High Sierra AntennAs

High Sierra AntennAs
HEATH TECH INC.
High Sierra AntennAs
Sidekick
Professional Antennas for the Amateur™
HIGH SIERRA ANTENNAS
Heath Tech Inc.,/High Sierra AntennAs is located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada
Mountains in Northern California near Grass Valley and Nevada City. Production of
antennas and accessories began in this beautiful and historic part of California in 1993. This
is an area with experienced engineers, sophisticated computerized machine shops, metal
shops with state of the art laser cutting equipment and high end powder coating companies.
In the last 11 years, antennas and accessories have been manufactured and sold to a wide
variety of customers including Mercedes Benz, Ford, Hyundai, the Army Corp of Engineers,
the U.S. Army, the U.S. Coast Guard, C.I.A., the F. B. I., the U.S. Customs Service,
Kenwood, Icom, embassies, utilities and amateur radio operators around the world.
Heath Tech Inc. which owns High Sierra Antennas has worked hard to produce the highest
quality products at the best possible price. As with our first antennas, others will copy our
products but none will have the same high quality. Thank you for purchasing a High Sierra
Antenna.
© Heath Tech Inc.
P.O. Box 2389
Nevada City, CA 95949
Table of Contents
OVERVIEW.............................................. 1
MAINTENANCE...................................... 3
INSTALLATION...................................... 5
THE FIRST STEP IS TO UNPACK THE BOX .... 5
INSTALLING THE CONTROL BOX................ 6
THE ALL IMPORTANT GROUND
CONNECTION .......................................... 11
RF FILTER ASSEMBLY ............................ 12
VEHICLE INSTALLATION ......................... 13
BASE INSTALLATION. ............................. 15
NO MATTER WHERE YOU INSTALL THE
ANTENNA, HERE ARE SOME THINGS TO
KEEP IN MIND .......................................... 16
OPERATION OF THE ANTENNA...... 17
THE UPS AND DOWNS OF THE ANTENNA .. 17
TROUBLESHOOTING, QUESTIONS
AND ANSWERS ..................................... 19
WARRANTY .......................................... 21
INDEX ..................................................... 22
1
Chapter
Overview
Please don’t call it a screwdriver antenna!
And, please do read this manual.
C
ongratulations on your purchase of our new, compact
continuous coverage motorized Sidekick. This new
version has several improvements over previous models
(HS-750 & HS-900). The major improvement is our new
motor. For years High Sierra has manufactured its own motors.
The new Black Hawk Motor™ is a quantum leap forward.
The new Black Hawk Motor™ is all metal. It has a very smooth
operation due to its bearings. It is also very, very quiet. When the
voltage is removed, this motor stops instantly. You can hear, see
and even feel the difference.
Parts for our antennas are manufactured using state of the art
computer controller equipment. Because of that equipment, we can
turn out large quantities to precision standards.
1
Installing an HF motorized antenna system is very different from a VHF or UHF antenna. A good
grounding system, counterpoise or radials is absolutely essential.
Operating this antenna without radials or a counterpoise can cause damage to
the main coil. The main coil is tightly wound in order to get coverage from 75 to
6 meters. Operating without a counterpoise will cause high voltage to develop
on the main coil which can cause an arc.
Tests with ohmmeters will likely provide misleading information. Antenna analyzers can
give incorrect or false information. You should use the transceiver and its built-in SWR
meter. Field strength meters may also be used.
Keep in mind that it is very possible to have a high SWR and greater field strength
with a properly installed and properly tuned system. For example, many antennas
can have a 50 ohm impedance with a corresponding low SWR. But, they are very
inefficient as radiators. They have a low SWR but don’t radiate very well. A low
SWR is not the goal. A strong signal is the goal. So, read the manual, follow the
instructions and do the maintenance. You will be very happy with the performance
of your High Sierra Antenna.
If you have some questions, please try to find the answers in the manual first. There is a
troubleshooting section and an index. If you can’t find the answers, please go to the website at
www.hamcq.com and use the ‘contact’ us box. Please do not call our 888 order line with technical
questions.
Here are some things to keep in mind:
•
Use the transceiver’s built-in SWR meter to tune the antenna.
•
We do not recommend the use of antenna analyzers or ohmmeters. You’ll be using a
transceiver to transmit not an analyzer or ohmmeter.
