Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Workgroup, OLP-NL, 1u, ENG

Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Workgroup, OLP-NL, 1u, ENG
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine
Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
Virtual machine technology offers compelling features, but also presents IT administrators with unique
challenges. Microsoft® System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 addresses these challenges
with a cost-effective, comprehensive management solution for virtual and physical machines. This
document presents an overview of System Center Virtual Machine Manager, and then details how the
solution helps IT administrators plan, deploy, manage, and optimize a virtual infrastructure.
Published: September 2009
For the latest information, please see www.microsoft.com/VMM or
www.microsoft.com/systemcenter.
Contents
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 1
What’s New in System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 .................................. 1
Live Migration.................................................................................................................................. 1
Support for Clustered Shared Volumes and Third Party CFS ..................................................... 2
Quick Storage Migration................................................................................................................. 2
Hot-Add and Removal of Storage .................................................................................................. 2
Maintenance Mode .......................................................................................................................... 3
Rapid Provisioning ......................................................................................................................... 3
Host Compatibility Checks............................................................................................................. 3
VMM Key Benefits .......................................................................................................... 3
Optimizes Resource Utilization ..................................................................................................... 3
Increases Operational Agility ......................................................................................................... 5
Takes Advantage of Existing Investments and Expertise ........................................................... 6
Virtual Machine Manager Features ................................................................................. 7
Flexible Deployment ....................................................................................................................... 7
Workgroup Setup ............................................................................................................................ 8
Co-Located Data Center Setup ...................................................................................................... 8
Distributed Enterprise Setup ......................................................................................................... 8
Management Toolset ...................................................................................................................... 9
Administrator Console ................................................................................................................... 9
Remote Management .................................................................................................................... 10
Physical-to-Virtual Wizard ............................................................................................................ 10
Intelligent Placement Ratings ...................................................................................................... 10
SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services Reports ........................................................................... 10
Self-Service Web Portal for Delegated Provisioning ................................................................. 11
Management Agents ..................................................................................................................... 11
Getting Started with Virtual Machine Manager .............................................................. 11
System Requirements .................................................................................................................. 11
Software Requirements ................................................................................................................ 12
Network Requirements ................................................................................................................. 16
Installation ..................................................................................................................................... 17
Installing the VMM Server ............................................................................................................ 17
Installing the VMM Administrator Console ................................................................................. 18
Installing the VMM Self-Service Portal ........................................................................................ 19
Installing the VMM Agent ............................................................................................................. 20
VMM Use Scenarios ..................................................................................................... 23
Server Consolidation .................................................................................................................... 23
Phased-In Consolidation .............................................................................................................. 23
Active Server Consolidation ........................................................................................................ 23
Consolidation with Virtual Machine Manager ............................................................................. 24
Provisioning New Virtual Machines ............................................................................................ 26
Administrator Provisioning .......................................................................................................... 27
High Availability with Failover Clustering................................................................................... 34
Reducing Planned Downtime with Live Migration ..................................................................... 46
Reducing Planned Downtime using Maintenance Mode ........................................................... 61
Optimizing Storage with Quick Storage Migration ..................................................................... 65
Dynamic Storage Management with Hot Add Storage............................................................... 73
Performance Resource Optimization (PRO) ............................................................................... 77
Delegated Administration............................................................................................................. 80
VMM Technology Differentiators ................................................................................................. 86
Intelligent Placement .................................................................................................................... 87
Centralized Library for Virtual Assets ......................................................................................... 90
Windows PowerShell .................................................................................................................... 92
Virtual Machine Manager Integration with Windows Server and System Center ........... 93
Best Choice for Windows ............................................................................................................. 93
Management of Physical and Virtual Infrastructure .................................................................. 94
Conclusion .................................................................................................................... 95
Introduction
Virtual machine technology is transforming data center operations, allowing companies to reduce
power, space, and cooling costs, and to respond faster to business needs. However, virtualization
brings its own set of difficulties. As IT managers deploy more virtual machine technology in their data
centers, they require integrated, centralized management tools to help ease the process of migrating
from a physical to virtual infrastructure, and then maintaining virtual infrastructure going forward.
Microsoft® System Center Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) empowers IT professionals with a simple
and cost-effective server management solution for both physical and virtual machines.
The Microsoft System Center family of system management products is a comprehensive solution
optimized for the management of Windows Server® operating systems running in a virtualized data
center.

Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager - Delivers simple and complete support for
consolidating multiple physical servers within a virtual infrastructure, thereby increasing overall
utilization of physical servers. VMM enables administrators and authorized users to rapidly provision
virtual machines. In addition, VMM provides a central virtualization management console to manage
both Microsoft and VMware virtual machines.

Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager - Provides continuous data protection on physical
and virtual machines for backup and business continuity.

Microsoft System Center Operations Manager - Provides a sophisticated solution for unified health
monitoring of physical and virtual machines.

Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager - Provides a comprehensive solution for change and
configuration management.
Together, System Center products provide a great solution for using existing IT administrative skills
with physical servers.
What’s New in System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2
Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 introduces a number of enhancements to support the administration
of virtual infrastructure.
Live Migration
The most significant enhancement in VMM 2008 R2 is support for Windows Server 2008 R2 Live
Migration. Live Migration enables you to move virtual machines between Hyper-V hosts with no
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
1
downtime and reduces the planned downtime associated with routine system maintenance. When Live
Migration is coupled with VMM’s Performance Resource Optimization (PRO) feature you can create a
dynamic IT environment, automatically reallocating virtual machine workloads based on resource
utilization and available capacity. In addition, VMM 2008 R2 supports queuing live migrations; this
improvement allows you to now define multiple live migrations and run them one after another in
sequence without waiting for the current live migration to complete.
Support for Clustered Shared Volumes and Third Party CFS
Cluster Shared Volumes (CSV) is a new feature in Windows Server 2008 R2 that provides
support for live migration. CSV enhances the virtual infrastructure by allowing multiple Hyper-V hosts to
access multiple VMs on a single LUN simultaneously. CSV support also enhances Live Migration by
allowing individual virtual machines to be moved to different hosts without affecting the other VMs
running on that host. With CSV, there is no need to move the virtual machine’s virtual hard disk files to
another LUN.
In addition, unlike the earlier storage model that required one VM per LUN, the new CSV storage
permits multiple virtual machine files to be stored on the same LUN, making storage management
much easier. VMM 2008 R2 can also detect and support third-party Clustered File Systems such as
Sanbolic.
Quick Storage Migration
Quick storage migration enables an administrator to move a virtual machine’s storage to a different
LUN or even to a different host while the VM is running, both with a minimum of downtime. Typically,
the amount of downtime required for quick storage migration is less than 2 minutes, though the actual
amount of downtime depends on the virtual machine’s activity level during the move. In addition, VMM
2008 R2 can now take advantage of VMware’s Storage VMotionTM feature for moving VMware virtual
machines to different storage locations with no downtime. Quick storage migration is especially useful
for customers taking advantage of the new CSV feature in Windows Server 2008 R2.
Hot-Add and Removal of Storage
Hot-add and removal of storage reduces planned downtime associated with adding disk storage to your
virtual infrastructure to accommodate increased storage requirements. The new Hot-Add and Removal
of Storage feature in VMM 2008 R2 allows an administrator to dynamically add and remove VHDs from
a running virtual machine with no interruption of service.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
2
Maintenance Mode
The new Maintenance Mode feature in VMM 2008 R2 allows an administrator to specify that they will
be performing maintenance tasks on a Hyper-V host. For example, if live migration is configured on the
host, then all active virtual machines will be migrated off the host onto other available Hyper-V hosts
during the maintenance period. If live migration is not available, then the state of all virtual machines on
the host is saved.
Rapid Provisioning
The Rapid Provisioning feature new in VMM 2008 R2 allows an administrator to deploy a new virtual
machine without needing to copy virtual hard disk (VHD) files across the network. Instead, the virtual
machine VHD files are copied on the backend, and VMM’s template feature is then used for guest
operating system customization. The template includes the operating system’s answer file that allows
the user to quickly customize the virtual machine on startup. Rapid provisioning is then performed using
PowerShell scripts.
Host Compatibility Checks
One of the requirements for live migration is that all hosts must have compatible processors. In order
for live migration to work, each Hyper-V host must use processors from the same vendor and they must
be in the same processor family. For example, you cannot set up live migration if one host is using an
AMD processor and the other host is using an Intel processor. The new Host Compatibility Check
feature validates that the processors used in each Hyper-V host are compatible for live migration.
VMM Key Benefits
VMM makes data center management more efficient by simplifying several important tasks. IT
administrators can easily consolidate underutilized physical servers, provision new virtual machines,
centrally manage virtual assets, and optimize virtual infrastructure — all while taking advantage of
existing investments and expertise. The following subsections summarize key benefits.
Optimizes Resource Utilization
Many data centers operate at full capacity for space, power, and cooling while the average CPU
utilization of a server in those data centers is between 5 percent and 15 percent. Virtualization helps
increase server utilization rates by allowing IT administrators to consolidate workloads on fewer
physical machines. This consolidation results in lower power, space, and cooling costs.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
3
VMM takes resource utilization a step further with end-to-end support for consolidating physical
servers. It helps IT administrators overcome key pain points in the consolidation process in the
following ways:

Provides insight into how workloads perform in the old environment – VMM uses data gathered
from System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) to assess which workloads are the best candidates for
consolidation. This holistic insight differentiates VMM from competing products and gives data center
administrators greater confidence when migrating from a physical to virtual infrastructure.

Provides more efficient storage management – VMM’s support for Windows Server 2008 R2’s Cluster
Shared Volume (CSV) allows files for multiple virtual machines to be stored on the same LUN. This
simplifies storage management by radically reducing the number of LUNs required by the virtual
machines managed by VMM.

Facilitates P2V conversion – Converting physical machines to virtual machines can be slow and errorprone, requiring administrators to halt the physical server. However, with VMM, P2V conversions are
routine. VMM simplifies P2V conversion tasks by providing administrators with an improved P2V wizard
and by taking advantage of Volume Shadow Copy Service in Windows Server 2008, Windows Server
2003, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. Virtual machines can be created using block-level disk access
speed without shutting down the source physical server.

Provides V2V conversion – In addition to P2V support, VMM also supports the conversion of VMware
virtual machines to the Microsoft virtual machine format. VMM supports converting virtual machines
directly from ESX Server hosts. VMM’s V2V conversion can convert either an entire VMware virtual
machine or just the disk image file. The V2V conversion process performs all modifications required to
make the converted virtual machine bootable. Unlike the P2V conversion, the V2V conversion is an offline
operation.

Takes the guesswork out of virtual machine placement – Virtual Machine Manager helps
administrators easily identify the most appropriate physical host servers for virtualized workloads. This
Intelligent Placement technology not only makes administrators’ jobs easier, but also helps ensure proper
deployment of data center resources and that these resources are in line with business goals. Intelligent
Placement in VMM inputs host system data, workload performance history, and administrator-defined
business requirements into sophisticated algorithms. The resulting Intelligent Placement ratings provide
easy-to-understand ranked results that take guesswork out of the placement task and ensure that
workloads are spread across physical resources for optimum performance. Intelligent Placement can be
used with both Microsoft Windows Server hosts and VMware ESX Servers.

Helps administrators fine-tune virtual and physical infrastructure – After virtual infrastructure is in
place, VMM provides a central console from which IT administrators can monitor and fine-tune their virtual
infrastructure for ongoing optimization. The VMM Administrator Console allows administrators to either
tune virtual machine settings or migrate virtual machines from one host to another in order to optimize
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
4
use of physical resources. VMM also works with System Center Operations Manager so that
administrators can comprehensively manage both physical and virtual infrastructure.
Increases Operational Agility
In traditional data centers without virtualization, provisioning new machines is a lengthy process
measured in days, weeks, or even months, making it difficult for IT departments to keep pace with the
rate of business growth and change. Even with virtualization in place, IT administrators face a number
of challenges that can undermine operational efficiency and effectiveness. For example, IT
administrators need to provision and tear down virtual machines for test and development groups,
ensure that new virtual machines are built from the latest patch images, and prevent unnecessary
virtual machines from consuming resources.
VMM puts administrators firmly in control of their virtual infrastructure so they can reap the full benefits
of virtualization and respond rapidly to business needs. VMM gives administrators the tools they need
to rapidly provision virtual machines, delegate virtual machine provisioning to authorized users, and
centrally manage virtual assets.

Reduces planned downtime – VMM support for Live Migration enables an administrator to move virtual
machines between Hyper-V hosts with no downtime. This enables routine maintenance to be performed
on Hyper-V hosts with no interruption of the computing resources for the end user.

Enables dynamic IT resource optimization – Coupling VMM’s Performance Resource Optimization
(PRO) feature with Live Migration enables the administrator to create a dynamic IT infrastructure that can
automatically shift virtual machine workloads between Hyper-V servers based on system resource
utilization levels.

Provides flexible storage management – An administrator can take advantage of VMM’s Quick Storage
Migration to optimize and consolidate the placement of virtual machine files on the SAN. Quick migration
allows the rapid movement of virtual machine files with minimal downtime. At the virtual machine level,
the ability to hot-add and remove storage enables the virtual machine to adapt quickly to changing
requirements.

Speeds provisioning of new virtual machines – With VMM, an IT department can deliver new virtual
machines to business clients anywhere in the network infrastructure with a quick turnaround. VMM
supports agile operations with a central library of virtual building blocks that provide all assets needed to
build and update virtual machines. VMM templates enable the administrator to deploy approved virtual
machine configurations rapidly. Rapid provisioning combines high performance SAN cloning and VMM
templates to create new virtual machine guests very quickly.

Reduces IT burdens by enabling user self-service – The VMM self-service Web portal allows
authorized users to provision virtual machines themselves, within policy limits set by administrators. This
means that the IT department retains full control of deployed resources without having to manually set up
and tear down environments for test and development teams. VMM improves the delegated-provisioning
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
5
scenario with added controls for administrators, including assigning resources to groups as well as
individuals, and setting quotas on available resources.

Enables efficient operations through administrative delegation – Delegated administration makes
virtual machine management for branch and departmental deployments more efficient by giving local
administrators the ability to manage virtual machines in their own environment. VMM administrators can
delegate scoped administrative functions to other members of the organization. Delegated administrators
have full administrative rights, but these delegated administrative rights are limited to the groups of VMs
that the VMM administrator specifies.

Ensures virtual machines are built to standard specifications – To minimize downtime and garner full
potential from staff resources, consistency in the data center is crucial. With virtual machine templates, IT
administrators know that newly provisioned servers are built with the latest patches and specifications.
Administrators can use templates repeatedly, increasing the deployment of standard virtual machines and
eliminating much of the post-installation adjustments that are required after building a machine from
scratch.

Keeps virtual assets organized – While a virtual data center is much more efficient than a physical data
center, virtual assets are easier to lose track of than physical assets. To help keep the virtual data center
in order, VMM provides a centralized library to store various virtual machine building blocks such as
offline machines, scripts, disk images (ISO files), virtual disks, and other assets. With the library’s easy-touse, structured format, IT administrators can quickly find and reuse components, thus remaining
productive and responsive to new server requests and modifications. With the VMM library, administrators
can easily take virtual machines offline to conserve resources and re-provision them when needed.
Administrators can also use a single console to monitor and manage virtual machines and hosts, and to
ensure deployed resources are meeting the needs of corresponding business groups.
Takes Advantage of Existing Investments and Expertise
Because VMM works with the products and technologies IT professionals are already familiar with,
such as Microsoft SQL Server 2005 TM, Active Directory® Domain Services, and Failover Clustering,
companies do not need to add specialized staff or separate management solutions for their virtual
infrastructure. In addition, VMM uses an intuitive, familiar interface that minimizes re-training.
VMM integrates tightly with other System Center systems management solutions for comprehensive
monitoring and management of both physical and virtual assets. VMM also uses Windows PowerShell,
an administrator-focused command shell and scripting language that will appeal to IT professionals who
feel comfortable with a command line interface.

Looks familiar and is easy to use – The VMM interface provides IT administrators with a reassuringly
familiar interface that is intuitively easy to use and requires little retraining. This is particularly true for
administrators who already rely on System Center Operations Manager since VMM maintains much of the
look and feel of that solution and provides integrated functionality.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
6

Works with the rest of the data center – Because of its Windows Server and System Center pedigree,
VMM fits in well with the rest of the data center. VMM takes advantage of several Windows Server-based
foundational services, such as Active Directory, Failover Clustering, Windows Remote Management
(WinRM), WS-Management, and Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI). VMM does not require
the introduction of non-native services or applications that can increase infrastructure complexity and
entail additional IT resources to manage and maintain.

Leverages investments in existing virtualization technologies – By enabling the management of
Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 R2, Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V, and VMware ESX Server, VMM
capitalizes on existing investments in both Microsoft and VMware virtualization technology. It streamlines
management functions by centralizing best-of-breed management for both platforms without sacrificing
features. For example, Microsoft Windows Server 2008 hosts can take full advantage of integrated
Failover Clustering support while ESX Server hosts can utilize features such as virtual machine Resource
Pools and VMotion.

Takes advantage of data center investments in SAN systems – Virtual machine images can be large
and therefore slow to send across the network. VMM automatically detects storage-attached network
(SAN) infrastructure where available and utilizes VDS technology to remap LUNS enabling faster
provisioning of new virtual machines and migration of existing virtual machines quickly.

Provides rich scripting environment – Administrators will appreciate the ability to automate common
operations using the Windows PowerShell command line interface in Virtual Machine Manager. The
entire VMM solution is built on Windows PowerShell. This enables administrators to translate every
operation possible in the graphical environment into the Windows PowerShell equivalent easily.
Administrators can then use these scripts as the basis for customized, automated operations.
Virtual Machine Manager Features
VMM offers a number of features that address critical challenges when managing virtual infrastructure.
These features can help IT professionals deal with these challenges more efficiently and deliver
increased business value to the organization.
Flexible Deployment
VMM supports virtual machines in a number of environments, ranging from an isolated, standalone
setup to a geographically distributed enterprise. The list below briefly describes typical VMM
deployments across various situations.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
7
Workgroup Setup
In a standalone setup, VMM runs on the same physical hardware as the virtual machines. A local SQL
Server 2005 database stores library files. This configuration is ideal for small development teams that
need to build virtual machines rapidly for test purposes.
Co-Located Data Center Setup
For a standard data center with co-located servers, VMM offers a management solution that monitors
and controls both physical and virtual machines, as shown in Figure 1. In this scenario, VMM pairs with
other products such as System Center Data Protection Manager, System Center Configuration
Manager, and System Center Operations Manager to gain the best advantage.
Distributed Enterprise Setup
VMM is enterprise-ready. It offers enterprise-oriented features and a strong ability to manage
thousands of virtual machines distributed across various network environments. VMM supports
management of physical host servers on a perimeter network (DMZ), non-trusted domains, and
supports utilization of a remote clustered database.
Figure 1. VMM works with physical and virtual servers in a typical corporate setup
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
8
Management Toolset
VMM empowers IT administrators with a toolset for virtual infrastructure management. The following list
of components summarizes how these tools work.
Administrator Console
The Administrator Console, shown in Figure 2, provides administrators with a full suite of virtual
machine management functions. This graphical user interface helps administrators easily manage state
transitions such as starting, stopping, and pausing virtual machines simply by clicking on the virtual
machine and then on the action to perform. Administrators can also save virtual machine setups as
templates and then clone those machines elsewhere. In addition, the Administrator Console works
seamlessly with Operations Manager 2007 to provide insight into both the physical and virtual
environment. For example, with the ability to map the relationship of virtual and physical assets, IT
administrators can more effectively plan hardware maintenance.
Since the VMM Administrator Console is built on the Operations Manager user interface, administrators
can quickly and easily become proficient at managing their virtual machines.
Figure 2. VMM Administrator Console provides a full suite of virtual machine management functions
Centralized Library
The VMM library is a central repository for virtual assets, or ―building blocks‖ used to create virtual
machines quickly and consistently, including:

Stored virtual machines

Virtual hard disks

CD/DVD software images, also called ISO files
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
9

Operating system profiles

Post-deployment customization scripts

Sysprep answer files

Hardware configurations

Templates
In small organizations within a single location, administrators can create the library on the same
machine as the VMM application. For larger, distributed organizations, IT administrators can implement
library stores at each data center location so they do not need to send files across wide-area networks
(WANs) and incur associated performance penalties.
Remote Management
VMM provides a range of features that make remote management of enterprise virtual environments
easier, including distributed libraries, Web-based self-provisioning, and support for host and virtual
machine management in perimeter networks and non-trusted domains. These features work together to
strengthen the management capabilities of VMM in enterprise environments.
Physical-to-Virtual Wizard
The VMM Physical-to-Virtual (P2V) wizard transforms the otherwise labor-intensive P2V task into a
routine process that offers automation whenever possible. VMM also works with available SAN systems
to ensure P2V conversions are efficient and reliable.
Intelligent Placement Ratings
Not only does the VMM Intelligent Placement process eliminate the data-gathering and manual analysis
needed to make informed decisions, but it also gathers this information into an easy-to-understand
report showing which physical host servers are best suited for a particular workload through a starranking system. Intelligent Placement works with both Windows Server hosts and VMware ESX Server
hosts connected with Virtual Infrastructure 3 and VirtualCenter Server. These reports give
administrators confidence in their virtual machine placement decisions.
SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services Reports
VMM uses SQL Server 2005 to store system information such as configurations and performance data.
When deployed together with Operations Manager, VMM allows administrators to take advantage of
SQL Server 2005 Reporting Services functions. SQL Server Reporting Services is a comprehensive,
server-based solution that enables the creation, management, and delivery of both traditional, paperoriented reports and interactive, Web-based reports. An integrated part of the Microsoft Business
Intelligence framework, Reporting Services combines the data management capabilities of SQL Server
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
10
and Windows Server with familiar and powerful Microsoft Office system applications to deliver real-time
information, support daily operations, and drive decisions.
Self-Service Web Portal for Delegated Provisioning
VMM also provides a Web portal from which authorized users can provision new virtual machines
without directly involving IT staff. This capability especially targets software test and development
teams, which often set up temporary virtual machines to try out new software. With VMM, IT
administrators retain control over access to resources.
Management Agents
In order to manage the virtual infrastructure, VMM installs software agents on each host server. The
management agents gather data from the host server’s Windows Server operating system and feed
that information back to VMM.
Getting Started with Virtual Machine Manager
The following sections provide the most up-to-date system requirements and step-by-step instructions
for installing and running VMM.
System Requirements
VMM includes the VMM server, the VMM Administrator Console, the VMM agent, and the VMM SelfService Portal (an optional component.)
By default, the VMM server is also a library server. If you do not set up a dedicated library server, you
will need additional hard disk space on the VMM server for storing library objects. You can also install
the Administrator Console on a different computer than the VMM server.
When you add a host or a library server in the Administrator Console, the VMM server automatically
installs an agent locally on the host. You can also manually install an agent locally on a host, which is
required if the host is on a perimeter network or in a non-trusted domain.
Before you begin installation, make sure prerequisite software is installed and all computers meet the
minimum hardware requirements.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
11
Software Requirements
The following charts detail the software requirements needed for VMM components.
VMM server
Operating
system
Windows Server 2008 R2 x64 with Hyper-V
Windows Server 2008 x64 with Hyper-V
Database
If not already installed, the VMM installation process will
install the Microsoft SQL Server™ 2005 Express Edition
SP3 on the local computer from the Setup Wizard. This
also installs the SQL Server 2005 Express Edition Toolkit
and creates a SQL Server instance named
MICROSOFT$VMM$ on the local computer.
Alternately, you can use an existing local or remote
instance of the following versions of Microsoft SQL Server
2005 or Microsoft SQL Server 2008:
 Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition SP3
 Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Standard Edition SP3
 Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Enterprise Edition SP3
 Microsoft SQL Server 2008
 Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Standard Edition
 Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Enterprise Edition

For more information about SQL Server options, see SQL
Server Options for Virtual Machine Manager in the System
Center Virtual Machine Manager Setup Help.
Other software Microsoft .NET Framework 2.01
Microsoft .NET Framework 3.02
Windows® Remote Management (WinRM)
Microsoft Core XML Services (MSXML) 6.03
Notes
1
If not already installed, you can install this software from within the Setup Wizard.
2
If the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 is not already installed, the Setup Wizard installs it
automatically. Installing .NET Framework 3.0 does not interfere with Microsoft .NET.
3
If not already installed, you can install this software from within the Setup Wizard.
VMM Administrator Console
Operating system
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2
Microsoft Windows Server 2008
Microsoft Windows Server 2003
Microsoft Windows Vista SP1
Microsoft Windows XP SP3
Other software
Microsoft .NET Framework 2.01
Microsoft .NET Framework 3.02
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
12
Windows PowerShell™ 1.03
Notes
1
If not already installed, you can install this software from within the Setup Wizard.
2
Install this software from the following site: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=69910. Installing the
Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 does not interfere with the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 components
already installed.
3
If not already installed, you can install this software from the following site:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=77521.
VMM Self-Service Portal
Operating system
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2
Microsoft Windows Server 2008
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 SP2
Other software
Microsoft .NET Framework 2.01
Microsoft .NET Framework 3.02
Windows PowerShell 1.03
Windows Server Internet Information Services (IIS) 4
Notes
1
If not already installed, you can install this software from within the Setup Wizard.
2
Install this software from the following site: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=69910. Installing the
Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0 does not interfere with the Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 components
already installed.
3
If not already installed, you can install this software from the following site:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=77521.
4
For Windows Server 2003, you can install IIS 6 in the Control Panel by using the Application Server
components group in Add/Remove Windows Components. For Windows Server 2008, you can install IIS
7 by using Server Manager. Select Add Roles, and then check the Application Server role.
VMM agent1
Operating
systems
Each virtual machine host must have the following software installed:

Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2

Microsoft Windows Server 2008

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 SP1 or above 1
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
13
Other software

Windows Remote Management (WinRM) 2

Microsoft Core XML Services (MSXML) 6.03
Notes
1
On Windows Server 2003, the host must also have either the 32-bit or the 64-bit edition of Virtual Server
2005 R2 installed.
2
Before you add a host or a library server in the Administrator Console and before you install an agent
locally on a host, you must first install WinRM.
3
Install this software from the following site: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=84599. For Microsoft
Windows Server 2003 R2, do not use Add/Remove Windows Components to enable WinRM as this will
install the wrong version. Use the link provided above to download the correct version.
VMM Monitoring and Reporting
System Center
software
For monitoring and reporting in VMM, use System Center Operations Manager 2007.
To monitor and report on virtual servers, you must install the following software:

System Center Operations Manager 2007

System Center Operations Manager 2007 Reporting Server

Virtualization Management Pack for System Center Operations Manager
2007
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
14
Hardware Requirements
The following charts detail the recommended minimum hardware requirements for VMM components.
VMM server
Processor
CPU running at 2.8 GHz or faster
RAM
2 GB
Disk space if using default local SQL Server 2005
Express Edition database
7 GB
Disk space if using remote SQL Server database1
1 GB
Disk space if using VMM Server as library server
200 GB
Notes
1
If you use an existing instance of SQL Server 2005 for the VMM database, refer to the SQL Server
product documentation for the minimum hardware requirements for that computer.
VMM Administrator Console
Processor
Pentium 500 MHz
RAM
256 MB
Disk space
512 MB
VMM Self-Service Portal
Processor
Pentium 500 MHz
RAM
256 MB
Disk space
512 MB
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
15
VMM agent
Virtual machine host
server requirements
The minimum hardware requirements for each virtual machine host will vary depending on the number
and type of guest operating systems, the applications you plan to install on the virtual machines, and the
anticipated workload.
For additional information, see the Virtual Server 2005 Deployment Guide on Microsoft TechNet or
Windows Server 2008: Hyper-V Planning and Deployment Guide
athttp://download.microsoft.com/download/8/1/5/81556693-1f05-494a-8d45cdeeb6d735e0/HyperV_Deploy.doc.
Library server
The minimum hardware requirements for a library server vary widely depending on the number and
size of virtual machine templates, virtual hard disks, virtual floppy disks, ISO images, scripts, hardware
profiles, guest operating system profiles, and stored virtual machines. The recommended hard disk
capacity for a computer with a VMM library is 200 GB.
Network Requirements
This section details network requirements and considerations for installing Virtual Machine Manager.

Connections – Due to the size of virtual machines, at least a 100MB Ethernet connection is suggested to
connect all computers in a VMM configuration. A 1GB Ethernet connection will ensure adequate
bandwidth and improved performance. However, if you use a 1GB Ethernet connection, you will likely see
further performance enhancements if you use a more powerful processor for the VMM server than the
recommended processor.

Domains – Before installing the VMM server, you must join the computer to a domain in Active
Directory® Domain Services (AD.) Virtual machine hosts may be part of a domain but they do not need to
be. AD supports hosts in the DMZ, as well as VMware ESX hosts that are not AD-joined.

Firewalls – If you want to manage a host across a machine-specific firewall, you must install the VMM
agent locally on the host, which automatically opens port 80. The agent also uses port 443 by default. In
order to manage hosts across a network firewall, you need to open the ports in that firewall manually to
allow communication between the VMM server and the host. Once you open the ports, you can add the
host to the VMM server.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
16
Installation
This section provides step-by-step instructions for installing VMM components, including:

VMM server

VMM Administrator Console

VMM Self-Service Portal

VMM agent
For detailed installation help, reference the Setup Help file included with the VMM download or product
DVD.
Important
Before installing VMM components, see the System Requirements section to make sure you have all
prerequisite software and hardware installed.
Installing the VMM Server
1. Sign on using a domain administrative account with local privileges.
2. From the product DVD or network share, double-click setup.exe.
3. In the Setup menu, click VMM Server.
4. On the License Terms, page click I accept the terms of this agreement.
5. On the Customer Experience Improvement Page (CEIP) page, click Yes to participate or No
to opt out of the CEIP.
6. On the Product Registration page, enter your name and the name of your company.
7. On the Prerequisites Check page, review any alerts or warnings about inadequate hardware or
uninstalled software prerequisites. You can continue if you receive warnings, but alerts must be
resolved before you can proceed with the installation.
8. On the Installation Location page, select the appropriate path for your System Center
VMM2008 program files location.
9. On the SQL Server Settings page, select Install SQL Server 2005 Express Edition SP3 or
Use a supported version of SQL Server. If you choose an existing SQL Server system, you
must enter the corresponding authentication information for it.
10. On the Library Share Settings page, select the option to either create a new library share or
use an existing library share. If you select to use an existing share then you must supply the
share name.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
17
11. On the Installation Settings page, assign the ports you want to use for communications and
file transfers between VMM components. If Windows Firewall is turned on, the wizard will
attempt to add firewall exceptions for each port.
Important
You can change the default port settings to avoid conflicts with other applications in your
environment. However, the port settings that you assign for the VMM server must identically
match the port settings you assign when installing associated VMM components.
12. On the Summary of Settings page, review your settings and do one of the following:
a. Click Previous to change any settings.
b. Click Install to install the VMM server.
13. On the Installation page, after setup is complete, click the link in the Status window to check
for the latest VMM updates.
Installing the VMM Administrator Console
You can install the VMM Administrator Console on the same computer as the VMM server or on a
different computer.
Important
To enable the Operations Manager Administrator Console to perform tasks on virtual machine hosts
and virtual machines from within the Virtualization Management Pack, you must install the VMM
Administrator Console on the same computer as the Operations Manager server.
Installing the Administrator Console also installs Windows PowerShell, which is the VMM command
shell required to perform these tasks.
1. From the product DVD or network share, double-click setup.exe.
2. In the Setup menu, click VMM Administrator Console.
3. On the License Terms page, click I accept the terms of this agreement.
4. On the Customer Experience Improvement Page (CEIP) page, click Next to accept the same
CEIP settings as the VMM Server.
5. On the Prerequisites Check page, review any alerts or warnings about inadequate hardware or
uninstalled software prerequisites. You can continue if you receive warnings, but alerts must be
resolved before you can proceed with the installation.
6. On the Installation Location page, select the appropriate path for your VMM Administrator
Console program files location.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
18
7. On the Port Assignment page, do one of the following:
a. Click Next to use the default port (8100) for the VMM Administrator Console to
communicate with the VMM server.
b. Assign a different port that you want to use for the VMM Administrator Console to
communicate with the VMM server, and then click Next.
Important
The port settings that you assign for the VMM Administrator Console must identically match
the port settings that you assigned in the VMM server.
8. On the Summary of Settings page, review your settings and do one of the following:
a. Click Previous to change any settings.
b. Click Install to install the VMM Administrator Console.
9. On the Installation page, after setup is complete, click the link in the Status window to check
for the latest VMM updates.
10. The Connect to Server dialog box opens the first time you open the console.
11. In the Connect to Server dialog box, do one of the following:
a. If you installed the VMM Administrator Console on the same computer as the VMM
server, click Connect to connect to the local VMM server (localhost) using the default
port (8100).
b. In the Server name box, type the name of the computer where the VMM server is
installed, followed by a colon and the port that you want to use to connect the VMM
Administrator Console to the VMM server (the default port is 8100), and then click
Connect.
Installing the VMM Self-Service Portal
The VMM Self-Service Portal is an optional, Web-based component that enables users to create and
manage their own virtual machines within a controlled environment.
Note
We recommended that you install the VMM Self-Service Portal on a separate computer from the VMM
server.
1. From the product DVD or network share, double-click setup.exe.
2. In the Setup menu, click SMM Self-Service Portal.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
19
3. On the License Terms page, click I accept the terms of this agreement.
4. On the Prerequisites Check page, review any warnings or alerts about inadequate hardware or
uninstalled software prerequisites. You can continue if you receive warnings, but alerts must be
resolved before you can proceed with the installation.
5. On the Web Server Settings page, do the following:
a. In the VMM server area, specify the name of both the VMM server you want the VMM
Self-Service Portal to connect to and the port that you want the VMM Self-Service Portal
to use to communicate with the VMM server.
b. In the Web server area, specify the port that you want self-service users to use to
connect to the Self-Service Portal.
Note
If the default port (80) for the VMM Self-Service Portal is being used by another Web site, you must either
use a different dedicated port or specify a host header for the portal. For more information about host
headers, see article 190008, "HOW TO: Use Host Header Names to Host Multiple Sites from One IP
Address in IIS 5.0" in the Microsoft Knowledge Base (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=88875).
6. On the Summary of Settings page, review your settings and do one of the following:
a. Click Previous to change any settings.
b. Click Install to install the VMM Self-Service Portal.
7. On the Installation page, after setup is complete, click the link in the Status window to check
for the latest VMM updates.
8. To finish the configuration of the VMM Self-Service Portal, you must associate the VMM SelfService Portal with the service and configure self-service policies. For more information, see
Setting Up Virtual Machine Self-Service in VMM Help.
Installing the VMM Agent
When you use the VMM Administrator Console to add a virtual machine host or a library server in a
trusted domain, the VMM server automatically installs a VMM agent on that host or library server using
the default settings.
For a host that is either on a perimeter network or is not joined to a domain that has a trust relationship
with the domain that the VMM server is in, you must install an agent locally on the host before you can
add the host to Virtual Machine Manager.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
20
You can also install an agent locally on a host in a trusted domain and then add that host by using the
VMM Administration Console.
Note
When you install a VMM agent locally on a host on a perimeter network, the Agent Setup Wizard prompts
you for an encryption key and for other information needed to access and manage the host and its virtual
machines. The wizard generates a set of credentials for the local agent service account. It then uses the
key to encrypt the credentials and the other agent-access information into a security file. You must
transfer this security file to the computer on which a VMM Administrator Console is installed.
After you transfer the security file, you can use the VMM Administrator Console to add the host. After the
host is added, VMM uses the credentials to communicate with the agent on the host.
To install an agent locally on a host on a perimeter network
1. From the product DVD or network share, double-click setup.exe.
2. In the Setup menu, click Local Agent.
3. On the Welcome to the Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager Agent (x64) Setup
Wizard dialog.
4. On the License Terms page, click I accept the terms of this agreement.
5. On the Destination Folder page, do one of the following:
a. Click Next to accept the default installation location.
b. Click Change, specify a different location, and then click Next.
6. On the Configuration settings page, do one of the following:
a. Click Next to accept the default port settings.
b. Type different ports, and then click Next.
Important
The port settings that you assign for the agent must identically match the port settings you assigned
for agents in the VMM server.
7. On the Security File Folder page, select the This host is on a perimeter network check box,
type and retype an encryption key, and then do one of the following:
a. Click Next to store the encrypted security file that contains agent credentials in the
default location.
b. Click Change, specify a different location to store the encrypted security file, and then
click Next.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
21
Important
Make note of the encryption key that you use to create the security file. You must enter this key
again when you are adding the host in the VMM Administrator Console.
8. On the Host network name page, do one of the following:
a. Click Next to have VMM contact the host by using its local computer name.
b. Click Use IP address to have VMM contact the host by using its IP address, and then
click Next.
9. On the Ready to install page, click Install.
10. Navigate to the folder where the security file is stored. The default location is
%SystemRoot%\Program Files\Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2\.
The name of this file is SecurityFile.txt.
11. Transfer the security file to a folder on the computer on which a VMM Administrator Console is
installed.
Important
After you have added the host, you should permanently delete the security file.
To install an agent locally on a host in a trusted domain
1. From the product DVD or network share, double-click setup.exe.
2. In the Setup menu, click Local Agent.
3. On the Welcome to the Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager Agent (x64) Setup
Wizard dialog.
4. On the License Terms page, click I accept the terms of this agreement.
5. On the Destination Folder page, do one of the following:
a. Click Next to accept the default installation location.
b. Click Change, specify a different location, and then click Next.
6. On the Configuration settings page, do one of the following:
a. Click Next to accept the default port settings.
b. Type in different port numbers, and then click Next.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
22
Important
The port settings that you assign for the agent must identically match the agent port settings that you
assigned for agents in the VMM server. For more information about assigning ports, see About
Assigning Ports in Virtual Machine Manager.
7. On the Security File Folder page, ensure that This host is on a perimeter network check box
is clear, and then click Next.
8. On the Ready to install page, click Install.
VMM Use Scenarios
VMM enhances the productivity of IT administrators when planning, deploying, maintaining, and
optimizing the virtual data center. The sections below describe how System Center VMM helps
administrators tackle the challenges of consolidating the physical environment and provisioning virtual
machines.
Server Consolidation
Server consolidation is a priority for most organizations implementing virtual machine technology. By
consolidating their physical servers, organizations realize two significant business benefits: power
savings and increased asset utilization. Organizations can either take a phased-in or all-at-once
approach to consolidation.
Phased-In Consolidation
The phased-in approach is incremental, and thus involves less disruption in terms of technology and
processes. With this approach, customers typically leave their existing application workloads on
physical servers, and only introduce virtualization for new server requests if they deem that the
anticipated workload is appropriate for virtualization. As older hardware is retired or requires significant
software upgrades, the workloads on those physical servers can be converted to virtual machines.
Thus, over time, data center operations become increasingly virtualized.
VMM supports the phased-in approach to consolidation with tools that make it easy to provision new
virtual machines, such as the centralized library of virtual machine building blocks.
Active Server Consolidation
Organizations that need to address power, cooling, and space issues as soon as possible will choose
an active server consolidation strategy. This scenario requires more upfront planning and staff
resources than the phased-in approach because the IT department must analyze physical servers and
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
23
corresponding workloads to determine virtualization candidates. However, this upfront effort yields
results almost immediately as the number of servers is reduced and utilization rates increase.
VMM supports active server consolidation with reports that identify the server best suited for
consolidation. Fast, reliable P2V (Physical-to-Virtual) conversion tools and Intelligent Placement
algorithms take the guesswork out of deciding on which physical host servers to place virtual machines.
Consolidation with Virtual Machine Manager
Whether an IT group chooses an incremental phased-in approach or an active consolidation project,
VMM provides tools to simplify the process and improve results. For example, the first step in migrating
from a physical data center, in which every workload exists on its own physical server, to a virtual data
center is to identify appropriate workloads for virtualization.
VMM helps administrators identify the right physical server workloads for consolidation by measuring
the target system’s performance counters or by determining if the Operations Manager is available. It
does so by analyzing the historical performance data stored in the Operations Manager database. The
VMM consolidation report (shown in Figure 3) then provides an easy-to-understand summary of an
application’s long-term performance. With this view, administrators can provide adequate resources for
those applications with seasonal surges in demand.
For example, a workload that runs a resource-intensive routine once a month has high variance in
performance and may not be appropriate for virtualization. Without the VMM consolidation report,
administrators would need to keep track of this historical performance data on a spreadsheet to
determine which server workloads to consolidate.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
24
Figure 3. VMM with Operations Manager can create a comprehensive consolidation candidates report
After identifying underutilized servers, IT administrators need to convert their physical machines to
virtual ones. Manually converting physical machines to virtual machines is slow and error-prone. VMM
mitigates these problems by integrating P2V conversions into the management application and by
providing timesaving tools such as the P2V wizard shown in Figure 4.
Converting physical servers into virtual machines is simple with VMM, which provides a task-based
wizard to guide the administrator through the process. VMM uses the Windows Server® Volume
Shadow Copy Service, which helps IT administrators create virtual machines without having to shut
down the source physical server.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
25
Figure 4. The P2V wizard helps users convert physical machines to virtual machines
VMM assists IT administrators in the important task of placing virtual machines on appropriate physical
server hosts. Whether your organization’s goal is to balance loads among existing hosts or to maximize
resource usage on each host, selecting the appropriate virtual machine host for a given workload is the
key to maximizing the utilization of physical assets. The process of selecting the best host for a given
virtual machine is called Intelligent Placement. (We address Intelligent Placement in detail later in this
paper.)
Provisioning New Virtual Machines
While consolidation provides compelling baseline benefits, virtualization with VMM makes IT groups
more responsive to business needs. The reason is quite simple — with virtualization, IT administrators
no longer have to procure and configure physical servers for new applications, a task that often takes
weeks or months. Instead, they can provision new virtual machines in a matter of minutes using the
VMM library and Administrator Console.
Better yet, with VMM, administrators can delegate this provisioning role to authorized users while
maintaining precise control over the management of virtual machines. Authorized users work from a
simple Web page that enables provisioning of virtual machines within preset controls.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
26
In addition, the VMM provisioning service can utilize storage-attached network (SAN) systems to
facilitate the rapid provisioning of large virtual machine images.
Administrator Provisioning
Administrators can quickly build new virtual machines from the Administrator Console using templates
provided from the VMM library. These templates are base configurations that help speed the
deployment of new virtual machines and ensure standard hardware and software configurations are
used. Figure 5 shows the interface used to select the template for new VM.
Figure 5. Use of templates speeds the deployment of new virtual machines
After selecting the appropriate template, a wizard-based task flow offers step-by-step guidance for
building a virtual machine from configuration to deployment. Figure 6 and Figure 7 show different
stages in creating a new virtual machine from a template.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
27
Figure 6. The Administrator Console provides configuration settings for a new virtual machine.
Figure 7. The New Virtual Machine Summary displays settings before deploying the new virtual machine
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
28
After you create the new virtual machine, VMM uses performance data from potential hosts to suggest
optimal hosts for the new virtual machine based on a tailored algorithm. Finally, the virtual machine is
placed on the physical host.
Self-Service Provisioning
One of the most commonly referenced virtualization scenarios is testing newly developed applications
on virtual infrastructure. In test and development environments, IT professionals are constantly
provisioning and tearing down virtual machines. While virtualization does simplify this task, IT
administrators typically still play a role.
Figure 8. The Administrator Console allows administrators to manage server and user permissions
Administrators control access to physical servers and can designate specific server resources for
individuals and groups, as shown in Figure 8. Authorized users work from templates and manage only
the virtual machines they, or their group, own. Additionally, administrators can set quotas on resources
available to users. The delegated provisioning scenario doesn’t require a client on the host, and large
numbers of users can be given delegated-provisioning privileges.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
29
As shown in Figure 9, VMM alleviates this administration burden with a simply designed self-service
Web portal where authorized test and development staff can provision their own virtual machine
resources under preset controls.
Provisioning a new virtual machine using the VMM self-service Web portal is a simple process
consisting of several straightforward steps. After opening the VMM self-service Web portal, users
choose from a prescribed list of virtual machine templates and initiate the setup process.
Figure 9. The self-service Web portal interface is the starting point for self-service provisioning
The self-service provisioning process is limited because VMM automates many functions according to
the self-service policy set by the administrator for the individual user or user group. Figure 10 shows the
minimal amount of information needed to create new virtual machines under the self-service
provisioning scenario. After the new virtual machine is created, VMM automatically runs the Intelligent
Placement process and places the new virtual machine on the appropriate physical server host.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
30
Figure 10. The self-service Web portal includes a mini-setup dialog
Management of Microsoft and VMware Virtual Machines
Managing ESX Server and Hyper-V VMM provides a centralized management platform for enterprise
virtualization of both Microsoft virtualization products as well as VMware virtualization products. Many
organizations are running both virtualization platforms, but before VMM 2008 they needed to manage
each different product using separate and distinct management tools. VMM 2008 provides best-ofbreed virtualization management in a single tool.
With VMM, you can manage Microsoft’s Virtual Server 2005 R2 and Hyper-V virtualization products as
well as VMware’s ESX Server via VMware vCenter Server. For example, VMM enables you to use
features like VMware’s VMotion technology to transfer VMs between different ESX Servers with no
downtime.
Likewise, VMM allows you to take advantage of Microsoft’s Live Migration to move a VM quickly
between Microsoft Hyper-V hosts. In the following figure, you can see VMM 2008 managing both
Microsoft Hyper-V servers as well as VMware ESX servers.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
31
Figure 11. Virtual Machine Manager handles both ESX and Hyper-V servers.
Managed servers are listed in the Host Groups pane on the left side of the screen. In this pane, the
virtual servers are grouped by Development and Production roles, and include both Hyper-V servers
and a VMware ESX server cluster named ESX35-Cluster running two ESX server systems. You can
see the details of the each managed server in the Production group in the Virtual Machines pane
shown in the middle of the screen.
This pane also shows the status of all VMs running, including the allocated memory and guest
operating system. When you select each different VM, the console and addition details appear in the
Details pane at the bottom of the screen.
VMware’s VirtualCenter Server is required to manage VMware ESX servers using VMM. To add a new
VirtualCenter Server to VMM’s console, select the Add VMware VirtualCenter Server option from the
VMM section of the Actions pane shown on the far right portion of the screen. This will display the Add
VMware VirtualCenter Server dialog shown in Figure 12.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
32
Figure 12. The Add VMware VirtualCenter server dialog adds VMware server names to the VMM console
Specify the VirtualCenter Server’s name in the Computer Name prompt. If the VirtualCenter Server
uses the default management port, you can leave the value in the TCP/IP port field at its default value
of 902. If your VirtualCenter Server uses a custom TCP/IP port then you will need to change that value
to the VirtualCenter TCP/IP port. Then, supply administrative login credentials for the VirtualCenter
Server and click OK.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
33
Figure 13. Virtual Machine Manager controls VirtualCenter Server and ESX Server
After adding the VirtualCenter Server, the VMMM management console can manage VMware VMs. In
Figure 13, you can see that VMM can control the VMware Virtual Machine Stop, Pause, and Save State
capabilities.
High Availability with Failover Clustering
Creating a highly available environment for virtual machines is every bit as important as it is for physical
servers. Failover Clustering is Microsoft’s primary high availability server-level protection technology. It
is available for both Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008. With Windows Server 2008,
Failover Clustering enables you to create a cluster of up to 16 nodes. If one cluster node fails then
other nodes in the cluster can assume the services running on that node. It can also provide high
availability at both the virtual server host level and the virtual machine guest level.
At the host level, Failover Clustering provides protection against the single point of failure that can
result from a host hardware failure. If a physical host server experiences a failure then all virtual
machines running on that host automatically start on another node in the cluster.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
34
At the guest level, the virtual machine can be part of a cluster in which other cluster nodes can be
virtual machines running on either the same or another host server. If a clustered virtual machine fails
then the virtual machine guest can be failed over to another cluster node. However, setting up Failover
Clustering for virtual host servers and guests can be a tricky manual process.
The integration of VMM2008 and Windows Server 2008 Failover Clustering solves this problem by
detecting the availability of Failover Clustering and automatically creates the cluster resources needed
to add the virtual machine to the to the Failover Cluster. You can see an example of adding a new VM
using Failover Clustering for high availability in Figure 14.
Figure 14. Adding Failover Clustering hosts with Virtual Machine Manager
Adding a new clustered VM is very much like creating a standard unclustered VM. However, before
creating a clustered VM you must have previously created a Windows Server 2008 Failover Cluster and
added the Windows Server Failover Cluster server to VMM. VMM 2008 will handle all configuration
steps required to add the new VM to the Failover Cluster. To create a new clustered VM, open VMM
then select the New virtual machine option from the VMM section of the Actions task pane in the far
right hand side of Figure 14. This will launch the New Virtual Machine Wizard shown in Figure 15.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
35
Figure 15. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Select the VM source
The first step in creating a new, clustered VM is to select the VM source. You can create a new VM
from scratch or you can use a previously created one. You can also use configure your new VM using
common VM settings pre-configured using VMM templates. This example will demonstrate how to use
a VM template as the basis for creating the new, clustered VM. To use an existing template click the
Browse button to display the Select Virtual Machine Source shown in Figure 16.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
36
Figure 16. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Create a VM using a template
The Select Virtual Machine Source window displays the existing templates that are stored in the VMM
library. To create a new VM using one of the templates, select a template from the list then click OK.
This will pull in the VM configuration settings saved with the template. In this case, selecting the
template named Win2K3SP2-Ent-x64-VL will close the dialog and return the selected template name to
the Select Source dialog you can see in Figure 17.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
37
Figure 17. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Select the saved template
After selecting the template containing the VM configuration information, click Next to display the
Virtual Machine Identity dialog shown in Figure 18.
Figure 18. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Name the virtual machine
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
38
The Virtual Machine Identity dialog allows you to name the new VM and optionally add some text that
describes the VM. In Figure 18, you can see that the new virtual machine is DevTest-Cluster1. The
Owner information automatically fills in the current login information. You have the option to override
this information if you want to create the VM with a different owner. You can also see that the
description indicates that this VM will be part of a Failover Cluster. Click Next to customize the virtual
machine’s hardware configuration as shown in Figure 19.
Figure 19. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Make the VM highly available
When you create a new virtual machine using a template the Configure Hardware dialog is initially filled
in with the values saved in the template. At this point, you can customize any of the hardware settings.
For example, you can alter either the amount memory or the number virtual CPUs that are available to
the VM. The Availability section of the VM hardware profile is the most important setting for creating a
new VM as part of a Windows Server Failover Cluster. To make the new VM a part of Failover Cluster
you need to check the Make this VM highly available check box as shown in Figure 19.
Note
In order for this to work, the Windows Server Failover Cluster must already be created and added to VMM. The
New Virtual Machine Wizard will take care of all required cluster configuration settings such as adding resource
groups with no additional manual configuration required.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
39
After making changes to the hardware profile and specifying to add the VM to a Failover Cluster, click
Next to choose the guest operating system used by the virtual machine as shown in Figure 20.
Figure 20. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Configure the guest operating system
Configuring the guest operating system profile enables you to control settings for the new VM’s guest
operating system including the type of OS used, names of administrators, passwords, the installation
product key, the time zone used, and whether the guest will be part of Windows domain or part of a
workgroup. Like the other VM settings, when you create a new VM using a template all of these
settings will originally come from the template but you are free to make changes to them before
creating the virtual machine. Click Next to specify the destination where the VM will be created.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
40
Figure 21. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Select the VM destination
A new VM can be placed directly on a VM host or stored in the VMM library offline storage location that
is primarily used to store inactive VMs. In this case, you need to add the VM to an existing VM host with
Failover Clustering capabilities; therefore, you should place it on an active host. Select Place the
virtual machine on a host to utilize VMM’s Intelligent Placement capabilities as shown in Figure 21.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
41
Figure 22. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Select the virtual machine host
VMM’s Intelligent Placement feature evaluates available virtualization hosts and recommends the most
suitable host using a five-star rating scale shown in Figure 22. An ideally suited host rates as five gold
stars. Hosts that VMM determines are not suitable have no gold stars. As Figure 22 shows, hosts can
be either Microsoft or VMware servers. While the number of stars indicates VMM’s Intelligent
Placement rating, you can manually override the selection and choose to place the VM on another host.
As you would expect, the VM will not be highly available if you elect to place the VM on a host that
doesn’t have Failover Clustering installation.
After reviewing VMM’s Intelligent Placement recommendations, select the host for your VM by
highlighting the desired host in the Select Virtual Machine Host window. In Figure 22, the host
WS08HV-N2.virt.contoso.com is selected. The Transfer Type indicates that this particular host is using
SAN storage. Click Next to select the path on the storage system where the VM files will be created.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
42
Figure 23. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Select the host storage path
In the Select Path dialog, you can choose the SAN LUN that you want to use to store your new VM. In
Figure 23, notice that you can’t select the C drive - the wizard only shows the SAN LUNs because SAN
storage is required in order to add a VM guest to Failover Cluster. After selecting the storage location
for the virtual machine the wizard prompts you to select a virtual network.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
43
Figure 24. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Select the VM network
The Select Networks dialog allows you to select the virtual network(s) that you want to connect to the
VM’s virtual network adapters. Each network adapter and available virtual networks are listed in the
dialog. Virtual networks that match the location requirements specified for the virtual network adapters
are prefixed with an asterisk. In this case, there is only a single virtual network to choose. Click Next to
present the last configuration dialog used by the New Virtual Machine Wizard.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
44
Figure 25. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Choose additional VM properties
The Additional Properties dialog allows you to control the actions VM will take when the virtual server
host starts and stops. The VM can automatically start and then automatically shut down when the
virtual server host shuts down. In this example, the VM is set so that it must be started manually after
the physical host starts. When the virtual server host stops, the VM will automatically save its state. The
Additional Properties dialog also gives you the option to override the settings for the guest operating
system. Click Next to display the final summary screen shown in Figure 26.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
45
Figure 26. Adding a new VM to a Failover Cluster – Review the VM settings summary
The Summary screen allows you to confirm the virtual machine settings before you deploy the virtual
machine to the selected host. If the host is a Microsoft Hyper-V system, the deployment process will
automatically install the Hyper-V Integration Components in the new VM.
Reducing Planned Downtime with Live Migration
Live Migration enables an administrator to move virtual machines between Hyper-V hosts with no
downtime and no loss of services for the end users of those virtual machines, and to perform scheduled
maintenance on Hyper-V hosts, again with no downtime for the virtual machines running on that host.
When combined with the VMM PRO feature, Live Migration can also dynamically move virtual
machines to different Hyper-V services in response to the resource utilization of the Hyper-V host or the
virtual machine. Live Migration is only available with Windows Server 2008 R2. It is enhanced by
Windows Server 2008 R2’s new Clustered Shared Volumes (CSV) feature. CSV enables multiple
cluster nodes to concurrently access the virtual machine files stored on the same LUN. The following
section outlines an example of how to create a virtual machine configured for Live Migration and how to
use VMM to initiate a Live Migration.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
46
Note
To create a virtual machine capable of Live Migration, a Windows Server 2008 R2 Failover Cluster
must already be created and added to VMM. You can then add one of the cluster disks as a CSV for
the Failover Cluster. The New Virtual Machine Wizard will take care of all required cluster configuration
settings such as adding a cluster service for the virtual machine with no additional manual configuration
required.
From the VMM Admin Console, select Virtual Machine from the navigation pane on the left side on the
console and then click New virtual machine in the Action pane. This will start the New Virtual
Machine Wizard shown in Figure 27.
Figure 27. Creating a virtual machine for Live Migration
Creating a virtual machine that can use Live Migration is very much like creating a highly available
virtual machine as illustrated in the previous section. The Select Source dialog enables you to choose
how you want to create the new virtual machine. You can create a new VM from scratch or you can use
an existing Template of Virtual Disk. This example shows how to create a new virtual machine by
selecting the Create the new virtual machine with a blank virtual hard disk option. Click Next to
display the Virtual Machine Identity dialog.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
47
Figure 28. Adding a new VM for Live Migration – Name the virtual machine
First, give the new virtual machine a name and optionally add a description of the virtual machine. In
Figure 28, the new virtual machine is named vWS08-SP01 and the owner is CONTOSO\administrator.
Click Next to customize the virtual machine’s hardware configuration as shown in Figure 29.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
48
Figure 29. Adding a new VM for Live Migration– Configure the processor
The initial values in the Configure Hardware screen are filled in from the [New] hardware profile. At this
point, you can customize any of the hardware settings. For example, you can alter either the amount
memory or the number and type of virtual CPUs that are available to the virtual machine. To enable
Live Migration to work between computers that might not have identical processors it is important to go
to the Processor Compatibility section and check the Allow migration to a virtual machine host with
a different processor version option. This will cause VMM to limit the processor features used in the
virtual machine, thereby enabling it to move between Hyper-V hosts that do not support exactly the
same processor features.
Note
The Allow migration to a virtual machine host with a different processor version facilitates the live
migration of virtual machines between Hyper-V hosts with different processor features. However, it
does not allow you to perfrom Live Migration to hosts with different processor manufacturers.
Next, scroll down to the Advanced section as shown in Figure 30.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
49
Figure 30. Adding a new VM for Live Migration – Configure availability
The Availability section of the virtual machine’s configuration settings adds the virtual machine to a
Windows Server Failover Cluster. This is a requirement for Live Migration. To make the new VM part of
a Failover Cluster, check Make this VM highly available as shown in Figure 30. Click Next to continue
the virtual machine configuration process.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
50
Figure 31. Adding a new VM for Live Migration– Select Destination
The Select Destination dialog controls where the virtual machine will be created either on a Hyper-V
host or stored in the VMM library. Select Place the virtual machine on a host to create the virtual
machine directly on a Hyper-V host and then display the Select Host dialog that shown in Figure 32.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
51
Figure 32. Adding a new VM for Live Migration– Select Host
Select the host for your VM by highlighting the desired host in the Select a host for the virtual
machine window. In Figure 32, you can see that the host WS08R2-S1.contoso.com is selected. Click
Next to select the path on the storage system where the virtual machine files will be created.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
52
Figure 33. Adding a new VM for Live Migration– Select Path
The Select Path dialog enables you to specify where the virtual machine configuration and virtual hard
disk (VHD) files will be stored. In order to use Live Migration the Virtual machine path must point to
the mount point used by Clustered Shared Volumes. By default, the mount point is located at
%SystemDrive%\ClusterStorage\Volume1. Selecting this location will cause both the virtual machine’s
configuration file and the VHD to be stored on the CSV. Click Next to configure the networking to be
used by the virtual machine.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
53
Figure 34. Adding a new VM for Live Migration– Select Networks
The Select Networks dialog allows you to select the virtual network(s) that you want to map to the
virtual machine’s virtual network adapters. Virtual networks that match the location requirements
specified for the virtual network adapters are prefixed with an asterisk. In Figure 34 you can see that
the virtual network adapter will be mapped to a previously defined Hyper-V virtual network named
External Virtual Network. Click Next to display the Additional Properties dialog.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
54
Figure 35. Adding a new VM for Live Migration– Additional Properties
The Additional Properties dialog allows you to specify the virtual machine’s actions when the Hyper-V
host is started and stopped. It also gives you the ability to specify a guest operating system. Click Next
to display the Summary screen shown in Figure 36.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
55
Figure 36. Adding a new VM for Live Migration– Summary
On the Summary dialog, you can confirm the virtual machine settings and then click Create to create
the new virtual machine. If the host is a Microsoft Hyper-V system the Hyper-V Integration Components
is automatically installed in the new virtual machine.
After the virtual machine has been created and you’ve installed a guest operating system, you can use
Live Migration to move the virtual machine to another Hyper-V host. To use Live Migration, open the
VMM Admin Console, expand the cluster containing the virtual machine you just created, then select
the host that is currently running the virtual machine.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
56
Figure 37. Initiating a Live Migration
To manually initiate a Live Migration, right-click the virtual machine and then select the Migrate option
from the context menu (as shown in Figure 37.) This will display the Select Host dialog shown in Figure
38.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
57
Figure 38. Selecting the Live Migration Destination
VMM’s Intelligent Placement feature recommends the most suitable hosts for a Live Migration target
using a five-star rating like the one shown in Figure 38. For example, hosts that VMM determines to be
unsuitable have no gold stars. In Figure 38 you can see that the Hyper-V host named WS08R2-S2 has
been selected as the Live Migration target. Click Next to display the Summary dialog you see in Figure
39.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
58
Figure 39. Confirming the Live Migration selections
The Summary dialog allows you to confirm the source host and destination target for the Live Migration.
Click Next to start the Live Migration and open the Jobs window shown in Figure 40.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
59
Figure 40. Running Live Migration
In the Jobs window, you can see the Live Migration progress in the Status column. In addition, you can
see the progress of the specific Live Migration job steps in the lower right portion of the window. After
the Live Migration has completed, the virtual machine will be running on the target host as shown in
Figure 41.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
60
Figure 41. After the Live Migration has completed
In Figure 41, you can see that the vWS08-SP01 virtual machine has been moved to the WS08R2-S2
host.
Reducing Planned Downtime using Maintenance Mode
VMM 2008 R2’s new Maintenance Mode can also help reduce planned downtime of the virtualized
guests by setting up a Hyper-V host for maintenance activities. Maintenance mode either automatically
saves the state of all running virtual machines or uses Live Migration to move those virtual machines to
other available Hyper-V hosts. As you would expect, Live Migration must be enabled in order to move
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
61
virtual machines to another host.
Figure 42. Starting maintenance mode
To place a Hyper-V host in maintenance mode, expand the Host Groups navigation tree and right-click
on the Hyper-V host that you want to place into maintenance mode, as you see in Figure 42. From the
context menu, select the Start maintenance mode option. This will display the Start Maintenance
Mode dialog you see in Figure 43.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
62
Figure 43. Selecting Live Migration for highly available VMs
The Start Maintenance Mode dialog enables you to choose which action you want VMM to take on the
virtual machines running on a selected host. You can either select to live-migrate HA-enabled virtual
machines to other hosts or you can elect to simply save the state of all running virtual machines.
Selecting the Live migrate all running HA virtual machines to other hosts in the cluster as you see
in Figure 43 will instruct VMM to use live migration to move all live migration-enabled virtual machines
to other hosts. Any running virtual machines that are not live migration-enabled will have their state
saved. Click Start maintenance mode to begin this process.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
63
Figure 44. Running maintenance mode
In Figure 44, you can see the migration symbol next to the vWS08-SP01 virtual machine. This virtual
machine is live migration-enabled and starting maintenance mode has initiated a live migration from the
WS08R2-S2 host to the WS08R2-S1 host. If more than one virtual machine is live migration-enabled
the subsequent live migrations will all be queued. After the live migrations have finished, the remaining
virtual machines will have their state saved.
When the host maintenance activities have been completed and you’re ready to bring the Hyper-V host
back online, you can expand the Host Groups, right-click on a virtual machine name, and select Stop
maintenance mode as shown in Figure 45.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
64
Figure 45. Stopping maintenance mode
Selecting the Stop maintenance mode option will take the host out of maintenance mode and will
restore the state of the virtual machines that were running.
Optimizing Storage with Quick Storage Migration
Quick Storage Migration helps you optimize your virtual machine storage by rapidly moving virtual
machine assets to different storage locations. Quick Storage Migration helps you take advantage of
Windows Server 2008’s new Cluster Shared Volumes to consolidate multiple virtual machines on a
single LUN. The initial release of Hyper-V required that each VM be located on its own LUN. However,
Migrating to Hyper-V R2 will immediately make all virtual machines previously configured for Quick
Storage Migration able to make use of Live Migration. However, to make storage management easier
you can use Quick Storage Migration to consolidate your existing virtual machines on fewer LUNs. In
addition, Quick Storage Migration can also enable you to make existing local virtual machines that are
not highly available capable of using live migration. Using Quick Storage Migration to move a locally
stored virtual machine to a CSV makes the virtual machine highly available and enables it to utilize live
migration.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
65
To use Quick Storage Migration, open the Virtual Machines view in the Virtual Machine Manager, then
right-click on the virtual machine that you want to move, as shown in Figure 46.
Figure 46. Starting storage migration
To use Quick Storage Migration, select Migrate storage from the context menu. This displays the
Select Path dialog that you see in Figure 47.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
66
Figure 47. Selecting the target storage path
The Select Path dialog enables you to choose the target storage location for both virtual machine
configuration files and virtual hard disk files. In this case, the virtual machine’s files are located on the
Hyper-V host’s local C: drive, which is not highly available. When the Select Path dialog is initially
displayed the current path used by the virtual machine is shown in the Location column. To move the
virtual machine to a new storage location first click Browse to display the Select Destination Folder
dialog shown in Figure 47.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
67
Figure 48. Selecting the CSV mount point
The Select Destination Folder dialog allows you to navigate to the target folder to which you want to
migrate the virtual machine’s storage assets. To migrate an existing virtual machine to Cluster Shared
Volumes, expand the Cluster Shared Volumes node and select a cluster disk that has been previously
configured for CSV. This will move the virtual machine’s storage and enable it to take advantage of the
benefits of CSV.
In Figure 48, you can see that CSV uses Cluster Disk 2. Other clusters may have different designations
but all clustered storage that has been CSV-enabled will be listed under the Cluster Shared Volumes
node. Select the desired CSV storage destination and then click OK.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
68
Figure 49. Selecting the target storage path
The selected destination path is now returned to the Select Path dialog. In Figure 49 you can see that
C:\ClusterStorage\Volume1 is the target storage location. The C:\ClusterStorage\Volume1 path is the
default mount point for Windows Server 2008 CSV. Click Next to display the Summary screen shown in
Figure 50.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
69
Figure 50. Confirming the storage migration selections
The Summary dialog lets you confirm your quick storage migration choices, and displays the name of
the virtual machine to be migrated along with your source and target virtual machine hosts. If you need
to make changes, you can click Previous and page back through the earlier steps in the wizard. Click
Move to start the migration.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
70
Figure 51. Running storage migration
Starting the quick storage migration process displays the Jobs window shown in Figure 51. The quick
storage migration progress appears in the Status column. In addition, the progress of the specific quick
storage migration job steps is shown in the lower right portion of the Jobs window.
When a quick storage migration is initiated, the virtual machine continues running while VMM copies
the virtual machine’s virtual hard disk (VHD) in the background. After the VMM has copied the VHD,
VMM pauses the virtual machine and copies the differencing disk to the new location and applies it to
the virtual machine. After the quick storage migration has finished, VMM will restart the virtual machine
on the target host as you can see in Figure 52.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
71
Figure 52. After the storage migration has completed
After the quick storage migration has completed, the virtual machine’s configuration, snapshots, and
virtual hard disk files will have all been moved to the new destination location. In this example, quick
storage migration moved the virtual machine to the CSV mount point, making the virtual machine highly
available and enabling it for live migration.
To verify the virtual machine’s changes, right-click the virtual machine name and select Properties to
display the virtual machine’s Properties dialog as shown in Figure 53.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
72
Figure 53. Verifying the new VM settings
On the Hardware Configuration tab, you can select the virtual hard disk name to confirm that the quick
storage migration moved the virtual machine to the new CSV storage location. In addition, scrolling
down through the virtual machine’s properties reveals that the virtual machine is also now highly
available. This enables you to use live migration with the virtual machine.
Dynamic Storage Management with Hot Add Storage
VMM’s ability to hot-add storage enables virtual machines to dynamically adjust to changing storage
requirements without incurring any downtime. To take advantage of hot-add storage the virtual machine
guest operating system must be running Windows Server 2008 R2 or higher.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
73
To hot-add storage to a virtual machine, open Virtual Machine Manager’s Virtual Machine view and
select a virtual machine that is running the Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system..
Figure 54. Opening the VM properties for Hot-Add
As you can see in Figure 54, you can right-click the Windows Server 2008 R2 virtual machine name to
display a context menu. You can then select Properties to display the virtual machine’s properties as
you can see in Figure 55.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
74
Figure 55. Selecting the New Disk option for the running VM
To hot-add storage, click the Hardware Configuration tab. If the guest operating system supports hotadd for storage, the Disk icon will be highlighted as shown in Figure 55. Click the Disk icon to add a
virtual hard disk to the virtual machine configuration and display the new storage pane, as shown in
Figure 56.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
75
Figure 56. Creating a new dynamic disk
You can elect to add an existing virtual hard disk or you can create a new virtual hard disk. To create a
new virtual hard disk, select the Create a new virtual hard disk option and then select the type and
size for the virtual hard disk. In Figure 56 you can see that the new virtual hard disk will be a dynamic
disk and that it will initially have a maximum size of 40 MB. Click OK to add the virtual disk to the
running virtual machine.
The virtual machine is available throughout the entire process and can immediately use the storage
after you have added the new virtual hard disk. You can see the updated properties of the virtual
machine by selecting the virtual machine in the Virtual Machine Manager’s Virtual Machine view and
then clicking on the Latest Job tab as shown in Figure 57.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
76
Figure 57. After hot-adding storage to the running VM
Performance Resource Optimization (PRO)
The VMM Performance Resource Optimization (PRO) feature provides monitoring and correction of
problems for virtual machines managed by VMM. PRO leverages the capabilities of Operations
Manager to provide management of both the physical virtual server host as well as the virtual machines
running on that host. If Operations Manager is not installed, VMM still provides all its other virtual
machine management features but the extended PRO capabilities will only be available if Operations
Manager is installed.
Figure 58 shows an example of the VMM PRO feature’s integration with Operations Manager. In this
figure, you can see the network diagram provided by Operations Manager.
The yellow warning icons indicate that a managed Web farm is having a problem. In this example, the
level of Web site activity has exceeded the threshold set in Operations Manager.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
77
Figure 58. VMM PRO integrates with Operations Manager
Using PRO, the administrator can set up tips to display when a given operations threshold has been
exceeded. PRO tips can be text descriptions that an operator must manually respond to or they can be
scripts either that take action automatically or when the operator interacts with the PRO tip. In this
example, the operator can click the PRO tip icon at the top the screen to display the PRO Tips dialog
shown in Figure 59.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
78
Figure 59. The PRO Tips dialog provides diagnostic instruction
VMM’s PRO tips display the pre-defined diagnostic message that the administrator has created as the
appropriate response for the given operations condition. In this case, the remedial action in the PRO tip
states, ―Add another IIS server to the Order Tracker Web farm‖. The expanded definition shown in the
Detail View pane at the bottom of the screen explains that the Web traffic has exceeded the expected
level and that adding another Web server will increase the available Web capacity. Here, the PRO tip
implements a script the operator can execute at their discretion. The operator can click Dismiss to
ignore the error or Implement to execute a script that will add an additional Web server VM to the
Order Tracker Web farm. You can see the results of implementing the PRO tip in Figure 60.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
79
Figure 60. The PRO Tips console provides success-failure feedback when implementing the PRO tip
Figure 60 shows the Operations Manager console after implementing the PRO tip. The yellow warning
icon is gone from the Pro Tip console and the Order Tracker Web server farm and all of the Web
servers now have green check marks indicating that everything is with the pre-defined operational
thresholds. You can also see that the Order Tracker Web farm has had an additional Web server
added, and now consists of three Web servers.
Delegated Administration
In large organizations, it can be quite cumbersome to require all virtual machine management to be
performed through one central location. Many organizations are global in nature and need localized
management capabilities to enable them to respond more effectively to the needs of the organization.
While self-service provisioning fulfils some of the end-user needs, it doesn’t address the full range of
management requirements that some organizations require. To address these issues VMM 2008 added
the ability to create delegated administrators. Delegated administrators can perform the full range of
actions that are available to the VMM administrator. However, delegated administrators are only
authorized to perform these functions on the range of VMs, hosts, and clusters that they have
permissions to manage.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
80
For example, a global organization may create a delegated administrator to manage just the VMs in
their Washington locations. This delegated administrator would then be able to work only with the VMs
in the group defined as Washington. The delegated administrator for Washington would not be able to
work with or even see other host groups, hosts, clusters and VMs that may be available.
To create a delegated administrator role, select the New User Role option from the User Role section
of the Actions pane. You will then see the Create User Role General dialog shown in Figure 61.
Figure 61. Create User Role dialog - Set up a new role
The User role name field at the top of the screen allows you to assign the new role a unique name. In
Figure 61, you can see that the new role is DelegatedAdminNY. The Description box provides a
complete description of the role to help identify and understand the role’s purpose. Use the User role
profile dropdown to select a type of role to create. In this example, it is the Delegated Administrator
profile.
Click Next to select the users authorized for the role.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
81
Figure 62. Create User Role dialog - Add users to a delegated administrator role.
The Add Members dialog lets you select the users that are authorized for the new delegated
administrator role. Click Add to display the Active Directory (AD) Select Users, Computers, or
Groups dialog that you can see in Figure 45. You can use the Object Types button to search for
existing users or groups, or you can enter the users or group name in the Enter the object names to
select box. In Figure 62, you can see that the pre-existing AD group named NYAdmin is selected. This
group was created using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in. Click OK to add the
role to VMM. The completed Add Members dialog with the new Delegated Administrators role will
appear as shown in Figure 63.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
82
Figure 63. Create User Role dialog - Add the Delegated Administrator role to VMM
While this example illustrates adding a single AD group to the VMM delegated administrator role, you
can add multiple AD users and groups by repeatedly using the Add button and selecting additional AD
users and groups as needed. After you have added all users and groups to the delegated
administrators role, click Next to specify the objects that a delegated administrator can manage.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
83
Figure 64. Create User Role dialog - Specify the object scope for the delegated administrator role
In Figure 64, you can see that the delegated administrator’s role can be granted rights to the host
groups New York, Hong Kong, and Redmond as well as the rights to all VMM libraries. This allows the
administrator to have full administrative control over the VMs in these host groups. Having rights over
the VMM library enables the new administrator to create new VMs in the library as well as deploy VMs
from the library to any of the other available groups. Click Next to display the Summary dialog shown in
Figure 65.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
84
Figure 65. Create User Role dialog - Summary of the delegated administrator’s role.
The Summary dialog allows you to confirm all configuration choices that you made while creating the
NYAdmin delegated administrator role. If you want to change any of the settings, you can use the
Previous button to page back through the prior dialog screens. Click Create to set up a new delegated
administrator role.
Like all of the dialogs in VMM, the Create User Role dialog is based on Windows PowerShell™
(described in further detail below.) Click View Script to display a Notepad window containing all of the
PowerShell commands required to create the new delegated administrator. You can see the
PowerShell script as it appears in Notepad in Figure 66.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
85
Figure 66. A PowerShell script controls the function for creating a delegated administrator
PowerShell is a new command line shell and scripting language that enables administrators to quickly
construct integration solutions and integrate VMM with established tools and procedures. VMM 2008’s
integration with PowerShell makes it easy for the administrator to create scripts that can be used to
automate all of the administrative functions that can be performed with VMM. The View Script feature is
available at the end of all of the VMM wizards, and it writes all the PowerShell script items directly into
Notepad from which you can modify or save the script. The PowerShell script example shown in Figure
66 illustrates the creation of the new role.
VMM Technology Differentiators
VMM differentiates itself from competing products by taking advantage of integration with the Windows
Server System™ platform and other Microsoft System Center solutions. In addition, VMM provides a
centralized best-of-breed virtual machine management function that enables the management of
Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 R2, Microsoft Hyper-V, and VMware ESX Server platforms. VMM takes
advantage of the best features of both the VMware and Microsoft platforms including full support for
VMware’s VMotion technology and Microsoft’s Live Migration and Quick Migration capability.
In addition, it also provides automated configuration for Windows Server 2008’s Failover Clustering.
VMM also introduces a centralized library to help administrators achieve the same level of control over
their assets with a purely physical environment.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
86
Intelligent Placement
System Center VMM uses a smart, holistic approach to placement called Intelligent Placement, which
differentiates the solution from alternative products. Intelligent Placement works with both Microsoft and
VMware virtualization platforms. When choosing physical hosts for virtual machines, IT administrators
need to pay special attention to small details, such as the processor and memory specifications of host
servers. Additionally, the performance of servers is constantly fluctuating based on usage trends, so IT
administrators need some way of tracking ongoing requirements and historical performance data.
Consequently, placement is one of the most complicated aspects of virtualization. VMM provides
administrators with a toolset to handle this task.
The Intelligent Placement tool in VMM uses data from the Windows Server System to help
administrators achieve specific goals. VMM selects appropriate hosts based on these four factors:

The workload’s resource consumption characteristics

Minimum CPU, disk, RAM, and network capacity requirements

Performance data from virtual machine hosts
An Intelligent Placement report is shown below in Figure 67.
VMM incorporates these considerations into algorithms that IT administrators can fine tune to maximize
resource utilization or balance workloads among hosts. Also, after a virtual machine is deployed, VMM
continues to analyze performance data and resource requirements for both the workload and the host
so that administrators can have an opportunity to further optimize their resources. IT administrators can
add more virtual machines by repeating the same process.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
87
Figure 67. The Intelligent Placement report provides an easy-to-understand “ranking” of host candidates.
Load-Balancing or Resource-Maximization
Administrators use one of two default algorithms to tune the Intelligent Placement results. The loadbalancing algorithm is meant for situations in which the administrator wishes to equally distribute
workloads across a set number of servers. For situations in which the administrator wants to avoid
adding servers, the resource-maximization algorithm helps ensure deployed servers are fully utilized.
Reduce Downtime and Enable Dynamic IT Management with Live Migration
VMM 2008 R2’s Live Migration feature is able to reduce planned downtime and when combined with
the VMM’s PRO feature can lay the foundation for dynamic IT management. You can use Live
Migration to move Hyper-V virtual machines to different Hyper-V host computers with no downtime.
This enables you to perform routine hardware or software maintenance to the physical host. When the
maintenance is completed, you can live-migrate the virtual machines back to the updated host – all with
no downtime for the virtual machines and without any end user downtime or interruption.
Combining Live Migration with VMM PRO enables completely dynamic IT management. For example,
you can use VMM’s PRO feature to specify maximum resource utilization levels for either Hyper-V
hosts or the virtual machines running on those hosts. When the Hyper-V host or virtual machine
exceeds those levels then the PRO feature can automatically implement a PRO Tip that performs a
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
88
virtual machine live migration to an alternate Hyper-V host that has available capacity. This enables
resource utilization level to drop back within the accepted thresholds.
Management of Microsoft and VMware Virtualization Platforms
A key point that sets VMM 2008 apart from other virtualization management solutions is its ability to
manage virtual machines running on both Microsoft virtualization hosts as well as virtual machines
running on VMware hosts. Many organizations have both types of virtualization solutions in place and
VMM 2008 enables you to manage both types of virtual machines while making the most of features
unique to each platform. In Figure 68, you can see how VMM 2008 used with ESX Server’s VMotion
capability to move VMs between hosts with no downtime.
Figure 68. Virtual Machine Manager handles Microsoft and VMware virtual machines
In Figure 68, you can see VMM managing a number of ESX Server VMs. The full range of VMware’s
management features are available, including the ability to start, stop, pause, shut down, and migrate
VMs. For example, you can utilize VMotion by selecting the ESX Server VM that you want to move and
then choosing the Migrate option from the context menu. This will invoke VMM Intelligent Placement
feature shown in Figure 69 to help you select the most suitable host.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
89
Figure 69. Managing Microsoft and VMware virtual machines – Selecting virtual machine hosts
VMM’s Intelligent Placement feature shows all available hosts for the virtual machine ranked according
to their suitability. Both VMware and Microsoft hosts are listed as possible migration targets. Under the
Transfer Type column, the Live option shown next to the ESX Servers indicates that the migration will
take advantage of VMotion to move the VM to that host with no downtime. To initiate a VMotion
migration, select a host with a Live transfer type and follow the wizard.
Seamless Management of Physical and Virtual IT Resources
VMM 2008 is able to work with System Center Operations Manager 2007 (SCOM) to provide seamless
management of all IT system resources, including both physical and virtual servers. The combination of
VMM and SCOM manages the entire IT infrastructure stack from the physical virtualization servers,
through the virtual guest operating systems down to the line-of-business applications running on the
virtual guest operating systems. In addition, the new PRO feature enables dynamic IT management by
allowing you to specify accepted operational conditions as well as create automated tips that enable
your organization to rapidly adjust to changing business conditions.
Centralized Library for Virtual Assets
With VMM, IT administrators not only provision new server resources faster, they also maintain strict
control over virtual assets. Unlike in a physical data center, where administrators seldom lose servers, it
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
90
is easy to lose track of analogous assets in a virtual data center. The VMM library serves as a centrally
managed repository for templates and other building-block resources, as shown in Figure 70. This
service helps keep important virtual assets from being duplicated, misfiled, or even deleted.
Figure 70. The library stores virtual data center assets , including ISO images, scripts, and VHDs
Each asset is tagged with basic metadata, such as hard drive size and operating system version, so
administrators can easily find and organize files. In addition, the library provides 10 free-form metadata
fields, which allow organizations to apply their own resource-management schemes to the library.
Assets stored in the library include:

Software images – IT administrators use these disk images as an alternative to physical media for
software distribution. With these disk images, administrators can distribute software to remote sites using
a WAN instead of dealing with physical media.

Post-deployment customization scripts – After virtual machines are set up, scripts can be deployed to
ensure updated security settings or to take care of other administrator functions.

Physical hardware settings – With common pre-set hardware settings readily available, IT
administrators have control similar to a physical environment.
For geographically dispersed operations, distributed VMM library servers facilitate the quick
transmission of assets to physical host servers at the edge of the organization, enabling rapid creation
and deployment of virtual machines in branch offices. In addition, the provisioning service for VMM
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
91
automatically detects and utilizes existing storage-attached network (SAN) system infrastructure where
available. This capability, coupled with the distributed storage architecture of Virtual Machine Manager,
facilitates the movement of large virtual machine images at top speeds.
Offline Virtual Machines
Administrators can store entire offline virtual machines in the VMM library. These virtual machines may
contain applications or processes only periodically needed and left unused the remainder of the time,
such as applications used for demonstrations. The ability to store and quickly re-provision virtual
machines makes it more likely that users and administrators will take episodic applications offline,
helping to save otherwise wasted resources.
Virtual Machine Templates
VMM empowers administrators with virtual machine templates. These templates essentially represent
standard virtual machine configurations similar to the mini-setup and System Preparation Utility
(Sysprep) commonly used in Windows Server deployments. Templates also encapsulate best practices
regarding hardware and guest operating system configuration, helping IT administrators manage their
virtual infrastructure in the uniformity of the environment.
Windows PowerShell
For even greater automation and control, VMM is fully scriptable using PowerShell. With this tool, IT
administrators can avoid labor-intensive manual processes by running remote scripted services against
many virtual machines. For example, IT administrators can write Windows PowerShell scripts to go with
templates so that the script will update the machine with the latest security patches when those new
virtual machines are provisioned.
Because the VMM console interface is layered on top of the PowerShell objects, every action logs an
audit trail that helps people learn the language. Easy to adopt, learn, and use, the PowerShell
architecture enables IT administrators to construct lightweight integration solutions quickly, linking
System Center with established data center tools and procedures. System Center Operations Manager
and System Center Data Protection Manager also use PowerShell.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
92
Virtual Machine Manager Integration with Windows Server and
System Center
VMM takes advantage of an IT department’s existing Windows Server and System Center expertise,
minimizing the need for extensive retraining of administrators and Help Desk personnel.
Best Choice for Windows
System Center integrates with, and simplifies management of, the Microsoft systems and applications
many organizations already have in place.
Virtual Server 2005 R2 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V
VMM works with Microsoft Virtual Server 2005 R2 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V. Virtual
Server 2005 R2 SP1 is the server virtualization technology engineered for the Windows Server 2003
platform, and runs most major x86 operating systems in a guest environment. Hyper-V is Microsoft’s
new hypervisor-based virtualization platform designed for Windows Server 2008. Hyper-V runs both 32bit x86 and 64-bit x64 guest operating systems and provides support for up to four virtual processors
64GB of RAM per VM.
Volume Shadow Copy
The Physical-to-Virtual (P2V) conversion tool in VMM takes advantage of the Volume Shadow Copy
Service in Windows Server 2003. The Volume Shadow Copy Service can produce consistent shadow
copies by coordinating with business applications, file-system services, backup applications, fastrecovery solutions, and storage hardware.
Active Directory
System Center utilizes the information stored in Active Directory® Domain Services to provide security
enhanced, managed access to virtual machines and physical host servers. Active Directory integration
also helps ensure seamless user experience as people move from virtual infrastructure to applications
traditionally hosted on physical machines.
Failover Clustering
VMM integrates completely with Windows Server 2008 Failover Clustering and is capable of
automatically detecting when a Windows Server 2008 host has Failover Clustering configured. It can
automatically ensure high availability configuration for discovered virtual machines.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
93
Microsoft SQL Server
System Center integrates with familiar tools and technologies like Microsoft SQL Server. System
Center uses a SQL Server 2005 or SQL Server 2008 database—located locally or clustered remotely—
to store performance and configuration data. In addition, reporting in VMM takes advantage of familiar
SQL Server Reporting Services through Operations Manager.
Management of Physical and Virtual Infrastructure
The System Center family of system management products provides a comprehensive management
solution for physical and virtual environments, with data protection, configuration management, and
health monitoring of both physical and virtual machines.
Data Protection and Recovery
System Center Data Protection Manager provides continuous data protection of physical and virtual
machines. Data Protection Manager enables backup and recovery of entire virtual machines on the
host by using efficient block-based replication, which makes it possible to recover entire virtual
machines in the event of disaster.
Change Management
System Center Configuration Manager (formerly Microsoft Systems Management Server) helps
improve IT productivity and efficiency by reducing manual tasks, enabling administrators to focus on
high-value projects, and maximizing hardware and software investments.
Server Health Monitoring
Operations Manager provides a sophisticated solution for unified health monitoring of physical and
virtual machines and an easy-to-use environment that tracks thousands of event and performance
monitors across hundreds of operating systems and applications.
Operations Manager provides an end-to-end service management solution that is the best choice for
Windows Server–based virtual machines. It integrates deeply with Windows Server technologies,
helping IT increase efficiency while enabling greater control of the data center environment.
VMware ESX Server Management
VMM can manage both Microsoft and VMware virtualization platforms. This provides a unified
management experience for both Microsoft and VMware virtual machines. VMM supports the full range
of VMware management capabilities including support for VMotion and Resource Pools.
In addition, all capabilities available to manage Windows virtualization hosts can also be used with
VMware hosts, including Intelligent Placement of virtual machines, library management, and complete
PowerShell scripting. Combining this with other products in the System Center family such as
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
94
Operations Manager and Data Protection Manager provides centralized management for all physical
and virtual servers.
Conclusion
VMM effectively addresses the key pain points in migrating from a physical to a virtual infrastructure
with easy-to-use conversion tools and insight into server and workload performance. Once a virtual
data center is established, VMM empowers administrators an essential set of management tools.
With VMM, IT administrators can increase operational agility, control delegated provisioning, and easily
optimize resource utilization in their virtual data center—all while taking advantage of familiar Windows
Server System™ products and technologies.
The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because
Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee
the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication.
This white paper is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, IN THIS
DOCUMENT.
Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be
reproduced, stored in, or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.
Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in this document. Except as
expressly provided in any written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,
copyrights, or other intellectual property.
© 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious. No
association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred.
Microsoft, Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V, Windows Server 2008 Standard, Enterprise and Data Center, Windows Server® Volume Shadow Copy Service,
Microsoft SQL Server 2005 TM, Active Directory® Domain Services , Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition SP1, Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Standard
Edition SP1 or SP2, Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Enterprise Edition SP1 or SP2, Microsoft SQL Server 2008, Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Standard Edition,
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Enterprise Edition, Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager, and Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager are
trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies.
All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.
Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 Reviewer’s Guide
95
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement