Thank you for choosing ONYX®. - Oce Display Graphics Systems

Thank you for choosing ONYX®. - Oce Display Graphics Systems
Thank you for
choosing ONYX.
®
Remember to register your product
within 30 days of installation.
To ensure proper installation and setup, please read through this guide
and keep it in a safe place for future reference.
To keep your software up-to-date, configure AutoUpdate to download
the latest revisions automatically.
This document and the software described in it are protected under the End User License
Agreement and are copyrighted by ONYX Graphics, Inc. with all rights reserved. Information in this document, and in all other documents or help systems pertaining to this
software, is subject to change without notice. No part of this publication or the software
may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into
any language in any form by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording,
or otherwise) for any purpose without the express written permission of ONYX Graphics, Inc.
ONYX Graphics, Inc. may have patents, patent applications, copyrights, trademarks, or
other intellectual property rights pertaining to subject matter in this or other documents.
Unless expressly provided in a written license agreement from ONYX Graphics, Inc., the
furnishing of this or other documents does not give you any license to these patents, copyrights, trademarks, or other intellectual property.
PANTONE® Colors displayed in the software application or in the user documentation
may not match PANTONE-identified standards. Consult current PANTONE Color Publications for accurate color. PANTONE® and other Pantone, Inc. trademarks are the property of Pantone, Inc. © Pantone, Inc., 2006.
Pantone, Inc. is the copyright owner of color data and/or software which are licensed to
ONYX Graphics, Inc. to distribute for use only in combination with RIPCenter, PosterShop, or ProductionHouse. PANTONE Color Data and/or Software shall not be copied
onto another disk or into memory unless as part of the execution of RIPCenter, PosterShop, or ProductionHouse.
Cos.jar End User License
The source code, object code, and documentation in the com.oreilly.servlet package are
licensed by Hunter Digital Ventures, LLC.
© 1994–2007 ONYX Graphics, Inc. All rights reserved.
The ONYX logo and ONYX glyph are registered trademarks of ONYX Graphics, Inc.
The names of actual companies and products mentioned in this or other documents, as
well as mentioned or shown in the software itself, may be the registered trademarks, or
service marks of their respective owners.
Language Settings
You can set your language settings by clicking File > General Settings...
and then changing your language in the Language option.
Support Information
In order to receive the most efficient
support, please be at your computer
with the software available. When
e-mailing, please include your contact
information, key number, and a brief
description of the problem.
See the online Help Files in your program for more information or trouble-shooting tips.
For technical support, please contact your local
representative or contact.
System Requirements
Operating System
®
• Windows XP Pro with the latest service pack, or
®
• Windows 2000 Pro/Server with the latest service pack
• Windows Vista® Business/Enterprise with the latest service pack
CPU
• Intel Pentium IV/Xeon 3+ Ghz,
• Athlon 64/Opteron 2+ GHz, or
• Dual CPU for multiple RIPs
Storage
• Two 80 GB Hard Drives
• 2 GB RAM per CPU
Video
• 1280 x 1024 16-bit color
Hardware
• USB Port for Security Key (dedicated)
• DVD-ROM drive
Anti-Virus Software
Several types of Anti-Virus software (including Symantec/Norton Anti-Virus) running real-time scans on your ONYX station can cause problems running the software such as slow rip times, failure to save printer settings, and
issues with color device readings not being accepted by Media Manager.
To resolve this issue, go into your Anti-Virus control panel (for Symantec/
Norton it’s under Real Time Scanner) and disable any scans on the ONYX
folder.
ii
Introduction
How to Use This Manual
Figure i—Hardware Key Permissions
This manual will help you understand how to use the various features of
your software. Due to the complexity of the product, this guide does not
fully describe all the possible software features.
If you do not find a particular topic in this manual, check the ONYX
website (www.ONYXgfx.com) or the Help Files in your program.
Some features described in this manual may not be available in your
software package. Check your Hardware Key permissions to view which
applications and features you can use.
To check your Hardware Key permissions:
1. Run the software.
2. Select File > View > Hardware Key from the File menu to display
the Hardware Key dialog (see Figure i).
If you have any questions about which features and applications are included in your software package, contact your sales representative.
Manual Icons
This icon directs you to other sources of
information or help.
This icon shows important suggestions,
tips, or ideas.
This icon shows warnings, cautions,
and critical information.
This manual uses icons to help you find important information quickly.
These icons are displayed at the left with a description of their purpose.
The arrow icon (above) indicates steps or instructions.
Quick Tips
1. Embed ICC Profiles when saving your image in your graphic application. This helps guarantee better color.
2. Copy your files to your local system for faster processing.
3. When saving .eps files, make sure that the printer and screen
fonts are included with your file.
4. Keep your printer maintained properly by running daily maintenance. Print a warm-up job to check that there are no areas of
over- or under-inking.
5. Recalibrate your media to provide up-to-date printer performance
information.
6. Setup AutoUpdate on your system. This guarantees that you always have the most recent version of the software.
iii
Contents
User Guide
RIP-Queue Navigation 1
Ch. 1: Setup & Printing
Objectives 2
Installing Your Software 2
Installing Your Printers 2
Registering Your Software 3
Configuring Your Printers 3
Setting Up Your Media 4
Opening an Image 4
Printing an Image 5
Virtual Printers——6
Job Status——6
Using Quick Sets 6
Creating a New Quick Set——7
Advanced Quick Set Options——8
Managing Quick Sets——10
Using Hot Folders 12
Trouble Shooting Hot Folders——12
Ch. 2: Preflight
Objectives 14
What is Preflight? 14
iv
Contents
Opening Images in Preflight 14
Modifying Basic Job Options 15
Printer & Media Tab 15
Preview & Size Tab 16
Cropping Your Image——16
Cropping Using Origin and Size Values——17
Rotating Your Image——17
Tiling Setup Tab 17
Enabling Tiles——17
Printing with Tiles——18
Adjusting Tiles——18
Overlapping Tiles——18
Setting Weld Overlap——19
Color Correction Tab 19
Primary Color Levels——19
Color/Gray Levels——20
White/Black Limits——21
Color Replacement——22
Filters——22
Print Tab 23
Print Setup——23
Setting Workflow Options——23
Marks Options——24
Output Options——25
Manage Printers 26
Advanced Guide
Ch. 3: Media Manager
Objectives 30
What is Media Manager? 30
The New Media Manager 31
Ch. 4: Workflow & Hardware Key
Objectives 32
What is the ONYX Workflow? 32
Original Image File——32
Quick Sets Apply Settings——33
Images with Settings Become Jobs——33
Processing Jobs——33
Ready to Print——34
Printing Jobs——34
Reprinting Jobs——34
Hardware Key 34
Updating Your Hardware Key——34
Ch. 5: Printing & Job Management
Objectives 36
When are Jobs Printed? 36
Holds——36
Media——36
Page Size——37
Printer Online——37
Triggering——38
How Are Jobs Printed? 38
Job Options——38
vi
Contents
Printer Settings——38
Placement Strategies 39
BestFit——39
Conserve Media——40
Group Jobs Together——40
Print Jobs Individually——40
Fotoba Cutter Marks ——40
Aborting a Print 42
Reprinting a Job 43
Managing Jobs 43
Changing Size (Magnification)——43
Changing the Media——44
Changing the Hold Status——44
Changing the Number of Copies——45
Modifying the Workflow Options——45
Modifying the Marks Options——45
Controlling Jobs 45
Viewing a Job——46
Changing a Job’s Order——46
Sending a Job to Preflight——46
Reprinting a Job——46
Selecting Tiles to Print——46
Changing the Printer Settings for a Job——47
Copying a Job to a Different Printer——47
Deleting a Job——47
Ch. 6: Virtual Printers & Other Systems
Objectives 48
Using the Virtual Printer 48
Printing from Other Windows Systems——48
Mac OSX (10.2.8 or earlier)——49
vii
Mac OSX (10.3.x+) with Windows Printing——50
Mac OSX (10.3.x+) with Printservices for UNIX——52
Installing Printservices for UNIX——53
Using the Web Portal (HTTP Access) 54
Changing the Web Portal Port——54
Submitting a Job Using the Web Portal——55
Ch. 7: Managing Printers
Objectives 56
Configuring Printers 56
Configuring the Printer Port——56
Using Printer Pools——58
Managing Media——59
Managing Page Sizes——60
Renaming a Printer——60
Changing the Base Folder——61
Ink Calculation——62
Managing Printers 63
Activating a Printer——63
Deactivating a Printer——63
Deleting a Printer——64
Creating a PrnInst——64
Duplicating a Printer——64
Ch. 8: Proofing
Objectives 66
What is Proofing? 66
Proofing Basics 66
Before Proofing 67
Comparing Printer Gamuts——67
Configuring a Proofing Printer——70
viii
Contents
Printing a Proof——70
Verify the Proof 72
Visual Tolerance Chart——72
Verification Strip——73
Ch. 9: Color Management & ICC Profiles
Objectives 74
What is Color Management? 74
What is an ICC Profile? 74
Color Theory 74
RGB——74
CMYK——75
Device-Dependent Color Spaces——75
Device-Independent Color Spaces——75
ICC Profiles——76
Input Profiles——77
Output Profiles——77
Rendering Intents——77
L*a*b* Image Files——78
Embedded Profiles——78
Color Matching Table——79
Color Management Options 79
Setting a Color Management Option in a Quick Set——80
Setting a Color Management Option in Preflight——80
ICC Profile Setup——80
Saving Custom Color Management Settings——82
Ch. 10: Contour Cutting
Objectives 84
What is Contour Cutting? 84
How do I use Contour Cutting? 84
ix
Preparing a File for Cutting 85
Defining the Cut Path in Illustrator——85
Modifying a Quick Set for Contour Cutting 86
Contour Cutting Workflows 87
Print and Cut on the Same Device——87
Print on Any Printer and Cut on the I-Cut——87
Print on Any Printer and Cut on a Separate Cutter——88
Using CUT-Server 89
What is CUT-Server?——89
Configuring CUT-Server——89
Workflow Options for Adding Cut Files——90
Cutting Workflow——90
Application Settings——91
Ch. 11: Layout Front-end
Objectives 94
What is Layout Front-end? 94
Using Layout Front-end 94
Application Settings——95
Image Tools Tab——95
Page Tools Tab——95
Images Tab——96
Printer & Media Options——97
Jobs——97
Glossary 100
Index 126
Contents
User Guide for 7
Workflow Products
RIP-Queue Navigation
The main RIP-Queue window is divided into five main areas:
• Printer Area (see 1)
• Jobs Ready to Print Area (see 2)
• Buffered Jobs Area (see 3)
• Information Area (see 4)
• Console (see 5)
Each area provides information relative to the area on the status of your
printers, jobs, or software. You can modify many settings by right-clicking in each area.
4
1
2
3
5
1
Setup & Printing
Objectives
These objectives may be covered in greater
detail in other chapters and the Help
Files in your program.
This chapter takes you through the basics of installing your software and
printing. By the end of this chapter, you will be able to do the following:
• Install the software and printers
• Register the software
• Setup your printer
• Print an image
• Use a Quick Set
• Use Hot Folders
Installing Your Software
To install the software:
If the software installation does not
begin automatically, browse to your
DVD drive and double-click it.
1. Log on to your computer with Administrator Privileges.
2. Plug-in your Hardware Key to your computer.
3. Insert the Program Disk into your DVD drive. Once the Install
window opens, review the install location, and click Next.
4. Read the License Agreement, check that you agree, and click
Install. This begins the install (see Figure 1).
5. Once the install is complete, click Finish to exit the installation.
Figure 1—Install Screen
Installing Your Printers
Your Hardware Key determines which printers are available to you. If
the printer you want is not available, contact your sales representative for
a Key Update. While you install the software only once, you can install
additional printers and media at any time. You can open the Add Printer
Wizard by clicking Show Options at the end of installation. If you need
to install printers later, insert your Program Disk into the DVD drive.
The wizard will open automatically.
To install printers:
1. After the Add Printer Wizard opens, select the printers and media
that you would like installed.
Setup & Printing—User Guide
To download new media profiles, go to
http://www.onyxgfx.com/download.pl.
2. Click Install.
3. Once the program is installed, click Finish. The program will
open automatically. You should immediately register your software and configure your printers.
Registering Your Software
If the software is not registered within
30 days, RIP-Queue will disable printing. Registering will re-enable printing.
Note to Windows Vista Users:
If you have trouble registering, see the
information on page 99.
The software requires you to register within 30 days of installation. The
easiest way to register is to submit your information using the online
registration form. Until you register, each time you run the program, a
dialog box will appear encouraging you to register (see Figure 2).
To register online:
1. In the Registration dialog box, click Request Registration Code.
If you are not connected to the internet and you click Request
Registration Code, you will be directed to other methods of registering your product.
2. Complete the Registration Form, and click Submit.
3. The registration code will be e-mailed to the address specified
in the form. Enter this code in the Registration Dialog, and click
Register.
4. Restart the program to complete registration.
Figure 2—Request Registration
For information on printer ports not
discussed in this manual, see the Help
Files in the program.
Configuring Your Printers
Each time you install or add a printer, the Configure Printer dialog will
appear. This dialog only displays valid configuration options for your
printer. If you do not know the type of port your printer uses, contact
your printer manufacturer or your network administrator. If you need
to reconfigure a printer, click Configure Printer on the main toolbar to
open the Configure Printer dialog.
There are many types of ports available, but the most common are
TCP/IP, USB, and Firewire.
To configure a TCP/IP printer:
1. In the Configure Printer dialog, click the Device tab. Select the
printer you want to configure, and click Configure Port. This
opens the Configure Printer Port dialog.
2. Select TCP/IP, and click Configure (see Figure 3).
3. Enter your IP Address and change the Data Type to <Port9100>.
Port9100 is the most commonly used port. For information on
other port types, see the Help Files in the program.
4. Click Test to verify that the IP address is valid. Click OK to finish.
Figure 3—Configure Printer Port: TCP/IP
To configure a USB printer:
1. In the Configure Printer dialog, click the Device tab. Select the
printer you want to configure, and click Configure Port. This
opens the Configure Printer Port dialog.
2. Select USB Printer, and click Configure.
3. Select your USB device from the available options, and click OK
(see Figure 4).
To configure a Firewire printer:
1. In the Configure Printer dialog, click the Device tab. Select the
printer you want to configure, and click Configure Port. This
opens the Configure Printer Port dialog.
Figure 4—Configure Printer Port: USB or Firewire
2. Select Firewire Printer, and click Configure.
3. Select your Firewire device from the available options, and click
OK (see Figure 4).
Setting Up Your Media
After you’ve configured your printer, verify that the media settings in the
program match the media that is currently loaded in your printer.
To setup media:
1. If you have not already done so, load the media into your printer
following your printer’s instructions.
2. In the program, highlight the printer in the Printer area (top-left
corner). The media and settings are displayed to the right of the
printer.
3. If the information in the program matches your media, you are
ready to print. If not, click Change on the right-side of the main
screen. This opens the Change Media and Placement dialog (see
Figure 5).
Figure 5—Change Media and Placement
4. Use the drop-down arrows to select the options that match the
media and page size options that you want to use. Click Setup to
configure your placement options.
5. Click OK to complete setup.
Opening an Image
There are several ways to open an image.
To open an image using RIP-Queue:
1. Click Open on the toolbar, or click File > Open. This displays the
Open dialog.
2. On the left-side of the dialog (see Figure 6), select which printer
you want to use from the drop-down menu. If you have already
Setup & Printing—User Guide
created Quick Sets, select your Quick Set. If you have not, leave
this setting as Default.
3. If you want to preview your image, check the Open in Preflight
option.
4. On the right-side of the dialog (see Figure 7), browse to your image, highlight it, and click Open. The image will open and move
to the Jobs Ready to Print area of the program window.
To open an image using Preflight:
1. In Preflight, click Open on the toolbar, or click File > Open. This
displays the Open dialog.
Figure 6—Open an Image
2. On the left-side of the dialog (see Figure 6), select which printer
you want to use from the drop-down menu. If you have already
created Quick Sets, select your Quick Set. If you have not, leave
this setting as Default.
3. If you want to apply the settings you used for your most recent
job, check the Apply Settings option.
4. On the right-side of the dialog (see Figure 7), browse to your image, highlight it, and click Open. The image will open in Preflight.
From here, you can modify and edit your image.
When you have finished modifying your image in Preflight, you can send
the image to RIP-Queue by clicking File > Submit.
Figure 7—Open an Image
Preflight allows you to edit and modify
your image. For more information, see
the Preflight chapter.
To help create an efficient workflow,
RIP-Queue automatically prints jobs
after they are processed.
Printing an Image
Once you have opened an image into RIP-Queue and setup your printers
and media, you are ready to print.
Printing is simple—Click on the image you want to print and drag it into
the Jobs Ready to Print area of your window.
However, the job will not print if the media settings for the job do not
match the media settings for the printer. If the media do not match, the
job remains in the Waiting for Media state until you change the media
type for the printer or the job so they match.
To change the media for a job:
1. Highlight the job in the Jobs Ready to Print area. This displays
information about the job in the Job Information area on the right.
2. Click Change. This opens the Job Properties dialog (see Figure
8).
Figure 8—Job Properties
Remember, if you make any changes,
you must reprocess the job before you
print it.
3. Change the Media Configuration Name, Media, or Page Size to
match the media that is currently loaded in the printer. Make sure
that this media matches the media settings for your job.
4. Click OK.
Whenever you change the media for your
printer, always make sure to change the
media settings in RIP-Queue. Doing
this will prevent any problems with
printing on incorrect media.
Once the Media for the job and the printer match, your image is ready
to print. If your job does not print automatically, verify again that your
media matches. If they match, you may need to select your printer and
click the Print Now button located on the right-side of your screen.
Virtual Printers
You can also print to RIP-Queue using Virtual Printers. A Virtual Printer
is a RIP-Queue printer that is used as a Windows printer. When you
install a printer, RIP-Queue automatically creates a Virtual Printer that
can be used from any application. This lets you print to RIP-Queue from
graphic design programs, word processors, internet browsers, or any
other application. To use the Virtual Printer, click File > Print in your
application, and select the RIP-Queue virtual printer (see Figure 9).
Figure 9—Virtual Printer
Figure 10—Online
Figure 11—Offline
Figure 12—Hold
Figure 13—Cookie Cutters & Quick Sets
Job Status
The icons located in the Printer Information area of the window indicate
the status of the print. There are three different statuses: Online, Offline,
and Hold.
• Online—indicated by a green sphere (see Figure 10). Clicking the
purple button will send the printer offline.
• Offline—indicated by a red sphere (see Figure 11). Clicking the
purple button will send the printer online.
• Hold—indicated by a hand (see Figure 12). The hold status shows
that there is something stopping the print from continuing. Often
this is an incorrect media setting or a Wait for Operator hold. If the
hold is a Wait for Media hold, change your media settings. Otherwise, click the Print Now button.
Using Quick Sets
A Quick Set is a tool that automatically applies certain settings to your
jobs. Using Quick Sets is similar to using a cookie cutter. Cookie cutters create cookies with particular shapes in an efficient manner. Just as
it would take a very long time to cut out perfect star patterns for each
cookie using only a table knife, it would also take a very long time to set
all your job settings or options for each image. More importantly, you can
use different Quick Sets to apply different settings or options to different
jobs much the same way you would use multiple cookie cutters to create
different cookie shapes (see Figure 13).
Once you create and apply Quick Sets to your jobs, each job will have
the correct settings right from the beginning. When you open an image,
Setup & Printing—User Guide
When you install the program, a generic
Quick Set for your printer is created.
This default Quick Set is similar to
using only one cookie cutter—it can be
useful, but you’ll probably want to create
your own for specialized workflows.
you select which Quick Set to apply. If you need to modify a particular
setting, you can do so in RIP-Queue or Preflight. If you don’t need to
modify any settings, you can go ahead and print. If you develop your
Quick Sets well, you can dramatically increase your productivity.
Creating a New Quick Set
To create a new Quick Set:
1. In your program, highlight your printer, and click Configure
Printer. This opens the Printer Configuration dialog.
2. Click the Quick Sets tab, then New (see Figure 14). This opens
the Edit Quick Set dialog.
Figure 14—Quick Sets New
When you create a Quick Set, a corresponding Hot Folder is created with
those same Quick Set properties. For
more information on Hot Folders, see
the Help Files in your program.
Figure 15—Edit Quick Set
To learn more about profiles, see the
Help Files in your program.
3. Set the options you want to use for this Quick Set. Click Advanced... if you want to set advanced options.
4. Click OK.
Edit Quick Set Options
The Edit Quick Set dialog allows you to setup your Quick Sets to match
your workflow needs (see Figure 15). The dialog lets you set the following options:
• Quick Set Name—this option determines the Quick Set name.
Use a name that accurately represents your settings.
• Media and Page Size—this option automatically assigns the current media and page size for your printer to your jobs. If you do
not use this option, you can specify your own settings in the Edit
Quick Set dialog. Make sure that your settings match what is in your
printer.
• Print Mode—the Print Mode consists of a predefined group of
settings that make up a mode. Modes are specific to the printer and
consist of a variety of settings.
• Color Management—lets you set which profiles your jobs will
use. You can select from the drop-down list or click Change Profiles to set up your own.
• Sizing Rule—this option determines the size of the printed
image. You can choose from Source Image, Width, Height, Pixel
Based, or Magnification. Source Image maintains the size (or factor
of the size) that the image file specifies. Width sets a standard width
for each job. Height sets a standard height for each job. Pixel Based
sizes the image by pixels. Magnification takes any of the previous
settings and enlarges (or reduces) the image by that factor. If your
image is larger than your page size, it is automatically reduced.
The Sizing Rule can be restricted to the
size of the media page. If the image
does not fit on the page, the image will
be shrunk to fit that page size unless
you have Tiling enabled. For more information on Tiling, see the Help Files in
your program.
For more information on Advanced
Quick Set options, see the Help Files in
your program.
Advanced Quick Set Options
Advanced Quick Set options let you control the settings that are typically
only modified for uncommon situations or non-standard workflows. To
access these options, click Advanced in the Edit Quick Set dialog.
Output
The Output tab of the Advanced Quick Set options controls how RIPQueue processes jobs (see Figure 16). You can set the following options:
• Output—this option determines what type of image output will
be processed. You can choose from Color, Grayscale, and Separations.
• Rotate—this option allows you to rotate your image by increments of 90°.
• Image—this option allows you to set the number of copies you
would like to print as well as print reflections (a mirror image of the
original file).
Figure 16—Output Options
Processing only affects raster (pixel
based) images.
• Processing—this option determines your processing settings.
You can set the program to Perform Image Processing During Print
Stage, Process with Interpolation, Process to allow rotation during
print stage, and Calculate Ink Usage. These options improve your
workflow and help you be more efficient.
Tiling
Figure 17—Tiling Options
The Tiling tab lets you separate a job into two or more pieces (see Figure
17). Typically, you use this option to print images larger than your media
or for display and mounting purposes. This option should only be used
if you want your Quick Set to tile every image the same way. For more
information, see the Help Files in your program.
Marks
Marks are special lines that are printed to aid in trimming, measuring,
or welding the image after it has printed (see Figure 18). The Marks tab
allows you to set various types of marks as well as the Print Label. For
more information, see the Help Files in your program.
Figure 18—Marks Options
Setup & Printing—User Guide
Crop
The Crop option lets you set a pre-defined area of each image that will
not be printed (see Figure 19). This option should only be used if you
want your Quick Set to crop every image the same way.
PostScript Halftone
Figure 19—Crop Options
The PostScript Halftone options determine how your halftone screens
are processed (see Figure 20). These options only apply to PostScript
images using the Halftone Dot Pattern. For more information, see the
Help Files in your program.
PostScript File
Figure 20—PostScript Halftone Options
Figure 21—PostScript File Options
The PostScript File tab controls the file name and separation options
that pertain to PostScript files (see Figure 21). If you do not use PostScript files, these options are not used.
• File Name Selection—this option determines whether you use
the image file name or the file’s embedded title as the name of the
image in RIP-Queue.
• Use Cutter Path Prefix—this option defines the spot channel
name prefix of a PostScript file that has been prepared for contour
cutting. For more information, see the Help Files in your program.
• Separations—this option determines how RIP-Queue processes
and prints separations. These options must be configured properly
for the image to process correctly. This option should only be used
if your Quick Set uses separated PostScript files with the same options every time.
• Auto Detect—this option automatically detects the configuration
of a PostScript Separated file.
PostScript
Figure 22—PostScript Options
The PostScript tab controls the job options that pertain to PostScript
files (see Figure 22). If you do not use PostScript files, these options are
not used.
• Page Size—PostScript files use an element called a bounding box.
This is a specific rectangular area of an image. Usually, the bounding box is the same size as the image; however, some images use a
larger box for margins or a smaller box for cropping. To print the
area defined by the bounding box, select the Only Use Bounding
Box option.
Using a duplication factor of 2 or
higher can greatly reduce processing
time, but may cause image degradation.
Figure 23—Anti-Aliasing (left—anti-aliasing
applied)
• Warning Level—use this option if you want the program to abort
the job if you have a missing font. If you disable this option, the job
will be processed with a substitute font.
• Two Stage Processing—this option converts your PostScript file
to a raster image. You can then further modify the raster image. The
Pixel Duplication option processes the image at a smaller resolution
and then copies the pixels to achieve the correct output resolution.
• Anti-Aliasing—this option smooths areas in your image that appear jagged. This can improve the appearance of low resolution
images (see Figure 23).
• Spot Color Replacement—this option lets you apply the spot
color specifications defined in the Color Matching Table. The Table
allows you to share colors you created in your graphics creation program with your printer.
Workflow
The Workflow tab determines how images and jobs are handled (see Figure 24). For more information, see the Help Files in your program.
Display
Figure 24—Workflow Options
Figure 25—Display Options
The Display tab allows you to set the Color Display settings for a job
(see Figure 25). Use these options to modify how the program displays
color information.
• Color Display—these options set the display you want to use for
sample point values. They do not affect the display for Color Correction tools.
• Color Correction Tools Display—this option determines if you
use CMYK values (0-255) or percentages (0-100). This becomes the
default setting for the Primary Color Curves and Color Replacement dialogs in Preflight.
Color Correction
The Color Correction tab assigns a Color Correction Filter to all jobs
using a particular Quick Set (see Figure 26). Click Import to add an additional filter. For more information, see the Help Files in your program.
Figure 26—Color Correction Options
10
Setup & Printing—User Guide
Managing Quick Sets
Managing Quick Sets alters the printer setup. Because of this, the program cannot process or print jobs while you modify the Quick Sets.
Make sure that you are not processing or printing a job before managing
Quick Sets.
To edit a Quick Set:
1. In the printer area of the main window, highlight the printer that
uses the Quick Set that you want to modify.
Editing a Quick Set in this manner
does not interrupt processing and
printing.
2. Click Edit Quick Sets in the toolbar. This opens the Edit Quick
Sets dialog.
3. Highlight the Quick Set you want to modify, and click Edit.
4. Modify the Quick Set options.
To rename a Quick Set:
1. In the printer area of the main window, highlight the printer that
uses the Quick Set that you want to rename.
2. Click Configure Printer on the toolbar. This opens the Configure
Printer dialog (see Figure 28).
3. From the Quick Sets tab, highlight the Quick Set you want to
rename, and click Edit.
4. Change the name of the Quick Set. The Default Quick Set cannot
be renamed.
Figure 28—Configure Printer Dialog
To copy a Quick Set:
1. In the printer area of the main window, highlight the printer that
uses the Quick Set that you want to copy.
2. Click Configure Printer on the toolbar. This opens the Configure
Printer dialog (see Figure 28).
3. From the Quick Sets tab, highlight the Quick Set you want to
copy, and click Copy. A new Quick Set with the same name plus
a number appears in the Quick Set list. To change the name,
click Edit.
To delete a Quick Set:
1. In the printer area of the main window, highlight the printer that
uses the Quick Set that you want to delete.
2. Click Configure Printer on the toolbar. This opens the Configure
Printer dialog (see Figure 28).
3. From the Quick Sets tab, highlight the Quick Set you want to
delete, and click Delete. You cannot delete the Default Quick Set.
11
To export a Quick Set:
1. In the printer area of the main window, highlight the printer that
uses the Quick Set that you want to export.
2. Click Configure Printer on the toolbar. This opens the Configure
Printer dialog (see Figure 28).
3. From the Quick Sets tab, highlight the Quick Set that you want
export, and click Export.
4. Browse to the location where you want to save the Quick Set,
specify a name for the Quick Set, and click Save.
To import a Quick Set:
1. In the printer area of the main window, highlight the printer that
will use the Quick Set that you want to import.
2. Click Configure Printer on the toolbar. This opens the Configure
Printer dialog (see Figure 28).
3. From the Quick Sets tab, click Import.
4. Browse to the Quick Set you want to import, and click Open.
Using Hot Folders
A Hot Folder is a special folder that automatically assigns Quick Set options to a job. Each Quick Set you create has a corresponding Hot Folder
that is automatically created. When the program is running, RIP-Queue
constantly monitors all of your Hot Folders for image files. When an
image is placed into a Hot Folder, the program moves it out of the Hot
Folder and into the queue where the image is processed and printed using the Quick Set options associated with that Hot Folder.
Hot Folders are located in the Input folder in your program files. Because RIP-Queue automatically shares the Input folder, you can copy
image files into a Hot Folder from any network system (Windows, Mac,
Linux, and so forth). RIP-Queue then processes and prints each image
using the Quick Set properties of that Hot Folder.
To drop images into a Hot Folder:
1. Open the folder where your images are located.
2. Copy them by right-clicking on them and selecting Copy.
3. In your program files, find the Input folder, and select the printer
you want to use. This opens the Hot Folders associated with that
printer (see Figure 29).
4. Paste your image files directly into the Hot Folder you want to
use. The images appear in RIP-Queue and begin processing according to the properties of that Hot Folder’s Quick Set.
Figure 29—Hot Folders
12
Setup & Printing—User Guide
Copying files into the Info Folder or
modifying the files that already reside
in the Info Folder can cause errors in
RIP-Queue.
The Info Folder is not a Hot Folder. It is a special RIP-Queue folder that
contains printer configuration settings.
Trouble Shooting Hot Folders
If RIP-Queue does not automatically process images dropped in a Hot
Folder, check the following:
• Does your Hardware Key have Hot Folders enabled? Check the
Hardware Key using the Hardware Key dialog (File > View >
Hardware Key) and verify that Hot Folders is enabled in your Key
tree. If it is not, contact your sales representative for an update.
• Are the images valid (supported) image files? Try opening them in
RIP-Queue using File > Open.
• Is RIP-Queue running? The Hot Folders are only active when the
RIP-Queue application is running.
• Are the image files read-only? RIP-Queue cannot process readonly images.
To remove read-only restrictions from a file:
1. Highlight the image files in Windows Explorer.
2. Right-click the files.
3. Select Properties.
4. Uncheck the Read-Only checkbox.
13
2
Preflight
Objectives
If you do not have Preflight, contact your
sales representative for a Key Update.
This chapter will take you through the basics of using Preflight. By the end
of this chapter, you will have an understanding of the following:
• Opening images in Preflight
• Modifying basic job options
• Adjusting color using Color Correction
• Modifying the image setup
• Using the Printer Manager
What is Preflight?
Preflight allows you to view and modify jobs before they are printed in
RIP-Queue. Preflight is not a required step to process and print a job, but
it is a useful tool when jobs need to be modified. Preflight can also import images directly from a scanner or digital camera and preview color
corrections and ICC profiles.
Opening Images in Preflight
You can bring an image into Preflight using any of the following ways:
• File > Open in Preflight
• File > Open from RIP-Queue
• Import into Preflight
• Preflight button in RIP-Queue
To open an image using File > Open in Preflight
1. Select Open from the File menu. This displays the Open dialog.
2. Browse to and highlight your image.
3. Choose a printer from the Printer drop-down menu.
4. Select a Quick Set from the Quick Set drop-down menu.
5. Click Open.
14
Preflight—User Guide
To open an image using File > Open in RIP-Queue
1. Click File > Open from the File menu. This displays the Open
dialog.
2. Browse to and highlight your image.
3. Choose a printer from the Printer drop-down menu.
4. Choose a Quick Set from the Quick Set drop-down menu.
5. Click the Open in Preflight option in the lower left corner of the
dialog.
6. Click Open.
The job opens in Preflight and displays in the Jobs Ready to Print area of
the RIP-Queue window with a status of Busy. Once you submit the job
from Preflight, RIP-Queue will process and print it.
To open an image by importing it into Preflight
1. Click File > Twain32 > Select Source from the File menu. This
opens the Select Source dialog.
If your device is not listed, reinstall
the Twain drivers for your device. For
more information, see your device’s user
manual.
2. Highlight the device you want to use, and click Select. This
becomes your default source. You can change it by selecting a
different device.
3. Click File > Twain32 > Acquire to display the Acquire Twain
dialog.
4. Browse to and highlight your image.
5. Choose a printer from the Printer drop-down menu.
6. Choose a Quick Set from the Quick Set drop-down menu.
7. Click Open.
To open an image using the Preflight button in RIP-Queue
1. Highlight the job in RIP-Queue.
2. Click Preflight on the right-side of the program window.
RIP-Queue sends the job to Preflight along with the job settings, and the
job displays in the Jobs Ready to Print area with a status of Busy. Once
you submit the job from Preflight, RIP-Queue will process and print it.
Modifying Basic Job Options
Preflight allows you to modify many of the characteristics of your job
using the tabs across the top of the Preflight window. These tabs are
Printer & Media, Preview & Size, Tiling Setup, Color Correction, and
Print. After you have modified your job, click the Print tab and Submit
to send the job back to RIP-Queue for printing.
15
Printer & Media Tab
The Printer & Media tab is used to set your media and mode (see Figure
1). You can also see which printer you are using and some basic information about your job.
To change the media for a job:
1. Click the Printer & Media tab.
2. Use the drop-down arrows to change your Media Configuration
and Media Name.
To set your mode:
1. Click the Printer & Media tab.
2. Use the drop-down arrows to set your Print Mode settings. Print
Mode includes your resolution, dot pattern, and color management settings.
The Color Management setup of a job allows you to control whether or
not the program applies ICC Profiles to the job. It also allows you to select which ICC Profile, if any, the program applies for each color space.
For more information, see the Help Files in your program.
To set a Color Management option:
1. Select the Printer & Media tab.
Figure 1—Printer & Media Tab
2. Under Mode, choose the Color Management option that best fits
your workflow.
3. If you want to customize the profile setup, click Change Profiles.
This opens the ICC Profile Setup dialog (see Figure 2). Select
the input profiles, output profiles, and rendering intents you want
to use, and click OK.
Preview & Size Tab
The Preview & Size tab allows you to crop, size, and rotate your jobs.
Cropping Your Image
Figure 2—ICC Profile Setup
Cropping an image selects a rectangular portion of the image to print.
The portion not included in the rectangular area is not printed. You can
crop an image using your mouse or Origin and Size values.
To crop an image using your mouse:
1. In the Preview and Size tab, place your cursor on the edge of
your image. The cursor will change into a line with two opposing
arrows.
16
Preflight—User Guide
2. Click and drag the dotted line until it defines the area you want to
print. You can move the print area by clicking inside the box and
dragging it to a new location.
3. Click Apply.
Cropping Using Origin and Size Values
Figure 3—Crop Using Origin and Size Values
Using Origin and Size values to crop your image lets you specify an exact
width, height, or magnification for your image (see Figure 3). Each of
these values can be locked to a specific size. To lock a value, click on the
checkbox next to each value. You can also use the Size values to enlarge
or shrink your image.
To crop an image using origin and size values:
Experiment with locking and unlocking
the value checkboxes to see what different
effects you can create. You can lock more
than one box at a time.
1. In the Preview and Size tab, lock any values that you want to
remain fixed.
2. Enter the values that you want to modify in the appropriate boxes.
To change the size of a job:
1. Select the Preview & Size tab.
If you want to create an image larger
than your page size, enable Tiling in
the Tiling tab. See the Tiling section of
this chapter for more information.
2. Choose your Maximum Printer Area by clicking the down-arrow
and selecting the size you want. Typically this is the page size
loaded into the printer.
3. Click OK.
4. Change the width, height, or magnification of your image.
When you modify one value, the other values will change to
maintain the image proportions. If you want to lock any value,
click the Lock box next to the value.
Rotating Your Image
Figure 4—Rotate or Flip an Image
Rotating and flipping images can take
several minutes depending on the size
of the file.
You can rotate your image by 90° increments using the Image Setup area
of the Preview and Size tab. To rotate an image, select the rotation you
want to use, and click Apply. You can also flip an image by selecting Flip
Image (see Figure 4).
Tiling Setup Tab
The Tiling Setup tab in Preflight lets you set tiling options. Tiling separates a job into two or more pieces and lets you print an image larger
than your page size or break an image into specific sizes for display or
mounting purposes.
17
Enabling Tiles
To enable tiles, select the Tiling Setup tab, and check the Enable Tiling
option. Activating this option allows you to choose any width for your image. If you disable tiling, Preflight restricts the image to a single tile where
the maximum width is equal to the Maximum Print Area selected for your
job. You can set the tile width and height in the Default Tile area by entering values into the Width and Height fields or using the down arrows.
Printing with Tiles
If tiling is enabled and your output exceeds the maximum print width or
height of your printer, the program will automatically break the image
into tiles. Because each tile is considered a separate piece, you can print
or re-print any tile you want. You can even process tiles individually by
clicking the Rip Tiles Individually checkbox.
To print specific tiles:
1. After enabling and setting up your tiles, click Tile Setup from the
Print tab. This opens the Tiles dialog.
2. Select the tiles you want to print, and click OK (see Figure 5). By
default, all the tiles are selected for printing.
Adjusting Tiles
Figure 5—Tile Dialog
When you choose a print size larger than the maximum page size for
your printer, the image preview displays dotted tile lines inside the image.
You can adjust these lines to create tiles of varying size. Making adjustments to a single tile affects all the tiles in that same row or column.
To create custom tiles:
1. In the Tiling Setup tab, enable Tiles, and click on the tile you
want to adjust.
2. In the Custom Tile area (see Figure 6), enter the new Width and
Height values for the tile. You can also click on the tile line in the
image and drag it to a new location.
If you want to cancel any adjustments, click Reset All Tiles at the bottom of the Tile Setup tab. This restores all tiles to the default values
listed for the Default Tile.
Figure 6—Custom Tile
Remember that changing a tile line affects all the tiles in that row or column.
18
Overlapping Tiles
You can set tiles to overlap between connecting tiles. This adds a repeated portion of the image between the tiles and makes it easier to properly
align the printed tiles.
Preflight—User Guide
Overlap has the following attributes:
• Applies to every tile
• Works the same both vertically and horizontally
• Is applied when the image is printed
• Available only if the image has more than one tile
• Does not affect tile size; tiles are measured from the center of the
overlap to the center of the next overlap.
To set an overlap:
1. In the Tiling Setup tab, select the Overlap option (see Figure 7).
2. Enter the overlap value, or use the up and down arrows to set
your value.
The overlap is divided equally to both sides of the tile. If you set your
overlap to one inch, each inside edge of the tile will print half an inch of
the adjoining tile. Outside edges will have no overlap.
Figure 7—Overlap
Weld Overlap is only available if your
overlap is set to at least half an inch.
Setting Weld Overlap
Welding is the process by which tiles are joined together. This can become difficult if there is ink on the portion of the media you want to
weld because the ink inhibits the adhesive from making a perfect bond.
The Weld Overlap option reserves a small portion of the overlap area as
blank and does not place any ink in this area. This leaves a clean surface
on which to apply the welding adhesive.
You can activate Weld Overlap by selecting the Weld Overlap option in
the Tiling tab.
Color Correction Tab
The Color Correction tab allows you to adjust the color in your image using several tools: Primary Color Levels, Color/Gray Levels, White/Black
Limits, Color Replacement, and Spot Layer. It also allows you to apply
color correction filters and view different color correction options.
Primary Color Levels
The Primary Color Levels tool allows you to modify the amount of saturation each primary color channel uses. You can access this tool by clicking Tools in the Color Correction tab and then selecting Primary Color
Levels.
19
Adjusting Saturation
You can adjust the saturation of each primary color channel by moving the saturation sliders left or right (see Figure 8). This tool modifies
the values in the mid-range more than those at the extreme high or low.
This creates a smooth curve that bows from the normal values. As you
modify each saturation value, your preview image will change to reflect
your modifications.
Primary Color Curves
Figure 8—Saturation
The Primary Color Curves tool allows you to modify the amount of ink
printed at any specific level. This differs from the Color Levels tool in
that Color Curves lets you modify specific areas of color such as highlights and shadows. Color Levels on the other hand affects the entire
range of color equally. Click Primary Color Curves in the Color Correction tab to open this tool (see Figure 9). This tool displays a curve for
each primary color.
The two axes for CMYK color correction curves represent input and
output color densities. The x-axis represents input density and the yaxis represents output density. These values, based on the location of
the cursor, are shown above the curve window as Before and After values
respectively.
To modify a Primary Color Curve:
1. In the Edit Channel window, mark each color that you want to
modify. You can modify multiple colors at the same time, or you
can modify individual colors (see Figure 9).
Figure 9—Primary Color Curves
You should not use the Primary Color
Curves tool for color replacement.
2. Click and drag in the curve window to create your curve. Depending on your settings, you can create several types of curves. For
more information on Primary Color Curves, please see the Help
Files in your program.
Color/Gray Levels
Color/Gray Levels only modify the K
value of a color sample. If there is no
K present, this tool will have no effect.
The Color/Gray Levels tool allows you to adjust the color composition
of an image by altering the contrast, brightness, and saturation of your
colors and the highlights, mid-tones, and shadows of your grays. Click
Tools in the Color Correction tab and then select Color/Gray Levels
to open this tool (see Figure 10).
Color Levels
Color Levels allow you to modify the attributes of all the colors in your
image. These controls are similar to the controls on your television set.
20
Preflight—User Guide
They do not change the actual color, but they can shift the color from
light to dark and dark to light. There are three controls: Contrast, Brightness, and Saturation.
• Contrast—this control adjusts the contrast of your image, making darks darker and lights lighter. Increasing the contrast increases
the difference between your dark and light values; decreasing the
contrast decreases the difference.
• Brightness—this control adjusts the brightness of your image by
changing the amount of K in all the colors of your image. Increasing the brightness lowers the amount of K; decreasing the brightness raises the amount of K.
• Saturation—this control adjusts how much color there is in your
image. Increasing the saturation adds more color to your image; decreasing the saturation reduces the amount of color. This tool does
not affect the amount of K in your image.
Figure 10—Color/Gray Levels
To modify Color Levels:
1. Click Tools > Color/Gray Levels in the Color Correction tab. This
opens the Color/Gray Levels tool (see Figure 10).
2. In the Color Levels area, click and drag each value to your desired value, or enter the value into the value box.
Gray Levels
Gray Levels allow you to modify the K level of an image in three different ranges: highlights, mid-tones, and shadows, by changing the amount
of K in an image.
Increasing the value increases the amount of black; decreasing the value
decreases the amount of black.
• Highlights—this control adjusts the amount of black in the lighter tones of your image.
• Mid-Tones—this control adjusts the amount of black in the middle tones of your image
• Shadows—this control adjusts the amount of black in the darker
tones of your image.
White/Black Limits
The White/Black Limits tool lets you clean up your image without introducing contrast. This tool was developed primarily to clean up scanned
images. When an image is scanned, the white and black values do not appear as true white and black. Setting White/Black Limits fixes this prob-
21
lem and balances the other colors. Because White/Black Limits control
the lightness of the color value averages instead of controlling the inks,
this tool uses RGB values instead of CMYK.
Color Limit
Figure 11—Color Limit
The Color Limit, Black Limit, and
White Limit tools are additive tools. If
you use these tools together, your image
can become much darker or lighter than
intended.
The Color Limit tool automatically sets the White and Black limits from
a selected color range (see Figure 11). Click Tools in the Color Correction tab and then White/Black Limits to open this tool. Select the
Color Limit option and click the A button. This will automatically set
the Color Limit. You can also adjust the color limit by entering values
into the number boxes, or by using the up and down arrows.
Clicking the A button takes the average of all RGB values in the image
and moves the white and black points in 5% of the total pixels in the image. This means that the lightest 5% of pixels are all set to white, and the
darkest 5% of all pixels are set to black, effectively reducing the gamma
range by 10%.
White Limit
Figure 12—White Limit
The White Limit lets you manually set the white point of your image by
selecting the pixels in your image that best represent white (see Figure
12). Click Tools in the Color Correction tab and then White/Black
Limits to open this tool. Select the White Limit option, and click the
Sample button. With your cursor, click the lightest point of your image
or on a color that you want to make the lightest point. This will change
all the colors equal to or lighter than the color you selected to white. You
can also modify the White Limit be entering values into the R, G, and B
boxes, or by using the up and down arrows.
Black Limit
Figure 13—Black Limit
22
The Black Limit lets you manually set the black point of your image by
selecting the pixels in your image that best represent black (see Figure
13). Click Tools in the Color Correction tab and then White/Black
Limits to open this tool. Select the Black Limit option, and click the
Sample button. With your cursor, click the darkest point of your image
or on a color that you want to make the darkest point. This will change
all the colors equal to or darker than the color you selected to black. You
can also modify the Black Limit be entering values into the R, G, and B
boxes, or by using the up and down arrows.
Preflight—User Guide
Color Replacement
The Color Replacement tool allows you to change the colors of a job
by substituting one color for another (see Figure 14). Click Tools in the
Color Correction tab and then Color Replacements to open this tool.
For more information, see the Help Files in your program.
Filters
A color correction filter is a file that modifies the color of a job. Think of
a filter as a pane of colored glass—if you place it on top of the image, it
changes the colors in the image.
A job can only have one color correction filter applied, but that filter can
contain multiple filters. Each filter can have one or more color correction
tools. If it has none, it is an empty filter.
To create a filter:
Figure 14—Color Replacement
An empty filter is automatically created
when a job is first opened in Preflight.
1. Click File > Filter Manager (see Figure 15).
2. Click New.
3. Enter a name for your filter.
4. Click Close.
Print Tab
Print Setup
Print Setup allows you to set Workflow, Marks, and Output options. These
options determine how the program will process and print your jobs. To
access these options, select the Print tab, and click Print Setup.
Setting Workflow Options
Workflow Options allows you to set the following workflow options (see
Figure 16):
Figure 15—Filter Manager
After Processing
• Delete Source Image—this option deletes the source image after
processing. This does not delete the job, and you can still reprint the
job. However, you cannot reprocess the job.
After Printing
Figure 16—Workflow Options
• Archive Job as Space Allows—this option moves printed jobs
to the Recycled Jobs area. These jobs will be deleted as needed to
obtain additional hard disk space to process incoming jobs.
23
• Archive Jobs Indefinitely—this option moves jobs to the Recycled Jobs area. Even if additional hard disk space is required, archived jobs will not be deleted.
• Delete Jobs—this option automatically deletes jobs after they are
printed. You cannot retrieve, restore, or reprint deleted jobs.
Job Creation
For more information on proofing, see
the Help Files in your program.
• Preview Image Before Processing—this option automatically
creates a preview of your jobs before they print.
• Make Copy of Image—this option copies the source file to the
work folder instead of referencing the location of the image. If you
are dealing with extremely large files, you may want to disable this
option.
• Create Proof Automatically—this option automatically sends a
copy of the job to a different printer as a proof. To use this feature,
you must have the Proof Workflow feature on your Hardware Key,
and you must configure a proofing printer. Contact your sales representative if you do not have this feature.
Process/Print Options
• Reprocess—this option reprocesses the job each time it is printed.
• Print—this option prints the job without reprocessing.
Operator
• Hold for Operator—this option will stop a job from printing until an operator chooses to print the job. Each job will appear in the
Jobs Ready to Print area of the program with a hold status. You can
print the job by highlighting it, and clicking the Hold icon.
• Default Operator Name—this option allows you to set user
names for each job. RIP-Queue displays the user name in the User
column of the queue. If you have multiple users sending jobs from
various systems, this helps you determine where each job is coming
from.
Marks Options
Figure 17—Marks Options
24
Marks are special lines that print with the image to aid in trimming or
measuring the final output. The Marks option also lets you set Print Label options (see Figure 17).
Preflight—User Guide
Registration Marks
Registration Marks print a crosshair at each corner of the image. These
help ensure that the image is straight on each side when trimming.
Tile Dotted Overlap
Tile Dotted Overlap marks are used when tiling an image with an overlap. These marks show where the overlap begins and ends to help you
combine tiles easily. When piecing the tiles together, the Tile Dotted
Overlap Mark of one tile overlays the corresponding mark on the adjacent tile.
Zero-Line Tile Marks
Figure 18—Zero-Line Tile Marks
Zero-Line Tile Marks print a black crosshair with a white inner portion
in the middle of the tile overlap area (see Figure 18).
Crop Marks
Crop Marks are quarter-inch right-angle marks that are placed on the
edges of each corner of the image. Because that same area is used for
Registration Marks, Crop Marks do not have any effect if you are already
using Registration Marks (see Figure 19).
Crop Outline
Figure 19—Crop Marks
Crop Outlines are a solid line (1 pixel wide) printed on the border of an entire image. Because Crop Outlines use the same area as Crop Marks, Crop
Marks do not have any effect when using Crop Outlines (see Figure 20).
Print Label
Figure 20—Crop Outlines
The Print Label option allows you to print job information at the end of
the printed image. For example, the print label can contain information
such as when the job was processed and printed; what type of ink, media,
media configuration, and resolution; and the name of the file. Check the
Use Large Text option to print the label using 22.5 pt. font instead of
the default setting of 7.5 pt.
Contour Cut Paths
For more information on the Print
Label and Contour Cutting features,
see the Help Files in your program.
Enable the Generate Tile Outline Cut Paths checkbox to cut around the
border of an image. The Trim Overlap option cuts on the Zero-Line Tile
Mark if you have tiled your image using an overlap. These features only
apply if you are using a contour cutting device.
25
Output Options
The Output tab controls how RIP-Queue processes jobs. This tab is divided into three sections: Output, Image, and Processing (see Figure 21).
Output
Figure 21—Output Options
Printing in Grayscale can create a
speckled appearance to your image. To
fix this, convert your image to grayscale
using an image editor program and then
print it using the Color output option.
The Output section determines the type of image output that RIPQueue processes. You can choose any of the following options:
• Color—this option, the default, creates color output.
• Grayscale—this option creates black and white output using only
the black channel of your printer..
• Separations—this option creates a black and white representation of each color channel. If the primary color setup is CMYK,
Separations will print four images; if you configure your media for
CMYKOG, Separations will print six images.
Image
The Image section allows you to print the job as a mirror image of the
original file. This option is typically used when printing on backlit or
transparent media.
Processing
Processing options are only available if
you are modifying a raster image.
The Processing section allows you to control how the image is processed.
• Perform Image Processing During Print Stage (Rip & Print
on the Fly)—this option processes the image while the data is being sent to the printer. If you disable this option, the image will be
processed first and then sent to the printer. Use the Print Jobs Individually placement strategy when this feature is enabled.
• Process with Interpolation—this option softens jagged edges
of low-resolution images. Although this option will not adversely
affect high-resolution images, it does increase the processing time.
• Process to allow rotation during print stage—This option automatically rotates images for a job to create the best fit to save
media.
• Calculate Ink Usage - This option calculates the amount of ink
that is used for a job
Manage Printers
Figure 22—Printer Manager
26
Because Preflight does not print directly to a printer, use Printer Manager to add or delete RIP-Queue printers for use by Preflight. Click File
> Printer Manager to open the Printer Manager (see Figure 22).
Preflight—User Guide
Adding a printer is not the same as
installing a printer. To learn how to
install a printer, see chapter 1.
When you install printers, RIP-Queue automatically adds printers to Preflight. Use Printer Manager to add RIP-Queue printers from a remote
system, or to re-add printers that have been previously deleted.
To add a printer:
1. In the Printer Manager, click Connect. This opens the Browse
Printers dialog.
2. Browse to the Input folder for the printer you want to add, highlight the name of the printer, and click Add (see Figure 23).
To delete a printer:
1. In the Printer Manager, click Delete. This will remove the printer.
2. Click Close.
Deleting a printer from Preflight does not remove that printer from
RIP-Queue. However, deleting a printer from RIP-Queue removes the
printer from Preflight.
Figure 23—Browse Printers
27
28
Advanced Guide
29
3
Media Manager
Objectives
This chapter briefly describes the new Media Manager. By the end of this
chapter, you will have a basic understanding of the following:
• Overview of the Media Manager
• Purpose of the Media Manager
What is Media Manager?
In your workflow, many variables affect your output. You print images
on a variety of media, use different inks, and even different printers.
How can you ensure quality and consistency with so many variables?
Media Manager provides quality and consistency by offering a system of
controls for your ink and media configurations, calibration, and profile
management. It provides more than just a simple solution to consistent
color, it allows you full control over managing your output.
You control your output through two main functions: Calibrating and
Profiling.
• Calibration—calibration is the process of synchronizing the media, ink, resolution, and dot pattern combination for your printer to
ensure consistent output.
• Profiling—profiling establishes your target output’s density and
color to ensure the highest quality prints.
Although the initial setup does take time, maintaining good color is simple and fast.
Media Manager allows you to control the following functions:
• Manage Media—create new media and modify existing ones.
• Manage Modes—set the ink type and configuration used by your
media and printer.
• Configure Printer Capabilities—control the use of dot patterns
and resolutions as well as enable the use of additional ink colors.
In addition, Media Manager gives you absolute control over your color
through profiling. Profiling involves going through a series of five steps
30
Media Manager—Advanced Guide
Ink density is the intensity of ink in
one area. It can be affected by resolution, dot pattern, and ink restrictions.
to create a profile. These steps set your Ink Restrictions, Linearizations,
Ink Limits, ICC Profiles, and UCR/GCR settings.
• Ink Restrictions—ensure that the proper amount of ink is placed
on the media and prevents over-saturation of ink combinations.
• Linearizations—determine the exact ink density for your printer.
• Ink Limits—prevent over-saturation of four-color combinations.
• ICC Profiles—use or create specific color information for each
media, ink, resolution, and dot pattern combination.
• UCR and GCR—create the optimal balance between three- and
four-color black.
Media Manager provides further output control by controlling the following:
• Create Screens for Press Proofing—customize screen dot patterns for color proofs and dot simulation.
• Import and Export ICC Profiles—use ICC Profiles from other
applications or import and export previously created ICC Profiles.
• Manage Color Measurement Devices—select from an extensive list of supported color measurement devices.
The New Media Manager
Figure 1—Media Manager
In the past, profiling took almost an entire day to complete. The New
Media Manager is designed with speed and usability in mind (see Figure
1). Instead of an entire day, the new Media Manager allows you to profile
in only a couple hours. This saves you time and money.
The new Media Manager was designed with Help Files incorporated into the program that take you step-by-step as you work
through the process. See the Help Files in your Media Manager
for more information.
If you need information on Color Measurement Devices, Calibrating, or
any other topic related to Media Manager or profiling, see the Help Files
in your program.
If you do not have Media Manager, contact your sales representative for
a Key Update.
You can open Media Manager by clicking Media Manager on the RIPQueue toolbar.
31
4
Workflow &
Hardware Key
Objectives
This chapter will take you through how an image is printed and discuss
your Hardware Key. By the end of this chapter, you will have an understanding of the following:
• ONYX Workflow
• Hardware Keys
What is the ONYX Workflow?
Figure 1—Simple Workflow
Figure 2—Detailed Workflow
Workflow is the process an image follows from the original file to the
printed job. RIP-Queue uses many different ways to reach those results,
and although the end result is a printed image, your actual workflow depends on the type of printer, desired output, and the image itself.
The most basic workflow is opening an image in RIP-Queue and printing (see Figure 1). Of course, the actual process of how images become
ready for printing is much more intricate.
Before you can print an image, you need to provide specific information
to RIP-Queue about how the image should be printed. Following are
several questions that should be answered:
• What size should the printed image be?
• What resolution should the final output have?
• What type of media will the printer use?
• Should the image use ICC profiles?
These and similar questions (known as Job Settings) determine how an
image is printed. Once your image has job settings, RIP-Queue can process it and send it to the printer (see Figure 2).
Following is an explanation of each step in a basic workflow process.
These and other topics are covered in greater detail throughout this manual and the Help Files in your program.
Original Image File
Figure 3—Original Image File
32
An original image file is only an image file and has no RIP-Queue settings associated with it (see Figure 3). Before RIP-Queue can use the
Workflow & Hardware Key—Advanced Guide
image file, you must define those settings. You can apply those settings
using Quick Sets.
Quick Sets Apply Settings
Figure 4—Quick Sets
In a basic workflow, a Quick Set applies the job settings, but you can
change these options manually if you want (see Figure 4). Whenever a
job enters RIP-Queue, a Quick Set is applied to the image even if it is
only the generic Default Quick Set. Because different types of images
need to be processed differently, you can create Quick Sets to match
your needs.
Images with Settings Become Jobs
Figure 5—Image with Job Settings
After the Quick Sets are applied, the image file becomes a job (see Figure
5). A job is an image combined with the RIP-Queue settings necessary to
print the image. When you apply settings to a job, the image itself is not
modified, but the job is. Once the image becomes a job, it is moved into
RIP-Queue where it is ready to be processed.
If you need to modify any of the job settings, this is the most efficient
time to do it. While you can modify a job after it has been processed, you
will need to reprocess the job for the changes to take effect.
Processing Jobs
Figure 6—Processing Jobs
The job settings determine how each job is processed (see Figure 6).
Processing a job can take several minutes depending on the job settings
and the original source file. For example, an image that is 2” by 3” would
take only a few seconds to process, but an image that was 200” by 300”
would take much longer.
Ripping
Raster files must still be ripped because
the processed raster data is different
than the original raster data.
The method by which jobs are processed is called Ripping. The word
RIP is an acronym that means raster image processing or raster image processor. Raster data, a collection of dots that make up an image, is the type
of data that is sent to the printer. When a job is processed, the original
image data is read and output data (processed data) is created according
to the job settings.
PostScript Files
PostScript files (*.ps, *.eps, and *.pdf) are different than raster files because they are not comprised of pixels or dots. Instead, they are a set of
instructions that describe how to create raster data. When PostScript files
are processed, they are read instructions first. This is called interpreting.
33
After the file is interpreted, RIP-Queue then creates raster data—rendering.
Ready to Print
Figure 7—Ready to Print
Once RIP-Queue processes the job, it is ready to print (see Figure 7).
At this stage in the workflow, you can still modify the job settings, but
certain job settings, like media, page size, and resolution, require that you
reprocess the job for the changes to take effect. Other job settings, like
number of copies, can be modified without reprocessing.
Printing Jobs
Figure 8—Printing
By default, images are printed in the order they are received (see Figure
8). Therefore, a job cannot print until the previous job finishes printing.
Depending on your settings, a job may wait until other jobs are also ready
or until you manually start the printing. You can configure the printer to
start printing automatically, when a certain percentage of the media is
used efficiently, or when a time-out value has passed.
Reprinting Jobs
Figure 9—Reprinting
Once RIP-Queue prints the job, it moves the file to the Buffered Jobs
area of the queue (see Figure 9). You can reprint jobs in this area at any
time, or you can modify the job, reprocess it, and then print.
Because the processed data has been created for files that were printed,
you can reprint a job at any time using the same processed data. Once
RIP-Queue creates the process data, you can even print jobs that no
longer have the original source image. However, you can only reprocess
a job if you still have the original source image.
Hardware Key
The Hardware Key determines the actual functions and features you can
use in your program. The Key is a physical plug that came with your
software (see Figure 10). Your Key contains information that specifies
exactly which features, printers, and capabilities you are able to use.
Figure 10—Hardware Key
For information on checking your
Hardware Key permissions, see the
Introduction to this manual.
34
Updating Your Hardware Key
If your Key does not list the features or printers that you want to use,
you can get a Key Update File from your sales representative. A Key Update is a small file that adds permissions to your Hardware Key.
Workflow & Hardware Key—Advanced Guide
To update your Key:
1. Run WinKey by choosing What’s On My Key from the Windows
Start menu.
2. Click File > Update.
3. Browse to the Key Update File (extension *.key).
4. Select the Key Update File, and click Open.
If the Key Update adds a new feature or capability, you may need to reinstall the software for that feature or capability to take effect. If the Key
Update only adds permissions for an additional printer, you only need to
install the new printer.
35
5
Printing & Job
Management
Objectives
This chapter will take you through printing. By the end of this chapter, you
will have an understanding of the following:
• How jobs are printed
• Placement Strategies
• Job Management
When are Jobs Printed?
RIP-Queue is designed to print your jobs automatically once certain conditions are met. These conditions include making sure you are using the
correct media, ensuring that the printer is online and not currently printing, and making sure that all holds are turned off. If any condition is not
met, the job will not print.
Holds
RIP-Queue will not print jobs that are On Hold. A Hold lets you review
a job before it is printed. After it is reviewed and modified, you can remove the Hold.
To change the Hold status of a job:
1. Highlight one or more jobs in the Jobs Ready to Print area.
2. Click the Hold button (the hand icon). This will remove the Hold
and, if all other conditions are met, print your image.
Media
Every job has a media associated with it. The media controls the output
profiles and printer settings and is the most important job setting besides
the printer itself.
Every printer also has a media associated with it. The media associated with the printer represents the media that is physically loaded in the
printer. Because your software will print automatically, make sure that the
media designated in RIP-Queue matches the media that is actually in the
printer. Failure to do so can cause your jobs to print on incorrect media.
36
Printing & Job Management—Advanced Guide
If the media for the job and the media for the printer do not match,
RIP-Queue will not print the job. The job will have a Wait for Media
status (see Figure 1). Once you change the media so they match, your
job will print.
Figure 1—Wait for Media
To change the media for a printer:
1. Highlight the printer in the Printers List area of the program
window.
2. Click Change in the Printer Information area on the right-side of
your screen. This opens the Change Media and Placement dialog
(see Figure 2).
3. Use the drop-down menus to select the Media that is currently
loaded into your printer.
4. Click OK.
Figure 2—Change Media and Placement
Changing the media for either your
printer or job sets a Wait for Media
hold. Release the hold to print.
To change the media for a job:
1. Highlight the job in the job list to display the job settings in the Job
Information area of the RIP-Queue window.
2. Click Change on the right-side of your screen. This opens the
Job Properties dialog (see Figure 3).
3. Change the Media Configuration Name and Media to match the
media that is currently loaded into the printer.
4. Click OK.
Page Size
Figure 3—Job Properties
Each image is processed for a specific page size, and a job will not print
if the page size is equal to or smaller than the page size currently loaded
in the printer.
The Maximum Printable Area of a job does not need to be the same as
the page size of the media in the printer, but the width and height of
the job does need to fit on the page. Tiling lets you print a larger image
than your page size by splitting your image into smaller pieces. For more
information on Tiling, read the Tiling section in the Preflight chapter, or
see the Help Files in your program.
Printer Online
The printer must be online before RIP-Queue can print a job. A green
icon in the Printer Information area indicates a printer is online; a red
icon indicates that it is offline. A yellow icon indicates that a printer is
currently printing. Once it finishes, it will go into an online state. Use the
online/offline button next to the green or red icons to change the state
of the printer.
37
Triggering
Triggering is the method by which you allow jobs to print. There are two
types of Start Print triggers: Manual and Automatic.
• Manual Triggering—this option delays printing until you click
the Print Now button in the Printer Information area.
• Automatic Triggering—this option automatically prints jobs
based on the percentage of the media that will be used or a timeout setting. You can also use the Print Now button to override any
delays.
To modify the triggering method:
1. Highlight the printer with the triggering method you want to change.
2. Click Change in the Printer Information area on the right-side of
your screen. This opens the Change Media and Placement dialog
(see Figure 2).
3. Click Setup. This opens the Placement Strategy dialog (see
Figure 4).
4. Check or uncheck the Automatically Start Printing option.
5. Click OK.
How Are Jobs Printed?
Figure 4—Placement Strategy
For more information on Job Options,
read the Job Options section of the
Managing Jobs chapter, or see the Help
Files in your program.
There are two sets of criteria that control how jobs are printed: Job Options and Printer Settings.
Job Options
Job Options control settings that are specific to each job. This includes
resolution, media, page size, tiling, marks, and other settings.
Job Options do not affect where the job prints on the media, neither do
they determine whether the job is nested or grouped with other jobs.
Printer Settings
Printer Settings control settings that apply to the jobs collectively. For
example, they control where jobs print on your media and whether they
are nested, grouped, or printed with cutter marks. The main printer settings are media currently in the printer, page size currently in the printer,
and placement.
To access the printer settings:
1. Highlight your printer.
2. Click Change to open the Change Media and Placement dialog.
38
Printing & Job Management—Advanced Guide
The Media Configuration Name, Media, and Page Size should always
match the ink and media currently in your printer. The Placement option
controls the placement and grouping (nesting) of your jobs. There are
five placement options to choose from.
• BestFit
• Conserve Media
• Group Jobs Together
• Print Jobs Individually
• Fotoba & Dicus Cutter Marks
Included with the Placement option are other settings that are specific
to the type of Placement option you select. These settings control the
positioning and grouping of jobs.
To modify the Placement specific options:
1. Highlight the printer.
2. Click Change to open the Change Media and Placement dialog.
3. Choose a Placement setting.
4. Click Setup. This opens the Placement Strategy dialog (see
Figure 4).
5. Modify the options you want to change, and click OK.
RIP-Queue retains the configuration for each Placement setting, allowing you to switch Placement settings without reconfiguring the Placement specific options each time. The Placement settings and the Placement specific options are also printer specific. In other words, changing
the Placement or Placement specific options for one printer will not
change those settings for your other printers.
Placement Strategies
Each Placement Strategy uses different algorithms and options that provide various workflow solutions for different situations. The primary
difference between each option is speed and unused media. Generally
speaking, if you need to print faster, you will include fewer jobs and have
more unused media. However, if you can delay printing until multiple
jobs are processed and ready to print, RIP-Queue can organize them to
effectively use more media.
BestFit
The BestFit placement strategy conserves the most media, but may be
your slowest option. BestFit automatically places jobs to use the most
39
media possible. RIP-Queue re-arranges and rotates the jobs when necessary. Every time a new job enters RIP-Queue, this strategy rearranges the
entire nest to better fit the new job with the existing jobs. Use BestFit if
you want to save the most media and do not need to print jobs on a strict
priority (first in, first out) basis.
Conserve Media
The Conserve Media placement strategy is very similar to BestFit with
some exceptions. Conserve Media does not rotate images for better
placement. Conserve Media also prints on a row-based system where the
largest image in a horizontal row determines the maximum height any
image in that row can be. On the other hand, BestFit does not use rows.
RIP-Queue rearranges the jobs when necessary. Every time a new job
enters RIP-Queue, the Conserve Media strategy re-arranges the entire
nest to better fit the new job with the existing jobs. Use Conserve Media
if you want to save media and do not need to print jobs on a strict priority basis.
Group Jobs Together
The Group Jobs Together placement strategy places jobs side-by-side to
use more media, but does not rearrange the order of the jobs as does
the Conserve Media placement. Use Group Jobs Together if you want to
save media and need to print jobs on a strict priority basis.
Print Jobs Individually
The Print Jobs Individually placement strategy prints only one job at a
time. Use Print Jobs Individually if you do not want to save media and
need to print jobs on a strict priority basis.
Fotoba & Dicus Cutter Marks
Use this strategy to print your images with Fotoba & Dicus Cutter Marks.
This strategy will conserve as much media as possible, but also creates
spacing between the images for the Marks. Use this option if you need
to print your images with Fotoba & Dicus Cutter Marks.
Modifying Placement Options
Each placement strategy offers a variety of Placement Options.
To modify the Placement specific options:
1. Highlight the printer.
2. Click Change to open the Change Media and Placement dialog.
40
Printing & Job Management—Advanced Guide
3. Choose a Placement setting.
4. Click Setup. This opens the Placement Strategy dialog (see
Figure 4).
5. Modify the options you want to change, and click OK.
Not all strategies will have the same
options.
Both Time and Area Based Starts
can be overridden by clicking the Print
Now button.
Following is a description of the available options for each strategy.
Print Triggering
Print Triggering controls when RIP-Queue sends the jobs to the printer.
You can select Time Based Start, Area Based Start, or Automatically
Start Printing. If you do not select any of these options, printing will
only occur when you click Print Now.
• Time Based Start—this option forces RIP-Queue to wait a specified time before printing.
• Area Based Start—this option forces RIP-Queue to wait until a
specified amount of media will be used before printing.
• Automatically Start Printing—this option sets RIP-Queue to
automatically print a job as soon as it is processed.
Justification
The justification setting determines where the printer places the prints
on the media. If you are using a strategy that prints multiple images at a
time, the justification applies to the group of images.
Offset
The offset settings add extra white space to the left or top of the printed
jobs. If you are using a strategy that prints multiple images at a time, the
offset applies to the group of images.
Printing Gutter
Printing Gutter determines the size and placement of the gutter. Gutters help make your color consistent by allowing heads to lay down each
color of ink on the media before passing over the print.
Flip every other tile
This option flips every other tile in an image 180 degrees
Print Multiple Rows at a Time
This option causes RIP-Queue to send all rows to the printer where it
prints as one group.
41
Contour Cutting
For more information on Contour Cutting, read the Contour Cutting chapter,
or see the Help Files in your program.
This option, located on the Options tab, allows you to generate marks
necessary for use with a contour cutting device. Select By Printer if your
printer also functions as a contour cutter.
Horizontal Copying
Select Horizontal Copying to place tiles or copies of a job side-by-side
across the page width. When Horizontal Copying is disabled, RIP-Queue
places each tile or copy of a job on its own row.
Grouping
Grouping determines how RIP-Queue orders the tiles or copies of a
job when printing. You can select to print By Tiles or By Copies. For example, printing two copies of a two-page document with By Tiles selected
results in [Copy 1 Page 1, Copy 1 Page 2, Copy 2 Page 1, Copy 2 Page
2]. Printing with By Copies selected prints the same job as [Copy 1 Page 1,
Copy 2 Page 1, Copy 1 Page 2, Copy 2 Page 2].
Space Between Copies
Set a value for each side of the image to determine how much white space
RIP-Queue leaves between images.
Percent to cache before printing
This option allows you to set when the processed information is sent
to the printer. When it is set to zero percent, information is sent to the
printer as fast as it is processed. When it is set to 100 percent, information
is not sent to the printer until the entire print is finished processing.
Cutter Mark Darkness
Select a value to set the darkness of the cutter mark, where 1 is the lightest and 4 is the darkest.
Aborting a Print
To abort a print:
1. Highlight the printer on which the job is printing.
2. Click the Abort button in the Printer Information area of the RIPQueue window.
After you abort a print job, the printer automatically goes into an offline
state. To turn the printer back online, click the Online/Offline button.
When you abort a print, the jobs that were currently printing are sent to
the Buffered Jobs area.
42
Printing & Job Management—Advanced Guide
It can take several minutes for a printer
to cease printing when you abort a job.
Reprinting a Job
After RIP-Queue prints a job, it sends the job to the Buffered Jobs area.
If the job is an Archive job, then it remains in the Buffered Jobs area
until you delete it. If the job is a Recyclable job, then RIP-Queue automatically deletes it if you do not have enough hard drive space to process
new jobs. You can reprint both Archive and Recyclable jobs. The Quick
Set controls whether a job becomes an Archive or Recyclable job.
To reprint a job:
1. Click and drag the job from the Buffered Jobs area to the Jobs
Ready to Print area.
2. A dialog appears asking if you want to re-process the job. Click
No unless you have modified the job in anyway that requires reprocessing. The job appears in the Jobs Ready to Print area and
prints according to the Triggering method you’ve selected.
Managing Jobs
For more information on Quick Sets
and Preflight, read the Quick Sets
section of the Setup & Printing
chapter and the Preflight chapter, or see
the Help Files in your program.
Managing Jobs is the process by which jobs are modified in RIP-Queue.
Many options cannot be set from RIP-Queue without using Quick Sets
or Preflight. If your software does not include Preflight, contact your
sales representative for a Key Update.
You can modify the following options directly from RIP-Queue:
• Size (magnification)
• Media
• Number of Copies
• Workflow Options
• Marks Options
Changing Size (Magnification)
When you open a job, RIP-Queue displays the size of that job in the
Buffered Jobs area (bottom left) of your window (see Figure 5). This size
is determined by the source file of your image unless you use a Quick Set
to modify the size automatically. You can also use RIP-Queue to modify
the size of your image after opening it in RIP-Queue.
To change the size of a job from RIP-Queue:
1. Highlight the job in RIP-Queue.
Figure 5—Buffered Jobs Area
2. Click Change in the Job Information area. This opens the Job
Properties dialog (see Figure 6).
3. From the Basic Properties tab, enter a value in the magnification
43
box, or use the up and down arrows to change the value. The
new job size will show under the magnification value box.
4. Click OK.
When you change the magnification of a job, the Magnification value is
reset to 1. For example, if you change the magnification of a 10” by 10”
job to a value of 2, RIP-Queue reprocesses the job at the new size (20”
by 20”) and sets the new size as a Magnification value of 1. To change the
job back to its original size, you would enter a Magnification value of .5.
If you want to specify the exact dimensions of the image, you must either
set a Quick Set to determine the height or width of the image before
opening it in RIP-Queue, or you can edit the image in Preflight.
Changing the Media
Figure 6—Job Properties Dialog
The media is shown in the Job Information area of your screen (see
Figure 5). The media setting is comprised of two parts: the Media Name
and the Media Configuration. The media name is the name of the media
itself. The Media Configuration (the portion shown in brackets) specifies
the media or ink setup in the printer.
The media of your job must match the media of your printer or it cannot print.
To change the media of a job:
1. Highlight the job you want to modify.
2. Click Change in the Job Information area. This opens the Job
Properties dialog (see Figure 6).
3. From the Basic Properties tab, select the Media Configuration
Name you want to use from the drop-down menu.
4. Highlight the Media Name you want to use. If the media name
you want to use does not appear in the list, it may not be available with your media configuration, or it was not installed when
you installed your printer.
For more information on installing
media, read the Installing Your
Printer section of the Setup & Printing chapter, or see the Help Files in
your program.
5. Click OK.
After you have changed the media for the job, RIP-Queue automatically
reprocesses the job. Reprocessing ensures that the correct calibrations
and profiles are associated with the media.
Changing the Hold Status
The Hold Status determines whether or not the job prints. If a job is on
hold, it will not print until you remove the hold.
To change the Hold status of a job:
44
Printing & Job Management—Advanced Guide
1. Highlight your job in the Jobs Ready to Print area.
2. Click the Hold button (the hand icon). This will remove the Hold
and, if all other conditions are met, print your image.
Changing the Number of Copies
RIP-Queue displays the number of copies in the Basic Properties tab of
the Job Information dialog (see Figure 6) and in the Copies column of
the Jobs Ready to Print area of your screen.
To change the number of copies of a job:
1. Highlight the job you want to modify.
2. Click Change in the Job Information area. This opens the Job
Properties dialog (see Figure 6).
3. From the Basic Properties tab, enter the number of copies you
would like printed in the Copies value box or use the up and
down arrows.
The maximum number of copies you
can enter for a job is 9999. Changing
the number of copies does not require
reprocessing.
4. Click OK.
Modifying the Workflow Options
Workflow Options allow you to control how RIP-Queue handles your
jobs. These options are found in the Job Properties dialog under the
Workflow tab (see Figure 7). For more information on Workflow Options, read the Setting Workflow Options section of the Preflight chapter, or
see the Help Files in your program.
Modifying the Marks Options
Marks are special lines that are printed with an image to aid in trimming
or measuring the final output. The Marks tab in the Job Properties dialog
allows you to set these marks (see Figure 8). For more information on
Marks Options, read the Marks Options section of the Preflight chapter,
or see the Help Files in your program.
Figure 7—Workflow Options
Controlling Jobs
Controlling Jobs helps you more effectively manage your workflow. You
can control jobs in RIP-Queue in the following ways:
• Viewing a Job
• Changing a Job’s Order
• Sending a Job to Preflight
Figure 8—Marks Options
• Reprinting a Job
• Selecting Tiles to Print
• Changing the Printer Settings for a Job
• Copying a Job to a Different Printer
45
• Deleting a Job
Viewing a Job
Use the Show Jobs For drop-down box to control how jobs are viewed
in the Jobs Ready to Print area of your screen (see Figure 9). You can
choose to view all jobs or just the jobs related to a specific printer.
Changing a Job’s Order
Figure 9—Show Jobs For Option
The arrow buttons on the left-side of the Jobs Ready to Print area of
your screen control the order in which jobs print (see Figure 10). You
can change the order of a job by highlighting it and then using the up
and down arrows to change its position in the Queue. Jobs are organized
by printer and then by order; you can only change the job order for each
printer. If you are using BestFit or Conserve Media, RIP-Queue ignores
the job order.
Sending a Job to Preflight
Figure 10—Job Order
To send a job to Preflight, highlight the job and click Preflight on the
main toolbar, or click Preflight in the Job Information area of your
screen. When a job is in Preflight, its status will display as Busy. It cannot
be modified, processed, or printed until it is submitted from Preflight.
Reprinting a Job
To reprint a job:
1. Highlight the job in the Buffered Jobs Area of your screen.
2. Drag the job into the Jobs Ready to Print area, or right-click the
job, and choose Process/Print.
3. When asked if you want to reprocess the job, click No unless you
have modified the printer or job options.
Selecting Tiles to Print
To select which tiles you want to print:
1. Right-click the job to open the right-click menu.
2. Choose Edit > Tiles. This opens the Tile for... dialog.
3. Highlight the tiles you want to print (see Figure 11).
4. Click OK.
Changing the Printer Settings for a Job
Figure 11—Tiles
46
To change the printer settings for a job:
Printing & Job Management—Advanced Guide
1. Right-click the job to open the right-click menu.
2. Choose Edit > Printer Settings. This opens the Printer Settings
dialog (see Figure 12).
3. Modify the Printer Settings you want to change.
4. Click OK.
Changing the printer settings can affect the color quality of the job.
Copying a Job to a Different Printer
To copy a job to a different printer:
1. Right-click the job to open the right-click menu.
2. Select Copy to.... This opens the Copy to... dialog (see Figure
13).
3. Select the printer you want to copy the job to.
Figure 12—Printer Settings
4. Click OK.
Deleting a Job
To delete a job:
1. Highlight the job you want to delete.
2. Press the Delete key on your keyboard, or click the Delete button
on the left-side of the job list. This will display a warning dialog
(see Figure 14).
3. Click Yes to delete the job.
Figure 13—Copy Job Option
Figure 14—Delete Job
47
6
Virtual Printers &
Other Systems
Objectives
This chapter discusses virtual printers, printing from other operating systems, and web printing. By the end of this chapter, you will know how
to do the following:
• Use Virtual Printers
• Setup non-Windows Operating Systems for printing
• Print using the Web Portal
Using the Virtual Printer
Figure 1—Virtual Printers
To use a virtual printer, you must have
Hot Folders enabled on your Hardware
Key.
A virtual printer is a RIP-Queue printer that is used as a Windows printer
(see Figure 1). When you install a RIP-Queue printer, RIP-Queue automatically creates a Windows printer in the Windows Operating System
for that device. When you print a job to that Windows printer, it sends
the job to RIP-Queue for processing and printing.
You can use any application to print to a virtual printer: graphic design
programs, word processors, internet browsers, and so forth. Just choose
File > Print in the application, and the application sends the image to
RIP-Queue.
When RIP-Queue creates a virtual printer, it automatically shares the
printer on the network. This means that any computer on the network,
Windows or Macintosh, can print from any application to the virtual
printer.
Printing from Other Windows Systems
To add the virtual printer to your Windows system:
1. From the Windows Start menu, access Settings > Printers >
Add Printer.
2. Choose to add a Network printer and browse to the RIP-Queue
system.
3. Install the printer.
Once you add the virtual printer to your printer list, you can print from
any application directly to RIP-Queue by selecting Print from the File
48
Virtual Printers & Other Systems—Advanced Guide
Figure 2—Printer Dialog
If you modify any settings that
contradict a setting in the Quick Set,
the Advanced Option setting takes
precedence.
Figure 3—Advanced Printer Options
menu. Be sure to choose the proper orientation, color options, and page
size from the Printer dialog (see Figure 2).
To configure additional options for your virtual printer, such as the
printer specific settings, click Advanced. This opens the Advanced Options dialog (see Figure 3). From the Advanced Options dialog, you can
modify the following options:
• Page (Paper) Size
• Number of Copies
• Resolution
• Scaling
• TrueType Font Handling
• Printer Features
Some features in the Advanced Option dialog may not have any effect
when printing to a virtual printer. For example, RIP-Queue controls
halftone creation for the image, so the Halftone Color Adjustment option in the Advanced Option dialog does not affect the color of the
printed image.
All of the printer options (such as page size, dot pattern, and Hot Folder
settings) are based upon a PPD (Printer Profile Description). A PPD is a
small text file that describes the features and capabilities of the printer.
Some settings controlled by the PPD, such as the Media and Hot Folder,
can change when you modify your printer in RIP-Queue. Whenever you
modify your printer by installing a new media, changing a Quick Set, or
performing other similar tasks, RIP-Queue updates the PPD file automatically. However, most programs obtain the printer information from
the PPD file on startup. This means that if you change your printer information, you should restart the programs from which you are printing
to take advantage of those changes.
Printing from a Mac OSX (10.2.8 or earlier)
To print from your Macintosh with OSX:
1. Verify that you have Windows/Macintosh connectivity capabilities
(such as Windows 2000 Server or PCMacLAN).
2. If your Mac cannot access the RIP-Queue Mac PPD folder
(ONYX Graphics\Production House\server\PPD\Mac), than copy
the PPDs from the RIP-Queue Mac PPD folder to the Mac’s hard
drive.
Figure 4—Printer List
3. On the Mac, open Print Center to open the Printer List dialog
(see Figure 4). You can find this application on the hard drive in
the same location as OSX, under Applications > Utilities.
49
4. In the Printer List dialog, click Add to display a secondary Printer
List dialog.
5. Use the drop-down menu to select the protocol that your Mac
connectivity package uses to share the printer (usually AppleTalk).
6. Select the appropriate printer from the list (see Figure 5).
Figure 5—Select a Printer
7. Use the Printer Model drop-down menu to select ONYX Graphics, and then choose the Model Name that corresponds to the
printer name you want to install. If neither ONYX Graphics nor
the appropriate Model Name appears, select Other for the Printer
Model. Next, browse to the PPDS from the RIP-Queue Mac PPD
folder (or from the Mac’s hard drive if you copied them there), and
select the appropriate PPD for your printer from the Choose a
File dialog (see Figure 6).
8. Verify that you selected the correct printer name and PPD, and
click Add.
Printing from Mac OSX (10.3.x or higher) with
Windows Printing
Figure 6—Select a PPD
There are three major steps when printing from OSX to an ONYX Virtual printer with Windows Printing:
• Configure the network
• Establish a Virtual Printer share name
• Add the printer on Mac OSX
Configuring the Network
It is vital that the OSX machine and the PC in which your ONYX Graphics software resides communicate. Configuring the Network ensures that
communication across the network can occur.
To configure the network:
The Ping utility is a system administrator’s tool used to see if a computer
is operating and if the network connections are intact. A small information
packet is sent through the network to
an IP Address. The computer that sent
the packet waits for a response. If the
connections are good, a return packet
is sent. If there is no communication
between the PC and Mac OSX,
consult your network administrator for
assistance.
50
1. Look up the IP Addresses of both the OSX and PC machines
(see the Finding IP Addresses section for more information).
2. Open a command prompt by clicking Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt.
3. Ping from the PC to see if there is communication between the
OSX machine and the PC. To do this, in the Command Prompt
window, type: ping <IP address of OSX machine>, then press
Enter. You can also open a command prompt by clicking Start >
Run…. In the Run dialog, type: cmd, and then click OK.
Finding an IP Address
An IP (Internet Protocol) Address consists of four decimal numbers in
Virtual Printers & Other Systems—Advanced Guide
the range of 0 – 255 separated by dots, such as 62.223.175.65. When you
connect to a network, your PC/Mac may automatically issue a unique
IP Address.
To locate a PC IP Address:
1. Open a command prompt window (Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt).
2. Type: ipconfig.
3. Press Enter, then look for the output section that specifically says
IP Address.
To locate a Mac OSX IP Address:
1. Pull down the Apple menu, and select System Preferences.
2. Choose Network.
3. In the Show drop-down list, select the network interface you are
using.
4. Click the TCP/IP tab.
5. Locate the IP Address line.
Establishing a Virtual Printer Share Name
Creating a Share Name allows you to easily recognize the virtual printer
when working from your Mac.
To establish the share name:
1. From the Start menu, select Settings > Printers and Faxes.
2. Right-click on the ONYX Virtual Printer, and select Sharing.
The Share Name cannot be longer than
12 characters including spaces.
3. In the Virtual Printer Properties dialog, locate the Share Name
field and change it so that it is no more than 12 characters long.
Then, write down the name located in the Share Name field.
4. Click OK to accept your changes and exit the dialog.
Adding the Printer on the Mac OSX
The final step in the OSX/Windows Printing process is to add the printer to the Mac OSX.
To add a printer to the Mac OSX:
1. On your PC, copy the PPD located in ONYX Graphics\Production
House\Server\PPD\Mac.
2. Paste the PPD somewhere on your Mac. To do this, go to your
Mac hard drive and choose Library > Printers > PPDs > Contents > Resources > and select an appropriate language for the
folder, such as choosing En.LPROJ for English).
3. On your Mac, open the Printer Utility. To do this, use the Finder
51
to select Go > Utilities > Printer Setup Utility.
4. Add a new printer.
5. Select Windows Printing from the first drop-down.
6. Select Network Neighborhood from the second drop-down list.
7. Select the Domain or Workgroup of which the ONYX RIP machine is a member (see Figure 7).
8. Select the name of the PC where the ONYX RIP resides.
Figure 7—Windows Printing
9. Once the list of available virtual printers appears, select the
printer you want to use, and click Choose.
10. From the Printer Model drop-down list, choose Other. Then
navigate to the folder where you placed the correct PPD (this is
the PPD you copied and pasted in steps 1 and 2).
11. Click Add (see Figure 8).
Now that you have established communication between your PC and
Mac OSX, installed Windows Printing, created a share name for the virtual printer, and added the printer onto your Mac OSX, you can print to
your ONYX Workflow software through your OSX machine.
Figure 8—Add
Printing from Mac OSX (10.3.x or higher) with
Printservices for UNIX
There are four major steps when printing from OSX to an ONYX Virtual printer with Printservices for UNIX:
• Configure the network
• Install Printservices for UNIX
• Establish a Virtual Printer share name
• Add the printer on Mac OSX
Configuring the Network
It is vital that the OSX machine and the PC in which your ONYX Graphics software resides communicate. Configuring the Network ensures that
communication across the network can occur.
To configure the network:
1. Look up the IP Addresses of both the OSX and PC machines
(see the Finding IP Addresses section for more information).
2. Open a command prompt by clicking Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt.
3. Ping from the PC to see if there is communication between the
OSX machine and the PC. To do this, in the Command Prompt
window, type: ping <IP address of OSX machine>, then press
Enter. You can also open a command prompt by clicking Start >
Run…. In the Run dialog, type: cmd, and then click OK.
52
Virtual Printers & Other Systems—Advanced Guide
Installing Printservices for UNIX
To install Printservices for UNIX:
1. From the Start menu, select Settings > Control Panel > Add or
Remove Programs. This opens the Add or Remove Programs
dialog.
2. Click Add/Remove Windows Components (found on the far left
of the dialog). This opens the Windows Components dialog.
3. Scroll to Other Network File and Print Services. Activate this
setting by clicking the checkbox, and then click Details. This
opens the Other Network File and Print Services dialog.
4. Activate Print Services for UNIX, and click OK.
5. In the Windows Components dialog, click Next to configure the
change.
6. From the Start menu, select Settings > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services. This opens the Services dialog (see
Figure 9).
7. Scroll to find TCP/IP Print Server, and then double-click it. This
opens the TCP/IP Print Server Properties dialog (see Figure 10).
Figure 9—Services Dialog
8. From the Startup Type drop-down list, choose Automatic.
9. Click Start to begin Printservices for UNIX. Note that the Status
and Startup Type for TCP/IP Print Server have changed to
Started and Automatic.
10. During the RIP station set-up, remember to turn off the network
firewall or make an exception on port 515 to use this workflow.
Establishing the Virtual Printer Share Name
Creating a Share Name allows you to easily recognize the virtual printer
when working from your Mac.
To establish the share name:
1. From the Start menu, select Settings > Printers and Faxes.
2. Right-click on the ONYX Virtual Printer, and select Sharing.
Figure 10—TCP/IP Print Server Properties
3. In the Virtual Printer Properties dialog, locate the Share Name
field and change it so that it is no more than 12 characters long.
Then, write down the name located in the Share Name field.
4. Click OK to accept your changes and exit the dialog.
The Share Name cannot be longer than
12 characters including spaces.
Adding the Printer on the Mac OSX
The final step in the OSX/Printservices for UNIX process involves adding the printer to the Mac OSX.
53
To add a printer to the Mac OSX:
1. On your PC, copy the PPD located in ONYX Graphics\Production
House\Server\PPD\Mac.
2. Paste the PPD somewhere on your Mac. To do this, go to your
Mac hard drive and choose Library > Printers > PPDs > Contents > Resources > and select an appropriate language for the
folder, such as choosing En.LPROJ for English).
3. On your Mac, open the Printer Utility. To do this, use the Finder
to select Go > Utilities > Printer Setup Utility.
4. Add a new printer.
5. From the Printer Model drop-down list choose Other, then go to
the folder where you placed the PPD (this is the PPD you copied
and pasted in steps 1 and 2).
6. Select LPR as the Printer Port.
7. For the Queue, choose the Share Name of your virtual printer.
You can change the Share name if you like.
8. In the IP Address field enter the IP address of the RIP station, not
the IP address of the printer.
To use the Web Portal, you must have
that feature included with your software.
Contact your sales representative for a
Key Update.
Figure 11—RIP-Queue Console
Now that you have established communication between your PC and
Mac OSX, installed Printservices for UNIX, established a share name
for the virtual printer, and added the printer onto your Mac OSX, you
can print to your ONYX Workflow software through your OSX machine.
Using the Web Portal (HTTP Access)
The Web Portal allows you to send jobs to RIP-Queue from a remote
computer on your local network through your web browser. This includes sending images to print from Macs. In the Web Portal you can
view the Active Jobs (equivalent to the Jobs Ready to Print area of the
RIP-Queue window), the Inactive Jobs (equivalent to the Buffered area
of the RIP-Queue window), and even control some job options like
number of copies, magnification, holds, and marks.
To launch the Web Portal:
1. Open RIP-Queue. In the bottom right corner of the window, the
message “Starting HTTP service on port 80” displays in the RIPQueue console (see Figure 11).
2. Open your internet browser.
Figure 12—Web Portal
54
3. In the address bar of your browser, type http:// followed by
the name of the machine on which RIP-Queue is running. For
example, http://Katherine2. If you have changed the port number
in RIP-Queue, you must follow the name of the machine with a
colon, then the port number (for example, http://Katherine:8080
or http://Katherine:1300).
Virtual Printers & Other Systems—Advanced Guide
4. Press Enter. This will open the Web Portal (see Figure 12).
Changing the Web Portal Port
The Web Portal uses port 80 by default; however, if a service is already
using that port, RIP-Queue displays an error in the RIP-Queue console.
To resolve this issue, change the port number in the General Settings of
RIP-Queue.
To change the RIP-Queue Web Portal Port:
1. In RIP-Queue select General Settings from the File menu to
open the General Settings dialog.
2. In the General Settings dialog, enter a new port number into the
Port field (e.g. 8080 or 1300).
3. Click OK.
Submitting a Job Using the Web Portal
To submit a job using the Web Portal:
1. In the Web Portal, click Browse in the Submit New Job area. This
opens the Choose File dialog (see Figure 13).
Figure 13—Choose File
2. Browse to the file you want to submit, and click Open.
3. In the Web Portal, select the printer you want to use and the
Quick Set you want to apply to the image.
4. Click Submit New Job.
5. Once RIP-Queue finishes processing the image, click Home on
the Web Portal page to refresh the page and display the updated
Active jobs. Depending on the image size, it can take several
minutes for the job to display in the Active Jobs list.
If the newly submitted job does not appear in the Active Jobs list, check
the RIP-Queue Console (located in the bottom right corner of the RIPQueue window) for information about the image.
Once you submit a job to RIP-Queue using the Web Portal, click the job
name to display the Edit Job dialog (see Figure 14). In this dialog you
can choose to modify job options such as holds, number of copies, and
magnification.
Placing a checkmark in the box next to the job name allows you to control the job by deleting, moving, holding, or making the job inactive
(moving the job directly to the buffered area without printing).
Clicking Refresh on your internet toolbar repeats the last action you
performed in the Web Portal. To refresh the Active Jobs list, click Home
on the Web Portal page (not on your browser toolbar).
Figure 14—Edit Job
55
7
Managing
Printers
Objectives
Note to Windows Vista Users:
If you have any trouble managing your
printers, see the information on page 99.
This chapter shows you how to configure and manage your printers. By
the end of the chapter, you will know how to do the following:
• Configure your printers
• Manage RIP-Queue printers
Configuring Printers
Figure 1—Configure Printers
Configuring printers allows you to set preferences for each of your printers. You can determine printer ports, folder settings, and other options.
The Configure Printer dialog allows you to control many of your printer’s variables such as Quick Sets, Media, etc (see Figure 1). It also allows
you to configure how RIP-Queue sends data to your printer.
You can access the Configure Printer dialog in one of three ways:
• Highlight the printer in RIP-Queue, and click Configure Printer
on the toolbar
• Highlight the printer in RIP-Queue, and choose Configure Printer from the Setup menu
• From Printer Manager, select your printer, and click Configure
Each method brings up the same Configure Printer dialog, with the same
options and features.
Configuring the Printer Port
The printer port is the method by which RIP-Queue communicates with
the printer.
To change the printer port for your printer:
1. Select the Device tab on the Configure Printer dialog.
2. Highlight the printer you want to configure from the Printer list.
3. Click Configure Port to display the Configure Printer Port dialog
(see Figure 2).
Figure 2—Configure Printer Port
56
4. From the Configure Printer Port dialog, choose the printer port
you want to print with, and then click Configure to modify the
port options.
Managing Printers—Advanced Guide
To learn more about the printer ports,
see the Help Files in your program.
Depending on your printer, you can use any of the following types of
ports:
• TCP/IP
• USB
• Firewire
• LPT
• SCSI
• VideoNet
• VPT
• Print Forwarding
• Print to Windows Printer Driver
• Print to File
The following ports are not tangible printer ports, but are alternative
methods to send jobs or prints to the printer:
• Print Forwarding
• Print to Windows Printer Driver
• Print to File
Print Forwarding
This port forwards print jobs to another RIP-Queue system. This allows
you to use one system to process the data, while another system sends
the data to the printer.
To use Print Forwarding:
1. Highlight the Print Forwarding port on the Configure Printer Port
dialog, and click Configure. This opens the Browse for Print
Server dialog (see Figure 3).
2. Browse to the input folder of the desired RIP-Queue printer. This
should be the printer to which the prints will be forwarded. In
most cases, this is on the network within a shared folder called
CONNECTINPUT.
3. Highlight the desired input folder. This usually has the same
name as the printer. The text “This is a valid Print Server Folder”
appears at the bottom of the Browse for Print Server dialog, and
the OK button is enabled.
Figure 3—Browse for Print Server
4. Click OK in both the Browse for Print Server dialog and the Configure Printer dialog.
If Print Forwarding does not display in the list, then either your printer
driver does not support Print Forwarding or you do not have Printer
Forwarding available on your Hardware Key. If your Hardware Key does
57
not have Print Forwarding, contact your sales representative for a Key
Update.
Print to Windows Printer Driver
You may want to use Print to Windows Printer Driver with certain printers that have printer ports or features that RIP-Queue may not support.
To use the Print to Windows Printer Driver:
If Print to Windows Printer Driver
does not display in the list, then your
printer driver does not support this
option.
1. Highlight the Print to Windows Printer Driver port on the Configure Printer Port dialog.
2. Click Configure. This opens the Select Other Printer dialog which
lists all the available Windows printers (see Figure 4).
3. Choose the Windows printer that matches the RIP-Queue printer.
You can also browse to a network printer by clicking Browse.
4. Click OK on both the Select Other Printer dialog and the Configure Printer dialog.
Print to File
Figure 4—Select Other Printer
Some printers cannot communicate directly with RIP-Queue, but instead
use an output file to retrieve the image data. You can also use the Print
to File option for troubleshooting purposes.
To use the Print to File port:
1. Highlight the Print to File port from the list of ports on the Configure Printer Port dialog.
2. Click Configure. This opens the Select Print File dialog (see
Figure 5). If the Printer Port dialog does not display Print to File,
then your printer does not support this option.
3. Browse to the location where you want to save the output file.
4. Type a name for the output file. If you want to use a file extension other than the one show by default, choose the appropriate
extension from the Save as Type drop-down menu.
5. Click Save. RIP-Queue automatically creates the output file as a
placeholder. The software does not save the actual printer output
until the printer prints a job.
Figure 5—Print to File
6. Click OK.
Using Printer Pools
A Printer Pool is a RIP-Queue printer that has two or more physical
printers. Printer pools are an effective tool when printing high-volume
jobs. When two physical printers are configured as a printer pool, and
each printer has the same media loaded, RIP-Queue automatically sends
jobs to the first printer that is ready.
58
Managing Printers—Advanced Guide
If you cannot increase the number of
physical printers, you do not have sufficient Key permissions. Contact your sales
representative for a Key Update.
You can also have each physical printer loaded with a different media.
This allows incoming jobs to be sent to the same printer (acting as a
printer pool), but without needing to wait for the media to be changed
on the printer.
The Physical Printer column in the Configure Printer dialog shows the
physical printers associated with the RIP-Queue printer. To increase the
number of physical printers, modify the value in the Number of Physical
Printers field.
Managing Media
Use the Media tab of the Configure Printer dialog to import and delete
media or to change the media specific options.
Changing the Media Specific Options
Media options are specific settings that control how the printer functions
when using that media. These settings can control the number of passes,
pass direction, head temperatures, and so forth.
To change the media specific options:
1. Choose the Media tab of the Configure Printer dialog.
2. Select the correct Media Type (Media Configuration) from the
drop-down menu.
3. Select the correct Media from the list.
4. Click Options to display the Printer Options dialog (see Figure 6).
5. Modify the media specific options.
6. Click OK.
Figure 6—Printer Options
If the Options button is disabled or does not appear on the Media tab
of the Configure Printer dialog, then your printer does not support
software-controlled media specific options. Change the options on the
physical printer to modify how the jobs are printed.
Changing the media specific options for a printer can affect the color
quality of the profiles associated with that media. You should re-profile
the media if you make significant changes to the media specific options.
To import a media:
1. In the Media tab of the Configure Printer dialog, click Import. This
displays the Open Media Library dialog.
2. Browse to and highlight the media library (.oml) file which contains the media you want to import, and click Open. This displays
the Import Media dialog.
59
3. In the Import Media dialog, place a check mark in the checkbox
next to the media you want to import, and click Import.
To delete a media:
1. Go to the Media tab of the Configure Printer dialog.
2. Select the Media Type (Media Configuration) from the drop-down
menu.
3. Highlight the Media you want to delete, and click Delete.
Managing Page Sizes
Figure 7—Page Sizes
The Page Sizes tab of the Configure Printer dialog shows the available
page sizes for the printer (see Figure 7). You can add, edit, or delete page
sizes using this tab. You can only edit Custom or Standard page sizes.
To add a Page Size:
1. Click Add on the Page Size tab of the Configure Printer dialog.
This opens the Add Page Size dialog (see Figure 8).
2. Choose Roll or Sheet as the page size type.
3. Choose the units of measurement (English or Metric) you want
RIP-Queue to display for the page size.
Figure 8—Add Page Sizes
4. From the Standard Page Sizes list, highlight the page size you
want to add. You can choose Custom if you want to define
the width and height of the page size, or you can choose a
predefined size from the list. If you choose a pre-defined size,
specify the margins for each side of the page.
5. Enter a name for the page size.
6. Click OK.
To edit a Page Size:
1. Highlight the Page Size you want to edit, and click Edit on the
Page Size tab of the Configure Printer dialog. This opens the
Edit/Add Page Size dialog (see Figure 8).
2. Change the options for the Page Size.
3. Click OK.
To delete a Page Size:
1. Highlight the Page Size you want to delete.
2. Click Delete.
Renaming a Printer
You can rename your printer to help identify your printers.
60
Managing Printers—Advanced Guide
To rename a printer:
1. Go to the Properties tab on the Configure Printer dialog.
2. Enter a new name for the printer in the Printer Name field.
3. Click OK.
Changing the Base Folder
RIP-Queue uses two special folders to manage jobs:
• Input Folder
• Work Folder
Input Folder
For more information on Hot Folders,
read the Using Hot Folders section
of the Setup & Printing chapter, or see
the Help Files in your program.
RIP-Queue uses the input folder to receive incoming image files. It also
contains the Hot Folder for each Quick Set. You can automatically send
an image to RIP-Queue by copying the image into the input folder or
any of the subfolders that represents a Quick Set. When RIP-Queue is
running, it automatically moves images from the input folder (and Hot
Folders) to the work folder where they are kept for processing, printing,
and archiving.
Work Folder
The work folder is where RIP-Queue keeps the image files for processing, printing, and archiving. RIP-Queue also uses the work folder to keep
system files that control the state of the printer.
Another folder, called the Base Folder, is the parent directory of both
the input folder and the work folders. The Base Folder is the RIP-Queue
program folder by default. You may want to change the Base Folder to a
different hard drive to allow faster access time to the image and job files
found in the input and work folders.
To change the Base Folder:
1. Select the Properties tab from the Configure Printer dialog.
2. From the Base Folder location of the Properties tab, click
Change. This opens the Browse Folders dialog (see Figure 9).
3. Browse to the location of the folder you want to use as the Base
Folder, or click New Folder to create a new folder.
4. Select the folder you want to use.
5. Click OK.
Figure 9—Browse Folders
Because the input and work folders can contain many large files, changing the Base Folder can take several minutes.
61
Ink Calculation
Use the Ink Calculation tab of the Configure Printer dialog to define the
Reporting Unit (cost per unit) and if necessary, adjust the Correction
Factor (ink drop volume). Each Resolution/Ink Type combination can
be defined and the reporting values adjusted per ink channel.
Define the Reporting Unit
Before you configure your reporting units, determine the volume of your
cartridge and divide it by the cost of the cartridge. The Cost/Volume =
the custom unit per volume measured.
To define the reporting unit:
1. In the Ink Calculation tab of the Configure Printer dialog, select
the Resolution and Ink Type you want to use (see Figure 10).
2. Select the Reporting Unit Type from the drop-down menu.
3. Calculate the cost per unit. (e.g., 680ml cartridge that costs
$239.99 = $.35/ml)
4. Enter the cost per unit for each ink channel by clicking in the field
and typing in the cost.
Figure 10—Ink Calculation
62
Adjust the Correction Factor
Each printer has a built-in default factor to determine ink usage per drop.
The default is set at 1 and takes into consideration known variables for
the device in an ideal working environment. When you print a job using
the default factor, the values reported reflect ink calculations based on
the printer manufacturer’s specifications and are interpreted internally by
the RIP-Queue which reports the data.
Because the reported data does not take into consideration variations in
the printer or working conditions, with some work on your part, it can be
fine-tuned to more accurately reflect your conditions. To fine tune your
correction factor, compare other known values with the reported values
from RIP-Queue to find the new correction factor.
Here are some simplified examples for fine tuning your correction factor
if the reported data is different from the known data. In each case, dividing the known factor (X) by the reported factor (Y) will give you your
specific Correction Factor.
• The printer reports how much ink is being used as a known value
(X). In RIP-Queue, compare the known value to the reported usage
by print job (Y).
• Install a new ink cartridge with known volume (X) and print until
Managing Printers—Advanced Guide
it’s empty. In Rip-Queue, print the job log and manually calculate
the total ink reported (Y) by adding up the ink used for all the jobs
printed with that ink cartridge.
• Physically weigh an ink cartridge before and after it prints. Convert
the mass to volume to get the exact known consumption (X). In
RIP-Queue, compare that to the reported usage by print job (Y).
Managing Printers
Use the Printer Manager to perform the following tasks:
• Configure a Printer
• Activate a Printer
• Deactivate a Printer
• Delete a Printer
• Create a PRNINST
• Duplicate a Printer
To open the Printer Manager, choose Manage Printers from the File
menu (see Figure 11). Before you manage your printer in RIP-Queue,
make sure no jobs are processing or printing. Because the printer management options affect how RIP-Queue is configured, all processing and
printing stops when you access the Printer Manager.
Activating a Printer
Figure 11—Printer Manager
The Printers list in the Printer Manager dialog shows all the printers
installed on your system. An active printer contains a check mark in the
box next to the printer name. You can only activate a certain number of
printers based on your program. RIP-Queue displays the number of active printers allowed at the bottom of the Printer Manager dialog, as well
as in the Hardware Key dialog (see Figure 12). To increase this number,
contact your sales representative for a Key Update.
Deactivating a Printer
Figure 12—Hardware Key
You may want to deactivate a printer
if you do not have enough active printer
permissions for all your printers.
To deactivate a printer in the Printer Manager, remove the check mark
from the checkbox next to the printer’s name. When you deactivate a
printer, RIP-Queue retains the printer port settings, Quick Sets, and jobs
assigned to that printer; however, the printer will not appear in the Printers list of the RIP-Queue window. If you reactivate a printer, RIP-Queue
restores all the settings and jobs to the state they were in when you deactivated the printer.
63
Deleting a Printer
Deleting a printer removes all jobs associated with that printer.
If you want to permanently delete a printer from your system, highlight
the printer in the Printer Manager, and click Delete.
Creating a PrnInst
A PrnInst is a RIP-Queue Printer Installation file. PrnInst files include
all the files necessary to install a printer in RIP-Queue, such as the profile
library information (medias and profiles), Quick Sets, and system files
(such as .dlls).
You may want to use the create PrnInst feature for several reasons:
• Backing up your printer settings
• Backing up your media profiles
• Installing a copy of the printer on a different RIP-Queue system
• Distributing a custom-made printer installation
To create a PrnInst:
1. In RIP-Queue, select Printer Manager from the File menu. This
opens the Printer Manager dialog (see Figure 11).
2. In the Printer Manager dialog, highlight the printer for which you
want to create a PRNINST.
3. Click Create PrnInst. This opens the PRNINST Options dialog.
4. In the PRNINST Options dialog, select the options you want to
include with the new PrnInst file by placing a check mark in the
checkbox next to the desired option. Click Next to open the Save
As dialog.
5. In the Save As dialog, enter a name for the new PrnInst file in the
File Name field, and click Save.
Duplicating a Printer
Use the Duplicate option to create a new printer that is an exact copy of
an existing one. This option is useful if you have more than one printer
of the same type.
Duplicating a printer is different than printer pooling. The printers in a
pool share the same profile library and Quick Sets, and anytime you add
or modify a media or profile, it applies to all the printers in the printer
pool.
Duplicate printers are completely separate printers, each with distinct
profile libraries and Quick Sets. If you add or modify a media, profile, or
Quick Set to either of the duplicate printers, the printers are no longer
identical.
64
Managing Printers—Advanced Guide
To duplicate a printer:
1. In Printer Manager, right-click the printer you want to duplicate to
display a list of options.
2. Choose Duplicate from the list of options.
After RIP-Queue duplicates the printer, verify that the new printer is
active by making sure the checkbox next to the printer name contains a
check mark. Duplicating a printer can take several minutes.
65
8
Proofing
Objectives
To use Proofing, you must have that
feature enabled on your Hardware Key.
Contact your sales representative for a
Key Update.
This chapter will show you how to setup proofing. By the end of the
chapter, you will know how to do the following:
• Compare printer gamuts
• Configure proofing printers
• Verify the proof
What is Proofing?
Proofing is the process of simulating the output of one printer on another device. This concept has long been used in traditional printing
industries like commercial offset printing where getting ready to print is
very labor intensive and expensive. These industries use a small, inexpensive printer to proof or simulate the way a printing press images color.
Proofing Basics
One of the primary purposes of printing a proof is to give you an idea
of what the final output will look like. Proofs can help you identify problems with your image without having to print the final product. While at
times you may require a press proof (an exact copy) of the final output,
press proofing involves printing the image to the final media using color
reproduction technology. This can take time and be expensive. In most
cases, you only need a simulation proof. A simulation proof does not
provide an exact copy of the final output, but a representation of the
final output.
If you determine that a simulation proof is acceptable in your situation,
it is important that you understand that the proof may not exactly match
the final output and that it may fall short of the original.
To proof an image, RIP-Queue requires that you have a minimum of
two active printers. One will act as your final output printer; the other as
your proofing printer. Your final output printer is the printer on which
you will print the final image. The proofing printer is the printer on which
you will proof your image. This allows you to review a representation of
your image without using the ink and media of the final output printer.
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Proofing—Advanced Guide
To proof an image properly, you must meet the following conditions:
• Your proofing printer should match the color of your final output
printer as closely as possible. This depends upon the compatibility of the proofing gamut and the final output gamut. In general,
the gamut of the proofing media should completely encompass the
gamut of the final output media. If the gamut of your final output
media falls outside the gamut of the proofing media, the proofing
printer cannot provide an exact color reproduction.
• You need accurate profiles for both the output printer and the
proofing printer.
• Ensure that you maintain and calibrate both printers regularly to
ensure that the target densities are accurate.
• Ensure that the calibration of your proofing printer is correct by
using the Verification Strip and the Visual Tolerance Chart.
Before Proofing
Before you proof an image, ensure that your proofing printer is capable
of reproducing the colors of the output printer and determine, in RIPQueue, which printer you will use as your proofing printer. The following sections describe how to set up your proofing process:
• Comparing Printer Gamuts
• Configuring a Proofing Printer
Comparing Printer Gamuts
The first step in the proofing process is to determine whether your
proofing media completely encompasses the gamut of your final output
media. This ensures that your proofing printer can accurately reproduce
the colors of your final output printer. To compare your proofing gamut
with your final output gamut, use the MediaAnalyzer tool.
MediaAnalyzer Tool
Figure 1—MediaAnalyzer Tool
The MediaAnalyzer tool allows you to visually compare two gamuts at
the same time (see Figure 1). The tool contains a Left Configuration, a
Right Configuration, and a Gamut Data View in the center where it maps
a rough wire frame representation of up to two gamuts on an L*a*b*
axis (see Figure 4). This allows you to determine if your proofing gamut
fully encompasses the final output gamut. If the proofing gamut does
not cover the final output gamut, it cannot accurately reproduce the desired colors.
67
To open the MediaAnalyzer tool:
1. Browse to the MediaAnalyzer folder on ONYX Graphics\Production House\preflight directory.
2. Double-click MediaAnalyzer.exe.
To view the gamut from the top, set the
a* slider to 85; to view the gamut from
the bottom set the a* slider to 265.
The MediaAnalyzer tool can capture gamut configurations from either a
measuring device by clicking Measure or by importing the information
from an ICC Profile by clicking ICC Import. You can directly load an
ICC Profile from a .PrnLib file or from a .PrnInst file. Clicking Save allows you to save a gamut configuration for viewing later. Clicking Load
allows you to open a previously saved gamut configuration.
Use the options at the bottom of the MediaAnalyzer window to control
what data displays in the Gamut Data View. Each slider control allows
you to rotate the gamut view along an axis. The L* axis runs vertically
in the Gamut Data View while both the a* and b* axis run horizontally.
For the most part, you will want to move the L* slider to rotate the view
around the L* axis, which allows you to view the various hues. Because
MediaAnalyzer provides a 3-dimensional perspective view, the parts of
the gamut and L*a*b* axis that are closer to you appear further from the
center of the view.
Use the MediaAnalyzer tool to analyze your ICC Profiles and compare
the color gamuts of your proofing printer and final output printer.
The Proofing Printer
First, view the gamut for the proofing printer.
To view the gamut:
Figure 2—Open
1. Launch the MediaAnalyzer by browsing to your ONYX Graphics
> Production House > Preflight directory and double-clicking
MediaAnalyzer.exe. This displays the MediaAnalyzer window
(see Figure 1).
2. In the MediaAnalyzer window, click ICC Import in the Left Configuration section to display the Open dialog (see Figure 2).
3. In the Open dialog, browse to the ONYX Graphics > Production
House > Common Folder. This folder lists all the installed printers with their associated .PrnLib files (see Figure 3).
4. Highlight the proofing printer’s PrnLib (the printer on which you
want to print a proof), and click Open. This displays the Select
Profile dialog.
5. Select the desired profile, and click OK. The MediaAnalyzer tool
displays a red wireframe which represents the gamut of the proofing profile (see Figure 4).
Figure 3—Common Folder
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The Select Profile dialog displays a list of printer profiles for the selected
Proofing—Advanced Guide
Figure 4—Gamut Wireframes
.PrnLib file. Each item in the list represents a separate printer profile and
uses this format: MediaConfig~Resolution~PatternID~Name.
The PatternID indicates which dot pattern this profile was created for.
The Pattern IDs are as follows:
• 0 = FDRP
• 1 = FDRP Line
• 2 = FDRP Plus
• 3 = Ordered Dither
• 4 = Screen
• 5 = Stochastic
• 6 = Contone
• 7 = Smooth Screen
The Final Output Printer
Next, view the gamut of the media you want to proof:
To view the gamut:
1. In the MediaAnalyzer window, click ICC Import in the Right Configuration section. This displays the Open dialog.
2. In the Open dialog, browse to the ONYX Graphics > Production
House > Common Folder. This folder lists all the installed printers with their associated .PrnLib files.
3. Highlight the final output printer’s PrnLib (the printer you want to
proof), and click Open. This displays the Select Profile dialog.
4. Select the desired profile, and click OK. The Media Analyzer tool
displays a blue wireframe which represents the gamut of the final
output profile (see Figure 4).
Reviewing the Gamut Data
Figure 5—Gamut Report
Once the MediaAnalyzer tool displays both gamut wireframes, review
the Left and Right Report windows (see Figure 5). The Gamut volume
value for the proofing gamut should generally be as big or bigger than
the gamut of the media that is being proofed.
Use the L* slider to rotate the gamuts and ensure that the blue (proofed)
gamut is entirely inside the red (proofing) gamut. Note any places where
the blue proofed gamut falls outside the red proofing gamut. This indicates that the proofing media cannot accurately reproduce these colors.
It is important to understand the limitations of the proofing media as
this sets the proper expectations. In some cases, you may feel that it is
acceptable for parts of the final output gamut to fall outside the proofing
69
gamut; however, this depends entirely upon your situation and expectations. In general, the proofing process is designed to help you understand
the expected output, even if the proof is not an exact replica.
Once you determine how your proofing printer and selected media will
reproduce the colors of your final output printer and media, you need to
configure your proofing printer.
Configuring a Proofing Printer
When you configure a printer for proofing, you select the final output
printer and then determine which printer and settings you want to use
for proofing.
To configure a proofing printer:
1. In RIP-Queue, highlight the printer you want to use for the final
output.
2. Click Configure Proofing. This opens the Proof Creation Settings dialog (see Figure 6).
3. Use the Printer drop-down menu to select the printer you want to
use for proofing.
4. Select the desired Quick Set for the proofing printer.
5. Set the Maximum Width and Height for the proof. This does not
set the actual width and height, it simply sets a limit on the size
of the proof. The actual output of the proof will be in proportion to
the original job.
Figure 6—Configure Proofing
6. Enable Proof All Pages if you want to print all the pages of a
multi-page document. Disable this option to only print a proof of
the first page.
7. Select the desired Rendering Intent using the drop-down menu.
8. Use the Pure Hues area to select which colors you want to exclude from the ICC workflow.
Once you configure your printer, you have completed the necessary setup, and you are ready to print a proof.
Printing a Proof
You can print a proof using any of three methods:
• From a selected job in RIP-Queue
• From Preflight
• Automatically using a Quick Set
To print a proof from a selected job in RIP-Queue:
1. Highlight the desired job in the Jobs Ready to Print or the Buffered Jobs Area of the RIP-Queue window.
70
Proofing—Advanced Guide
2. Right-click the highlighted job, and select Proof.
3. RIP-Queue creates a new job in the Jobs Ready to Print area
and appends -Proof to the job name. RIP-Queue also places the
original job on hold until you release it (see Figure 7).
Figure 7—Proofing
Make sure that the job you highlight for
proofing is originally set to print on the
final output printer.
Depending on the Quick Set and Media Placement settings, the proof
image previews, rips, and prints just as a normal job.
While you can manage proofs in the same way as any other job, you
should not need to open a proof job in Preflight nor should you edit any
color management or color correction settings. This defeats the purpose
of a proof—mimic the output of another printer. However, you can
modify the color management, size, etc., of the original job in Preflight.
Proofing from Preflight
You can submit for proofing any image you modify in Preflight. This
allows you to apply changes such as color filters or cropping to an image
and then submit those changes to the proof printer before tying up the
final output printer.
To print a proof from Preflight:
1. Open the desired job in Preflight by right-clicking the job in the
Jobs Ready to Print area of RIP-Queue and selecting Edit >
Job in Preflight. If you open a job into Preflight using another
method, you will not have the option to submit the job as a proof.
2. Use the tools in Preflight to make any necessary crops, edits,
or color changes. It is acceptable to make color changes at this
point because you are changing the original image before you
proof it. However, it is important that you do not open the proof
image into Preflight and modify the color.
3. Once you have made the desired changes, click the Print tab in
Preflight (see Figure 8).
4. Click Submit Proof. RIP-Queue creates a new job in the Jobs
Ready to Print area and appends -Proof to the job name. RIPQueue also places the original job on hold until you release it.
Figure 8—Proofing from Preflight
Depending on the Quick Set and Media Placement settings, the proof
previews, rips, and prints just as a normal job.
After the proof is ready, review the results. If necessary, you can edit the
color of the original image again and submit another proof. Do this until
you achieve the desired result.
Proofing Automatically Using a Quick Set
You can create a Quick Set for your final output printer which automatically sends a proof file to the proofing printer. Use this option if you
regularly print a proof before printing your final output.
71
To print a proof using Quick Sets:
1. Highlight the final output printer in RIP-Queue.
2. Click Edit Quick Set. This opens the Edit Quick Sets window.
3. Highlight the Quick Set you want to configure, and click Edit. This
opens the Edit Quick Set dialog.
4. Click Advanced. This opens the Edit Quick Set—Advanced Options dialog (see Figure 9).
5. In the Workflow Tab, enable the Create Proof Automatically
check box.
6. Click OK.
Figure 9—Proofing Using Quick Sets
Each time you apply this Quick Set to an image, RIP-Queue creates a
new job in the Jobs Ready to Print area and appends -Proof to the job
name. RIP-Queue places the original job on hold until you release it.
Verify the Proof
In order for your proofing printer to be accurate, it is important that you
properly calibrate the proofing media. However, due to environmental
variables and printer wear and tear, calibrations tend to drift. In other
words, they lose their accuracy.
It is important that your proofing printer’s calibration be accurate to ensure that it is producing the correct colors. Printing a Visual Tolerance
Chart (located in the ONYX Graphics\Production House\Samples
folder) on the proofing printer immediately after calibrating the proofing
media gives you an accurate reference point. When you print a proof, you
can ensure that your proofing printer is producing accurate output by
checking the Verification strip which prints at the bottom of each proof
against the Visual Tolerance Chart. You should print a Visual Tolerance
Chart for each media, ink, resolution, and dot pattern that you will be
using.
Visual Tolerance Chart
Figure 10—Visual Tolerance Chart
The Visual Tolerance Chart displays several sets of patches along with
varying differences of lightness, saturation, and hue which correspond
to the patches on the Verification strip (see Figure 10). This helps you to
determine if your proofing printer’s output is accurate.
To print a Visual Tolerance Chart:
1. In RIP-Queue select Open from the File menu. This displays the
Open dialog.
2. Browse to the ONYX Graphics\Production House\Samples
directory.
72
Proofing—Advanced Guide
3. Highlight the file named VisualToleranceChart.tif.
4. In the Open dialog, use the Printer drop-down menu to select
your proofing printer.
5. Use the Quick Sets drop-down menu to select the All Profiles
Off Quick Set. If you do not already have an All Profiles Off Quick
Set, open the Job into Preflight and set your profile selections
there.
6. Click Open. The image processes and prints according to your
printer and Quick Set settings.
Keeping the strips of the Visual
Tolerance Chart in an envelope will
prevent fading.
Once you print the Visual Tolerance Chart, cut it into strips along the
white lines and, using a paper hole puncher, punch holes where indicated
by the white circles. Make sure there are no white borders around the
holes. Print a new Visual Tolerance Chart each time you recalibrate a
media.
Verification Strip
Now that you have printed the Visual Tolerance Chart, you can compare
it to the Verification strip which prints at the bottom of each proof to
check the accuracy of the media calibration.
To verify the calibration of the proofing media:
1. Using strip one of the Visual Tolerance Chart, place the hole of
the patch marked with a V over the first patch of the Verification
Strip. Make sure that the colors are identical (see Figure 11).
Repeat this step, comparing each set of patches in strips one and
two of the Visual Tolerance Chart with the corresponding patch in
the Verification strip.
Figure 11—Strip One
2. If your verification strip does not match the patch with a marker
(V), use the other patches in the set to determine whether your
proof is within the visual tolerance range—lighter/darker, under
saturated/over saturated, or a different hue.
3. Using the set of patches on strip three of the Visual Tolerance
Chart, place the hole nearest the patch marked with a V over
the corresponding patch on the Verification Strip. Make sure that
the colors are identical (see Figure 12). The verification patches
should match the densest corresponding patch on the Visual
Tolerance Chart.
Figure 12—Strip Three
4. Ensure that the last four patches on the Verification Strip are
within the color range of the corresponding patches on strip four
of the Visual Tolerance Chart (see Figure 13). For example, compare the last yellow patch on the Verification Strip against all the
yellow patches on strip four of the Visual Tolerance Chart. The
Verification patch should match the patch marked with a V.
Figure 13—Strip Four
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9
Color Management
& ICC Profiles
Objectives
This chapter will take you through Color Management and ICC Profiles.
By the end of this chapter, you will have an understanding of the following items:
• Color Management & Color Theory
• ICC Profiles
• Color Management Options
• Profile and Calibration Terminology
What is Color Management?
If you are unfamiliar with the theory
behind Color Management, read the
Color Theory section of this chapter.
If you are familiar with Color Theory,
skip ahead to Color Management
Options.
Color Management determines the color characteristics of your images
in RIP-Queue by using color spaces and profiles. Understanding and
using proper Color Management will help you achieve quality output
color.
What is an ICC Profile?
The ICC (International Colour Consortium) sets the standards for color
management in the imaging industry. An ICC profile lets one device
know how another device has created its colors and how those colors
should be interpreted or reproduced. Simply put, ICC Profiles help ensure that you have accurate color.
Color Theory
Color theory is a set of basic rules for mixing color to achieve a desired result. Because color can be formed using both additive (RGB) and
subtractive (CMYK) methods, two different definitions, or color spaces,
were developed to describe color.
RGB
RGB color is based on the light spectrum, and it breaks color down into
an RGB representation. In other words, all color is defined by a certain
amount of R (red), G (green), and B (blue). Light emitting devices such
74
Color Management & ICC Profiles—Advanced Guide
as TVs and computer monitors function in this manner. If you were
to turn your monitor off, you would see black because no R, G, or B
colors are present. This would be represented as RGB% 0,0,0. If you
were looking at a white screen, this would be represented as RGB%
100,100,100 because each red, green, and blue source is shining at full
potential. Other colors are created by combining various amounts of R,
G, and B. True white light is composed of a full spectrum of all light
colors, but RGB is close enough for most standards. RGB is referred to
as an additive color theory because when you add all the colors together,
you get white.
CMYK
A color gamut is the range of colors
that are possible. For example, a color
printer has a much larger gamut than a
black and white printer because a color
printer has more color options.
CMYK color is based on colorants and is referred to as a subtractive
color theory because you get white by taking away color. C (cyan), M
(magenta), and Y (yellow) are used to create color. In theory, an equal
amount of C, M, and Y would create K (black), but the result in practice
is actually a muddy brown. Because of this, K is added to create pure
blacks and other dark colors. K is also an economical solution since K
ink is less expensive than C, M, or Y.
Because RGB color spaces are defined by light and not colorants like
CMYK, RGB devices generally have a much larger color gamut. This
creates some problems because the color on your monitor can be different than what is printed.
Device-Dependent Color Spaces
Figures 1 & 2—Device-Dependent Color Spaces
RGB and CMYK are referred to as device-dependent color spaces because the colors defined in these spaces are intrinsically tied to the devices they are defined on. A device may refer to a printer, scanner, monitor, or any device in which color is created. For example, in a television
showroom each television has a slightly different color even though they
are displaying the same program—they each have their own unique RGB
color spaces. Likewise, printers have a unique CMYK color space that
varies slightly from printer to printer.
Colors that are defined in device-dependent color spaces cannot accurately be changed to any other device-dependent color space in a direct
process because they are not compatible (see Figures 1 & 2). Like an
interpreter, you need something that can communicate will both RGB
and CMYK.
Device-Independent Color Spaces
In 1976, a mathematical color space was created that could be used as an
75
To ensure consistency, the L*a*b* color
space must be viewed in a controlled
light or color temperature. If you try to
match a 5000° K (D50) light-box to
an image on a 6500° K (D65) monitor, the colors will appear different. You
can use any light value, as long as you
always use the same value in each step
of the workflow.
Because the L*a*b* color space is theoretical, it has no gamut limitation. RGB
and CMYK each have a restricted
gamut and each gamut is different.
Figure 3—L*a*b* and Profiles
interpreter—L*a*b*. This color space is now the standard method used
to interpret between two device-dependent color spaces. Because L*a*b*
is not dependent on any color space, it is called a device-independent
color space.
The L*a*b* color space has three different components—L*, a*, and
b*. L* is the lightness value which ranges from 0 (no lightness) to 100
(maximum lightness); a* determines the red-to-green value and ranges
from +128 (red) to -128 (green); and b* defines the yellow-to-blue value
and ranges from +128 (yellow) to -128 (blue).
Because the L*a*b* space is a fixed standard, any defined value will always be accurate. L*a*b*: 65,5,-110 can be correctly understood by an
L*a*b* compatible program or device as the exact shade of blue that it
was originally designed as. In comparison, you cannot accurately measure
the actual CMYK and RGB color spaces.
Once an L*a*b* value is defined, accuracy can be guaranteed within the
realms of the L*a*b* space—but the source and the target of a particular color is almost always either RGB or CMYK. Because each devicedependent space is different, the idiosyncrasies and gamut restrictions
must be taken into account before a translation to the L*a*b* space can
occur. This is done with a profile (see Figure 3).
Profiles can be referred to as ICC Profiles, ICM Profiles, or Color Management Profiles and have either the .icc or .icm extension. RIP-Queue
supports both formats, and both formats may be used interchangeably
in RIP-Queue.
ICC Profiles
Use caution when dealing with an
input source that has a gamut significantly different than the gamut of
the output source because they can be
impossible to correctly match.
76
An ICC Profile correctly maps a particular device-dependent color space
to an L*a*b* standard. A profile also works in a reverse manner to map
an L*a*b* value to a device-dependent space. For example, when you
scan an image the original color space (of the scanner) is RGB. Applying
a profile to the image correctly converts the RGB data to an L*a*b* color
space. Then, applying another profile accurately changes the L*a*b* values to CMYK in order to print the image (see Figure 3). If each profile is
accurate, the colors of the printed image match the colors of the original
image.
It is important to note that profiles are tied to the color space they were
created in. That means that the profiles, too, are device-dependent.
Therefore, if you create a profile for one printer, it may not be accurate
if you use it for another printer.
You can apply ICC profiles to either convert a device-dependent color
Color Management & ICC Profiles—Advanced Guide
Figure 4—Conversions using L*a*b* and Profiles
space to L*a*b* or to convert L*a*b* to a device-dependent color space;
in other words, you can use most ICC Profiles as either an input or
an output profile. The only difference between an input and an output
profile is how you use the profile. However, remember that profiles are
device-dependent, and using an input profile as the RIP-Queue output
profile (or vice-versa) can cause undesirable color changes in your printed image.
Input profiles convert the device-dependent color space of the image
to L*a*b*, and output profiles convert L*a*b* to the device-dependent
color space of the output device or file (see Figure 4). Because the output of RIP-Queue is the printed image, the output profile is the default
ICC Profile for the media in the printer.
Input Profiles
Because profiles are device-dependent, you should select appropriate
input profiles for both CMYK and RGB color spaces. RIP-Queue also
allows separate profiles for images (raster data) and vector objects (PostScript data). You can also choose a profile for one type and choose not
to use a profile for another.
Output Profiles
The output profile used in RIP-Queue is the Default Printer ICC profile
for the printer, media, dot pattern, and resolution combination you are
using.
Rendering Intents
You can also select a rendering intent for the output profile from the
ICC Profile Setup dialog. Rendering Intents control how a profile is applied and how the colors are mapped from one gamut to another (how
the profile maps colors within the image that are not achievable by the
printer gamut). Because printers must take into account gamuts, white
point, and other variable factors, rendering intents allow one profile to
be used for different circumstances.
You can choose a rendering intent for both images (raster data) and vector objects (PostScript data). You can also choose from the following options: Perceptual (Images), Saturation (Graphics), Relative Colorimetric,
Absolute Colorimetric, and Poster Color. To choose these options, click
on the down arrow for either Images or Vector.
• Perceptual (Images)—this gives your images pleasing color. It
adjusts all the colors in the image to control the colors that are outside the gamut of the output profile. Every color changes slightly,
77
For more information on Proofing, read
the Proofing chapter, or see the Help
Files in your program.
but the overall results of your image look pleasing because the relationship between the colors stays the same. This is the default setting for images.
• Saturation (Graphics)—this gives you the best solid hues. It takes
all colors and scales them to the brightest saturation possible. This
is most suitable for printing when color impact is more important
than color accuracy, such as when you want to print vector (PostScript) data with bold and bright colors.
• Relative Colorimetric—this is used for proofing when you do
not want to simulate the final output substrate color. It accurately reproduces the colors within the printers’ range but does not attempt
to accurately render the out-of-gamut colors. This can result in some
strange color patterns because the final colors that are out-of-gamut
are not reproduced. This setting uses the color of the output media
as the white point. When proofing, this proofs only the image, and
assumes that the media used is the same as the final media.
• Absolute Colorimetric—this is used for proofing when you want
to simulate the final output substrate color. It accurately reproduces
all the colors within the printer’s range, but adjusts the out-of-gamut
colors so that they fall within the range of the printer. This setting
simulates the white point of the input profile. For proofing, this
proofs both the image and the media.
• Poster Color—this rendering intent, created by ONYX Graphics,
Inc. to allow for an improved CMYK color workflow, preserves hue
and relative saturation by mapping the input CMYK gamut directly
to the output CMYK gamut. If the output gamut is larger than the
input gamut, the output will be more colorful than the source image.
Use this rendering intent with a CMYK source workflow. Using this
rendering intent with an RGB source workflow provides the same
results as the perceptual rendering intent.
L*a*b* Image Files
Although most images require an input profile to be processed correctly,
L*a*b* files (image files with an L*a*b* color space) do not use an input
profile. Using L*a*b* files is highly recommended because they avoid an
initial conversion from RGB or CMYK, which guarantees more accurate
color. RIP-Queue supports both L*a*b* TIFF and PSD files.
Embedded Profiles
Because the input profile of an image should match the output profile
of the software or device it came from, many programs facilitate the ap-
78
Color Management & ICC Profiles—Advanced Guide
If an image contains an embedded
profile, you can still overwrite the
embedded profile and use another input
profile instead.
plication of profiles by using Embedded Profiles. When an application
embeds a profile, it automatically packages the profile with the image.
When possible, you should use the embedded profile bundled with an
image because it will most accurately interpret your image.
For example, if you create an image in Photoshop and save it as a TIFF
file with embedded profiles applied, Photoshop encodes the profile into
the TIFF file to be used as the input profile in another application. When
you bring that image into RIP-Queue, the profile is automatically available for your use.
The embedded profile displays in the ICC Profile Setup dialog as Image’s
Embedded Profile. RIP-Queue does not display the actual name of the
profile. Because of this, you should always check that the correct profile
is defined before you export or save the original image file.
Color Matching Table
The Color Matching Table is a lookup table for named process (spot)
colors. For example, if you have a PostScript file that uses a customdefined color called SPOTCOLOR Yellow C, RIP-Queue can use the
specific L*a*b* values associated with that color when processing and
printing the image.
The Color Matching Table only applies when using PostScript files with
named process colors. When a PostScript file contains a named process
color that is listed in the Color Matching Table, RIP-Queue ignores the
vector input profiles and calculates the output color value directly using
the L*a*b* value of the process color and the default output profile of
the printer. Refer to the online help for more information concerning
the Color Matching Table.
Color Management Options
You can also access the ICC Profile
Setup dialog from Preflight by clicking
the Printer and Media tab and then
Change Profiles.
Because there are so many different settings that control color, RIPQueue groups these settings into Color Management options to facilitate
managing the color settings.
When you select a Color Management option in Preflight or in a Quick
Set, you do not have to select individual settings, such as the input and
output ICC Profiles, because selecting the Color Management option
automatically sets those options for you. However, if you do want to
change the individual profiles, click Change Profiles from Edit Quick
Sets to open the ICC Profile Setup dialog.
79
Setting a Color Management Option in a Quick
Set
If you want to use a specific Color Management option for future images, edit a Quick Set and select that Color Management option.
To access the Color Management option for a Quick Set:
1. Highlight the printer that uses the Quick Set you want to modify.
2. Click Edit Quick Sets on the Toolbar. This opens the Edit Quick
Sets menu.
3. Highlight the Quick Set you want to modify, and click Edit. This
opens the Edit Quick Set dialog (see Figure 5).
4. Select the Color Management option you want to use.
Figure 5—Edit Quick Sets
5. Click Change Profiles if you want to select individual profiles using the ICC Profile Setup dialog.
Setting a Color Management Option in Preflight
If you want to specify a particular Color Management option for a single
image, open the image in Preflight and change the Color Management
option. If you change the Color Management options for a job, you will
need to reprocess the job before you can reprint it.
To change the Color Management option in Preflight:
1. Open the image in Preflight.
2. Click the Printer and Media tab.
3. Modify the Color Management option in the Mode area (see
Figure 6).
Figure 6—Mode Area
4. Click Change Profiles if you want to select individual profiles using the ICC Profile Setup dialog.
ICC Profile Setup
Figure 7—ICC Profile Setup
80
Use the ICC Profile Setup dialog to specify individual profiles for image
and vector aspects of a particular color space (see Figure 7). Depending
on the type of image you are working with, different options display
in the ICC Profile Setup dialog. For example, if you are working with
an RGB image, RIP-Queue disables the CMYK options; if the job is a
CMYK image, then it disables the RGB options. PostScript files generally contain more than one data type, so RIP-Queue enables both the
RGB and the CMYK sections when you are working with a PostScript
file. However, when working with a PostScript file, one or both sections
(RGB or CMYK) can be ineffective if there are no such color space elements in the image. RIP-Queue disables both the CMYK and the RGB
Color Management & ICC Profiles—Advanced Guide
input profile selections when working with L*a*b* data. When creating
or editing a Quick Set, RIP-Queue enables all options.
You can also set output profile and rendering intents in the ICC Profile
Setup dialog. Use the following tabs and options to set the input and
output profiles, as well as the rendering intents, for your image:
Profiles Tab
It is highly recommended that you do
not disable the Use Embedded Profiles
When Available option when using
TIFF and PSD files.
You can use the Profiles tab to set the following options (see Figure 7):
• CMYK Image
• CMYK Vector
• RGB Image
• RGB Vector
• Custom Image—this option applies a profile to any image format other than CMYK or RGB (e.g., CMYKOG, CMYKRB)
• Use Embedded Profiles When Available—disabling this option causes RIP-Queue to ignore embedded profiles.
• Proof—this option allows you to simulate a specific color space
or device.
• Pure Hues—if you want to print your primary process colors
without the profiles, click Pure Hues (the button with the colored
squares; see Figure 8). Using Pure Hues applies the profile to all the
colors except those with the checkbox selected on the Pure Hues
dialog.
Rendering Intents Tab
Figure 8—Pure Hues
The Rendering Intents tab allows you to select the rendering intent you
want to use (see Figure 9). If you are working with a PostScript file or
a Quick Set, you can choose a rendering intent for both image and vector. For information on rendering intents, refer to the Rendering Intents
information in the Color Theory section of this chapter.
The Proof option is disabled unless a proof ICC is selected on the Profiles tab. Proofing allows you to simulate the rendering intent as if you
were printing on another printer.
Output Tab
The Output tab allows you to set how RIP-Queue will output an image
(see Figure 10).
Figure 9—Rendering Intents
81
Figure 10—Output
GCR (Gray Component Replacement)
is the process of removing the graying
component equivalent to the least
dominant color, and replacing that with
black ink in the black separation.
• Output—use the Output drop-down list to select the output profile you want to use for your image.
• Advanced Black Generation—click Advanced Black Generation on the Output Tab to access the Advanced Black Generation
dialog. This dialog includes both GCR and Gray Balance options.
Use the drop-down menus to add GCR tables and Gray Balance
profiles for your data type. For GCR options, you can select No
GCR Selected, Default GCR, or Custom GCR. For Gray Balance
options, you can select No Gray Balance Selected and Default Gray
Balance (see Figure 11).
• Spot Channel Replacement—this option allows you to print
separation files with defined spot colors on any printer space (see
Figure 12). For example, the spot colors in a CMYKSS file can be
converted to CMYK so the file can be printed correctly on a CMYK
printer. This option lets you print files designed for a spot color
workflow on printers that don’t have spot color channels.
To use the spot channel replacement tools:
1. From the Output Tab, click Spot Channel Replacement.
2. In the Spot Channel Replacement dialog, highlight the spot color
you want to define, and click Edit. This opens the Edit Spot
Channel Replacement dialog.
3. Select the desired color space.
4. When you are finished, click OK.
Figure 11—Advanced Black Generation
Gray Balance adjusts the levels of C,
M, or Y to get a balanced gray. ICC
Profiles do this automatically, so only
use this option if you are not using an
ICC Profile.
Saving Custom Color Management Settings
You can save your custom color management settings for future use.
While you can only save your settings in a Quick Set, these settings are
available for your use in Preflight.
To save your custom color management settings:
1. Highlight the printer you want to modify, and click Edit Quick
Sets on the toolbar. This opens the Edit Quick Sets dialog.
2. Highlight the Quick Set you want to save your custom color
management settings to, and click Edit. This will open the Edit
Quick Set dialog.
3. In the Color MAnagement area of the Edit Quick Set dialog, click
Change Profiles and adjust the profile settings as desired.
Click OK to accept the changes and return to the Edit Quick
Set dialog.
4. Once you modify the profiles, click the pull down arrow on the
Change Profiles button in the Color Management area of the Edit
Quick Set dialog to display a menu. Select Save As... to display
82
Color Management & ICC Profiles—Advanced Guide
the Save Color Management Setting dialog (see Figure 13).
5. Enter a name for the custom color management setting, and click
OK. Once you have saved a custom color management setting,
you can modify or delete these settings.
Figure 12—Spot Channel Replacement
Figure 13—Save Color Management Setting
83
10
Contour
Cutting
Objectives
This chapter will take you through the details of Contour Cutting. By the
end of the chapter, you will know how to do the following:
• Prepare a file for Contour Cutting
• Modify a Quick Set for Contour Cutting
• Use Contour Cutting workflows
• Configure CUT-Server
What is Contour Cutting?
You must have Contour Cutting
enabled on your Hardware Key to use
the proofing feature. Contact your sales
representative for a Key Update.
Contour cutting allows you to print an image and then use a specialized
device to cut portions of that image. To do this, you prepare a file with a
specialized spot color which acts as a cut path. You then print the job using RIP-Queue. Once RIP-Queue completes the print, the cutting device
uses the cut path to determine where the image needs to be cut.
How do I use Contour Cutting?
To use the contour cutting feature, you need to prepare your image file
properly. There are three steps to setting up contour cutting.
1. Create a cut path in a vector-based drawing program such as Adobe® Illustrator® or CorelDRAW.®
2. Create a special Quick Set that uses the cutter path prefix. This
creates the cut file from the cut paths in the image.
3. Determine your cutting workflow and change your printer’s setup
options accordingly. You must change the setup options to print the
file with a barcode and registration marks.
Depending upon your equipment, you can use one of three cutting
workflows:
• Print and cut on the same device—this workflow uses RIPQueue to print and cut.
• Print on any printer and use the I-Cut® digital die cutter—this
workflow uses RIP-Queue to print and the I-Cut application to cut.
84
Contour Cutting—Advanced Guide
• Print on any printer and use a separate cutter—this workflow
uses RIP-Queue to print and CUT-Server to cut.
Preparing a File for Cutting
The first step in the Contour Cut process is to prepare your file for
contour cutting. To prepare your file, first you must define the cut path
in a vector-based drawing program. The cut path can be as simple or
complex as you like.
Once you create the cut path, assign a spot color to it. This spot color
(specifically the name, not the color) is the most important part of preparing the file because it allows the cutter software to determine where
the cutter should cut the image.
The name you assign to this spot color must have a unique prefix which
matches the prefix assigned in RIP-Queue (see the next section, Modifying
a Quick Set for Contour Cutting, for information on where to set this prefix).
In RIP-Queue, the default prefix for the cut path spot color is CutContour. Once you decide on a prefix you can append unique identifiers to
the name like CutContour1.
When RIP-Queue processes and prints the file, the path with this specially named spot color will not be printed with the rest of the image.
RIP-Queue processes the spot color as a cut path and creates a separate
cut script file for your cutting device.
Defining the Cut Path in Illustrator
If you need help creating a spot color
in your drawing program, see that
program’s Help Files.
The following steps are specific to Adobe Illustrator; however, many
drawing programs use similar steps to achieve the same result. The most
important part of creating a cut path is that you must create a spot color
named CutContour and that you apply the color to the cut path.
To define a cut path in Adobe Illustrator:
1. Open your file in Adobe Illustrator.
2. Create a new layer (Window > Layer > New Layer) and select
that layer. With complex artwork, create a new layer for your cut
path elements; with simple artwork this is not always necessary.
For help on creating layers, refer to the Adobe Illustrator Help.
3. Draw your cut path using the rectangle/ellipse, pen, or pencil tool.
Make sure you close all paths.
Assign a Spot Color
For RIP-Queue to recognize your cut path, you must assign a unique
spot color to the path.
85
To assign a spot color to the cut path in Adobe Illustrator:
1. Open the Swatches palette (see Figure 1). If the Swatches palette is not visible, select Swatches from the Window menu.
2. Click the arrow on the upper right corner of the Swatches palette
to display a secondary menu and select New Swatch to display
the New Swatch dialog, or click the New Swatch icon on the
Swatches toolbar.
3. In the New Swatch dialog, enter CutContour as the name for the
swatch. Whatever you enter here must match what is entered
into RIP-Queue.
4. Select Spot Color from the Color Type drop-down menu (see
Figure 2).
5. Use the slider bars to create a CMYK color. The color is not
important, only what you name the color.
Figure 1—Swatch Palette
6. Click OK to close the New Swatch dialog.
7. Select your cut paths and assign the new swatch color to those
paths.
Save Your File
Now that you have defined the cut path and assigned a spot color to the
cut path, save your file in .eps format.
Figure 2—New Swatch
Modifying a Quick Set for Contour Cutting
Before you can print a contour cut file, you must either modify an existing Quick Set or create a new one for your contour cut files. Using a
specialized Quick Set for contour cutting allows you to include additional
options such as Tile Outline Cut Paths and Trim Overlap.
To Create a New Quick Set for Contour Cutting:
1. In RIP-Queue, highlight the desired printer, and click Configure
Printer. This opens the Configure Printer dialog.
2. In the Configure Printer dialog, click New on the Quick Set tab.
This opens the Edit Quick Set dialog (see Figure 3).
3. Set all appropriate options in the Edit Quick Set dialog. Deselect
the first option under the Media section and click the arrow under
the Maximum Print Area for more print area options.
4. Click Advanced to open the Advanced Options dialog.
5. In the Advanced Options dialog go to the Postscript File tab and
enable the Use Cutter Path Prefix option (see Figure 4).
Figure 3—Edit Quick Sets
86
6. In the text field in the Use Cutter Path Prefix area, enter the
prefix you assigned to the cut path spot color in the vector based
graphic application. If you opted to use the default spot color
prefix, then leave this field at its default setting.
Contour Cutting—Advanced Guide
7. Set additional cutter options by selecting the Marks tab in the
Advanced Options dialog. This dialog lets you set the following
options:
Figure 4—Use Cutter Path Prefix
It is imperative that the text in the
Cutter Path Prefix field match the
prefix you assigned to the cut path
spot color, including case and spaces.
If this field does not match the prefix
you assigned to the cut path spot color,
RIP-Queue will not recognize the spot
color as a cut path.
• Generate Tile Outline Cut Paths—this option is useful for multiple copies of a photo that doesn’t contain an embedded cut line,
or for cutting around the edge of a tiled image.
• Trim Overlap—this option configures RIP-Queue to place cut
lines in the center of the overlap.
Contour Cutting Workflows
Depending upon the type of equipment you have, your workflow will
fall into one of three categories:
• Print and cut on the same device
• Print on any printer and cut on the I-Cut digital die cutter
• Print on any printer and cut on a separate cutter
Print and Cut on the Same Device
There are many devices which act as both a printer and a cutter.
To print and cut a job on the same device:
1. In RIP-Queue, highlight the desired printer, and click Change.
This opens the Change Media and Placement dialog.
2. In the Change Media and Placement dialog, click Setup. This
opens the Placement Strategy dialog.
3. On the Options tab select By Printer in the Contour Cutting dropdown menu (see Figure 5).
4. Click OK to close both the Placement Strategy dialog and the
Change Media and Placement dialog.
5. In RIP-Queue, open your file and apply the new Contour Cutting
Quick Set.
Figure 5—By Printer Option
Once RIP-Queue finishes printing the file, the cutter automatically cuts
along the cut path.
Print on Any Printer and Cut on the I-Cut Digital
Die Cutter
In this workflow, you can print on any printer and then use the I-Cut
digital die cutter. When you print an image to cut on an I-Cut digital die
cutter, the software automatically prints a barcode which the cutter uses
to find the corresponding cut file.
87
To print on any printer and cut using the I-Cut digital die
cutter:
1. In RIP-Queue, highlight the desired printer, and click Change.
This opens the Change Media and Placement dialog.
2. In the Change Media and Placement dialog, click Setup. This
opens the Placement Strategy dialog.
3. On the Options tab, select I-Cut in the Contour Cutting drop-down
menu (see Figure 6).
4. Click OK to close both the Placement Strategy dialog and the
Change Media and Placement dialog.
5. In RIP-Queue, open your file and apply the new Quick Set.
6. Once RIP-Queue finishes printing the file, place the finished print
on the cutting table.
7. Launch the I-Cut application and go to Options > File Location.
Figure 6—I-Cut Option
8. Browse your network and select the shared Hot Folder (machine
name\cutter\I-Cut).
9. Start the cutting process. The cutter automatically reads the
printed barcode and finds the corresponding cut script file.
Print on Any Printer and Cut on a Separate Cutter
This workflow allows you to print your job on any printer and then cut
on any cutting device.
To print on any printer and cut on a separate cutter:
1. In RIP-Queue, highlight the desired printer, and click Change.
This opens the Change Media and Placement dialog.
2. In the Change Media and Placement dialog, click Setup. This
opens the Placement Strategy dialog.
3. On the General tab, set the top offset to 2 inches. This adds an
extra margin the cutter needs when moving the media back and
forth during the cut process.
4. On the Options tab select the desired cutter from the Contour
Cutting drop-down menu (see Figure 7). If this menu does not list
your specific cutter, select Generic Cutter.
5. Click OK to close both the Placement Strategy dialog and the
Change Media and Placement dialog.
6. In RIP-Queue, open your file and apply the new Contour Cutting
Quick Set.
Figure 7—Generic Cutter
88
7. Once RIP-Queue finishes printing the file, use the CUT-Server to
cut the print. For more information on using the CUT-Server, see
the Using CUT-Server section of this chapter.
Contour Cutting—Advanced Guide
Using CUT-Server
What is CUT-Server?
For optimal performance, we recommend
that you run AutoUpdate for the latest
revision of the CUT-Server software.
CUT-Server is an ONYX application that sends cut information to your
specific cutter. RIP-Queue creates the cut information for the CUTServer from the cut path you defined in your graphics application.
How do I use CUT-Server?
CUT-Server only works with the specific cutters listed in the Placement
Strategy dialog in RIP-Queue; however, there is also a Generic Cutter
option which works with most cutting devices.
Configuring CUT-Server
Once you’ve run the executable to install the new application, launch the
CUT-Server by double-clicking the icon on your desktop or selecting
CUT-Server from the Start menu. The first time you start the application, CUT-Server displays the Add Cutter dialog (see Figure 8).
To add a cutter
1. In the Add Cutter dialog, click Add Cutter.
2. Use the Cutter Type drop-down menu to select the desired cutter,
then click OK.
3. Highlight the device, and click Configure.
Figure 8—Add Cutter
4. In Port Settings, use the drop-down menu to select the port type.
Click Setup to open the Port Configuration dialog.
5. Use the Port Configuration dialog to setup your specific device.
6. In the Device Settings area, select the Default cut setting, and
click Configure. This opens the Edit Cutter Settings dialog (see
Figure 9). These setting are the cutting equivalent to Quick Sets.
7. The Edit Cutter Settings dialog displays the current default settings. The Cutter Settings dialog for a specific cutter displays
the setting name, knife pressure, and cut velocity. The Cutter
Settings dialog for a generic cutter displays common HP-GL/2
commands to drive a variety of cutters. If you know the specific
commands unique for your cutter, you can modify the settings
here.
8. Click OK.
9. Click Close.
Figure 9—Edit Cutter Settings
If you need to add a new cutter or manage your existing cutter, select
Application Settings on the tool bar and then the Cutters icon. In the
Device Management dialog you can Add, Delete, and Configure cutters.
The first time you use the generic cutter, you must calibrate your specific
cutter to recognize the generic cutter alignment marks on your image.
89
Workflow Options for Adding Cut Files
There are several workflow options for adding cut files to the job list.
When you add a cut file using any of these methods, the file will display
under the correct device heading. If you add a cut file for a cutter that’s
not configured, you will be prompted with a message to add that specific
cutter. Cut jobs will display in the job list for the intended cutter.
Cutter Hot Folder
This is the most common workflow. Once RIP-Queue processes the image, it creates the cut file and stores it in the Hot Folder for that cutter.
CUT-Server recognizes cutter Hot Folders automatically so the job displays in the CUT-Server job list.
Opening Cut Files Manually
To open a cut file manually, click Open from the tool bar and browse to
the cut file. The recognized file extension for cut files is .xml.
Scanning a Barcode
To add a cut file using a barcode reader, click Scan a Barcode from
the tool bar and scan the barcode or type in the number of the barcode
located on the print.
Drag and Drop
You can drag and drop cut files into CUT-Server. To do this, select the
file and drag and drop the file into the application.
Custom Hot Folder
You can configure custom Hot Folders for CUT-Server to recognize a
network folder or another known location. To do this, click Application
Settings on the main toolbar. Click Jobs > Add and browse from the
Application Settings dialog.
Archive
To open a job from a previously archived file, click Archive from the tool
bar, highlight the file, and click Restore. This moves the job from the
Archive into the job list for the intended cutter.
Cutting Workflow
Once you have installed the cutter, you can add you cut files to the job
list.
90
Contour Cutting—Advanced Guide
To send a cut job to the cutter:
1. In the CUT-Server window, highlight the desired cut job from the
job list to display the cut paths in the preview area.
2. If you want to change the rotation or apply a different cutter setting, use the mini-arrow in the right corner of the cutter heading. This expands and contracts the rotation and cutter setting
options. Use the drop-down arrows to make your selection (see
Figure 10).
Figure 10—Cutter Settings
3. If you want to inspect your cut paths, use the zoom and pan tools.
To reset the preview, use the zoom drop-down, and select Fit to
Window.
4. Load the print into the cutter. If you’ve made a change to the rotation, check the preview area to verify the correct orientation.
5. Click Cut Now.
Application Settings
The Application Settings dialog controls the general appearance of the
program as well as device and job settings (see Figure 11). You can access the dialog using the Application Settings icon on the tool bar of the
main window.
Changing the Appearance
Figure 11—Application Settings
Appearance is the first dialog displayed in Application Settings (see Figure 11). Use these settings to change the general appearance of the program.
• Ruler Enabled—this option displays rulers along the top and leftside of the preview screen.
• Show text on toolbar buttons—this option displays text under
the tool bar icons.
• Display warning when deleting cut file—this options will cause
a warning message to be displayed to make sure you want to delte
that cut file.
• Show feed direction on the preview—this option displays feed
direction arrows above the preview screen. If you rotate cut jobs,
this indicates the media orientation.
• Animate Cut Path—this option displays cut paths as an animated
dashed line.
• Use Operating System buttons and controls—this option
causes the buttons and controls to change to the defualt options of
your operating system.
• Use Default Font Size—this option displays the font size for the
91
user interface. Deselect this option to change the font size from the
default. Font size does not control fonts in the image.
• Units—this option displays the units of measurements.
• Language—this option displays the current language for the user
interface. Use the drop-down menu to select your desired language.
You will be prompted to restart the program for the changes to take
effect.
Managing Cutters
Figure 12—Cutters
Select the Cutters icon on the left-side of the Application Settings dialog
to display the cutter window (see Figure 12). Use the Cutter settings to
manage your devices.
The Device Management section of the Cutters window displays a list
of current devices.
• Add Cutter—if you want to add a new cutter, click the Add button.
• Delete Cutter—if you want to delete a cutter from the list, highlight the device, and click Delete.
• Configure Cutter—if you want to configure a cutter from the list,
highlight the device, and click Configure.
The Application Settings section of the Cutters window displays a checkbox for Sort CutPaths and Allow Open CutPaths.
• Sort CutPaths—this is checked by default and improves cut accuracy and efficiency by sorting cut paths in a logical manner to reduce
media feed adjustment while cutting.
• Allow Open CutPaths—this option allows the cutter to leave
an open path and not connect back to the beginning point of the
cutter.
Managing Jobs
Figure 13—Jobs
92
Select the Jobs icon on the left-side of the Application Settings dialog
to open the Job options (see Figure 13). Use these settings to configure
Archive Options and Hot Folders.
The radio button controls how jobs are handled after cutting.
• Don’t do anything with jobs after cutting—this option leaves
the job in the job list until you manually delete the file. You can
manually delete files from the job list by highlighting the job, and
then either selecting Delete from the right-click menu or the Delete
icon located on the tool bar.
Contour Cutting—Advanced Guide
• Archive jobs after cutting—this automatically moves jobs to the
Archive list. You can manually archive jobs from the job list by highlighting the job, and selecting Archive from the right-click menu.
Restore or delete archived jobs using the Archive icon on the tool
bar.
• Delete jobs after cutting—this deletes the job from the list after
cutting.
CUT-Server automatically recognizes ONYX Hot Folders and displays
cut files in the job list for the intended cutter. CUT-Server displays a list
of custom Hot Folders from the network or a different known location.
Use the checkbox to enable active Hot Folders.
• Add—if you want to add a custom Hot Folder, click Add and
browse to the location. You can add an unlimited number of Hot
Folders and any cut jobs in the defined Hot Folders will display in
the job list.
• Edit—if you want to edit a Hot Folder from the list, highlight the
entry, and click Edit. This allows you to browse to a new location.
• Remove—if you want to remove a Hot Folder from the list, highlight the entry, and click Remove.
Viewing Shortcuts
Select the Shortcuts icon on the left-side of the Application Settings
dialog to view the Shortcut Key Strokes (see Figure 14). These are only
for display and are not editable.
Figure 14—Shortcut Keys
Viewing About
Select the About icon on the left-side of the Application Settings dialog
to view the CUT-Server information.
93
11
Layout
Front-end
Objectives
If you do not have Layout Front-end,
contact your sales representative for a
Key Update.
This chapter will introduce you to Layout Front-end. By the end of this
chapter, you will understand the following.
• Purpose of Layout Front-end
• Functionality of Layout Front-end
What is Layout Front-end?
Figure 1—Layout Front-end
A Job is a group of images organized
for printing as a single unit.
Overlap Tiles allows you to conserve the
most media by making the white boundaries around many images transparent.
This allows you to overlap tiles and
conserve media.
Layout Front-end gives you immediate, hands-on control over multiple
images (see Figure 1). Instead of modifying and printing a single image
at a time in multiple applications, Layout allows you to open, modify,
organize, and print any number of images from a single application.
Unlike RIP-Queue, Layout does not use Quick Sets, and it is only available before an image is sent to RIP-Queue. This allows you to customize
the organization of your images on your media, modify the images using
the simplified tools, select your printer and media settings, and then send
the nest to RIP-Queue much faster than sending each image to Preflight
individually. When you click the Print button, the nest is processed, sent
to RIP-Queue, and printed as a single image. Because the image is only
processed at printing and not after each modification, your changes appear immediately.
Layout also has several new features such as Overlap Tiles, Multiple Jobs,
image bleeds, simplified color corrections and tiling, and variable data.
Because Layout allows you to organize your images how you want them
on the media, it is especially useful for flatbed printers. You should use
Layout to conserve the most media possible, overlap tiles, perform basic
modifications, and use variable data. You should not use Layout for jobs
handled with Quick Sets.
Using Layout Front-end
Layout Front-end was designed to be user friendly and highly intuitive.
The following sections describe basic functionality. See the Help Files in
your program for more information about specific features.
94
Layout Front-end—Advanced Guide
Application Settings
Figure 2—Application Settings
You can access the Application Settings (see Figure 2) by clicking the
Application Settings button on the main toolbar. The Application Settings control the following options and features:
• Appearance—this option controls the basic appearance of the
program, cut path color, measurement units, and language settings.
• Quality Options—this option determines the speed and quality
of image processing prior to printing. This option can also affect
the quality of the final print.
• Image Options—this option allows you to adjust processing and
printing options for your image.
• Cutter—this option manages your cutters. It lets you add, delete,
and configure your cutters.
• Shortcuts—this option displays shortcut keys used in Layout
Front-end.
• About—this option displays information about the application.
Image Tools Tab
Figure 3—Image Tools Tab
Figure 4—Image Color Correction
Figure 5—Color Replacement
The Image Tools tab (see Figure 3) controls job settings such as size, tiling, and color corrections. To access any feature in the Image Tools tab,
click on the tab and then select the appropriate feature. Many of these
features are explained in the Preflight chapter. You can also look at the
Help Files in your program.
• Size Crop—this option sets the width, height, magnification, and
orientation of your image. You can also crop your image by clicking
the Crop Image button.
• Tiling—this option sets the tiles and tile overlaps for your image
using either automatic or manual settings.
• Color Management—this option modifies the color of your
image using the Image Color Correction tool. To open the Image
Color Correction tool (see Figure 4), highlight your image and click
the Basic Adjustments button. Click the appropriate color to adjust your image. The preview windows by each color show what the
image will look like if you choose to add more of that color. You
can modify brightness, contrast, and saturation using the appropriate buttons along the bottom of the screen.
• Color Replacement—this option selects and changes one color
to another color (see Figure 5).
• Cut Paths—this option creates automatic cut paths.
95
• Labels—this option controls what information appears in the label. It also controls the location and appearance of the label.
• Marks—this option determines the marks that will be printed
with your image.
• Image Bleed—this option lets you print a bleed with your image.
You can choose from Colored, Duplicate, Wrap, and Mirror. Image
bleeds leave your cut image with a clean edge.
• Variable Data—this option lets you create a template image where
certain portions of the image are modified from image to image.
Instead of modifying each image individually, Variable Data allows
you to import data from a spreadsheet. Layout Front-end will then
automatically insert the appropriate data in the pre-defined fields.
This option is often used when printing similar items like price advertisements, business cards, and name plates.
• Package Templates—this option allows you to use and create
templates that automatically resize, duplicate, and arrange the image
on the media. Select an open image and use the drop down menu
to select a template or click Template Manager to create a new template. This will apply the template to the open image.
Page Tools Tab
Figure 6—Page Tools Tab
The Page Tools tab (see Figure 6) controls your initial image settings,
layout, and cutter marks. To access any feature in the Page Tools tab, click
on the tab and then select the appropriate feature.
• Settings—this option lets you name your job and apply a watermark to your image
• Layout—this option lets you determine the vertical and horizontal space between each of your images. You can also automatically
arrange your images and add offsets. To manually arrange your images, click and drag the image to a location.
• Cutter Marks—this option lets you place a barcode on your image for contour cutting and determines the type and size of cutter
marks you will use. You can also manually place cutter marks on
your image to maximize media usage and efficiency.
Images Tab
The Images tab (see Figure 7) displays the images from your current job.
Each image is listed with any associated tiles. You can select which images or tiles you want to print by selecting or deselecting the Print option
next to each image. If you deselect an image, it will still be available in the
96
Layout Front-end—Advanced Guide
job, but it will not be displayed nor will it print. This allows you to print
only specific tiles or, with PostScript files, only specific pages. You can
delete an image by highlighting and selecting Delete Image.
Printer and Media Options
Figure 7—Images Tab
Figure 8—Printer and Media Options
The Printer and Media Options section (see Figure 8) on the bottom of
the application window displays your printer and media settings. Use the
drop down arrows to select your settings. These settings need to match
the settings you have in RIP-Queue.
• Printer—this option lets you select the printer you want to use.
Printers that are already installed in RIP-Queue are automatically
available in Layout Front-end.
• Cutter—this option lets you select the cutter you want to use.
You can add cutters by selecting Application Settings > Cutters
> Add Cutter.
• Media Group—this option lets you select the media configuration you want to use.
• Media—this option lets you select which media you want to use.
• Mode—this option sets your mode.
• Page Size—this option determines the page size.
• Print Button—this option controls printing and cutting. Depending on your settings, it will either let you Print, Cut, or Print and
Cut.
Jobs
Figure 9—Jobs
Layout organizes your images using Jobs. Jobs are groups of images organized for printing as a single unit. You can create, delete, and rename
jobs by right-clicking on the bottom of the application window (see Figure 9). You can also add a job by clicking on the green + or delete a job
by selecting that job and clicking on the red X. To switch between jobs,
click on the job you want to view.
97
Note to Windows Vista Users
Make sure to have the following settings applied to be able to register and adjust settings on Virtual Printers.
UAC (User Ac- Administrator Effects on Registration, Application and
count Control) Privileges
Virtual Printers
State
Off
Yes
Off
No
On
Yes
On
No
Registration works normally. Application runs normally. User
has complete access to Virtual Printer settings.
User must right-click the application icon and select Run as
administrator.... You will then be able to register normally. The
application will then run normally and changes to virtual printers can be made. UAC State should not affect access to Virtual
Printer settings. If this action does not give you administrative
privileges and access to printer settings, log off and log back
on with an administrative account or turn on UAC.
Registration works normally. Application runs normally. User
has complete access to Virtual Printer settings. If you right
click and select Run as administrator... a warning will open asking whether you want to cancel or allow this action. Select Allow.
User must right-click the application icon and select Run as
administrator.... A dialog opens displaying user accounts with
administrative privileges. Select the desired account and type in
the password. You will then be able to register normally. The
application will then run normally and changes to virtual printers can be made. UAC State should not affect access to Virtual
Printer settings.
*Adjustable settings for Virtual Printers include: add/remove/edit page sizes, add/
remove/rename media, add/remove/edit keywords, rename printer, activate/deactivate printer, add/remove/rename quicksets, add/remove/rename modes.
99
Glossary
A
ACRN
Achromatic Color Replacement. See GCR
Active Printers
A Printer that can be used in RIP-Queue. Use Printer Manager to
activate or deactivate printers.
Additive Color (Additive Primaries)
Colors formed by the combination of red, green, and blue colored
light. Video images are produced by this method. This differs from
Subtractive Color (used in printing), in that adding more color lightens the image; 100% of all three colors produces white.
Aliasing
Visual stair-stepping of edges that occurs in images that have been enlarged too much. Sometimes known as jaggies. See also Anti-aliasing.
ANPA-COLORTM
ANPA-COLORTM Color System. American color matching system, mostly used in newspaper printing.
Anti-aliasing
Technique for reducing the visual stair-stepping of edges that occurs in an image that has been enlarged too much by averaging or
blending the colors next to the edge.
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange)
A coding standard that uses 7 or 8 bits to assign numerical values up
to 256 for the representation of characters and symbols.
100
Glossary
AST
Adobe Separation Table. Color profile providing RGB to CMYK
color conversions.
B
Banding
1. Distinct levels of color in an otherwise continuous span of color,
caused by printing gradients without sufficient color information.
2. Horizontal striping caused by a printer head malfunction. Usually
this is either a misfiring head or improper media feeding.
Base Address
The address at which a device resides in computer memory. The
computer must know this address to communicate with the device.
Base Folder
A folder containing the input and work folders for a printer.
Bitmap
A raster image format where each position on a video screen or
printout is a picture element (Pixel). Every pixel is addressable, and
they are stored and processed at that level. Each pixel is represented
by 1 (for black and white images) or more bits (24 bits allows approximately 16 million shades of gray or colors). A bitmap is the
two-dimensional matrix of pixel representation.
Black Generation
Addition of K ink to Process Colors when converting from RGB to
CMYK. Usually handled through UCR or GCR methodologies.
Bounding Box
An invisible frame drawn by an application around a portion of an
image that sets the size. This applies to PostScript only.
Brightness
A measure of the total amount of light emitted, transmitted, or reflected by an object or image; normally measured in Candela.
101
C
Candela
International unit of measure for Luminance, approximately equal
to one candlepower. In technical terms, a candela is 1/60th of the
luminous intensity per square centimeter of a blackbody radiating at
the temperature of solidification of platinum (2,046 K).
Chrominance
Signal which describes Hue and Saturation, used in measuring the
difference between two colors of equal Brightness.
CIE (Commission Internationale de l’Éclairage)
An international group that developed the most commonly used set
of color definition standards. See also ICC.
CIECAM, CIECAM97
Profile standards proposed by the ICC which take into account
viewing conditions such as temperature, light angle, and light type.
CIELab
A uniform Colorspace proposed by the CIE for use in the measurement of small color differences. See also L*a*b*.
CMYK
System for describing colors based on a combination of values for
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black; the ink colors used in four-color
process printing. In theory, 100% of Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow
create Black. In practice, the addition of Black ink is necessary to
print a true Black. See RGB.
CMYKOG
System for describing color based on a combination of values for
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black, Orange, and Green. It is an expansion of the CMYK color model that provides a larger color gamut.
CMYKRGB
System for describing colors based on a combination of values for
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black, Red, Green, and Blue. It is an expansion of the CMYK color model that provides a larger color gamut.
102
Glossary
Color
The attribute of visual experience that can be described using the
dimensions of Hue, Saturation, and Brightness.
Color Gamut
The range of color that can be created on an output device.
Color/Gray Levels
A color correction tool that allows modification of contrast, brightness, and saturation (Color Levels), as well as the highlights, midtones, and shadow levels (Gray Levels).
Color Layer
A layer of a separated image composed of a single color.
Color Management System (CMS)
A System which ensures color uniformity across input and output
devices so that the final printed results match the originals. The
characteristics or profiles of devices are normally established by reference to standard color targets.
Color Rendering Dictionary (CRD)
A feature of PostScript Level 2 and PostScript Level 3 that specifies output device color capabilities using CIE color notation. Contained in a PostScript RIP, a CRD converts CIE Yxy information
embedded in a PostScript file to CMYK information for output.
Color Rendering Intent
A method of mapping color values so colors can be reproduced
on different devices even if the devices have a different gamut. As
part of this process, it determines how in-gamut and out-of-gamut
colors are mapped. See also Rendering Intent.
Color Separation
The process of splitting full-color images into their CMYK components. Color separation can also refer to one or all four of the
separate pieces of film or data files from which a four-color version
is to be printed. Each separation is a distinct Halftone image.
103
Color Space
The set of referents used to describe color. The color spaces displayed in RIP-Queue are CMYK, RGB, and HSV. L*a*b* manipulations are also possible in Color Correction.
Color Space Array (CSA)
Color space description that specifies source color characteristics.
(These are usually embedded in PostScript Level 2 and PostScript
Level 3 EPS files.) A CSA is based on the monitor settings of the
application or is specified by the printer driver.
Color Temperature
A measurement of color value in degrees Kelvin. The higher the
temperature the closer it moves to white. Typical daylight rages from
5500°K to 6500°K.
Color Wheel
An image or chart that displays the entire color spectrum at one
time. See wheel.tif in the RIP-Queue Samples directory.
Colorimeter
An instrument that measures and quantifies color in a way that resembles human vision. The measurements are usually in the form
of coordinates in a CIE color space.
Continuous Tone
1. Images that contain an apparently infinite range of shade and
color smoothly blended to create a true copy of the source image.
2. Printing method where dots of equal size are placed in a variable-spaced pattern causing the transitions between colors to appear
more natural.
Contone
A RIP-Queue dot pattern that produces continuous tone data (such
as RGB TIFF output) as opposed to half-tone data.
Contrast
The difference in tone between the darker and lighter parts of an
image.
104
Glossary
Crop Box
Defines the area of an image that is to be included in the final output. Anything outside of the crop box is excluded.
Cropping
Cutting or manipulating an image to eliminate unwanted detail
along the top, bottom, or sides of an image. Cropped images in
RIP-Queue are square or rectangular in shape.
D
DCS (Desktop Color Separations)
A version of the standard EPS format; this lets you save color separations of CMYK or multi-channel files. Use the DCS 2.0 format to
export images containing spot channels and single alpha channels
from Adobe Photoshop.
Densitometer
A photoelectric instrument that measures the density of printed
inks or dyes. A densitometer works in two modes: Integral mode
measures density on a logarithmic scale from 0 to about 4; Dotpercent mode measures density on a linear scale from 0 to 100.
RIP-Queue uses integral mode.
Density
Degree of opacity of coverage by an ink or toner. Usually measured
as a percentage, with 0% equal to no ink, and 100% equal to full
coverage.
Density Linearization
A procedure to normalize a device behavior to obtain a linear input
to output response for opacity.
Density Range
The measurable difference between the brightest highlight (white)
and the darkest value (black) that a device can create or register. The
greater the dynamic range, the more lifelike the image.
105
Device Independent Color Space
A color space that is not dependant on any particular physical device. See CIELab.
Dithering
Process of averaging primary colors to approximate other colors.
DLL (Dynamic Linked Library)
A file containing a set of functions/routines called by a program to
perform a task.
DMA (Direct Memory Access)
This allows high speed transfer of data between a peripheral device
(such as an LPT port) and a computer’s memory without using the
computer’s processor. DMA channels can work simultaneously independent of the computer’s processor.
Dot
A single element in the halftone printing process. In traditional halftone generation, dots vary in size to control the intensity of the
printed color. In digital printing, the dot size is fixed by the print
mechanism.
Dot Gain, Dot Bloom
Process whereby the ink or toner spreads (blooms) larger than the
initial size of the dot due to either capillary action or the ink physically running over the edges of the dot (over inking). Dot gain can
be modified by adjusting the physical environment (humidity or
temperature) of the printer, or by reducing the saturation level of
the inks. See GCR, UCR.
DPI (Dots Per Inch)
Screen or printer resolution. A single value (for example 1200 dpi)
means dots per linear inch both vertically and horizontally; two values (for example 600 x 1200 dpi) indicates horizontal and vertical
resolutions, respectively. A dpi value shown as 600@1200 dpi means
that the image is processed at 600, but is printed at 1200. See also
Dot, Virtual Pixel.
106
Glossary
Drop-Down Menu
A user interface element that allows a selection from a menu accessed by clicking a down arrow.
Dye Sublimation (Dye Sub)
A printing process using small heating elements to evaporate pigments from a carrier film depositing them smoothly onto a media.
Dynamic Range
The measurable difference between the brightest highlight (white)
and the darkest value (black) that a device can create or register. The
greater the dynamic range, the more lifelike the image.
E
ECP (Enhanced Capability Port)
A parallel port (LPT) interface which uses the following characteristics:
1. Uses RLE (Run-Length Encoded) data compression for input
and output.
2. Provides for I/O buffers at either end.
3. Uses DMA for handling actual data transfer.
4. Allows ECP devices to address multiple channel across the same
physical interface. This supports multi-function devices, such as
combination scanner/modem/fax/printer devices.
ECW
A raster file format that uses high compression.
Effective Resolution
Resolution of Raster Format image independent of the printer resolution. Effective resolution is determined by dividing the nominal
resolution of the image by the pixel duplication ratio. For example:
a 2048x3072 pixel image has an effective resolution of 300 dpi at
10x7 inches, 200 dpi at 15x10 inches, 150 dpi at 20x14 inches and
72 dpi at 42x28 inches.
107
Embedded Profiles
Profiles that are contained in a raster file. TIFF, PSD, and JPG files
support embedded profiles.
Encapsulated PostScript (EPS)
A PostScript (vector) file format that can include various options
such as the specified PostScript level, embedded fonts, and a preview
image. EPS files are printer-independent. See also PS, PostScript.
Enhanced-Gamut Color
Another name for HiFi (CMYKOG) color.
EPP Port (Enhanced Parallel Port)
A parallel port specification jointly introduced by Intel, Xircom, and
Zenith Data Systems.
Error Diffusion
Screening technology used in digital printers where fixed-size dots
are placed based on image details and tone values to enhance detail.
See also FDRP Diffusion.
F
FDRP Diffusion (Fixed Dot Random Placement Diffusion)
Patented error-diffusion process created by ONYX Graphics, Inc.
for use in large-format printing.
FDRP Line (Fixed Dot Random Placement Diffusion—Line
variant)
Modified version of the FDRP Diffusion Process created by ONYX
Graphics, Inc.
FDRP Plus
A hybrid of the Stochastic and FDRP Diffusion dot patterns.
Flatness
The vector calculation of the maximum distance of any points of
the approximation from the corresponding point on the true curve,
measured in output device pixels.
108
Glossary
FOCOLTONE Color
FOCOLTONE® Color System. English color matching system.
Fotoba Cutter Marks
Proprietary marks that are printed around images to allow the images to be cut out automatically.
Four-color Process Printing
The basic method for recreating a broad spectrum of colors on
a printing press or computer printer, using only Yellow, Magenta,
Cyan, and Black inks or dyes. See also Process Color Printing.
G
Gamma
Contrast level in photographic images. Mathematically, this is the
logarithmic relationship between input and output. A perfect mirror has a gamma of 1.0 (1:1), while color transparency film has a
gamma of approximately 2.0 (1:10). See also Tonal Range.
Gamut
The range of colors that can be created by a particular output device. Colors are referred to as in-gamut if they can be reproduced
on a particular device and out-of-gamut if they cannot.
GCR (Gray Component Replacement)
In Four-color Process Printing, black is made up of a combination
of the three primary colors. GCR determines how much black to
print with black ink, and how much black to print with the remaining three colors. See also UCR. Also known as Skeleton Black Generation when used in converting RGB files to CMYK.
GIF (Graphic Interchange Format)
A standard for small raster image files. GIF files support transparencies and different color palettes.
Grayscale
1. The range of tones from black to white.
2. An image consisting of only levels of black and white.
109
H
Halftone
1. An image in which continuous tones are simulated by regular patterns (screens) of small dots.
2. A process for creating images. Screening can be done at different
angles and the line density varies over a wide range (50 – 500 lines
per inch). Printing a black & white photograph on a press or printer
requires the creation of a single halftone. Four color process printing requires a separate halftone for each of the process colors. See
also Continuous Tone, Screen Angle.
Hardware Key
The physical plug that is required to use RIP-Queue.
HexachromeTM
Pantone® trademark name for a printing system that uses specific
values of CMYK plus Orange and Green. See also CMYKOG(V).
HiFi Color
Printing system using additional levels of dilute toner (usually cyan
and magenta) in combination with CMYK to produce a wider gamut of colors and more natural-looking images. May also refer to a
printing system using additional primary process colors.
Histogram
A type of graph that shows frequency data in two-dimensional rectangles. The width of each rectangle represents the class interval (in
RIP-Queue, this is the section of the spectrum), while the height
represents the number of occurrences (in RIP-Queue, this is the
number of pixels with that color value).
Hot Folder
A folder found in the Input folder that can be used to automatically
process images by copying images into that folder. Each Hot Folder
represents a specific Quick Set.
HSV
A color space that defines colors by Hue, Saturation, and Value
(Brightness).
110
Glossary
Hue
1. A tint or color specified by an angle on the HSV Color Wheel.
Going counter-clockwise around the wheel, hues shift from red to
yellow to green to cyan to blue to magenta and finally back to red.
2. The attribute of a color that permits it to be identified as a specific color. Hue combined with Saturation and Value fully defines
a color.
I
ICC Profile
An international standard for describing color transformations. Also
known as ICM (.icm). See also Color Profile and Profile Library.
ICC (International Color Consortium)
An organization that developed the standard for color management.
ICR (Integrated Color Removal)
See GCR.
IEEE-1284
The preferred standard for LPT ports, cables, and communication.
ICM Profile
See ICC Profile.
Ikon Card
A PCI add-on card that is required to print to some printers. Use the
VPT printer port to print using the Ikon Card.
Ink Limiting
The process of restricting the total amount of ink applied to a media by adjusting the maximum percentage of the color values in a
processed image.
Ink/Toner Model
A set of parameters for a specific ink or toner. This is used in calibration to compensate for imperfectly balanced inks and to assist in
generating similar output from dissimilar inks.
111
Input Folder
A folder that is constantly monitored for image files to allow automatic processing and printing. See Hot Folder.
Input Profile
1. A profile that describes the color characteristics of a device such
as a scanner that is used to create images.
2. A profile that identifies the output device being simulated for ICC
Color Matching (that is, modifying the output image so that a print
on one device appears as if it were printed on a different device).
Intensity
Degree of saturation or reflection of visible light.
Interpolation
Process of increasing the apparent resolution of a raster image by
using either a bi-cubic or sequential algorithm to create new dots in
between the existing dots.
Intranet
A local computer network connecting nearby computer systems and
printers, such as in an office.
J
Job
An image coupled with RIP-Queue settings.
JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group)
A raster file format as well as a standard for compression of image
files in general. See also Raster Format.
K
Key Update
A file that adds permissions to your Hardware Key. See Hardware
Key.
112
Glossary
L
L*a*b* (L*a*b* Color)
A uniform color space proposed by the CIE for use in the measurement of small color differences. The lightness (L*) and the color
parameters (a* and b*) accurately define a color. See also CIELab.
LAN (Local Area Network)
A computer network designed to connect nearby computers and
printers, such as in an office. A LAN can be connected to another
LAN, or the Internet.
Landscape Orientation
A page oriented so that it is wider than it is tall.
Leading Edge Effect (LEE)
This is a print error where an empty strip appears following a solid
color or no color area. Use a Stochastic dot pattern to fix this.
Line Screen
Organization of elements in a printing screen, used to define the
density of the screen. For example, a 140-line screen is a pattern
that has 140 Halftone Dots per linear inch. The greater the number,
the more accurately details are printed. See also Screen Ruling.
Linearization
The process of normalizing a device so that it produces a linear
(1:1) input to output response.
LPI (Lines Per Inch)
This refers to the number of Halftone Dots that will be printed per
linear inch in an image, based on the Screen used.
Luminance
The lightness or Brightness of an image.
LZWTM
Standard form of loss less file compression for video and graphic
images (such as RIFF). From Lempel-Ziv-Welch, the inventors.
113
M
Media
A paper or other substrate that the printer creates images on.
Media Model
A media model defines the targets used for calibrating for different
classes of inks. See also Ink/Toner Model.
Metamerism
Condition where two colors match each other under one light
source, but not another.
Moire (Interference Pattern)
A pattern of visible waves caused by overprinting halftones whose
screen angles are aligned improperly. This is usually the result of
scanning and screening a previously screened halftone image. The
pattern is confusing and destroys detail, creating uneven tonal values. See also Screen Angle.
Monitor Profile
A profile that describes the color characteristics of a display device.
Monochrome
An image that is composed only of levels of a single color and
white. See also Grayscale.
N
Nibs
A part of the physical print head on the printer that produces the
ink dots.
O
Opacity
Resistance to the passage of light.
114
Glossary
Ordered Dithering
A dot pattern that attempts to evenly distribute the expected range
of color levels using a matrix acting as a screen. This is done by
defining the dot placement in a recursive fashion. This results in a
screen which has a grid appearance to it. In RIP-Queue, ordered
dithering has been extended to place each color at angles to other
colors. This produces a rosette pattern similar to the halftoning that
appears in newspapers, since the rosettes are small. See also Halftone, Screen, Screen Angle.
Origin
The point where the measurement units for both x and y axes are
zero. In RIP-Queue the origin is always the top-left corner of the
selection box; in PostScript it is always the lower-left corner.
Output Profile
A profile that describes the color characteristics of an output device, such as a printer or film recorder.
P
Pantone®
A system for identifying colors based on CMYK values as they appear on the printed page.
Patch
Single color sample contained in a swatch. Used as part of profile
generation.
PCX
A standard for raster image files developed by ZSoft for PCPaintbrush.
PDF (Portable Document Format)
Modified PostScript file format used by the Acrobat document exchange system. Fonts should be embedded within the PDF document in order for RIP-Queue to use them.
115
PhotoCD
Raster image format developed by Kodak. There are two types,
each containing multiple resolutions. Standard PhotoCD images are
2048x3072 pixels, and require 18MB of storage. Professional PhotoCD images are 4096x6144 pixels and require 80MB of storage.
Photospectrometer
Device for measuring color. Also known as Spectrophotometer.
Pixel (PEL)
Picture element. A single point in a raster format image.
Pixel Duplication Ratio
Ratio of input pixels to output dots. (Scan resolution divided by
output resolution).
Pixelization
Effect of over-enlarging a raster image so that the individual pixels
in the source image become visible. See also Aliasing.
Plate
Layer of a separated image that is composed of a single color. See
also Color Layer and Separation.
Portrait Orientation
A page oriented so that it is taller than it is wide. See also Landscape
Orientation and Transverse Orientation.
Posterization
The effect produced when an image or part of an image is displayed
or printed with too few colors (or shades of gray) to accurately reproduce color differences.
PostScript (PS)
A vector-based page description language, which stores text and
graphics as lines and arcs that can be filled with a variety of different backgrounds. PostScript files are printer dependent, do not need
a showpage command, and have embedded fonts. See also Encapsulated PostScript, PDF.
116
Glossary
PostScript Screen
A specific setting for a color channel that determines the frequency,
angle, and function when using the Halftone dot pattern.
PPD (Printer Profile Description)
A file listing the limits and capabilities of a printer in a form that
printer drivers and other software programs can read.
Preflight
An application used to view and modify RIP-Queue jobs.
Primary Colors
Colors that can be combined in various proportions to produce another color. In the light (additive color) spectrum, primary colors
are red, green, and blue. In inks, paints, and other pigments (subtractive color), the primary colors are generally cyan (red), yellow,
and magenta (blue).
Printer Pool
One or more similar printers that share a common printer library,
Hot Folders, and Quick Sets.
PrnInst (Printer Installation File)
A proprietary file format used to install a RIP-Queue printer. A
PRNINST file contains the dlls, profile library information (media,
calibrations, and profiles), and other support files that are necessary
to use a given printer.
Process Colors
The four ink colors used in four-color process printing: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black.
Profile
1. A method of defining and compensating for the color shifts in an
image as it is shown on a monitor and printed on a media.
2. A specific Printer/Ink/Media combination in RIP-Queue.
Profile Library (Printer Profile Library)
Collection of color profiles specific to a printer type.
117
PSD (Photoshop Document)
The native file format of Adobe Photoshop. They are raster files
that support L*a*b* color, spot channels, and embedded profiles.
Pure Hues
Color created by applying 100% each of one or more inks in an
image.
Q
Queue
An organized list of jobs that are printed on a first-in first-out
(FIFO) basis.
Quick Set
A group of settings that is applied to images to create jobs in an
efficient manner.
R
Raster
File format in which pixels are placed in a grid. (That is, pixels are
located by exact addresses, rather than by their relation to other pixels.)
Raster Format
Graphic file format in which images are described as a matrix of
dots. See also Raster.
Rasterizing
Conversion of a file to Raster format.
Reflective Copy
A piece of artwork that is viewed by reflected light (for example,
drawings or photographs). Also called reflection copy and reflective
art. See also, Transparency.
118
Glossary
Registration
The precise alignment of film or plates for printing. Register marks,
usually placed outside the trim area, assist the printer and finisher in
achieving accurate registration in multiple color jobs.
Registration Marks
Cross-hair marks placed at each corner of the image to help ensure
proper registration. Registration Marks are also used to aid in trimming the image.
Rendering Intent
A method of compressing out-of-gamut color values so they can
be reproduced.
Resolution
The number of dots available to represent graphic detail in a given
area. On a computer screen, resolution is usually measured in pixels
per inch (ppi). On a printer, the resolution is measured in dots per
inch, or dpi. Halftone resolution measurements are in lines per inch,
or LPI. See also Screen Ruling.
RGB
System for describing colors based on a combination of values for
Red, Green, and Blue—the additive primaries. RGB is the basic additive color model used for color video display. Mixing various percentages of red, green, and blue light can recreate most of the spectrum; combining 100% of all three creates white light. See CMYK,
Additive Color.
RIP (Raster Image Processing)
Method for converting a vector-based image into a raster based
(pixel-by-pixel grid) image.
Ripping
Process of turning files into printer or bitmap files. See Rasterizing.
RLE (Run Length Encoding)
A method of loss less file compression.
119
S
Saturation
Term used to describe the strength, purity, or vividness of a hue.
Saturation indicates how much color is present. When there is no
saturation, there is no color.
Screen Angle
The orientation of a halftone screen as measured from the horizontal axis. Forty-five degrees is commonly used for Black and White,
105° for Cyan, 75° for Magenta, and 90° for Yellow.
Screen Ruling
Measure of the fineness of a Halftone screen—the higher the number, the finer the screen. See also Lines Per Inch.
Screen (Screen Pattern, Screening)
1. A way of filling areas in graphic design, created with various densities of black-and-white (or color-and-white) patterns.
2. The process of breaking up a photograph into dots of black and
white for easier printing.
3. A shade of gray or color. Black (solid) is 100% screening and
white is 0%. See Halftone, Line Screen.
Separation
Individual layer of a multi-color image. Each layer contains the
amount of each primary color needed to produce a four-color image when layers are superimposed on each other.
Separation Color Space
PDF’s name for a Spot Color. A separation color space always carries an alternate tint transform. The transform can be in RGB or
CMYK (or others) and gives the rules for outputting in that space
when the named color is unavailable.
Server
A computer that provides facilities to other computers on a local
area network. Examples of servers include file servers, print servers,
and mail servers.
120
Glossary
SID
A proprietary raster file format developed by LizardTech, Inc. Also
known as MrSID. This format uses high compression algorithms.
Skeleton Black Generation
A color separation technique that substitutes Black ink for calculated amounts of Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow. Black gives more depth
in the reproduction, corrects a color cast in the shadows, and results
in better gray neutrality. See also GCR.
Spectrophotometer
An instrument used to measure the spectral transmittance or reflectance of objects. They provide densitometric and colorimetric data,
and can be used to read Linearizations and ICC Profile swatches.
Spot Color
A specific color or type applied to individual graphic items.
Spot Color Printing
A method of color printing using an ink that is premixed to a specific color, such as a corporate logo. These colors are generally premixed according to a color matching system and are printed on top
of preexisting color. Sometimes referred to as Fifth-color Printing.
Stochastic Sampling
Dot pattern analysis and generation using locations in the area of
a pixel wherein the pixel is perturbed or jittered. This produces an
average of the color for an area. Stochastic generation methods are
generally much faster than other methods, at some expense in shadow and highlight detail.
Strike Mode
Technology which controls how often and at what point the printer
applies additional ink dots to the media.
Subtractive Color
Colors that are formed by the removal of certain wavelengths of
light. Colors on a printed page are subtractive (e.g., white light
strikes the page and the ink absorbs some wavelengths. This allows
only certain colors to be reflected to the eye.)
121
Subtractive Primaries
Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow, which, along with Black, are the ink
colors used in four-color process printing. See also RGB.
Swatch
Standard print image used by RIP-Queue for profile generation. A
swatch contains multiple patches.
Swath
A band of ink laid down by the printer head as it moves across the
media.
SWOP (Specification for Web Offset Publication)
The most common standard for American printing inks. This is not
tied to any individual color matching system or device.
T
Targa
24 or 32-bit raster format originally developed for video production
by AT&T EPIC (later Truevision). This format does not support
the storage of image data as planes of color information.
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol)
A communications protocol developed under contract from the
U.S. Department of Defense to connect dissimilar systems. Supports mail (SMTP), file transfer (FTP), remote terminal operation
(Telnet), and remote printing. RIP-Queue supports TCP/IP remote
printing.
TIFF (Tagged Image File Format)
A standard raster format for graphic files.
TIFF-IT (Tagged Image File Format for Image Technology)
A variant of the TIFF file format developed by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. (ANSI). It is intended to smooth prepress workflow by making images easier to exchange and transfer.
122
Glossary
Tile
Section of a print image. Images can be tiled when they are too large
for the media, or to fit mounting and display requirements
Tint
A solid color reduced in shade by screening. Altering the tint alters
the hue of a color without affecting the saturation of the color.
Tonal Range
Range of white in an image. An image with a small tonal range will
appear very flat, because there will be little difference between the
darker and lighter areas of the image. See also Contrast.
Tone
Degree of luminosity or amount of white in color represented by
the L axis in the L*a*b* color space. See also Luminance.
TOYO Color
TOYO 88 ColorfinderTM 1050 System. (Japanese)
Transparency
Any artwork that is viewed by light passing through it, rather than
reflecting off it. See Reflective Copy.
Transverse Orientation
Page oriented so that it is wider than it is tall, but the text is rotated
90° so that it remains in the same relation to the page as in a Portrait
orientation. See Portrait Orientation, Landscape Orientation.
Triggering
The mechanism by which RIP-Queue determines when jobs can be
printed. Manual print triggering is controlled by the Print Now button. Automatic print triggering is controlled by a time-out value or
an area percentage value of media usage.
TRUMATCH Color
TRUMATCH Swatching SystemTM. An American color matching
system.
123
TWAIN (Technology without An Interesting Name)
A platform-independent interface for acquiring images from image
devices.
U
UCR (Under Color Removal)
The process of reducing the smallest Halftone Dot in areas where
yellow, magenta, and cyan all print, together with quantities of the
other two colors, sufficient to produce a neutral gray, and replacing
that color with black ink. See also GCR.
URL (Uniform Resource Locator)
An address on the Internet or an intranet.
V
Value
Representation how bright (or dark) a color is. As value increases,
the amount of black decreases. See also Brightness.
Vector Format
Graphic file format in which an image is described as a set of mathematical relationships. See PostScript.
VideoNet
A proprietary network protocol used to communicate with some
printers such as ColorSpan devices.
Virtual Pixel
A dpi value that is processed at a lower resolution than is printed.
The virtual pixel value is shown in two parts separated by the @
character, such as 600@1200. 600@1200 means that the image is
processed at 600 but is printed at 1200. See also Dot.
Virtual Printer
A Windows printer driver that prints to RIP-Queue. The virtual
printer can be shared on a network for other systems (Windows or
Macintosh) to use.
124
Glossary
VPT
A printer port used when printing via an Ikon card and generally
used for Xerox electrostatic printers.
W
White/Black Limits
A color correction tool that modifies the white and black points of
an image without changing the values of the midtones.
WinKey
An application that shows the permissions of the Hardware Key.
WinKey is also used to print, e-mail, or update the key permissions.
Y
YCC
Kodak’s internal format standard for PhotoCD image files. This file
format is not currently supported by RIP-Queue. Save these files as
PCD files. See PhotoCD.
Z
Zipped File
Any file that is compressed using the algorithms developed by PKware. Used for loss less compression of files for storage or transfer.
125
Index
A
Aborting a Print 42
Absolute Colorimetric 78
Activating a Printer 63
Adding a Cutter 89
Adding Printers 27
Additive Color Theory 75
Add Printer Wizard 2
Advanced Black Generation 82
After Printing 23
Archive Job as Space Allows 23
Archive Jobs Indefinitely 24
Delete Jobs 24
After Processing 23
Delete Source Image 23
Anti-Aliasing 10
Archive Job as Space Allows 23
Archive Jobs Indefinitely 24
Area Based Start 41
Auto Detect 9
Automatically Start Printing 38, 41
Automatic Triggering 38
AutoUpdate i
B
Base Folder 61
Changing the Base Folder 61
Input Folder 61
126
Work Folder 61
BestFit 39
Black Limit 22
Bounding Box 9
Brightness 21
Buffered Jobs Area 1
C
Calculate Ink Usage 8
Calibration 30
Changing a Job’s Order 46
CMYK 75
Color 74 – 83
Color/Gray Levels 19 – 21
Brightness 21
Color Levels 20
Contrast 21
Gray Levels 21
Highlights 21
Mid-Tones 21
Saturation 21
Shadows 21
Color Correction 19 – 23
Color Correction Filter 10
Color Correction Tab 19
Color/Gray Levels 20
Color Levels 20
Color Replacement 23
Filters 23
Index
Primary Color Levels 19
Primary Color Curves 20
Saturation 20
White/Black Limits 21
Color Correction Tools Display 10
Color Display 10
Color Levels 19 – 21
Modifying 21
Color Limit 22
Color Management 74 – 83
Color Management Options 79
Setting Color Management Options in a
Quick Set 80
Setting a Color Management Option in Preflight 80
Saving Color Management Settings 82
Color Management Profiles 76
Color Matching Table 79
Color Replacement 23
Color Spaces 75
CMYK 75
Device-Dependent Color Spaces 75
Device-Independent Color Spaces 75
L*a*b* 76
RGB 74
Color Theory 74
Additive Color Theory 75
Subtractive Color Theory 75
Configure Printers 3, 56
Configure Printer Capabilities 30
Configuring the Printer Port 56
Firewire Printer 4
TCP/IP Printer 3
USB Printer 4
Configuring the Network 50, 52
Configuring the Printer Port 56 – 58
Conserve Media 40
Console 1
Contour Cut Paths 25
Contour Cutting 41, 84 – 93
CUT-Server 85
Generic Cutter 88
I-Cut® digital die cutter 84
Modifying a Quick Set for Contour Cutting 86
Preparing a File for Cutting 85
Print and cut on the same device 84
Workflows 87
Contrast 21
Copies 45
Changing the Number of Copies 45
Copying a Job to a Different Printer 47
Correction Factor 62
Adjusting the Correction Factor 62
Create Proof Automatically 24
Crop 9, 16 – 17, 25
Crop Marks 25
Crop Outline 25
Using Origin and Size Values 17
Using the Mouse 16
Crop Marks 25
Crop Outline 25
Custom Image 81
CUT-Server 85
Configuring CUT-Server 89
Adding a Cutter 89
Cutter Hot Folder 90
Cutter Mark Darkness 42
Cutter Path Prefix 9
127
D
Deactivating a Printer 63
Default Operator Name 24
Default Quick Set 11, 33
Defining the Cut Path 85
Delete Jobs 24
Delete Source Image 23
Deleting a Job 47
Deleting a Printer 64
Deleting Meida 60
Deleting Printers 27
Device-Dependent Color Spaces 75
Device-Independent Color Spaces 75
Display 10
Do Not Apply Output Profile to L*a*b* Images 82
Dot Pattern 8
Duplicating a Printer 64
E
Embedded Profiles 78
Enabling Tiles 18
F
File Name Selection 9
Filter Manager 23
Filters 23
Creating Filters 23
Empty Filters 23
Filter Manager 23
Multiple Filters 23
Final Output Printer 69
Firewire 4
Flip 17
Fotoba Cutter Marks 40
128
G
Gamma Range 22
Gamut Data View 67
Gamuts 67 – 70, 75
Reviewing Gamuts 69
Viewing Gamuts 68
GCR 82
Advanced Black Generation 82
Generate Tile Outline Cut Paths 87
Generic Cutter 89
Gray Levels 21
Grayscale 26
Grouping 42
Group Jobs Together 40
H
Hardware Key iii, 34
Permissions iii, 35
Updating the Hardware Key 34
Height 7
Highlights 21
Hold 36, 44 – 45
Changing the Hold Status 36
Hold Icon 24
Wait for Media 37
Hold for Operator 24
Hold Icon 24
Horizontal Copying 42
Hot Folders 12 – 13
Cutter Hot Folder 90
Dropping Images in Hot Folders 12
Trouble Shooting 13
HTTP Access (Web Portal) 54 – 55
Index
I
I-Cut® digital die cutter 84
ICC Profiles 74, 76 – 77
Embedded iii
ICC Profile Setup 80
ICC Profile Setup 80
Output Tab 81
Profiles Tab 81
Rendering Intents Tab 81
ICM Profiles 76
Image 8, 26
Image Bleed 96
Importing 15
Importing Media 59
Information Area 1
Ink Calculation 62
Adjusting the Correction Factor 62
Defining the Reporting Unit 62
Ink Limits 31
Ink Restrictions 31
Input Folder 12, 61
Input Profiles 77
Install 2
Printer 2
Software 2
IP Address 50 – 51
Finding an IP Address 50
J
Job
Change Job Size 17, 43
Changing a Job’s Order 46
Changing the Hold Status 44
Changing the Media 44
Copying a Job to a Different Printer 47
Deleting a Job 47
Modifying the Marks Options 45
Modifying the Workflow Options 45
Printing Jobs 34
Processing Jobs 33
Reprinting Jobs 34
Sending a Job to Preflight 46
Viewing a Job 46
Job Creation 24
Create Proof Automatically 24
Make Copy of Image 24
Preview Image Before Processing 24
Job Options 15
Jobs Ready to Print Area 1
Job Status 6
Hold 6
Offline 6
Online 6
Justification 41
K
Key Update 34 – 35
Keywords 10, 11
L
L*a*b* 76, 78
L*a*b* Image Files 78
Language Settings ii
Layout 96
Layout Front-end 94 – 97
Application Settings 95
Image Tools Tab 95
Images Tab 96
129
Jobs 97
Page Tools Tab 96
Printer & Media Options 97
Left Configuration 67
Linearizations 31
M
Mac OSX 49 – 53
Adding the Printer on the Mac OSX 51, 53
Configuring the Network 50, 52
Printing from a Mac OSX 49
Printservices for UNIX 53
Windows Printing 50
Magnification 7, 43 – 44
Make Copy of Image 24
Managing Printers 26 – 27, 63 – 65
Activating a Printer 63
Adding Printers 27
Creating a PrnInst 64
Deactivating a Printer 63
Deleting a Printer 64
Deleting Printers 27
Duplicating a Printer 64
Managing Media 59
Changing the Media Specific Options 59
Deleting Media 60
Importing Media 59
Managing Quick Sets 11
Manual Triggering 38
Marks 8, 24 – 25, 45
Contour Cut Paths 25
Crop Marks 25
Crop Outline 25
Registration Marks 25
130
Tile Dotted Overlap 25
Zero-Line Tile Marks 25
Marks Options 24 – 25, 45
Modifying the Marks Options 45
Maximum Print Area 37
Maximum Printer Area 17
Media 36 – 37
Change the Media for a Job 5, 37, 44
Change the Media for a Printer 16, 37
Managing Media 59 – 60
Setting up Media 4
MediaAnalyzer Tool 67
Gamut Data View 67
Left Configuration 67
Right Configuration 67
Media and Page Size 7
Media Manager 30 – 31
Media Settings 4
Change Media 5, 16
Mid-Tones 21
Mode 7, 16
Manage Modes 30
Set the Mode 16
Modifying Placement Options 40
Modifying Triggering 38
N
Navigation 1
O
Offline 6
Offset 41
Online 6
ONYX Workflow 32
Index
Opening Images 4
File > Open 14, 15
Importing Images into Preflight 15
Open in Preflight 5
Open in RIP-Queue 4
Operator 24
Default Operator Name 24
Hold for Operator 24
Original Image File 32
Origin and Size Values 16, 17
Output 8, 26, 81 – 82
Color 26
Grayscale 26
Output Tab 81
Separations 26
Output Options 26
Image 26
Output 26
Processing 26
Output Profiles 77
Output Tab 81
Overlap 18 – 19, 25
Weld Overlap 19
Overlap Tiles 94
Overlapping Tiles 18
Weld Overlap 19
P
Page Size 37, 60
Adding Page Sizes 60
Deleting Page Sizes 60
Editing Page Sizes 60
PatternID 69
Perceptual (Images) 77
Perform Image Processing During Print Stage 8
Pixel Based 7
Pixel Duplication 10
Placement Strategies 39 – 42
BestFit 39
Conserve Media 40
Fotoba Cutter Marks 40
Group Jobs Together 40
Placement Options 40
Contour Cutting 41
Cutter Mark Darkness 42
Grouping 42
Horizontal Copying 42
Justification 41
Modifying Placement Options 40
Offset 41
Print All Rows at a Time 41
Print Triggering 41
Size of Cutter Mark 42
Space Between Copies 41
Space Between Image and Cutter Mark 42
Vertical Cutter Mark 42
Print Jobs Individually 40
Poster Color 78
PostScript 9, 33
PostScript File 9, 33
PostScript Halftone 9
PostScript Separated File 9
PPD (Printer Profile Description) 49
Preflight 14
Color Correction Tab 19
Importing Images into Preflight 15
Preflight Button 15
Preview & Size Tab 16
131
Printer & Media Tab 16
Print Tab 23
Tiling Setup Tab 17
Preflight Button 15
Press Proof 66
Preview & Size Tab 16
Preview Image Before Processing 24
Primary Color Curves 20
Modifying 20
Primary Color Levels 19
Print All Rows at a Time 41
Print and cut on the same device 84
Printer & Media Tab 16
Printer Area 1
Printer Gamuts 67
Printer Manager 26 – 27, 63 – 65
Printer Pools 58
Printer Ports 56 – 58
Configuring the Printer Port 56
Firewire 57
LPT 57
Print Forwarding 57
Print to File 57
Print to Windows Printer Driver 57
SCSI 57
TCP/IP 57
USB 57
VideoNet 57
VPT 57
Printer Settings 38, 47
Print Forwarding 57
Printing 5 – 6
Aborting a Print 42
Printing a Proof 70
132
Printing from a Mac OSX 49
Printing Jobs 34
Reprinting Jobs 43
with Tiles 18
Print Jobs Individually 40
Print Label 25
Print Now Button 38
Print Reflections 8
Printservices for UNIX 52 – 54
Print Setup 23
Print Tab 23
Marks Options 24
Output Options 26
Print Setup 23
Workflow Options 23
Print to File 58
Print to Windows Printer Driver 58
Print Triggering 41
Area Based Start 41
Automatically Start Printing 41
Time Based Start 41
PrnInst 64
Creating a PrnInst 64
Process/Print Options 24
Print 24
Reprocess 24
Processing 8, 26, 33
Perform Image Processing During Print Stage 26
Process with Interpolation 26
Two-Stage Processing 10
Processing Jobs 33
Process with Interpolation 26
Profiles 77
Embedded Profiles 78
Index
ICC Profiles 76
Input Profiles 77
Output Profiles 77
Rendering Intents 77
Profiles Tab 81
Profiling 30
Proofing 66 – 67, 81
Comparing Printer Gamuts 67
Final Output Printer 69
Press Proof 66
Printing a Proof 70
Proofing Printer 68
Simulation Proof 66
Verifying Proofs 72
Proofing Printer 68
Configuring a Proofing Printer 70
Pure Hues 81
Q
Quick Sets 6 – 12
Advanced Quick Set Options 8
Color Correction 10
Crop 9
Display 10
Keywords 10
Marks 8
Output 8
PostScript 9
PostScript File 9
PostScript Halftone 9
Tiling 8
Workflow 10
Create a New Quick Set 7
Default Quick Set 11
Edit a Quick Set 7
Managing 11
Copy 11
Delete 11
Edit 11
Export 12
Import 12
Rename 11
Modifying a Quick Set for Contour Cutting 86
Quick Set Options 7
Media and Page Size 7
Mode 7
Quick Set Name 7
Sizing Rule 7
Using Quick Sets 6
R
Raster Data 33
Read-Only Files 13
Registration 3
Registration Code 3
Registration Form 3
Registration Marks 25
Relative Colorimetric 78
Renaming a Printer 60
Rendering Intents 77
Absolute Colorimetric 78
Perceptual (Images) 77
Poster Color 78
Relative Colorimetric 78
Rendering Intents Tab 81
Saturation (Graphics) 78
Rendering Intents Tab 81
Reporting Unit 62
Defining the Reporting Unit 62
133
Reprinting Jobs 34, 43
Reprocess 24
Resolution 16
RGB 74
Right Configuration 67
RIP-Queue 4, 15, 70
Ripping 33
Rotate 8, 17
S
Saturation 21, 78
Scaling 49
SCSI 57
Sending a Job to Preflight 46
Separations 9, 26
Setup Media 4
Shadows 21
Simulation Proof 66
Size 7, 43 – 44
Changing Size (Magnification) 43
Size of Cutter Mark 42
Sizing Rule 7
Source Image 23
Space Between Copies 41
Space Between Image and Cutter Mark 42
Spot Channel Replacement 82
Spot Color Replacement 10
Subtractive Color Theory 75
Support Information ii
System Requirements ii
T
TCP/IP 3
Tile Dotted Overlap 25
134
Tiling 8, 18
Adjusting 18
Create Custom Tiles 18
Enabling Tiles 18
Overlapping Tiles 18
Printing with Tiles 18
Reset Tiles 18
Selecting Tiles to Print 46
Tiling Setup Tab 17
Weld Overlap 19
Tiling Setup Tab 17
Time Based Start 41
Triggering 38, 41
Automatic Triggering 38
Manual Triggering 38
Modifying Triggering 38
Trim Overlap 87
TrueType Font Handling 49
Twain32 15
Two-Stage Processing 10
U
UCR 31
Updating the Hardware Key 34
USB 4
Use Embedded Profiles When Available 81
V
Variable Data 96
Verification Strip 73
Vertical Cutter Mark 42
Viewing a Job 46
Virtual Printers 6, 48
Virtual Printer Share Name 51
Establishing a Virtual Printer Share Name 51
Index
Visual Tolerance Chart 72 – 73
Printing Visual Tolerance Charts 72
W
Wait for Media 5
Warning Level 10
Web Portal (HTTP Access) 54
Changing the Web Portal Port 54
Launching the Web Portal 54
Submitting a Job Using the Web Portal 55
Weld Overlap 19
White/Black Limits 21 – 22
Black Limit 22
Color Limit 22
White Limit 22
White Limit 22
Width 7, 18
Windows Printing 50 – 52
WinKey 35
Workflow 10, 23–24, 32, 34, 45
Contour Cutting Workflows 87
ONYX Workflow 32
Workflow Options 23
After Printing 23
After Processing 23
Job Creation 24
Modifying the Workflow Options 45
Operator 24
Process/Print Options 24
Work Folder 61
Z
Zero-Line Tile Marks 25
135
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