, supervisory,
monitor, trouble, disablement, or test state.
1
2
3
4
05:45:00
A002 D000
>002PULL STATION
1ST FLOOR
EAST EXIT DOOR
001ALARM ACTIVE
P:01 C:01 D:001
No Message
ALM SUP TRBL MON
002 000 000 000
1. Time field: Displays the system time in 24-hour format
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.15
Product description
2. Active and disabled points field: Displays the number of
active points (Annn) and the number of disabled points (Dnnn)
currently in the system
3. Event message window: Displays two event messages from
the selected event message queue. Event messages are numbered
in the order in which they were received and include the device
address (or location description, if programmed) of the device
that signaled the event. Use the up and down arrow switches to
scroll through the event messages.
4. Event message queues: Displays the number of event
messages stored in each of the event message queues. Use the
left and right arrow switches to select an event message queue.
Details display screen
Pressing the Help switch while an event message is selected
displays the Details display screen.
DETAILS
P:01 C:01 D:002
1ST FLOOR
EAST EXIT DOOR
*END COMPLETE*
ALM SUP TRBL MON
002 000 000 000
The Details display screen provides the device address and, if
programmed, the location description of the device that
generated the selected event message. If the selected event
message were for a zone, the Details display screen would show
which devices in the zone were activated.
2.16
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Command menu organization
Operator commands are organized into menus. There are four
separate levels of command menus as described below.
Level 1 command menus
The level 1 command menus (see
Table 2-9) include the commands that anyone can use without
entering a password.
Table 2-9: Level 1 command menu organization
Commands
(NFPA72 systems)
Commands
(ULC-527 systems)
1) Status
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
2) Reports
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) Alarm History
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) Alarm History
3) Test
1) Lamp Test
1) Lamp Test
Menu
4) Login
Level 2 command menus
The level 2 command menus (see Table 2-10) include the
commands that an operator can use after entering the level 2
password or after switching the Enable Controls key switch to
the ON position.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.17
Product description
Table 2-10: Level 2 command menu organization
Commands
(NFPA72 systems)
Commands
(ULC-527 systems)
1) Status
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
2) Reports
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) History
3) Alarm History
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) History
3) Alarm History
3) Test
1) Lamp Test
1) Lamp Test
4) Enable
1) Zone
2) Device
1) Zone
2) Device
5) Disable
1) Zone
2) Device
1) Zone
2) Device
6) Activate
1) Alt Sens
2) Alt Msg Route
1) Alt Sens
2) Alt Msg Route
7) Restore
1) Prm Sens
2) Prm Msg Route
1) Prm Sens
2) Prm Msg Route
8) Program
1) Edit Password
1) Level 1
1) Time/Date
1) Enter Time
2) Edit Password
1) Level 1
Menu
9) Login
Level 3 command menus
The level 3 command menus (see Table 2-11) include the
commands that an operator can use after entering the level 3
password.
2.18
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Table 2-11: Level 3 command menu organization
Commands
(NFPA72 systems)
Commands
(ULC-527 systems)
1) Status
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
2) Reports
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) History
3) Revisions
4) Alarm History
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) History
3) Revisions
4) Alarm History
3) Test
1) Start Test
2) Cancel Test
3) Lamp Test
1) Start Test
2) Cancel Test
3) Lamp Test
4) Enable
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
4) Switch
5) Loop Mapping
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
4) Switch
5) Loop Mapping
5) Disable
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
4) Switch
5) Loop Mapping
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
4) Switch
5) Loop Mapping
6) Activate
1) Output
2) Alt Sens
3) Alt Msg Route
4) LED
1) Output
2) Alt Sens
3) Alt Msg Route
4) LED
7) Restore
1) Output
2) Prm Sens
3) Prm Msg Route
4) LED
1) Output
2) Prm Sens
3) Prm Msg Route
4) LED
Menu
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.19
Product description
Menu
8) Program
Commands
(NFPA72 systems)
Commands
(ULC-527 systems)
1) Time/Date
1) Enter Time
2) Enter Date
2) Edit Password
1) Level 1
2) Level 2
1) Time/Date
1) Enter Time
2) Enter Date
2) Edit Password
1) Level 1
2) Level 2
9) Login
Level 4 command menus
The level 4 command menus (see Table 2-12) include the
commands that an operator can use by entering the level 4
password.
Table 2-12: Level 4 command menu organization
Commands
(NFPA72 systems)
Commands
(ULC-527 systems)
1) Status
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
1) All Active
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
7) Disabled Pts
8) Outputs
9) Internal
2) Reports
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) History
3) Revisions
4) Alarm History
1) Maintenance
1) Dirty>80%
2) Dirty>20%
3) Single Device
4) Card Devices
2) History
3) Revisions
4) Alarm History
3) Test
1) Start Test
2) Cancel Test
3) Lamp Test
1) Start Test
2) Cancel Test
3) Lamp Test
Menu
2.20
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Commands
(NFPA72 systems)
Commands
(ULC-527 systems)
4) Enable
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Card
4) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
5) Switch
6) Loop Mapping
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Card
4) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
5) Switch
6) Loop Mapping
5) Disable
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Card
4) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
5) Switch
6) Loop Mapping
1) Zone
2) Device
3) Card
4) Group
1) AND
2) Matrix
3) Time Control
5) Switch
6) Loop Mapping
6) Activate
1) Output
2) Alt Sens
3) Alt Msg Route
4) LED
1) Output
2) Alt Sens
3) Alt Msg Route
4) LED
7) Restore
1) Output
2) Prm Sens
3) Prm Msg Route
4) LED
1) Output
2) Prm Sens
3) Prm Msg Route
4) LED
8) Program
1) Time/Date
1) Enter Time
2) Enter Date
2) Edit Password
1) Level 1
2) Level 2
3) Level 3
4) Level 4
3) Restart
4) Clear History
5) Configure
1) AutoLearn
2) System
3) Cards
4) Zones
5) Outputs
6) Exit
1) Time/Date
1) Enter Time
2) Enter Date
2) Edit Password
1) Level 1
2) Level 2
3) Level 3
4) Level 4
3) Restart
4) Clear History
5) Configure
1) AutoLearn
2) System
3) Cards
4) Zones
5) Outputs
6) Exit
Menu
9) Login
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.21
Product description
Command descriptions
MAIN MENU
►1)Status
2)Reports
3)Test
4)Enable
5)Disable
6)Activate
7)Restore
8)Program
9)Login
This topic describes the commands that you can use to operate
the control panel from the CPU/Display Unit. System commands
are organized into menus. The password you use to log on to the
fire alarm system determines which command menus are
presented on the CPU/Display Unit. For more information, see
the topic “Command menu organization” in this chapter.
Main menu
Pressing the Menu switch displays the main menu. Each
command on the main menu displays a subordinate command
menu described below.
Status menu
STATUS MENU
►1)All Active
2)Alarm
3)Supervisory
4)Trouble
5)Monitor
6)Test
7)Disabled Pts
8)Outputs
9)Internal
Use the commands on the Status menu to check the status of the
fire alarm system. The report that each command creates
includes both physical points and pseudo points.
All Active: Display or print a list of all addressable points that
are in an active (abnormal) state.
Alarm: Display or print a list of all alarm input device types that
are active (in alarm).
Supervisory: Display or print a list of all active supervisory
input device types.
Trouble: Display or print a list of all points in trouble.
Monitor: Display or print a list of all active monitor input device
types.
Test: Display or print a list of points in an active service group
that are in the active or trouble state.
Disabled Pts: Display or print a list of all addressable points
that are disabled.
Outputs: Display or print a list of all active output device types
and LED/switch card LEDs.
Internal: Display or print the status of the power supply
voltages.
Reports menu
REPORTS MENU
►1)Maintenance
2)History
3)Revisions
4)Alarm History
2.22
Use the commands on the Reports menu to retrieve maintenance
and service related information from the control panel. There are
five kinds of report: maintenance, history, revisions, and alarm
history.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Maintenance
The Maintenance command lets you select one of the reports
described below.
Dirty > 80%: Creates a report that lists all intelligent addressable
smoke detectors that are more than 80% dirty. A smoke detector
that is more than 80% dirty should be cleaned or replaced as
soon as possible.
Dirty > 20%: Creates a report that lists all intelligent addressable
smoke detectors that are more than 20% dirty. A smoke detector
that is more than 20% dirty should be noted for possible cleaning
or replacing in the future.
Single Device: Creates a report that lists the attributes of a
specific intelligent addressable smoke detector. The attributes
listed include type, location description (if programmed), percent
dirty, and primary and alternate alarm sensitivity values.
Requires the panel-card-device address (PPCCDDD) of the
detector.
Card Devices: Creates a report that lists the attributes of every
intelligent addressable smoke detector connected to a specific
loop controller. The attributes listed include type, location
description (if programmed), percent dirty, and primary and
alternate alarm sensitivity values. Requires the panel-card
address (PPCC) of the loop controller.
History
The History command creates a report that lists the last 1,000
events or operator instructions processed by the control panel.
The items in the list are presented in the order in which they
occurred and contain the following information:
•
•
•
The event or system command name
The time and date of occurrence
The source that initiated the event or command
Revisions
The Revisions command creates a report that lists the revision
level of all the hardware and software components installed in
the cabinet.
For the project database, the report includes:
•
•
•
•
The market place
The configuration utility version number and project number
if the database loaded into the panel was created using the
configuration utility
The CPU firmware revision number
The database serial number and the date it was compiled
For the CPU/Display Unit, the report includes:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.23
Product description
•
•
The CPU type and firmware version number
The quantity and type of LED/switch cards installed
For each option card, the report includes:
•
•
•
The card number
The card type
The firmware revision number and date
Alarm History
The Alarm History command creates a report that lists the
number of times the control panel has entered the alarm state.
Test menu
TEST MENU
►1)Start Test
2)Cancel Test
3)Lamp Test
Use the commands on the Test menu to perform periodic
inspection tests on the fire alarm system. There are three test
commands.
Start Test: Lets you verify the operation of devices in the
selected service group without causing the control panel to enter
the fire alarm or trouble state.
Cancel Test: Returns the devices in the selected service group to
normal operation. Upon canceling a test, any devices left in an
active state causes the control panel to report a trouble.
Lamp Test: Temporarily turns on the panel buzzer, all LED
indicators, and every pixel on the alphanumeric display. When
operated from the control panel CPU/Display Unit, the lamp test
command tests only the control panel. When operated from a
remote annunciator CPU/Display Unit, the lamp test command
tests the indicators on all remote annunciators at the same time.
Enable menu
ENABLE MENU
►1)Zone
2)Device
3)Card
4)Group
5)Switch
Use the commands on the Enable menu to place parts of the fire
alarm system that have been disabled back into service.
Zone: Enables the zone selected from a zone list.
Device: Enables a device or circuit. Requires a panel-card-
device address (PPCCDDD).
Card: Enables an option card. Requires a panel-card address
(PPCC).
Group: Displays the Enable Group menu from which you can
enable an AND group, matrix group, or time control.
Switch: Enables a switch on an LED/switch card. Requires a
group-switch address (GGSS).
2.24
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Disable menu
DISABLE MENU
►1)Zone
2)Device
3)Card
4)Group
5)Switch
Use the commands on the Disable menu to take individual zones,
input and output points, option cards, and other parts of the fire
alarm system out of service.
Zone: Disables the zone selected from a zone list.
Device: Disables a device or circuit. Requires a panel-card-
device address (PPCCDDD).
Card: Disables an option card. Requires a panel-card address
(PPCC).
Group: Displays the Disable Group menu from which you can
disable an AND group, matrix group, or time control.
Switch: Disables a switch on an LED/switch card. Requires a
group-switch address (GGSS).
Activate menu
ACTIVATE MENU
►1)Output
2)Alt Sens
3)Alt Msg Route
4)LED
Use the commands on the Activate menu to switch outputs and
LED indicators on, and switch sensor sensitivity and event
message routing to their alternate settings.
Output: Changes the state of an output point from off to an
active state or from one active state to another active state.
Alt Sens: Switches fire detector sensitivity settings from
primary alarm sensitivity to alternate alarm sensitivity.
Alt Msg Route: Switches event message routing from primary
message routing to alternate message routing.
LED: Changes the state of an LED from off to an active state or
from one active state to another active state.
Restore menu
RESTORE MENU
►1)Output
2)Prm Sens
3)Prm Msg Route
4)LED
Use the commands on the Restore menu to switch outputs and
LED indicators off, and switch sensor sensitivity and event
message routing to their primary settings.
Output: Changes the state of an output point to off.
Prm Sens: Switches sensor sensitivity settings from alternate
alarm sensitivity to primary alarm sensitivity.
Prm Msg Route: Switches event message routing from alternate
message routing to primary message routing.
LED: Changes the state of an LED to off.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.25
Product description
Event messages
Event messages are used to help locate the source of an
abnormal state. The control panel dynamically maintains the 500
most recent, highest priority event messages. There are four
kinds of event message: fire alarm, supervisory, trouble, and
monitor.
An event message consists of three lines of text. The first line
displays the event name and number. The next two lines display
a location description. If a location description was not
programmed, the display shows the address of the point that
signaled the event and the text “No message.”
Event message queues
Event messages are stored in four event message queues located
at the bottom of the event message display screen. They are
arranged from left to right in order of importance as follows:
•
•
•
•
ALM = fire alarm event messages (highest priority)
SUP = supervisory event messages
TRBL = trouble event messages
MON = monitor event messages (lowest priority)
Fire alarm event messages
08:31:00
A002 D000
►002ZONE ALARM
1ST FLOOR
EAST WING
001PULL STATION
P:01 C:01 D:001
No message
ALM SUP TRBL MON
002 000 000 000
2.26
Fire alarm event messages identify fire alarm inputs that have
been activated and are stored in the ALM event message queue.
Activated fire alarm inputs signal a fire alarm or life-threatening
emergency that requires immediate attention. The table below
describes the different fire alarm event messages that can appear
in the ALM event message queue.
Event name
Description
ALARM ACTIVE
Smoke detector is active
AND GROUP
AND group is active
HEAT ALARM
Heat detector is active
PULL STATION
Manual pull station is active
MATRIX GROUP
Matrix group is active
WATERFLOW
Waterflow switch is active
ZONE ALARM
Fire alarm zone is active
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Supervisory event messages
08:31:00
A001 D000
►001TAMPER
P:01 C:01 D:001
No message
ALM SUP TRBL MON
000 000 000 001
Supervisory event messages are stored in the SUP event message
queue and identify active supervisory inputs. Active supervisory
inputs indicate a component of the fire suppression system is an
abnormal state. The table below lists the different supervisory
event messages that can appear in the SUP event message queue.
Event name
Description
LATCH SUPV
A device used to monitor a component of
the fire suppression system is active
LATCH TAMPER
Sprinkler tamper switch circuit is active
SUPERVISORY
A device used to monitor a component of
the fire suppression system is active
TAMPER
Sprinkler tamper switch circuit is active
ZONE SUPER
Supervisory zone in the active state
Trouble event messages
08:31:00
A001 D000
►001LCL FAULT
Battery Wiring
Or Battery Fault
ALM SUP TRBL MON
000 000 001 000
Trouble event messages identify system inputs and system
outputs that are in a fault state and are stored in the TRBL event
message queue. The table below describes the different trouble
event messages that can appear in the TRBL event message
queue.
Event name
Description
DISABLED
System component is disabled
GROUND FAULT
Earth ground fault
INTERNAL TBL
Internal system trouble
LCL TROUBLE
Trouble reported by an option card
SERVICE GROUP
Service group is active
TEST
Service group test is active
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.27
Product description
Event name
Description
TROUBLE
Generic trouble event message for the
following Signature troubles:
TROUBLE OPEN
•
BAD PERSONATY: Personality
mismatch
•
BAD TYPE: Device type mismatch
•
COMM FAULT: Communication failure
•
DEV COMPATIB: Incompatible device
•
DIRTY HEAD: Detector is 100% dirty
and needs to be cleaned or replaced
Open detected on a supervised output’s
field wiring
TROUBLE SHORT Short detected on a supervised output’s
field wiring
UNEXPECT DEV
Device installed but not defined in the
project database
Monitor event messages
08:31:00
A001 D000
►001MONITOR
P:01 C:01 D:001
No message
ALM SUP TRBL MON
000 000 000 001
2.28
Monitor event messages are stored in the MON event message
queue and identify active monitor inputs. Active monitor inputs
indicate the operation of ancillary system functions. The table
below describes the different monitor event messages that can
appear in the MON event message queue.
Event name
Description
ALARM VERIFY
Alarm verification in progress
LCL MONITOR
Common monitor
MAINT ALERT
Smoke detector is at least 80% dirty
MONITOR
Active nonlatching input circuit
OBJECT RUN
Service group is active
PREALARM
Possible fire condition exists
SWITCH
Switch pressed on LED/switch card
TIME CONTROL
Time control is active
ZONE MONITOR
Monitor zone in the active state
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
Control panel operation
The control panel can operate simultaneously in the following
states:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Normal
Alarm
Supervisory
Trouble
Monitor
Disable
Test
Each state is described in detail below.
Note: For the control panel to indicate an abnormal operating
state, the event message for the activated point must be routed to
the control panel. Event message routing does not affect the
outputs of the abnormal state.
Normal state
The control panel operates in the normal state in the absence of
any active inputs. In the normal state, only the power LED is on
and the alphanumeric display shows the System Normal display
screen.
Alarm state
The control panel enters the alarm state when an alarm input is
activated (goes into alarm).
Output of the alarm state
Upon entering the alarm state, the control panel:
•
Changes the contact positions on the common alarm relay
(Relay 1 on the PS6 card)
•
Activates all common alarm outputs
•
Executes the active response programmed for the First
Alarm pseudo point
•
Executes the active response programmed for the alarm
input
Indication of the alarm state
The control panel indicates it is in the alarm state as follows:
•
The panel buzzer sounds a repeating pattern of four beeps
•
The Alarm LED flashes at a rate of 300 times per minute
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.29
Product description
•
The alphanumeric display shows the content of the ALM
message queue starting with the most recent alarm event
message
•
If the input was an alarm zone, the zone’s active LED on the
LED/switch card flashes at a rate of 300 times per minute
Supervisory state
The control panel enters the supervisory state when a
supervisory input is activated.
Output of the supervisory state
Upon entering the supervisory state, the control panel:
•
Closes the normally open contacts on the common
supervisory relay (Relay 2 on the PS6 card)
•
Executes the active response programmed for the First
Supervisory pseudo point
•
Executes the active response programmed for the
supervisory input
Indication of the supervisory state
The control panel indicates it is in the supervisory state as
follows:
•
The panel buzzer sounds a repeating pattern of two beeps
•
The Supervisory LED flashes at a rate of 30 times per
minute
•
If the input was a supervisory zone, the zone’s active LED
on the LED/switch card flashes at a rate of 300 times per
minute
•
The alphanumeric display shows the content of the SUP
message queue starting with the most recent event message
Note: Most supervisory indications are restored automatically
when the supervisory input is restored. Latching supervisory
inputs and latching tamper inputs require a system reset in order
for the indications to restore.
Trouble state
The control panel enters the trouble state when there is a system,
device, or wiring fault.
Output of the trouble state
Upon entering the trouble state, the control panel:
2.30
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
•
Opens the normally closed contacts on the common trouble
relay (Relay 3 on the PS6 card)
•
Executes the trouble response programmed for the First
Trouble pseudo point
•
Executes the trouble response programmed for the point that
signaled the trouble condition
Indication of the trouble state
The control panel indicates it is in the trouble state as follows:
•
The panel buzzer beeps at a rate of 30 times per minute
•
The Trouble LED flashes 30 times per minute
•
The alphanumeric display shows the content of the TRBL
message queue starting with the most recent trouble event
message
•
If the trouble is a zone trouble, the trouble LED on the
LED/switch card for the zone flashes at a rate of 300 times
per minute
•
If the trouble is a CPU fault, the CPU Fault LED turns on
•
If the trouble is a ground fault, the Ground Fault LED turns
on
Note: Trouble indications are restored automatically when the
trouble condition is cleared. If the panel buzzer has been
silenced, a new trouble re-sounds the buzzer.
Monitor state
The control panel enters the monitor state when a monitor input
is activated.
Output of the monitor state
Upon entering the monitor state, the control panel:
•
Executes the active response programmed for the First
Monitor pseudo point
•
Executes the active response programmed for the monitor
input
Indication of the monitor state
The control panel indicates it is in the monitor state as follows:
•
The panel buzzer sounds a repeating pattern of four beeps
•
The Monitor LED flashes 30 times per minute
•
If the input was a monitor zone, the zone’s active LED on
the LED/switch card flashes 300 times per minute
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.31
Product description
•
The alphanumeric display shows the content of the monitor
event message queue (MON) starting with the most recent
event message
Note: Monitor indications are restored automatically when the
monitor input is restored.
Disable state
The control panel enters the disable state when a zone, device,
card, logic group or switch is disabled. Logic groups that can be
disabled include AND groups, matrix groups, and time controls.
Note: For anything other than a zone, use the Disabled Pts.
command on the Status menu to identify a disabled point. For
more information, see the topic “Checking system status” in
Chapter 5.
Output of the disable state
Upon entering the disable state, the control panel:
•
Opens the normally closed contacts on the common trouble
relay (Relay 3 on the PS6 card)
•
Executes the trouble response programmed for the First
Trouble pseudo point
•
Executes the trouble response programmed for the First
Disable pseudo point
•
Executes the disablement response programmed for the point
that was disabled
Indication of the disable state
The control panel indicates it is in the disable state as follows:
•
The panel buzzer beeps at a rate of 30 times per minute
•
The Disable/Test LED turns on
•
The Trouble LED flashes at a rate of 30 times per minute
•
The TRBL message queue displays a LCL TROUBLE event
message for the First Disable pseudo point
•
The TRBL message queue displays a DISABLED event
message for the disabled point
When a point is disabled, the control panel does not process any
of the point’s status changes and the point remains in its current
state. For example, if an Audible device type in the normal state
were disabled and subsequently activated, the Audible device
type would not turn on until it was enabled. Conversely, if an
active Audible device type were disabled and subsequently
restored, the Audible device type would not turn off until it was
enabled.
2.32
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Product description
If a point in trouble is disabled and the cause of the trouble
changes while the point is disabled, the point’s original trouble
event message may not update when the point is enabled. For
example, a shorted NAC output circuit whose wiring is opened
after it has been disabled still displays the TROUBLE SHRT
event message after it is enabled.
Test state
The control panel enters the test state when a service group is
activated.
Output of the test state
Upon entering the test state, the control panel:
•
Executes the active response programmed for the First
Monitor pseudo point
•
Executes the trouble response programmed for the First
Trouble pseudo point
•
Executes the trouble response programmed for the First Test
pseudo point
•
Executes the running response programmed for the service
group
While in the test state:
•
When a member of an active service group is activated, the
control panel executes the service group’s active test
response
•
When a member of an active service group is placed in a
trouble condition, the control panel executes the service
group’s trouble test response
Note: If a trouble test response has not been programmed, the
control panel executes the active test response instead.
Indication of the test state
The control panel indicates it is in the test state as follows:
•
The panel buzzer beeps at a rate of 30 times per minute
•
The Disable/Test LED turns on
•
The Monitor LED flashes at a rate of 30 times per minute
•
The Trouble LED flashes at a rate of 30 times per minute
•
The TRBL message queue displays a LCL TROUBLE event
message for the First Test pseudo point
•
The MON message queue displays an OBJECT RUN event
message for the service group
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
2.33
Product description
2.34
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 3
Panel components
Summary
This chapter provides technical descriptions of the components
that can be installed in the control panel.
Content
PS6 Power Supply Card • 3.3
Description • 3.3
Specifications • 3.3
Relay outputs • 3.4
Smoke/accessory power output • 3.5
RS-485 communication port • 3.6
RS-232 communication port • 3.7
Auxiliary power outputs • 3.7
Standby battery input • 3.8
Address switch settings • 3.9
Jumper settings • 3.9
SLIC Signature Loop Interface Controller • 3.11
Description • 3.11
Specifications • 3.11
NAC output circuits • 3.12
Intelligent addressable loop interface • 3.14
Address switch settings • 3.14
Jumper settings • 3.15
Two-wire smoke detector application • 3.16
Genesis horn/strobe application • 3.18
ZB16-4 Class B Conventional Zone Card • 3.20
Description • 3.20
Specifications • 3.20
IDC input circuits • 3.21
NAC output circuits • 3.22
Address switch settings • 3.24
ZA8-2 Class A Conventional Zone Card • 3.25
Description • 3.25
Specifications • 3.25
IDC input circuits • 3.26
NAC output circuits • 3.27
Address switch settings • 3.29
ZR8 Relay Card • 3.30
Description • 3.30
Specifications • 3.30
Relay outputs • 3.30
Address switch settings • 3.31
Jumper settings • 3.32
DLD Dual Line Dialer Card • 3.33
Description • 3.33
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.1
Panel components
Specifications • 3.33
Address switch settings • 3.33
AutoCID feature • 3.34
Wiring • 3.35
NT-A (RS-485 card with QS-232 module) • 3.37
Description • 3.37
Specifications • 3.37
Address switch settings • 3.37
Jumper settings • 3.38
RS-485 data cable connections • 3.38
LED/switch cards • 3.40
SL30 card • 3.40
SL30-1 card • 3.41
SL30L card • 3.41
SL20L5S • 3.42
3.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
PS6 Power Supply Card
Description
The PS6 card (see Figure 3-1) accepts stepped-down AC via the
transformer and converts it into the DC voltages required to
power the system. The PS6 card provides three 24 Vfwr
auxiliary outputs for powering notification appliances and
controls for ancillary equipment, and one 24 Vdc regulated
output for powering four-wire smoke detectors or ancillary
equipment.
The PS6 card also accepts DC voltage from standby batteries to
operate the control panel when mains power is interrupted. The
battery charging circuit ensures the standby batteries are fully
charged at all times.
Relay output terminals
Smoke/accessory output terminals
RS-485 terminals
RS-232 terminals
CPU/Display Unit connector
Smoke/accessory power jumper
Rail bus communications LED
RS-485 card cable connector
Failsafe jumper
AUX power terminals
Battery terminals
Transformer connector
Figure 3-1: PS6 card front view
Specifications
Footprint: double space
Wire size: 18 to 12 AWG (0.75 to 2.5 sq mm)
Input voltage
AC input: 115/230 V, 50/60 Hz via transformer
DC input: 24 Vdc via batteries
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.3
Panel components
Battery charging circuit
Charge voltage: 24 Vdc
Deep discharge voltage: 19 Vdc
Charge current: 2 A
Charge capacity: 40 Ah (UL), 30 Ah (ULC)
Maximum rail load: 1.32 A at 24 Vdc
Smoke/accessory power output circuit
Voltage: 24 Vdc, regulated
Current: 250 mA
Continuous or resettable via jumper selection
Auxiliary power output circuits
Quantity: 3
Voltage: 17.5 to 26.4 Vfwr (full-wave rectified)
Current: 1.5 A each circuit, 4.5 A total
RS-485 port
Wire type: Twisted pair, 6 twists/ft (18 twists/m), minimum
Circuit capacitance: 0.4 µF
Circuit resistance: 100 Ω
Circuit length: 3,000 ft (914.4 m), maximum
Signal voltage: 0 to 5 Vdc
RS-232 port
Circuit length: 20 ft (6.1 m), maximum
Signal voltage: -10 to 10 Vdc
Relay 1 (common alarm relay)
Type: Form C
Contact rating: 1 A at 20.0 to 26.4 Vdc (0.6 PF)
Relay 2 (common supervisory relay)
Type: Normally open
Contact rating: 1 A at 20.0 to 26.4 Vdc (0.6 PF)
Relay 3 (common trouble relay)
Type: Normally open, held closed
Contact rating: 1 A at 20.0 to 26.4 Vdc (0.6 PF)
Relay 4 (user programmable relay)
Type: Normally open
Contact rating: 1 A at 20.0 to 26.4 Vdc (0.6 PF)
Relay outputs
The PS6 card includes four dry contact relays that can be used to
operate controls for ancillary equipment. The four relays are
described below.
Relay 1: Form C relay that switches contact positions when any
fire alarm input is activated (common alarm).
Relay 2: Normally open relay that closes when any supervisory
input is activated (common supervisory).
Relay 3: Normally open, held closed relay that opens when there
is any trouble condition or when the panel is de-energized
(common trouble).
3.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Relay 4: Normally open relay that closes and opens according to
system programming.
Figure 3-2 shows the terminal block connections for the relay
outputs on a PS6 card.
Ancillary equipment
N.C.
NO C NC C NO C NO C NO
Relay
Relay Relay Relay
1
2
3
4
(021)
Figure 3-2: Relay output wiring
Smoke/accessory power output
The PS6 card provides one 24 Vdc regulated output (see Figure
3-3) for powering four-wire smoke detectors or accessory
equipment.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.5
Panel components
+
−
24 Vdc riser
+ −
SMOKE
ACC PWR
Figure 3-3: Smoke/accessory power output wiring
The smoke/accessory power output can be configured for
continuous 24 Vdc or resettable 24 Vdc using jumper JP2. For
more information, see “Jumper settings” later in this topic.
RS-485 communication port
The PS6 card provides one Class B RS-485 communication port
(see Figure 3-4) for connecting remote annunciators to the
control panel.
Note: Do not extend the RS-485 data cables more than 3,000 ft
from the control panel.
+
−
RS-485 riser
Twisted pair
+ −
RS485
Figure 3-4: RS-485 port wiring
3.6
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Panel components
RS-232 communication port
The PS6 card provides one RS-232 communication port (see
Figure 3-5) for connecting a laptop computer or accessory
devices to the control panel.
Accessory
equipment
N.C.
RTS TX RX COM
Figure 3-5: RS-232 port wiring
Auxiliary power outputs
The PS6 card provides three 24 Vfwr (full-wave rectified) power
outputs (see Figure 3-6) for powering audible and visible
notification appliances, and controls for ancillary equipment.
Note: Do not use the auxiliary power outputs to power remote
annunciators.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.7
Panel components
AUX1 AUX2 COM AUX3 COM
−
+
24Vfwr riser
−
+
24Vfwr riser
−
+
24Vfwr riser
Figure 3-6: Auxiliary power output wiring
Standby battery input
Figure 3-7 shows the terminal block connections used to wire
standby batteries to the PS6 card. For more information, see the
topic “Connecting standby batteries” in Chapter 6.
3.8
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Panel components
BATT PWR
+
−
12 Vdc
NC
12 Vdc
Figure 3-7: Standby battery wire connections
Caution: Observe battery polarity when connecting standby
batteries to the PS6 card. Connecting batteries with their polarity
reversed damages the PS6 card.
Address switch settings
The PS6 card does not have an address switch for assigning card
addresses. The PS6 card’s card address is factory set at 15.
For a list of PS6 card point addresses, see the topic “PS6 card
addresses” in Appendix D.
Jumper settings
JP1 and JP2 (see Figure 3-8) are used to configure the PS6 card.
JP1 enables or disables failsafe operation. JP2 configures the
smoke/accessory power output for continuous or resettable 24
Vdc.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.9
Panel components
JP2
JP2
Continuous
(default)
Resettable
JP1
Enabled (default)
JP1
Disabled
Figure 3-8: PS6 card jumpers
When JP1 is placed in the enabled position, the PS6 card
automatically switches to failsafe operation if it loses
communication with the CPU/Display Unit. Upon switching to
failsafe operation, the common trouble relay contacts open and
the PS6 card takes over responsibility for monitoring the fire
alarm system. If a fire alarm input is activated while failsafe
operation is in effect:
•
The common alarm relay contacts switch positions (Relay 1
on the PS6 card)
•
All conventional common alarm outputs are activated
•
All intelligent addressable common alarm and audible
outputs are activated
When JP2 is placed in the resettable position, a system reset
temporarily removes 24 Vdc from the smoke/accessory output
terminals. In the continuous position, system reset does not
interrupt the output voltage.
3.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
SLIC Signature Loop Interface Controller
Description
The SLIC card (see Figure 3-9) provides one signaling line
circuit interface (also called a loop) for connecting intelligent
addressable components to the control panel. It also provides two
conventional NAC output circuits for operating audible
notification appliances (horns), visible notification appliances
(strobes), and controls for ancillary equipment.
NAC output terminals
NAC 1 signal jumpers
Card address switch
Rail bus communication LED
NAC riser terminals
Loop communication LED
Loop terminals
Figure 3-9: SLIC card front view
Specifications
Footprint: single space
Wire size: 18 to 12 AWG (0.75 to 2.5 sq mm)
NAC output circuits
Quantity: 2 (NAC 1 and NAC 2)
Type: Reverse polarity
Configuration: Class B or Class A
NAC 1 output voltage: 24 V, nom. or 17.5 to 26.4 Vfwr
(jumper configurable)
NAC 1 output current: 2.0 A, max.
NAC 2 output voltage: 24 V, nom.
NAC 2 output current: 1.0 A, max.
End-of-line resistor: 10 kΩ, 1/2 W
Signaling line circuit
Quantity: 1
Configuration: Class B or Class A
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.11
Panel components
Capacity: 250 devices
T-taps: 124
Circuit resistance: 65 Ω, max.
Circuit capacitance: 0.3 µF, max.
Ground fault impedance: 5.5 kΩ
Riser input voltage: 24 V, nom.
Operating environment
Temperature: 32 to 120 °F (0 to 49 °C)
Humidity: 93% RH, noncondensing
Current requirements
Standby current: 33 mA
Alarm current: 57 mA (does not include NAC 1 current
when JP1 and JP2 are set for internal)
NAC output circuits
NAC 1 and NAC 2 are dedicated NAC output circuits.
Both outputs can be independently wired to Class A or Class B
notification appliance circuits (see Figure 3-10). In order to
operate notification appliances connected to NAC 2, and
optionally to NAC 1 via jumper selection, a 24-volt signal must
be applied to the SLIC card’s RISER IN terminals. The power
supply must be UL/ULC listed for fire protective signaling
systems.
3.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
EOLR
(Class B)
+
−
+
−
+
−
Class A
only
+
−
−
+
−
+
Normal +
−
+
−
Active
+ B − +A −
NAC 1
(270)
EOLR
(Class A)
+ B − +A −
NAC 2
(271)
RISER
OUT
IN
+ − + −
+ −
Next
device
Required to operate
NAC 2 output
+
−
UL/ULC listed
24V power supply
Figure 3-10: SLIC card NAC output wiring
In the normal state (i.e., the NAC output is turned off):
•
A short or low impedance across the circuit wiring causes
the NAC output to enter the trouble state and generate a
TROUBLE SHRT event message
•
An open circuit causes the NAC output to enter the trouble
state and generate a TROUBLE OPEN event message
In the active state (i.e., the NAC output is turned on), circuit
supervision is disabled. If a short is applied to the circuit wiring
during this time, the short is passed through to the signal power
source connected to the riser input terminals.
Note: NAC output circuits will not turn on (activate) if there is a
short on the circuit wiring, but will turn on if there is an open
circuit.
You can configure SLIC card NAC outputs as common alarm,
audible, visible, or supervised outputs using the device types
listed below.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.13
Panel components
Circuit type
Device type
Common alarm output
Com Alarm Out (default for NAC 2)
Audible output
Audible
Visible output
Visible (default for NAC 1)
Supervised output
Output
For more information about device types, see “Before you
begin” in Chapter 7.
Intelligent addressable loop interface
Figure 3-11 shows the terminal connections for wiring an
intelligent addressable loop to the SLIC card. The SLIC card
supports the following intelligent addressable loop wiring
configurations:
•
•
Class B with or without t-taps
Class A with or without t-taps
LOOP
RTN OUT
+ − + −
+
−
Class A
only
Data In terminals
on first device
+ Data Out terminals
on last device
−
Figure 3-11: Intelligent addressable loop wiring
Address switch settings
You can configure the SLIC card for any address between 01
and 07 as shown in Figure 3-12.
3.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
ON
S1
1
2
3
4
Address S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
01
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
02
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
03
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
04
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
05
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
06
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
07
ON
ON
ON
OFF
Figure 3-12: SLIC card address switch settings
For a list of SLIC card point addresses, see the topic “SLIC card
addresses” in Appendix D.
Jumper settings
JP1 and JP2 (see Figure 3-13) select the signal used to operate
notification appliances connected to NAC 1. Placing the jumper
across pins 1 and 2 (default setting) selects the external 24 volts
connected to the SLIC card’s RISER IN terminals. Placing the
jumper across pins 2 and 3 selects the internal 24 volts from the
rail bus.
If a signal is not connected to the RISER IN terminals and the
jumpers are placed across pins 1 and 2, the devices connected to
NAC 1 will not operate.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.15
Panel components
JP1 JP2
Riser 24 volts (default)
Internal 24 volts
Figure 3-13: SLIC card jumpers
Note: The auxiliary power circuit on the PS6 card supplies the
24 volts derived from the rail. As such, when JP1 and JP2 are
placed in the internal position, NAC 1 current loads must be
accounted for to ensure that the auxiliary power circuit’s current
limit is not exceeded.
Two-wire smoke detector application
Typically, retrofitting a fire alarm system requires incorporating
the protected premises’ existing two-wire smoke detector
circuits. To connect two-wire smoke detectors to an intelligent
addressable loop you need a 2-SMK and a SIGA-UM.
Note: Do not install more than 15 SIGA-UMs configured for
two-wire smoke detectors on a loop, no more than 7 if isolator
devices are also installed.
To install this application:
1. Wire the 2-SMK and SIGA-UM as shown in Figure 3-14.
2. Configure the SIGA-UM’s first address as an Alarm Active
device type with one of the personality codes listed below.
3.16
Personality
Description
13
Supports Class B circuits consisting of two-wire
smoke detectors and dry contact initiating
devices (e.g., pull stations, heat detectors) and
does not provide alarm verification
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Personality
Description
14
Supports Class B circuits consisting of two-wire
smoke detectors only and provides alarm
verification
20
Supports Class A circuits consisting of two-wire
smoke detectors and dry contact initiating
devices (e.g., pull stations, heat detectors) and
does not provide alarm verification
21
Supports Class A circuits consisting of two-wire
smoke detectors only and provides alarm
verification
3. Configure the SIGA-UM’s second address as a Monitor
device type with None as its personality.
4. Set JP1 on the SIGA-UM shown in Figure 3-14.
5. Set JP2 on the PS6 card for continuous 24 volts.
+
+ −
−
PS6
+ − + −
SMOKE RS485
ACC PWR
JP2
Continuous
2-SMK
Resettable
Class A only
−
UL/ULC LISTED
22 kΩ EOLR
(Class A only)
IN+ OUT+
16 15 14 13
−
IN + OUT+
UL/ULC LISTED
15 kΩ EOLR
(Class B only)
12 11 10 9
SIGA-UM
8 7 6 5
4 3 2 1
Not used
From
SLIC card
Data In (+ )
Data Out (+)
Data In (− )
Data Out (−)
To
next device
Figure 3-14: Two-wire smoke detector application wiring
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.17
Panel components
Genesis horn/strobe application
Some jurisdictions require that Alarm Silence turns off audible
notification appliances (horns) but not visible notification
appliances (strobes.) If your system uses Genesis horn/strobes, to
meet this requirement you need to include a SIGA-CR.
Note: This application requires that you use the software
configuration utility. The SIGA-RM1 is used only if supervision
of the NAC power riser is required.
1. Wire the SIGA-CR and Genesis horn/strobe as shown in
Figure 3-15.
2. Configure the SIGA-CC1 as a Visible device type.
3. Configure the SIGA-CR as a Dry Contact device type.
4: Program an Alarm Silence response that activates the
SIGA-CR.
When the SIGA-CR is activated its normally closed contacts
open and removes power from the Genesis horn/strobe’s
horn input.
3.18
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Data In (+)
Data In (−)
24 Vdc (+)
24 Vdc (−)
From
SLIC card
From
UL/ULC listed
power supply
+ − + −
8 7 6 5
SIGA-CC1
+ − + −
4 3 2 1
10 9
Active
+
−
Normal
−
+
NC
+ − + −
4 3 2 1
SIGA-CR
8 7 6
C
−
+
−
+
−
+
+ −
SIGA-RM1
H
S
Genesis Horn/Strobe
with Signal Master
+ −
−
+
Genesis
Horn/Strobe
47 kΩ
EOLR
Panel components
Figure 3-15: Genesis horn/strobe application wiring
3.19
Panel components
ZB16-4 Class B Conventional Zone Card
Description
The ZB16-4 card provides 16 Class B IDC input circuits for
monitoring hard-wired zones consisting of two-wire smoke
detectors and dry contact initiating devices. Four of the IDC
input circuits can be configured as Class B NAC output circuits
for operating polarized audible notification appliances (horns),
visible notification appliances (strobes), and controls for
ancillary equipment.
IDC input terminals
(Z1 to Z9)
Rail bus communication LED
Card address switch
NAC riser terminals
for Z15 and Z16
NAC riser terminals
for Z13 and Z14
IDC input/NAC output terminals
(Z13 to Z16)
IDC input terminals
(Z10 to Z12)
Figure 3-16: ZB16-4 card front view
Specifications
Footprint: double space
Wire size: 18 to 12 AWG (0.75 to 2.5 sq mm)
IDC input circuits
Quantity: 12 to 16
Wiring configuration: Class B
Detector voltage: 20.33 to 24.76 Vdc, max. ripple 2,000 mV
Short circuit current: 75.9 mA, max.
3.20
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Resistance: 50 Ω, max.
Capacitance: 100 µF, max.
End-of-line resistor: 4.7 kΩ, 1/2 W
Compatibility ID: 100
NAC output circuits
Quantity: 1 to 4
Wiring configuration: Class B
Output voltage: 24 V, nominal
Output current: 2.0 A, max.
End-of-line resistor: 10 kΩ, 1/2 W
Riser inputs
Quantity: 2
Voltage: 24 V, nominal
Operating environment
Temperature: 32 to 120 °F (0 to 49 °C)
Humidity: 93% RH, noncondensing
IDC input circuits
Z1 through Z12 (see Figure 3-18) are dedicated initiating device
circuit (IDC) inputs. Z13 through Z16 can be configured as IDC
inputs or as notification appliance circuit (NAC) outputs. For
more information, see the topic “NAC output circuits” below.
EOLR
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+ Z1 − + Z2 − + Z3 −
(001) (002) (003)
+ Z4 − + Z5 − + Z6 −
(004) (005) (006)
+ Z7 −
(007)
+ Z8 − + Z9 −
(008) (009)
(010) (011) (012) (013) (014) (015) (016)
+ Z10 − + Z11 − + Z12 − + Z13 − + Z14 − + Z15 − + Z16 −
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
EOLR
Figure 3-17: ZB16-4 card IDC input circuit wiring
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.21
Panel components
ZB16-4 card IDC inputs operate as follows:
•
A short or low impedance across the circuit wiring causes
the circuit to enter the active state and generate an event
message based on its device type
•
An open circuit causes the IDC input to enter the trouble
state and generate a TROUBLE OPEN event message
ZB16-4 card IDC inputs are configured as fire alarm,
supervisory, or monitor inputs using the device types listed
below.
Circuit type
Device type
Fire alarm input
Alarm Active (default), Pull Station, Heat
Alarm, Alarm Verify, and Waterflow
Supervisory input
Supervisory, Tamper, Latching
Supervisory, and Latching Tamper
Monitor input
Monitor
For more information about device types, see “Before you
begin” in Chapter 7.
NAC output circuits
By default, Z13 through Z16 are configured as NAC output
circuits. In order to operate notification appliances connected to
Z13 and Z14, a 24-volt signal must be applied to the ZB16-4
card’s R1 terminals. In order to operate appliances connected to
output circuits Z15 and Z16, a 24-volt signal must be applied to
the ZB16-4 card’s R2 terminals. The power supply must be
UL/ULC listed for fire protective signaling systems.
3.22
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
(013) (014) (015) (016)
+ Z13 − + Z14 − + Z15 − + Z16 − + R1 − + R2 −
Normal +
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
Active −
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
UL/ULC listed
24V power supply
+
−
+
−
+
−
−
EOLR
Figure 3-18: ZB16-4 card NAC output circuit wiring
In the normal state (i.e., the NAC output is turned off), ZB16-4
card NAC outputs operate as follows:
•
A short or low impedance across the circuit wiring causes
the NAC output to enter the trouble state and generate a
TROUBLE SHRT event message
•
An open circuit causes the NAC output to enter the trouble
state and generate a TROUBLE OPEN event message
In the active state (i.e., the NAC output is turned on), circuit
supervision is disabled. If a short is applied to the circuit wiring
during this time, the short is passed through to the signal power
source connected to the riser input terminals.
Note: NAC output circuits will not turn on (activate) if a short is
present on the circuit wiring but will turn on if there is an open
circuit.
ZB16-4 card NAC outputs are configured as common alarm,
audible, visible, or supervised outputs using the device types
listed below.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.23
Panel components
Circuit type
Device type
Common alarm output
Comm Alm Out (default for Z13 and
Z14)
Audible output
Audible
Visible output
Visual (default for Z15 and Z16)
Supervised output
Super Output
For more information about device types, see “Before you
begin” in Chapter 7.
Address switch settings
You can configure the ZB16-4 card for any address between 01
and 13 as shown in Figure 3-19.
ON
S1
1
2
3
4
Address S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
01
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
02
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
03
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
04
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
05
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
06
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
07
ON
ON
ON
OFF
08
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
09
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
10
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
11
ON
ON
OFF
ON
12
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
13
ON
OFF
ON
ON
Figure 3-19: ZB16-4 card address switch
For a list of ZB16-4 card point addresses, see the topic “ZB16-4
card addresses” in Appendix D.
3.24
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Panel components
ZA8-2 Class A Conventional Zone Card
Description
The ZA8-2 card (see Figure 3-20) provides eight Class A IDC
input circuits for monitoring hard-wired zones consisting of twowire smoke detectors and dry contact initiating devices. Two of
the IDC input circuits can be configured as Class A NAC output
circuits for operating polarized audible notification appliances
(horns), visible notification appliances (strobes), and controls for
ancillary equipment.
IDC input terminals
(Zone 1 to Zone 3)
IDC input/NAC output terminal
(Zone 4)
NAC riser terminals
for Zone 4
Card address switch
Rail bus communication LED
NAC riser terminals
for Zone 8
IDC input/NAC output terminal
(Zone 8)
IDC input terminals
(Zone 5 to Zone 7)
Figure 3-20: ZA8-2 card front view
Specifications
Footprint: double space
Wire size: 0.75 to 2.5 sq mm (18 to 12 AWG)
Input circuits
Quantity: 6 to 8
Wiring configuration: Class A
Detector voltage: 20.33 to 24.76 Vdc, max. ripple 2,000 mV
Output current: 100 mA, max.
Maximum standby current: 120 µA
Resistance: 50 Ω, max.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.25
Panel components
Capacitance: 100 µF, max
End-of-line resistor: 4.7 kΩ, 1/2 W
Output circuits
Quantity: 1 to 2
Wiring configuration: Class A
Output voltage: 24 V, nominal
Output current: 2.0 A, max.
End-of-line resistor: 10 kΩ, 1/2 W
Riser inputs
Quantity: 2
Voltage: 24 V, nominal
Operating environment
Temperature: 32 to 120 °F (0 to 49 °C)
Humidity: 93% RH, noncondensing
IDC input circuits
−
+ B−
+ A−
ZONE 1
(001)
−
+
−
+B−
+ A−
ZONE 2
(002)
+
−
+
−
+ B − +A −
ZONE 3
(003)
+
−
+
−
EOLR
+
+
EOLR
−
EOLR
+
EOLR
Zone 1 through Zone 3 and Zone 5 through Zone 7 (see Figure
3-21) are dedicated initiating device circuit (IDC) inputs. Zone 4
and Zone 8 can be configured as IDC inputs or as notification
appliance circuit (NAC) outputs. For more information, see the
topic “NAC output circuits” below.
+ B−
+A −
ZONE 4
(004)
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
+
−
EOLR
(008)
ZONE 8
+B−
+A −
EOLR
(007)
ZONE 7
+ B − +A −
EOLR
(006)
ZONE 6
+ B−
+A −
EOLR
(005)
ZONE 5
+B−
+ A−
Figure 3-21: ZA8-2 card IDC input circuit wiring
ZA8-2 card IDC inputs operate as follows:
3.26
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
•
A short or low impedance across the circuit wiring causes
the circuit to enter the active state and generate an event
message based on its device type
•
An open circuit causes the IDC input to enter the trouble
state and generate a TROUBLE OPEN event message
Note: Open circuit troubles are latched and won't clear until the
wiring fault is corrected and the control panel is reset.
You can configure ZA8-2 card IDC inputs as fire alarm,
supervisory, or monitor inputs using the device types listed
below.
Circuit type
Device type
Fire alarm input
Alarm Active (default), Pull Station, Heat
Alarm, Alarm Verify, and Waterflow
Supervisory input
Supervisory, Tamper, Latching
Supervisory, and Latching Tamper
Monitor input
Monitor
For more information about device types, see “Before you
begin” in Chapter 7.
NAC output circuits
By default, Zone 4 and Zone 8 (see Figure 3-22) are configured
as NAC output circuits. In order to operate notification
appliances connected to Zone 4, a 24-volt signal must be applied
to the ZA8-2 card’s top NAC PWR IN terminals. In order to
operate notification appliances connected to Zone 8, a 24-volt
signal must be applied to the ZA8-2 card’s bottom NAC PWR
IN terminals. The power supply must be UL/ULC listed for fire
protective signaling systems
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.27
+
−
+
−
Active
−
+
Normal
+
−
EOLR
Panel components
24 Vfwr riser
for ZONE 4
+ −
+ B−
+A −
+ IN −
ZONE 4 NAC PWR
(004)
(008)
Normal
+
−
Active
−
+
EOLR
ZONE 8
NAC PWR
+B−
+A −
+ IN −
+ −
24 Vfwr riser
for ZONE 8
+
−
+
−
Figure 3-22: ZA8-2 card NAC output circuit wiring
In the normal state (i.e., the NAC output is turned off), ZA8-2
card NAC outputs operate as follows:
•
A short or low impedance across the circuit wiring causes
the NAC output to enter the trouble state and generate a
TROUBLE SHRT event message
•
An open circuit causes the NAC output to enter the trouble
state and generate a TROUBLE OPEN event message
In the active state (i.e., the NAC output is turned on), circuit
supervision is disabled. If a short is applied to the circuit wiring
during this time, the short is passed through to the signal power
source connected to the riser input terminals.
3.28
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Note: NAC output circuits will not turn on (activate) if a short is
present on the circuit wiring but will turn on if there is an open
circuit.
You can configure ZA8-2 card NAC outputs as common alarm,
audible, visible, or supervised outputs using the device types
listed below.
Circuit type
Device type
Common alarm output
Comm Alm Out (default for Zone 4)
Audible output
Audible
Visible output
Visual (default for Zone 8)
Supervised output
Super Output
For more information about device types, see “Before you
begin” in Chapter 7.
Address switch settings
You can configure the ZA8-2 card for any address between 01
and 13 as shown in Figure 3-23.
ON
S1
1
2
3
4
Address S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
01
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
02
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
03
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
04
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
05
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
06
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
07
ON
ON
ON
OFF
08
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
09
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
10
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
11
ON
ON
OFF
ON
12
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
13
ON
OFF
ON
ON
Figure 3-23: ZA8-2 card address switch settings
For a list of ZA8-2 card point addresses, see the topic “ZA8-2
card addresses” in Appendix D.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.29
Panel components
ZR8 Relay Card
Description
The ZR8 card provides eight separate relays for operating
ancillary equipment. Each relay is jumper configurable for
normally open or normally closed operation.
Relay terminals (R1 to R4)
Relay configuration jumpers (JP1 to JP4)
for relays R1 to R4
Rail bus communication LED
Card address switch
Relay configuration jumpers (JP5 to JP8)
for relays R5 to R8
Relay terminals (R5 to R8)
Figure 3-24: ZR8 card front view
Specifications
Footprint: single space
Wire size: 18 to 12 AWG (0.75 to 2.5 sq mm)
Relay outputs
Quantity: 8
Style: Normally open or normally closed via jumper
selection
Contact rating: 1.0 A at 24 Vdc (0.6 PF)
Operating environment
Temperature: 32 to 120 °F (0 to 49 °C)
Humidity: 93% RH, noncondensing
Relay outputs
Figure 3-25 shows the terminal block connections for each relay
output. Relay contacts are configured for normally open or
normally closed operation via jumper selections.
3.30
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Ancillary equipment
(001)
R2
(002)
R3
(003)
R4
(004)
(005)
R5
(006)
R6
(007)
R7
(008)
R8
Ancillary equipment
Figure 3-25: ZR8 card relay output wiring
Address switch settings
You can configure the ZR8 card for any address between 01 and
13 as shown in Figure 3-26
ON
S1
1
2
3
4
Address S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
01
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
02
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
03
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
04
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
05
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
06
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
07
ON
ON
ON
OFF
08
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
09
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
10
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
11
ON
ON
OFF
ON
12
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
13
ON
OFF
ON
ON
Figure 3-26: ZR8 card address switch settings
For a list of ZR8 card point addresses, see the topic “ZR8 card
addresses” in Appendix D.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.31
Panel components
Jumper settings
Jumpers JP1 through JP8 (see Figure 3-27) determine the
position of the relay contacts when the relays are de-energized.
JP1 through JP4 configure relays R1 through R4, respectively.
JP5 through JP8 configure relays R5 through R8, respectively.
R1
JP1
R2
JP2
R3
JP3
R4
JP4
Note: Relays shown de-energized
JP5
JP6
JP7
R5
R6
R7
JP8
R8
Figure 3-27: ZR8 card jumpers
Note: The intended operation of the relay must be taken into
consideration when making jumper selections. For example, if
you want the relay to close on any trouble condition, including
loss of power, place the jumper in the normally closed position
and program the relay so that it is energized at system start up.
3.32
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
DLD Dual Line Dialer Card
Description
The DLD card provides two telephone line connections for
transmitting system status changes over the public switched
telephone network to one or two compatible digital alarm
communicator receivers (DACR). The DLD card can transmit
status changes in Contact ID and 4/2 formats to eight subscriber
accounts.
Line 2 terminals
Line 1 terminals
Rail bus communication LED
Tx Out LED
Rx In LED
Figure 3-28: DLD card front view
Specifications
Footprint: single space
Wire size: 18 to 12 AWG (0.75 to 2.5 sq mm)
Current requirements
Standby: 13 mA
Dialing: 20 mA
Operating environment
Temperature: 32 to120 °F (0 to 49 °C)
Humidity: 93 % RH, noncondensing
Address switch settings
The DLD card does not have an address switch for assigning
card addresses. The DLD card’s card address is factory set at 14.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.33
Panel components
AutoCID feature
The DLD card incorporates an AutoCID (automatic Contact ID)
feature that provides a predefined set of dialer strings for
transmitting status changes to Contact ID subscriber accounts.
The DLD card transmits the predefined set of dialer strings when
a point changes to an active or trouble state, provided:
•
The point that changed to the active or trouble state is not
programmed to initiate a separate dialer response
•
The project database does not include a default alarm,
supervisory, or trouble dialer message
The transmission order is to transmit custom dialer responses
first. If there isn't a custom dialer response programmed, transmit
the default message. If a default message is not programmed
then transmit the predefined dialer string.
The predefined Contact ID dialer strings are listed below.
Fire alarm inputs
Device type
Event code
Group No.
Point ID
Alarm (see note)
110
Card no.
Device no.
Alarm zone
110
00
Zone no.
AND group
None
Heat
114
Card no.
Device no.
Matrix group
None
Pull
115
Card no.
Device no.
Verified smoke
110
Card no.
Device no.
Waterflow
113
Card no.
Device no.
Note: Event code 111 is transmitted for intelligent addressable
smoke detectors that are assigned the Alarm device type.
Supervisory inputs
3.34
Device type
Event code
Group No.
Point ID
Latching supervisory
200
Card no.
Device no.
Latching tamper
203
Card no.
Device no.
Supervisory
200
Card no.
Device no.
Supervisory zone
200
00
Zone no.
Tamper
203
Card no.
Device no.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Trouble conditions
Description
Event code
Group No.
Point ID
Detector trouble
380
Card no.
Device no.
Device disable
570
Card no.
Device no.
Circuit trouble
373
Card no.
Device no.
Zone trouble
300
00
Zone no.
Zone disable
570
00
Zone no.
Service group test
607
00
Service no.
Peripheral
communication fault
330
00
000
Battery charger fault
302
00
000
Battery fault
302
00
000
Auxiliary power output 320
shorted
00
000
Primary AC power
failure
301
00
000
Excessive battery
current
302
00
000
Ground fault (SIGA
devices only)
310
Card no.
Device no.
All other ground faults
310
00
000
Loop wiring problem
331
Card no.
000
Loop ground fault
310
Card no.
000
TELCO Line 1 fault
351
00
000
TELCO Line 2 fault
352
00
000
CMS receiver fault
354
00
000
Periodic test (system
normal)
602
00
000
Periodic test (system
abnormal)
608
00
000
System test - Drill
604
00
000
All other troubles
300
00
000
All other disables
570
Card no.
Device no.
Wiring
The DLD card typically connects to an RJ-31X block using an
8-position, 4-conductor modular cord as shown in Figure 3-29.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.35
Panel components
Punch Down
Block
TELCO
Line 1
Punch Down
Block
Tip
Tip
TELCO
Line 2
Ring
3
4
5
2
Ring
RJ-31X block
(supplied by installer)
6
3
7
1
4
5
2
8
Ring
7
1
Punch Down
Block
Tip
6
8
Punch Down
Block
Tip
PBX
Ring
PBX
Brown
Gray
Red
Green
Brown
Gray
Red
Green
8-position, 4-conductor
modular cord
(supplied by installer)
TIP RNG TIP RNG TIP RNG TIPRNG
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
LINE 1
LINE 2
Figure 3-29: DLD installation wiring diagram
The modular cord’s wire colors may not be the same as shown in
Figure 3-29 so you should verify the wire continuity between the
DLD card and the RJ-31X block’s terminals as shown in Figure
3-30.
RJ-31X
block
DLD
Line (X)
Ring Out
Brown
Ring In
Tip In
Red
Green
Tip Out
Gray
1
2
1
2
3
4
3
4
5
6
5
6
7
8
7
8
Ring
Ring
Tip
Punch
Down
Block
Tip
Figure 3-30: RJ-31X block schematic
3.36
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
NT-A (RS-485 card with QS-232 module)
Description
The NT-A consists of the RS-485 card and the QS-232 UART
module. Together, they provide an additional communication
channel for wiring Class A remote annunciator panels. The
control panel requires installation of both cards while remote
annunciators only require installation of the QS-232 UART
module and only then if you want to connect a printer or laptop
computer to the remote annunciator.
RS-485 Channel 1
RS-485 Channel 2
Ground fault supervision
jumper
Figure 3-31: RS-485 card front view
Specifications
Footprint: single space (RS-485 card)
Wire size: 18 to 12 AWG (0.75 to 2.5 sq mm)
Wire type: Twisted pair, six twists per foot, minimum
Circuit capacitance: 0.4 µF
Circuit resistance: 100 Ω
Circuit length: 3,000 ft (914.4 m), maximum
Signal voltage: 0 to 5 Vdc
Address switch settings
The NT-A does not require a card address and therefore does not
have an address switch.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.37
Panel components
Jumper settings
JP1 (see Figure 3-32) enables ground fault supervision of the
RS-485 data cables by the PS6 card. Ground fault supervision
must be enabled when the PS6 card is used to supply power to a
remote annunciator. Ground fault supervision must be disabled
when the PS6 card is not used to power remote annunciators.
Enabled
(default)
Disabled
Figure 3-32: RS-485 card jumpers
RS-485 data cable connections
Figure 3-33 shows the terminal block connections for wiring
data cables to the RS-485 card.
Note: Do not extend the RS-485 data cables more than 3,000 ft
(914.4 m) from the control panel.
3.38
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Twisted
pair
PS6
card
+
−
CH2 terminals
on last panel
+
−
CH1 terminals
on last panel
Twisted
pair
+CH2− +CH1−
Figure 3-33: RS-485 card wiring
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.39
Panel components
LED/switch cards
LED/switch cards can be used for zone annunciation, point
annunciation, or manual override controls. When an LED/switch
card is used for zone annunciation:
•
The red Alarm LED is used to indicate an active fire alarm
zone
•
The yellow Active LED is used to indicate an active
supervisory or monitor zone
•
The yellow trouble LED is used to indicate a zone trouble, a
zone disablement, and a zone in test
•
The switch, if available, brings up the zone’s location
description on the CPU/Display Unit
Note: In a zoned fire alarm system, the LED/switch card closest
to the CPU/Display Unit is typically assigned to switch group 1,
and the next is assigned to switch group 2.
When an LED/switch card is used for point annunciation, you
can program the LEDs to indicate point status as required. You
can also program the switch, if available, to provide manual
override functions.
For a list of LED/switch card addresses, see the topic
“LED/switch card addresses” in Appendix D.
SL30 card
The SL30 card (see Figure 3-34) provides 30 groups of LEDs
and switches and is typically used for zone annunciation. Each
LED-switch group consists of a red and a yellow LED under the
left lens, a yellow LED under the right lens, and a switch. The
switches are numbered 1 to 30.
3.40
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
1
6
11
16
21
26
2
7
12
17
22
27
3
8
13
18
23
28
4
9
14
19
24
29
5
10
15
20
25
30
Fault LED (yellow)
Alarm LED (red) or
Active LED (yellow)
Switch
Typical each
LED-switch group
Figure 3-34: SL30 card front view
SL30-1 card
The SL30-1 card (see Figure 3-36) provides 30 groups of LEDs
and switches and is typically used for zone annunciation. Each
LED-switch group consists of a red and a yellow LED under the
left lens, a yellow LED under the right lens, and a switch. The
switches are numbered 31 to 60.
31
36
41
46
51
56
32
37
42
47
52
57
33
38
43
48
53
58
Fault LED (yellow)
Alarm LED (red) or
Active LED (yellow)
Switch
34
39
44
49
54
59
35
40
45
50
55
60
Typical each
LED-switch group
Figure 3-35: SL30-1 card front view
SL30L card
The SL30L card (see Figure 3-36) provides 30 groups of LEDs
and is typically used for zone or point annunciation when custom
labeling is desired. Each LED-switch group includes a red and a
yellow LED under the left lens, a yellow LED under the right
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.41
Panel components
lens, and a label window. Label inserts are provided with the
SL30L card so you can label each LED-switch group.
Fault LED (yellow)
Alarm LED (red) or
Active LED (yellow)
Label insert
window
Typical each
LED-switch group
Figure 3-36: SL30L card front view
SL20L5S
The SL20L5S card (see Figure 3-37) provides 20 groups of
LEDs without switches and 5 groups of LEDs with switches. It is
typically used for point annunciation and manual override
controls. Each LED-switch group includes a red and a yellow
LED under the left lens and a yellow LED under the right lens.
LED-switch groups 21 through 25 also include a switch. Card
inserts are provided with the SL20L5S card so you can label
each LED-switch group.
3.42
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel components
Fault LED (yellow)
Alarm LED (red) or
Active LED (yellow)
Label insert
window
LED-switch groups
1 to 20
Fault LED (yellow)
Alarm LED (red) or
Active LED (yellow)
Label insert
window
Switch
LED-switch groups
21 to 25
Figure 3-37: SL20L5S card front view
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
3.43
Panel components
3.44
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 4
Accessories
Summary
This chapter provides technical descriptions of the accessories
that can be connected to the control panel.
Content
CDR-3 Bell Coder • 4.2
Description • 4.2
Specifications • 4.2
Operation • 4.3
Switch settings • 4.4
Jumper settings • 4.5
Coded alarm signaling application • 4.6
RPM Reverse Polarity Module • 4.8
Description • 4.8
Specifications • 4.8
Remote station protective signaling system application • 4.8
2-CTM City Tie Module • 4.10
Description • 4.10
Specifications • 4.10
Auxiliary protective signaling system application • 4.10
IOP3A RS-232 Isolator • 4.12
Description • 4.12
Specifications • 4.12
Jumper settings • 4.12
Switch settings • 4.13
Connecting two devices to the RS-232 port • 4.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
4.1
Accessories
CDR-3 Bell Coder
Description
The CDR-3 provides coded signals and evacuation signals for
use in zoned fire alarm system applications where a unique code
is required to identify each fire alarm zone. The CDR-3 provides
tone outputs for preamp amplifiers and dry contact outputs for
audible notification appliance circuits (horns).
Figure 4-1: CDR-3 front view
Note: The CDR-3 must have a firmware version of 3.0 or
greater. Tone outputs are not supported.
Specifications
Input voltage: 24 Vdc
Current requirements
Standby: 60 mA
Alarm: 100 mA
Supervised tone outputs (isolated)
Output impedance: 1.2 kΩ
Output voltage: 3.5 Vrms
EOL: 10 kΩ
Tone outputs
Types: Temporal (3-3-3), March time (20 or120 bpm), and
Coded
Signal: 1 kHz, 10 Vrms
Dry contact (coded output)
Output rating: 30 Vdc at 4 A, max. (PF 0.35), 25 Vrms at
100 W, max., 70 Vrms at 100 W, max.
March time: 20 or 120 bpm
Normal coding range: 4 or 6 rounds, 1-4 digits, 0-9 and
A-Z each (representing codes between 0 and 35)
Extended coding range: 4 or 6 rounds, 1-3 digits; 1 digit: 0 to
70; 2 digits: 0-9 and A-Z each
PSNI queue: 50 most recent alarms
RS-232 input baud rates: 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600
Mounting: Standard, half-module footprint
Maximum wire size: 14 AWG (1.5 sq mm)
4.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Accessories
Operation
Normal state
The CDR-3 operates in the normal state when there are no alarm
messages in its event buffer and in the absence of any trouble
conditions. In the normal state, only the green Power LED is on.
Active state
The CDR-3 enters the active state after it receives an alarm
message containing a bell code from the control panel. Upon
entering the active state, the CDR-3:
•
Switches the duration relay contact. The red LED next to the
duration relay indicates when the relay is energized. The
duration relay remains energized until the coded signal has
been repeated four or six times according to S1-3.
•
Outputs a coded signal via the coded tone output terminals
according to the code format selected by S1-4 and S1-5.
•
Toggles the bell code relay contacts according to the code
format selected by S1-4 and S1-5. The red LED next to the
bell code relay indicates when the relay is energized.
•
Outputs an evacuation signal via the temporal tone output
terminals according to the evacuation signal type selected by
S1-1 and S1-2.
•
Toggles the temporal relay contact according to the
evacuation signal selected by S1-1 and S1-2. The red LED
next to the temporal relay indicates when the relay is
energized.
Trouble state
The CDR-3 enters the trouble state under the following
conditions:
•
•
•
•
An open circuit on the coded tone output
An open circuit on the temporal tone output
A CPU fault
An RS-232 communication fault
Upon entering the trouble state, the CDR-3:
•
Outputs the selected evacuation signal on the temporal tone
output terminals
•
Toggles the temporal relay contact
•
Closes the trouble relay’s normally open contacts.
•
Turns the yellow Trouble LED on
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
4.3
Accessories
Coded signal formats
The four formats you can select using S1-4 and S1-5 are
described below.
Format 1: Coded signal is identical to the bell code. Example: A
bell code of 5-5-5-5 generates a coded signal consisting of 5
pulses and a pause, then 5 pulses and a pause, then 5 pulses and a
pause, and then 5 pulses and a pause.
Format 2: Coded signal combines the first and second digits of
the bell code. Example: A bell code of 5-5-5-5 generates a coded
signal consisting of 10 pulses and a pause, then 5 pulses and a
pause, and then 5 pulses and a pause.
Format 3: Coded signal combines the second and third digits of
the bell code. Example: A bell code of 5-5-5-5 generates a coded
signal consisting of 5 pulses and a pause, then 10 pulses and a
pause, and then 5 pulses and a pause.
Format 4: Coded signal combines the third and fourth digits of
the bell code. Example: A bell code of 5-5-5-5 generates a coded
signal consisting of 5 pulses and a pause, then 5 pulses and a
pause, and then 10 pulses and a pause.
Switch settings
Switch S1 is used to configure the evacuation signal, code
sequence, and RS-232 communication as described below.
Evacuation Code
signal sequence RS-232
ON
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Evacuation signal
4.4
S1-1
S1-2
Description
OFF
OFF
Temporal tone (3-3-3)
OFF
ON
Fast march tone (120 bpm)
ON
ON
Slow march tone (20 bpm)
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Accessories
Code sequence
S1-3
S1-4
S1-5
Description
OFF
6 rounds
ON
4 rounds
OFF
OFF
Format 1 (0-9, 0-9, 0-9, 0-9)
ON
OFF
Format 2 (0-18, 0-9, 0-9)
OFF
ON
Format 3 (0-9, 0-18, 0-9)
ON
ON
Format 4 (0-9, 0-9, 0-18)
RS-232 communication
S1-6
S1-7
S1-8
Description
OFF
Even parity
ON
No parity
OFF
OFF
1200 baud
ON
OFF
2400 baud
OFF
ON
4800 baud
ON
ON
9600 baud
Jumper settings
JP1 and JP2 configure the bell code relay and temporal relay,
respectively, for normally closed or normally open operation as
shown in Figure 4-2.
JP1
JP2
BELL CODE
RELAY
TEMPORAL
RELAY
Figure 4-2: CDR-3 jumper settings
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
4.5
Accessories
Coded alarm signaling application
In a coded alarm signaling system, when an alarm input is
activated, the system’s notification appliance circuits sound a
coded signal representing the zone of origin followed by an
evacuation signal.
1. Mount an MFC-A cabinet in the same room as the control
panel. Connect the two using a section of conduit no greater
than 20 ft in length. Run all wiring between the two cabinets
through the conduit.
2. Mount the CDR-3 in the MFC-A cabinet.
3. Configure the CDR-3 as follows:
Parity bit: No parity
Baud rate: 9600 baud
Code format: As required
Evacuation signal: As required
Rounds: As required
4. Install a 10 kΩ EOLR across TB2-1 and TB2-2, and TB2-11
and TB2-12 on the CDR-3.
5. Set JP2 on the PS6 card for continuous 24 volts.
6. Wire the CDR-3 as shown in Figure 4-3.
Note: If a printer is also connected to the control panel,
install an IOP3A isolator module between PS6 card’s
RS-232 port and the CDR-3.
7. Configure the NAC output circuit used to operate the booster
power supply as a common alarm output device type
4.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
PS6
−
+
+
CDR-3
+
−
BELL CODE
RELAY
JP1
AUX(n) COM
RS232
NAC 2
Resettable
Continuous
TEMPORAL
RELAY
JP2
JP2
OUT
−
DURATION
RELAY
−
+
NAC 1
A
RISER
OUT
IN
+
B
+
+
+
−
−
10 kΩ
EOLR
−
+
+
IN
+
−
−
−
SENSE 1 COM
− RTS TX RX COM
SMOKE RS485
ACC PWR
−
+
BPS series
power supply
NAC 1
Active
−
−
−
+
−
+
NAC 2
A
−
−
LOOP
RTN
OUT
+
B
+
−
+
−
+
SLIC
−
+
−
+
CODED
TONE
10 kΩ
EOLR
TRBL
OUT
N/C
15 kΩ EOLR
15 kΩ EOLR
+
N/C
+
−
−
COMMON
+
COMMON
Normal
24V
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
EARTH GRND
+
TEMPORL
TONE
10 kΩ
EOLR
Accessories
Figure 4-3: Typical CDR-3 application wiring diagram
4.7
RS232 INPUT
PRINT SUPV
Accessories
RPM Reverse Polarity Module
Description
The RPM provides reverse polarity alarm, supervisory, and
trouble signals for use in remote station protective signaling
system applications using dedicated wire pairs. Each output is
independently activated when its corresponding input is pulled to
common.
SUPV
TRBL
ALRM
CITY
BOX
REVERSE POLARITY
TRANSMITTERS
ALARM TROUBLE SUPV
JP1
TRBL IN
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
COM
24V
Figure 4-4: RPM front view
Note: You must use a separate relay to signal trouble conditions.
Specifications
Input voltage: 24 Vdc
Current requirements
Standby: 20 mA
Active: 270 mA, max.
Reverse polarity circuits
Open circuit voltage: 24 Vdc
Short circuit current: 7 mA, max.
Local energy master box circuit
Voltage: 24 Vdc
Remote station protective signaling system
application
In a remote station protective signaling system, when the control
panel enters the alarm state, an alarm signal is automatically
transmitted to the proper authorities (e.g., a public fire
communication services center, a fire station, or similar
governmental agency) located away from the protected premises.
Supervisory and trouble signals may be transmitted to the same
or to a different location.
Installation
1. Mount an MFC-A cabinet in the same room as the control
panel. Connect the two using a section of conduit no greater
4.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Accessories
than 20 ft in length. Run all wiring between the two cabinets
through the conduit.
2. Mount the RPM in the MFC-A cabinet.
3. Set JP2 on the PS6 card for continuous 24 volts.
4. Wire the RPM to the PS6 card as shown in Figure 4-5.
Operation
The PS6 card’s common trouble relay is normally held in the
closed position and opens when the control panel enters the
trouble state. When wired as shown in Figure 4-5,
smoke/accessory power is passed through the common trouble
relay and energizes the PAM-1 relay, holding its normally closed
contacts in the open position. When there is a system trouble or
loss of power, the common trouble relay opens and de-energizes
the PAM-1 relay. This in turn closes the relay contacts and pulls
the RPM’s TRBL input to common.
Wire nut
PAM-1 Relay
24
0
SUPV
TRBL
ALRM
TRBL IN
COM
+24
N.C.
C.
N/U
CITY
BOX
REVERSE POLARITY
TRANSMITTERS
ALARM
TROUBLE
SUPV
JP1
3.9 kΩ
RELAY
1
N.C. + − + −
SMOKE RS485
ACC PWR
RELAY RELAY RELAY
2
3
4
JP2
Continuous
Normal
+
−
+
−
+
−
Active
−
+
−
+
−
+
Central station receiver
Resettable
PS6 card
Figure 4-5: RPM wiring diagram
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
4.9
Accessories
2-CTM City Tie Module
Description
The 2-CTM City Tie Module provides off-premises signal
transmission for use in auxiliary protective signaling system
applications. It is used in conjunction with a SIGA-CC1 to
activate a local energy master box.
Specifications
Mounting: Single gang box
Input voltage: 24 Vdc, nominal
Municipal box operation
Voltage: 24 Vdc, nominal:
Wire resistance:25 Ω
Trip current: 200 mA into 14.5 Ω coil
Current requirements
Standby: 20 mA
Active: 300 mA, max.
Operating environment
Temperature: 0 to 49 °C (32 to 120 °F)
Relative humidity: 0 to 93%, noncondensing
Auxiliary protective signaling system application
In an auxiliary protective signaling system, when the control
panel enters the alarm state, an alarm signal is automatically
transmitted to the public fire communication services center via
the municipal fire alarm system.
Installation
1. Install the 2-CTM in the same room as and within three feet
of the SIGA-CC1.
2. Configure the SIGA-CC1 as a common alarm output device
type.
3. Wire the 2-CTM as shown in Figure 4-6.
4.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Accessories
Normal
Active
−
+
+
−
10 9
1 2
SIGA-CC1
2-CTM
8 7 6 5
4 3 2 1
2 1
Master box
+
−
+
−
From
UL/ULC listed
power supply
24 Vdc (+)
24 Vdc (−)
Normal
Active
−
+
From
SLIC card
Data In (+)
Data In (−)
+
−
Municipal
circuit
Figure 4-6: 2-CTM application wiring diagram
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
4.11
Accessories
IOP3A RS-232 Isolator
Description
The IOP3A electrically isolates the fire alarm control panel's
RS-232 port from grounds introduced when connecting
peripheral devices. The IOP3A provides two isolated RS-232
connections, as well as a DB-9 and an RJ12 connector for
downloading. The IOP3A should be used in all applications that
require the fire alarm control panel be isolated from earth ground
connections.
Figure 4-7: IOP3A front view
Specifications
Input voltage: 24 Vdc
Current requirements
Standby: 60 mA
Alarm: 60 mA
Mounting: Standard, half-module footprint
Maximum wire size: 14 AWG (1.5 sq mm)
Jumper settings
Configure the IOP3A as shown in Figure 4-8 and described
below.
JB1
3
2
JB4
JB2
1
JB3
Figure 4-8: IOP3A jumper settings
4.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Accessories
Jumper
Setting
Description
JB1
1 to 2
Select mode
2 to 3
Supervision mode
IN
Output 1 supervision disable. 12 Vdc
on TB2-1.
OUT
Output 1 supervision enable
IN
Output 2 supervision disable. 12 Vdc
on TB3-1.
OUT
Output 2 supervision enable
IN
Select mode
OUT
Supervision mode
JB2
JB3
JB4
Note: JB1 and JB4 settings must agree.
Switch settings
SW1 (see Figure 4-9) configures the IOP3A as described below.
UP
SW1
Figure 4-9: IOP3A switch settings
Setting
Description
UP
Outputs 1 and 2 are enabled. RJ-12 and DB-9
connectors are disabled.
DOWN
Outputs 1 and 2 are disabled. RJ-12 and DB-9
connectors are enabled.
Note: Always leave SW1 in the UP position and use the barcode
jack on the CPU/Display Unit for downloading to the control
panel.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
4.13
Accessories
Connecting two devices to the RS-232 port
In installations that have two devices connected to the control
panel’s RS-232 port, such a printer and a CDR-3, you need to
install an IOP3A to divide the RS-232 transmission path.
1. Mount an MFC-A cabinet in the same room as the control
panel. Connect the two using a section of conduit no greater
than 20 ft in length. Run all wiring between the two cabinets
through the conduit.
2. Mount the IOP3A and the CDR-3 in the MFC-A cabinet.
3. Wire as shown in Figure 4-10.
Note: The external power supply must provide a continuous
24 Vdc and be UL/ULC listed for fire protective signaling
systems.
To
PT–1S
7
32
DB–25P
(rear view)
PS6 card
RX
TX
COM
External 24 Vdc
power supply
−
+
Always leave in
the UP position
IOP3A
+
−
−
+
CDR-3
Figure 4-10: IOP3A application wiring diagram
4.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 5
Operating instructions
Summary
This chapter provides instructions for operating the fire alarm
system from the control panel CPU/Display Unit. It is intended
for those who might be expected to operate the control panel in a
fire alarm emergency.
Content
Logging on to the fire alarm system • 5.2
Checking system status • 5.3
Displaying or printing maintenance reports • 5.7
Display or print a history report • 5.9
Displaying the alarm history • 5.10
Performing a lamp test • 5.11
Silencing the panel buzzer • 5.12
Resetting the fire alarm system • 5.13
Silencing fire alarm signals • 5.14
Sounding an alarm • 5.15
Disabling and enabling a zone • 5.16
Disabling and enabling a device • 5.17
Switching detector alarm sensitivity • 5.18
Switching event message routes • 5.19
Changing the level 1 password • 5.20
Restarting the fire alarm system • 5.21
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.1
Operating instructions
Logging on to the fire alarm system
Before you can operate any of the system commands, you must
first log on to the fire alarm system. The password you use to log
on to the fire alarm system determines which command menus
you are allowed to use. The password levels are described as
follows:
•
The level 2 password lets you use the level 2 command
menus
•
The level 3 password lets you use the level 3 command
menus
•
The level 4 password lets you use the level 4 command
menus
Note: The level 1 command menus do not require a password.
The control panel lets you use the command menus for the
password you entered until you log on with a different password
or until the user time-out period expires (approximately three
minutes). After the user time-out period expires, the control
panel automatically returns to using the level 1 command menus.
For more information, see the topic “Command menu
organization” in Chapter 2.
To log on to the fire alarm system:
1. Press Menu.
2. Choose Login.
3. Enter the password for the desired command level.
5.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Checking system status
The Status menu commands let you check the status of the fire
alarm system. Each command generates a list that you can view
on the alphanumeric display or print for later use.
Note: To print a list you must have a printer connected to the
panel you are operating.
Displaying or printing a list of active points
STATUS
►1)All Active
2)Alarm
3)Supervisory
4)Trouble
5)Monitor
6)Test
7)Disabled Pts.
8)Outputs
9)Internal
ENTER PANEL
00
00 = All Panels
REPORT OUTPUT
►1)Display
2)Print
Use the All Active command on the Status menu to display or
print a list of all addressable points that are in an active
(abnormal) state.
To display or print a list of active points:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose All Active.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Displaying or printing a list of active alarm points
Use the Alarm command on the Status menu to display or print a
list of alarm input device types that are in the alarm state. The
list also includes any fire-related pseudo points.
To display or print a list of active alarm points:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose Alarm.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Displaying or printing a list of active supervisory points
Use the Supervisory command on the Status menu to display or
print a list of supervisory input device types that are active. The
list also includes any supervisory-related pseudo points.
To display or print a list of active supervisory points:
1. Press Status.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.3
Operating instructions
2. From the Status menu, choose Supervisory.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Displaying or printing a list of points in the trouble state
Use the Trouble command on the Status menu to display or print
a list of device types that are in the trouble state. The list also
includes any trouble-related pseudo points.
To display or print a list of points in trouble:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose Trouble.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Displaying or printing a list of active monitor points
Use the Monitor command on the Status menu to display or print
a list of monitor input device types that are in the active state.
The list also includes any monitor-related pseudo points.
To display or print a list of active monitor points:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose Monitor.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Displaying or printing a list of points in an active service
group
Use the Test command on the Status menu to display or print a
list of points in an active service group that are in the active or
trouble state. The list also includes the name of the active service
group.
5.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
To display or print a list of points in an active service group:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose Test.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Display or print a list of disabled points
Use the Disabled Pts command on the Status menu to display or
print a list of all addressable points that are disabled. The list
shows the device type, address, and the event message for each
disabled point.
To display or print a list of disabled points:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose Disabled Pts.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Displaying or printing a list of active output points
Use the Outputs command on the Status menu to display or print
a list of output device types that are in the active state. The list
also includes LED/switch card LEDs.
To display or print a list of active output points:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose Outputs.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Displaying or printing power supply voltages
Use the Internal command on the Status menu to display or print
the current power supply voltages.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.5
Operating instructions
To display or print power supply voltages:
1. Press Status.
2. From the Status menu, choose Internal.
3. Press Enter to accept the default (all panels).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
5.6
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Displaying or printing maintenance reports
There are four maintenance reports available to help you
determine whether any fire alarm sensors require servicing. You
can view each report on the alphanumeric display or print it for
later use.
Note: To print a report you must have a printer connected to the
panel you are operating.
Display or print a Dirty>80% report
MAINTENANCE
►1)Dirty>80%
2)Dirty>20%
3)Single Device
4)Card Devices
Use the Dirty>80% command on the Maintenance menu to
display or print a Dirty>80% report. A Dirty>80% report lists all
fire alarm sensors whose compensation levels exceed 80%. The
compensation level value is an indication of a fire alarm sensor’s
inability to compensate for environmental conditions.
ENTER PANEL
01
Note: Fire alarm sensors on this list require servicing as soon as
possible.
To display or print a Dirty>80% report:
1. Press Menu.
2. From the main menu, choose Reports, then Maintenance,
and then Dirty>80%.
3
Press Enter to accept the default (panel 01).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Display or print a Dirty>20% report
MAINTENANCE
1)Dirty>80%
►2)Dirty>20%
3)Single Device
4)Card Devices
ENTER PANEL
01
Use the Dirty>20% on the Maintenance menu to display or print
a Dirty>20% report. A Dirty>20% report lists all fire alarm
sensors whose compensation levels exceed 20%. The
compensation level value is an indication of a fire alarm sensor’s
inability to compensate for environmental conditions.
Note: Fire alarm sensors on this list may require servicing and
should be watched carefully.
To display or print a Dirty>20% report:
1. Press Menu.
2. From the main menu, choose Reports, then Maintenance,
and then Dirty>20%.
3
Press Enter to accept the default (panel 01).
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.7
Operating instructions
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Display or print a Single Device report
MAINTENANCE
1)Dirty>80%
2)Dirty>20%
►3)Single Device
4)Card Devices
ENTER DEVICE
01CCDDD
Use the Single Device command on the Maintenance menu to
display or print a Single Device report. A Single Device report
lists the configuration settings for an individual fire alarm sensor.
The report includes the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The device address
The detector type
The location description (if programmed)
The compensation level (percent dirty)
The primary alarm sensitivity setting
The alternate alarm sensitivity setting
To display or print a Single Device report:
1. Press Menu.
2. From the main menu, choose Reports, then Maintenance,
and then Single Device.
3. Enter the panel-card-device address (PPCCDDD) of the fire
alarm sensor.
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
Display or print a Card Devices report
MAINTENANCE
1)Dirty>80%
2)Dirty>20%
3)Single Device
►4)Card Devices
ENTER CARD
01CC
Use the Card Devices command on the Maintenance menu to
display or print a Card Devices report. A Card Devices report
lists the operating parameters for all fire alarm sensors on a
specific loop controller.
To display or print a Card Devices report:
1. Press Menu.
2. From the main menu, choose Reports, then Maintenance,
and then Card Devices.
3
Enter the panel-card address (PPCC) of the loop controller.
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
5.8
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Display or print a history report
REPORTS
1)Maintenance
►2)History
3)Alarm History
ENTER PANEL
01
REPORT OUTPUT
►1)Display
2)Printer
Use the History command on the Reports menu to display or
print a history report. A history report lists all of the events that
have been introduced to the panel, and the time and date of each
occurrence.
To display or print a history report:
1. Log on using the level 2 password or turn the Enable
Controls switch to the On position.
2. From the main menu, choose Reports, then History.
3. Enter the panel number.
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
5.9
Operating instructions
Displaying the alarm history
REPORTS
1)Maintenance
2)History
►3)Alarm History
Use the Alarm History command on the Reports menu to display
the alarm history while the control panel is in an abnormal state.
The alarm history display shows how many times the control
panel has entered the fire alarm state.
To display the alarm history:
1. Press Menu.
2. From the main menu, choose Reports then Alarm History.
5.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Performing a lamp test
TEST
►1)Lamp Test
Use the Lamp Test command on the Test menu to verify the
operation of the alphanumeric display and the LED indicators.
The lamp test command temporarily turns on the panel buzzer,
all LED indicators, and every pixel on the alphanumeric display.
Note: When operated from the control panel’s CPU/Display
Unit, the lamp test command only tests the control panel. When
operated from a remote annunciator’s CPU/Display Unit, the
lamp test command tests all remote annunciators at the same
time.
To perform a lamp test:
1. Press Menu.
2. From the main menu, choose Test, and then Lamp Test.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.11
Operating instructions
Silencing the panel buzzer
The panel buzzer sounds whenever an event message is received
at the control panel. Pressing the Panel Silence switch silences
the panel buzzer and acknowledges all current event messages.
Unless programmed otherwise, the panel buzzer automatically
re-sounds 24 hours after being silenced if no new event messages
are received at the control panel.
Note: The panel buzzer can be configured to sound periodically
as a reminder that there is a fault in the system and the panel has
been silenced.
To silence the panel buzzer:
1. Press Panel Silence.
5.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Resetting the fire alarm system
Pressing the Reset switch restores the fire alarm system to its
normal state provided there are no inputs still in a latched
(active) condition. If any inputs are still in a latched condition at
the end of the reset cycle, audible notification appliances, if
silenced, will re-sound and the panel buzzer, if silenced, will resound.
Caution: Do not reset the fire alarm system until the proper
authorities have determined that the threat of fire is no longer
present.
To reset the fire alarm system:
1. Press Reset.
2. Enter the level 2 password.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.13
Operating instructions
Silencing fire alarm signals
Pressing the Alarm Silence switch silences all audible and
common alarm device types, and if configured, visible device
types.
Pressing Alarm Silence does not silence the device types
described above under the following conditions:
•
When a waterflow device type is active and the system is not
configured to allow silencing when a waterflow device type
is active
•
When the system is configured to delay the silencing of fire
alarm signals, in which case the Alarm Silence switch may
not be operational for up to five minutes after the initial fire
alarm event
Silenced outputs automatically re-sound when:
•
The Alarm Silence switch is pressed a second time
•
Another alarm input device type is activated
•
A subsequent device in an active zone is activated and the
system is configured to allow zone re-sounding.
To silence fire alarm signals:
1. Press Alarm Silence.
2. Enter the level 2 password.
5.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Sounding an alarm
Pressing the Drill switch activates all audible, visible, and
common alarm output device types. Pressing the Drill switch a
second time returns these outputs to their normal condition.
To sound an alarm:
1. Press Drill.
2. Press Enter to confirm that you want to sound all alarms.
3. Enter the level 2 password.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.15
Operating instructions
Disabling and enabling a zone
The fire alarm system can include one or more zones. Each zone
represents a defined area in the protected premises. You can
disable and enable zones from the control panel using the Zone
command on the Disable menu and Enable menu, respectively.
Disabling a zone
DISABLE
►1)Zone
2)Device
Use the Zone command on the Disable menu to temporarily take
a zone out of service and prevent it from initiating a set of
responses.
To disable a zone:
1. Log on using the level 2 password or turn the Enable
Controls switch to the On position.
2. From the main menu, choose Disable, then Zone.
3. Select the zone from the pick list, then press Enter.
— or —
Press the corresponding zone switch on the LED/switch
card.
Enabling a zone
ENABLE
►1)Zone
2)Device
Use the Zone command on the Enable menu to return a disabled
zone to service and allow it to initiate a set of responses.
Note: If the zone is disabled because all of the points in the zone
were individually disabled, you must re-enable at least one point
in the zone before the zone can be re-enabled.
To enable a zone:
1. Log on using the level 2 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Enable, then Zone.
3. Select the zone from the pick list, then press Enter.
— or —
Press the corresponding zone switch on the LED/switch
card.
5.16
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Disabling and enabling a device
You can disable and enable devices from the control panel using
the Disable Device and Enable Device commands. To disable or
enable a device you must know the device’s address. To
determine a device’s address, see Appendix D, “System
addresses.”
Disabling a device
DISABLE
1)Zone
►2)Device
Use the Device command on the Disable menu to disable a
device and prevent it from activating a response.
Notes
ENTER DEVICE
01CCDDD
•
Disabling all of the points in a zone also disables the zone
•
Common alarm output device types cannot be disabled
To disable a device:
1. Log on using the level 2 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Disable, then Device.
3. Enter the address of the device, where: PP = 01, CC = the
card number, and DDD = the device number.
Enabling a device
ENABLE
1)Zone
►2)Device
Use the Enable Device command to return a disabled device to
service. When you enable the device, all indicators and outputs
activated by the device will reactivate.
ENTER DEVICE
01CCDDD
To enable a device:
1. Log on using the level 2 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Enable, then Device.
3. Enter the address of the device, where: PP = 01, CC = the
card number, and DDD = the device number.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.17
Operating instructions
Switching detector alarm sensitivity
Intelligent addressable detectors are configured with a primary
and alternate alarm sensitivity setting. Typically, the primary
alarm sensitivity setting is used for daytime operation. The
alternate alarm sensitivity setting is used for nighttime and
weekend operation.
In most applications, a time control is used to automatically
switch detectors to their alternate sensitivity setting. When the
time control is restored, detector alarm sensitivity is
automatically switched back to the primary sensitivity setting.
You can override the active alarm sensitivity settings using the
Alternate Sensitivity command on the Activate menu and
Primary Sensitivity command on the Restore menu.
Note: The default setting for both primary and alternate alarm
sensitivity is “Low.” When both alarm sensitivity settings are the
same, switching alarm sensitivity does not have any effect.
Switching from primary to alternate alarm sensitivity
ACTIVATE MENU
1)Output
►2)Alt Sens
3)Alt Msg Route
4)LED
Use the Alt Sens (alternate sensitivity) command on the Activate
menu to cause intelligent addressable detectors to use their
alternate alarm sensitivity setting instead of their primary alarm
sensitivity setting.
To switch from primary to alternate sensitivity:
1. Log on using the level 2 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Activate, then Alt Sens.
Switching from alternate to primary alarm sensitivity
RESTORE MENU
1)Output
►2)Prm Sens
3)Prm Msg Route
4)LED
Use the Prm Sens (primary sensitivity) command on the Restore
menu to cause intelligent addressable detectors to use their
primary alarm sensitivity setting instead of their alternate alarm
sensitivity setting.
To switch from alternate to primary sensitivity:
1. Log on using the level 2 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Restore, then Prm Sens.
5.18
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Switching event message routes
Event messages are programmed with a primary and an alternate
message route. Typically, a fire alarm system uses the primary
message route during daytime operation and the alternate
message route during nighttime operation.
In most applications, a time control is used to automatically
switch event messages over to their alternate route setting. When
the time control is restored, event messages are automatically
switched back to their primary route settings. You can override
the event message route in effect using the Alternate Message
Route command on the Activate menu and the Primary Message
Route command on the Restore menu.
Note: The default setting for both primary and alternate message
routes is “All Cabinets.” When both event message route settings
are the same, switching message routes does not have any effect.
Switching from primary to alternate message routing
ACTIVATE MENU
1)Output
2)Alt Sens
►3)Alt Msg Route
4)LED
Use the Alt Msg Route (alternate message route) command on
the Activate menu to switch event message routing from primary
message routing to alternate message routing.
To switch from primary to alternate message routing:
1. Log on using the level 2 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Activate, then Alt Msg Route.
Switching from alternate to primary message routing
RESTORE MENU
1)Output
2)Prm Sens
►3)Prm Msg Route
4)LED
Use the Prm Msg Route (primary message route) command on
the Restore menu to switch event messages routing from
alternate message routing to primary message routing.
To switch from alternate to primary message routing:
1. Log on using the level 2 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Restore, then Prm Msg Route.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.19
Operating instructions
Changing the level 1 password
PROGRAM MENU
►1)Edit Password
PASSWORD MENU
1)Level 1
Use the Edit Password command on the Program menu to
change the password setting for using level 1 command menus.
To change the level 1 password you must log on using the level
2, level 3, or level 4 password.
The default level 1 password is 1111.
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX
To change the level 1 password:
1. Log on using the level 2, 3, or 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Edit Password.
3. On the Password menu, choose Level 1.
4. Enter the new password.
5.20
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Operating instructions
Restarting the fire alarm system
PROGRAM MENU
1)Time Date
►2)Restart
Use the Restart command on the Program menu to reinitialize
the fire alarm system without removing power.
To restart the fire alarm system:
ENTER PANEL
00
00 = All Panels
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Restart.
3. Enter a panel number or press Enter to accept the default (all
panels).
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
5.21
Operating instructions
5.22
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 6
Installation
Summary
This chapter provides instructions for installing the fire alarm
system. It is intended for trained installers who are familiar with
all applicable codes and regulations.
Content
Installation overview • 6.2
Mounting the control panel backbox • 6.4
Pulling cables into the backbox • 6.7
Installing panel components • 6.8
Installing the PS6 card • 6.10
Installing the front panel • 6.12
Connecting mains AC • 6.15
Installing standby batteries • 6.16
Installing a QSA series remote annunciator • 6.17
Mounting the backbox • 6.17
Pulling cables into the backbox • 6.21
Installing the RAI card • 6.21
Installing the front panel • 6.21
RAI card wiring • 6.23
Commissioning the system • 6.26
Using the control panel • 6.26
Using the software configuration utility • 6.31
Connecting peripheral devices • 6.33
Connecting a laptop computer • 6.33
Connecting a serial printer • 6.33
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.1
Installation
Installation overview
This topic provides a descriptive overview of how to install the
fire alarm system. Please read this topic in its entirety before
proceeding.
The fire alarm system must be installed in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions, the local authority having
jurisdiction (AHJ), and all local, regional, and national electrical
and building codes.
Step 1 - Unpack the equipment: Before you begin, you should
unpack the equipment to make sure you have everything you
need and that it is has not been damaged.
Step 2 - Mount the control panel backbox: Mount the control
panel backbox first. When mounting the control panel backbox,
please keep in mind the following:
•
Make sure the installation location is free from construction
dust and debris, and immune to extreme temperature ranges
and humidity
•
Allow for enough floor and wall space so the panel can be
installed and serviced without any obstructions
•
Use fasteners that can support the full weight of the cabinet,
including the standby batteries
•
Tighten fasteners firmly to prevent the cabinet from
vibrating
For more information, see the topic “Mounting the control panel
backbox” later in this chapter.
Step 3 - Pull the cables into the backbox: Pull all of the cables
into the backbox and tag them for easy identification. Do not
worry about dressing the cables until after the panel components
are installed. For more information, see the topic “Pulling cables
into the backbox” later in this chapter.
Step 4 - Install the panel components: Install the panel
components only after the threat of construction damage and
vandalism has passed. All panel components are sensitive to
ESD (electrostatic discharge). To prevent ESD damage:
6.2
•
Keep panel components in their protective antistatic
packaging at all times. Remove only for inspection or
installation.
•
Ground yourself with an approved static-protective wrist
strap when handling panel components
•
Do not touch any component leads or connector pins when
installing panel components
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
For more information, see the topic “Installing panel
components” later in this chapter. Additional installation
information is provided in Chapter 3, “Panel components,” and
in the installation sheets that are shipped with each piece of
equipment.
Step 5 - Connect mains AC: Connect mains AC power after all
the panel components have been installed and wired. Do not
energize the panel until you are ready to commission the system.
For more information, see the topic “Connecting mains AC”
later in this chapter.
Step 6 - Install the standby batteries: Typically, standby
batteries are placed in the cabinet but not connected until after
the system has been tested in order to preserve battery life. Do
not connect the battery until the panel is energized. For more
information, see the topic “Installing standby batteries” later in
this chapter.
Step 7 - Install remote annunciators: If the system includes
remote annunciators, install them before commissioning the
system. For more information, see the topic “Installing QSA
series remote annunciators” later in this chapter.
Step 8 - Commission the system: Commissioning the system
involves energizing the system, programming the system, and
then testing the system. You should commission the system only
after a complete visual inspection of the control panel and other
equipment. Check for any damage that may have occurred
during the installation. For more information, see the topic
“Commissioning the system” later in this chapter.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.3
Installation
Mounting the control panel backbox
Mount the control panel backbox as shown in Figure 6-1. See
Figure 6-2 and Figure 6-3 for backbox dimensions and fixing
point locations.
For semiflush installations, attach a trim ring to the backbox to
give it a more finished appearance and to prevent it from being
installed incorrectly.
10.8 cm
(4-1/4 in)
6.8 cm
(2-11/16 in)
4.0 cm
(1-9/16 in)
Trim ring
Surface mount
Semiflush mount
Figure 6-1: Control panel backbox mounting diagram
6.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
4.6 cm
1-13/16 in
4.6 cm
1-13/16 in
4.6 cm
1-13/16 in
6.7 cm
2-5/8 in
6.7 cm
2-5/8 in
4.6 cm
1-13/16 in
4.6 cm
1-13/16 in
3.2 cm
1-1/4 in
4.6 cm
1-13/16 in
47.2 cm
18-9/16 in
10.6 cm
4-3/16 in
Fixing point
(surface mount)
3.2 cm
1-1/4 in
Fixing point
(surface mount)
42.1 cm
16-9/16 in
16.5 cm
6-1/2 in
24.3 cm
9-9/16 in
4.6 cm
1-13/16 in
45.7 cm
18 in
Fixing point
(surface mount)
0 24V
19.1 cm
7-1/2 in
4.4 cm
1-3/4 in
Fixing points
(semiflush mount)
4.4 cm
1-3/4 in
Fixing points
(semiflush mount)
Figure 6-2: Backbox dimensions for a QS4-5-(G/R)-(1/2)
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.5
Installation
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
6.7 cm
(2-5/8 in)
6.7 cm
(2-5/8 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
3.2 cm
(1-1/4 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
47.2 cm
(18-9/16 in)
10.6 cm
(4-3/16 in)
Fixing point
(surface mount)
3.2 cm
(1-1/4 in)
Fixing point
(surface mount)
42.1 cm
(16-9/16 in)
16.5 cm
(6-1/2 in)
23.3 cm
(9-3/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
76.2 cm
(30 in)
18.7 cm
(7-3/8 in)
13.1 cm
(5-3/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
4.6 cm
(1-13/16 in)
Fixing point
(surface mount)
0 24V
19.1 cm
(7-1/2 in)
4.4 cm
(1-3/4 in)
Fixing points
(semiflush mount)
4.4 cm
(1-3/4 in)
Fixing points
(semiflush mount)
Figure 6-3: Backbox dimensions for a QS2-5-(G/R)-(1/2)
6.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Pulling cables into the backbox
Pull high voltage mains power cables into the backbox through
the knockout closest to the terminal block as shown Figure 6-4.
Pull all low voltage data cables into the backbox through the
remaining knockouts. When pulling cables into the backbox,
keep in mind the following:
•
Keep low voltage cables within the shaded area. Keep high
voltage cables within the unshaded area.
•
Do not run cables through the knockouts at the bottom of the
backbox if batteries are to be installed in the cabinet
•
Make sure to remove any debris and any metal filings after
pulling the cables into the backbox
Note: There are a sufficient number of knockouts to pull cables
into the backbox in a neat and orderly manner without having to
punch additional holes.
Low voltage cable entry points
High voltage
cable
entry point
Low voltage
cable
entry points
PS6
Battery
compartment
0 24V
Figure 6-4: Typical cable entry locations
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.7
Installation
Installing panel components
Figure 6-5 shows the recommended cabinet layouts for fiveoption and twelve-option cabinets. In a twelve-option cabinet,
the panel components installed on the top DIN rail are connected
to those installed on the bottom DIN rail via the QS-Cable12
rail-to-rail cable assembly. Install panel components in the
following order:
1. Install the PS6 card. For more information, see the topic
“Installing the PS6 card” later in this chapter.
2. Install the front panel. For more information, see the topic
“Installing the front panel” later in this chapter.
3. Install the RS-485 card, if used, next to the PS6 card.
4. Install all remaining option cards and set their card
addresses.
Caution: Do not install any panel components while the control
panel is energized.
Tip: Wait until the possibility of construction damage or
vandalism has passed before installing the panel components.
6.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
1 single space card and 2 double space cards
3 single space cards and 1 double space card
5 single space cards and 0 double space cards
0 24V
Battery
compartment
1 single space card and 2 double space cards
3 single space cards and 1 double space card
5 single space cards and 0 double space cards
1 single space card and 3 double space cards
3 single space cards and 2 double space card
5 single space cards and 1 double space cards
7 single space cards and 0 double space cards
0 24V
Battery
compartment
Figure 6-5: Cabinet layout diagram
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.9
Installation
Installing the PS6 card
This topic describes how to install the PS6 card. When installing
a PS6 card into a twelve-option cabinet enclosure you must use
the transformer extension cable (P/N 7140016) to connect the
transformer.
Caution: Never plug or unplug the transformer with mains AC
applied. Doing so may damage the PS6 card.
To install the PS6 card:
1. Set the PS6 card on the left end of the DIN rail as shown in
Figure 6-6 then engage the locking mechanism to prevent the
PS6 card from moving.
2. Attach the power supply ground wire to the cabinet backbox.
3. Plug the transformer into the PS6 card.
Tip: Slip the extension cable into the cable retainer before
making connections.
6.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
7140016
Cable retainer
0 24V
Twelve-option cabinet
0 24V
Five-option cabinet
Figure 6-6: Power supply card installation
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.11
Installation
Installing the front panel
This topic describes how to install the front panel. The front
panel consists of the cabinet door, the CPU/Display Unit, and
LED/switch cards.
Step 1: Attach the cabinet door to the backbox
Attach the cabinet door to the backbox then connect the ground
strap between the backbox and the cabinet door. See Figure 6-7.
#6 K-nut
(5X)
#8 K-nut
(2X)
Ground strap
Figure 6-7: Cabinet door assembly
6.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Step 2: Attach the CPU/Display Unit and LED/switch cards to
the cabinet door
Set the LED/switch cards inside the CPU/Display Unit then
attach the CPU/Display Unit to the cabinet door as shown in
Figure 6-8.
8 x .375 plastite screw
#8 washer
(8X)
Figure 6-8: Front panel assembly
There are four models of LED/switch card that you can install on
the front panel.
Table 6-1 lists the suggested LED/switch card arrangements.
Table 6-1: Suggested LED/switch card arrangements
PR ES S Z ON E FOR IN FOR MATION
ALARM
Supervisory
Disable/Test
Position
1
Monitor
Trouble
Ground Fault
CPU Fault
Power
H el p
Position
2
Stat us
Panel S ilence
ME NU
D el
Panel S ilenced
Off
Ent er
On
No. of zones
1 to 30
1 to 60
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Sy st em
R es et
Alarm
Sil enc e
D ril l
1
2
3
Enable C ont rols
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
Position 1
Position 2
SL30L
BLNK or SL20L5S
SL30
BLNK or SL20L5S
SL30L
SL30L or SL20L5S
SL30
SL30-1 or SL20L5S
6.13
Installation
Step 3: Connect the ribbon cables
Connect the ribbon cables as shown in Figure 6-9. After
connecting the ribbon cables, attach the CPU cover.
7140013
7140013
7140015-02
J3
J2
Attach key switch ground strap
to closest point on cabinet door
0 24V
Figure 6-9: Front panel ribbon cable connections
6.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Connecting mains AC
Figure 6-10 shows how to wire mains AC to the terminal block.
After you have wired mains AC to the terminal block return the
tabbed end of the terminal block cover to its slot in the side of
the cabinet.
Note: The control panel must be connected to a dedicated branch
circuit from the mains distribution panel with its own doublepole, double-throw disconnect device. In addition, all mains
wiring must be double insulated.
Caution: The middle connection on the mains terminal block
makes a mechanical connection to chassis (earth) ground. Do not
allow the mains live and neutral conductors to make contact with
the middle connector on the mains terminal block.
Dedicated 115/230 V
branch circuit
Circuit
breaker
Live
115/230 V
mains
Neutral
Earth Gnd
0
N
24V
L
Fuse
(5 A)
Figure 6-10: Mains AC wiring diagram
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.15
Installation
Installing standby batteries
Figure 6-11 shows how to install standby batteries. First place
the batteries in the backbox battery compartment area then
secure the batteries using the appropriate battery bracket, ordered
separately.
The table below lists the batteries that can be installed in the
backbox. To determine which battery your system requires, use
the battery calculation worksheet in Appendix A.
Model
Manufacturer
Rating
12V4A
GS Battery, Inc.
12 volts, 4 ampere-hours
12V6A5
GS Battery, Inc.
12 volts, 6.5 ampere-hours
12V10A
GS Battery, Inc.
12 volts, 10 ampere-hours
Caution: Connect and disconnect standby batteries only with
mains AC power applied.
12 Vdc
12 Vdc
7 Ah battery bracket
Figure 6-11: Standby battery installation
6.16
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Installing a QSA series remote annunciator
Remote annunciators are used to provide system controls and
indicators at remote locations within the protected premises and
are typically configured the same as the control panel. Installing
a remote annunciator requires that you perform the following
sequence of steps. Each step is discussed in greater detail later in
this topic.
To install a remote annunciator:
1. Mount the backbox.
2. Pull cables into the backbox.
3. Install the RAI card.
4. Install the front panel.
5. Connect the power and data cables to the RAI card.
Tip: To prevent the equipment from being damaged or
vandalized, stop after you have pulled the cables into the cabinet.
Complete the installation only after it is safe to do so.
Mounting the backbox
Mount the backbox as shown in Figure 6-12. When mounting the
backbox, always remember the following:
•
Use fasteners that can support the full weight of the cabinet
•
Tighten fasteners firmly to prevent the cabinet from
vibrating
See Figure 6-13 and Figure 6-14 for backbox dimensions and
fixing point locations.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.17
Installation
Surface mount
Semiflush mount
Figure 6-12: Remote annunciator backbox mounting diagram
6.18
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
14.25 in (36.2 cm)
12.05 in (30.6 cm)
9.57 in (24.3 cm)
7.05 in (17.9 cm)
4.57 in (11.6 cm)
2.13 in
(5.4 cm)
1.5 in (3.8 cm)
Fixing point
3.5 in
(8.9 cm)
12.25 in (31.1 cm)
7.56 in
(19.2 cm)
Fixing point
Fixing point
QSA-1-S
33.2 cm
12.05 in (30.6 cm)
9.57 in (24.3 cm)
7.05 in (17.9 cm)
4.57 in (11.6 cm)
2.87 in
(7.3 cm)
2.09 in
(5.3 cm)
Fixing point
2.0 in
(5.1 cm)
11.26 in (28.6 cm)
3.94 in
(10.2 cm)
7.68 in
(19.5 cm)
6.57 in
(16.7 cm)
Fixing point
Fixing point
13.07 in (33.2 cm)
QSA-1-F
Figure 6-13: QSA-1-S and QSA-1-F backbox dimensions
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.19
Installation
18.5 in (47.0 cm)
12.05 in (30.6 cm)
9.57 in (24.3 cm)
7.05 in (17.9 cm)
4.57 in (11.6 cm)
2.13 in
(5.4 cm)
1.5 in (3.8 cm)
3.5 in
(8.9 cm)
16.54 in (42.0 cm)
7.56 in
(19.2 cm)
Fixing point
Fixing point
QSA-2-S
17.56 in (44.6 cm)
12.05 in (30.6 cm)
9.57 in (24.3 cm)
7.05 in (17.9 cm)
4.57 in (11.6 cm)
2.87 in
(7.3 cm)
2.09 in
(5.3 cm)
2.0 in
(5.1 cm)
15.55 in (39.5 cm)
3.94 in
(10.2 cm)
7.68 in
(19.5 cm)
6.57 in
(16.7 cm)
Fixing point
Fixing point
18.5 in (47.0 cm)
QSA-2-F
Figure 6-14: QSA-2-S and QSA-2-F backbox dimensions
6.20
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Pulling cables into the backbox
Pull power and data cables into the backbox through any of the
cable entry points. All cables entering the backbox are low
voltage cables so there is no requirement to keep them separated.
After pulling the cables into the backbox, make sure to remove
any debris and any metal filings.
Note: There are a sufficient number of knockouts to pull cables
into the backbox in a neat and orderly manner without having to
punch additional holes.
Installing the RAI card
Attach the RAI card to the backbox as shown in Figure 6-15.
Cable entry points
RAI card
6-32 x 1/2 screw
#6 washer
(4X)
Backbox
Figure 6-15: RAI card installation
Installing the front panel
The front panel consists of the cabinet door, the CPU/Display
Unit, and LED/switch cards. The steps required to install the
front panel are described below.
Step 1: Attach the cabinet door to the backbox
Attach the cabinet door to the backbox as shown in Figure 6-16.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.21
Installation
#6 K-nut
(3X)
Figure 6-16: Remote annunciator door installation
Step 2: Attach the CPU/Display Unit and LED/switch cards to
the cabinet door
Place the LED/switch cards into position on the CPU/Display
Unit then attach the CPU/Display Unit to the cabinet door as
shown in Figure 6-17.
Note: Remote annunciator CPU/Display Units must be the same
CPU type as the CPU/Display Unit installed on the control
panel.
8 x .375 plastite screw
(6X)
#8 washer
Cabinet door
CPU/Display Unit
LED/switch card
Figure 6-17: Remote annunciator CPU/Display Unit and LED/switch card installation
6.22
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Attach the key switch ground strap to the cabinet door as shown
in Figure 6-18.
Key switch ground strap
CPU/Display
Unit
Door
8 x .375 plastite screw
Ring terminal
#8 washer
Figure 6-18: Key switch ground strap connection
Step 3: Connect the ribbon cables
Connect the ribbon cables as shown in Figure 6-19.
7140013
7140015-01
Figure 6-19: Remote annunciator ribbon cable connections
RAI card wiring
The remote annunciator requires a continuous 24 Vdc supply
voltage and communicates with the control panel over the RS485 transmission path. The cable connections are made on the
RAI card.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.23
Installation
Connecting the power cables
Connect the power cables to the RAI card as shown in Figure
6-20.
For single remote annunciator installations you can use the PS6
card to supply operating power to the remote annunciator. For
multiple remote annunciator installations you must use a 24 Vdc
supply that is UL/ULC listed for fire protective signaling
systems.
WARNING: Make sure the 24-volt supply is de-energized before
connecting power cables to the RAI card.
24V IN 1
24V IN 2
+
−
+
−
From
previous
24 Vdc (−) device
24 Vdc (+)
24 Vdc (+)
24 Vdc (−)
To
next
device
RAI card
Figure 6-20: Remote annunciator power wiring
6.24
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Connecting the RS-485 data cables
Connect the RS-485 data cables to the RAI card as shown in
Figure 6-21. Do not extend the RS-485 data cables more than
3,000 ft (914.4 m) from the control panel.
CH1+
CH1
CH2
+
−
+
−
CH1−
CH1+
CH1−
CH1+
CH1−
RAI card
CH1
CH2
+
−
+
−
CH1+
CH1−
CH1+
CH1−
CH1+
CH1−
RS-485 in
Class B
wiring
RS-485 out
Primary
RS-485 in
Primary
RS-485 out
Class A
wiring
Secondary
RS-485 in
Secondary
RS-485 out
Figure 6-21: Remote annunciator data cable connections
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.25
Installation
Commissioning the system
After the control panel and remote annunciators have been
completely installed and wired, you can begin commissioning
the system. There are two ways to commission the system. You
can commission the system using the control panel or by using
the software configuration utility.
During system testing and programming you may be required to
temporarily connect a laptop computer or a serial printer. For
more information, see the topic “Connecting peripheral devices”
later in this chapter.
Using the control panel
To commission the system using the control panel, follow the
steps described below.
Step 1: Energize the system
Apply power to the control panel and all of the remote
annunciators. Before applying power, you should verify that
each option card installed in the control panel has a unique card
address.
Wait until the control panel completes all diagnostic checks
before proceeding.
Step 2: Configure the remote annunciators
Please Wait
System is
initializing
Siga devices
need extra time.
Press
to Cont.
Failure to wait
could disable
other operations
Press Help (?)
to get more data
on the
Siga Cards.
Initialization progress
screen
The next step is to configure the remote annunciators using the
AutoLearn command. Configuring a remote annunciator consists
of assigning it a panel number, telling it how many panels are
connected together, and specifying how it is wired.
Caution: If you set the Network Class option for Class A
operation when the remote annunciators are actually wired for
Class B operation, the control panel won’t be able to
communicate with a serial printer or a laptop computer unless
you install a QS-232 UART module or “autolearn” the control
panel a second time with Class B selected.
To configure a remote annunciator:
1. Log on to the remote annunciator using the level 4 password.
2. From the Main menu, choose Program, and then Configure.
Wait until the panel is initialized before proceeding.
3. On the Configure menu, choose AutoLearn.
4. Press Del twice, and then enter an unused panel ID from 02
to 09 (01 is reserved for the control panel).
6.26
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Installation
Mark the number on the panel for future reference.
5. Press Del twice then enter the total number of panels in the
system (the control panel plus all remote annunciators).
6. On the Network Class menu, select how the remote
annunciators are wired (Class A or Class B) then press Enter.
Step 3: Configure the control panel
The next step is to configure the control panel using the
AutoLearn command. Configuring the control panel consists of
assigning it a panel number, telling it how many panels are
connected together, and specifying how it is wired.
If a DLD card is installed, you must enter the receiver telephone
numbers, the identification number, and in some cases the
default dialer strings for the default subscriber account (Account
1). Other accounts can be added later.
Note: Before proceeding, view a revision report to make sure
that all optional panel components are listed and addressed
correctly. For more information, see the topic “Display or print a
revision report” in Chapter 8.
CONFIGURE
►1)AutoLearn
2)System
3)Cards
4)Zones
5)Output
6)Exit
ENTER PANEL ID
XX
To configure a control panel:
1. Log on to the control panel using the level 4 password.
2. From the Main menu, choose Program, and then Configure.
Wait until the panel is initialized before proceeding.
3. On the Configure menu, choose AutoLearn.
4. Press Del twice, and then enter a panel ID of 01.
ENTER MAX PANEL
XX
5. Press Del twice then enter the total number of panels in the
system (the control panel plus all remote annunciators).
NETWORK CLASS
1)CLASS ‘A’
►2)CLASS ‘B’
6. On the Network Class menu, select the wiring configuration
(Class A or Class B) of the RS-485 transmission path, and
then press Enter.
Wait until the database is updated before proceeding.
The following steps are only required when a DLD card is
installed.
To configure the dialer:
PRIMARY RCVR #
ENTER PHONE #
1. Enter the first telephone number used to connect to the
receiver. The telephone number can consist of up to 23
numeric characters.
Example: For 1-555-867-5309, enter 15558675309.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.27
Installation
SECONDARY RCVR #
ENTER PHONE #
2. Enter the second telephone number used to connect to the
receiver. The telephone number can consist of up to 23
numeric characters.
Example: For 1-555-752-1792, enter 15557521792.
ENTER ACCOUNT
XXXX
ENTER TEST TIME
HHMM
3. Enter the 4-digit subscriber account number.
4. Enter the time when you want the dialer to perform its 24hour periodic test. Enter the time in 24-hour format, where
HH is the hour and MM is the minutes.
Example: For 12:45 in the morning, enter 0045. For 12:45 in
the afternoon, enter 1245.
DIALER FORMAT ▼
►1)4/2
2)Contact ID
5. On the Dialer Format menu, choose one of the following:
•
4/2 to transmit status changes in 4/2 format
•
Contact ID to transmit status changes using the
predefined set of Contact ID dialer strings.
If you chose Contact ID, skip to step 14. If you chose 4/2,
complete the steps below.
ENTER TEST STNG
NORMAL
XX
6. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when it
performs its 24-hour periodic test and the control panel is in
the normal state.
ENTER TEST STNG
ABNORMAL
XX
7. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when it
performs its 24-hour periodic test and the control panel is not
in the normal state. This number must be distinctively
different from the number entered in the previous step.
ENTER TEST STNG
ALARM ACT
XX
8. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when an
alarm input is activated (goes into alarm) and the alarm input
is not programmed to initiate a custom dialer response This
is the default alarm activation string.
ENTER TEST STNG
ALARM RST
XX
9. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when an
active alarm input is restored and the alarm input is not
programmed to initiate a custom dialer response This is the
default alarm restoration string.
ENTER TEST STNG
TROUBLE ACT
XX
10. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when a
point signals a trouble condition and the point is not
programmed to initiate a custom dialer response. This is the
default trouble activation string.
ENTER TEST STNG
TROUBLE RST
XX
11. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when a
point that signaled a trouble condition is restored and the
point is not programmed to initiate a custom dialer response.
This is the default trouble restoration string.
ENTER TEST STNG
SUPERVISORY ACT
XX
12. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when a
supervisory input is activated and the supervisory input is
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Installation
not programmed to initiate a custom dialer response This is
the default supervisory activation string.
ENTER TEST STNG
SUPERVISORY RST
XX
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
UPDATE DATABASES
►1)Save
13. Enter the number that you want the dialer to send when an
active supervisory input is restored and the supervisory input
is not programmed to initiate a custom dialer response This
is the default supervisory restoration string.
14. On the Exit menu, choose Save Edits. Wait while the
database is updated.
15. On the Update Databases menu, choose Save. Wait while the
database is updated.
Step 4: Add loop devices to the project database
At this point, the control panel has a partial default project
database that includes each option card installed in the panel.
What the project database doesn’t include are the devices
installed on the Signature loops. For each Signature loop, the
control panel displays the following trouble message:
LCL TROUBLE: Unconfig. Device
The next step is to add the loop devices to the project database.
The easiest way to do this is to use the Auto Loop command.
SLIC
1)Config Card
2)Config Detect
3)Config Module
►4)Auto Loop
5)Accept Map
6)Exit
To add the loop devices to the project database
1. Log on to the control panel using the level 4 password.
2. From the Main menu, choose Program, and then Configure.
Wait while the panel initializes before proceeding.
# Detectors :032
# Modules
:007
3. For each SLIC card installed in the control panel, on the
Configure menu, choose Cards.
Enter: Accept
Delete: Cancel
4. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
5. On the SLIC menu, choose Auto Loop.
The system displays a screen that shows how many detectors
and modules were detected on the loop.
6. If the number of devices found is correct, press Enter then
wait while the database is updated. If not, press Del to
cancel.
If the correct device count is not displayed, it is probably due
to a wiring error or loose terminal connection and should be
corrected before continuing.
7. Choose Exit, then Exit, and then Save.
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Installation
Step 5: Clear trouble messages
The next step is to clear the trouble messages displayed on the
control panel CPU/Display Unit. To help with troubleshooting,
see the topic “Clearing trouble messages” in Chapter 8.
For each remote annunciator installed, you should have the
following trouble messages:
LCL FAULT: CH1 Communications
LCL FAULT: CH2 Communications
LCL FAULT: Database Incompatible
These trouble messages are expected and will be cleared once
the project databases are synchronized in the final step. If only
the communication trouble messages are displayed and not an
incompatible database message, there is a problem with the
remote annunciator wiring. The wiring fault must be corrected
before the project databases can be synchronized.
Note: The CH2 Communications trouble message is not
displayed on systems where Network Class is programmed for
Class B.
Step 6: Make changes to the project database
The default project database creates a general fire alarm system.
In a general fire alarm system, all notification appliance circuits
turn on when any fire alarm input is activated. If your system
requirements exceed that of a general fire alarm system (such as
zone reporting and location descriptions), you can make changes
to the project database from the control panel CPU/Display Unit
at this time.
If you need to make any changes, do so in the following
sequence:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
System
Cards
Devices
Output groups
Zones
Save your changes after each step. Do not update the remote
annunciators until after all output group testing and zone testing
has been completed. For more information, see Chapter 7 “Front
panel programming.”
Step 7: Synchronize the project databases
After the system has been completely tested and all the trouble
messages have been cleared (except for the three described
earlier) you can use the Save & Sync command to synchronize
the project databases. Synchronizing the project databases is
necessary so all of the panels are operating with the same
database. The Save & Sync command saves the project database
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Installation
in the control panel and then automatically updates all of the
remote annunciators.
Note: Only use the Save & Sync command when the system is
completely programmed from the front panel. Do not use the
software configuration utility to download a project database to
the control panel then use the Save & Sync command to update
the remote annunciators.
Using the software configuration utility
To commission the system using the software configuration
utility, follow the steps described below.
Step 1: Energize the system
Apply power to the control panel and all of the remote
annunciators. Wait until the control panel completes all
diagnostic checks before proceeding.
Step 2: Download the project database into each panel
After you have energized the system, download the project
database into the control panel and each remote annunciator,
starting with the control panel. Figure 6-22 shows the dialog box
that you use to download the project database.
Figure 6-22: Communications Selection Form dialog box
Each CPU/Display Unit is shipped from the factory with a panel
ID of 1. When you download the project database to a remote
annunciator, you must confirm that you want to overwrite the
existing panel ID number with the one selected in the
Communications Selection Form dialog box.
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6.31
Installation
Figure 6-23 shows the message that is displayed when the
CPU/Display Unit panel ID number does not match the panel ID
number selected in the Communications Selection Form dialog
box. Clicking OK at this point overwrites the existing panel ID
number with the one selected.
Figure 6-23: Panel ID mismatch message box
To download the project database:
1. Start the software configuration utility then open the project.
2. Connect the laptop computer to the panel.
3. On the Tools menu, choose Send Database To Panel.
4. In the Communications Selection Form dialog box, click the
Communications Port arrow, and then select the COM port
used to connect the laptop computer to the panel.
5. If you are downloading to the control panel, check only the
Selected check box for Panel 1.
If you are downloading to a remote annunciator, check the
Selected check box for the panel ID number that you want
assigned to the remote annunciator.
6. Click Transmit Database To System.
7. After the transfer is complete click OK, and then close the
Communications Selection Form dialog.
Step 3: Clear trouble messages
After you have downloaded the project database to all of the
panels, clear all of the trouble messages displayed on the control
panel CPU/Display Unit. For more information, see the topic
“Clearing trouble messages” in Chapter 8.
Step 4: Make changes to the project database
If you have to make any changes to the project database, make
the changes in the software configuration utility then download
the corrected project database to all of the panels as described
above.
Note: Do not use the Save & Sync command to update the
project database in the remote annunciators if you have
programmed the system using the software configuration utility.
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Installation
Connecting peripheral devices
Connect peripheral devices to the control panel as described
below. The laptop computer is used for programming purposes
only and should be disconnected when not in use.
Connecting a laptop computer
There are two ways to connect a laptop computer to the control
panel. You can use the RS-232 terminals on the PS6 card or you
can use the RJ-12 modular jack on the CPU/Display Unit.
Figure 6-24 shows how to connect a laptop computer to the
RS-232 terminals on a PS6 card. Connecting a laptop computer
in this manner requires that you use programming cable P/N
260097, ordered separately.
Note: Connecting a laptop computer to the RS-232 terminals
may cause a ground fault. The ground fault event message goes
away when you remove the connection.
P/N 260097
White
Red
Black
2
3
5
DB-9 female
rear view
Figure 6-24: Laptop computer connection via the RS-232
terminals
You can also connect a laptop computer to the RJ-12 modular
jack on the CPU/Display Unit. Connecting a laptop computer in
this manner requires that you use programming cable Model no.
PROGCABLE-1, ordered separately.
Connecting a serial printer
Figure 6-25 shows how to connect a serial printer to the RS-232
terminals on a PS6 card. Locate the printer within 20 ft of the
control panel and set the printer configuration switches for 9600
baud, 8 bits, 1 stop bit, no parity, and no flow control.
Note: Connecting a serial printer to the RS-232 terminals may
cause a ground fault. The ground fault event message goes away
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
6.33
Installation
when you disconnect the printer. To prevent ground faults use an
IOP3A RS-232 Isolator.
7
To
PT–1S
3
2
DB–25P
(rear view)
Figure 6-25: Serial printer connection diagram
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QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 7
Front panel programming
Summary
This chapter provides instructions for programming the fire
alarm system from the control panel CPU/Display Unit. It is
intended for those trained and authorized to program the fire
alarm system.
Content
Before you begin • 7.3
What is a zone? • 7.3
What is an output group? • 7.3
What is a service group? • 7.5
Device type descriptions • 7.6
Programming limits • 7.10
Automatically configuring the system • 7.11
Using the AutoLearn command • 7.11
Using the Auto Loop command • 7.11
Changing level 3 and level 4 passwords • 7.12
Configuring the system automatically • 7.13
Editing system configuration settings • 7.14
Adding user labels • 7.15
Setting the alarm silence/reset inhibit timer • 7.17
Setting the AC power delay timer • 7.17
Saving system configuration changes • 7.17
Adding and deleting option cards • 7.18
Adding an option card • 7.18
Deleting an option card • 7.19
Editing ZB16-4 card configuration settings • 7.20
Adding a location description to the event message • 7.20
Changing the device type setting • 7.21
Saving ZB16-4 card configuration changes • 7.21
Editing ZA8-2 card configuration settings • 7.22
Adding a location description to the event message • 7.22
Changing the device type setting • 7.23
Saving ZA8-2 card configuration changes • 7.23
Editing SLIC card configuration settings • 7.24
Changing the device type setting of NAC 1 and NAC 2 • 7.24
Changing the wiring class setting • 7.25
Saving SLIC card configuration changes • 7.25
Adding intelligent addressable devices automatically • 7.26
Adding and deleting intelligent addressable detectors • 7.28
Adding an intelligent addressable detector • 7.28
Deleting an intelligent addressable detector • 7.28
Editing intelligent addressable detector settings • 7.30
Adding a location description to the event message • 7.30
Viewing the model type setting • 7.31
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.1
Front panel programming
Changing the alarm sensitivity setting • 7.32
Changing the alarm verification setting: • 7.32
Changing the prealarm setting • 7.33
Changing the base type setting • 7.33
Saving detector configuration changes • 7.34
Adding and deleting intelligent addressable modules • 7.35
Adding an intelligent addressable module • 7.35
Deleting an intelligent addressable module • 7.35
Editing intelligent addressable module settings • 7.37
Viewing the module’s model number • 7.37
Adding a location description to an event message • 7.38
Changing the device type setting • 7.38
Changing the personality setting • 7.39
Saving module configuration changes • 7.39
Editing DLD card configuration settings • 7.40
Changing the number of receivers • 7.40
Entering receiver telephone numbers • 7.40
Changing the number of retry attempts • 7.41
Changing default dialer messages • 7.41
Saving DLD card configuration changes • 7.42
Adding and deleting subscriber accounts • 7.43
Adding subscriber accounts • 7.43
Deleting subscriber accounts • 7.43
Editing subscriber account configuration settings • 7.44
Entering an account number • 7.44
Selecting the transmission format • 7.44
Changing the normal test dialer string • 7.44
Changing the abnormal test dialer string • 7.45
Changing the periodic test time • 7.45
Selecting a receiver • 7.45
Saving subscriber account configuration changes • 7.46
Adding and deleting output groups • 7.47
Adding an output group • 7.47
Deleting an output group • 7.47
Editing an output group • 7.49
Adding a relay response • 7.49
Adding a delay response • 7.50
Adding a dialer response • 7.51
Removing a response from an output group • 7.52
Reviewing responses in an output group • 7.53
Adding and deleting zones • 7.55
Adding a zone • 7.55
Deleting a zone • 7.55
Editing zone configuration settings • 7.57
Adding a location description to the event message • 7.57
Adding, deleting, and reviewing zone members • 7.57
Adding, removing, and reviewing zone output group
assignments • 7.59
Entering a zone code • 7.61
Changing the zone type • 7.61
Saving zone configuration changes • 7.62
Clearing the history log • 7.63
Saving the project database • 7.64
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QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Before you begin
This topic describes several programming features that you
should understand before you begin programming the fire alarm
system.
What is a zone?
A zone is a collection of points that are grouped together in the
project database in the same manner that the system designer
divided the protected premises. Zones provide a single zonal
response and are used to limit the number of event messages
processed by the system. Firewall designations, planned
evacuation criteria, architectural design, and other factors
determine how points are grouped into zones.
What is an output group?
An output group is a collection of responses organized into sets
according to specific response types. The response types for
which you can create and edit responses from the control panel
CPU/Display Unit are described below.
Active: The set of responses that is executed when a point
assigned to the output group changes to the active state.
Trouble: The set of responses that is executed when a point
assigned to the output group signals a trouble condition.
In addition to active and trouble responses, there are a number of
response types for which you can create and edit responses using
the software configuration utility. These response types are
described below.
Active Test: The set of responses that is executed when a point
in a service group assigned to the output group changes to the
active state and the service group is active.
Disablement: The set of responses that is executed when a point
assigned to the output group changes to the disabled state.
Trouble Test: The set of responses that is executed when a point
in a service group assigned to the output group signals a trouble
condition and the service group is active.
Pre Alarm: The set of responses that is executed when a fire
alarm detector assigned to the output group signals that its
prealarm threshold has been crossed.
Running: The set of responses that is executed when a service
group assigned to the output group is activated.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.3
Front panel programming
Verify: The set of responses that is executed when a fire alarm
detector assigned to the output group is in the process of
verifying a possible fire alarm condition.
The size of a project database is limited. Effective use of output
groups keeps the size of the project database manageable and
makes programming easier and quicker. The following examples
show how to use output groups effectively.
Example 1: Combining common responses in the same
output group
Instead of programming separate output groups for each input
when the output groups include the same responses, program a
single output group that includes the common responses as
shown in Figure 7-1.
Output Group 1
Smoke
1
Active response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Activate Floor 1 strobes
Output Group 2
Smoke
2
Active response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Activate Floor 1 strobes
Smoke
1
Output Group 1
Active response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Activate Floor 1 strobes
Smoke
2
Before
After
Figure 7-1: Combining common responses in the same output group
Example 2: Combining sets of responses in the same output
group
Instead of programming separate output groups for individual
response types that share common inputs, program a single
output group that includes each response type as shown in Figure
7-2.
7.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Smoke
1
Output Group 1
Active response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Activate Floor 1 strobes
Smoke
2
Smoke
1
Output Group 1
Smoke
1
Output Group 2
Trouble response:
Activate Floor 1 trouble
LED
Smoke
2
Active response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Activate Floor 1 strobes
Trouble response:
Activate Floor 1 trouble
LED
Smoke
2
Before
After
Figure 7-2: Combining response types in the same output group
Example 3: Combining mutually exclusive responses in the
same output group
Instead of programming separate output groups that include
mutually exclusive responses when the responses are activated
by different inputs, program a single output group as shown in
Figure 7-3.
A good example is combining zone responses and service group
responses. Zones can activate active and fault responses but not
active test responses. Service groups on the other hand can
activate active test responses but not active and fault responses.
Output Group 1
Zone
1
Active response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Activate Floor 1 strobes
Output Group 2
Service
Group
1
Active Test response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Insert 5-second delay
Output Group 1
Zone
1
Service
Group
1
Before
Active response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Activate Floor 1 strobes
Active Test response:
Activate Floor 1 horns
Insert 5-second delay
After
Figure 7-3: Combining mutually exclusive responses in the same output group
What is a service group?
A service group is a collection of points in the project database
that are grouped together to facilitate periodic system testing.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.5
Front panel programming
Service groups can comprise all of the devices in the protected
premises or you can divide the protected premises into multiple
service groups to lessen the impact periodic testing has on the
building occupants.
By default, the system provides one service group (service
group129) that allows a service technician to perform an active
test and a fault test on every device in the system. To program
multiple service groups you must use the software configuration
utility.
Device type descriptions
Device types determine the operation of the points to which they
are assigned. The device types that can be used to program the
system are described below.
Alarm verify: Device type assigned to system inputs that test for
smoke particles in the air a second time before signaling an
alarm condition. System inputs with this device type are
commonly called verified smoke inputs. When activated, verified
smoke inputs generate an Alarm Verify event when the presence
of smoke is first detected then a Fire Active event if the presence
of smoke is confirmed.
Alarm verification helps prevent false alarms in areas where
transient smoke is anticipated by resetting the smoke detector
after it first latches then waiting to see if it latches again within
the designated confirmation period. The figure below shows the
alarm verification timing.
Alarm verification period
Retard-reset-restart period
Confirmation period
No alarm at control unit
Alarm required at control unit
Control unit
Detector
restart
Retard-reset
period
Power-up
period
8s
16 s
60 s
Pull station: Device type assigned to system inputs that are used
to signal the manual initiation of a fire alarm. System inputs with
this device type are commonly called pull station inputs. When
activated, pull station inputs generate Pull Station events and
cause the system to enter the alarm state.
Dry contact: Device type assigned to relay control circuits that
are used to operate normally open or normally closed controls
7.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
for ancillary equipment. System outputs with this device type are
commonly called dry contact outputs. Dry contact outputs
operate as follows:
•
They can be programmed to activate on any automatic or
manual event
•
They are not automatically turned off (silenced) when the
Alarm Silence switch is pressed
•
They are not automatically turned on when the Drill switch
is pressed
Alarm active: Device type assigned to system inputs that are
used signal the presence of smoke particles in the air. System
inputs with this device type are commonly called smoke inputs.
When activated, smoke inputs generate Fire Active events and
cause the system to enter the alarm state.
Alarm output: Device type assigned to system outputs that are
used to automatically operate audible notification appliances
(e.g., horns), visible notification appliances (e.g., strobes), or
controls for ancillary equipment. System outputs with this device
type are commonly called common alarm outputs. Common
alarm outputs operate as follows:
•
They are automatically activated when the control panel
enters the alarm state.
•
They are automatically turned off (silenced) when the Alarm
Silence switch is pressed
•
They are automatically turned on when the Drill switch is
pressed
In contrast to other output device types, common alarm outputs
cannot be disabled and do not require programming.
Heat alarm: Device type assigned to system inputs that are used
to signal an abnormal increase in temperature. System inputs
with this device type are commonly called heat inputs. When
activated, heat inputs generate Heat Alarm events and cause the
system to enter the alarm state.
Latching supervisory: Device type assigned to system inputs
that are used to signal an abnormal condition with a component
of the fire suppression system (e.g., low water pressure). System
inputs with this device type are commonly called latching
supervisory inputs. When activated, latching supervisory inputs
generate Latch Supv events and cause the system to enter the
supervisory state. The Latch Supv event is not automatically
restored when the supervisory input is restored. Restoring the
Latch Supv event requires a panel reset.
Latching tamper: Device type assigned to system inputs that are
used to signal an abnormal condition that could prevent the
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.7
Front panel programming
required operation of the fire suppression system (e.g., a shut
water control valve). System inputs with this device type are
commonly called latching tamper inputs. When activated,
latching tamper inputs generate Latch Tamper events and cause
the system to enter the supervisory state. The Latch Tamper
event is not automatically restored when the tamper input is
restored. Restoring the Latch Tamper event requires a panel
reset.
Monitor: Device type assigned to system inputs that signal the
operation of ancillary system functions (e.g., a switch closure).
System inputs with this device type are commonly called
monitor inputs. When activated, monitor inputs generate Monitor
events and cause the system to enter the monitor state.
Output: Device type assigned to system outputs that are used to
operate polarized controls for ancillary equipment. System
outputs with this device type are commonly called supervised
outputs. Supervised outputs operate as follows:
•
They can be programmed to activate on any automatic or
manual event
•
They are not automatically turned off (silenced) when the
Alarm Silence switch is pressed
•
They are not automatically turned on when the Drill switch
is pressed
Audible: Device type assigned to system outputs that are used to
operate polarized notification appliances (e.g., horns). System
outputs with this device type are commonly called audible
outputs. Audible outputs operate as follows:
•
They can be programmed to activate on any automatic or
manual event
•
They are automatically turned off (silenced) when the Alarm
Silence switch is pressed
•
They are automatically turned on when the Drill switch is
pressed
Supervisory: Device type assigned to system inputs that are
used to signal an abnormal condition with a component of the
fire suppression system (e.g., low water pressure). System inputs
with this device type are commonly called supervisory inputs.
When activated, supervisory inputs generate Supervisory events
and cause the system to enter the supervisory state. The
Supervisory event is automatically restored when the supervisory
input is restored.
Tamper: Device type assigned to system inputs that are used to
signal an abnormal condition that could prevent the required
operation of the fire suppression system (e.g., a shut water
7.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
control valve). System inputs with this device type are
commonly called tamper inputs. When activated, tamper inputs
generate Tamper events and cause the system to enter the
supervisory state. The Tamper event is automatically restored
when the tamper input is restored.
Visual: Device type assigned to system outputs that are used to
operate polarized visible indicators (e.g., strobes). System
outputs with this device type are commonly called visible
outputs. Visible outputs operate as follows:
•
They can be programmed to activate on any automatic or
manual event
•
They are automatically turned off (silenced) when the Alarm
Silence switch is pressed
•
They are automatically turned on when the Drill switch is
pressed
Water Flow: Device type assigned to system inputs that are used
to signal when water is flowing through the sprinkler system.
System inputs with this device type are commonly called
waterflow inputs. When activated, waterflow inputs generate a
Waterflow event and cause the system to enter the alarm state.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.9
Front panel programming
Programming limits
Table 7-1 lists the maximum limits for front panel programming
and the software configuration utility.
Table 7-1: Front panel and software configuration utility programming limits
Feature
Front panel
Software configuration utility
Zones
Quantity: 480
Members: 32
Output groups per zone: 6
Quantity: 480
Members: 32
Output groups per zone: 16
Output groups
Quantity: 250
Devices activating an output group:
limited to zones
Quantity: 250
Devices activating an output group:
unlimited
Service groups
None [1]
Quantity: 128
Members: unlimited
Output groups per service group: 16
AND groups
None
Quantity: 64
Members: 16
Output groups per AND group: 16
Matrix groups
None
Quantity: 64
Members: 64
Output groups per matrix group: 16
Time controls
None
Quantity: 32
Output groups per time control: 16
Switch groups
None [2]
16
Notes
[1] A single service group (service group 129) is automatically created that allows the periodic
testing of the entire system and cannot be changed through front panel programming
[2] Switch groups 1 and 2 are automatically assigned and cannot be changed through front
panel programming
3. A device can’t be a member of more than one zone, one service group, five AND groups, and
five matrix groups at the same time
4. The project database can’t have more than 4,186 objects
7.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Automatically configuring the system
The two commands that you can use to automatically configure
the system are described below.
Using the AutoLearn command
Use the AutoLearn command to automatically configure the
control panel and remote annunciators from their respective
CPU/Display Units. The AutoLearn command lets you:
•
Assign panel numbers
•
Designate how the control panel and remote annunciators are
wired together
•
Detect which option cards are installed in the control panel
The AutoLearn command replaces the existing project database
with a default project database based on the hardware
configuration it detects. The default project database configures
the system as a general fire alarm system that activates all
notification appliance circuits when any fire alarm input is
activated. The default project database also includes one service
group (129) and two output groups (249 and 250).
Service Group 129 consists of all fire alarm, supervisory, and
monitor device types that are not members of another service
group.
Output Group 249 provides an active test response that briefly
turns on all Alarm Output device types and the Visible device
types detected when the default project database was created.
The active test response does not turn on any Audible, Visible,
or Output device types added after the default database was
created. The active test response is activated when a member of
Service Group 129 changes to the active or trouble state and
Service Group 129 is active.
Output Group 250 provides an active response that turns on the
Visible device types detected when the default project database
was created. The active response does not turn on any Audible,
Visible, or Output device types added after the default project
database was created. The active response is activated when the
control panel enters the alarm state.
Using the Auto Loop command
Use Auto Loop command to automatically add the intelligent
addressable devices to the SLIC card. The Auto Loop command
replaces the data in the SLIC card’s actual data table with the
devices it finds installed on the loop. For more information, see
the topic “Adding intelligent addressable devices automatically.”
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.11
Front panel programming
Changing level 3 and level 4 passwords
PROGRAM MENU
1)Time Date
►2)Edit Password
3)Restart
4)Clear History
5)Configure
Use the Edit Password command on the Program menu to
change the password setting for using level 3 command menus.
To change the level 3 password you must log on using the level
4 password.
PASSWORD
1)Level
2)Level
►3)Level
4)Level
The default level 4 password is 4444.
MENU
1
2
3
4
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX
The default level 3 password is 3333.
To change the level 3 password:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Edit Password.
3. On the Password menu, choose Level 3.
4. Enter the new password then wait while the database is
updated.
To change the level 4 password:
1. On the Password menu, choose Level 4.
2. Enter the new password then wait while the database is
updated.
7.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Configuring the system automatically
CONFIGURE
►1)AutoLearn
2)System
3)Cards
4)Zones
5)Output
6)Exit
Use the AutoLearn command on the Configure menu to
configure the control panel and remote annunciators from their
respective CPU/Display Units. For more information about the
AutoLearn command, see the topic “Automatically configuring
the system” earlier in this chapter.
Caution: Do not use the AutoLearn command if you have made
any changes to the project database from the front panel or have
downloaded a project database from the software configuration
utility. The AutoLearn command replaces the existing project
configuration settings with default values that may be contrary to
those you have programmed.
Note: Before proceeding, if configuring a control panel, view a
revision report to make sure that all optional panel components
are accounted for and are addressed correctly. For more
information, see the topic “Display or print a revision report” in
Chapter 8.
To configure the system automatically:
1. Log on to the panel using the level 4 password.
2. From the Main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then AutoLearn.
4. If configuring a control panel, enter a panel ID number of
01.
If configuring a remote annunciator, enter a panel ID from
02 to 09.
5. Enter the total number of panels in the system (the control
panel plus all remote annunciators).
6. On the Network Class menu, select the wiring configuration
(Class A or Class B) of the RS-485 transmission path, and
then press Enter.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.13
Front panel programming
Editing system configuration settings
This topic describes how to edit system configuration settings.
To see a diagram of the process, refer to “System configuration
menus” in Appendix C. Table 7.2 lists the default system
settings.
Table 7.2: Default system settings
Option
NFPA 72 defaults
ULC 527
Marketplace
NFPA72
ULC-527
Language
English (US)
English (US)
Date Format
MM/DD/YYYY
MM/DD/YYYY
Annunciator Baud Rate
9600
9600
Annunciator Communication
Class
Class B
Class B
Alarm Silence
Audible and Com Alarm Out
device types
Audible and Com Alarm Out
device types
Drill
Audible, Visible, and Com
Alarm Out device types
Audible, Visible, and Com
Alarm Out device types
Drill Activation Type
Steady
Steady
Waterflow Silence
Disabled
Disabled
Zone Resound Inhibit
Disabled
Disabled
2-Stage Operation
Disabled
Enabled (5-minute delay)
Trouble Reminder
Disabled
Disabled
Automatic Alarm Signal Silence Disabled
Disabled
Alarm Signal Silence/Reset
Inhibit [1]
Disabled
Disabled
Panel Silence Resound
Disabled
24 hours
AC Power Trouble Delay [1]
Disabled
6 hours
User labels [1]
No text
No text
[1] Can be changed through front panel programming. All others require the software
configuration utility.
To edit the system’s configuration settings:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then System.
3. Follow the instructions provided below.
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Front panel programming
Adding user labels
CONFIG SYSTEM
►1)User Labels
2)ALM/RST Inhib
3)AC Power Dly
4)Exit
Use the User Labels command on the Config System menu to
add user-defined labels to the project database as described
below.
Note: Entering text from the front panel requires that you use a
compatible bar code scanning device.
To add user labels:
1. On the Config System menu, choose User Labels then
follow the instructions provided below.
Entering the facility’s name
USER LABEL
►1)Facility Name
2)Inst Company
3)Phone Number
4)Programmer
5)Exit
Use the Facility Name command on the User Label menu to
enter the name of the building in which the fire alarm system is
installed. This information is displayed when the control panel is
in the normal condition.
To enter the name of the facility:
1. On the User Labels menu, choose Facility Name.
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the required
text.
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the User Labels
menu.
Entering the installing company’s name
USER LABEL
1)Facility Name
►2)Inst Company
3)Phone Number
4)Programmer
5)Exit
Use the Inst Company command on the User Label menu to
enter the name of the company that installed the fire alarm
system (i.e., your company’s name.)
To enter the name of the installing company:
1. On the User Labels menu, choose Inst Company.
InstallerComp
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the required
text.
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the User Labels
menu.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.15
Front panel programming
Entering the installing company’s telephone number
USER LABEL
1)Facility Name
2)Inst Company
►3)Phone Number
4)Programmer
5)Exit
Phone Number
Use the Phone Number command on the User Label menu to
enter the telephone number of the company that installed the fire
alarm system (i.e., your company’s telephone number) or the
person to contact for technical assistance.
Note: If the telephone number contains numbers and letters, you
must use a compatible bar code scanning device to enter the text
portion from the front panel.
To enter the telephone number of the installing company:
1. On the User Labels menu, choose Phone Number.
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the telephone
number.
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the User Labels
menu.
Entering the programmer’s name
USER LABELS
1)Facility Name
2)Inst Company
3)Phone Number
►4)Programmer
5)Exit
Programmer Name
Use the Programmer command on the User Labels menu to enter
the name of the person that programmed the fire alarm system.
To enter the name of the system programmer:
1. On the User Labels menu, choose Programmer.
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the required
text.
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the User Labels
menu.
Saving user labels
USER LABELS
1)Facility Name
2)Inst Company
3)Phone Number
4)Programmer
►5)Exit
Use the Exit command on the User Labels menu to save your
changes and return to the Configure menu. You also have the
option to not save any of your changes.
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
1. On the User Labels menu, choose Exit.
7.16
To save user labels:
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without saving
your changes
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Setting the alarm silence/reset inhibit timer
CONFIG SYSTEM
1)User Labels
►2)ALM/RST Inhib
3)AC Power Dly
4)Exit
ALARM/RESET INHI
►1)None
2)1 min
3)3 min
4)5 min
Use the ALM/RST Inhib command on the Config System menu
to set the duration of the alarm silence/reset inhibit timer. The
alarm silence/reset inhibit timer determines how long
notification appliances must remain active before an operator can
silence them or reset the fire alarm system.
To set the alarm silence/reset inhibit timer:
1. On the Config System menu, choose ALM/RST Inhib.
2. On the Alarm/Reset Inhibit menu, choose the duration.
Setting the AC power delay timer
CONFIG SYSTEM
1)User Labels
2)ALM/RST Inhib
►3)AC Power Dly
4)Exit
AC POWER DELAY
►1)None
2)6 Hours
3)12 Hours
Use the AC Power Dly command on the Config System menu to
set the duration of the AC power delay timer. The AC power
delay timer determines how long the control panel waits before
reporting a primary AC power failure off-premises provided
there are no other trouble conditions present.
To set the AC power delay timer:
1. On the Config System menu, choose AC Power Dly.
2. On the AC Power Delay menu, choose the duration.
Saving system configuration changes
CONFIG SYSTEM
1)User Labels
2)ALM/RST Inhib
3)AC Power Dly
►4)Exit
Use the Exit command on the Config System menu to save the
system configuration changes and return to the Configure menu.
You also have the option to return to the Configure menu
without saving your changes.
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
To save system configuration changes:
1. On the Config System menu, choose Exit.
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without saving
your changes
7.17
Front panel programming
Adding and deleting option cards
Adding an option card
Main Menu
1)Status
2)Reports
3)Test
4)Enable
5)Disable
6)Activate
7)Restore
►8)Program
9)Login
CONFIGURE
1)Time/Date
2)Edit Password
3)Restart
4)Clear History
►5)Configure
CONFIGURE
1)AutoLearn
2)System
►3)Cards
4)Zones
5)Output
6)Exit
EDIT CARD
►1)Add
2)Edit
3)Delete
ENTER CARD
CC
Use the Add command on the Edit Card menu to add an option
card to the project database. Before the option card can be added
to the project database, it must be installed in the control panel.
After you have added the option card, you can edit its
configuration or accept the default settings.
Caution: Do not use the AutoLearn command to add an option
card after you have made any programming changes from the
front panel or have downloaded a project database from the
software configuration utility. The AutoLearn command replaces
the existing project database with a default database and removes
any custom programming.
To add an option card:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Add, and then enter the
card’s address.
The system automatically displays the configuration menu
for the selected card.
4. Choose Exit to accept the card’s default settings and return
to the Configure menu
— or —
Continue and edit the card’s configuration settings.
For ZB16-4 cards, see “Editing ZB16-4 card configuration
settings.”
For ZA8-2 cards, see “Editing ZA8-2 card configuration
settings.”
For SLIC cards, see “Editing SLIC card configuration
settings.”
For DLD cards, see “Editing DLD card configuration
settings.”
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Front panel programming
Deleting an option card
Main Menu
1)Status
2)Reports
3)Test
4)Enable
5)Disable
6)Activate
7)Restore
►8)Program
9)Login
CONFIGURE
1)Time/Date
2)Edit Password
3)Restart
4)Clear History
►5)Configure
Use the Delete command on the Edit Card menu to remove an
option card from the project database. The system provides a
warning screen to confirm you selected the correct card before it
deletes it from the project database.
To delete an option card:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Delete, and then enter the
address of the card you want deleted.
4. On the warning screen, verify the card number then do one
of the following:
CONFIGURE
1)AutoLearn
2)System
►3)Cards
4)Zones
5)Output
6)Exit
•
Press Del to return to the Configure menu without
deleting the selected card
•
Press Enter to delete the card and return to the Configure
menu
EDIT CARD
1)Add
2)Edit
►3)Delete
ENTER CARD
CC
*SYSTEM WARNING*
Delete Card
Card: CC
DELETE to Cancel
ENTER to proceed
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.19
Front panel programming
Editing ZB16-4 card configuration settings
This topic describes how to edit a ZB16-4 card’s configuration
settings. To see a diagram of the process, refer to “ZB16-4 card
configuration menus” in Appendix C. Table 7-3 lists the ZB16-4
card’s default settings.
Table 7-3: ZB16-4 card default settings
Circuit
Device No.
Default setting
Z1 to Z12
001 to 012
Text message = No text
Device type = Alarm Active
Z13 to Z14
013 to 014
Text message = No text
Device type = Comm Alm Out
Z15 to Z16
015 to 016
Text message = No text
Device type = Visual
To edit a ZB16-4 card’s configuration settings:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the ZB16-4
card’s address.
TRAD ZONE
►1)Circuit Num
2)Exit
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
4. For each circuit on the ZB16-4 card, do the following:
On the Trad Zone menu, choose Circuit Num then enter the
device address of the circuit whose settings you want to edit.
Follow the instruction provided below.
Adding a location description to the event
message
CIRCUIT EDIT
►1)Text Message
2)Device Type
3)Exit
ENTER TEXT
Use the Text Message command on the Circuit Edit menu to add
a location description to a circuit’s event message. The location
description is displayed when the circuit is in an abnormal
condition. If you do not add a location description, only the
circuit’s panel-card-device address is displayed.
Note: Entering text from the front panel requires that you use a
compatible bar code scanning device.
To add a location description:
1. On the Circuit Edit menu, choose Text Message.
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the location
description text.
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Front panel programming
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the Circuit Edit
menu.
4. Continue making changes to the selected circuit or choose
Exit on the Circuit Edit menu to return to the Trad Zone
menu. From there you can save your changes.
Changing the device type setting
CIRCUIT EDIT
1)Text Message
►2)Device Type
3)Exit
DEVICE EDIT
▼
►ALARM ACTIVE
PULL STATION
HEAT ALARM
WATERFLOW
SUPERVISORY
TAMPER
MONITOR
LATCH SUPV
LATCH TAMPER
ALARM VERIFY
COMM ALM OUT
AUDIBLE
VISUAL
SUPER OUTPUT
Use the Device Type command on the Circuit Edit menu to
change a circuit’s device type. The device type setting
determines the circuit’s operation. For device type descriptions,
see the topic “Before you begin” earlier in this chapter.
WARNING: In some cases, changing an IDC input circuit’s
device type removes it from all zones, AND groups, and matrix
groups. Likewise, changing an NAC output circuit’s device type
removes it from all output groups. When this happens all
correlations are removed and the panel does not provide any
indication.
To change the device type setting:
1. On the Circuit Edit menu, choose Device Type.
2. Select a device type from the list then press Enter to accept
the change and return to the Circuit Edit menu.
3. Continue making changes to the selected circuit or choose
Exit on the Circuit Edit menu to return to the Trad Zone
menu. From there you can save your changes.
Saving ZB16-4 card configuration changes
TRAD ZONE
1)Circuit num
►2)Exit
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
Use the Exit command on the Trad Zone menu to return to the
Configure menu. Upon exiting the Trad Zone menu, you can
save your changes or return to the Configure menu without
saving your changes.
To save ZB16-4 card configuration changes:
1. On the Trad Zone menu, choose Exit.
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without saving
your changes
7.21
Front panel programming
Editing ZA8-2 card configuration settings
This topic describes how to edit a ZA8-2 card’s configuration
settings. To see a diagram of the process, refer to “ZA8-2 card
configuration menus” in Appendix C. Table 7-4 lists the ZA8-2
card’s default settings.
Table 7-4: ZA8-2 card default settings
Circuit
Device No.
Default setting
Zone 1 to
Zone 3
001 to 003
Text message = No text
Device type = Alarm Active
Zone 4
004
Text message = No text
Device type = Comm Alm Out
Zone 5 to
Zone 7
005 to 007
Text message = No text
Device type = Alarm Active
Zone 8
008
Text message = No text
Device type = Visual
To edit a ZA8-2 card’s configuration settings:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the ZA8-2
card’s address.
TRAD ZONE
►1)Circuit Num
2)Exit
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
4. For each circuit on the ZA8-2 card, do the following:
On the Trad Zone menu, choose Circuit Num then enter the
device address of the circuit whose settings you want to edit.
Follow the instruction provided below.
Adding a location description to the event
message
CIRCUIT EDIT
►1)Text Message
2)Device Type
3)Exit
ENTER TEXT
Use the Text Message command on the Circuit Edit menu to add
a location description to a circuit’s event message. The location
description is displayed when the circuit is in an abnormal
condition. If you do not add a location description, only the
circuit’s panel-card-device address is displayed.
Note: Entering text from the front panel requires that you use a
compatible bar code scanning device.
To add a location description:
1. On the Circuit Edit menu, choose Text Message.
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QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the location
description text.
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the Circuit Edit
menu.
4. Continue making changes to the selected circuit or choose
Exit on the Circuit Edit menu to return to the Trad Zone
menu. From there you can save your changes.
Changing the device type setting
CIRCUIT EDIT
1)Text Message
►2)Device Type
3)Exit
DEVICE EDIT
▼
►ALARM ACTIVE
PULL STATION
HEAT ALARM
WATERFLOW
SUPERVISORY
TAMPER
MONITOR
LATCH SUPV
LATCH TAMPER
ALARM VERIFY
COMM ALM OUT
AUDIBLE
VISUAL
SUPER OUTPUT
Use the Device Type command on the Circuit Edit menu to
change a circuit’s device type. The device type setting
determines the circuit’s operation. For device type descriptions,
see the topic “Before you begin” earlier in this chapter.
WARNING: In some cases, changing an IDC input circuit’s
device type removes it from all zones, AND groups, and matrix
groups. Likewise, changing an NAC output circuit’s device type
removes it from all output groups. When this happens all
correlations are removed and the panel does not provide any
indication.
To change the device type setting:
1. On the Circuit Edit menu, choose Device Type.
2. Select a device type from the list then press Enter to accept
the change and return to the Circuit Edit menu.
3. Continue making changes to the selected circuit or choose
Exit on the Circuit Edit menu to return to the Trad Zone
menu. From there you can save your changes.
Saving ZA8-2 card configuration changes
TRAD ZONE
1)Circuit num
►2)Exit
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
Use the Exit command on the Trad Zone menu to return to the
Configure menu. Upon exiting the Trad Zone menu, you can
save your changes or return to the Configure menu without
saving your changes.
To save ZA8-2 card configuration changes:
1. On the Trad Zone menu, choose Exit.
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without saving
your changes
7.23
Front panel programming
Editing SLIC card configuration settings
This topic describes how to edit a SLIC card’s configuration
settings. To see a diagram of the process, refer to “SLIC card
configuration menus” in Appendix C. Table 7-5 lists the SLIC
card’s default settings.
Table 7-5: SLIC card default settings
Option
Default setting
NAC 1
Visible device type
NAC 2
Com Alarm Out device type
Wiring class
Class A or Class B (defined by actual
wiring)
To edit a SLIC card’s configuration settings:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
SLIC
►1)Config Card
2)Config Detect
3)Config Module
4)Auto Loop
5)Accept Map
6)Exit
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
CONFIG CARD
►1)NAC 1
2)NAC 2
3)Wiring Class
4)Exit
Use the NAC 1 and NAC 2 commands on the Config Card menu
to change the device type of the SLIC card’s NAC output
circuits. The device type setting determines the circuit’s
operation. For device type descriptions, see the topic “Before
you begin” earlier in this chapter.
NAC 1
1)Audible
►2)Visible
3)Com Alarm Out
4)Output
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Config Card then follow the
instructions provided below.
Changing the device type setting of NAC 1 and
NAC 2
To change the device type setting of NAC 1 or NAC 2:
1. On the Config Card menu, choose one of the following:
•
NAC 1 to change the device type of the NAC output
circuit labeled NAC 1
•
NAC 2 to change the device type of the NAC output
circuit labeled NAC 2
2. Select a device type from the list.
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Front panel programming
Changing the wiring class setting
CONFIG CARD
1)NAC 1
2)NAC 2
►3)Wiring Class
4)Exit
WIRING CLASS
1)Class ‘A’
►2)Class ‘B’
Use the Wiring Class command on the Config Card menu to
change the wiring class designation of the intelligent addressable
loop.
Note: The wiring class designation must match the actual wiring
configuration of the intelligent addressable loop.
To change the wiring class setting:
1. On the Config Card menu, choose Wiring Class.
2. On the Wiring Class menu, choose one of the following:
•
Class A for Class A operation
•
Class B for Class B operation
Saving SLIC card configuration changes
CONFIG CARD
1)NAC 1
2)NAC 2
3)Wiring Class
►4)Exit
Use the Exit command on the Config Card menu to save your
changes and return to the SLIC menu. You can also return to the
SLIC menu without saving your changes.
To save SLIC card configuration changes:
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
1. On the Config Card menu, choose Exit.
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the SLIC
menu
•
NO Save to return to the SLIC menu without saving
your changes
7.25
Front panel programming
Adding intelligent addressable devices automatically
CONFIGURE
1)AutoLearn
2)System
►3)Cards
4)Zones
5)Output
6)Exit
Caution: Do not use the AutoLoop command to add devices
EDIT CARD
►1)Add
2)Edit
3)Delete
ENTER CARD
CC
SLIC
1)Config Card
2)Config Detect
3)Config Module
►4)Auto Loop
5)Accept Map
6)Exit
#Detectors
#Modules
Use the Auto Loop command on the SLIC menu to automatically
add intelligent addressable devices (detectors and modules) to a
SLIC card’s loop. The AutoLoop command detects which
devices are installed on the loop and adds them to the project
database using the current settings stored in each device.
:032
:007
Enter: Accept
Delete: Cancel
after you have made any programming changes from the front
panel or have downloaded a project database from the software
configuration utility. The AutoLoop command replaces existing
project configuration settings with default values that may be
contrary to those you have programmed.
To automatically add devices to the loop:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Auto Loop.
The system displays a screen that shows how many detectors
and modules were detected on the loop.
5. If the number of devices found is correct, press Enter to
update the database. If not, press Del to cancel.
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Front panel programming
Table 7-6: Factory default settings for intelligent addressable devices
Model
Personality
Device Type
Description
IPHS, PHS, PS, IS
none
Alarm
Smoke detector settings as follows:
Sensitivity: Least
Verification: None
Prealarm: None
HFS, HRS, IM
none
Heat
Heat detector settings not
programmable
Single-stage pull
stations
01
Pull
Class B Alarm Latching
Monitor
Class B Alarm Latching
01
Pull
Class B Alarm Latching
03
Monitor
Class B Active Nonlatching
03
Monitor
Class B Active Nonlatching
CC1(S), MCC1(S)
05
Common Alarm
Output
Riser selector
CC2, MCC2
07
Common Alarm
Output
Dual riser selector
CR(R), MCR(R)
08
Nonsupervised
Output
Dry contact
CT1, MCT1
01
Alarm
Class B Alarm Latching
CT2, MCT2
01
Alarm
Class B Alarm Latching
01
Alarm
Class B Alarm Latching
DTS
01
Alarm
Class B Alarm Latching
IO
31
Monitor
Monitor Input/Output N.O.
MAB
04
Monitor
Class A Signal Output
Dual-stage pull stations 01
APS
04
UM
04
not used
Monitor
04
Class A Signal Output
not used
MM1
03
Monitor
Class B Active Nonlatching
WTM
02
Alarm
Class B Active Latching - Delayed
04
Supervisory
Class B Active Latching
23
Monitor
Riser monitor - 24 Vdc
RM1, MRM1
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.27
Front panel programming
Adding and deleting intelligent addressable detectors
Adding an intelligent addressable detector
SLIC
1)Config Card
►2)Config Detect
3)Config Module
4)Auto Loop
5)Accept Map
6)Exit
CONFIG DETECTOR
►1)Add
2)Edit
3)Delete
CONFIG DETECTOR
►1)Device Addres
2)Enter Serial#
Use the Add command on the Config Detector menu to add an
intelligent addressable detector to the project database. After you
have added the detector, you can edit its configuration settings.
For more information, see the topic “Editing intelligent
addressable detector settings” later in this chapter.
To add an intelligent addressable detector:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Config Detect.
5. On the Config Detector menu, choose Add then do one of
the following:
•
Choose Device Addres to add a detector by assigning a
device address then entering the detector’s serial number
•
Choose Enter Serial# to add a detector by entering its
serial number and letting the system assign the device
address
6. Edit the detector’s configuration settings or Exit and accept
the detector’s default settings.
Deleting an intelligent addressable detector
SLIC
1)Config Card
►2)Config Detect
3)Config Module
4)Auto Loop
5)Accept Map
6)Exit
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Add
2)Edit
►3)Delete
CONFIG DETECTOR
►1)Device Addres
2)Enter Serial#
Use the Delete command on the Config Detector menu to delete
an intelligent addressable detector from the project database.
To delete an intelligent addressable detector:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Config Detect.
5. On the Config Detector menu, choose Delete then do one of
the following:
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
7.28
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
•
Choose Device Addres to delete a detector using its
device address
•
Choose Enter Serial# to delete a detector using its serial
number
6. On the Config Detector menu, choose Exit.
7. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Save to delete the detector and return to the Config
Detector menu
•
NO Save to return to the Config Detector menu without
deleting the detector
7.29
Front panel programming
Editing intelligent addressable detector settings
This topic describes how to edit an intelligent addressable
detector’s configuration settings. To see a diagram of the
process, refer to “SLIC card configuration menus” in Appendix
C
To edit a detector’s configuration settings:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Config Detect.
5. On the Config Detect menu, choose Edit then do one of the
following:
•
Choose Device Addres then enter the detector’s device
address
•
Choose Enter Serial# then enter the detector’s serial
number
6. Follow the instructions provided below.
Adding a location description to the event
message
CONFIG DETECTOR
►1)Message
2)Model
3)Sensitivity
4)Verification
5)Pre-Alarm
6)Base Type
7)Exit
P:nn C:nn D:nnn
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
ENTER TEXT
Use the Message command on the Config Detector menu to add
a location description to a detector’s event message. The location
description is displayed when the detector is in an abnormal
condition. If you do not add a location description, only the
detector’s panel-card-device address is displayed.
Note: Entering text from the front panel requires that you use a
compatible bar code scanning device.
To add a location description:
1. On the Config Detector menu, choose Message.
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the location
description text.
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the Config
Detector menu.
7.30
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Viewing the model type setting
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Message
►2)Model
3)Sensitivity
4)Verification
5)Pre-Alarm
6)Base Type
7)Exit
Note: Changing a detector’s model type resets its current
sensitivity, verification, and prealarm settings to the selected
model type’s default values.
P:nn C:nn D:nnn
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
To view the detector’s model type:
MODULE MODEL
►PS
SD
*END: COMPLETE*
Use the Model command on the Config Detector menu to view
the selected detector’s model type. Do not use the Model
command to change a detector’s model type.
1. On the Config Detector menu, choose Model.
The arrow on the Module Model pick list indicates the
selected detector’s model type.
2. Press Del to return to the Config Detector menu.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.31
Front panel programming
Changing the alarm sensitivity setting
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Message
2)Model
►3)Sensitivity
4)Verification
5)Pre-Alarm
6)Base Type
7)Exit
Use the Sensitivity command on the Config Detector menu to
change a detector’s primary and alternate alarm sensitivity
settings. Each setting corresponds to a %obscuration level as
listed in the table below.
P:nn C:nn D:nnn
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
Setting
SENSITIVITY
1)Most
2)More
3)Normal
4)Less
►5)Least
Alarm %obscuration levels
IPHS, PHS, and PS
IS
Most
1.0
0.7
More
2.0
1.0
Normal
2.5
1.2
Less
3.0
1.4
Least
3.5
1.6
Note: To configure a detector’s primary and alternate alarm
sensitivity for different values (daytime/nighttime operation) you
must use the software configuration utility.
To change the alarm sensitivity setting:
1. On the Config Detector menu, choose Sensitivity
2. On the Sensitivity menu, choose a sensitivity setting
according to the table above.
Changing the alarm verification setting:
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Message
2)Model
3)Sensitivity
►4)Verification
5)Pre-Alarm
6)Base Type
7)Exit
Use the Verification command on the Config Detector menu to
change a detector’s alarm verification setting. Alarm verification
provides a brief period for the detector to confirm the presence
of smoke before signaling an alarm condition.
P:nn C:nn D:nnn
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
1. On the Config Detector menu, choose Verification.
VERIFICATION
►1)None
2)12 seconds
3)24 seconds
4)36 seconds
5)48 seconds
7.32
To change the alarm verification setting:
2. On the verification menu, choose one of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
None
12 seconds
24 seconds
36 seconds
48 seconds
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Changing the prealarm setting
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Message
2)Model
3)Sensitivity
4)Verification
►5)Pre-Alarm
6)Base Type
7)Exit
P:nn C:nn D:nnn
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
PRE-ALARM
►1)None
2)20%
3)40%
4)60%
5)80%
Use the Pre-Alarm command on the Config Detector menu to
change a detector’s prealarm setting. The prealarm setting
provides an early notification of a possible fire alarm condition
and is a percentage of the detector’s alarm sensitivity setting.
WARNING: Prealarm obscuration levels below 80% should not
be used without full knowledge of the possible consequences.
To change the prealarm setting:
1. On the Config Detector menu, choose Pre-Alarm.
2. On the Pre-Alarm menu, choose one of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
None
20%
40%
60%
80%
Changing the base type setting
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Message
2)Model
3)Sensitivity
4)Verification
5)Pre-Alarm
►6)Base Type
7)Exit
P:nn C:nn D:nnn
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
Use the Base Type command to change the type of base to which
the selected detector is mounted.
To change the base type setting:
1. On the Config Detector menu, choose Base Type.
2. On the Base Type menu, choose one of the following:
BASE TYPE
►1)Standard
2)Relay
3)Isolator
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
•
•
Standard
Relay
Isolator
7.33
Front panel programming
Saving detector configuration changes
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Message
2)Model
3)Sensitivity
4)Verification
5)Pre-Alarm
6)Base Type
►7)Exit
Use the Exit command on the Config Detector menu to save the
detector configuration changes and return to the Configure Loop
menu. You also have the option to return to the Configure Loop
menu without saving your changes.
P:nn C:nn D:nnn
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
1. On the Config Detector menu, choose Exit.
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
7.34
To save detector configuration changes:
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure Loop menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure Loop menu without
saving your changes
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Adding and deleting intelligent addressable modules
Adding an intelligent addressable module
SLIC
1)Config Card
2)Config Detect
►3)Config Module
4)Auto Loop
5)Accept Map
6)Exit
CONFIG MODULE
►1)Add
2)Edit
3)Delete
CONFIG MODULE
►1)Device Addres
2)Enter Serial#
Use the Add command on the Config Module menu to add an
intelligent addressable module to the project database. After you
have added the module, you can edit its configuration settings.
For more information, see the topic “Editing intelligent
addressable module settings” later in this chapter.
To add an intelligent addressable module:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Config Module.
5. On the Config Module menu, choose Add then do one of the
following:
•
Choose Device Addres to add a module by assigning a
device address then entering the module’s serial number
•
Choose Enter Serial# to add a module by entering its
serial number and letting the system assign the device
address
6. Edit the module’s configuration settings or Exit and accept
the module’s default settings.
Deleting an intelligent addressable module
SLIC
1)Config Card
2)Config Detect
►3)Config Module
4)Auto Loop
5)Accept Map
6)Exit
CONFIG DETECTOR
1)Add
2)Edit
►3)Delete
CONFIG DETECTOR
►1)Device Addres
2)Enter Serial#
Use the Delete command on the Config Detector menu to delete
an intelligent addressable detector from the project database.
To delete an intelligent addressable module:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Config Module.
5. On the Config Module menu, choose Delete then do one of
the following:
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.35
Front panel programming
•
Choose Device Addres to delete a module using its
device address
•
Choose Enter Serial# to delete a module using its serial
number
6. On the Config Module menu, choose Exit.
7. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
7.36
•
Save to delete the module and return to the Config
Module menu
•
NO Save to return to the Config Module menu without
deleting the module
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Editing intelligent addressable module settings
This topic describes how to edit an intelligent addressable
module’s configuration settings. To see a diagram of the process,
refer to “SLIC card configuration menus” in Appendix C.
To edit a module’s configuration settings:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the SLIC
card’s address.
4. On the SLIC menu, choose Config Module.
5. On the Config Module menu, choose Edit then do one of the
following:
•
Choose Device Addres then enter the module’s device
address
•
Choose Enter Serial# then enter the module’s serial
number
6. Follow the instructions provided below.
Viewing the module’s model number
CONFIG MODULE
►1)Model
2)Device 1
3)Device 2
4)Exit
P:01 C:02 D:126
S#:5098770798
P:XX C:XX D:XXX
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
Use the Model command on the Config Module menu to view
the selected module’s model type.
WARNING: Changing the model type may remove an important
life safety feature from the fire alarm system. Never use the
Model command to change a module’s module type.
To view the module’s model type:
MODULE MODEL ▼
►MCC1
CC1
CC1S
MCC1S
*END: COMPLETE*
1. On the Config Module menu, choose Model.
The arrow on the Module Model pick list indicates the
selected module’s model type.
2. Press Del to return to the Config Module menu.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
7.37
Front panel programming
Adding a location description to an event
message
CONFIG MODULE
1)Model
►2)Device 1
3)Device 2
4)Exit
P:01 C:02 D:126
S#:5098770798
P:XX C:XX D:XXX
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
CONFIG MOD 1
►1)Message
2)Type
3)Personality
4)Exit
ENTER TEXT (32)
Use the Message command on the Config Mod menu to add a
location description to a module’s event message. The location
description is displayed when the module is in an abnormal
condition. If you do not add a location description, only the
module’s panel-card-device address is displayed.
Note: Entering text from the front panel requires that you use a
compatible bar code scanning device.
To add a location description to an event message:
1. On the Config Module menu, choose one of the following:
•
Device 1 to add a location description to a single-address
module or to the first address of a dual-address module
•
Device 2 to add a location description to the second
address of a dual-address module
2. On the Config Mod menu for the selected address, choose
Message.
3. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the location
description text then press Enter.
4. Press Exit to return to the Config Module menu.
Changing the device type setting
CONFIG MODULE
1)Model
►2)Device 1
3)Device 2
4)Exit
Use the Type command on the Config Mod menu to change the
device type of an intelligent addressable module. The Module
Type list only shows the device types that are valid for the
selected module’s model type.
P:01 C:02 D:126
S#:5098770798
P:XX C:XX D:XXX
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
For a description of device types, see the topic “Before you
begin” earlier in this chapter.
CONFIG MOD 1
1)Message
►2)Type
3)Personality
4)Exit
1. On the Config Module menu, choose one of the following:
MODULE TYPE
▼
►COMM ALM OUT
AUDIBLE
VISUAL
SUPER OUTPUT
*END: COMPLETE*
7.38
To change the device type setting:
•
Device 1 to change the device type of a single-address
module or of the first address of a dual-address module
•
Device 2 to change the device type of the second address
of a dual-address module
2. On the Config Mod menu for the selected address, choose
Type.
3. On the Module Type pick list, select the device type then
press Enter.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
4. Press Exit to return to the Config Module menu.
Changing the personality setting
CONFIG MODULE
1)Model
►2)Device 1
3)Device 2
4)Exit
Use the Personality command on the Config Mod menu to
change the personality of an intelligent addressable module.
P:01 C:02 D:126
S#:5098770798
P:XX C:XX D:XXX
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
1. On the Config Module menu, choose one of the following:
CONFIG MOD 1
1)Message
2)Type
►3)Personality
4)Exit
MOD PERSONALTY▼
►5:Riser Select
*END: COMPLETE*
To change the personality setting:
•
Device 1 to change the personality of a single-address
module or of the first address of a dual-address module
•
Device 2 to change the personality of the second address
of a dual-address module
2. On the Config Mod menu for the selected address, choose
Personality.
3. On the Mod Personalty pick list, select the personality then
press Enter.
4. Press Exit to return to the Config Module menu.
Saving module configuration changes
CONFIG MODULE
1)Model
2)Device 1
3)Device 2
►4)Exit
Use the Exit command on the Config Module menu to save the
module configuration changes and return to the Configure Loop
menu. You also have the option to return to the Configure Loop
menu without saving your changes.
P:01 C:02 D:126
S#:5098770798
P:XX C:XX D:XXX
S#:XXXXXXXXXX
To save module configuration changes:
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
1. On the Config Module menu, choose Exit.
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the Config
Module menu
•
NO Save to return to the Config Module menu without
saving your changes
7.39
Front panel programming
Editing DLD card configuration settings
This topic describes how to edit a DLD card’s configuration
settings. To see a diagram of the process, refer to “DLD card
configuration menus” in Appendix C.
To edit a DLD card’s configuration setting
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit then enter the DLD
card’s address (14).
4. Edit the DLD card’s configuration as described below.
Changing the number of receivers
DIALER SETUP
►1)#’s of CMS
2)CMS Phone #
3)Retry Count
4)Accounts
5)Default Msgs
6)Exit
Use the #’s of CMS command on the Dialer Setup menu to
change the number of receivers to which the DLD card can
connect. The default setting is 1
To change the number of receivers:
1. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose #’s of CMS.
NUMBER RECEIVE
►1)1
2)2
2. On the Number Receive menu, choose one of the following:
•
1 to connect to one receiver
•
2 to connect to two receivers
Entering receiver telephone numbers
DIALER SETUP
1)#’s of CMS
►2)CMS Phone #
3)Retry Count
4)Accounts
5)Default Msgs
6)Exit
Use the CMS Phone # command to enter telephone numbers for
each receiver to which the DLD card can connect. For each
receiver, the DLD card can dial out using two telephone
numbers. If for any reason the DLD card can’t connect to a
receiver using one telephone number, it will abort the attempt
and try to make connection using the other telephone number.
PHONE NUMBERS
►1)Rcvr 1 Prim #
2)Rcvr 1 Sec #
3)Rcvr 2 Prim #
4)Rcvr 2 Sec #
To enter receiver telephone numbers:
ENTER PHONE #
7.40
1. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose CMS Phone #.
2. On the Phone Numbers menu, choose one of the following:
•
Rcvr 1 Prim # to enter the first telephone number for
Receiver 1
•
Rcvr 1 Sec # to enter the second telephone number for
Receiver 1
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
•
Rcvr 2 Prim # to enter the first telephone number for
Receiver 2
•
Rcvr 2 Sec # to enter the second telephone number for
Receiver 2
3. Enter the telephone number. The telephone number can
consist of up to 23 numeric characters.
Example: For 1-555-867-5309, enter 15558675309.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for each telephone number. After you
have entered all of the telephone numbers, choose Exit to
return to the Dialer Setup menu.
Changing the number of retry attempts
DIALER SETUP
1)#’s of CMS
2)CMS Phone #
►3)Retry Count
4)Accounts
5)Default Msgs
6)Exit
Use the Retry Count command on the Dialer Setup menu to
change the number of times the DLD card will attempt to make
contact with a receiver before signaling a trouble condition.
To change the number of retry attempts:
1. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose Retry Count.
RETRY (05-10)
05
2. Enter the new retry count number. You can enter a number
between 05 and 10. The default setting is 05.
Changing default dialer messages
DIALER SETUP
1)#’s of CMS
2)CMS Phone #
3)Retry Count
4)Accounts
►5)Default Msgs
6)Exit
DEFAULT MSGS
►1)Alarm
2)Trouble
3)Supervisory
4)Exit
MSG
►1)Account
2)Active Msg
3)Restore Msg
4)Exit
Use the Default Msgs command on the Dialer Setup menu to
change the default activation and restoration dialer strings for
alarm, supervisory, and trouble messages. The DLD card
automatically sends the default dialer strings for points that are
not programmed to initiate a custom dialer response.
Note: If you want the DLD card to use the predefined Contact
ID strings when sending status changes to the default subscriber
account, leave the default dialer activation and restoration
messages as XXXXXXXXX.
To change the default dialer messages:
1. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose Default Msgs.
2. On the Default Msgs menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Alarm to change the default alarm activation and
restoration dialer string
•
Trouble to change the default trouble activation and
restoration dialer string
•
Supervisory to change the default supervisory activation
and restoration dialer string
7.41
Front panel programming
3. For each message type, on the MSG menu:
Choose Account, select the subscriber account from the pick
list, and then press Enter.
Choose Active Msg then enter the required activation dialer
string
Choose Restore Msg then enter the required restoration
dialer string
Choose Exit to return to the Default Msgs menu.
4. After a default message has been entered for each message
type, choose Exit on the Default Msgs menu to return to the
Dialer Setup menu.
Saving DLD card configuration changes
DIALER SETUP
1)#’s of CMS
2)CMS Phone #
3)Retry Count
4)Accounts
5)Default Msgs
►6)Exit
Use the Exit command on the Dialer Setup menu to return to the
Configure menu. Upon exiting the Dialer Setup menu, you can
save your changes or return to the Configure menu without
saving your changes.
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
1. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose Exit.
7.42
To save DLD card configuration changes:
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without saving
your changes
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Adding and deleting subscriber accounts
Use the Accounts command on the Dialer Setup menu to add and
delete subscriber account as described below.
Adding subscriber accounts
Use the <NEW> command on the Accounts pick list to add a
subscriber account to the project database. The DLD card can
send status changes to up to eight subscriber accounts.
To add a subscriber account:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit, and then enter 14.
4. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose Accounts.
5. On the Accounts pick list, choose <NEW>.
6. Edit the account’s configuration settings or choose Exit on
the Accounts menu to add the subscriber account and return
to the Dialer Setup menu.
Deleting subscriber accounts
Use the Delete command on the Accounts menu to delete a
subscriber account from the project database.
To delete a subscriber account:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Cards.
3. On the Edit Card menu, choose Edit, and then enter 14.
4. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose Accounts.
5. On the Accounts pick list, select the account number you
want to delete then press enter.
6. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Save Edits to delete the account and return to the Dialer
Setup menu
•
NO Save to return to the Dialer Setup menu without
deleting the account
7.43
Front panel programming
Editing subscriber account configuration settings
Use the commands on the Accounts menu to edit a subscriber
account’s configuration settings as described below. To display
the Accounts menu, choose Accounts on the Dialer Setup menu
then select an account from the Accounts pick list or choose
<NEW> to create a new account.
Entering an account number
ACCOUNTS
►1)Account #
2)Formats
3)Test-Normal
4)Test-Abnormal
5)Test Time
6)CMS
7)Delete
8)Exit
ENTER ACCOUNT
0000
Use the Account # command on the Accounts menu to enter the
identification number for a new subscriber account or to change
the account number of an existing account.
To enter an account number:
1. On the Accounts menu, choose Account #.
2. Type the subscriber account’s 4-digit identification number
then press Enter.
Selecting the transmission format
ACCOUNTS
1)Account #
►2)Formats
3)Test-Normal
4)Test-Abnormal
5)Test Time
6)CMS
7)Delete
8)Exit
DIALER FORMAT ▼
►1)4/2
2)Contact ID
Use the Formats command on the Accounts menu to select the
format that the DLD card uses to send status changes to the
selected account. The DLD card can send status changes in 4/2
(SIA Pulse Format P3) and Contact ID formats. The transmission
format you select must match the format that the selected
subscriber account is set up to receive.
To select the transmission format:
1. On the Accounts menu, choose Formats.
2. On the Dialer Format menu, choose one of the following:
•
4/2 if the account is set up to receive 4/2 (SIA Pulse
Format P3)
•
Contact ID if the account is set up to receive Contact ID
Changing the normal test dialer string
ACCOUNTS
1)Account #
2)Formats
►3)Test-Normal
4)Test-Abnormal
5)Test Time
6)CMS
7)Delete
8)Exit
Use the Test-Normal command on the Accounts menu to change
the dialer string that the DLD card sends to the selected
subscriber account when it performs its 24-hour periodic test and
the control panel is in the normal state.
ENTER TST STNG
XX
2. Enter the 2- or 9-digit dialer string.
7.44
To change the normal test dialer string:
1. On the Accounts menu, choose Test-Normal.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Changing the abnormal test dialer string
ACCOUNTS
1)Account #
2)Formats
3)Test-Normal
►4)Test-Abnormal
5)Test Time
6)CMS
7)Delete
8)Exit
ENTER TST STNG
XX
Use the Test-Abnormal command on the Accounts menu to
change the dialer string that the DLD card sends when it
performs its 24-hour periodic test and the control panel is not in
the normal state.
Note: The abnormal test dialer string must be distinctively
different from the normal test dialer string.
To change the abnormal test dialer string:
1. On the Accounts menu, choose Test-Abnormal.
2. Enter the 2- or 9-digit dialer string.
Changing the periodic test time
ACCOUNTS
1)Account #
2)Formats
3)Test-Normal
4)Test-Abnormal
►5)Test Time
6)CMS
7)Delete
8)Exit
Use the Test Time command on the Accounts menu to change
when the DLD card sends its test signal to the selected account.
The time is entered in 24-hour format, where HH is the hour and
MM is the minutes.
ENTER TEST TIME
HHMM
2. Enter the time in 24-hour format.
To change the periodic test time:
1. On the Accounts menu, choose Test Time.
Example: For midnight, enter 0000. For 1:00 p.m., enter
1300.
Selecting a receiver
ACCOUNTS
1)Account #
2)Formats
3)Test-Normal
4)Test-Abnormal
5)Test Time
►6)CMS
7)Delete
8)Exit
Use the CMS command on the Accounts menu to select which
receiver holds the subscriber account.
To select a receiver:
1. On the Accounts menu, choose CMS.
2. On the Number Receive menu, choose one of the following:
NUMBER RECEIVE
►1)1
2)2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
1 for Receiver 1
•
2 for Receiver 2
7.45
Front panel programming
Saving subscriber account configuration changes
ACCOUNTS
1)Account #
2)Formats
3)Test-Normal
4)Test-Abnormal
5)Test Time
6)CMS
7)Delete
►8)Exit
Use the Exit command on the Accounts menu to return to the
Dialer Setup menu. From the Dialer Setup menu you can exit
and save the subscriber account configuration changes.
To save subscriber account configuration changes:
1. On the Accounts menu, choose Exit.
2. On the Dialer Setup menu, choose Exit.
3. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
7.46
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without saving
your changes
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
Adding and deleting output groups
CONFIGURE
1)AutoLearn
2)System
3)Cards
4)Zones
►5)Output
6)Exit
EDIT OUTPUT
►1)Add
2)Edit
3)Delete
OUTPUT GROUP
►1)Responses
2)Review
3)Exit
Use the Output command on the Configure menu to add and
delete output groups as described below. For more information
about output groups, see the topic “Before you begin” earlier in
this chapter.
Adding an output group
Use the Add command on the Edit Output menu to add an output
group to the project database. After you have added the output
group, you must add at least one response before the output
group can be saved. For more information, see the topic “Editing
an output group” later in this chapter.
To add an output group:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Output.
3. On the Edit Output menu, choose Add.
4. On the Output Group menu, choose Responses to continue
editing the output group.
Deleting an output group
EDIT OUTPUT
1)Add
2)Edit
►3)Delete
OUTPUT LIST
►Output Group001
Output Group002
Output Group249
Output Group250
*END: COMPLETE*
Use the Delete command on the Edit Output menu to delete an
output group from the project database.
If you delete Output Group 249, you remove the active test
response that Service Group 129 uses to briefly turn on
notification appliances when performing a periodic system test.
To reprogram the active test response you must use the software
configuration utility.
If you delete Output Group 250, when the control panel enters
the alarm state, the Visible device types detected when the
default project database was created will not turn on. You will
have to add these devices to another output group manually or
use the software configuration utility.
To delete an output group:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Output.
3. On the Edit Output menu, choose Delete.
4. Select the output group from the list, then press Enter.
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Front panel programming
5. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
7.48
•
Save Edits to permanently delete the output group
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without
deleting the output group
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Front panel programming
Editing an output group
EDIT OUTPUT
1)Add
►2)Edit
3)Delete
Use the Edit command on the Edit Output menu to add responses
to an output group, and to remove responses from an output
group. You can only add 10 responses at a time before you must
save your edits by exiting until you reach to the Configure menu.
OUTPUT LIST
▼
►Output Group001
Output Group002
Output Group249
Output Group250
*END: COMPLETE*
Front panel programming only lets you add or remove active and
trouble responses, for other response types you must use the
configuration utility. For more information about response types,
see “Before you begin” at the beginning of this chapter.
Tip: When using front panel programming to edit an output
group, add all of the active responses first then all of the trouble
responses. The order in which you add responses doesn’t matter
except when delay responses are included.
To edit an output group:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Output.
3. On the Edit Output menu, choose Edit then select the output
group from the list and press Enter.
4. Follow the instructions provided below.
Adding a relay response
OUTPUT GROUP
►1)Responses
2)Review
3)Exit
Use the Relay command on the Response Type menu to add a
relay response. A relay response is used to activate (turn on)
relay outputs, NAC outputs, and outputs used to operate controls
for ancillary equipment.
OUTPUT TYPE
►1)Active
2)Trouble
Note: Front panel programming does not let you add a response
that restores (turns off) an output.
OUTPUT RESPONSES
►1)Add
2)Remove
To add a relay response:
1. On the Output Group menu, choose Responses then on the
Output Type menu choose one of the following:
RESPONSE TYPE
►1)Relay
2)Dialer
3)Delay
•
Active to add a response from the list of active responses
•
Trouble to add a response from the list of trouble
responses
2. On the Output Responses menu, choose Add.
3. On the Response Type menu, choose Relay then enter the
address of the output you want activated, where CC is the
card address and DDD is the device address.
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Front panel programming
RESPONSE RELAY
►1)ON
2)20 BPM
3)120 BPM
4)Temporal
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
4. If the address you entered is for an intelligent addressable
device, the command to activate it is automatically entered
for you. Skip to the next step.
If the device address you entered is for a conventional output
circuit, you must choose how you want it activated. On the
Response Relay menu, choose one of the following
commands:
•
ON to activate the output
•
20 BPM to activate the output and have it turn on and off
20 times per minute
•
120 BPM to activate the output and have it turn on and
off 120 times per minute
•
Temporal to activate the output and have it turn on and
off in a 3-3-3 pattern
5. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
•
Save Edits to save the response and return to the Output
Group menu
•
NO Save to return to the Output Group menu without
saving the response
Adding a delay response
OUTPUT GROUP
►1)Responses
2)Review
3)Exit
Use the Delay command on the Response Type menu to add a
delay between one or more responses. A delay response consists
of when to initiate the delay and for how long
OUTPUT TYPE
►1)Active
2)Trouble
To add a delay response:
OUTPUT RESPONSES
►1)Add
2)Remove
RESPONSE TYPE
1)Relay
2)Dialer
►3)Delay
RESPONSE DELAY
►1)Delay Type
2)Delay Time
3)Exit
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
7.50
1. On the Output Group menu, choose Responses then on the
Output Type menu choose one of the following:
•
Active to add a response from the list of active responses
•
Trouble to add a response from the list of trouble
responses
2. On the Output Responses menu, choose Add.
3. On the Response Type menu, choose Delay.
4. On the Response Delay menu, choose Delay Type then on
the Delay Type menu choose one of the following:
•
Act & Restore to execute the delay when the input
activating the output group is activated and restored
•
Activation to execute the delay only when the input
activating the output group is activated
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Front panel programming
•
Restoration to execute the delay only when the input
activating the output group is restored
5. On the Response Delay menu, choose Delay Time then enter
the amount of delay in seconds.
6. Choose Exit, then on the Exit menu, choose one of the
following:
•
Save Edits to save the response and return to the Output
Group menu
•
NO Save to return to the Output Group menu without
saving the response
Adding a dialer response
OUTPUT GROUP
►1)Responses
2)Review
3)Exit
OUTPUT TYPE
►1)Active
2)Trouble
OUTPUT RESPONSES
►1)Add
2)Remove
RESPONSE TYPE
1)Relay
►2)Dialer
3)Delay
ACCOUNTS
▼
►1111
2222
3333
*END: COMPLETE*
Use the Dialer command on the Response Type menu to add a
dialer response. A dialer response consists of when to send the
dialer string, the response priority, and the dialer string.
Front panel programming only lets you program zonal response.
To add a dialer response:
1. On the Output Group menu, choose Responses then on the
Output Type menu choose one of the following:
Active to add a response from the list of active responses
•
Trouble to add a response from the list of trouble
responses
2. On the Output Responses menu, choose Add.
3. On the Response Type menu, choose Dialer.
4. Select a subscriber account from the Accounts list then press
Enter. Pressing Del returns you to the Output Group menu.
5. On the Reponse Dialer menu, choose Send On then choose
one of the following:
REPONSE DIALER
►1)Send On
2)Priority
3)String
4)Exit
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
•
•
Activation if the dialer string is transmitted when a
device is activated
•
Restoration if the dialer string is transmitted when a
device is restored
6. On the Reponse Dialer menu, choose Priority then choose
one of the following:
•
•
•
Life Safety (highest priority, transmitted first)
Property
System Integr (lowest priority, transmitted last)
7. On the Reponse Dialer menu, choose String then enter the
dialer string.
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8. On the Reponse Dialer menu, choose Exit then on the Exit
menu, choose one of the following:
•
Save Edits to save the response and return to the Output
Group menu
•
NO Save to return to the Output Group menu without
saving the response
Removing a response from an output group
EDIT OUTPUT
1)Add
►2)Edit
3)Delete
OUTPUT GROUP
►1)Responses
2)Review
3)Exit
OUTPUT TYPE
►1)Active
2)Trouble
OUTPUT RESPONSES
1)Add
►2)Remove
OUTPUT RESPONS▼
►P01C01D015 BALS
P01C01D016 BALS
*END:COMPLETE*
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
7.52
Use the Remove command on the Output Responses menu to
remove a response from a set of active or fault responses.
To remove a response:
1. On the Output Group menu, choose Responses then on the
Output Type menu choose one of the following:
•
Active to add a response from the list of active responses
•
Trouble to add a response from the list of trouble
responses
2. On the Output Responses menu, choose Remove.
3. Select the response from the list then press Enter to delete
the response and return to the Output Group menu.
4. When you are finished removing responses, choose Exit,
then on the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the Output
Group menu
•
NO Save to return to the Output Group menu without
saving your changes
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Front panel programming
Reviewing responses in an output group
EDIT OUTPUT
1)Add
►2)Edit
3)Delete
OUTPUT GROUP
1)Responses
►2)Review
3)Exit
OUTPUT TYPE
►1)Active
2)Trouble
OUTPUT RESPONS
►P01C01D015 BALS
P01C01D016 BALS
*END: COMPLETE*
Use the Review command on the Output Group menu to review
a set of active or fault responses in an output group. Refer to
Table 7-7 for a description of the response codes.
To review a set of responses:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Output.
3. On the Edit Output menu, choose Edit, then select the output
group from the list and press Enter.
4. On the Output Group menu, choose Review.
5. On the Output Type menu, choose one of the following:
•
Active to review the set of active responses
•
Trouble to review the set of fault responses
6. Press Enter to return to the Output Group menu.
Table 7-7: Response code descriptions
Response code
Description
P[pp]C[cc]D[ddd][1][2][3][4]
Response code for an output circuit, where:
P[pp]C[cc]D[ddd] = the device address, where: pp = the
panel number (01), cc = the card number (01–13), and ddd =
the device number (001–999)
1= the command direction, where: B = Both activation and
restoration, A = Activation only, and R = Restoration only
2 = the response command, where: N = no operation, A =
Activate, E = Enable, R = Restore, I = Disable, and D =
Delay
3 = the response priority, where: S = Set, A = Latch, L =
Low, M = Medium, and H = High
4 = the output state, where: S = Steady, R = Restore, W =
20 bpm, F = 120 bpm, and T = Temporal
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Front panel programming
Table 7-7: Response code descriptions
Response code
Description
P[00]C16D[ddd][1][2][3][4]
Response code for an LED, where:
P[00]C16D[ddd] = the device address, where: ddd = the
device number of the LED (001–999)
Note: A *** represents a device number greater than 999
1= the command direction, where: B = Both activation and
restoration, A = Activation only, and R = Restoration only
2 = the response command, where: N = no operation, A =
Activate, E = Enable, R = Restore, I = Disable, and D =
Delay
3 = the response priority, where: S = Set, A = Latch, L =
Low, M = Medium, and H = High
4 = the output state, where: S = Steady, R = Restore, W =
Slow Blink, and F = Fast Blink
Delay: [ssss][1]
Response code for a delay, where:
ssss = the amount of delay in seconds (0001 – 9999)
1 = the command direction, where: B = Both activation and
restoration, A = Activation only, and R = Restoration only
[ACCT][1][2][Q][EEE][GG][PPP]
— or —
[ACCT][1][2][PP]
This is what the panel display looks like when you review a
response for dialer string.
ACCT is the 4-digit subscriber account number (0000 to
9999)
1 is the priority attribute (L = Life Safety, P = Property, S =
System Integrity)
2 is the command direction (B = Both activation and
restoration, A = Activation only, R = Restoration only)
For Contact ID dialer strings:
Q is the event qualifier (1 = activation event, 3 = restoration
event)
EEE is the event code. See Appendix E for a list of Contact
ID event codes.
GGPPP is the point being reported
For 4/2 dialer strings:
PP is the point being reported (00–99)
UNKNOWN
7.54
Response code for a valid response that cannot be edited
from the control panel CPU/Display Unit. Example: a
response that disables an output circuit.
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Front panel programming
Adding and deleting zones
Use the Zone command on the Configure menu to add and delete
zones as described below. For more information about zones, see
the topic “Before you begin” earlier in this chapter.
Adding a zone
CONFIGURE
1)AutoLearn
2)System
3)Cards
►4)Zones
5)Output
6)Exit
EDIT ZONE
►1)Add
2)Edit
3)Delete
Use the Add command on the Edit Zone menu to add a zone to
the project database. After you have added the zone, you can edit
the zone’s configuration settings. For more information, see the
topic “Editing zone configuration settings” later in this chapter.
Note: Zones added from the front panel are automatically
labeled “ZONE Groupnnn” where “nnn” is the next available
zone number.
To add a zone:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Add.
4. On the Zone Type menu, choose one of the following:
•
Alarm Zone to add a zone consisting of fire alarm inputs
•
Supervisory Z to add a zone consisting of supervisory
inputs
•
Monitor Zone to add a zone consisting of monitor inputs
5. Edit the zone configuration settings or choose Exit to save
your changes and return to the Configure menu.
Deleting a zone
CONFIGURE
1)AutoLearn
2)System
3)Cards
►4)Zones
5)Output
6)Exit
Use the Delete command on the Edit Zone to delete a zone from
the project database. Deleting a zone makes its members
available to other zones.
To delete a zone:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
EDIT ZONE
1)Add
2)Edit
►3)Delete
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Delete.
4. Select the zone from the list, then press Enter.
5. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
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Front panel programming
7.56
•
Save Edits to delete the zone from the project database
and return to the Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without
deleting the zone from the project database
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Front panel programming
Editing zone configuration settings
This topic describes how to edit zone configuration settings. To
see a diagram of the process, refer to “Zone configuration
menus” in Appendix C.
Note: By default, zones are configured to allow zone troubles.
To change this setting you must use the software configuration
utility.
To edit zone configuration settings:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zones menu, choose Edit then follow the
instructions provided below.
Adding a location description to the event
message
ZONE EDIT
►1)Message
2)Members
3)Output Group
4)Coding
5)Type
6)Exit
ENTER TEXT
Use the Message command on the Zone Edit menu to add a
location description to the zone’s event message. The location
description is displayed when the zone is in an abnormal
condition. If you do not add a location description, only the
zone’s panel-card-device address is displayed.
Note: Entering text from the front panel requires that you use a
compatible bar code scanning device.
To add a location description:
1. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Message.
2. Using the bar code scanning device, scan in the location
description text.
3. Press Enter to accept the text and return to the Zone Edit
menu.
ZONE EDIT
1)Message
►2)Members
3)Output Group
4)Coding
5)Type
6)Exit
Adding, deleting, and reviewing zone members
Use the Members command on the Zone Edit menu to add
members to a zone, delete members from a zone, and review a
list of zone members.
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Adding members to a zone
ZONE MEMBERS
►1)Device Addres
2)Delete
3)Review
ENTER DEVICE
CCDDD
Use the Device Addres command on the Zone Members menu to
add members to the zone. Zone members are the inputs used to
activate the zone response. A zone can have up to thirty-two
members.
To add members to a zone:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit, then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Members.
5. On the Zone Members menu, choose Device Addres, then
type the member’s device address, where CC is the card
number and DDD is the device number.
6. Press Enter to accept the address and return to the Zone
Members menu.
If you type in an invalid address, nothing happens when you
press Enter.
7. When you are finished adding members to the zone press
Del to return to the Zone Edit menu.
Deleting members from a zone
ZONE MEMBERS
1)Device Addres
►2)Delete
3)Review
ZONE LIST
►P:01 C:01 D:001
P:01 C:01 D:002
P:01 C:01 D:003
P:01 C:01 D:004
*END: COMPLETE*
Use the Delete command on the Zone Members menu to delete
members from a zone.
To delete members from a zone:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit, then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Members.
5. On the Zone Members menu, choose Delete.
6. Select the address of the member you want deleted then
press Enter to return to the Zone Members menu.
7. When you are finished deleting members from the zone
press Del to return to the Zone Edit menu.
7.58
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Front panel programming
Reviewing a list of zone members
ZONE MEMBERS
1)Device Addres
2)Delete
►3)Review
ZONE LIST
P:01 C:01 D:001
P:01 C:01 D:002
P:01 C:01 D:003
P:01 C:01 D:004
*END:COMPLETE*
Use the Review command on the Zone Members menu to see a
list of zone members. The zone members list includes all of the
points that have been added to a zone in order to activate the
zone’s output group responses
To review a list of zone members:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit, then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Members.
5. On the Zone Members menu, choose Review to display the
zone list.
6. After reviewing the zone members list, press Del to return to
the Zone Edit menu.
Adding, removing, and reviewing zone output
group assignments
ZONE EDIT
1)Message
2)Members
►3)Output Group
4)Coding
5)Type
6)Exit
OUTPUT GROUP
►1)Add
2)Remove
3)Review
OUTPUT LIST
►Output 1
Output 2
Output 3
*END: COMPLETE*
Use the Output Group command on the Zone Edit menu to add
output groups to a zone, remove output groups from a zone, and
review a list of output groups that have been assigned to a zone.
Adding an output group to a zone
Use the Add command on the Output Group menu to assign an
output group to a zone. Adding an output group to the zone
establishes the correlation between the zone and the responses
included in the output group. You can add up to six output
groups to one zone.
To add an output group to a zone:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit, then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Output Group.
5. On the Output Group menu, choose Add.
6. Select an output group from the list and press Enter to return
to the Output Group menu.
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7. When you are finished adding output groups to the zone
press Del to return to the Zone Edit menu.
Removing an output group from a zone
OUTPUT GROUP
1)Add
►2)Remove
3)Review
OUTPUT LIST
►Output 1
Output 2
*END: COMPLETE*
Use the Remove command on the Output Group menu to remove
an output group from a zone. Removing an output group from a
zone eliminates the correlation between the zone and the
responses included in the output group.
To remove an output group from a zone:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Output Group.
5. On the Output Group menu, choose Remove.
6. Select an output group from the list and press Enter to return
to the Output Group menu.
7. When you are finished removing output groups from the
zone press Del to return to the Zone Edit menu.
Reviewing a list of output groups assigned to a zone
OUTPUT GROUP
1)Add
2)Remove
►3)Review
OUTPUT LIST
Output 1
Output 2
*END:COMPLETE*
Use the Review command on the Output Group menu to see a
list of output groups assigned to a zone.
To review a list of output groups assigned to a zone:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit, then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Output Group.
5. On the Output Group menu, choose Review.
6. After reviewing the output group list, press Del to return to
the Zone Edit menu.
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Entering a zone code
Use the Coding command on Zone Edit menu to enter a zone
code. The zone code uniquely identifies the zone for coded fire
alarm systems.
To enter a zone code.
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Coding then enter the 4-digit
code.
Changing the zone type
ZONE EDIT
1)Message
2)Members
3)Output Group
4)Coding
►5)Type
6)Exit
Use the Type command on the Zone Edit menu to change the
zone’s type. The zone’s type determines which devices you can
add as zone members and which event is generated when the
zone is activated.
ZONE TYPE
►1)Alarm Zone
2)Supervisory Z
3)Monitor Zone
changing the zone’s type automatically removes the members
from the zone.
Caution: If you have already added members to the zone,
To change the zone type:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Configure, and
then Zones.
3. On the Edit Zone menu, choose Edit, then select a zone from
the list and press Enter.
4. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Type.
5. On the Zone Type menu, choose one of the following:
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
•
Alarm Zone to change the selected zone to a fire alarm
zone
•
Supervisory Z to change the selected zone to a
supervisory zone
•
Monitor Zone to change the selected zone to a monitor
zone
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Front panel programming
Saving zone configuration changes
ZONE EDIT
1)Message
2)Members
3)Output Group
4)Coding
5)Type
►6)Exit
Use the Exit command on the Zone Edit menu to save the zone
configuration changes and return to the Configure menu. You
also have the option to return to the Configure menu without
saving your changes.
EXIT
►1)Save Edits
2)NO Save
1. On the Zone Edit menu, choose Exit.
7.62
To save module configuration changes:
2. On the Exit menu, choose one of the following:
•
Save Edits to save your changes and return to the
Configure menu
•
NO Save to return to the Configure menu without saving
your changes
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Front panel programming
Clearing the history log
PROGRAM MENU
1)Time/Date
2)Edit Password
3)Restart
►4)Clear History
5)Configure
ENTER PANEL
00
00 = All panels
Use the Clear History command on the Program menu to clear
the history log and reset the alarm history counter to zero (0000).
The alarm history counter keeps track of how many times the
control panel has entered the alarm condition.
To clear the history log:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Clear History.
3. Enter the panel number of the control panel whose history
log you want cleared.
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Saving the project database
CONFIGURE MENU
1)AutoLearn
2)System
3)Cards
4)Zones
5)Output
►6)Exit
After you finish making all of your programming changes, exit
the Configure menu to save your changes and update the project
database. Use the Save command on the Update Databases menu
to save the project database only in the control panel. Use the
Save & Sync command to save the project database in the
control panel and automatically update the project database in all
of the remote annunciators.
UPDATE DATABASES
►1)Save
2)Save & Sync
You must also save the project database after adding eight
responses to an output group.
Tip: Depending on the size of the system, updating the project
database across remote annunciators may take several minutes.
Use the Save & Sync command only after the system has been
completely tested.
To save the project database:
1. On the Configure menu, choose Exit.
2. On the Update Database menu, choose one of the following:
7.64
•
Save to save the control panel database
•
Save & Sync to save the control panel database and
update all of the remote annunciators
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Chapter 8
Service and troubleshooting
Summary
This chapter provides instructions for servicing and
troubleshooting the fire alarm system. It is intended for those
trained and authorized to maintain the fire alarm system.
Content
Display or print a revision report • 8.2
Starting and canceling a service group test • 8.3
Disabling and enabling an AND group • 8.4
Disabling and enabling a matrix group • 8.5
Disabling and enabling a time control • 8.6
Disabling and enabling a switch • 8.7
Disabling and enabling an option card • 8.8
Turning an output on and off • 8.9
Turning an LED on and off • 8.11
Setting the system time and date • 8.13
Changing the level 2 password • 8.14
Clearing trouble messages • 8.15
Replacing the control panel fuse • 8.20
Using HyperTerminal • 8.21
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.1
Service and troubleshooting
Display or print a revision report
REPORTS
1)Maintenance
2)History
►3)Revisions
4)Alarm History
Use the Revisions command on the Reports menu to display or
print a revision report. The revision report lists the firmware
revision levels of all the hardware and software components
installed in the control panel.
Figure 8-1 shows an example of a printed revision report.
ENTER PANEL
01
REPORT OUTPUT
►1)Display
2)Printer
Note: To print a report you must have a printer connected to the
panel you are operating.
To display or print a revision report:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Reports, then Revisions.
3. Enter the panel number of the control panel.
4. On the Report Output menu, choose one of the following:
•
Display to view the list on the alphanumeric display
•
Printer to print the list
--------------------------------------------------------REVISION REPORT
PANEL: 01
13:27:38 08/24/04
--------------------------------------------------------ALARM COUNT:
0000
MARKET
: NFPA72
CPU
: V01.60.00
QS-CU
: V00.00.00
QS-CU PRJ: V00.00.00
DB S/N
: 00105751
DB DATE : 08/24/04
CARD TYPE: CPU-4L
ANN TYPE :
(1)SL30
CARD: 01
CARD TYPE: SLIC
FIRMWARE : V01.00.00
06/24/01
CARD: 14
CARD TYPE: DLD
FIRMWARE: V01.20.00
04/11/02
CARD: 15
CARD TYPE: PS6
FIRMWARE : V01.00.00
05/30/01
*END: COMPLETE*
Figure 8-1: Example revision report
8.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Starting and canceling a service group test
You can start and cancel a service group test from the control
panel using the Start Test and Cancel Test commands. A service
group test must be performed at regular intervals to verify the
system operation.
WARNING: If a fire starts in a zone that is being tested, the zone
will not report the fire alarm condition. To ensure occupant
safety, always post a fire watch while a zone is being tested.
When a device in a service group under test is activated, the
system initiates the programmed active test response. When a
device in a service group under test is placed in a trouble state (a
detector is pulled from its base), the system initiates the
programmed trouble test response. If a trouble test response is
not programmed, the system defaults to the active test response.
Note: The proper testing sequence is to perform the trouble test
first and then the activation test. If the activation test is
performed first, the trouble test will not activate any outputs.
Starting a service group test
TEST MENU
►1)Start Test
2)Cancel Test
3)Lamp Test
Use the Start Test command on the Test menu to start a service
group test.
To start a service group test:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. Choose Test, then Start Test.
3. Select the service group from the pick list for the zone you
want tested then press Enter.
Canceling a service group test
TEST MENU
1)Start Test
►2)Cancel Test
3)Lamp Test
Use the Cancel Test command to end a service group test. If a
point is in the active condition (a pull station is left engaged) the
control panel warns you of the condition before canceling the
test.
Note: The system automatically resets after all service group
tests are cancelled.
To cancel a service group test:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. Choose Test, then Cancel Test.
3. Select a service group from the pick list then press Enter.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.3
Service and troubleshooting
Disabling and enabling an AND group
You can disable and enable AND groups from the control panel
using the AND command on the Disable Group menu and
Enable Group menu, respectively. AND groups are an advanced
programming feature and are typically used in applications that
require a specific number of active fire alarm points before the
system activates a response.
Disabling an AND group
DISABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
►3)Group
4)Switch
5)Loop Mapping
Use the AND command on the Disable Group menu to disable
an AND group and prevent it from activating a response.
DISABLE GROUP
►1)AND
2)Matrix
3)Time Control
2. From the main menu, choose Disable, then Group, and then
AND.
To disable an AND group:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
3. Select an AND group from the pick list, then press Enter.
Enabling an AND group
ENABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
►3)Group
4)Switch
5)Loop Mapping
Use the Enable AND command on the Enable Group menu to
return a disabled AND group to service. If you enable an AND
group that was activated while it was disabled, any active
responses programmed for the AND group are automatically
activated.
ENABLE GROUP
►1)AND
2)Matrix
3)Time Control
To enable an AND group:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Enable, then Group, and then
AND.
3. Select an AND group from the pick list, then press Enter.
8.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Disabling and enabling a matrix group
The fire alarm system can comprise one or more matrix groups.
Matrix groups initiate a set of responses when a specific number
of fire detectors are activated or when two fire detectors within a
defined search radius are activated. You can disable and enable
matrix groups from the control panel using the Matrix command
on the Disable Group and Enable Group menus.
Disabling a matrix group
DISABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
3)Card
►4)Group
5)Switch
Use the Matrix command on the Disable Group menu to
temporarily take a matrix group out of service and prevent it
from initiating a set of responses.
DISABLE GROUP
►1)Matrix
2)Time Control
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
To disable a matrix group:
2. Choose Disable, then Group, and then Matrix.
3. Select a matrix group from the pick list, then press Enter.
Enabling a matrix group
ENABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
3)Card
►4)Group
5)Switch
Use the Matrix command on the Enable Group menu to return a
disabled matrix group to service and allow it to initiate a set of
responses.
ENABLE GROUP
►1)Matrix
2)Time Control
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
To enable a matrix group:
2. Choose Enable, then Group, and then Matrix.
3. Select a matrix group from the pick list, then press Enter.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.5
Service and troubleshooting
Disabling and enabling a time control
The fire alarm system can be programmed with one or more time
controls. Time controls initiate a set of responses at a specific
time and date as determined by the system clock. You can
disable and enable time controls from the control panel using the
Time Control command on the Disable Group and Enable Group
menus.
Disabling a time control
DISABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
3)Card
►4)Group
5)Switch
Use the Time Control command on the Disable Group menu to
temporarily take a time control out of service and prevent it from
initiating a set of responses.
DISABLE GROUP
1)Matrix
►2)Time Control
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
To disable a time control:
2. Choose Disable, then Group, and then Time Control.
3. Select a time control from the pick list, then press Enter.
Enabling a time control
DISABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
3)Card
►4)Group
5)Switch
Use the Time Control command on the Enable Group to return a
disabled time control to service and allow it to initiate a set of
responses.
DISABLE GROUP
1)Matrix
►2)Time Control
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
To enable a time control:
2. Choose Enable, then Group, and then Time Control.
3. Select a time control from the pick list, then press Enter.
8.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Disabling and enabling a switch
You can disable and enable a switch on an LED/switch card
from the control panel using the Switch command on the Disable
menu and the Enable menu, respectively. To disable or enable a
switch you must know the switch’s address. To determine a
switch’s address, see the topic “LED/switch card addresses” in
Appendix D.
Disabling a switch
DISABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
3)Group
►4)Switch
5)Loop Mapping
Use the Switch command on the Disable menu to disable a
switch on an LED/switch card and prevent it from activating a
response. When you press a switch that is disabled, the control
panel recognizes that the switch was pressed, but does not
activate any responses programmed for the switch.
ENTER SWITCH GRP
GGSS
To disable a switch:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Disable, then Switch.
3. Enter the switch address, where GG = the group number of
the LED/switch card, and SS is the switch number.
Enabling a switch
ENABLE MENU
1)Zone
2)Device
3)Group
►4)Switch
5)Loop Mapping
Use the Switch command on the Enable menu to return a
disabled switch on an LED/switch card to service. If you enable
a switch that was pressed while it was disabled, the control panel
activates any responses programmed for the switch.
To enable a switch:
ENTER SWITCH GRP
GGSS
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Enable, then Switch.
3. Enter the switch address, where GG = the group number of
the LED/switch card, and SS is the switch number.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.7
Service and troubleshooting
Disabling and enabling an option card
You can disable and enable option cards from the control panel
using the Card command on the Disable menu and Enable menu,
respectively. To disable or enable an option card you must know
the card’s address as determined by its card address switch.
Disabling an option card
DISABLE
1)Zone
2)Device
►3)Card
4)Group
5)Switch
6)Loop Mapping
ENTER CARD
01CC
Use the Card command on the Disable menu to disable an option
card and prevent it from activating any responses.
To disable an option card:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Disable, then Card.
3. Enter the card number, where: PP = 01, and CC = the card
number.
Enabling an option card
ENABLE
1)Zone
2)Device
►3)Card
4)Group
5)Switch
6)Loop Mapping
ENTER CARD
01CC
8.8
Use the Card command on the Enable menu to return a disabled
option card to service.
To enable an option card:
1. Log on using the level 4 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Enable, then Card.
3. Enter the card number, where: PP = 01, and CC = the card
number.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Turning an output on and off
You can turn an output on and off from the control panel using
the Output command on the Activate and Restore menus,
respectively.
Turning an output on or off from the control panel requires that
you specify a priority. Typically, fire alarm systems use low
priority commands to activate or restore outputs. In some cases,
fire alarm systems may use low priority and medium priority
commands. High priority commands are always reserved for
manual override operations.
WARNING: Turning an output on or off from the control panel,
if done incorrectly, may override a critical life safety feature of
the fire alarm system. Correct operation requires that you
activate the output then restore it, or restore the output then
activate it. Never activate or restore an output two or more times
in a row without performing the opposite operation the same
number of times.
Note: You cannot change the state of an active common alarm
output.
Turning an output on
ACTIVATE MENU
►1)Output
2)Alt Sens
3)Alt Msg Route
4)LED
Use the Output command on the Activate menu to turn an output
on as described below.
Conventional audible outputs: Steady, 20 bpm, 120 bpm, and
temporal
Conventional common alarm outputs: Steady, 20 bpm, 120 bpm,
and temporal
Conventional visible outputs: On
Relay outputs: Steady, 20 bpm, 120 bpm, and temporal
Intelligent addressable outputs (all device types): Steady
Note: It is possible to turn an output on more than once using
different priority levels and different output states.
To turn an output on:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Activate, then Output.
3. Enter the output’s address, where PP = 01, CC = the card
number, and DDD = the device number.
4. On the Output menu, choose the desired output state, and
then choose High Priority.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.9
Service and troubleshooting
Turning an output off
RESTORE MENU
►1)Output
2)Alt Sens
3)Alt Msg Route
4)LED
Use the Output command on the Restore menu to turn an output
off.
Note: It is possible to turn an output off more than once using
different priority levels.
To turn an output off:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Restore, then Output.
3. Enter the output’s address, where PP = 01, CC = the card
number, and DDD = the device number.
4. On the Output menu, choose Off, then choose High Priority.
8.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Turning an LED on and off
You can turn an LED on an LED/switch card on and off from the
control panel using the LED command on the Activate menu and
Restore menu, respectively. Turning an LED on or off requires
that you know the LED’s address. To determine the LED’s
address, see the topic “LED/switch card addresses” in Appendix
D.
WARNING: Turning an LED on or off from the control panel, if
done incorrectly, may override a critical life safety feature of the
fire alarm system. Correct operation requires that you activate
the LED then restore it, or restore the LED then activate it.
Never activate or restore an LED two or more times in a row
without performing the opposite operation the same number of
times.
Turning an LED on
ACTIVATE MENU
1)Output
2)Alt Sens
3)Alt Msg Route
►4)LED
Use the Activate LED command to turn an LED on. LEDs can
be turned on in one of three states: steady, fast blink, and slow
blink. It is possible to turn an LED on more than once using
different priority levels and different output states.
To turn an LED on:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Activate.
3. On the Activate menu, choose LED.
4. On the LED menu, choose the desired output state, then
enter the LED’s address, where GG = the group number, SS
= the switch number, and L = is the LED number.
Example: Enter 01011 to activate the red LED in the first
LED/switch group on the LED/switch card assigned to group
number 1.
Turning an LED off
RESTORE MENU
1)Output
2)Alt Sens
3)Alt Msg Route
►4)LED
Use the LED command on the Restore menu to turn an LED off.
To turn an LED off:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Restore.
3. On the Restore menu, choose LED.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.11
Service and troubleshooting
4. On the LED menu, choose Off, then enter the LED’s
address, where GG = the group number, SS = the switch
number, and L = is the LED number.
Example: Enter 01011 to restore the red LED in the first
LED/switch group on the LED/switch card assigned to group
number 1.
8.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Setting the system time and date
The control panel includes a system clock that it uses to time
stamp events and to activate time controls. The time is presented
in 24-hour format. The date is presented in day-month-year
format.
Setting the time
TIME/DATE MENU
►1)Enter Time
2)Enter Date
13:00:00
ENTER TIME
HHMMSS
Use the Enter Time command on the Time/Date menu to set the
system clock for the current time. The time is entered in 24-hour
format, for example:
000000 = midnight
010000 = 1:00 a.m.
120000 = noon
130000 = 1:00 p.m.
235900 = 11:59 p.m.
To set the system clock for the current time:
1. Log on using the level 3 password (UL systems) or level 2
password (ULC systems).
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Time/Date, and
then Enter Time.
3. Press DEL until the display shows HHMMSS.
4. Enter the time in 24-hour format, where HH = hours, MM =
minutes, and SS = seconds.
Example: To set the time for 7:27:00 p.m., enter 192700.
Setting the date
TIME/DATE MENU
1)Enter Time
►2)Enter Date
Use the Enter Date command on the Time/Date menu to set the
system clock to the current date.
To set the system clock for the current date:
05/09/2002
ENTER DATE
DDMMYYYY
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Time/Date, and
then Enter Time.
3. Press DEL until the display shows DDMMYYYY.
Enter the date, where DD = the number of the day, MM =
the number of the month, and YYYY = the year.
Example: To set the date for July 31, 2002, enter 07312002.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.13
Service and troubleshooting
Changing the level 2 password
PROGRAM MENU
1)Time/Date
►2)Edit Password
PASSWORD MENU
1)Level 1
►2)Level 2
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX
Use the Edit Password command on the Program menu to
change the password setting for using level 2 command menus.
To change the level 2 password you must log on using the level
3 or level 4 password.
The default level 2 password is 2222.
To change the level 2 password:
1. Log on using the level 3 password.
2. From the main menu, choose Program, then Edit Password.
3. On the Password menu, choose Level 2.
4. Enter the new password.
8.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Clearing trouble messages
Table 8-1 lists the trouble messages that can appear on the
CPU/Display Unit and their possible causes. Locate the trouble
message in the table then follow the instructions to correct the
fault indicated by the message. The trouble messages are listed
alphabetically.
Table 8-1: Trouble messages
Message
Description
GROUND FAULT: Check
System Wiring
There is an earth ground fault in the system. Possible causes
for this fault are:
• A computer that is not electrically isolated is connected to
the RS-232 port
• A wire shorted to earth ground
Locate the source of the fault by disconnecting the field wires
inside the panel one at a time until the fault message clears.
Once located, verify the field wiring to clear the short.
TROUBLE
Intelligent addressable device trouble. Press Help to identify the
specific trouble message.
COMMN FAULT – An intelligent addressable device is not
communicating with the panel. Possible causes for this fault
are:
• The device is not installed
• The device is installed but is defective
• The loop is wired incorrectly, or the loop wiring is open or
shorted
Identify the point that reported the fault by pressing Help. Make
corrections as required.
TROUBLE OPEN
An open circuit was detected. Possible causes for this fault are:
•
Missing or incorrect end of line resistor
•
Loose terminal connection or missing device
•
Missing or broken wire
Identify the point that reported the fault by pressing Help.
Verify the correct end of line resistor is installed on the last
device on the circuit. Verify the field wiring is correct and the
connections are secure.
TROUBLE SHRT
A short circuit was detected. Possible causes for this fault are:
• A wire-to-wire short
• Wires reversed between two devices
Identify the point that reported the fault by pressing Help. Clear
the short.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.15
Service and troubleshooting
Table 8-1: Trouble messages
Message
Description
LCL TROUBLE
There is a fault with an intelligent addressable device. Press
Help to identify the device and the fault.
LCL TROUBLE: Aux Power 1/2
Shorted
The AUX 1 or AUX2 power output is shorted
LCL TROUBLE: Aux Power 3
Shorted
The AUX 3 power output is shorted
LCL TROUBLE: Battery
Charger Fault
The power supply card is having trouble charging the standby
batteries. Possible causes for this fault are:
• The standby batteries are wired backwards
• The standby batteries are defective
• The power supply card is defective
De-energize the panel then verify the standby batteries are not
wired backwards. If they are, you may have blown a fuse and
must also replace the power supply card. If the problem
persists, replace the standby batteries.
LCL TROUBLE: Battery Wiring
or Battery Fault
Battery voltage is below 20.4 Vdc. Verify the battery is properly
installed. If the problem persists, replace the batteries.
LCL TROUBLE: Call For
Service
The panel detected an internal CPU processing fault.
LCL TROUBLE: Card XX
Card XX in the project database, where XX is the card’s
address, was not detected in the control panel. The possible
causes for this fault are:
Get a History report before contacting technical support.
• Card XX is not installed
• Card XX is installed but its card address switch setting does
not match its address in the project database
LCL TROUBLE: Card XX
Communications
Card XX, where XX is the card’s address, is not
communicating. Possible causes for this fault are:
• Card XX is defective
• Card XX was not installed prior to the initial download
LCL TROUBLE: Card XX Setup Card XX installed in the panel and the card at address XX in
Mismatch
the project database are not the same. Verify all card address
switch settings and make the necessary changes.
LCL TROUBLE: CH1
Communications
8.16
There is a wiring fault with the primary RS-485 transmission
path (channnel 1). Check the wiring from the control panel to
each repeater panel. Verify the wire connections are secure
and that the wires are not missing or crossed (plus-to-minus
and minus-to-plus). Make corrections if necessary.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Table 8-1: Trouble messages
Message
Description
LCL TROUBLE: CH2
Communications
There is a wiring fault with the secondary RS-485 transmission
path (channnel 2). Check the wiring from the control panel to
each repeater panel. Verify the wire connections are secure
and that the wires are not missing or crossed (plus-to-minus
and minus-to-plus). Make corrections if necessary.
LCL TROUBLE: Code
Supervision
Internal CPU memory failure
LCL TROUBLE: Database
Incompatible
Changes made to the system programming on the control panel
were not updated in this unit. Update the project database on
all the remote annunciator panels.
LCL TROUBLE: Database
Supervision
Internal CPU memory failure
LCL TROUBLE: Excessive
Battery Current
The standby batteries are weak. Replace the batteries.
LCL TROUBLE: LED/switch
Display
There is a problem with an LED/switch card. The possible
causes are:
• A ribbon cable connection is loose or missing
• An LED/switch card is defined in the project database but is
not installed on the panel
• An LED/switch card is not defined in the project database
but is installed on the panel
Identify the panel that reported the fault by pressing Help.
Install the required LED/switch card if it is missing. If the ribbon
cable connection is loose or missing, de-energize the panel,
connect the ribbon cables, and then restart the system. If the
LED/switch card is properly installed, update the project
database to include the LED/switch card.
Caution: Connecting ribbon cables while the panel is energized
may damage the LED/switch card. Always de-energize the
panel before connecting ribbon cables to the LED/switch card.
LCL TROUBLE: Line Failure
An error has been detected on an intelligent addressable loop
that prevented the line from initializing. Identify which SLIC card
reported the fault by pressing Help. Correct any wiring issues
and then reset the system.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.17
Service and troubleshooting
Table 8-1: Trouble messages
Message
Description
LCL TROUBLE: Unconfig.
Device
A device is installed on an intelligent addressable loop but is
not defined in the project database. The possible causes for
this fault are:
• The device is defined in the project database but is
configured with the wrong device address
• The device is not defined in the project database
Identify the SLIC card that reported the fault by pressing Help.
Verify each device on the loop and their address switch
settings. If a device is found with an incorrect address, make
the necessary corrections, and then restart the system. If a
device is found that is not in the project database, update the
project database to include the missing device.
LCL TROUBLE: Panel
Switched Latched
A switch is stuck in the pressed position. Identify the card that
reported the fault. Locate the switch and clear the obstruction. If
the problem persists, replace the card.
LCL TROUBLE: Panel
Unexpected Card
An option card is installed in the cabinet but is not defined in the
project database. The possible causes for this fault are:
• The option card is defined in the project database but is
configured with the wrong card address
• The option card is not defined in the project database
Obtain a Cabinet report from the software configuration utility.
Verify the address switch setting of each option card installed in
the panel matches their address in the project database.
If an address mismatch is found, change the address switch
setting on the option card to match the address in the project
database then restart the system.
If a option card is found that is not in the project database,
remove the option card or update the project database to
include the missing card then download the new project
database.
LCL TROUBLE: Power supply
card EEPROM fault
There is a problem with the internal memory on the power
supply card. Restart the panel. If the problem persists, replace
power supply card.
LCL TROUBLE: Power supply
card RAM fault
There is a problem with the internal memory on the power
supply card. Restart the panel. If the problem persists, replace
power supply card.
LCL TROUBLE: Power supply
card ROM fault
There is a problem with the internal memory on the power
supply card. Restart the panel. If the problem persists, replace
power supply card.
LCL TROUBLE: Power Supply
Setup Mismatch
The CPU encountered a problem configuring the power supply
card
8.18
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Table 8-1: Trouble messages
Message
Description
LCL TROUBLE: Primary AC
Power Failure
The mains input voltage is below 85% of its nominal value. The
possible causes for this fault are:
• The disconnect device installed between the main
distribution panel the control panel is switched off
• The control panel fuse is blown or missing
• The control panel transformer is not connected
Check the disconnect device. If it is ON, switch the disconnect
device OFF, then open the control panel and verify that the
transformer is plugged into the power supply card. Next, check
if the fuse is blown or missing. Replace the fuse if necessary.
LCL TROUBLE: Reboot Fault
The system performed an unexpected reboot. View or print a
History report to determine why the panel rebooted. Press
Reset to clear.
LCL TROUBLE: ROM
Supervision
Internal CPU memory failure. Restart the panel. If the problem
still persists, replace the card.
LCL TROUBLE: Service Active
Trouble
A service group test was canceled with a device still in the
active state. Check the service group’s status (Status > Test) to
see which point is still active. Restore the point then reset the
system.
LCL TROUBLE: Smoke Power
Shorted
Smoke/Accessory power output is shorted
LCL TROUBLE: Switch Latched A switch is stuck in the pressed position. Identify the card that
reported the fault. Locate the switch and clear the obstruction. If
the problem persists, replace the card.
LCL TROUBLE: Task Failure
Internal processing fault
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.19
Service and troubleshooting
Replacing the control panel fuse
The control panel is protected with a 5 A fuse as shown in the
figure below.
Dedicated 115/230 V
branch circuit
Circuit
breaker
Live
115/230 V
mains
Neutral
Earth Gnd
0
N
24V
L
Fuse
(5 A)
To replace the fuse:
1. Switch off the circuit breaker that supplies mains AC power
to the control panel.
2. Open the cabinet door, then remove the terminal block cover
from its slot to expose the AC terminal block.
3. Unplug the fuse holder and replace the existing fuse with a
new fuse of the same type and size.
4. Plug the fuse holder into the AC terminal block and insert
the terminal block cover into its slot.
5. Switch on the circuit breaker that supplies mains AC power
to the control panel.
8.20
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Service and troubleshooting
Using HyperTerminal
HyperTerminal is a useful tool for gathering information from
the control panel through an RS-232 port connection in order to
troubleshoot system faults. The information gathered can be
saved as a plain text file (TXT extension) and submitted
electronically to technical support for evaluation.
HyperTerminal comes with your Windows operating system as
an installable option. HyperTerminal, if installed, is typically
found on the Accessories menu (Start > Programs > Accessories
> Hyperterminal).
Note: HyperTerminal Professional Edition is available free of
charge for personal use. You can download HyperTerminal
Professional Edition from the Internet at
http://www.hilgraeve.com.
Setting up a HyperTerminal connection
Before you can gather information from the control panel you
must set up a HyperTerminal connection.
To set up a HyperTerminal connection:
1. Start HyperTerminal.
2. In the Connection Description dialog box, type a name for
the connection in the Name box then click OK.
3. In the Connect To dialog box, select the COM port you are
using to connect your laptop computer to the control panel
then click OK.
4. In the COM port’s Properties dialog box, set the port settings
as described below then click OK.
Bits per second: 9600
Data bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop bits: 1
Flow control: None
5. On the File menu, click Save to save your connection
settings.
Capturing a report
The history report and the revisions report provide useful
information for troubleshooting system faults. You should
always have this information available before calling technical
support.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
8.21
Service and troubleshooting
To capture a report:
1. On the Transfer menu, click Capture Text.
2. In the File box in the Capture Text dialog box, type a name
for the captured text file. Example: history report. The
TXT file extension is added automatically.
If you want to save the file to somewhere other than the
default location, click the Browse button, navigate to the
desired location, then name the file.
3. Click Start.
4. From the Control/Display Unit, log on using the level 3
password.
5. From the main menu, choose Reports, then choose the report
you want captured.
6. On the Print Output menu, choose Printer to send the report
to HyperTerminal.
7. Wait until the report transfer is complete.
8. On the Transfer menu, click Capture Text, and then Stop.
8.22
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Appendix A
System calculations
Summary
This appendix provides worksheets for sizing standby batteries,
and for calculating the maximum wire lengths for notification
appliance circuits and intelligent addressable loops.
Content
Notification appliance circuit maximum wire length • A.2
Intelligent addressable loop maximum wire length • A.3
Battery calculations • A.9
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
A.1
System calculations
Notification appliance circuit maximum wire length
Use the worksheet below to determine the maximum wire length
of a notification appliance circuit.
Maximum line loss [1]
1.5 V
×
1,000
1,500
Wire resistance per 1000 ft/pair [2]
÷
Ω
Total operating current required [3]
÷
A
Maximum wire length
ft
Notes
[1] For worst case estimates, use a maximum line loss of 1.5
volts and assume all appliances are clustered at the end of
the circuit
[2] Use 3.5 for 12 AWG and 2.5 sq mm wire, 5.2 for 14 AWG
and 1.5 sq mm wire, 8.0 for 16 AWG and 1.0 sq mm wire,
and 13.0 for 18 AWG and 0.75 sq mm wire
[3] Use the filtered 20 Vdc Average Operating Current ratings
found on the installation or catalog sheet for each device
A.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
System calculations
Intelligent addressable loop maximum wire length
Use the instructions provided below to calculate the maximum
wire length of an intelligent addressable loop. The maximum
wire length is made up of two components: the total amount of
wire and the longest circuit path.
Step 1: Total wire
Use the worksheet below to calculate the total amount of wire
that you can use to construct an intelligent addressable loop. The
total amount of wire is based on the cable manufacturer's
capacitance per foot rating. In no case shall the total amount of
wire exceed the values listed in Table A-1.
500,000 pF
Cable capacitance
÷
pF/ft
Total wire
ft
Table A-1: Maximum amount of wire you can use to
construct an intelligent addressable loop
Wire type
18 AWG or
0.75 mm2
16 AWG or
1.0 mm²
14 AWG or
1.5 mm²
Twisted pair,
nonshielded
25 pF/36 pF/38 pF
20,000 ft
(6096 m)
13,888 ft
(4233 m)
13,157 ft
(4010 m)
Twisted pair, shielded
58 pF/82 pF/84 pF
8,621 ft
(2628 m)
6,098 ft
(1859 m)
5,952 ft
(1814 m)
Nontwisted pair,
nonshielded
20 pF/20 pF/20 pF
20,000 ft
(6096 m)
20,000 ft
(6096 m)
20,000 ft
(6096 m)
Step 2: Longest path
Use Table A-2 through Table A-5 to determine the intelligent
addressable loop’s longest circuit path. The longest circuit path
is based on wire size and type, and the number of detectors,
modules, SIGA–UMs or SIGA–MABs installed on the loop.
In the illustration below, the longest circuit path (shown in bold
lines) is 1,240 ft (378 m). The total amount of wire comprising
the loop is 1,640 ft (500 m)
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
A.3
System calculations
10 ft
(3 m)
FACP
200 ft
(61 m)
J
30 ft
(9 m)
200 ft
(61 m)
J
100 ft
(30 m)
A.4
100 ft
(30 m)
J
1000 ft
(305 m)
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
System calculations
Table A-2: Longest allowable circuit path with 0 SIGA-UMs or SIGA-MABs configured for 2wire smoke detectors
Maximum allowable wire distance using nontwisted, nonshielded wire pairs
18 AWG
16 AWG
14 AWG
Detector
addresses
Module
addresses
ft
m
ft
m
ft
m
1 to 25
0
7437
2267
11815
3601
18792
5728
26 to 50
0
7038
2145
11180
3408
17782
5420
51 to 75
0
6638
2023
10545
3214
16772
5112
76 to 100
0
6238
1901
9910
3021
15762
4804
101 to 125
0
5839
1780
9275
2827
14752
4497
0
1 to 25
7267
2215
11544
3519
18361
5597
1 to 25
1 to 25
6867
2093
10909
3325
17351
5289
26 to 50
1 to 25
6467
1971
10275
3132
16342
4981
51 to 75
1 to 25
6068
1849
9640
2938
15332
4673
76 to 100
1 to 25
5668
1728
9005
2745
14322
4365
101 to 125
1 to 25
5268
1606
8370
2551
13312
4057
0
26 to 50
6697
2041
10639
3243
16921
5157
1 to 25
26 to 50
6297
1919
10004
3049
15911
4850
26 to 50
26 to 50
5897
1798
9369
2856
14901
4542
51 to 75
26 to 50
5498
1676
8734
2662
13891
4234
76 to 100
26 to 50
5098
1554
8099
2469
12881
3926
101 to 125
26 to 50
4698
1432
7464
2275
11871
3618
0
51 to 75
5906
1800
9383
2860
14923
4549
1 to 25
51 to 75
5250
1600
8340
2542
13265
4043
26 to 50
51 to 75
4633
1412
7360
2243
11707
3568
51 to 75
51 to 75
4051
1235
6435
1961
10235
3120
76 to 100
51 to 75
3498
1066
5558
1694
8839
2694
101 to 125
51 to 75
2973
906
4723
1440
7512
2290
0
76 to 100
3931
1198
6245
1903
9932
3027
1 to 25
76 to 100
3404
1037
5407
1648
8601
2621
26 to 50
76 to 100
2899
883
4605
1404
7324
2232
51 to 75
76 to 100
2413
735
3833
1168
6096
1858
76 to 100
76 to 100
1945
593
3089
942
4913
1498
101 to 125
76 to 100
1493
455
2371
723
3771
1149
0
101 to 125
2631
802
4180
1274
6649
2027
1 to 25
101 to 125
2165
660
3439
1048
5470
1667
26 to 50
101 to 125
1713
522
2721
829
4328
1319
51 to 75
101 to 125
1274
388
2023
617
3218
981
76 to 100
101 to 125
847
258
1345
410
2140
652
101 to 125
101 to 125
431
131
685
209
1089
332
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
A.5
System calculations
Table A-3: Longest allowable circuit path with 1 to 5 SIGA-UMs or SIGA-MABs configured
for 2-wire smoke detectors
Maximum allowable wire distance using nontwisted, nonshielded wire pairs
18 AWG
16 AWG
14 AWG
Detector
addresses
Module
addresses
ft
m
ft
m
ft
m
1 to 25
0
6778
2066
10768
3282
17126
5220
26 to 50
0
6131
1869
9741
2969
15492
4722
51 to 75
0
5501
1677
8739
2664
13899
4236
76 to 100
0
4885
1489
7760
2365
12342
3762
101 to 125
0
4282
1305
6802
2073
10819
3298
0
1 to 25
5353
1632
8504
2592
13525
4122
1 to 25
1 to 25
4720
1439
7498
2286
11926
3635
26 to 50
1 to 25
4100
1250
6513
1985
10359
3157
51 to 75
1 to 25
3491
1064
5546
1691
8821
2689
76 to 100
1 to 25
2893
882
4597
1401
7311
2228
101 to 125
1 to 25
2306
703
3663
1116
5826
1776
0
26 to 50
3776
1151
5999
1829
9542
2908
1 to 25
26 to 50
3153
961
5009
1527
7966
2428
26 to 50
26 to 50
2539
774
4034
1230
6416
1956
51 to 75
26 to 50
1935
590
3075
937
4890
1491
76 to 100
26 to 50
1340
409
2130
649
3387
1032
101 to 125
26 to 50
754
230
1197
365
1905
581
0
51 to 75
2491
759
3957
1206
6293
1918
1 to 25
51 to 75
1868
569
2967
904
4720
1439
26 to 50
51 to 75
1254
382
1992
607
3168
966
51 to 75
51 to 75
648
198
1030
314
1638
499
76 to 100
51 to 75
50
15
80
24
126
39
101 to 125
51 to 75
0
76 to 100
1386
422
2201
671
3501
1067
1 to 25
76 to 100
760
232
1208
368
1921
586
26 to 50
76 to 100
143
44
227
69
361
110
51 to 75
76 to 100
76 to 100
76 to 100
101 to 125
76 to 100
0
101 to 125
1 to 25
101 to 125
26 to 50
101 to 125
51 to 75
101 to 125
76 to 100
101 to 125
101 to 125
101 to 125
A.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
System calculations
Table A-4: Longest allowable circuit path with 6 to 10 SIGA-UMs or SIGA-MABs configured
for 2-wire smoke detectors
Maximum allowable wire distance using nontwisted, nonshielded wire pairs
18 AWG
16 AWG
14 AWG
Detector
addresses
Module
addresses
ft
m
ft
m
ft
m
1 to 25
0
5045
1538
8015
2443
12748
3886
26 to 50
0
4494
1370
7139
2176
11355
3461
51 to 75
0
3950
1204
6275
1913
9981
3042
76 to 100
0
3414
1040
5423
1653
8625
2629
101 to 125
0
2884
879
4581
1396
7286
2221
0
1 to 25
4106
1252
6523
1988
10375
3162
1 to 25
1 to 25
3542
1080
5627
1715
8950
2728
26 to 50
1 to 25
2985
910
4742
1445
7542
2299
51 to 75
1 to 25
2435
742
3868
1179
6152
1875
76 to 100
1 to 25
1891
576
3004
916
4778
1456
101 to 125
1 to 25
1353
412
2150
655
3419
1042
0
26 to 50
2869
874
4557
1389
7248
2209
1 to 25
26 to 50
2296
700
3648
1112
5802
1768
26 to 50
26 to 50
1730
527
2749
838
4372
1332
51 to 75
26 to 50
1170
357
1859
567
2957
901
76 to 100
26 to 50
617
188
979
299
1558
475
101 to 125
26 to 50
68
21
108
33
172
53
0
51 to 75
1796
547
2853
869
4537
1383
1 to 25
51 to 75
1214
370
1929
588
3067
935
26 to 50
51 to 75
638
195
1014
309
1613
492
51 to 75
51 to 75
69
21
109
33
173
53
76 to 100
51 to 75
101 to 125
51 to 75
0
76 to 100
833
254
1323
403
2105
642
1 to 25
76 to 100
242
74
385
117
613
187
26 to 50
76 to 100
51 to 75
76 to 100
76 to 100
76 to 100
101 to 125
76 to 100
0
101 to 125
1 to 25
101 to 125
26 to 50
101 to 125
51 to 75
101 to 125
76 to 100
101 to 125
101 to 125
101 to 125
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
A.7
System calculations
Table A-5: Longest allowable circuit path with 11 to 15 SIGA-UMs or SIGA-MABs
configured for 2-wire smoke detectors
Maximum allowable wire distance using nontwisted, nonshielded wire pairs
18 AWG
16 AWG
14 AWG
Detector
addresses
Module
addresses
ft
m
ft
m
ft
m
1 to 25
0
3931
1198
6245
1903
9932
3027
26 to 50
0
3427
1045
5444
1659
8659
2639
51 to 75
0
2928
892
4651
1418
7397
2255
76 to 100
0
2432
741
3864
1178
6145
1873
101 to 125
0
1941
592
3083
940
4903
1495
0
1 to 25
3247
990
5158
1572
8204
2501
1 to 25
1 to 25
2722
830
4324
1318
6878
2096
26 to 50
1 to 25
2202
671
3498
1066
5563
1696
51 to 75
1 to 25
1686
514
2678
816
4259
1298
76 to 100
1 to 25
1174
358
1865
568
2966
904
101 to 125
1 to 25
666
203
1058
323
1683
513
0
26 to 50
2204
672
3502
1067
5570
1698
1 to 25
26 to 50
1664
507
2644
806
4205
1282
26 to 50
26 to 50
1129
344
1793
547
2852
869
51 to 75
26 to 50
598
182
950
289
1511
460
76 to 100
26 to 50
71
22
113
34
179
55
101 to 125
26 to 50
0
51 to 75
1263
385
2007
612
3192
973
1 to 25
51 to 75
710
216
1128
344
1794
547
26 to 50
51 to 75
161
49
256
78
407
124
51 to 75
51 to 75
76 to 100
51 to 75
101 to 125
51 to 75
0
76 to 100
1 to 25
76 to 100
26 to 50
76 to 100
51 to 75
76 to 100
76 to 100
76 to 100
101 to 125
76 to 100
0
101 to 125
1 to 25
101 to 125
26 to 50
101 to 125
51 to 75
101 to 125
76 to 100
101 to 125
101 to 125
101 to 125
A.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
System calculations
Battery calculations
Use the worksheet below to determine the ampere-hour rating of
the control panel’s standby batteries.
Alarm current
(mA)
Standby
current (mA)
Control panel (see Table A-6)
Smoke/accessory power (see Table A-7)
AUX 1 output [1]
AUX 2 output
AUX 3 output
Loop 1 [2]
Loop 2
Loop 3
Loop 4
Total current [3]
Operating time required
×
×
hr
min
÷ 60
+
=
mAh
× 1.2
mAh
÷ 1,000
Battery size [4]
Ah
Notes
[1] Maximum 1.5 A per AUX output
[2] For all intelligent addressable loops, obtain standby and alarm currents from loop current calculation
worksheets
[3] If total standby or alarm current exceeds 6.0 A, switch part of the load to an auxiliary power supply. The
auxiliary power supply must be UL/ULC listed for fire protective signaling systems.
[4] Battery size may not exceed 40 Ah for UL systems or 30 Ah for ULC systems. If the battery size is
greater than 10 Ah you must use an external battery cabinet.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
A.9
System calculations
Table A-6: Control panel current load worksheet
Qty
Standby
current (mA)
Alarm
current (mA)
Qty x Standby
current (mA)
Qty x Alarm
current (mA)
1
199
235
199
235
LED/switch card [2]
1
1
XGD card
1
1
SLIC card
33
57
ZB16-4 card
117
152
ZA8-2 card
73
116
DLD card
13
20
RS-485 card
60
60
ZR8 card [3]
11
18
Devices
Base panel [1]
+
+
Totals (mA) [4]
Notes
[1] Includes the PS6 card and a CPU/Display Unit and no annunciator cards
[2] Add 0.75 mA for each energized LED
[3] Add 18 mA for each energized relay
[4] Control panel current and smoke/accessory power current may not exceed 1.32 A
A.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
System calculations
Table A-7: Smoke/accessory power current load worksheet
Standby
current (mA)
Alarm
current (mA)
QSA [1]
154
166
SRA
66
75
LED/switch card [2]
1
1
XGD card [3]
5
5
CDR-3
60
100
IOP3A
60
60
RPM
20
20
SIGA-UM or -MAB [4]
2
17
Devices
Qty
Qty x Standby
current (mA)
Qty x Alarm
current (mA)
Totals (mA) [5]
Notes
[1] Includes a CPU/Display Unit, an RAI card, and no annunciator cards
[2] Add 0.75 mA for each energized LED
[3] Add 6.25 mA for each energized LED if powered from the PS6 card’s smoke/accessory power output
[4] Only the first SIGA-UM or SIGA-MAB in the alarm state draws current. The remaining ones do not.
[5] Totals may not exceed 250 mA
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
A.11
System calculations
A.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Appendix B
Barcode library
Summary
This appendix provides a set of barcodes that you can use to add
location descriptions to event messages from the control panel
CPU/Display Unit.
Content
Uppercase letters • B.2
Numbers and ordinals • B.2
Common words • B.3
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
B.1
Barcode library
Uppercase letters
A
B
C
D
Backspace
E
F
G
H
Delete
I
J
K
L
Enter
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Space
Numbers and ordinals
B.2
1
2
3
4
Backspace
5
6
7
8
Delete
9
0
Enter
1ST
2ND
3RD
4TH
5TH
6TH
7TH
8TH
9TH
0TH
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Barcode library
Common words
ABORT
ABOVE
ALARM
APARTMENT
APT
AREA
ATRIUM
AUDITORIUM
BASEMENT
BELOW
CAFETERIA
CEILING
CLASSROOM
CLOSET
COMPUTER
CONFERENCE
CORRIDOR
DAMPER
DETECTOR
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
B.3
Barcode library
DOOR
DUCT
EAST
ELECTRICAL
ENTRANCE
EXIT
FAN
FAULT
FIRE
FIRE PUMP
FLAME
FLOOR
FOYER
GARAGE
GENERATOR
GYM
HALL
HEAT
HORN
JANITOR
B.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Barcode library
KITCHEN
LAB
LEFT
LEVEL
LIBRARY
LOBBY
LOWER
MACHINE
MECHANICAL
MENS
MEZZANINE
MONITOR
NORTH
OFFICE
PARKING
PENTHOUSE
PULL
RELAY
RESTROOM
RIGHT
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
B.5
Barcode library
ROOM
SECURITY
SHAFT
SMOKE
SOUTH
STAGE
STAIRWELL
STOCKROOM
STORAGE
STROBE
SUITE
SUPERVISORY
TROUBLE
UNDER
UPPER
UTILITY
WAREHOUSE
WATERFLOW
WEST
WOMENS
B.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Barcode library
ZONE
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
B.7
Barcode library
B.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Appendix C
Menu flow diagrams
Summary
This appendix provides menu flow diagrams to use for general
reference when programming the fire alarm system from the
control panel CPU/Display Unit.
Content
System configuration menus • C.2
SLIC card configuration menus • C.3
ZB16-4 card configuration menus • C.6
ZA8-2 card configuration menus • C.7
DLD card configuration menus • C.8
Zone configuration menus • C.10
Output group configuration menus • C.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
C.1
Menu flow diagrams
System configuration menus
Log on as
level 4 operator
MAIN MENU
8) Program
PROGRAM MENU
5) Configure
CONFIGURE
4) System
6) Exit
UPDATE DATABASES
1) Save
2) Save and Sync
CONFIG SYSTEM
1) User Labels
2) ALM/RST Inhib
3) AC Power Dly
4) Exit
Update
all panels
Update
control panel
AC POWER DELAY
1) None
2) 6 Hours
3) 12 Hours
ALARM/RESET INHI
1) None
2) 1 min
3) 3 min
4) 5 min
USER LABELS
1) Facility Name
2) Inst Company
3) Phone Number
4) Programmer
5) Exit
ENTER TEXT
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
Update
databases
C.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Menu flow diagrams
SLIC card configuration menus
Log on as
level 4 operator
MAIN MENU
8) Program
PROGRAM MENU
5) Configure
CONFIGURE
3) Cards
6) Exit
UPDATE DATABASES
1) Save
2) Save and Sync
EDIT CARD
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
ENTER CARD
CC
Update
all panels
Delete
Update
databases
Update
control panel
Add/Edit
C
SLIC
1) Config Card
2) Config Detect
3) Config Module
4) AutoLoop
5) Accept Map
6) Exit
A
B
* Detectors
* Modules
:XXX
:XXX
Expected
* Detectors
* Modules
:XXX
:XXX
Actual
* Detectors
* Modules
:XXX
:XXX
Enter : Accept
Delete : Cancel
Enter : Accept
Delete : Cancel
CONFIGURE CARD
1) NAC 1
2) NAC 2
3) Wiring Class
4) Exit
WIRING CLASS
1) Class ‘A’
2) Class ‘B’
NAC 2
1) Audible
2) Visible
3) Com Alarm Out
4) Output
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
Update
databases
NAC 1
1) Audible
2) Visible
3) Com Alarm Out
4) Output
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
C.3
Menu flow diagrams
A
CONFIG DETECTOR
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
C
CONFIG DETECTOR
1) Device Addres
2) Enter Serial#
ENTER SERIAL #
XXXXXXXXXX
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
CONFIG DETECTOR
1) Message
2) Model
3) Sensitivity
4) Verification
5) Pre-Alarm
6) Base Type
7) Exit
BASE TYPE
1) Standard
2) Relay
3) Isolator
PRE-ALARM
1) None
2) 20%
3) 40%
4) 60%
5) 80%
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
Update
databases
VERIFICATION
1) None
2) 12 seconds
3) 24 seconds
4) 36 seconds
5) 48 seconds
SENSITIVITY
1) Most
2) More
3) Normal
4) Less
5) Least
MODULE MODEL
PS
SD
*END:COMPLETE*
ENTER TEXT (32)
C.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Menu flow diagrams
B
CONFIG MODULE
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
C
CONFIG MODULE
1) Device Addres
2) Enter Serial#
ENTER SERIAL #
XXXXXXXXXX
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
CONFIG MODULE
1) Model
2) Device 1
3) Device 2
4) Exit
CONFIGURE MOD 2
1) Message
2) Type
3) Personality
4) Exit
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
Update
databases
MOD PERSONALTY
1 Alarm B
*END: COMPLETE*
MODULE TYPE
PULL STATION
ALARM ACTIVE
*END: COMPLETE*
ENTER TEXT (32)
CONFIGURE MOD 1
1) Message
2) Type
3) Personality
4) Exit
MOD PERSONALTY
1 Alarm B
*END: COMPLETE*
MODULE TYPE
PULL STATION
ALARM ACTIVE
*END: COMPLETE*
ENTER TEXT (32)
MODULE MODEL
270
*END:COMPLETE*
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
C.5
Menu flow diagrams
ZB16-4 card configuration menus
Log on as
level 4 operator
MAIN MENU
8) Program
PROGRAM MENU
5) Configure
CONFIGURE
3) Cards
6) Exit
UPDATE DATABASES
1) Save
2) Save and Sync
EDIT CARD
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
Update
all panels
ENTER CARD
CC
Add/Edit
Delete
Update
databases
Update
control panel
TRAD ZONE
1) Circuit num
2) Exit
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
Update
databases
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
CIRCUIT EDIT
1) Text Message
2) Device Type
3) Exit
Yes
DEVICE EDIT
ALARM ACTIVE
PULL STATION
HEAT ALARM
WATERFLOW
SUPERVISORY
TAMPER
MONITOR
LATCH SUPV
LATCH TAMPER
ALARM VERIFY
COMM ALM OUT
AUDIBLE
VISUAL
SUPER OUTPUT
DDD>012?
No
DEVICE EDIT
ALARM ACTIVE
PULL STATION
HEAT ALARM
WATERFLOW
SUPERVISORY
TAMPER
MONITOR
LATCH SUPV
LATCH TAMPER
ALARM VERIFY
ENTER TEXT (32)
C.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Menu flow diagrams
ZA8-2 card configuration menus
Log on as
level 4 operator
MAIN MENU
8) Program
PROGRAM MENU
5) Configure
CONFIGURE
3) Cards
6) Exit
UPDATE DATABASES
1) Save
2) Save and Sync
EDIT CARD
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
Update
all panels
ENTER CARD
CC
Delete
Add/Edit
Update
databases
Update
control panel
TRAD ZONE
1) Circuit num
2) Exit
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
Update
databases
ENTER DEVICE
DDD
CIRCUIT EDIT
1) Text Message
2) Device Type
3) Exit
Yes
DEVICE EDIT
ALARM ACTIVE
PULL STATION
HEAT ALARM
WATERFLOW
SUPERVISORY
TAMPER
MONITOR
LATCH SUPV
LATCH TAMPER
ALARM VERIFY
COMM ALM OUT
AUDIBLE
VISUAL
SUPER OUTPUT
DDD=004
or 008?
No
DEVICE EDIT
ALARM ACTIVE
PULL STATION
HEAT ALARM
WATERFLOW
SUPERVISORY
TAMPER
MONITOR
LATCH SUPV
LATCH TAMPER
ALARM VERIFY
ENTER TEXT (32)
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
C.7
Menu flow diagrams
DLD card configuration menus
Log on as
level 4 operator
MAIN MENU
8) Program
PROGRAM MENU
5) Configure
CONFIGURE
3) Cards
6) Exit
UPDATE DATABASES
1) Save
2) Save and Sync
Update
all panels
EDIT CARD
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
Update
control panel
ENTER CARD
CC
Delete
Update
databases
Add/Edit
E
D
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO save
Update
databases
C.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Menu flow diagrams
D
DIALER SETUP
1) #’s of CMS
2) CMS Phone #
3) Retry Count
4) Accounts
5) Default Msgs
6) Exit
E
DEFAULT MSGS
1) Alarm
2) Trouble
3) Supervisory
4) Exit
MSG
1) Account
2) Active Msg
3) Restore Msg
4) Exit
ENTER TEST STNG
XX
ACCOUNTS
1234
1235
*END: Complete
ACCOUNTS
1234
1235
<new>
*END: Complete
RETRY (05-10)
05
PHONE NUMBERS
1) Rcvr 1 Prim #
2) Rcvr 1 Sec #
3) Rcvr 2 Prim #
4) Rcvr 2 Sec #
5) Exit
ENTER PHONE #
*
NUMBER RECEIVE
1) 1
2) 2
ACCOUNTS
1) Account #
2) Formats
3) Test-Normal
4) Test-Abnormal
5) Test Time
6) CMS
7) Delete
8) Exit
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO save
NUMBER RECEIVE
1) 1
2) 2
ENTER TEST TIME
1200
ENTER TEST STNG
00
DIALER FORMAT
1) 4/2
2) Contact ID
ENTER ACCOUNT
0000
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
C.9
Menu flow diagrams
Zone configuration menus
Log on as
level 4 operator
MAIN MENU
8) Program
PROGRAM MENU
5) Configure
CONFIGURE
4) Zones
6) Exit
UPDATE DATABASES
1) Save
2) Save and Sync
EDIT ZONE
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
ZONE LIST
Zone 1
Zone 2
Zone 3
*END: COMPLETE*
Delete
ZONE TYPE
1) Alarm Zone
2) Supervisory Z
3) Monitor Zone
Update
all panels
Edit
Update
control panel
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
G
Update
databases
F
C.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Menu flow diagrams
F
ZONE EDIT
1) Message
2) Members
3) Output Group
4) Coding
5) Type
6) Exit
G
ZONE TYPE
1) Alarm Zone
2) Supervisory Z
3) Monitor Zone
CODED MSG (4)
XXXX
OUTPUT GROUP
1) Add
2) Remove
3) Review
OUTPUT LIST
Output 1
*END: COMPLETE*
OUTPUT LIST
Output 1
Output 2
Output 3
*END: COMPLETE*
ZONE MEMBERS
1) Device Addres
2) Delete
3) Review
ZONE LIST
P:01 C:01 D:001
P:01 C:01 D:002
P:01 C:01 D:003
*END: COMPLETE*
ENTER DEVICE
CCDDD
ENTER TEXT (32)
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
C.11
Menu flow diagrams
Output group configuration menus
Log on as
level 4 operator
MAIN MENU
8) Program
PROGRAM MENU
5) Configure
CONFIGURE
5) Output
6) Exit
UPDATE DATABASES
1) Save
2) Save and Sync
EDIT OUTPUT
1) Add
2) Edit
3) Delete
Update
all panels
OUTPUT LIST
Output Group 001
Output Group 002
Output Group 129
*END: COMPLETE*
Update
control panel
Delete
Edit
I
OUTPUT GROUP
1) Responses
2) Review
3) Exit
OUTPUT TYPE
1) Active
2) Fault
Review
OUTPUT RESPONS
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
Update
databases
P01C01D015 BALS
P01C01D016 BALS
*END: COMPLETE*
Responses
OUTPUT RESPONSES
1) Add
2) Remove
OUTPUT RESPONS
P01C01D015 BALS
P01C01D016 BALS
Delay: 0030 A
*END: COMPLETE*
H
C.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Menu flow diagrams
H
RESPONSE TYPE
1) Relay
2) Dialer
3) Delay
RESPONSE DELAY
1) Delay Type
2) Delay Time
3) Exit
EXIT
1) Save Edits
2) NO Save
ENTER TIME
0000
I
DELAY TYPE
1) Act & Restore
2) Activation
3) Restoration
ACCOUNTS
1234
1235
*END: COMPLETE*
RESPONSE DIALER
1) Send On
2) Priority
3) String
4) Exit
ENTER TEST STNG
XX
PRIORITY
1) Life Safety
2) Property
3) System Integr
RESPONSE SEND ON
1) Activation
2) Restoration
ENTER DEVICE
CCDDD
Conventional?
No
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Yes
RESPONSE RELAY
1) ON
2) 20 BPM
3) 120 BPM
4) Temporal
C.13
Menu flow diagrams
C.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Appendix D
Addresses
Summary
This appendix provides a comprehensive list of system addresses
to use for general reference.
Content
System addresses • D.2
Control panel CPU card addresses • D.4
Remote annunciator CPU card addresses • D.6
PS6 card addresses • D.8
SLIC card addresses • D.9
ZB16-4 card addresses • D.10
ZA8-2 card addresses • D.11
ZR8 card addresses • D.12
DLD card addresses • D.13
LED/switch card addresses • D.14
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.1
Addresses
System addresses
Table D-1 lists the addresses (PPCDDD) assigned to the fire
alarm system.
Table D-1: System addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
00
00
000
Reserved
00
00
001
Startup Response pseudo point. The Startup Response pseudo
point is activated when the system is started up or restarted.
00
00
002
First Alarm pseudo point. The First Alarm pseudo point is
activated when the first fire alarm input is activated and is
restored after all active fire alarm inputs have been restored.
00
00
003
First Supervisory pseudo point. The First Supervisory pseudo
point is activated when the first supervisory input is activated and
is restored after all active supervisory inputs have been restored.
00
00
004
First Trouble pseudo point. The First Trouble pseudo point is
activated on the first trouble condition and is restored after all
trouble conditions have been restored.
00
00
005
First Monitor pseudo point. The First Monitor pseudo point is
activated when the first monitor input is activated and is restored
after all active monitor inputs have been restored.
00
00
006
Drill pseudo point. The Drill pseudo point is activated when the
Drill switch is pressed or a response that includes the Drill
command is executed.
00
00
007
Evacuation pseudo point. The Evacuation pseudo point is
activated when a response that includes the Evacuation
command is executed.
00
00
008
Alarm Silence pseudo point. The Alarm Silence pseudo point is
activated when the Alarm Silence switch is pressed or a response
that includes the Alarm Silence command is executed.
00
00
009
Two Stage Expiration pseudo point. The Two Stage Expiration
pseudo point is activated when the two-stage timer has expired.
00
00
010
Reset pseudo point. The Reset pseudo point is activated when
the Reset switch is pressed.
00
00
011
Reset Phase 1 pseudo point. The Reset Phase 1 pseudo point is
activated during the first phase of the Reset function.
00
00
012
Reset Phase 2 pseudo point. The Reset Phase 2 pseudo point is
activated during the second phase of the Reset function.
00
00
013
Reset Phase 3 pseudo point. The Reset Phase 3 pseudo point is
activated during the third phase of the Reset function.
00
00
014
First Disable pseudo point. The First Disable pseudo point is
activated when the first point is disabled and is restored after all
disabled points are enabled.
D.2
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-1: System addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
00
00
015
First Test pseudo point. The First Test pseudo point is activated
when a service group test is active.
00
00
016
Two Stage Timer Started pseudo point. The Two Stage Timer
Started pseudo point is activated when the first fire alarm input is
activated and remains active until the two-stage timer expires or a
second fire alarm input is activated.
00
00
017
User Trouble pseudo point. The User Trouble pseudo point is
activated when a response that includes the Force Trouble
command is executed.
00
00
018
Delayed Output pseudo point. The Delayed Output pseudo point
is activated when a response that includes the Cancel Delay
command is executed.
00
16
001 – XXX
LED/switch cards. See Table D-10 through Table D-25
00
17
001 – 480
Zones
00
18
001 – 016
AND groups
00
19
001 – 064
Matrix groups
00
20
001 – 129
Service groups
00
21
001 – 032
Time controls
00
21
248 – 255
Dialer subscriber account self-test time controls
00
22
001 – 250
Output groups
01
00
001 – 033
Control panel’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
01
01 – 13
000 – XXX
Option cards. See Table D-5, Table D-6, Table D-7, and Table
D-8.
01
14
000 – 016
DLD card. See Table D-9.
01
15
000 – 024
Power supply card. See Table D-4.
02
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 1’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
03
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 2’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
04
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 3’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
05
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 4’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
06
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 5’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
07
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 6’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
08
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 7’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
09
00
001 – 033
Remote annunciator 8’s CPU card. See Table D-2.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.3
Addresses
Control panel CPU card addresses
Table D-2 lists the addresses (PPCCDDD) assigned to a
CPU/Display Unit’s CPU card. PP is the cabinet on which the
CPU/Display Unit is installed (e.g., 01 for the control panel, 02
through 09 for remote annunciator panels). CC is the CPU card’s
address.
Table D-2: CPU card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
PP
00
000
Panel PP Card Communications pseudo point. This pseudo
point is activated when there is a communication failure between
this CPU card and CPU card on the control panel.
PP
00
001
Panel PP Reset Extension pseudo point. This pseudo point is
activated when an intelligent addressable loop requires
additional time to initialize.
PP
00
002
Panel PP Service Active Trouble pseudo point. This pseudo
point is activated when a service group test is canceled with a
device still in the active state.
PP
00
003
Panel PP DB Incompatible pseudo point. This pseudo point is
activated when there is a project database mismatch between
CPU cards.
PP
00
004
Panel PP Reboot Fault pseudo point. This pseudo point is
activated when there is an unexpected reboot of the system.
PP
00
005
Panel PP CH1 Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
is activated when there is a fault with the primary RS-485
transmission path (channel 1).
PP
00
006
Panel PP Task Failure pseudo point. This pseudo point is
activated when there is an internal CPU process fault.
PP
00
007 – 019
Card xx Setup Mismatch pseudo point. This pseudo point is
activated when the option card assigned address xx in the
project database is not the same as the option card assigned
address xx in the control panel.
PP
00
020
Dialer Setup Mismatch pseudo point. This pseudo point is
activated when there is a problem configuring the DLD card.
PP
00
021
Power Supply Setup Mismatch pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a problem configuring the power supply card.
PP
00
022
Panel PP LED/Switch Display pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a problem with an LED/switch card.
PP
00
023
Panel PP CH2 Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a fault with the secondary RS-485 transmission path
(channel 2).
PP
00
024
Reserved
D.4
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-2: CPU card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
PP
00
025
Pnl PP Database Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory failure.
PP
00
026
Panel PP Code Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory failure.
PP
00
027
Panel PP Call for Service pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a CPU process fault.
PP
00
028
Panel PP ROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory failure.
PP
00
029
Panel PP RS232 Port Fault pseudo point. This pseudo point is
reserved for future use.
PP
00
030
Panel PP Program Mode pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an attempt is being made to change the project
database.
PP
00
031
Panel PP Unexpected Card pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an option card installed on the DIN rail is not defined in
the project database.
PP
00
032
Panel PP Switch Latched pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a switch is stuck in the pressed position.
01
00
034
Panel PP Loop Database pseudo point
01
00
035
Panel PP Alt. Sensitivity pseudo point
01
00
036
Panel PP Alt. Routing pseudo point
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.5
Addresses
Remote annunciator CPU card addresses
Table D-2 lists the addresses assigned to a remote annunciator’s
CPU card. PP is the cabinet on which the CPU/Display Unit is
installed (e.g., 02 through 09 for remote annunciator panels). CC
is the CPU card’s address.
Table D-3: Remote annunciator CPU card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
PP
00
000
Annunciator PP Communications pseudo point. This pseudo
point is activated when there is a communication failure between
this CPU card and CPU card on the control panel.
PP
00
001
Annunciator PP Reset Extension pseudo point. This pseudo
point is activated when an intelligent addressable loop requires
additional time to initialize.
PP
00
002
Ann PP Service Active Trouble pseudo point. This pseudo point
is activated when a service group test is canceled with one of its
devices still in the active state.
PP
00
003
Ann PP Database Incompatible pseudo point. This pseudo point
is activated when the project database has been revised and not
updated on this CPU card.
PP
00
004
Annunciator PP Reboot Fault pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an unexpected reboot of the system.
PP
00
005
Ann PP CH1 Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a fault with the primary RS-485 transmission path
(channel 1).
PP
00
006
Annunciator PP Task Failure pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal CPU process fault.
PP
00
022
Ann PP, LED/Switch Display pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a problem with an LED/switch card.
PP
00
023
Ann PP, CH2 Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a fault with the secondary RS-485 transmission path
(channel 2).
PP
00
025
Ann PP Database Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory failure.
PP
00
026
Ann PP Code Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory failure.
PP
00
027
Ann PP, Call for Service pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a CPU process fault.
PP
00
028
Ann PP ROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory failure.
PP
00
029
Ann PP RS232 Port Fault pseudo point. This pseudo point is
reserved for future use.
D.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-3: Remote annunciator CPU card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
PP
00
030
Ann PP Program Mode pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an attempt is being made to change the project
database.
PP
00
032
Ann PP Switch Latched pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a switch is stuck in the pressed position.
PP
00
033
Annunciator PP Power Fault pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates 24 Vdc is missing on a repeater panel’s secondary
power input terminals.
01
00
035
Panel PP Alt. Sensitivity pseudo point
01
00
036
Panel PP Alt. Routing pseudo point
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.7
Addresses
PS6 card addresses
Table D-4 lists the addresses assigned to a PS6 card. PP is the
cabinet in which the PS6 card resides (e.g., 01 for the control
panel). CC is the PS6 card’s address.
Table D-4: PS6 card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
01
15
000
Card 15 Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a communication failure between the PS6 card and the
CPU card.
01
15
001
Battery Charger Fault pseudo point. This pseudo point indicates
the battery circuit charging voltage is below 20.4 Vdc.
01
15
002
Battery Wiring or Battery Fault pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates the battery voltage is below 20.4 Vdc.
01
15
003
AUX Power 1/2 Shorted pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a short on AUX1 or AUX2.
01
15
004
Thermal Fault pseudo point. Reserved for future use.
01
15
005
AUX Power 3 Shorted pseudo point. This pseudo point indicates
a short on AUX3.
01
15
006
Smoke Power Shorted pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates when the smoke/accessory power output is shorted.
01
15
007
Primary AC Power Failure pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates that the control panel has lost mains power.
01
15
008
Excessive Battery Current pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an over current condition while operating on standby
power.
01
15
009
Check System Wiring pseudo point. This pseudo point indicates
the presence of an earth ground fault in the system wiring.
01
15
010
Power Supply RAM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
15
011
Power Supply ROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo
point indicates an internal memory fault.
01
15
012
Power Supply EEPROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo
point indicates an internal memory fault.
01
15
013 – 020
Reserved
01
15
021
Power Supply User Relay (programmable)
01
15
022
Power Supply Fault Relay (not programmable)
01
15
023
Power Supply Supv Relay (not programmable)
01
15
024
Power Supply Alarm Relay (not programmable)
D.8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
SLIC card addresses
Table D-5 lists the addresses assigned to a SLIC card. PP is the
cabinet in which the SLIC card resides (e.g., 01 for the control
panel). CC is the card address as determined by the SLIC card’s
address switch.
Table D-5: SLIC card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
01
CC
000
Card CC Communications pseudo point. Indicates a
communication failure between the SLIC card and the CPU card
01
CC
001 – 125
Intelligent addressable detectors
01
CC
126 – 250
Intelligent addressable modules
01
CC
251
Card CC, Loop Wiring Problem pseudo point. Indicates an open
or short on the loop.
01
CC
252
Card CC Map Fault pseudo point. Indicates a map fault.
01
CC
253
Card CC, Mapping in Progress pseudo point
01
CC
254
Card CC, Mapping Disabled pseudo point
01
CC
255
Card CC Unconfig. Device pseudo point. Indicates a device is
installed on the loop that is not defined in the project database
01
CC
256
Card CC, Line Initialization pseudo point. Indicates the loop is
being initialized.
01
CC
257
Card CC, Loop Ground Fault pseudo point. Indicates the SLIC
card detected a ground fault on the loop wiring.
01
CC
258 - 269
Reserved
01
CC
270
NAC 1 (user defined)
01
CC
271
NAC 2 (user defined)
01
CC
272
Card CC, LIM Driver Fault pseudo point. Indicates a
communication failure between the SLIC card and the LIM card.
01
CC
273
Card CC, RAM Supervision pseudo point. Indicates an internal
memory fault.
01
CC
274
Card CC, ROM Supervision pseudo point. Indicates an internal
memory fault.
01
CC
275
Card CC, EEPROM Supervision pseudo point. Indicates an
internal memory fault.
Note: CC can be any number between 01 and 07.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.9
Addresses
ZB16-4 card addresses
Table D-6 lists the panel-card-device addresses assigned to a
ZB16-4 card. PP is the cabinet in which the ZB16-4 card resides
(e.g., 01 for the control panel). CC is the card address as
determined by the ZB16-4 card’s address switch.
Table D-6: ZB16-4 card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
01
CC
000
Card CC Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a communication failure between the ZB16-4 card and
the CPU card.
01
CC
001
IDC input circuit, Z1
01
CC
002
IDC input circuit, Z2
01
CC
003
IDC input circuit, Z3
01
CC
004
IDC input circuit, Z4
01
CC
005
IDC input circuit, Z5
01
CC
006
IDC input circuit, Z6
01
CC
007
IDC input circuit, Z7
01
CC
008
IDC input circuit, Z8
01
CC
009
IDC input circuit, Z9
01
CC
010
IDC input circuit, Z10
01
CC
011
IDC input circuit, Z11
01
CC
012
IDC input circuit, Z12
01
CC
013
IDC input/NAC output circuit, Z13
01
CC
014
IDC input/NAC output circuit, Z14
01
CC
015
IDC input/NAC output circuit, Z15
01
CC
016
IDC input/NAC output circuit, Z16
01
CC
017
Card CC, RAM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
CC
018
Card CC, ROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
CC
019
Card CC, EEPROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo
point indicates an internal memory fault.
Note: CC can be any number between 01 and 13.
D.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
ZA8-2 card addresses
Table D-7 lists the addresses assigned to a ZA8-2 card. PP is the
cabinet in which the ZA8-2 card resides (e.g., 01 for the control
panel). CC is the card address as determined by the ZA8-2 card’s
address switch.
Table D-7: ZA8-2 card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
01
CC
000
Card CC Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a communication failure between the ZA8-2 card and
the CPU card.
01
CC
001
IDC input circuit, Zone 1
01
CC
002
IDC input circuit, Zone 2
01
CC
003
IDC input circuit, Zone 3
01
CC
004
IDC input/NAC output circuit, Zone 4
01
CC
005
IDC input circuit, Zone 5
01
CC
006
IDC input circuit, Zone 6
01
CC
007
IDC input circuit, Zone 7
01
CC
008
IDC input/NAC output circuit, Zone 8
01
CC
009
Card CC, RAM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
CC
010
Card CC, ROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
CC
011
Card CC, EEPROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo
point indicates an internal memory fault.
Note: CC can be any number between 01 and 13.
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.11
Addresses
ZR8 card addresses
Table D-8 lists the addresses assigned to a ZR8 card. PP is the
cabinet in which the ZR8 card resides (e.g., 01 for the control
panel). CC is the card address as determined by the ZR8 card’s
address switch.
Table D-8: ZR8 card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
01
CC
000
Card CC Communications pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates a communication failure between the ZR8 card and the
CPU card.
01
CC
001
Relay circuit R1
01
CC
002
Relay circuit R2
01
CC
003
Relay circuit R3
01
CC
004
Relay circuit R4
01
CC
005
Relay circuit R5
01
CC
006
Relay circuit R6
01
CC
007
Relay circuit R7
01
CC
008
Relay circuit R8
01
CC
009
Card CC, RAM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
CC
010
Card CC, ROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
CC
011
Card CC, EEPROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo
point indicates an internal memory fault.
Note: CC can be any number between 01 and 13.
D.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
DLD card addresses
Table D-9 lists the addresses assigned to a DLD card. PP is the
cabinet in which the DLD card resides (e.g., 01 for the control
panel). CC is the DLD card’s address.
Table D-9: DLD card addresses
PP
CC
DDD
Description
01
14
000
Card 14. This pseudo point indicates a communication failure
between the DLD card and the CPU card.
01
14
001
Primary Phone Line:Check TELCO
01
14
002
Secondary Phone Line:Check TELCO
01
14
003
Pri. Receiver Failed to answer
01
14
004
Sec. Receiver Failed to answer
01
14
005
Dialer Account 1 Fault
01
14
006
Dialer Account 2 Fault
01
14
007
Dialer Account 3 Fault
01
14
008
Dialer Account 4 Fault
01
14
009
Dialer Account 5 Fault
01
14
010
Dialer Account 6 Fault
01
14
011
Dialer Account 7 Fault
01
14
012
Dialer Account 8 Fault
01
14
013
Dialer Card, RAM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
14
014
Dialer, ROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
14
015
Dialer, EEPROM Supervision pseudo point. This pseudo point
indicates an internal memory fault.
01
14
16
Dialer, Queue overflow
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.13
Addresses
LED/switch card addresses
Table D-10 through Table D-25 list the addresses assigned to an
LED/switch card. LED/switch card addresses vary according to
the annunciator card group to which the LED/switch card is
assigned. There are 16 possible annunciator card groups.
Note: Each point on an LED/switch card has a group-switchLED address (GGSSL) and a panel-card-device address
(PPCCDDD).
Table D-10: Annunciator card group 1 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
D.14
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
01
01
n/a
00
16
001
Alarm (red) LED
01
01
1
00
16
001
Active (yellow) LED
01
01
2
00
16
002
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
01
3
00
16
003
Switch
01
02
n/a
00
16
004
Alarm (red) LED
01
02
1
00
16
004
Active (yellow) LED
01
02
2
00
16
005
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
02
3
00
16
006
Switch
01
03
n/a
00
16
007
Alarm (red) LED
01
03
1
00
16
007
Active (yellow) LED
01
03
2
00
16
008
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
03
3
00
16
009
Switch
01
04
n/a
00
16
010
Alarm (red) LED
01
04
1
00
16
010
Active (yellow) LED
01
04
2
00
16
011
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
04
3
00
16
012
Switch
01
05
n/a
00
16
013
Alarm (red) LED
01
05
1
00
16
013
Active (yellow) LED
01
05
2
00
16
014
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
05
3
00
16
015
Switch
01
06
n/a
00
16
016
Alarm (red) LED
01
06
1
00
16
016
Active (yellow) LED
01
06
2
00
16
017
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
06
3
00
16
018
Switch
01
07
n/a
00
16
019
Alarm (red) LED
01
07
1
00
16
019
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-10: Annunciator card group 1 addresses
LED-switch group
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
01
07
2
00
16
020
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
07
3
00
16
021
Switch
01
08
n/a
00
16
022
Alarm (red) LED
01
08
1
00
16
022
Active (yellow) LED
01
08
2
00
16
023
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
08
3
00
16
024
Switch
01
09
n/a
00
16
025
Alarm (red) LED
01
09
1
00
16
025
Active (yellow) LED
01
09
2
00
16
026
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
09
3
00
16
027
Switch
01
10
n/a
00
16
028
Alarm (red) LED
01
10
1
00
16
028
Active (yellow) LED
01
10
2
00
16
029
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
10
3
00
16
030
Switch
01
11
n/a
00
16
031
Alarm (red) LED
01
11
1
00
16
031
Active (yellow) LED
01
11
2
00
16
032
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
11
3
00
16
033
Switch
01
12
n/a
00
16
034
Alarm (red) LED
01
12
1
00
16
034
Active (yellow) LED
01
12
2
00
16
035
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
12
3
00
16
036
Switch
01
13
n/a
00
16
037
Alarm (red) LED
01
13
1
00
16
037
Active (yellow) LED
01
13
2
00
16
038
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
13
3
00
16
039
Switch
01
14
n/a
00
16
040
Alarm (red) LED
01
14
1
00
16
040
Active (yellow) LED
01
14
2
00
16
041
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
14
3
00
16
042
Switch
01
15
n/a
00
16
043
Alarm (red) LED
01
15
1
00
16
043
Active (yellow) LED
01
15
2
00
16
044
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.15
Addresses
Table D-10: Annunciator card group 1 addresses
LED-switch group
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
D.16
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
15
3
00
16
045
Switch
01
16
n/a
00
16
046
Alarm (red) LED
01
16
1
00
16
046
Active (yellow) LED
01
16
2
00
16
047
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
16
3
00
16
048
Switch
01
17
n/a
00
16
049
Alarm (red) LED
01
17
1
00
16
049
Active (yellow) LED
01
17
2
00
16
050
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
17
3
00
16
051
Switch
01
18
n/a
00
16
052
Alarm (red) LED
01
18
1
00
16
052
Active (yellow) LED
01
18
2
00
16
053
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
18
3
00
16
054
Switch
01
19
n/a
00
16
055
Alarm (red) LED
01
19
1
00
16
055
Active (yellow) LED
01
19
2
00
16
056
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
19
3
00
16
057
Switch
01
20
n/a
00
16
058
Alarm (red) LED
01
20
1
00
16
058
Active (yellow) LED
01
20
2
00
16
059
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
20
3
00
16
060
Switch
01
21
n/a
00
16
061
Alarm (red) LED
01
21
1
00
16
061
Active (yellow) LED
01
21
2
00
16
062
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
21
3
00
16
063
Switch
01
22
n/a
00
16
064
Alarm (red) LED
01
22
1
00
16
064
Active (yellow) LED
01
22
2
00
16
065
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
22
3
00
16
066
Switch
01
23
n/a
00
16
067
Alarm (red) LED
01
23
1
00
16
067
Active (yellow) LED
01
23
2
00
16
068
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
23
3
00
16
069
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-10: Annunciator card group 1 addresses
LED-switch group
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
01
24
n/a
00
16
070
Alarm (red) LED
01
24
1
00
16
070
Active (yellow) LED
01
24
2
00
16
071
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
24
3
00
16
072
Switch
01
25
n/a
00
16
073
Alarm (red) LED
01
25
1
00
16
073
Active (yellow) LED
01
25
2
00
16
074
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
25
3
00
16
075
Switch
01
26
n/a
00
16
076
Alarm (red) LED
01
26
1
00
16
076
Active (yellow) LED
01
26
2
00
16
077
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
26
3
00
16
078
Switch
01
27
n/a
00
16
079
Alarm (red) LED
01
27
1
00
16
079
Active (yellow) LED
01
27
2
00
16
080
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
27
3
00
16
081
Switch
01
28
n/a
00
16
082
Alarm (red) LED
01
28
1
00
16
082
Active (yellow) LED
01
28
2
00
16
083
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
28
3
00
16
084
Switch
01
29
n/a
00
16
085
Alarm (red) LED
01
29
1
00
16
085
Active (yellow) LED
01
29
2
00
16
086
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
29
3
00
16
087
Switch
01
30
n/a
00
16
088
Alarm (red) LED
01
30
1
00
16
088
Active (yellow) LED
01
30
2
00
16
089
Trouble (yellow) LED
01
30
3
00
16
090
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
02
01
n/a
00
16
091
Alarm (red) LED
02
01
1
00
16
091
Table D-11: Annunciator card group 2 addresses
LED-switch group
1
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.17
Addresses
Table D-11: Annunciator card group 2 addresses
LED-switch group
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
D.18
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
02
01
2
00
16
092
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
01
3
00
16
093
Switch
02
02
n/a
00
16
094
Alarm (red) LED
02
02
1
00
16
094
Active (yellow) LED
02
02
2
00
16
095
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
02
3
00
16
096
Switch
02
03
n/a
00
16
097
Alarm (red) LED
02
03
1
00
16
097
Active (yellow) LED
02
03
2
00
16
098
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
03
3
00
16
099
Switch
02
04
n/a
00
16
100
Alarm (red) LED
02
04
1
00
16
100
Active (yellow) LED
02
04
2
00
16
101
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
04
3
00
16
102
Switch
02
05
n/a
00
16
103
Alarm (red) LED
02
05
1
00
16
103
Active (yellow) LED
02
05
2
00
16
104
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
05
3
00
16
105
Switch
02
06
n/a
00
16
106
Alarm (red) LED
02
06
1
00
16
106
Active (yellow) LED
02
06
2
00
16
107
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
06
3
00
16
108
Switch
02
07
n/a
00
16
109
Alarm (red) LED
02
07
1
00
16
109
Active (yellow) LED
02
07
2
00
16
110
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
07
3
00
16
111
Switch
02
08
n/a
00
16
112
Alarm (red) LED
02
08
1
00
16
112
Active (yellow) LED
02
08
2
00
16
113
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
08
3
00
16
114
Switch
02
09
n/a
00
16
115
Alarm (red) LED
02
09
1
00
16
115
Active (yellow) LED
02
09
2
00
16
116
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-11: Annunciator card group 2 addresses
LED-switch group
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
09
3
00
16
117
Switch
02
10
n/a
00
16
118
Alarm (red) LED
02
10
1
00
16
118
Active (yellow) LED
02
10
2
00
16
119
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
10
3
00
16
120
Switch
02
11
n/a
00
16
121
Alarm (red) LED
02
11
1
00
16
121
Active (yellow) LED
02
11
2
00
16
122
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
11
3
00
16
123
Switch
02
12
n/a
00
16
124
Alarm (red) LED
02
12
1
00
16
124
Active (yellow) LED
02
12
2
00
16
125
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
12
3
00
16
126
Switch
02
13
n/a
00
16
127
Alarm (red) LED
02
13
1
00
16
127
Active (yellow) LED
02
13
2
00
16
128
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
13
3
00
16
129
Switch
02
14
n/a
00
16
130
Alarm (red) LED
02
14
1
00
16
130
Active (yellow) LED
02
14
2
00
16
131
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
14
3
00
16
132
Switch
02
15
n/a
00
16
133
Alarm (red) LED
02
15
1
00
16
133
Active (yellow) LED
02
15
2
00
16
134
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
15
3
00
16
135
Switch
02
16
n/a
00
16
136
Alarm (red) LED
02
16
1
00
16
136
Active (yellow) LED
02
16
2
00
16
137
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
16
3
00
16
138
Switch
02
17
n/a
00
16
139
Alarm (red) LED
02
17
1
00
16
139
Active (yellow) LED
02
17
2
00
16
140
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
17
3
00
16
141
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.19
Addresses
Table D-11: Annunciator card group 2 addresses
LED-switch group
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
D.20
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
02
18
n/a
00
16
142
Alarm (red) LED
02
18
1
00
16
142
Active (yellow) LED
02
18
2
00
16
143
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
18
3
00
16
144
Switch
02
19
n/a
00
16
145
Alarm (red) LED
02
19
1
00
16
145
Active (yellow) LED
02
19
2
00
16
146
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
19
3
00
16
147
Switch
02
20
n/a
00
16
148
Alarm (red) LED
02
20
1
00
16
148
Active (yellow) LED
02
20
2
00
16
149
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
20
3
00
16
150
Switch
02
21
n/a
00
16
151
Alarm (red) LED
02
21
1
00
16
151
Active (yellow) LED
02
21
2
00
16
152
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
21
3
00
16
153
Switch
02
22
n/a
00
16
154
Alarm (red) LED
02
22
1
00
16
154
Active (yellow) LED
02
22
2
00
16
155
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
22
3
00
16
156
Switch
02
23
n/a
00
16
157
Alarm (red) LED
02
23
1
00
16
157
Active (yellow) LED
02
23
2
00
16
158
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
23
3
00
16
159
Switch
02
24
n/a
00
16
160
Alarm (red) LED
02
24
1
00
16
160
Active (yellow) LED
02
24
2
00
16
161
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
24
3
00
16
162
Switch
02
25
n/a
00
16
163
Alarm (red) LED
02
25
1
00
16
163
Active (yellow) LED
02
25
2
00
16
164
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
25
3
00
16
165
Switch
02
26
n/a
00
16
166
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-11: Annunciator card group 2 addresses
LED-switch group
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
02
26
1
00
16
166
Active (yellow) LED
02
26
2
00
16
167
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
26
3
00
16
168
Switch
02
27
n/a
00
16
169
Alarm (red) LED
02
27
1
00
16
169
Active (yellow) LED
02
27
2
00
16
170
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
27
3
00
16
171
Switch
02
28
n/a
00
16
172
Alarm (red) LED
02
28
1
00
16
172
Active (yellow) LED
02
28
2
00
16
173
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
28
3
00
16
174
Switch
02
29
n/a
00
16
175
Alarm (red) LED
02
29
1
00
16
175
Active (yellow) LED
02
29
2
00
16
176
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
29
3
00
16
177
Switch
02
30
n/a
00
16
178
Alarm (red) LED
02
30
1
00
16
178
Active (yellow) LED
02
30
2
00
16
179
Trouble (yellow) LED
02
30
3
00
16
180
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
03
01
n/a
00
16
181
Alarm (red) LED
03
01
1
00
16
181
Active (yellow) LED
03
01
2
00
16
182
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
01
3
00
16
183
Switch
03
02
n/a
00
16
184
Alarm (red) LED
03
02
1
00
16
184
Active (yellow) LED
03
02
2
00
16
185
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
02
3
00
16
186
Switch
03
03
n/a
00
16
187
Alarm (red) LED
03
03
1
00
16
187
Active (yellow) LED
03
03
2
00
16
188
Table D-12: Annunciator card group 3 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.21
Addresses
Table D-12: Annunciator card group 3 addresses
LED-switch group
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
D.22
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
03
3
00
16
189
Switch
03
04
n/a
00
16
190
Alarm (red) LED
03
04
1
00
16
190
Active (yellow) LED
03
04
2
00
16
191
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
04
3
00
16
192
Switch
03
05
n/a
00
16
193
Alarm (red) LED
03
05
1
00
16
193
Active (yellow) LED
03
05
2
00
16
194
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
05
3
00
16
195
Switch
03
06
n/a
00
16
196
Alarm (red) LED
03
06
1
00
16
196
Active (yellow) LED
03
06
2
00
16
197
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
06
3
00
16
198
Switch
03
07
n/a
00
16
199
Alarm (red) LED
03
07
1
00
16
199
Active (yellow) LED
03
07
2
00
16
200
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
07
3
00
16
201
Switch
03
08
n/a
00
16
202
Alarm (red) LED
03
08
1
00
16
202
Active (yellow) LED
03
08
2
00
16
203
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
08
3
00
16
204
Switch
03
09
n/a
00
16
205
Alarm (red) LED
03
09
1
00
16
205
Active (yellow) LED
03
09
2
00
16
206
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
09
3
00
16
207
Switch
03
10
n/a
00
16
208
Alarm (red) LED
03
10
1
00
16
208
Active (yellow) LED
03
10
2
00
16
209
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
10
3
00
16
210
Switch
03
11
n/a
00
16
211
Alarm (red) LED
03
11
1
00
16
211
Active (yellow) LED
03
11
2
00
16
212
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
11
3
00
16
213
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-12: Annunciator card group 3 addresses
LED-switch group
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
03
12
n/a
00
16
214
Alarm (red) LED
03
12
1
00
16
214
Active (yellow) LED
03
12
2
00
16
215
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
12
3
00
16
216
Switch
03
13
n/a
00
16
217
Alarm (red) LED
03
13
1
00
16
217
Active (yellow) LED
03
13
2
00
16
218
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
13
3
00
16
219
Switch
03
14
n/a
00
16
220
Alarm (red) LED
03
14
1
00
16
220
Active (yellow) LED
03
14
2
00
16
221
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
14
3
00
16
222
Switch
03
15
n/a
00
16
223
Alarm (red) LED
03
15
1
00
16
223
Active (yellow) LED
03
15
2
00
16
224
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
15
3
00
16
225
Switch
03
16
n/a
00
16
226
Alarm (red) LED
03
16
1
00
16
226
Active (yellow) LED
03
16
2
00
16
227
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
16
3
00
16
228
Switch
03
17
n/a
00
16
229
Alarm (red) LED
03
17
1
00
16
229
Active (yellow) LED
03
17
2
00
16
230
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
17
3
00
16
231
Switch
03
18
n/a
00
16
232
Alarm (red) LED
03
18
1
00
16
232
Active (yellow) LED
03
18
2
00
16
233
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
18
3
00
16
234
Switch
03
19
n/a
00
16
235
Alarm (red) LED
03
19
1
00
16
235
Active (yellow) LED
03
19
2
00
16
236
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
19
3
00
16
237
Switch
03
20
n/a
00
16
238
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.23
Addresses
Table D-12: Annunciator card group 3 addresses
LED-switch group
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
D.24
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
03
20
1
00
16
238
Active (yellow) LED
03
20
2
00
16
239
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
20
3
00
16
240
Switch
03
21
n/a
00
16
241
Alarm (red) LED
03
21
1
00
16
241
Active (yellow) LED
03
21
2
00
16
242
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
21
3
00
16
243
Switch
03
22
n/a
00
16
244
Alarm (red) LED
03
22
1
00
16
244
Active (yellow) LED
03
22
2
00
16
245
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
22
3
00
16
246
Switch
03
23
n/a
00
16
247
Alarm (red) LED
03
23
1
00
16
247
Active (yellow) LED
03
23
2
00
16
248
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
23
3
00
16
249
Switch
03
24
n/a
00
16
250
Alarm (red) LED
03
24
1
00
16
250
Active (yellow) LED
03
24
2
00
16
251
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
24
3
00
16
252
Switch
03
25
n/a
00
16
253
Alarm (red) LED
03
25
1
00
16
253
Active (yellow) LED
03
25
2
00
16
254
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
25
3
00
16
255
Switch
03
26
n/a
00
16
256
Alarm (red) LED
03
26
1
00
16
256
Active (yellow) LED
03
26
2
00
16
257
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
26
3
00
16
258
Switch
03
27
n/a
00
16
259
Alarm (red) LED
03
27
1
00
16
259
Active (yellow) LED
03
27
2
00
16
260
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
27
3
00
16
261
Switch
03
28
n/a
00
16
262
Alarm (red) LED
03
28
1
00
16
262
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-12: Annunciator card group 3 addresses
LED-switch group
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
03
28
2
00
16
263
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
28
3
00
16
264
Switch
03
29
n/a
00
16
265
Alarm (red) LED
03
29
1
00
16
265
Active (yellow) LED
03
29
2
00
16
266
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
29
3
00
16
267
Switch
03
30
n/a
00
16
268
Alarm (red) LED
03
30
1
00
16
268
Active (yellow) LED
03
30
2
00
16
269
Trouble (yellow) LED
03
30
3
00
16
270
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
04
01
n/a
00
16
271
Alarm (red) LED
04
01
1
00
16
271
Active (yellow) LED
04
01
2
00
16
272
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
01
3
00
16
273
Switch
04
02
n/a
00
16
274
Alarm (red) LED
04
02
1
00
16
274
Active (yellow) LED
04
02
2
00
16
275
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
02
3
00
16
276
Switch
04
03
n/a
00
16
277
Alarm (red) LED
04
03
1
00
16
277
Active (yellow) LED
04
03
2
00
16
278
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
03
3
00
16
279
Switch
04
04
n/a
00
16
280
Alarm (red) LED
04
04
1
00
16
280
Active (yellow) LED
04
04
2
00
16
281
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
04
3
00
16
282
Switch
04
05
n/a
00
16
283
Alarm (red) LED
04
05
1
00
16
283
Active (yellow) LED
04
05
2
00
16
284
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
05
3
00
16
285
Table D-13: Annunciator card group 4 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.25
Addresses
Table D-13: Annunciator card group 4 addresses
LED-switch group
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
D.26
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
04
06
n/a
00
16
286
Alarm (red) LED
04
06
1
00
16
286
Active (yellow) LED
04
06
2
00
16
287
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
06
3
00
16
288
Switch
04
07
n/a
00
16
289
Alarm (red) LED
04
07
1
00
16
289
Active (yellow) LED
04
07
2
00
16
290
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
07
3
00
16
291
Switch
04
08
n/a
00
16
292
Alarm (red) LED
04
08
1
00
16
292
Active (yellow) LED
04
08
2
00
16
293
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
08
3
00
16
294
Switch
04
09
n/a
00
16
295
Alarm (red) LED
04
09
1
00
16
295
Active (yellow) LED
04
09
2
00
16
296
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
09
3
00
16
297
Switch
04
10
n/a
00
16
298
Alarm (red) LED
04
10
1
00
16
298
Active (yellow) LED
04
10
2
00
16
299
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
10
3
00
16
300
Switch
04
11
n/a
00
16
301
Alarm (red) LED
04
11
1
00
16
301
Active (yellow) LED
04
11
2
00
16
302
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
11
3
00
16
303
Switch
04
12
n/a
00
16
304
Alarm (red) LED
04
12
1
00
16
304
Active (yellow) LED
04
12
2
00
16
305
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
12
3
00
16
306
Switch
04
13
n/a
00
16
307
Alarm (red) LED
04
13
1
00
16
307
Active (yellow) LED
04
13
2
00
16
308
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
13
3
00
16
309
Switch
04
14
n/a
00
16
310
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-13: Annunciator card group 4 addresses
LED-switch group
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
04
14
1
00
16
310
Active (yellow) LED
04
14
2
00
16
311
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
14
3
00
16
312
Switch
04
15
n/a
00
16
313
Alarm (red) LED
04
15
1
00
16
313
Active (yellow) LED
04
15
2
00
16
314
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
15
3
00
16
315
Switch
04
16
n/a
00
16
316
Alarm (red) LED
04
16
1
00
16
316
Active (yellow) LED
04
16
2
00
16
317
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
16
3
00
16
318
Switch
04
17
n/a
00
16
319
Alarm (red) LED
04
17
1
00
16
319
Active (yellow) LED
04
17
2
00
16
320
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
17
3
00
16
321
Switch
04
18
n/a
00
16
322
Alarm (red) LED
04
18
1
00
16
322
Active (yellow) LED
04
18
2
00
16
323
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
18
3
00
16
324
Switch
04
19
n/a
00
16
325
Alarm (red) LED
04
19
1
00
16
325
Active (yellow) LED
04
19
2
00
16
326
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
19
3
00
16
327
Switch
04
20
n/a
00
16
328
Alarm (red) LED
04
20
1
00
16
328
Active (yellow) LED
04
20
2
00
16
329
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
20
3
00
16
330
Switch
04
21
n/a
00
16
331
Alarm (red) LED
04
21
1
00
16
331
Active (yellow) LED
04
21
2
00
16
332
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
21
3
00
16
333
Switch
04
22
n/a
00
16
334
Alarm (red) LED
04
22
1
00
16
334
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.27
Addresses
Table D-13: Annunciator card group 4 addresses
LED-switch group
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
D.28
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
04
22
2
00
16
335
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
22
3
00
16
336
Switch
04
23
n/a
00
16
337
Alarm (red) LED
04
23
1
00
16
337
Active (yellow) LED
04
23
2
00
16
338
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
23
3
00
16
339
Switch
04
24
n/a
00
16
340
Alarm (red) LED
04
24
1
00
16
340
Active (yellow) LED
04
24
2
00
16
341
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
24
3
00
16
342
Switch
04
25
n/a
00
16
343
Alarm (red) LED
04
25
1
00
16
343
Active (yellow) LED
04
25
2
00
16
344
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
25
3
00
16
345
Switch
04
26
n/a
00
16
346
Alarm (red) LED
04
26
1
00
16
346
Active (yellow) LED
04
26
2
00
16
347
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
26
3
00
16
348
Switch
04
27
n/a
00
16
349
Alarm (red) LED
04
27
1
00
16
349
Active (yellow) LED
04
27
2
00
16
350
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
27
3
00
16
351
Switch
04
28
n/a
00
16
352
Alarm (red) LED
04
28
1
00
16
352
Active (yellow) LED
04
28
2
00
16
353
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
28
3
00
16
354
Switch
04
29
n/a
00
16
355
Alarm (red) LED
04
29
1
00
16
355
Active (yellow) LED
04
29
2
00
16
356
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
29
3
00
16
357
Switch
04
30
n/a
00
16
358
Alarm (red) LED
04
30
1
00
16
358
Active (yellow) LED
04
30
2
00
16
359
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-13: Annunciator card group 4 addresses
LED-switch group
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
04
30
3
00
16
360
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
05
01
n/a
00
16
361
Alarm (red) LED
05
01
1
00
16
361
Active (yellow) LED
05
01
2
00
16
362
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
01
3
00
16
363
Switch
05
02
n/a
00
16
364
Alarm (red) LED
05
02
1
00
16
364
Active (yellow) LED
05
02
2
00
16
365
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
02
3
00
16
366
Switch
05
03
n/a
00
16
367
Alarm (red) LED
05
03
1
00
16
367
Active (yellow) LED
05
03
2
00
16
368
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
03
3
00
16
369
Switch
05
04
n/a
00
16
370
Alarm (red) LED
05
04
1
00
16
370
Active (yellow) LED
05
04
2
00
16
371
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
04
3
00
16
372
Switch
05
05
n/a
00
16
373
Alarm (red) LED
05
05
1
00
16
373
Active (yellow) LED
05
05
2
00
16
374
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
05
3
00
16
375
Switch
05
06
n/a
00
16
376
Alarm (red) LED
05
06
1
00
16
376
Active (yellow) LED
05
06
2
00
16
377
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
06
3
00
16
378
Switch
05
07
n/a
00
16
379
Alarm (red) LED
05
07
1
00
16
379
Active (yellow) LED
05
07
2
00
16
380
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
07
3
00
16
381
Switch
05
08
n/a
00
16
382
Table D-14: Annunciator card group 5 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.29
Addresses
Table D-14: Annunciator card group 5 addresses
LED-switch group
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
D.30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
05
08
1
00
16
382
Active (yellow) LED
05
08
2
00
16
383
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
08
3
00
16
384
Switch
05
09
n/a
00
16
385
Alarm (red) LED
05
09
1
00
16
385
Active (yellow) LED
05
09
2
00
16
386
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
09
3
00
16
387
Switch
05
10
n/a
00
16
388
Alarm (red) LED
05
10
1
00
16
388
Active (yellow) LED
05
10
2
00
16
389
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
10
3
00
16
390
Switch
05
11
n/a
00
16
391
Alarm (red) LED
05
11
1
00
16
391
Active (yellow) LED
05
11
2
00
16
392
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
11
3
00
16
393
Switch
05
12
n/a
00
16
394
Alarm (red) LED
05
12
1
00
16
394
Active (yellow) LED
05
12
2
00
16
395
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
12
3
00
16
396
Switch
05
13
n/a
00
16
397
Alarm (red) LED
05
13
1
00
16
397
Active (yellow) LED
05
13
2
00
16
398
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
13
3
00
16
399
Switch
05
14
n/a
00
16
400
Alarm (red) LED
05
14
1
00
16
400
Active (yellow) LED
05
14
2
00
16
401
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
14
3
00
16
402
Switch
05
15
n/a
00
16
403
Alarm (red) LED
05
15
1
00
16
403
Active (yellow) LED
05
15
2
00
16
404
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
15
3
00
16
405
Switch
05
16
n/a
00
16
406
Alarm (red) LED
05
16
1
00
16
406
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-14: Annunciator card group 5 addresses
LED-switch group
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
05
16
2
00
16
407
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
16
3
00
16
408
Switch
05
17
n/a
00
16
409
Alarm (red) LED
05
17
1
00
16
409
Active (yellow) LED
05
17
2
00
16
410
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
17
3
00
16
411
Switch
05
18
n/a
00
16
412
Alarm (red) LED
05
18
1
00
16
412
Active (yellow) LED
05
18
2
00
16
413
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
18
3
00
16
414
Switch
05
19
n/a
00
16
415
Alarm (red) LED
05
19
1
00
16
415
Active (yellow) LED
05
19
2
00
16
416
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
19
3
00
16
417
Switch
05
20
n/a
00
16
418
Alarm (red) LED
05
20
1
00
16
418
Active (yellow) LED
05
20
2
00
16
419
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
20
3
00
16
420
Switch
05
21
n/a
00
16
421
Alarm (red) LED
05
21
1
00
16
421
Active (yellow) LED
05
21
2
00
16
422
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
21
3
00
16
423
Switch
05
22
n/a
00
16
424
Alarm (red) LED
05
22
1
00
16
424
Active (yellow) LED
05
22
2
00
16
425
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
22
3
00
16
426
Switch
05
23
n/a
00
16
427
Alarm (red) LED
05
23
1
00
16
427
Active (yellow) LED
05
23
2
00
16
428
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
23
3
00
16
429
Switch
05
24
n/a
00
16
430
Alarm (red) LED
05
24
1
00
16
430
Active (yellow) LED
05
24
2
00
16
431
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.31
Addresses
Table D-14: Annunciator card group 5 addresses
LED-switch group
25
26
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
24
3
00
16
432
Switch
05
25
n/a
00
16
433
Alarm (red) LED
05
25
1
00
16
433
Active (yellow) LED
05
25
2
00
16
434
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
25
3
00
16
435
Switch
05
26
n/a
00
16
436
Alarm (red) LED
05
26
1
00
16
436
Active (yellow) LED
05
26
2
00
16
437
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
26
3
00
16
438
Switch
05
27
n/a
00
16
439
Alarm (red) LED
05
27
1
00
16
439
Active (yellow) LED
05
27
2
00
16
440
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
27
3
00
16
441
Switch
05
28
n/a
00
16
442
Alarm (red) LED
05
28
1
00
16
442
Active (yellow) LED
05
28
2
00
16
443
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
28
3
00
16
444
Switch
05
29
n/a
00
16
445
Alarm (red) LED
05
29
1
00
16
445
Active (yellow) LED
05
29
2
00
16
446
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
29
3
00
16
447
Switch
05
30
n/a
00
16
448
Alarm (red) LED
05
30
1
00
16
448
Active (yellow) LED
05
30
2
00
16
449
Trouble (yellow) LED
05
30
3
00
16
450
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
06
01
n/a
00
16
451
Alarm (red) LED
06
01
1
00
16
451
Active (yellow) LED
06
01
2
00
16
452
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
01
3
00
16
453
Switch
06
02
n/a
00
16
454
Table D-15: Annunciator card group 6 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
D.32
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-15: Annunciator card group 6 addresses
LED-switch group
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
06
02
1
00
16
454
Active (yellow) LED
06
02
2
00
16
455
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
02
3
00
16
456
Switch
06
03
n/a
00
16
457
Alarm (red) LED
06
03
1
00
16
457
Active (yellow) LED
06
03
2
00
16
458
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
03
3
00
16
459
Switch
06
04
n/a
00
16
460
Alarm (red) LED
06
04
1
00
16
460
Active (yellow) LED
06
04
2
00
16
461
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
04
3
00
16
462
Switch
06
05
n/a
00
16
463
Alarm (red) LED
06
05
1
00
16
463
Active (yellow) LED
06
05
2
00
16
464
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
05
3
00
16
465
Switch
06
06
n/a
00
16
466
Alarm (red) LED
06
06
1
00
16
466
Active (yellow) LED
06
06
2
00
16
467
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
06
3
00
16
468
Switch
06
07
n/a
00
16
469
Alarm (red) LED
06
07
1
00
16
469
Active (yellow) LED
06
07
2
00
16
470
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
07
3
00
16
471
Switch
06
08
n/a
00
16
472
Alarm (red) LED
06
08
1
00
16
472
Active (yellow) LED
06
08
2
00
16
473
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
08
3
00
16
474
Switch
06
09
n/a
00
16
475
Alarm (red) LED
06
09
1
00
16
475
Active (yellow) LED
06
09
2
00
16
476
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
09
3
00
16
477
Switch
06
10
n/a
00
16
478
Alarm (red) LED
06
10
1
00
16
478
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.33
Addresses
Table D-15: Annunciator card group 6 addresses
LED-switch group
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
D.34
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
06
10
2
00
16
479
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
10
3
00
16
480
Switch
06
11
n/a
00
16
481
Alarm (red) LED
06
11
1
00
16
481
Active (yellow) LED
06
11
2
00
16
482
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
11
3
00
16
483
Switch
06
12
n/a
00
16
484
Alarm (red) LED
06
12
1
00
16
484
Active (yellow) LED
06
12
2
00
16
485
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
12
3
00
16
486
Switch
06
13
n/a
00
16
487
Alarm (red) LED
06
13
1
00
16
487
Active (yellow) LED
06
13
2
00
16
488
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
13
3
00
16
489
Switch
06
14
n/a
00
16
490
Alarm (red) LED
06
14
1
00
16
490
Active (yellow) LED
06
14
2
00
16
491
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
14
3
00
16
492
Switch
06
15
n/a
00
16
493
Alarm (red) LED
06
15
1
00
16
493
Active (yellow) LED
06
15
2
00
16
494
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
15
3
00
16
495
Switch
06
16
n/a
00
16
496
Alarm (red) LED
06
16
1
00
16
496
Active (yellow) LED
06
16
2
00
16
497
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
16
3
00
16
498
Switch
06
17
n/a
00
16
499
Alarm (red) LED
06
17
1
00
16
499
Active (yellow) LED
06
17
2
00
16
500
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
17
3
00
16
501
Switch
06
18
n/a
00
16
502
Alarm (red) LED
06
18
1
00
16
502
Active (yellow) LED
06
18
2
00
16
503
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-15: Annunciator card group 6 addresses
LED-switch group
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
18
3
00
16
504
Switch
06
19
n/a
00
16
505
Alarm (red) LED
06
19
1
00
16
505
Active (yellow) LED
06
19
2
00
16
506
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
19
3
00
16
507
Switch
06
20
n/a
00
16
508
Alarm (red) LED
06
20
1
00
16
508
Active (yellow) LED
06
20
2
00
16
509
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
20
3
00
16
510
Switch
06
21
n/a
00
16
511
Alarm (red) LED
06
21
1
00
16
511
Active (yellow) LED
06
21
2
00
16
512
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
21
3
00
16
513
Switch
06
22
n/a
00
16
514
Alarm (red) LED
06
22
1
00
16
514
Active (yellow) LED
06
22
2
00
16
515
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
22
3
00
16
516
Switch
06
23
n/a
00
16
517
Alarm (red) LED
06
23
1
00
16
517
Active (yellow) LED
06
23
2
00
16
518
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
23
3
00
16
519
Switch
06
24
n/a
00
16
520
Alarm (red) LED
06
24
1
00
16
520
Active (yellow) LED
06
24
2
00
16
521
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
24
3
00
16
522
Switch
06
25
n/a
00
16
523
Alarm (red) LED
06
25
1
00
16
523
Active (yellow) LED
06
25
2
00
16
524
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
25
3
00
16
525
Switch
06
26
n/a
00
16
526
Alarm (red) LED
06
26
1
00
16
526
Active (yellow) LED
06
26
2
00
16
527
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
26
3
00
16
528
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.35
Addresses
Table D-15: Annunciator card group 6 addresses
LED-switch group
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
06
27
n/a
00
16
529
Alarm (red) LED
06
27
1
00
16
529
Active (yellow) LED
06
27
2
00
16
530
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
27
3
00
16
531
Switch
06
28
n/a
00
16
532
Alarm (red) LED
06
28
1
00
16
532
Active (yellow) LED
06
28
2
00
16
533
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
28
3
00
16
534
Switch
06
29
n/a
00
16
535
Alarm (red) LED
06
29
1
00
16
535
Active (yellow) LED
06
29
2
00
16
536
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
29
3
00
16
537
Switch
06
30
n/a
00
16
538
Alarm (red) LED
06
30
1
00
16
538
Active (yellow) LED
06
30
2
00
16
539
Trouble (yellow) LED
06
30
3
00
16
540
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
07
01
n/a
00
16
541
Alarm (red) LED
07
01
1
00
16
541
Active (yellow) LED
07
01
2
00
16
542
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
01
3
00
16
543
Switch
07
02
n/a
00
16
544
Alarm (red) LED
07
02
1
00
16
544
Active (yellow) LED
07
02
2
00
16
545
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
02
3
00
16
546
Switch
07
03
n/a
00
16
547
Alarm (red) LED
07
03
1
00
16
547
Active (yellow) LED
07
03
2
00
16
548
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
03
3
00
16
549
Switch
07
04
n/a
00
16
550
Alarm (red) LED
07
04
1
00
16
550
Table D-16: Annunciator card group 7 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
D.36
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-16: Annunciator card group 7 addresses
LED-switch group
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
07
04
2
00
16
551
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
04
3
00
16
552
Switch
07
05
n/a
00
16
553
Alarm (red) LED
07
05
1
00
16
553
Active (yellow) LED
07
05
2
00
16
554
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
05
3
00
16
555
Switch
07
06
n/a
00
16
556
Alarm (red) LED
07
06
1
00
16
556
Active (yellow) LED
07
06
2
00
16
557
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
06
3
00
16
558
Switch
07
07
n/a
00
16
559
Alarm (red) LED
07
07
1
00
16
559
Active (yellow) LED
07
07
2
00
16
560
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
07
3
00
16
561
Switch
07
08
n/a
00
16
562
Alarm (red) LED
07
08
1
00
16
562
Active (yellow) LED
07
08
2
00
16
563
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
08
3
00
16
564
Switch
07
09
n/a
00
16
565
Alarm (red) LED
07
09
1
00
16
565
Active (yellow) LED
07
09
2
00
16
566
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
09
3
00
16
567
Switch
07
10
n/a
00
16
568
Alarm (red) LED
07
10
1
00
16
568
Active (yellow) LED
07
10
2
00
16
569
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
10
3
00
16
570
Switch
07
11
n/a
00
16
571
Alarm (red) LED
07
11
1
00
16
571
Active (yellow) LED
07
11
2
00
16
572
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
11
3
00
16
573
Switch
07
12
n/a
00
16
574
Alarm (red) LED
07
12
1
00
16
574
Active (yellow) LED
07
12
2
00
16
575
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.37
Addresses
Table D-16: Annunciator card group 7 addresses
LED-switch group
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
D.38
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
12
3
00
16
576
Switch
07
13
n/a
00
16
577
Alarm (red) LED
07
13
1
00
16
577
Active (yellow) LED
07
13
2
00
16
578
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
13
3
00
16
579
Switch
07
14
n/a
00
16
580
Alarm (red) LED
07
14
1
00
16
580
Active (yellow) LED
07
14
2
00
16
581
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
14
3
00
16
582
Switch
07
15
n/a
00
16
583
Alarm (red) LED
07
15
1
00
16
583
Active (yellow) LED
07
15
2
00
16
584
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
15
3
00
16
585
Switch
07
16
n/a
00
16
586
Alarm (red) LED
07
16
1
00
16
586
Active (yellow) LED
07
16
2
00
16
587
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
16
3
00
16
588
Switch
07
17
n/a
00
16
589
Alarm (red) LED
07
17
1
00
16
589
Active (yellow) LED
07
17
2
00
16
590
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
17
3
00
16
591
Switch
07
18
n/a
00
16
592
Alarm (red) LED
07
18
1
00
16
592
Active (yellow) LED
07
18
2
00
16
593
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
18
3
00
16
594
Switch
07
19
n/a
00
16
595
Alarm (red) LED
07
19
1
00
16
595
Active (yellow) LED
07
19
2
00
16
596
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
19
3
00
16
597
Switch
07
20
n/a
00
16
598
Alarm (red) LED
07
20
1
00
16
598
Active (yellow) LED
07
20
2
00
16
599
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
20
3
00
16
600
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-16: Annunciator card group 7 addresses
LED-switch group
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
07
21
n/a
00
16
601
Alarm (red) LED
07
21
1
00
16
601
Active (yellow) LED
07
21
2
00
16
602
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
21
3
00
16
603
Switch
07
22
n/a
00
16
604
Alarm (red) LED
07
22
1
00
16
604
Active (yellow) LED
07
22
2
00
16
605
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
22
3
00
16
606
Switch
07
23
n/a
00
16
607
Alarm (red) LED
07
23
1
00
16
607
Active (yellow) LED
07
23
2
00
16
608
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
23
3
00
16
609
Switch
07
24
n/a
00
16
610
Alarm (red) LED
07
24
1
00
16
610
Active (yellow) LED
07
24
2
00
16
611
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
24
3
00
16
612
Switch
07
25
n/a
00
16
613
Alarm (red) LED
07
25
1
00
16
613
Active (yellow) LED
07
25
2
00
16
614
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
25
3
00
16
615
Switch
07
26
n/a
00
16
616
Alarm (red) LED
07
26
1
00
16
616
Active (yellow) LED
07
26
2
00
16
617
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
26
3
00
16
618
Switch
07
27
n/a
00
16
619
Alarm (red) LED
07
27
1
00
16
619
Active (yellow) LED
07
27
2
00
16
620
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
27
3
00
16
621
Switch
07
28
n/a
00
16
622
Alarm (red) LED
07
28
1
00
16
622
Active (yellow) LED
07
28
2
00
16
623
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
28
3
00
16
624
Switch
07
29
n/a
00
16
625
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.39
Addresses
Table D-16: Annunciator card group 7 addresses
LED-switch group
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
07
29
1
00
16
625
Active (yellow) LED
07
29
2
00
16
626
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
29
3
00
16
627
Switch
07
30
n/a
00
16
628
Alarm (red) LED
07
30
1
00
16
628
Active (yellow) LED
07
30
2
00
16
629
Trouble (yellow) LED
07
30
3
00
16
630
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
08
01
n/a
00
16
631
Alarm (red) LED
08
01
1
00
16
631
Active (yellow) LED
08
01
2
00
16
632
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
01
3
00
16
633
Switch
08
02
n/a
00
16
634
Alarm (red) LED
08
02
1
00
16
634
Active (yellow) LED
08
02
2
00
16
635
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
02
3
00
16
636
Switch
08
03
n/a
00
16
637
Alarm (red) LED
08
03
1
00
16
637
Active (yellow) LED
08
03
2
00
16
638
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
03
3
00
16
639
Switch
08
04
n/a
00
16
640
Alarm (red) LED
08
04
1
00
16
640
Active (yellow) LED
08
04
2
00
16
641
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
04
3
00
16
642
Switch
08
05
n/a
00
16
643
Alarm (red) LED
08
05
1
00
16
643
Active (yellow) LED
08
05
2
00
16
644
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
05
3
00
16
645
Switch
08
06
n/a
00
16
646
Alarm (red) LED
08
06
1
00
16
646
Active (yellow) LED
08
06
2
00
16
647
Table D-17: Annunciator card group 8 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
6
D.40
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-17: Annunciator card group 8 addresses
LED-switch group
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
06
3
00
16
648
Switch
08
07
n/a
00
16
649
Alarm (red) LED
08
07
1
00
16
649
Active (yellow) LED
08
07
2
00
16
650
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
07
3
00
16
651
Switch
08
08
n/a
00
16
652
Alarm (red) LED
08
08
1
00
16
652
Active (yellow) LED
08
08
2
00
16
653
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
08
3
00
16
654
Switch
08
09
n/a
00
16
655
Alarm (red) LED
08
09
1
00
16
655
Active (yellow) LED
08
09
2
00
16
656
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
09
3
00
16
657
Switch
08
10
n/a
00
16
658
Alarm (red) LED
08
10
1
00
16
658
Active (yellow) LED
08
10
2
00
16
659
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
10
3
00
16
660
Switch
08
11
n/a
00
16
661
Alarm (red) LED
08
11
1
00
16
661
Active (yellow) LED
08
11
2
00
16
662
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
11
3
00
16
663
Switch
08
12
n/a
00
16
664
Alarm (red) LED
08
12
1
00
16
664
Active (yellow) LED
08
12
2
00
16
665
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
12
3
00
16
666
Switch
08
13
n/a
00
16
667
Alarm (red) LED
08
13
1
00
16
667
Active (yellow) LED
08
13
2
00
16
668
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
13
3
00
16
669
Switch
08
14
n/a
00
16
670
Alarm (red) LED
08
14
1
00
16
670
Active (yellow) LED
08
14
2
00
16
671
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
14
3
00
16
672
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.41
Addresses
Table D-17: Annunciator card group 8 addresses
LED-switch group
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
D.42
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
08
15
n/a
00
16
673
Alarm (red) LED
08
15
1
00
16
673
Active (yellow) LED
08
15
2
00
16
674
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
15
3
00
16
675
Switch
08
16
n/a
00
16
676
Alarm (red) LED
08
16
1
00
16
676
Active (yellow) LED
08
16
2
00
16
677
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
16
3
00
16
678
Switch
08
17
n/a
00
16
679
Alarm (red) LED
08
17
1
00
16
679
Active (yellow) LED
08
17
2
00
16
680
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
17
3
00
16
681
Switch
08
18
n/a
00
16
682
Alarm (red) LED
08
18
1
00
16
682
Active (yellow) LED
08
18
2
00
16
683
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
18
3
00
16
684
Switch
08
19
n/a
00
16
685
Alarm (red) LED
08
19
1
00
16
685
Active (yellow) LED
08
19
2
00
16
686
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
19
3
00
16
687
Switch
08
20
n/a
00
16
688
Alarm (red) LED
08
20
1
00
16
688
Active (yellow) LED
08
20
2
00
16
689
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
20
3
00
16
690
Switch
08
21
n/a
00
16
691
Alarm (red) LED
08
21
1
00
16
691
Active (yellow) LED
08
21
2
00
16
692
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
21
3
00
16
693
Switch
08
22
n/a
00
16
694
Alarm (red) LED
08
22
1
00
16
694
Active (yellow) LED
08
22
2
00
16
695
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
22
3
00
16
696
Switch
08
23
n/a
00
16
697
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-17: Annunciator card group 8 addresses
LED-switch group
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
08
23
1
00
16
697
Active (yellow) LED
08
23
2
00
16
698
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
23
3
00
16
699
Switch
08
24
n/a
00
16
700
Alarm (red) LED
08
24
1
00
16
700
Active (yellow) LED
08
24
2
00
16
701
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
24
3
00
16
702
Switch
08
25
n/a
00
16
703
Alarm (red) LED
08
25
1
00
16
703
Active (yellow) LED
08
25
2
00
16
704
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
25
3
00
16
705
Switch
08
26
n/a
00
16
706
Alarm (red) LED
08
26
1
00
16
706
Active (yellow) LED
08
26
2
00
16
707
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
26
3
00
16
708
Switch
08
27
n/a
00
16
709
Alarm (red) LED
08
27
1
00
16
709
Active (yellow) LED
08
27
2
00
16
710
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
27
3
00
16
711
Switch
08
28
n/a
00
16
712
Alarm (red) LED
08
28
1
00
16
712
Active (yellow) LED
08
28
2
00
16
713
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
28
3
00
16
714
Switch
08
29
n/a
00
16
715
Alarm (red) LED
08
29
1
00
16
715
Active (yellow) LED
08
29
2
00
16
716
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
29
3
00
16
717
Switch
08
30
n/a
00
16
718
Alarm (red) LED
08
30
1
00
16
718
Active (yellow) LED
08
30
2
00
16
719
Trouble (yellow) LED
08
30
3
00
16
720
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.43
Addresses
Table D-18: Annunciator card group 9 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
D.44
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
09
01
n/a
00
16
721
Alarm (red) LED
09
01
1
00
16
721
Active (yellow) LED
09
01
2
00
16
722
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
01
3
00
16
723
Switch
09
02
n/a
00
16
724
Alarm (red) LED
09
02
1
00
16
724
Active (yellow) LED
09
02
2
00
16
725
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
02
3
00
16
726
Switch
09
03
n/a
00
16
727
Alarm (red) LED
09
03
1
00
16
727
Active (yellow) LED
09
03
2
00
16
728
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
03
3
00
16
729
Switch
09
04
n/a
00
16
730
Alarm (red) LED
09
04
1
00
16
730
Active (yellow) LED
09
04
2
00
16
731
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
04
3
00
16
732
Switch
09
05
n/a
00
16
733
Alarm (red) LED
09
05
1
00
16
733
Active (yellow) LED
09
05
2
00
16
734
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
05
3
00
16
735
Switch
09
06
n/a
00
16
736
Alarm (red) LED
09
06
1
00
16
736
Active (yellow) LED
09
06
2
00
16
737
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
06
3
00
16
738
Switch
09
07
n/a
00
16
739
Alarm (red) LED
09
07
1
00
16
739
Active (yellow) LED
09
07
2
00
16
740
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
07
3
00
16
741
Switch
09
08
n/a
00
16
742
Alarm (red) LED
09
08
1
00
16
742
Active (yellow) LED
09
08
2
00
16
743
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
08
3
00
16
744
Switch
09
09
n/a
00
16
745
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-18: Annunciator card group 9 addresses
LED-switch group
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
09
09
1
00
16
745
Active (yellow) LED
09
09
2
00
16
746
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
09
3
00
16
747
Switch
09
10
n/a
00
16
748
Alarm (red) LED
09
10
1
00
16
748
Active (yellow) LED
09
10
2
00
16
749
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
10
3
00
16
750
Switch
09
11
n/a
00
16
751
Alarm (red) LED
09
11
1
00
16
751
Active (yellow) LED
09
11
2
00
16
752
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
11
3
00
16
753
Switch
09
12
n/a
00
16
754
Alarm (red) LED
09
12
1
00
16
754
Active (yellow) LED
09
12
2
00
16
755
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
12
3
00
16
756
Switch
09
13
n/a
00
16
757
Alarm (red) LED
09
13
1
00
16
757
Active (yellow) LED
09
13
2
00
16
758
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
13
3
00
16
759
Switch
09
14
n/a
00
16
760
Alarm (red) LED
09
14
1
00
16
760
Active (yellow) LED
09
14
2
00
16
761
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
14
3
00
16
762
Switch
09
15
n/a
00
16
763
Alarm (red) LED
09
15
1
00
16
763
Active (yellow) LED
09
15
2
00
16
764
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
15
3
00
16
765
Switch
09
16
n/a
00
16
766
Alarm (red) LED
09
16
1
00
16
766
Active (yellow) LED
09
16
2
00
16
767
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
16
3
00
16
768
Switch
09
17
n/a
00
16
769
Alarm (red) LED
09
17
1
00
16
769
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.45
Addresses
Table D-18: Annunciator card group 9 addresses
LED-switch group
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
D.46
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
09
17
2
00
16
770
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
17
3
00
16
771
Switch
09
18
n/a
00
16
772
Alarm (red) LED
09
18
1
00
16
772
Active (yellow) LED
09
18
2
00
16
773
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
18
3
00
16
774
Switch
09
19
n/a
00
16
775
Alarm (red) LED
09
19
1
00
16
775
Active (yellow) LED
09
19
2
00
16
776
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
19
3
00
16
777
Switch
09
20
n/a
00
16
778
Alarm (red) LED
09
20
1
00
16
778
Active (yellow) LED
09
20
2
00
16
779
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
20
3
00
16
780
Switch
09
21
n/a
00
16
781
Alarm (red) LED
09
21
1
00
16
781
Active (yellow) LED
09
21
2
00
16
782
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
21
3
00
16
783
Switch
09
22
n/a
00
16
784
Alarm (red) LED
09
22
1
00
16
784
Active (yellow) LED
09
22
2
00
16
785
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
22
3
00
16
786
Switch
09
23
n/a
00
16
787
Alarm (red) LED
09
23
1
00
16
787
Active (yellow) LED
09
23
2
00
16
788
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
23
3
00
16
789
Switch
09
24
n/a
00
16
790
Alarm (red) LED
09
24
1
00
16
790
Active (yellow) LED
09
24
2
00
16
791
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
24
3
00
16
792
Switch
09
25
n/a
00
16
793
Alarm (red) LED
09
25
1
00
16
793
Active (yellow) LED
09
25
2
00
16
794
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-18: Annunciator card group 9 addresses
LED-switch group
26
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
25
3
00
16
795
Switch
09
26
n/a
00
16
796
Alarm (red) LED
09
26
1
00
16
796
Active (yellow) LED
09
26
2
00
16
797
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
26
3
00
16
798
Switch
09
27
n/a
00
16
799
Alarm (red) LED
09
27
1
00
16
799
Active (yellow) LED
09
27
2
00
16
800
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
27
3
00
16
801
Switch
09
28
n/a
00
16
802
Alarm (red) LED
09
28
1
00
16
802
Active (yellow) LED
09
28
2
00
16
803
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
28
3
00
16
804
Switch
09
29
n/a
00
16
805
Alarm (red) LED
09
29
1
00
16
805
Active (yellow) LED
09
29
2
00
16
806
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
29
3
00
16
807
Switch
09
30
n/a
00
16
808
Alarm (red) LED
09
30
1
00
16
808
Active (yellow) LED
09
30
2
00
16
809
Trouble (yellow) LED
09
30
3
00
16
810
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
10
01
n/a
00
16
811
Alarm (red) LED
10
01
1
00
16
811
Active (yellow) LED
10
01
2
00
16
812
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
01
3
00
16
813
Switch
10
02
n/a
00
16
814
Alarm (red) LED
10
02
1
00
16
814
Active (yellow) LED
10
02
2
00
16
815
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
02
3
00
16
816
Switch
10
03
n/a
00
16
817
Table D-19: Annunciator card group 10 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.47
Addresses
Table D-19: Annunciator card group 10 addresses
LED-switch group
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
D.48
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
10
03
1
00
16
817
Active (yellow) LED
10
03
2
00
16
818
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
03
3
00
16
819
Switch
10
04
n/a
00
16
820
Alarm (red) LED
10
04
1
00
16
820
Active (yellow) LED
10
04
2
00
16
821
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
04
3
00
16
822
Switch
10
05
n/a
00
16
823
Alarm (red) LED
10
05
1
00
16
823
Active (yellow) LED
10
05
2
00
16
824
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
05
3
00
16
825
Switch
10
06
n/a
00
16
826
Alarm (red) LED
10
06
1
00
16
826
Active (yellow) LED
10
06
2
00
16
827
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
06
3
00
16
828
Switch
10
07
n/a
00
16
829
Alarm (red) LED
10
07
1
00
16
829
Active (yellow) LED
10
07
2
00
16
830
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
07
3
00
16
831
Switch
10
08
n/a
00
16
832
Alarm (red) LED
10
08
1
00
16
832
Active (yellow) LED
10
08
2
00
16
833
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
08
3
00
16
834
Switch
10
09
n/a
00
16
835
Alarm (red) LED
10
09
1
00
16
835
Active (yellow) LED
10
09
2
00
16
836
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
09
3
00
16
837
Switch
10
10
n/a
00
16
838
Alarm (red) LED
10
10
1
00
16
838
Active (yellow) LED
10
10
2
00
16
839
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
10
3
00
16
840
Switch
10
11
n/a
00
16
841
Alarm (red) LED
10
11
1
00
16
841
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-19: Annunciator card group 10 addresses
LED-switch group
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
10
11
2
00
16
842
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
11
3
00
16
843
Switch
10
12
n/a
00
16
844
Alarm (red) LED
10
12
1
00
16
844
Active (yellow) LED
10
12
2
00
16
845
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
12
3
00
16
846
Switch
10
13
n/a
00
16
847
Alarm (red) LED
10
13
1
00
16
847
Active (yellow) LED
10
13
2
00
16
848
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
13
3
00
16
849
Switch
10
14
n/a
00
16
850
Alarm (red) LED
10
14
1
00
16
850
Active (yellow) LED
10
14
2
00
16
851
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
14
3
00
16
852
Switch
10
15
n/a
00
16
853
Alarm (red) LED
10
15
1
00
16
853
Active (yellow) LED
10
15
2
00
16
854
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
15
3
00
16
855
Switch
10
16
n/a
00
16
856
Alarm (red) LED
10
16
1
00
16
856
Active (yellow) LED
10
16
2
00
16
857
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
16
3
00
16
858
Switch
10
17
n/a
00
16
859
Alarm (red) LED
10
17
1
00
16
859
Active (yellow) LED
10
17
2
00
16
860
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
17
3
00
16
861
Switch
10
18
n/a
00
16
862
Alarm (red) LED
10
18
1
00
16
862
Active (yellow) LED
10
18
2
00
16
863
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
18
3
00
16
864
Switch
10
19
n/a
00
16
865
Alarm (red) LED
10
19
1
00
16
865
Active (yellow) LED
10
19
2
00
16
866
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.49
Addresses
Table D-19: Annunciator card group 10 addresses
LED-switch group
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
D.50
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
19
3
00
16
867
Switch
10
20
n/a
00
16
868
Alarm (red) LED
10
20
1
00
16
868
Active (yellow) LED
10
20
2
00
16
869
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
20
3
00
16
870
Switch
10
21
n/a
00
16
871
Alarm (red) LED
10
21
1
00
16
871
Active (yellow) LED
10
21
2
00
16
872
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
21
3
00
16
873
Switch
10
22
n/a
00
16
874
Alarm (red) LED
10
22
1
00
16
874
Active (yellow) LED
10
22
2
00
16
875
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
22
3
00
16
876
Switch
10
23
n/a
00
16
877
Alarm (red) LED
10
23
1
00
16
877
Active (yellow) LED
10
23
2
00
16
878
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
23
3
00
16
879
Switch
10
24
n/a
00
16
880
Alarm (red) LED
10
24
1
00
16
880
Active (yellow) LED
10
24
2
00
16
881
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
24
3
00
16
882
Switch
10
25
n/a
00
16
883
Alarm (red) LED
10
25
1
00
16
883
Active (yellow) LED
10
25
2
00
16
884
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
25
3
00
16
885
Switch
10
26
n/a
00
16
886
Alarm (red) LED
10
26
1
00
16
886
Active (yellow) LED
10
26
2
00
16
887
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
26
3
00
16
888
Switch
10
27
n/a
00
16
889
Alarm (red) LED
10
27
1
00
16
889
Active (yellow) LED
10
27
2
00
16
890
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
27
3
00
16
891
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-19: Annunciator card group 10 addresses
LED-switch group
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
10
28
n/a
00
16
892
Alarm (red) LED
10
28
1
00
16
892
Active (yellow) LED
10
28
2
00
16
893
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
28
3
00
16
894
Switch
10
29
n/a
00
16
895
Alarm (red) LED
10
29
1
00
16
895
Active (yellow) LED
10
29
2
00
16
896
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
29
3
00
16
897
Switch
10
30
n/a
00
16
898
Alarm (red) LED
10
30
1
00
16
898
Active (yellow) LED
10
30
2
00
16
899
Trouble (yellow) LED
10
30
3
00
16
900
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
11
01
n/a
00
16
901
Alarm (red) LED
11
01
1
00
16
901
Active (yellow) LED
11
01
2
00
16
902
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
01
3
00
16
903
Switch
11
02
n/a
00
16
904
Alarm (red) LED
11
02
1
00
16
904
Active (yellow) LED
11
02
2
00
16
905
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
02
3
00
16
906
Switch
11
03
n/a
00
16
907
Alarm (red) LED
11
03
1
00
16
907
Active (yellow) LED
11
03
2
00
16
908
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
03
3
00
16
909
Switch
11
04
n/a
00
16
910
Alarm (red) LED
11
04
1
00
16
910
Active (yellow) LED
11
04
2
00
16
911
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
04
3
00
16
912
Switch
11
05
n/a
00
16
913
Alarm (red) LED
11
05
1
00
16
913
Table D-20: Annunciator card group 11 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.51
Addresses
Table D-20: Annunciator card group 11 addresses
LED-switch group
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
D.52
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
11
05
2
00
16
914
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
05
3
00
16
915
Switch
11
06
n/a
00
16
916
Alarm (red) LED
11
06
1
00
16
916
Active (yellow) LED
11
06
2
00
16
917
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
06
3
00
16
918
Switch
11
07
n/a
00
16
919
Alarm (red) LED
11
07
1
00
16
919
Active (yellow) LED
11
07
2
00
16
920
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
07
3
00
16
921
Switch
11
08
n/a
00
16
922
Alarm (red) LED
11
08
1
00
16
922
Active (yellow) LED
11
08
2
00
16
923
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
08
3
00
16
924
Switch
11
09
n/a
00
16
925
Alarm (red) LED
11
09
1
00
16
925
Active (yellow) LED
11
09
2
00
16
926
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
09
3
00
16
927
Switch
11
10
n/a
00
16
928
Alarm (red) LED
11
10
1
00
16
928
Active (yellow) LED
11
10
2
00
16
929
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
10
3
00
16
930
Switch
11
11
n/a
00
16
931
Alarm (red) LED
11
11
1
00
16
931
Active (yellow) LED
11
11
2
00
16
932
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
11
3
00
16
933
Switch
11
12
n/a
00
16
934
Alarm (red) LED
11
12
1
00
16
934
Active (yellow) LED
11
12
2
00
16
935
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
12
3
00
16
936
Switch
11
13
n/a
00
16
937
Alarm (red) LED
11
13
1
00
16
937
Active (yellow) LED
11
13
2
00
16
938
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-20: Annunciator card group 11 addresses
LED-switch group
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
13
3
00
16
939
Switch
11
14
n/a
00
16
940
Alarm (red) LED
11
14
1
00
16
940
Active (yellow) LED
11
14
2
00
16
941
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
14
3
00
16
942
Switch
11
15
n/a
00
16
943
Alarm (red) LED
11
15
1
00
16
943
Active (yellow) LED
11
15
2
00
16
944
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
15
3
00
16
945
Switch
11
16
n/a
00
16
946
Alarm (red) LED
11
16
1
00
16
946
Active (yellow) LED
11
16
2
00
16
947
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
16
3
00
16
948
Switch
11
17
n/a
00
16
949
Alarm (red) LED
11
17
1
00
16
949
Active (yellow) LED
11
17
2
00
16
950
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
17
3
00
16
951
Switch
11
18
n/a
00
16
952
Alarm (red) LED
11
18
1
00
16
952
Active (yellow) LED
11
18
2
00
16
953
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
18
3
00
16
954
Switch
11
19
n/a
00
16
955
Alarm (red) LED
11
19
1
00
16
955
Active (yellow) LED
11
19
2
00
16
956
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
19
3
00
16
957
Switch
11
20
n/a
00
16
958
Alarm (red) LED
11
20
1
00
16
958
Active (yellow) LED
11
20
2
00
16
959
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
20
3
00
16
960
Switch
11
21
n/a
00
16
961
Alarm (red) LED
11
21
1
00
16
961
Active (yellow) LED
11
21
2
00
16
962
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
21
3
00
16
963
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.53
Addresses
Table D-20: Annunciator card group 11 addresses
LED-switch group
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
D.54
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
11
22
n/a
00
16
964
Alarm (red) LED
11
22
1
00
16
964
Active (yellow) LED
11
22
2
00
16
965
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
22
3
00
16
966
Switch
11
23
n/a
00
16
967
Alarm (red) LED
11
23
1
00
16
967
Active (yellow) LED
11
23
2
00
16
968
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
23
3
00
16
969
Switch
11
24
n/a
00
16
970
Alarm (red) LED
11
24
1
00
16
970
Active (yellow) LED
11
24
2
00
16
971
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
24
3
00
16
972
Switch
11
25
n/a
00
16
973
Alarm (red) LED
11
25
1
00
16
973
Active (yellow) LED
11
25
2
00
16
974
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
25
3
00
16
975
Switch
11
26
n/a
00
16
976
Alarm (red) LED
11
26
1
00
16
976
Active (yellow) LED
11
26
2
00
16
977
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
26
3
00
16
978
Switch
11
27
n/a
00
16
979
Alarm (red) LED
11
27
1
00
16
979
Active (yellow) LED
11
27
2
00
16
980
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
27
3
00
16
981
Switch
11
28
n/a
00
16
982
Alarm (red) LED
11
28
1
00
16
982
Active (yellow) LED
11
28
2
00
16
983
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
28
3
00
16
984
Switch
11
29
n/a
00
16
985
Alarm (red) LED
11
29
1
00
16
985
Active (yellow) LED
11
29
2
00
16
986
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
29
3
00
16
987
Switch
11
30
n/a
00
16
988
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-20: Annunciator card group 11 addresses
LED-switch group
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
11
30
1
00
16
988
Active (yellow) LED
11
30
2
00
16
989
Trouble (yellow) LED
11
30
3
00
16
990
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
12
01
n/a
00
16
991
Alarm (red) LED
12
01
1
00
16
991
Active (yellow) LED
12
01
2
00
16
992
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
01
3
00
16
993
Switch
12
02
n/a
00
16
994
Alarm (red) LED
12
02
1
00
16
994
Active (yellow) LED
12
02
2
00
16
995
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
02
3
00
16
996
Switch
12
03
n/a
00
16
997
Alarm (red) LED
12
03
1
00
16
997
Active (yellow) LED
12
03
2
00
16
998
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
03
3
00
16
999
Switch
12
04
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
04
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
04
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
04
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
05
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
05
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
05
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
05
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
06
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
06
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
06
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
06
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
07
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
07
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
07
2
00
16
***
Table D-21: Annunciator card group 12 addresses
LED/switch group
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.55
Addresses
Table D-21: Annunciator card group 12 addresses
LED/switch group
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
D.56
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
07
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
08
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
08
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
08
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
08
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
09
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
09
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
09
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
09
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
10
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
10
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
10
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
10
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
11
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
11
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
11
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
11
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
12
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
12
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
12
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
12
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
13
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
13
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
13
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
13
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
14
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
14
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
14
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
14
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
15
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
15
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
15
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
15
3
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-21: Annunciator card group 12 addresses
LED/switch group
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
12
16
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
16
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
16
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
16
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
17
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
17
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
17
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
17
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
18
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
18
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
18
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
18
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
19
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
19
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
19
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
19
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
20
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
20
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
20
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
20
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
21
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
21
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
21
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
21
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
22
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
22
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
22
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
22
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
23
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
23
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
23
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
23
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
24
n/a
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.57
Addresses
Table D-21: Annunciator card group 12 addresses
LED/switch group
25
26
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
12
24
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
24
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
24
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
25
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
25
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
25
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
25
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
26
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
26
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
26
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
26
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
27
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
27
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
27
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
27
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
28
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
28
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
28
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
28
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
29
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
29
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
29
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
29
3
00
16
***
Switch
12
30
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
12
30
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
12
30
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
12
30
3
00
16
***
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
13
01
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
01
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
01
2
00
16
***
Table D-22: Annunciator card group 13 addresses
LED-switch group
1
D.58
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-22: Annunciator card group 13 addresses
LED-switch group
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
01
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
02
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
02
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
02
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
02
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
03
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
03
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
03
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
03
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
04
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
04
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
04
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
04
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
05
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
05
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
05
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
05
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
06
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
06
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
06
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
06
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
07
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
07
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
07
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
07
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
08
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
08
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
08
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
08
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
09
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
09
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
09
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
09
3
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.59
Addresses
Table D-22: Annunciator card group 13 addresses
LED-switch group
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
D.60
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
13
10
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
10
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
10
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
10
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
11
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
11
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
11
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
11
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
12
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
12
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
12
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
12
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
13
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
13
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
13
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
13
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
14
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
14
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
14
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
14
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
15
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
15
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
15
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
15
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
16
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
16
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
16
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
16
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
17
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
17
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
17
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
17
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
18
n/a
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-22: Annunciator card group 13 addresses
LED-switch group
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
13
18
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
18
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
18
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
19
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
19
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
19
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
19
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
20
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
20
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
20
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
20
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
21
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
21
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
21
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
21
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
22
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
22
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
22
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
22
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
23
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
23
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
23
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
23
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
24
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
24
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
24
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
24
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
25
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
25
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
25
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
25
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
26
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
26
1
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.61
Addresses
Table D-22: Annunciator card group 13 addresses
LED-switch group
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
13
26
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
26
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
27
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
27
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
27
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
27
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
28
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
28
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
28
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
28
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
29
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
29
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
29
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
29
3
00
16
***
Switch
13
30
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
13
30
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
13
30
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
13
30
3
00
16
***
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
14
01
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
01
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
01
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
01
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
02
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
02
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
02
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
02
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
03
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
03
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
03
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
03
3
00
16
***
Table D-23: Annunciator card group 14 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
D.62
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-23: Annunciator card group 14 addresses
LED-switch group
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
14
04
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
04
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
04
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
04
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
05
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
05
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
05
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
05
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
06
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
06
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
06
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
06
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
07
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
07
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
07
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
07
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
08
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
08
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
08
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
08
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
09
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
09
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
09
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
09
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
10
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
10
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
10
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
10
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
11
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
11
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
11
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
11
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
12
n/a
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.63
Addresses
Table D-23: Annunciator card group 14 addresses
LED-switch group
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
D.64
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
14
12
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
12
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
12
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
13
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
13
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
13
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
13
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
14
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
14
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
14
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
14
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
15
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
15
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
15
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
15
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
16
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
16
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
16
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
16
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
17
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
17
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
17
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
17
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
18
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
18
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
18
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
18
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
19
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
19
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
19
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
19
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
20
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
20
1
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-23: Annunciator card group 14 addresses
LED-switch group
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
14
20
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
20
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
21
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
21
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
21
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
21
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
22
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
22
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
22
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
22
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
23
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
23
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
23
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
23
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
24
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
24
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
24
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
24
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
25
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
25
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
25
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
25
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
26
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
26
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
26
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
26
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
27
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
27
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
27
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
27
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
28
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
28
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
28
2
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.65
Addresses
Table D-23: Annunciator card group 14 addresses
LED-switch group
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
28
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
29
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
29
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
29
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
29
3
00
16
***
Switch
14
30
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
14
30
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
14
30
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
14
30
3
00
16
***
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
15
01
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
01
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
01
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
01
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
02
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
02
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
02
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
02
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
03
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
03
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
03
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
03
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
04
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
04
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
04
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
04
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
05
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
05
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
05
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
05
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
06
n/a
00
16
***
Table D-24: Annunciator card group 15 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
6
D.66
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-24: Annunciator card group 15 addresses
LED-switch group
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
15
06
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
06
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
06
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
07
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
07
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
07
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
07
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
08
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
08
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
08
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
08
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
09
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
09
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
09
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
09
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
10
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
10
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
10
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
10
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
11
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
11
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
11
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
11
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
12
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
12
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
12
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
12
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
13
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
13
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
13
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
13
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
14
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
14
1
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.67
Addresses
Table D-24: Annunciator card group 15 addresses
LED-switch group
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
D.68
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
15
14
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
14
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
15
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
15
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
15
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
15
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
16
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
16
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
16
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
16
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
17
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
17
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
17
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
17
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
18
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
18
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
18
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
18
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
19
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
19
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
19
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
19
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
20
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
20
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
20
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
20
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
21
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
21
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
21
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
21
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
22
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
22
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
22
2
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-24: Annunciator card group 15 addresses
LED-switch group
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
22
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
23
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
23
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
23
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
23
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
24
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
24
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
24
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
24
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
25
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
25
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
25
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
25
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
26
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
26
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
26
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
26
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
27
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
27
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
27
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
27
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
28
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
28
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
28
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
28
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
29
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
29
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
29
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
29
3
00
16
***
Switch
15
30
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
15
30
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
15
30
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
15
30
3
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.69
Addresses
Table D-25: Annunciator card group 16 addresses
LED-switch group
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
D.70
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
16
01
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
01
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
01
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
01
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
02
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
02
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
02
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
02
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
03
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
03
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
03
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
03
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
04
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
04
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
04
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
04
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
05
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
05
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
05
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
05
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
06
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
06
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
06
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
06
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
07
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
07
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
07
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
07
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
08
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
08
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
08
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
08
3
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-25: Annunciator card group 16 addresses
LED-switch group
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Switch
16
09
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
09
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
09
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
09
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
10
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
10
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
10
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
10
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
11
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
11
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
11
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
11
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
12
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
12
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
12
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
12
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
13
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
13
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
13
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
13
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
14
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
14
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
14
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
14
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
15
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
15
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
15
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
15
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
16
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
16
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
16
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
16
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
17
n/a
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.71
Addresses
Table D-25: Annunciator card group 16 addresses
LED-switch group
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
D.72
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Alarm (red) LED
16
17
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
17
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
17
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
18
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
18
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
18
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
18
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
19
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
19
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
19
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
19
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
20
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
20
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
20
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
20
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
21
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
21
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
21
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
21
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
22
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
22
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
22
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
22
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
23
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
23
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
23
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
23
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
24
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
24
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
24
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
24
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
25
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
25
1
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Addresses
Table D-25: Annunciator card group 16 addresses
LED-switch group
26
27
28
29
30
Component
GG
SS
L
PP
CC
DDD
Active (yellow) LED
16
25
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
25
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
26
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
26
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
26
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
26
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
27
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
27
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
27
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
27
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
28
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
28
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
28
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
28
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
29
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
29
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
29
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
29
3
00
16
***
Switch
16
30
n/a
00
16
***
Alarm (red) LED
16
30
1
00
16
***
Active (yellow) LED
16
30
2
00
16
***
Trouble (yellow) LED
16
30
3
00
16
***
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
D.73
Addresses
D.74
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Appendix E
Contact ID event codes
Summary
This appendix provides a list of Contact ID event codes that you
can use when programming dialer strings.
Content
Alarms • E.2
Supervisories • E.3
Troubles • E.4
Bypasses/disables • E.8
Test/miscellaneous • E.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
E.1
Contact ID event codes
Alarms
Contact ID alarm event codes are listed in the table below. The
Data Type column designates which information to include as
the last five digits of the dialer string when you use the
corresponding event code.
Fire alarms (110 – 119)
E.2
Event code
Description
Data type
110
Fire
Point ID
111
Smoke
Point ID
112
Combustion
Point ID
113
Water flow
Point ID
114
Heat
Point ID
115
Pull station
Point ID
116
Duct
Point ID
117
Flame
Point ID
118
Near alarm
Point ID
119
not defined
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Contact ID event codes
Supervisories
The following table lists the Contact ID supervisory event codes.
The last column (data type) designates which information to
include in the last five digits of the dialer string when you use
the corresponding event code.
Fire supervisory (200 – 219)
Event code
Description
Data type
200
Fire supervisory
Point ID
201
Low water pressure
Point ID
202
Low CO2 (carbon dioxide)
Point ID
203
Gate valve sensor
Point ID
204
Low water level
Point ID
205
Pump activated
Point ID
206
Pump failure
Point ID
207 – 219
not defined
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
E.3
Contact ID event codes
Troubles
Contact ID trouble event codes are divided into the following
categories:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
System troubles
Sounder/relay troubles
System peripheral troubles
Communication troubles
Protection loop troubles
Sensor troubles
General alarms
The following tables list the Contact ID trouble event codes. The
last column (data type) designates which information to include
in the last five digits of the dialer string when you use the
corresponding event code.
System troubles (300 – 319)
Event code
Description
Data type
300
System trouble
Point ID
301
AC loss
Point ID
302
Low system battery
Point ID
303
RAM checksum bad
Point ID
304
ROM checksum bad
Point ID
305
System reset
Point ID
306
Panel programming changed
Point ID
307
Self-test failure
Point ID
308
System shutdown
Point ID
309
Battery test failure
Point ID
310
Ground fault
Point ID
311
Battery missing or dead
Point ID
312
Power supply over-current
Point ID
313
Engineer reset
User ID
314 – 319
not defined
Sounder/relay troubles (320 – 329)
E.4
Event code
Description
Data type
320
Sounder/relay
Point ID
321
Bell 1
Point ID
322
Bell 2
Point ID
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Contact ID event codes
Event code
Description
Data type
323
Alarm relay
Point ID
324
Trouble relay
Point ID
325
Reversing relay
Point ID
326
Notification appliance Ckt. #3
Point ID
327
Notification appliance Ckt. #4
Point ID
328 – 329
not defined
System peripheral troubles (330 – 349)
Event code
Description
Data type
330
System peripheral trouble
Point ID
331
Polling loop open
Point ID
332
Polling loop short
Point ID
333
Expansion module failure
Point ID
334
Repeater failure
Point ID
335
Local printer out of paper
Point ID
336
Local printer failure
Point ID
337
Expansion module DC loss
Point ID
338
Expansion module low battery
Point ID
339
Expansion module reset
Point ID
340
not defined
Point ID
341
Expansion module tamper
Point ID
342
Expansion module AC loss
Point ID
343
Expansion module self-test fail
Point ID
344 – 349
not defined
Communication troubles (350 – 369)
Event code
Description
Data type
350
Communication trouble
Point ID
351
Telco line 1 fault
Point ID
352
Telco line 2 fault
Point ID
353
Long range radio transmitter
fault
Point ID
354
Failure to communicate event
Point ID
355
Loss of radio supervision
Point ID
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
E.5
Contact ID event codes
Event code
Description
Data type
356
Loss of central polling
Point ID
357
Long range radio VSWR
problem
Point ID
358 – 369
not defined
Protection loop (370 – 379)
Event code
Description
Data type
370
Protection loop
Point ID
371
Protection loop open
Point ID
372
Protection loop short
Point ID
373
Fire trouble
Point ID
374
Exit error (zone)
Point ID
375
Panel zone trouble
Point ID
376
Holdup zone trouble
Point ID
377 – 379
not defined
Sensor troubles (380 – 399)
E.6
Event code
Description
Data type
380
Sensor trouble
Point ID
381
Loss of supervision - RF
Point ID
382
Loss of supervision - RPM
Point ID
383
Sensor tamper
Point ID
384
RF low battery
Point ID
385
Smoke detector high sensitivity Point ID
386
Smoke detector low sensitivity
Point ID
387
Intrusion detector high
sensitivity
Point ID
388
Intrusion detector low
sensitivity
Point ID
389
Sensor self-test failure
Point ID
390
not defined
391
Sensor watch trouble
Point ID
392
Drift compensation error
Point ID
393
Maintenance alert
Point ID
394 – 399
not defined
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Contact ID event codes
General alarms (140 – 149)
Event code
Description
Data type
140
General alarm
Point ID
141
Polling loop open
Point ID
142
Polling loop short
Point ID
143
Expansion module failure
Point ID
144
Sensor tamper
Point ID
145
Expansion module tamper
Point ID
146
Silent burglary
Point ID
147 – 149
not defined
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
E.7
Contact ID event codes
Bypasses/disables
Contact ID bypasses/disables event codes are divided into the
following categories:
•
•
•
•
•
System disables
Sounder/relay disables
System peripheral disables
Communication disables
Bypasses
The following tables list the Contact ID bypasses/disables event
codes. The last column (data type) designates which information
to include in the last five digits of the dialer string when you use
the corresponding event code.
System disables (500 – 519)
Event code
Description
Data type
500
System disable
Point ID
501
Access reader disable
Point ID
502 – 519
not defined
Sounder/relay disables (520 – 529)
Event code
Description
Data type
520
Sounder/relay disable
Point ID
521
Bell 1 disable
Point ID
522
Bell 2 disable
Point ID
523
Alarm relay disable
Point ID
524
Trouble relay disable
Point ID
525
Reversing relay disable
Point ID
526
Notification appliance Ckt. #3
disable
Point ID
527
Notification appliance Ckt. #4
disable
Point ID
528 – 529
not defined
System peripheral disables (530 – 549)
E.8
Event code
Description
Data type
530
System peripheral disable
Point ID
531
Module added
Point ID
532
Module removed
Point ID
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Contact ID event codes
Event code
Description
533 – 549
not defined
Data type
Communication disables (550 – 569)
Event code
Description
Data type
550
Communication disabled
Point ID
551
Dialer disabled
Point ID
552
Radio transmitter disabled
Point ID
553
Remote upload/download
disabled
Point ID
534 – 549
not defined
Bypasses (570 – 579)
Event code
Description
Data type
570
Zone/sensor bypass
Point ID
571
Fire bypass
Point ID
572
24 hour zone bypass
Point ID
573
Burglar bypass
Point ID
574
Group bypass
User ID
575
Swinger bypass
Point ID
576
Access zone shunt
Point ID
577
Access point bypass
Point ID
578 – 579
not defined
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
E.9
Contact ID event codes
Test/miscellaneous
Contact ID test/miscellaneous event codes are divided into the
following categories:
•
•
•
•
•
Test/miscellaneous
Event log
Scheduling
Personnel monitoring
Miscellaneous
The following tables list the Contact ID test/miscellaneous event
codes. The last column (data type) designates which information
to include in the last five digits of the dialer string when you use
the corresponding event code.
Test/miscellaneous (600 – 619)
E.10
Event code
Description
Data type
600
Test/miscellaneous
Point ID
601
Manual trigger test report
Point ID
602
Periodic test report
Point ID
603
Periodic RF transmission
Point ID
604
Fire test
User ID
605
Status report to follow
Point ID
606
Listen-in to follow
Point ID
607
Walk Test mode
User ID
608
Periodic test - system trouble
present
Point ID
609
Video transmitter active
Point ID
610
not defined
611
Point tested OK
Point ID
612
Point not tested
Point ID
613
Intrusion zone walk tested
Point ID
614
Fire zone walk tested
Point ID
615
Panic zone walk tested
Point ID
616
Service request
Point ID
617– 619
not defined
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Contact ID event codes
Event log (620 – 629)
Event code
Description
Data type
620
Event log
Point ID
621
Event log reset
Point ID
622
Event log 50% full
Point ID
623
Event log 90% full
Point ID
624
Event log overflow
Point ID
625
Time/date reset
User ID
626
Time/date inaccurate
Point ID
627
Program mode entry
Point ID
628
Program mode exit
Point ID
629
32 hour event log marker
Point ID
Scheduling (630 – 639)
Event code
Description
Data type
630
Schedule change
Point ID
631
Exception schedule change
Point ID
632
Access schedule change
Point ID
633 – 639
not defined
Personnel monitoring (640 – 649)
Event code
Description
Data type
640
Personnel monitoring
Point ID
641
Senior watch trouble
Point ID
642
Latch-key supervision
User ID
643 – 649
not defined
Miscellaneous (650 – 659)
Event code
Description
Data type
650
Personnel monitoring
Point ID
651
Reserved
652 – 652
not defined
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
E.11
Contact ID event codes
E.12
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Z
Index
AC power delay timer • 7.17
AC Power Dly command • 7.17
Account # command
Accounts menu • 7.44
Accounts menu commands
Account # • 7.44
CMS • 7.45
Exit • 7.46
Formats • 7.44
Test Time • 7.45
Test-Abormal • 7.45
Test-Normal • 7.44
Activate menu • 2.25
Activate menu commands
Alt Msg Route • 2.25, 5.19
Alt Sens • 2.25, 5.18
LED • 2.25, 8.11
Output • 2.25, 8.9
active and disabled points field • 2.16
Active LED • 2.13
active response type • 7.3
active test response type • 7.3
ADC menu commands
Exit • 7.25
Add command
Config Detector menu • 7.28
Config Module menu • 7.35
Edit Card menu • 7.18
Edit Output menu • 7.47
Edit Zone menu • 7.55
Output Group menu • 7.59
adding
intelligent addressable detectors • 7.28
intelligent addressable modules • 7.35
members to a zone • 7.58
option cards • 7.18
output groups • 7.47
output groups to a zone • 7.59
zones • 7.55
adding a delay response • 7.50
adding a dialer response • 7.51
adding a location description
detectors • 7.30
modules • 7.38
ZA8-2 card circuits • 7.22
ZB16-4 card circuits • 7.20
zones • 7.57
adding a relay response • 7.49
adding intelligent addressable devices automatically •
7.26
address switch settings
DLD card • 3.33
PS6 card • 3.9
SLIC card • 3.14
ZA8-2 card • 3.29
ZB16-4 card • 3.24
ZR8 card • 3.31
addresses
Control panel CPU card • D.4
DLD card • D.13
LED/switch cards • See LED/switch card addresses
PS6 card • D.8
Remote annunciator CPU card • D.6
SLIC card • D.9
system • D.2
ZA8-2 card • D.11
ZB16-4 card • D.10
ZR8 card • D.12
alarm active device type • 7.7
Alarm command • 2.22
Alarm command • 5.3
Alarm History command • 2.24, 5.10
alarm history field • 2.15
Alarm LED • 2.10
Alarm output device type • 7.7
Alarm Silence pseudo point • D.2
Alarm Silence switch • 2.11, 5.14
alarm silence/reset inhibit timer • 7.17
alarm state
event messages • 2.26
indications • 2.29
outputs • 2.29
alarm verify device type • 7.6
All Active command • 2.22, 5.3
ALM/RST Inhib command • 7.17
alphanumeric display • 2.11
Alt Msg Route command • 2.25, 5.19
Alt Sens command • 2.25, 5.18
alternate alarm sensitivity
switching to primary • 5.18
alternate message route
switching to primary • 5.19
AND command
Disable Group menu • 8.4
Enable Group menu • 8.4
Ann PP CH1 Communications pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP Code Supervision pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP Database Incompatible pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP Database Supervision pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP Program Mode pseudo point • D.7
Ann PP ROM Supervision pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP RS232 Port Fault pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP Service Active Trouble pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP Switch Latched pseudo point • D.7
Ann PP, Call for Service pseudo point • D.6
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Z.1
#
#’s of CMS command
Dialer Setup menu • 7.40
2
2-CTM
description • 4.10
specifications • 4.10
A
Ann PP, CH2 Communications pseudo point • D.6
Ann PP, LED/Switch Display pseudo point • D.6
Annunciator PP Communications pseudo point • D.6
Annunciator PP Power Fault pseudo point • D.7
Annunciator PP Reboot Fault pseudo point • D.6
Annunciator PP Reset Extension pseudo point • D.6
Annunciator PP Task Failure pseudo point • D.6
audible device type • 7.8
Auto Loop command • 7.11, 7.26
AutoLearn command • 7.11, 7.13
AUX Power 1/2 Shorted pseudo point • D.8
AUX Power 3 Shorted pseudo point • D.8
auxiliary power outputs • 3.7
B
banner window • 2.15
barcode jack • 2.12
Base Type command • 7.33
Battery Charger Fault pseudo point • D.8
Battery Wiring or Battery Fault pseudo point • D.8
C
Cancel Test command • 2.24, 8.3
canceling a service group test • 8.3
capturing a report • 8.21
Card 15 Communications pseudo point • D.8
Card CC Communications pseudo point • D.9, D.10,
D.11, D.12
Card CC Map Fault pseudo point • D.9
Card CC Unconfig. Device pseudo point • D.9
Card CC, EEPROM Supervision pseudo point • D.9,
D.10, D.11, D.12
Card CC, LIM Driver Fault pseudo point • D.9
Card CC, Line Initialization pseudo point • D.9
Card CC, Loop Ground Fault pseudo point • D.9
Card CC, Loop Wiring Problem pseudo point • D.9
Card CC, Mapping Disabled pseudo point • D.9
Card CC, Mapping in Progress pseudo point • D.9
Card CC, RAM Supervision pseudo point • D.9, D.10,
D.11, D.12
Card CC, ROM Supervision pseudo point • D.9, D.10,
D.11, D.12
Card command
Disable menu • 2.25, 8.8
Enable menu • 2.24, 8.8
card descriptions
DLD card • 3.33
PS6 card • 3.3
SL20L5S card • 3.42
SL30 card • 3.40
SL30-1 card • 3.41
SL30L card • 3.41
SLIC card • 3.11
ZA8-2 card • 3.25
ZB16-4 card • 3.20
ZR8 card • 3.30
Card Devices command • 2.23, 5.8
Card xx Setup Mismatch pseudo point • D.4
CDR-3
description • 4.2
jumper settings • 4.5
specifications • 4.2
switch settings • 4.4
changing alarm sensitivity
detectors • 7.32
changing detector alarm verification • 7.32
Z.2
changing device types
intelligent addressable modules • 7.38
NAC 1 and NAC 2 output circuits • 7.24
ZA8-2 cards • 7.23
ZB16-4 cards • 7.21
changing personalities
intelligent addressable modules • 7.39
changing the base type setting • 7.33
changing the level 1 password • 5.20
changing the level 2 password • 8.14
changing the level 3 password • 7.12
changing the level 4 password • 7.12
changing the pre-alarm setting • 7.33
changing the wiring class setting • 7.25
changing the zone type • 7.61
Check System Wiring pseudo point • D.8
Circuit Edit menu commands
Device Type • 7.21, 7.23
Exit • 7.20, 7.21, 7.22, 7.23
Text Message • 7.20, 7.22
Circuit Num command
Trad Zone menu • 7.20, 7.21, 7.22, 7.23
Clear History command • 7.63
clearing the history log • 7.63
clearing trouble messages • 8.15
CMS command
Accounts menu • 7.45
CMS Phone # command
Dialer Setup menu • 7.40
Coding command • 7.61
command menus
level 1 • 2.17
level 2 • 2.17
level 3 • 2.18
level 4 • 2.20
commissioning the system: • 6.26
common relay outputs • 3.4
Config Card menu commands
Exit • See Exit menu commands
NAC 1 • 7.24
NAC 2 • 7.24
Wiring Class • 7.25
Config Detector menu commands
Add • 7.28
Delete • 7.28
Edit • 7.30
Sensitivity • 7.32
Config Detector menu commands
Base Type • 7.33
Exit • See Exit menu commands
Message • 7.30
Model • 7.31
Pre-Alarm • 7.33
Verification • 7.32
Config Mod menu commands
Message • 7.38
Config Module menu commands
Add • 7.35
Delete • 7.35
Edit • 7.37
Config Module menu commands
Exit • See Exit menu commands
Model • 7.37
Personality • 7.39
Type • 7.38
Config System menu commands
AC Power Dly • 7.17
ALM/RST Inhib • 7.17
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Exit • See Exit menu commands
User Labels • See User Labels menu commands
Configure Loop 1 menu commands
Detector • See Config Detector menu commands
Module • See Config Module menu commands
Configure Loop 2 menu commands • See Configure
Loop 1 menu commands
Configure menu commands
AutoLearn • 7.13
Cards • See Edit Card menu commands
Exit • See Update Databases menu commands
Output • See Edit Output menu commands
System • See Config System menu commands
Zones • See Edit Zone menu commands
configuring the system automatically • 7.13
control panel operation
alarm state • 2.29
disable state • 2.32
monitor state • 2.31
supervisory state • 2.30
test state • 2.33
trouble state • 2.30
CPU card
addresses • D.4, D.6
CPU Fault LED • 2.10
CPU/Display Unit
installation • 6.12
D
Default Msgs command
Dialer Setup menu • 7.41
default settings
SLIC card • 7.24
ZA8-2 card • 7.22
ZB16-4 card • 7.20
Delayed Output pseudo point • D.3
Delete command
Config Detector menu • 7.28
Config Module menu • 7.35
Edit Card menu • 7.19
Edit Output menu • 7.47
Edit Zone menu • 7.55
Zone Members menu • 7.58
Delete switch • 2.12
deleting
intelligent addressable detectors • 7.28
intelligent addressable modules • 7.35
members from a zone • 7.58
option cards • 7.19
output groups • 7.47
zones • 7.55
description
2-CTM • 4.10
CDR-3 • 4.2
IOP3A • 4.12
RPM • 4.8
Details display screen • 2.16
Device command
Disable menu • 2.25, 5.17
Enable menu • 2.24, 5.17
Device Type command
Circuit Edit menu • 7.21, 7.23
device type descriptions • 7.6
Dialer Setup menu commands
#’s of CMS • 7.40
CMS Phone # • 7.40
Default Msgs • 7.41
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Retry Count • 7.41
Dialer Setup Mismatch pseudo point • D.4
Dirty>20% command • 2.23, 5.7
Dirty>80% command • 2.23, 5.7
Disable Group menu commands
AND • 8.4
Matrix • 8.5
Time Control • 8.6
Disable menu • 2.25
Disable menu commands
Card • 2.25, 8.8
Device • 2.25, 5.17
Group • See Disable Group menu commands
Switch • 2.25, 8.7
Zone • 2.25, 5.16
disable state
indications • 2.32
outputs • 2.32
Disable/Test LED • 2.10
Disabled Pts command • 2.22, 5.5
disablement response type • 7.3
disabling
AND groups • 8.4
devices • 5.17
matrix groups • 8.5
option cards • 8.8
switches • 8.7
time controls • 8.6
zones • 5.16
displaying
active fire alarm points • 5.3
active monitor points • 5.4
active output points • 5.5
active supervisory points • 5.3
all active points • 5.3
Card Devices report • 5.8
Dirty>20% report • 5.7
Dirty>80% report • 5.7
disabled points • 5.5
history report • 5.9
points in an active service group • 5.4
points in trouble • 5.4
power supply voltages • 5.5
revision report • 8.2
Single Device report • 5.8
displaying maintenance reports • 5.7
DLD card
address switch settings • 3.33
addresses • D.13
description • 3.33
specifications • 3.33
down cursor switch • 2.12
Drill pseudo point • D.2
Drill switch • 2.11, 5.15
dry contact device type • 7.6
E
Edit Card menu commands
Add • 7.18
Delete • 7.19
Edit command
Config Detector menu • 7.30
Config Module menu • 7.37
Edit Output menu • 7.49
Edit Output menu commands
Add • 7.47
Delete • 7.47
Z.3
Edit • 7.49
Edit Password command • 5.20, 7.12, 8.14
Edit Zone menu commands
Add • 7.55
Delete • 7.55
editing an output group
adding a delay response • 7.50
adding a dialer response • 7.51
adding a relay response • 7.49
removing a response • 7.52
editing detector settings
alarm sensitivity • 7.32
base type • 7.33
message • 7.30
model type • 7.31
pre-alarm • 7.33
verification • 7.32
editing DLD card settings
number of receivers • 7.40
receiver telephone numbers • 7.40
retry attempts • 7.41
editing module settings
device type • 7.38
message • 7.38
model number • 7.37
personality • 7.39
editing SLIC card settings
NAC 1 • 7.24
NAC 2 • 7.24
wiring class • 7.25
editing system settings
ac power delay • 7.17
alarm silence/reset inhibit • 7.17
user labels • 7.15
editing ZA8-2 card settings
device type • 7.23
text message • 7.22
editing ZB16-4 card settings
device type • 7.21
text message • 7.20
editing zone settings
coding • 7.61
members • 7.57
message • 7.57
output group • 7.59
type • 7.61
Enable Controls switch • 2.12
Enable Group menu commands
AND • 8.4
Matrix • 8.5
Time Control • 8.6
Enable menu • 2.24
Enable menu commands
Card • 2.24, 8.8
Device • 2.24, 5.17
Group • See Enable Group menu commands
Switch • 2.24, 8.7
Zone • 2.24, 5.16
enabling
AND groups • 8.4
devices • 5.17
matrix groups • 8.5
option cards • 8.8
switches • 8.7
time controls • 8.6
zones • 5.16
Enter Date command • 8.13
Enter switch • 2.12
Z.4
Enter Time command • 8.13
entering a zone code • 7.61
entering the facility’s name • 7.15
entering the installing company’s name • 7.15
entering the name of the system programmer • 7.16
entering the telephone number of the installing
company • 7.16
Evacuation pseudo point • D.2
Event Message display screen • 2.15
event message queues • 2.16
event message window • 2.16
Excessive Battery Current pseudo point • D.8
Exit command
Accounts menu • 7.46
ADC menu • 7.25
Circuit Edit menu • 7.20, 7.21, 7.22, 7.23
Config Card menu • 7.25
Config Detector menu • 7.34
Config Module menu • 7.39, 7.62
Config System menu • 7.17
Dialer Setup menu • 7.42
Trad Zone menu • 7.21, 7.23
User Labels menu • 7.16
Exit menu commands
NO Save • 7.16, 7.17, 7.21, 7.23, 7.25, 7.34, 7.39,
7.42, 7.62
Save Edits • 7.16, 7.17, 7.21, 7.23, 7.25, 7.34, 7.39,
7.42, 7.62
F
Facility Name command • 7.15
failsafe operation jumper • 3.9
fire alarm event messages • 2.26
fire alarm system limitations • 1.4
First Alarm pseudo point • D.2
First Disable pseudo point • D.2
First Monitor pseudo point • D.2
First Supervisory pseudo point • D.2
First Test pseudo point • D.3
First Trouble pseudo point • D.2
Formats command
Accounts menu • 7.44
G
Ground Fault LED • 2.10
ground fault supervision jumper • 3.38
H
heat alarm device type • 7.7
Help switch • 2.11
History command • 2.23, 5.9
HyperTerminal • 8.21
I
IDC inputs
ZA8-2 card • 3.26
ZB16-4 card • 3.21
indications
alarm state • 2.29
disable state • 2.32
monitor state • 2.31
supervisory state • 2.30
test state • 2.33
trouble state • 2.31
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Inst Company command • 7.15
installation
RPM • 4.8
intelligent addressable detectors
adding a location description • 7.30
changing alarm sensitivity • 7.32
viewing the model type • 7.31
intelligent addressable modules
adding a location description • 7.38
changing the device type • 7.38
changing the personality • 7.39
viewing the model number • 7.37
Internal command • 2.22, 5.5
IOP3A
description • 4.12
jumper settings • 4.12
specifications • 4.12
switch settings • 4.13
J
jumper settings
CDR-3 • 4.5
IOP3A • 4.12
PS6 card • 3.9
RS-485 card • 3.38
SLIC card • 3.15
ZR8 card • 3.32
L
Lamp Test command • 2.24, 5.11
laptop computer wire connections • 6.33
latching supervisory device type • 7.7
latching tamper device type • 7.7
LED command
Activate menu • 2.25, 8.11
Restore menu • 2.25, 8.11
LED/switch card
installation • 6.12
LED/switch card addresses
group 1 • D.14
group 10 • D.47
group 11 • D.51
group 12 • D.55
group 13 • D.58
group 14 • D.62
group 15 • D.66
group 16 • D.70
group 2 • D.17
group 3 • D.21
group 4 • D.25
group 5 • D.29
group 6 • D.32
group 7 • D.36
group 8 • D.40
group 9 • D.44
Left cursor switch • 2.11
level 1 command menus • 2.17
level 2 command menus • 2.17
level 3 command menus • 2.18
level 4 command menus • 2.20
limitation of liability • 1.5
logging on to the fire alarm system • 5.2
M
Maintenance menu commands
Card Devices • 2.23
Card Devices • 5.8
Dirty>20% • 2.23, 5.7
Dirty>80% • 2.23, 5.7
Single Device • 2.23
Single Device • 5.8
matrix group
disabling • 8.5
enabling • 8.5
Menu switch • 2.12
Message command
Config Detector menu • 7.30
Config Mod menu • 7.38
Zone Edit menu • 7.57
messages
fire alarm events • 2.26
monitor events • 2.28
supervisory events • 2.27
trouble events • 2.27
Model command
Config Detector menu • 7.31
Config Module menu • 7.37
Monitor command • 2.22, 5.4
monitor device type • 7.8
monitor event messages • 2.28
Monitor LED • 2.10
monitor state
indications • 2.31
monitor event messages • 2.28
outputs • 2.31
N
NAC 1 command
Config Card menu • 7.24
NAC 2 command
Config Card menu • 7.24
NAC outputs
ZA8-2 card • 3.27
ZB16-4 card • 3.22
NAC1 signal jumper • 3.15
NO Save command • 7.16, 7.17, 7.21, 7.23, 7.25, 7.34,
7.39, 7.42, 7.62
normal state • 2.29
numeric keypad • 2.11
O
Output command
Activate menu • 2.25, 8.9
Restore menu • 2.25, 8.10
output device type • 7.8
output group description • 7.3
Output Group menu commands
Add • 7.59
Remove • 7.60
Review • 7.53, 7.60
outputs
alarm state • 2.29
disable state • 2.32
monitor state • 2.31
supervisory state • 2.30
test state • 2.33
trouble state • 2.30
Outputs command • 2.22, 5.5
Main menu • 2.22
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Z.5
P
Panel PP Alt. Routing pseudo point • D.5, D.7
Panel PP Alt. Sensitivity pseudo point • D.5, D.7
Panel PP Call for Service pseudo point • D.5
Panel PP Card Communications pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP CH1 Communications pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP CH2 Communications pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP Code Supervision pseudo point • D.5
Panel PP DB Incompatible pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP LED/Switch Display pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP Loop Database pseudo point • D.5
Panel PP Program Mode pseudo point • D.5
Panel PP Reboot Fault pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP Reset Extension pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP ROM Supervision pseudo point • D.5
Panel PP RS232 Port Fault pseudo point • D.5
Panel PP Service Active Trouble pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP Switch Latched pseudo point • D.5
Panel PP Task Failure pseudo point • D.4
Panel PP Unexpected Card pseudo point • D.5
Panel Silence switch • 5.12
Panel Silence/Acknowledge switch • 2.12
performing a lamp test • 5.11
Personality command
Config Module menu • 7.39
Phone Number command • 7.16
Pnl PP Database Supervision pseudo point • D.5
Power LED • 2.10
Power Supply EEPROM Supervision pseudo point •
D.8
Power Supply RAM Supervision pseudo point • D.8
Power Supply ROM Supervision pseudo point • D.8
Power Supply Setup Mismatch pseudo point • D.4
Power Supply User Relay • D.8
Pre-Alarm command • 7.33
prealarm response type • 7.3
Prim Msg Route command • 5.19
Primary AC Power Failure pseudo point • D.8
primary alarm sensitivity
switching to alternate • 5.18
primary message route
switching to alternate • 5.19
printing
active monitor points • 5.4
active supervisory points • 5.3
activefire alarm points • 5.3
activel output points • 5.5
all active points • 5.3
Card Devices report • 5.8
Dirty>20% report • 5.7
Dirty>80% report • 5.7
disabled points • 5.5
history report • 5.9
points in an active service group • 5.4
points in trouble • 5.4
power supply voltages • 5.5
revision report • 8.2
Single Device report • 5.8
printing maintenance reports • 5.7
Prm Msg Route command • 2.25
Prm Sens command • 2.25, 5.18
Program menu commands
Clear History • 7.63
Configure • See Configure menu commands
Edit Password • 5.20, 7.12, 8.14
Restart • 5.21
Time/Date • See Time/Date menu commands
Z.6
programmable features • 2.3
Programmer command • 7.16
PS6 card
address switch settings • 3.9
addresses • D.8
description • 3.3
installation • 6.10
jumper settings • 3.9
specifications • 3.3
wire connections • See PS6 card wire connections
PS6 card wire connections
auxiliary power outputs • 3.7
relay outputs • 3.4
RS-232 port • 3.7
RS-485 port • 3.6
smoke/accessory power output • 3.5
standby batteries • 3.8
pseudo points
Alarm Silence • D.2
Ann PP CH1 Communications • D.6
Ann PP Code Supervision • D.6
Ann PP Database Incompatible • D.6
Ann PP Database Supervision • D.6
Ann PP Program Mode • D.7
Ann PP ROM Supervision • D.6
Ann PP RS232 Port Fault • D.6
Ann PP Service Active Trouble • D.6
Ann PP Switch Latched • D.7
Ann PP, Call for Service • D.6
Ann PP, CH2 Communications • D.6
Ann PP, LED/Switch Display • D.6
Annunciator PP Communications • D.6
Annunciator PP Power Fault • D.7
Annunciator PP Reboot Fault • D.6
Annunciator PP Reset Extension • D.6
Annunciator PP Task Failure • D.6
AUX Power 1/2 Shorted • D.8
AUX Power 3 Shorted • D.8
Battery Charger Fault • D.8
Battery Wiring or Battery Fault • D.8
Card 15 Communications • D.8
Card CC Communications • D.9, D.10, D.11, D.12
Card CC Map Fault • D.9
Card CC Unconfig. Device • D.9
Card CC, EEPROM Supervision • D.9, D.10, D.11,
D.12
Card CC, LIM Driver Fault • D.9
Card CC, Line Initialization • D.9
Card CC, Loop Ground Fault • D.9
Card CC, Loop Wiring Problem • D.9
Card CC, Mapping Disabled • D.9
Card CC, Mapping in Progress • D.9
Card CC, RAM Supervision • D.9, D.10, D.11, D.12
Card CC, ROM Supervision • D.9, D.10, D.11, D.12
Card xx Setup Mismatch • D.4
Check System Wiring • D.8
Delayed Output • D.3
Dialer Setup Mismatch • D.4
Drill • D.2
Evacuation • D.2
Excessive Battery Current • D.8
First Alarm • D.2
First Disable • D.2
First Monitor • D.2
First Supervisory • D.2
First Test • D.3
First Trouble • D.2
Panel PP Alt. Routing • D.5, D.7
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Panel PP Alt. Sensitivity • D.5, D.7
Panel PP Call for Service • D.5
Panel PP Card Communications • D.4
Panel PP CH1 Communications • D.4
Panel PP CH2 Communications • D.4
Panel PP Code Supervision • D.5
Panel PP DB Incompatible • D.4
Panel PP LED/Switch Display • D.4
Panel PP Loop Database • D.5
Panel PP Program Mode • D.5
Panel PP Reboot Fault • D.4
Panel PP Reset Extension • D.4
Panel PP ROM Supervision • D.5
Panel PP RS232 Port Fault • D.5
Panel PP Service Active Trouble • D.4
Panel PP Switch Latched • D.5
Panel PP Task Failure • D.4
Panel PP Unexpected Card • D.5
Pnl PP Database Supervision • D.5
Power Supply EEPROM Supervision • D.8
Power Supply RAM Supervision • D.8
Power Supply ROM Supervision • D.8
Power Supply Setup Mismatch • D.4
Primary AC Power Failure • D.8
Reset • D.2
Reset Phase 1 • D.2
Reset Phase 2 • D.2
Reset Phase 3 • D.2
Smoke Power Shorted • D.8
Startup • D.2
Thermal Fault • D.8
Two Stage Expiration • D.2
Two Stage Timer Started • D.3
User Trouble • D.3
pull station device type • 7.6
R
RAI card
installation • 6.21
wiring • 6.23
relay outputs
PS6 card • 3.4
ZR8 card • 3.30
remote annunciator installation • 6.17
Remove command
Output Group menu • 7.60
Output Responses menu • 7.52
removing
output groups from a zone • 7.60
responses • 7.52
replacing the control panel fuse • 8.20
Reports menu • 2.22
Reports menu commands
Alarm History • 2.24, 5.10
History • 2.23, 5.9
Maintenance • See Maintenance menu commands
Revisions • 2.23, 8.2
Reset Phase 1 pseudo point • D.2
Reset Phase 2 pseudo point • D.2
Reset Phase 3 pseudo point • D.2
Reset pseudo point • D.2
Reset switch • 5.13
resetting the alarm history counter • 7.63
resetting the fire alarm system • 5.13
response type descriptions • 7.3
Restart command • 5.21
restarting the fire alarm system • 5.21
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
Restore menu • 2.25
Restore menu commands
LED • 2.25, 8.11
Output • 2.25, 8.10
Prim Msg Route • 5.19
Prm Msg Route • 2.25
Prm Sens • 2.25, 5.18
Retry Count command
Dialer Setup menu • 7.41
Review command
Output Group menu • 7.60
Zone Members menu • 7.59
reviewing
output group responses • 7.53
output groups assigned to a zone • 7.60
zone members • 7.59
Revisions command • 2.23, 8.2
right cursor switch • 2.11
RPM
description • 4.8
installation • 4.8
specifications • 4.8
RS-232 port • 3.7
RS-485 card
jumper settings • 3.38
specifications • 3.37
wire connections • 3.38
RS-485 port • 3.6
running response type • 7.3
S
Save & Sync command • 7.64
Save command • 7.64
Save Edits command • 7.16, 7.17, 7.21, 7.23, 7.25,
7.34, 7.39, 7.42, 7.62
saving card configuration changes
DLD card • 7.42
SLIC card • 7.25
ZA8-2 card • 7.23
ZB16-4 card • 7.21
saving detector configuration changes • 7.34
saving module configuration changes • 7.39
saving system configuration changes • 7.17
saving the project database • 7.64
saving user labels • 7.16
saving zone configuration changes • 7.62
Sensitivity command • 7.32
serial printer wire connections • 6.33
service group description • 7.5
setting the AC power delay timer • 7.17
setting the alarm silence/reset inhibit timer • 7.17
setting the system time and date • 8.13
setting up a HyperTerminal connection • 8.21
silencing fire alarm signals • 5.14
silencing the panel buzzer • 5.12
Single Device command • 2.23, 5.8
SL20L5S card
description • 3.42
SL30 card
description • 3.40
SL30-1 card
description • 3.41
SL30L card
description • 3.41
SLIC card
address switch settings • 3.14
addresses • D.9
Z.7
default settings • 7.24
description • 3.11
jumper settings • 3.15
specifications • 3.11
SLIC card wire connections
intelligent addressable interface • 3.14
NAC output circuits • 3.12
SLIC menu commands
Auto Loop • 7.26
Smoke Power Shorted pseudo point • D.8
smoke/accessory power output
jumper settings • 3.9
wire connections • 3.5
sounding an alarm • 5.15
specifications
2-CTM • 4.10
CDR-3 • 4.2
DLD card • 3.33
IOP3A • 4.12
PS6 card • 3.3
RPM • 4.8
RS-485 card • 3.37
SLIC card • 3.11
ZA8-2 card • 3.25
ZB16-4 card • 3.20
ZR8 card • 3.30
standby batteries
installation • 6.16
standby battery input • 3.8
Start Test command • 2.24, 8.3
starting a service group test • 8.3
Startup pseudo point • D.2
Status menu • 2.22
Status menu commands
Alarm • 2.22, 5.3
All Active • 2.22, 5.3
Disabled Pts • 2.22, 5.5
Internal • 2.22, 5.5
Monitor • 2.22, 5.4
Outputs • 2.22, 5.5
Supervisory • 2.22, 5.3
Test • 2.22, 5.4
Trouble • 2.22, 5.4
Status switch • 2.11
Supervisory command • 2.22, 5.3
supervisory device type • 7.8
supervisory event messages • 2.27
Supervisory LED • 2.10
supervisory state
indications • 2.30
outputs • 2.30
Switch command
Disable menu • 2.25, 8.7
Enable menu • 2.24, 8.7
switch settings
CDR-3 • 4.4
IOP3A • 4.13
switching detector alarm sensitivity • 5.18
switching event message routes • 5.19
system
addresses • D.2
hardware capabilities • 2.3
System Normal display screen • 2.15
System Reset switch • 2.11
T
tamper device type • 7.8
Z.8
Test command • 2.22, 5.4
Test menu • 2.24
Test menu commands
Cancel Test • 2.24, 8.3
Lamp Test • 2.24, 5.11
Start Test • 2.24, 8.3
test state
indications • 2.33
outputs • 2.33
Test Time command
Accounts menu • 7.45
Test-Abormal command
Accounts menu • 7.45
Test-Normal command
Accounts menu • 7.44
Text Message command • 7.20, 7.22
Thermal Fault pseudo point • D.8
time and date field • 2.15
time control
disabling • 8.6
enabling • 8.6
time field • 2.15
Time/Date menu commands
Enter Date • 8.13
Enter Time • 8.13
Trad Zone menu commands
Circuit Num • 7.20, 7.21, 7.22, 7.23
Exit • See Exit menu commands
Trouble command • 2.22, 5.4
trouble event messages • 2.27
Trouble LED • 2.10, 2.13
trouble messages • 8.15
trouble response type • 7.3
trouble state
event messages • 2.27
indications • 2.31
outputs • 2.30
trouble test response type • 7.3
turning an LED off • 8.11
turning an LED on • 8.11
turning an output off • 8.10
turning an output on • 8.9
Two Stage Expiration pseudo point • D.2
Two Stage Timer Started pseudo point • D.3
Type command • 7.61
Config Module menu • 7.38
U
up cursor switch • 2.12
Update Databases menu commands
Save • 7.64
Save & Sync • 7.64
User Labels menu commands
Exit • See Exit menu commands
Facility Name • 7.15
Inst Company • 7.15
Phone Number • 7.16
Programmer • 7.16
User Trouble pseudo point • D.3
V
Verification command • 7.32
verify response type • 7.4
viewing the model number
modules • 7.37
viewing the model type
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
detectors • 7.31
visual device type • 7.9
W
water flow device type • 7.9
wire connections
PS6 card • See PS6 card wire connections
ZA8-2 card • See ZA8-2 card wire connections
ZB16-4 card • See ZB16-4 card wire connections
Wiring Class command • 7.25
Z
ZA8-2 card
address switch settings • 3.29
addresses • D.11
default settings • 7.22
description • 3.25
IDC inputs • 3.26
NAC outputs • 3.27
specifications • 3.25
wire connections • See ZA8-2 card wire
connections
ZB16-4 card
address switch settings • 3.24
addresses • D.10
default settings • 7.20
description • 3.20
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
IDC inputs • 3.21
NAC outputs • 3.22
specifications • 3.20
wire connections • See ZB16-4 card wire
connections
Zone command
Disable menu • 2.25, 5.16
Enable menu • 2.24, 5.16
zone description • 7.3
Zone display/select switch • 2.13
Zone Edit menu commands
Coding • 7.61
Members • See Zone Members menu commands
Message • 7.57
Output Group • See Output Group menu
commands
Type • 7.61
Zone Members menu commands
Delete • 7.58
Device Addres • 7.58
Review • 7.59
ZR8 card
address switch settings • 3.31
addresses • D.12
description • 3.30
jumper settings • 3.32
relay outputs • 3.30
specifications • 3.30
Z.9
Z.10
QS4 Technical Reference Manual
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