•
An SWR of less than 2:1 is good. A lower SWR reading will not result in improved
performance. In others words, when the antenna system has achieved an SWR of 2:1
or less you can stop. There is no reason for you to seek an SWR that is lower.
2
2
Chapter
Maintenance
High Sierra Antennas has learned over the years that good maintenance is the key
to good performance. That’s why we are discussing maintenance even before
installation of the system
R
outine maintenance includes doing the following items:
1. Frequently clean the antenna and check for loose screws.
2. Once a year, wax the powder coated aluminum tube with any brand of car wax.
Doing that will maintain the shine of the enameled surface.
3. You can keep the weathershield in good shape by frequently cleaning it with a glass
cleaner. We make the plastic parts here at High Sierra Antennas with materials that
are UV resistant. However, over time, the plastic will crack or fade. Replacement
weathershields are always available.
4. Once each year, you should replace the contact spring. That stainless steel spring is
subjected to vibration. While many
have had the spring last for three or
four years, it is prudent to just replace
the spring each year. To replace the
spring, remove the whip, and
weathershield from the antenna.
Loosen the three set screws in the
collar. Remove the collar. Remove the
spring from the collar. If the spring
has become deformed, it must be replaced. You can clean the groove that holds the
3
spring with sandpaper. Do not use steel wool. Fibers from the steel wool can
contaminate the main coil. One shorted turn on the main coil can cause it to no
longer function! Replacement springs are always available here at High Sierra.
5. Make certain that the large washer supplied with the antenna is tightly secured
between the top cap of the weathershield and the whip or quick disconnect.
Otherwise, water will leak into the antenna and cause damage.
6. If you are using a quick disconnect, clean it frequently.
7. Frequently check all connections for corrosion. Corrosion will change the SWR and
lower the performance of the antenna system. Frequently check for loose
connections.
8. We get calls from customers because they hear a click in the receiver or the SWR
changes rapidly. Both of those are caused by loose connections and not something
inside the antenna. There are no connections inside the antenna’s tube.
In order for the warranty to be honored, the above items must be done. It just makes
good sense to maintain the antenna system.
4
3
Chapter
Installation
The first step is to unpack the box
C
arefully check all shipping boxes for contents since material is often packed in
layers, put in plastic bags and taped to the inside of the box. If purchased from
HIGH SIERRA AntennAs, email immediately if you feel any item is missing. We
maintain a packing record for each box and can verify what went into each order.
•
Before you call to say something is missing, please check the entire
package. Dump all the pieces out of the box. Almost every week
someone calls to say something is missing, when in fact, the item is in the
box. If you feel something is missing, email from the website using the
contact us form on the website at www.cq73.com.
If you purchased from a dealer, please contact that dealer if something is missing.
Installing the manual control box.
The control box should be mounted in a convenient
location since it will be used to tune the antenna.
The control box is prewired. Simply put the cigarette
lighter plug into an outlet. If you do not want the
cigarette lighter plug or if it does not fit your outlet, just
cut it off. The cable is supplied with a 2 amp fuse. The
Black Hawk Motor™ draws about 300 ma. when running
and about 1 amp at stall. We recommend that the fuse be
no larger than 2 amperes.
5
We have provided the plug for the wires to the motor. You can simply use butt connectors
to make the connection to the wires that go to the antenna’s motor.
The Black Hawk Motor™ will operate from 9 to 24 volts DC. For home or base use, power
supplies are available from High Sierra.
The light on the control box will illuminate when the antenna’s coil is fully extended or fully
retracted. The light may also blink when the antenna’s motor is started. The lens on the light
assembly may be red or green. It does not matter.
Here are some things to keep in mind:
•
You will need to supply 9to 24 volts DC to the control box.
•
The supply needs to provide about 1 amp maximum.
•
If the cigarette lighter plug is not needed or does not fit, cut it off.
•
Do use a 2 amp fuse.
Installing the i-Box.
The control box should be mounted in a convenient location since it will be used to tune the
antenna.
We have provided the plug for the wires to the motor. You can simply use butt connectors
to make the connection to the wires that go to the antenna’s motor.
Turn off your Icom™ transceiver. Plug the 4 pin connector into the AH-4 tuner jack on the
back of your Icom™ transceiver. When the transceiver is powered-up, a signal from the ITENNA control box tells the transceiver that the antenna is connected.
6
Operation of the i-Box, Powered by Icom
Think of the switch in the control box as having an extra set of contacts that close when
the switch is rocked up or down. Each time you rock the switch the motor is turned on
and the transceiver will transmit a carrier with reduced power. After the switch is
released, the transceiver will continue to transmit for a few seconds giving you extra time
to observe the built-in SWR meter. When rocking the switch, tune for an SWR of less
than 2:1 and release the switch. The antenna is tuned. It is just that simple.
For Icom transceivers with a built-in antenna tuner, there is a slightly different process.
Press and hold the tuner button on the face of the transceiver for about 1 second. When
you hear a tone from the speaker, then rock the switch to tune the antenna. As you rock
the switch, the transmit indicator on the transceiver will light indicating that the
transceiver is transmitting in the tune mode at 10 watts. For practice, do this process a
few times.
The light on the control box will illuminate when the antenna’s coil is fully extended or fully
retracted. The light may also blink when the antenna’s motor is started. This is normal and
expected. The lens on the light assembly may be red or green. It does not matter.
The i-Box will not function properly with the IC-7000. Please see the next section for
information on the i-Box 7000 that is specifically manufactured for the 7000.
Installing the i-Box.-7000
The control box
should be mounted
in a convenient
location since it will
be used to tune the
antenna.
We have provided
the plug for the
wires to the motor. You can simply use butt connectors to make the connection to the wires
that go to the antenna’s motor.
Turn off your Icom™ transceiver. Plug the 13 pin din connector into matching din jack on
the rear of the IC-7000. When the transceiver is powered-up, the i-Box 7000 will get the
voltage for the motor from the IC-7000 and cause it to transmit when the switch it rocked.
7
Operation of the i-Box 7000
Because of the firmware inside the IC-7000, it does not
have a functioning SWR meter when the transceiver is in
the tune mode. That is very different from other Icom
transceivers.
In order for the transceiver to indicate an SWR, it cannot
be in the tune mode but must be transmitting in RTTY,
FM or AM.
So, in order to tune the antenna, push the ‘Mode’ switch
until the IC-7000 is in the AM mode. If you are in SSB,
that will take 3 pushes of the switch. Putting the
transceiver into AM will reduce power to about 35-40 watts. Think of the switch in the
control box as having an extra set of contacts that close when the switch is rocked up or
down. Each time you rock the switch the motor is turned on and the transceiver will
transmit an AM carrier and the SWR meter will indicate the SWR at the final transistors
as it should. When you have obtained an SWR of less than 2:1, release the rocker switch
and push the ‘Mode’ button 1 more time to get back to SSB.
The light on the control box will illuminate when the antenna’s coil is fully extended or fully
retracted. The light may also blink when the antenna’s motor is started. This is normal and
expected. The lens on the light assembly may be red or green. It does not matter.
Installing the k-Box.
The k-Box controller should be mounted in a convenient
location since it will be used to tune the antenna.
The controller is prewired. Simply plug the 6 pin connector
into the back of your Kenwood™ transceiver’s tuner jack
while it turned off. Power for the motor comes through
that jack.
We have provided the plug for the wires to the motor. You
can simply use butt connectors to make the connection to
the wires that go to the antenna’s motor.
Turn off your Kenwood™ transceiver. Plug the 6 pin connector into the tuner jack on the
back of your Kenwood™ transceiver. When the transceiver is powered-up, a signal from the
k-Box Controller tells the transceiver that an antenna tuner is connected.
8
Operation of the k-box.
The k-Box controller works a little differently from the i-Box due to the internal circuitry
of the Kenwood transceivers. If you are using the Kenwood TS-480HS, please see the
paragraph at the bottom of this section. The k-Box handshakes with the transceiver so
that it thinks there is an antenna tuner connected. To tune, you first press the ‘AT’
buttom on the front of the transceiver. The transceiver will transmit a carrier with
reduced power (about 10-15 watts). When the rocker switch is moved, the motor is
turned on and the coil will move either up or down. To take the transceiver out of the
tune mode, you can press the ‘AT’ switch again or wait for the transceiver to ‘time out.’
Most Kenwood transceivers have a tuning time of just under one minute.
When rocking the switch while in the tune mode, watch the transceiver’s built-in SWR
meter. Tune for an SWR of less than 2:1 and release the switch. The antenna is tuned.
It is just that simple.
The light on the control box will illuminate when the antenna’s coil is fully extended or fully
retracted. The light may also blink when the antenna’s motor is started. The lens on the light
assembly may be red or green. It does not matter.
For the Kenwood TS-480HX, we have constructed a special control box. The reason for
that is that the 200 watt version of the TS-480 will only transmit 100 watts when an antenna
tuner is connected. As a result, our special control box for the Kenwood TS-480HX does
not communicate with the transceiver. That is, the 480HX will not think that there is an
antenna tuner connected and reduce power. Only the voltage for the motor will be taken
from the transceiver. We recommend that you program the PF key to be the ‘tune’ key for
the transceiver. It is a simple process discussed in the 480 instruction manual to program the
PF key. To tune the antenna with the PF programmed to be the tune key, you will press the
PF key and then rock the up/down switch. Watch the transceiver’s SWR meter and tune for
an SWR of less than 2:1. When the SWR is less than 2:1, the antenna is tuned. The light on
the control box will illuminate when the antenna’s coil is fully extended or fully retracted. The
light may also blink when the antenna’s motor is started. The lens on the light assembly may
be red or green. It does not matter.
9
Installing the Universal y-Box, EZ-Tune Controller .
The Universal y-Box Controller should be mounted in a convenient location since it will be
used to tune the antenna.
The controller is prewired. Turn off the transceiver. There are three cables coming from the
box. One has a cigarette lighter plug. That is connected to your power supply. If you don’t
need the cigarette lighter plug, then simply cut it off.
The molded black plug with the red/black wires is connected to the matching plug on the
antenna. We have provided pig tail connector to help with the wiring.
The third cable coming out of the controller has a three conductor 1/8 inch plug. That is a
standard stereo plug. That plugs into the ACC Jack on the back of your FT-857 or FT-897.
In your instructions, it is likely labeled number 4 as shown in the picture below.
Think of the switch in the control box as having an extra set of contacts that close when
the switch is rocked up or down. Each time you rock the switch the motor is turned on
and the transceiver will transmit a carrier. After the switch is released, the transceiver
will continue to transmit for a few seconds giving you extra time to observe the built-in
SWR meter. When rocking the switch, tune for an SWR of less than 2:1 and release the
switch. The antenna is tuned.
The light on the control box will illuminate when the antenna’s coil is fully extended or fully
retracted. The light may also blink when the antenna’s motor is started. This is normal and
expected. The lens on the light assembly may be red or green. It does not matter.
10
Installing the antenna
Make certain that the mount you have purchased is capable of supporting the antenna.
Whether the antenna is to be used on a vehicle or at a home/base, the ground, radials or
counterpoise must be connected very close to the coax connector. All of those
connections should have one point of connection close to the coax connector on your
mount.
The all important ground, counterpoise or radial connection
S
ince the Sidekick is electrically a quarter-wave antenna, a good vehicle grounding
system, counterpoise or radials is absolutely essential so that there will not be
damaging voltages on the main coil. Also, any resistance introduced into the
system impacts performance and can also cause high SWR readings. Long ground leads
must be avoided.
If the SWR is higher than 2:1, the problem is likely the ground, counterpoise or radial
system that you have employed. It is not the result of something inside the antenna.
You must use wide, flat strap for vehicle ground leads. We do not recommend the
use of braid. A counterpoise or radials must be connected directly to the mount next
to the coax connector.
Here are some things to keep in mind:
•
For a ground strap to work, it must be at least one inch wide. You can use the
specially designed HS-GS ground strap from High Sierra.
•
Wire and round cables generally will not work for a ground conductor.
Don’t use them!
•
Don’t use braid. It will corrode over time and affect the SWR of the system.
Some braid has a high resistance path to ground. Pinching the braid to put it
into a solder lug reduces is effectiveness. Half inch wide braid is roughly equal to
#12 wire. In other words, braid is almost useless.
•
For a vehicle installation, connect the ground strap to the sheet metal. Connecting
the ground strap to the frame may not be adequate.
•
More than one ground strap may be necessary. That is especially true on 10 and
6 meters.
11
•
The ground strap must be connected to a screw on your mounting bracket
that is adjacent to the coax connector.
•
For home or base use, the counterpoise or radials must be connected to a
screw on your mounting bracket that is adjacent to the coax connector.
•
Not having a ground, radials or counterpoise will cause damage to the antenna.
RF Filter Assembly
The RF filter assembly helps isolate the motor wires from the
antenna. This RF filter or choke also helps with noise generated
by the motor’s brushes. The wires should loop through the
bead 2 times. The ferrite bead is brittle and can be broken. So,
be careful. We recommend that you mount the filter close to
the antenna.
Here are some things to keep in mind:
•
The RF filter needs to be close to the antenna.
•
The color of the wires through the bead does not matter.
•
If you drop the bead, it will crack.
12
Vehicle Installation
Our experience is that the antenna can function well in several locations on a vehicle.
The length of the ground strap should be kept to less than three feet long (from a screw
on the mounting bracket to the vehicle body/frame). Sometimes it's a good idea to test
the location first.
The ground strap should first be connected to the sheet metal of the vehicle. If the SWR
on 20 meters or 15 meters is above 2:1, another strap to the frame may also be
necessary.
Use at least 15 feet of coax. Short runs of coax can affect the SWR reading at the
transceiver.
Long supports below the antenna can cause matching problems. If you must use a long
support, try grounding it first. If the antenna will not tune on one or two bands, try
isolating the support from ground.
Ladders on recreational vehicles are also problematic. While many have had very
successful installation on ladders, others have had difficulty. Some have found that
running a ground strap from the mounting bracket to the metal framing of the RV is all
that is needed. Others have had to run one or two radials on the top of the RV. Some
have found that metal trim and luggage racks are all that is needed. In other words,
some experimenting is necessary for installation on an RV.
If you pull a trailer and plan to mount the antenna on the towing vehicle, make sure
there is a good RF connection between the towing vehicle and the trailer. If this is not
done, you may soon discover your antenna system has an intermittent connection. The
problem is caused by loose (intermittent) coupling between the vehicles through the
trailer hitch. A simple jumper cable across the hitch
corrects the problem.
The mag mount shown in the picture below will
work. The ‘T’ type of mag mount that has
aluminum strips between the magnets will not
work. With the ‘T’ type of mount of there is a real
poor connection to the shield of the coax. In
addition, there is very little coupling to the vehicle.
13
Trunk lip mounts are availabe from High Sierra Antennas. Please call for information.
Comet and Diamond trunk lip mounts will work when the mount is properly grounded.
In addition to planning where you will mount the antenna, also consider how the cables will be
routed. Be especially careful to keep cables and wires away from exhaust pipes, catalytic
converters, other bundles of wires and
computers.
Note: Your
number one
concern with
installing
any antenna
is safety.
Use extreme
care
installing
and using
this antenna.
Another location consideration is the overall
height of the antenna system. You risk hitting
bridges and over-passes when the antenna
height exceeds 13 feet/4m. There are safety
considerations as well. You are responsible
for antenna safety.
Here are some things to keep in mind:
•
You are responsible for safety, safety, safety and more safety.
•
The ground strap should be less than three feet.
•
Keep the total antenna height less than 13 feet above the ground.
•
Use at least 15 feet of coax between the antenna and the transceiver.
•
Some experimenting may be needed.
•
Don’t drive while tuning!! It’s just not worth it.
14
Base Installation
For a base installation, the radials or counterpoise must be connected to a screw on your
mount adjacent to the coax connector. The radials can be as simple as wire that is cut to a
quarter wavelength. We have found that wires 32, 16, 11 and 8 feet long will provide
continuous coverage from 3.5 to 30MHz. You can also use 8 wires that are 10 feet long. The
radials should be spread out like spokes on a wheel.
Generally speaking, burying of radials increases ground losses. So, having the radials on the top
of the ground will increase performance.
Like most HF antennas, generally speaking higher is better. However, most of us must
compromise. So, if you can put it up on the roof, that is better. If you cannot use the roof,
then install the antenna on the ground.
Here are some things to keep in mind:
•
You are responsible for safety, safety, safety.
•
Higher is better. But for some, the antenna must be low.
•
Radials or a counterpoise must be used.
•
A driven ground stake or grounding rod is probably useless.
•
The radials or counterpoise must be connected to a screw next to the coax connector.
15
No matter where you install the antenna, here are some things to keep in mind
•
Think about safety, safety, and more about safety! Your first concern is making
sure that neither you nor anyone else will be injured. Adding a db to the signal strength
won’t matter if someone is injured.
•
Don’t use braid. Typically, braid is not much better than a small diameter wire. Either
use our HS-GS ground strap or a flat wide strap of sheet metal. Plumber’s tape or pipe
strap sold in hardware stores is a very good ground strap. Please don’t call to say the
antenna won’t tune if you have used braid.
•
The connection of the ground strap must be made to a screw near the coax connector.
•
Try not to re-engineer the antenna design. With over 10,000 antennas in use around the
world, we have worked very hard to make this antenna the best possible.
•
A long whip will add signal strength on 40 and 80 meters. The antenna was designed so
that whips up to about 9 feet long and capacity hats may be used. However, the antenna
will become too long for resonance on 10 meters and perhaps lower frequencies.
•
We strongly recommend that there be at least 15 feet of coax between the antenna and
the transceiver. \
•
Don’t DWT (driving while tuning)!
16
4
Chapter
Operation of the Antenna
The ups and downs of the antenna
The following assumes that there is a three foot whip attached to the top of
the antenna:
Adjust the control switch so that about 1.5 inch of the coil winding is above the collar. Set the
transceiver to a mode that produces a steady-state carrier (AM, RTTY, CW or FM). Generally
speaking, you cannot tune the antenna for minimum SWR while in the SSB mode. Set the
transceiver to 7200 KHz and reduce power to 10 to 20 watts. Watch the SWR meter and continue
to increase the inductance by moving the coil up until a sharp dip in the SWR occurs. Adjust for
lowest reading by moving the control switch back and forth. You are now tuned to 7200 KHz.
Increase the power to approximately 100 watts and recheck for resonance. Due to the design of the
SWR meter, a minor adjustment to the antenna will likely be needed when the power is increased.
SWR meters do change readings when the power level is changed.
If your transceiver does not have an SWR meter, you can use the power output meter. Just tune for
maximum output which will occur at minimum SWR. It does not matter whether or not you use
maximum out watts or minimum SWR. Either reading will result in a properly tuned antenna at a
frequency.
The highest frequency occurs at the minimum inductance position. Tuning will be sharp. So watch
carefully for the dip in the SWR or the increase in output power. On some installations, the lowest
frequency may occur above 3.5 MHz. On some installations, the highest frequency may occur
below 6 meters. It is also possible for the spring contact to run off the bottom end of the coil.
17
Here are some approximate positions of the main coil. The
measurement shown is from the top turn on the main coil to
the top of the collar.
75 Meters 5 3/8 inches
40 Meters 1 7/8 inches
20 Meters 5/8 inch
15 Meters 1/4 inch
10 Meters 1/8 inch
Due to the variables in any given installation, the position of
the coil can be different from the dimensions shown above.
The above assumes that there is a three foot long whip or its
equivalent connected to the top of the antenna. In other
words, if you attach a fiberglass CB whip to the antenna, it will
not tune the same way.
For added efficiency, a longer whip may be used. The
antenna is constructed so that an eight foot whip may be used.
18
Weathershield removed for
discussion only.
5
Chapter
Troubleshooting, Questions and
Answers
Here are some of the typical questions that we get
Q:
How long is the three foot whip?
A:
The whip is 36 inches long.
Q:
I was driving down the road and decided to tune the antenna. I looked down at the transceiver’s SWR meter
to tune the antenna and my car crashed into a tree. The SWR is now really high. Why did that happen?
A:
You are not supposed to be DWT (driving while tuning). This is no joke.
Q:
My antenna on the car has a high SWR on 10 meters. The SWR is 3:1. What’s wrong?
A:
You need to improve the ground connection or add a second ground strap.
Q:
My SWR is really high. It’s 1.9:1. What can I do about that?
A:
Don’t worry about it. An SWR of 1.9:1 is terrific. Did you know that an SWR of 5:1
results in only a 1/6 of an S unit decrease in signal strength? If the SWR is less than 2:1,
most transceivers will not roll back power.
Q:
The SWR on 20 meters is higher than all of the other bands. Why? I ran braid to the frame of the car.
A:
Well likely there is an inadequate ground connection. First of all, don’t use braid.
Second, use a flat wide strap. I would add a second ground strap to the sheet metal of the
vehicle. You should also try another length of coax.
Q:
I hooked up the antenna and the SWR is very high. I think the antenna is shorted out. Is that possible?
19
A:
No, it is not possible for the antenna to short out. Replace the coax with some
known to be good that already has the connectors installed. The coax should be at least 15
feet long.
Q:
I think something is loose inside my new antenna. When I turn it upside down, I hear a rattle. Should I
send the antenna back?
A:
No. What you are hearing are the stainless steel washers on the lead screw sliding
down its length. That is a normal sound to hear.
Q:
The coil spins when I try to move it up or down. What’s wrong?
A:
The coil cannot spin if the weathershield is tight. The key on the outside of the
aluminum tube and keyway in the weathershield keep the coil from spinning. You
need to tighten the whip or quick disconnect.
Q:
The main coil won’t go up and down. What’s wrong?
A:
You first need to check the spring that makes contact with the coil. To do that,
remove the whip and quick disconnect. Remove the two screws in the top or bottom
cap of the weathershield. Lower or remove the weathershield. Loosen the three set
screws in the collar that holds the spring. Remove the collar. Remove the contact
spring from the collar. If the spring is not uniform, it must be replaced.
Q:
The spring wore out or is deformed. Why did that happen?
A:
Well, the contact spring is subjected to a lot of vibration. It is made from
stainless steel and is a patented device. Over time, it will wear out. We recommend
that the spring be replaced about once a year. We tried fingerstock and found that it
wore out very quickly and required that the antenna be returned for repair. Fingerstock
contains Berrylium which is an extremely hazardous material. We don’t want our
employees or you to be exposed to Berrylium. The spring is stainless steel, relatively
inexpensive and very simple to replace. In addition, it is impossible for the spring to
lose contact with the coil. Fingerstock cannot maintain contact over time.
Q:
My SWR is 1:6. What’s `wrong?
A:
Well first, the SWR is expressed as X:1. So, if you mean the SWR is 6:1, I would
check the coax connectors for a short or an open. The best way to do that is to replace
the coax with new
20
6
Chapter
10 Year Limited Warranty
High Sierra Antennas have a 10 year limited warranty
High Sierra Antennas and Heath Tech Inc. warrants to the original purchaser of the antenna and
accessories are free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of one year from the date
of original purchase when used in compliance with the instructions and maintained as shown in this
instruction manual.
The Black Hawk Motor™ has a ten year limited warranty. The main coil also has a ten year limited
warranty.
In no event shall High Sierra Antennas or Heath Tech Inc. be responsible for incidental or
consequential damages, nor damage due to misuse or the use of any unauthorized attachment(s).
Damage to the product resulting from accident, abuse, neglect, negligence, alterations, unapproved
attachments, alterations or other causes unrelated to problems with material or workmanship are not
covered by this warranty.
In the case of manufacturer defects in material or workmanship, High Sierra Antennas agrees to
repair or remedy a defect without charge. The purchaser must obtain a return authorization number
from High Sierra Antennas email using the ‘contact us’ form on the website at www.cq73.com.
The product must be shipped insured via UPS or FedEx with the return authorization number
clearly written on the outside of the box. Unauthorized returns will not be accepted.
The returned product must be clean. The product must be properly boxed and protected. Damage
as the result of shipping is not covered by this warranty.
21
Index
B
Q
base installation, 9
braid, 10
quick disconnect, 3
R
C
radials, 9
Routine maintenance, 3
RV, 8
collar, 16
contact spring, 3
control box, 5
corrosion, 4
S
safety, 10
SWR, 15
SWR is very high, 15
SWR of 2:1 or less is good, 2
F
fingerstock, 16
fuse, 5
G
T
ground connection, 15
ground strap, 10, 15
trailer, 8
V
H
vehicle, 8
HS-GS ground strap, 10
W
L
warranty, 17
weathershield, 3
whip, 3
Ladders on recreational vehicles, 8
length of coax, 15
Revised on April 22, 2004. There were a lot of mistakes.
22
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising