STK Start Training Manual

STK Start Training Manual
STK Level 1 and Level 2 Training Manual
Version 11.2, March 2017
© 2017 Analytical Graphics Inc. All Rights Reserved
Table of Contents
STK Level 1 and Level 2 Training Manual
1
Table of Contents
1
Level 1 - Beginner Training
4
Evaluation License
4
Part 1: Model Complex Systems
5
Lesson 1.1: STK Scenarios
5
Create a New Scenario
6
Part 2: Insert STK Objects
8
Lesson 2.1: Insert STK Objects
8
Insert and Configure Objects
9
Part 3: Object Properties
16
Lesson 3.1: Object Properties
16
Modify Object Properties
17
Part 4: Compute Access
20
Compute Access
20
Compute Access for a sensor on a Ground Site
Part 5: Report & Graphs
21
23
Lesson 5.1: Using the Report & Graph Manager
23
Reports and Graphs
24
Part 6: Extend STK Capabilities
26
Connect and the STK Object Model
26
Use Examples to Familiarize Yourself with Automating STK
Part 7: Share Your Work
26
27
Lesson 7.1: The Movie Timeline
27
Use the Movie Timeline Wizard to Define the Output
CZML Exporter
28
29
Enable the CZML Exporter and Export the Scenario
Save STK Scenarios
30
30
Save the Scenario as a VDF
31
Become Level 1: STK Certified
32
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What's in the Test?
32
STK Level 2 - Advanced
32
Evaluation License
32
Part 8: Add Fidelity with STK Pro
34
Analytical and Visual Terrain
34
Add Terrain and Imagery to Determine its Impact on Line of Sight Visibility
Chain Objects
35
39
Create a Multi-hop Link
40
Part 9: Create an AzEl Mask from Images
AzEl Mask Tool
41
41
Create a Sensor AzEl Mask
42
Part 10: Customize Analysis with Analysis Workbench
Vector Geometry Tool
47
47
Create a Targeted Vector from a Fixed Location to a Vehicle
Calculation Tool
48
50
Create a New Condition for when the Angle between the moving vehicle and a fixed location
Time Tool
51
52
Create a Custom Interval Set that defines Tracking Opportunities
Part 11: Compute Coverage Over Regions
STK Coverage
54
56
56
Define Coverage and Compute Accesses from the Assets to the Grid
Coverage Quality
57
58
Measure the Quality of Coverage
60
Part 12: Build a Volumetric Object
64
Volumetrics
64
Build an Area of Operations
65
Create Components for the Volumetric Object.
67
Part 13: Perform Trade Studies with Analyzer
STK Analyzer
71
71
Perform a Trade Study
72
Part 14: Evaluate Communication Links
STK Communications
75
75
Model Communication Equipment and Calculate Link Budget
Part 15: Analyze Radar Systems
76
81
STK Radar
81
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Model a Radar and Measure The Quality
82
Create a Radar site that has three separate faces, each scanning a 120 degree azimuth and an
elevation of two (2) degrees to 89 degrees.
84
Track the International Space Station.
86
Part 16: Integrating STK with Matlab
87
Integrating STK and MATLAB
87
Create a New Instance of STK from Inside MATLAB
88
Create a New STK Scenario from Inside MATLAB
89
Insert and Configure Objects
89
Compute Access Between Objects
90
Retrieve Satellite Altitude During Access
90
Part 17: Model Aircraft Missions with Aviator
Lesson 17.1: Aviator
91
91
Create a New Aviator Scenario, Model a Runway, Location to Fly Over, and an Aircraft with the
Aviator Propagator
Part 18: Design Trajectories with Astrogator
Astrogator
92
98
98
Model a Spacecraft Object Using STK Astrogator
Target Sequences
99
101
Use a Target Sequence to Raise Your Orbit
102
Use a Target Sequence to Raise the Altitude at Periapsis
104
Become Level 2: STK Master Certified
107
What's in the Test?
107
Page 3 of 107
Level 1 - Beginner Training
STK Level 1 - Beginner training is designed to familiarize first-time users with STK workflow and provide a basic
understanding of STK software capabilities. This training is designed to allow you to model and incorporate your
own systems and missions throughout the lessons.
Evaluation License
This training requires a free permanent license to complete. You can obtain the necessary license for the training
by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
The Level 1 - Beginner training is a series of tutorials designed to get the user started using STK.
Tutorial
Description
License Required
Create a Scenario
Learn how to create a scenario in STK
STK (Free)
Insert STK Objects
Learn how to add STK objects to a scenario.
STK (Free)
Modify STK Objects
Learn how to modify STK objects in a scenario.
STK (Free)
Compute Access
Learn how to compute access between objects.
STK (Free)
Create Reports & Graphs
Learn how to generate reports and graphs in STK.
STK (Free)
Send Connect Commands
Learn how to send Connect Commands in STK.
STK (Free)
Make a Movie
Learn how to make a movie in STK.
STK (Free)
Once you have completed these tutorials, you will be ready to take the free level 1 STK Certification test! Visit
www.agi.com/training/
Note: For the STK 10 version of this training, visit
http://help.agi.com/StartTraining/StartTraining1013.htm
Page 4 of 107
Part 1: Model Complex Systems
Lesson 1.1: STK Scenarios
When STK launches, the Welcome dialog will appear. Using the options available here, you can create new
scenarios, open existing scenarios, access the STK Help System, or exit the STK application.
Note: This training focuses on the latest capabilities available with STK. You can learn more about
STK and download the software on our website (http:www.agi.com/products/engineering-tools).
Page 5 of 107
Task: Create a New Scenario
1. Create a new scenario.
a. Launch STK (
).
b. Create a Scenario (
).
c. In the New Scenario Wizard set the following options:
a. Name the scenario ("STK_Fundamentals").
b. Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the defaults.
2. Customize the STK Workspace.
a. Close the Insert STK Objects Tool. We will explore this later.
b. Close the Timeline View by clicking the (
Timeline View.
c. Maximize (
) in the upper-right corner of the
) the 3D Graphics window.
Note: STK organizes the integrated windows with
tabs at the bottom of the integrated workspace.
d. Extend the Window menu and select Tile Vertically to center the windows
in the workspace.
3. Save the scenario.
a. Extend the File menu and select Save (
) to save the scenario.
a. STK automatically creates a directory with the same name as
your scenario.
4. Explore the 2D Graphics window:
a. Use the mouse controls to zoom and pan around the 2D Graphics
windows.
a. To pan, hold the left mouse button and drag the mouse around
the 2D Graphics window.
b. To zoom in and out, use the mouse scroll wheel or the zoom
icons ( , ).
5. Explore the 3D Graphics window:
i. To rotate the globe, hold down the left mouse button and move the
mouse around.
ii. To zoom, hold the right mouse button and move the mouse up and
down (or use the mouse scroll wheel).
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iii. To zoom in on an area, click the Zoom In (
around the area of interest.
) button and drag a box
iv. To pan around, enable the Grab Globe (
) mode and hold the
Shift key and left mouse down and move the mouse around.
v. Use the Home View (
) button to return to the default Earth view.
Mouse controls for 3D.
6. Animate through the scenario
a. Use the Animation Controls to play through the scenario.
a. Play (
) or Step Forward (
b. Pause (
c. Increase (
d. Reset (
) or Step Backward (
).
) the action.
) or Decrease (
) the speed of the animation.
) the action.
b. Use the slider bar in the Timeline View to scroll through the scenario time
period.
If you get lost in the 3D Graphics window, click the Home View (
orients the 3D Graphics camera back on the default Earth View.
If you get lost in the animation period, click the Reset (
animation and resets it to the animation start time.
) button. The Home View re-
) button. The Reset button stops the
We have provided a quick reference guide for the basic toolbars in STK. You can find it here:
<STK install folder>\stktraining\pdf\ToolbarQuickReferenceGuide.pdf.
Page 7 of 107
Part 2: Insert STK Objects
Lesson 2.1: Insert STK Objects
STK Objects provide a generic template for modeling land (
), sea (
on the ground (
,
), sensors (
). The Insert STK Objects tool (
the left and one of the corresponding insert methods on the right.
Page 8 of 107
), air (
), and space vehicles (
), sites
) allows you to select any STK Object on
Task: Insert and Configure Objects
1. Model at least one ground site (any type:
,
,
).
a. From the Insert STK Objects tool ( ), select Place (
the available methods (examples below).
) and choose one of
a. From City Database
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Place (
).
ii. Select From City Database from the Select A Method list.
iii. Click Insert... to bring up the City Database.
iv. In the City Name text field, enter a city name (e.g.
Bloomington).
v. Click Search. The matching cities will be shown in the results
list.
vi. Select the result corresponding to the desired Province (e.g.
Minnesota) from the list.
vii. Click Insert.
viii. Click Close to close the City Database window.
b. Search by Address (requires Internet (
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
))
), select Place (
).
ii. Select Search by Address from the Select A Method list.
iii. Click Insert... to bring up the Insert by Address search tool.
iv. In the search text field, enter an address (e.g. 1600
Pennsylvania Ave).
v. Click Search. The matching addresses will be shown in the
results list.
vi. Select the corresponding Result (e.g. White House) from the
list.
vii. Select the desired Color in the lower-left (e.g. White).
viii. Click Insert.
ix. Click Close to close the Insert by Address window.
b. From the Insert STK Objects tool ( ), select Facility (
of the available methods (examples below).
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) and choose one
a. Insert Default
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Facility (
).
ii. Select Insert Default as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert....
iv. Right-click the facility (
Rename (e.g. AGI_HQ).
) in the Object Browser, and select
b. From Standard Object Database
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Facility (
).
ii. Select From Standard Object Database as the Select A
Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring up the Facility Database.
iv. In the Name text field, enter a Site Name (e.g. Guam 2).
Note: You may see duplicate results. Scroll to the
right to see the Source. If an internet connection
exists, results will display from both AGI's
Standard Object Database (requires internet) and
the Local Database. If no internet connection
exists, STK will only search the local database.
v. Click Search. The matching facilities are displayed in the
Results list.
vi. Select the corresponding result (e.g. Guam 2 GU2 Leolut)
from the list.
vii. Click Insert.
viii. Click Close to close the Facility Database window.
c. From the Insert STK Objects tool ( ), select Target (
of the available methods (example below).
) and choose one
a. Insert Default
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Target (
).
ii. Select Insert Default as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert...
Note: The default target object is located at zero
(0) degrees latitude and zero (0) degrees
longitude.
2. Center your 3D view on a ground site (
Page 10 of 107
,
,
).
a. In the STK Object Browser, right-click on a ground site (
select Zoom To.
b. Use the Home View (
,
,
) and
) button to reset the 3D view.
3. Model at least one moving vehicle (any type:
,
,
).
a. From the Insert STK Objects tool ( ), select Satellite (
of the available methods (examples below).
) and choose one
a. Search From Standard Object Database
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
).
), select Satellite (
ii. Select the From Standard Object Database as the
Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Standard Object Database
to the front.
iv. In the Name or ID text field, enter a Satellite Name or
ID (e.g. Geoeye).
v. Click Search. The matching satellite are shown in the
Results field.
Note: You may see duplicate results. Scroll
to the right to see the Source. If an internet
connection exists, results will display from
both AGI's Standard Object Database
(requires internet) and the Local Database.
If is no internet connection exists, STK will
only search the local database.
Click on the Advanced... button for more
Insert options. Here you can choose the
analysis time period, the propagation step
size and TLE source.
vi. Select the corresponding result (e.g. Official
Name=GeoEye 1) from the list.
vii. Click Insert.
viii. Click Close to close the Satellite Database window.
ix. Local
b. Design an Orbit with the Orbit Wizard.
Page 11 of 107
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Satellite (
).
ii. Select Orbit Wizard as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Orbit Wizard to the front.
iv. Select an orbit Type (e.g. Circular).
v. Set the Satellite Name (e.g. CircularSat).
vi. Enter the desired parameters in the Definition area (e.g.
RAAN 160 deg).
vii. Click OK to insert the satellite into the scenario and close the
Orbit Wizard window.
c. Insert a satellite from an Archived Database.
i. Obtain an Archived Satellite Database.
i. Open the Scenario's (
) properties (
).
ii. Select the Basic - Database page.
iii. Click the Update Database Files... button.
iv. Select the Obtain Archived Database option.
v. Specify the Archive Date by entering it in the text field
or using the drop-down menu.
vi. Click the Update button. If an archive is not available
for the specified date, the archive for the next newest
data is used instead.
ii. Insert a Satellite from an Archived Satellite Database.
i. From the Insert STK Objects menu, select the Satellite
object on the left.
ii. Select the From TLE File method.
iii. Click the Insert... button.
iv. Click Open.
v. Click the Modify... button.
vi. Disable the On propagation, automatically retrieve
elements option.
vii. Click OK.
viii. Use the Common Name and SSC Number fields to
search through the archived database.
b. Model an Aircraft (
) using one of the options below.
Page 12 of 107
a. Typing in Waypoints
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Aircraft (
).
ii. Select Define Properties as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Properties Browser to the front.
iv. Click Insert Point twice to add two waypoints manually.
v. Enter values for the second waypoint (e.g. Lat = 10 deg, Lon
= 10 deg).
vi. Click OK to dismiss the Properties Browser.
b. Clicking the Waypoints in the 2D Graphics window.
c. Clicking the Waypoints in the 3D Graphics window.
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Aircraft (
).
ii. Select Define Properties as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Properties Browser to the front.
iv. Close the Properties Browser.
v. Bring the 3D Graphics window to the front.
vi. Select the new aircraft in the 3D Object Editing toolbar (
)
vii. Click the Object Edit Start (
editor.
) button to start the object
viii. Add, modify, or remove waypoints directly in the 3D Graphics
window:
ix. If you want to start over, click the Cancel (
start editing again.
) button, then
x. When you finish, click the Object Edit Accept (
c. Model a Missile (
) using one of the options below.
Page 13 of 107
) button.
a. Typing in the Launch and Impact locations.
b. Clicking the Launch and Impact Locations in the 2D Graphics
window.
i. Zoom In and Pan the 2D Graphics window so the desired
launch and impact points are in view.
l
You cannot Pan in the 2D Graphics window while the
Properties Browser is open. Every click is considered a
lunch or impact point.
ii. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Missile (
).
iii. Select Define Properties as the Select A Method option.
iv. Click Insert... to bring the Properties Browser to the front.
v. Click in the 2D map to edit the launch location.
vi. Click OK to dismiss the warning box that explains the delta V
changed.
vii. Click in the 2D map to edit the impact location.
viii. Click OK to dismiss the Properties Browser.
4. Center your 3D view on an STK Vehicle.
a. In the STK Object Browser, right-click on a vehicle (
Zoom To.
b. Click Reset (
,
,
) and select
) to reset the animation time.
c. To slow down the animation, click the Decrease Time Step (
) button.
Note: The current time step is in the lower-right corner of the
STK GUI.
d. Click Play (
) to watch the vehicle move along its path.
e. Use the Home View (
) button to reset the 3D view to center the Earth.
5. Add an interval to your Timeline View for an STK vehicle (
,
,
).
a. If your Timeline View is not open, extend the STK View menu and select
Timeline View.
b. In the Timeline View toolbar, select Add Time Components (
).
c. Select the STK vehicle object on the left (e.g. ISS).
d. Select any time interval on the right (e.g. EphemerisTimeSpan) and click OK.
e. Right-click on the new interval in the Timeline View and select Center.
Page 14 of 107
f. Use the gray slider bar (
) to scroll through the time intervals.
g. Right-click on the Scenario availability interval (top row) and select Center.
h. Close the Timeline View to de-clutter screen.
6. Model a Sensor (
) on at least one ground site and each moving object.
a. Insert a Sensor (
) on a ground site (any type:
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
,
,
), select Sensor (
).
).
ii. Select Insert Default as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Select Object window to the front.
iv. Select a ground site (any type:
window (e.g. Bloomington).
,
,
) in the Select Object
v. Click OK.
b. Insert a Sensor (
) on a vehicle (any type:
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
,
,
).
), select Sensor (
).
ii. Select Insert Default as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Properties Browser to the front.
iv. Select a vehicle (any type:
(e.g. CircularSat).
,
,
) in the Select Object window
v. Click OK.
Did You Know? You can import a KML file and use it as an STK Object. Open the Globe Manager (
) and select the KML tab. You can import your own KML here or browse to <STK install
folder>/Help/stktraining/KML/MtStHelens.kmz.
AGI Techs Say: When you insert a satellite from the Standard Object Database, the database uses
the most current TLE data available. If you're working in an offline environment, you can download
all current and archived satellite databases on AGI's website at
http://www.agi.com/resources/satdb/satdbpc.aspx.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 15 of 107
Part 3: Object Properties
Lesson 3.1: Object Properties
Customizing properties creates a meaningful environment for the objects in the scenario. The properties used to
define STK objects and visualization windows are organized in the Properties Browser (
object has its own set of properties, which are organized into four main categories.
). Each type of STK
Case Study
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics is using STK to provide a Test and Evaluation
(T&E) integrated solution for the F-35 Lightning II Program, utilizing the
STKExternal Propagator. You can find out more about the F-35 Lightning II
Program on our website.
1. Basic properties define the foundation for the type of object selected.
2. 2D Graphics modify the general elements of an object's display in the visualization windows, such as color,
line style, and markers.
3. 3D Graphics modify the three-dimensional elements of an object's display, such as the 3D model - AGI
(*.mdl) or COLLADA models, dynamic data displays, etc.
4. Constraints define conditions that must be met before links become available (geometry, visibility, lighting,
timing, RF signal strength).
Did You Know? STK allows a user to import data to define a vehicle route, orbit, or trajectory. You
can accomplish this through the use of an external ephemeris (*.e) file, which is an ASCII text file
formatted for compatibility with STK that includes time, position, and velocity information.
Ephemeris data that is properly formatted can be imported into STK using the STKExternal
Propagator
Page 16 of 107
Task: Modify Object Properties
1. Change the properties of a vehicle (any type:
,
,
).
a. In the STK Object Browser, right-click on a vehicle (any type:
and select Properties (
,
,
)
).
b. Change the vehicle's orbit/route/trajectory:
a. Satellite
i. Select the Basic - Orbit page.
ii. Change the desired inputs.
iii. Click Apply to apply the changes and keep the
Properties Browser open.
b. Aircraft
i. Select the Basic - Route page.
ii. Change the desired inputs.
iii. Click Apply to apply the changes and keep the
Properties Browser open.
c. Missile
i. Select the Basic - Trajectory page.
ii. Change the desired inputs.
iii. Click Apply to apply the changes and keep the
Properties Browser open.
c. Change the attitude of the vehicle.
a. Satellite
i. Select the Basic - Attitude page.
ii. Change the desired Type (e.g. ECF velocity alignment
with radial constraint).
iii. Click Apply to change the properties and keep the
Properties Browser open.
b. Aircraft
i. Select the Basic - Attitude page.
ii. Change the desired Type (e.g. Coordinated Turn).
iii. Click Apply to change the properties and keep the
Properties Browser open.
c. Missile
Page 17 of 107
i. Select the Basic - Attitude page.
ii. Change the desired Type (e.g. ECF velocity alignment
with radial constraint).
iii. Click Apply to change the properties and keep the
Properties Browser open.
d. Change the vehicle's color:
i. Select the 2D Graphics - Attributes page.
ii. Select the desired Color in the drop-down list.
iii. Increase the Line Width thickness.
iv. Click Apply to accept the changes and keep the Properties Browser
open.
e. Change the vehicle's 3D Model.
i. Select the 3D Graphics - Model page.
ii. Click the ellipse (
) button beside the Model File option.
iii. Browse to the desired 3D model and click Open.
iv. Click Apply to accept the changes and keep the Properties Browser
open.
f. Add vectors to the vehicle
i. Select the 3D Graphics - Vector page.
ii. Enable the Show option on the desired vectors (e.g. Sun Vector,
Moon Vector, SunMoon Angle, Body Axes).
iii. Click Apply to accept the changes and keep the Properties Browser
open.
iv. Right-click on the object and select Zoom To.
g. Add a Data Display for the vehicle
i. Select the 3D Graphics - Data Display page.
ii. Enable the Show option on a dynamic data display (e.g. Classical
Orbital Elements).
iii. Click OK to accept the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
2. Modify at least one ground site’s sensor (
) Properties.
a. In the STK Object Browser, right-click on the ground site's sensor (
select Properties.
b. Change the sensor's field-of-view.
Page 18 of 107
) and
i. Select the Basic - Definition page.
ii. Enter the desired Angle value in the textbox (e.g. 90 deg Cone Half
Angle).
iii. Click Apply to accept the changes and keep the Properties Browser
open.
c. Change the sensor's range constraint .
i. Select the Constraints - Basic page.
ii. Enable the Max Range option and enter the desired range
constraint value in the textbox (e.g. 1000 km).
iii. Click OK to apply changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
AGI Techs Say: You can double-click on an object in the Object Browser to open its properties. If
you want to have the properties page for two objects open, right-click on the second object in the
Object Browser while the properties for the first are still open, and select Properties from the menu
that appears.
Page 19 of 107
Part 4: Compute Access
Compute Access
Calculating object-to-object visibility in STK is called Access (
). An access is defined FROM one object TO
another object. STK calculates the times that an object can access, or "see," another object based on their
properties and constraints.
Note: The Access tool provides quick links to reports, graphs, and Timeline View.
Page 20 of 107
Task: Compute Access for a sensor on a Ground Site
1. Compute Access from a ground site's sensor to a vehicle (any type:
a. Click the Access tool icon (
Access.
,
,
).
) or extend the Analysis menu and select
b. On the Access page, click the Select Object... button and select the sensor
(
) on the ground site as the Access For object (From).
c. Select a vehicle object (
,
,
) as the To object.
d. Click the Compute button.
2. Generate an Access (
) report.
a. In the Reports section, click Access...
b. Click the Save as Quick Report (
Report.
) button to save the report as a Quick
i. Click the down arrow on the Quick Report Manager (
see the report has been added to the list.
) to
c. In the report, right-click on an Access Start Time and extend the Start Time
menu to select the Set Animation Time option.
Note: If your report says "No Access Found," modify the
vehicle's properties so that the vehicle flies through the sensor
field-of-view.
d. Bring the 3D Graphics window to the front and look for the access lines
between the objects.
e. Click the Access tab at the bottom of the Integrated Workspace to bring the
Access Tool to the front.
f. In the Reports section, click the AER.. . button to create an AER report.
3. Create a New Stored View (
a. Click the Stored Views (
).
) button on the 3D Graphics toolbar.
b. Click the New button to create a new Stored view.
c. Double-click on the View Name "view0" and rename it (e.g. AccessView).
d. Click OK.
4. Add Access Intervals (
) to the Timeline View.
a. If your Timeline View is not open, extend the STK View menu and select
Timeline View.
Page 21 of 107
b. In the Timeline View toolbar, select Add Time Components (
c. Select the access (
).
) object on the left.
d. Select AccessIntervals in the Components for section on the right.
e. Click OK to add the Access Intervals to the Timeline View and dismiss the
Add Time Components tool.
5. Animate (
) the scenario and watch the acces Intervals start and end.
6. Decrease the Max Range constraint and observe the effects of the constraint.
a. In the STK Object Browser, right-click on the ground site’s sensor (
select Properties.
) and
b. Select the Constraints - Basic page.
c. Enter the desired Max range constraint value in the textbox (e.g. 500 km).
d. Click OK to apply changes and dismiss the Properties Broswer.
e. Refresh (
) the AER report to see the effects of the updated constraint.
f. Notice any changes to the report and Timeline View after the constraint
was applied.
g. Close the Timeline view.
Note: You can generate commonly used Access-specific reports directly from the Access tool
without opening the Report & Graph Manager.
Did You Know? Light time delay and the directionality of the signal transmission are considered
when computing the times one object can access another object. Moreover, the effects of refraction
will be considered for objects specifying its use in access in their refraction settings.
Note: If any of the access objects are changed, the access is automatically computed. But if you
have an access report or graph open, it is not automatically regenerated. You will need to do that
manually.
Page 22 of 107
Part 5: Report & Graphs
Lesson 5.1: Using the Report & Graph Manager
Each STK Object (including Access) has hundreds of associated data providers that STK automatically computes.
The Report & Graph Manager allows a user to quickly generate reports and graphs from a list of commonly used
data providers, called "Installed Styles."
AGI Techs Say: The Quick Report Manager is available from the Analysis menu and an object's
right-click menu.
After generating the reports and graphs, there are a variety of toolbar icons that allow a user to manage their data
(change units, set animation times, save quick reports, save as txt or a *.csv, etc).
Did You Know? You can create your own customized reports and/or graphs inside the Report &
Graph Manager.
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Task: Reports and Graphs
1. Click the Report & Graph Manager (
select Report & Graph Manager.
) icon or extend the Analysis menu and
a. Create an LLA Position report for one of your vehicles.
i. Select the desired Object Type (e.g. Satellite, Aircraft, Missile, etc).
ii. Select at least one object for the report that will be generated.
Note: Use the Ctrl key to select multiple objects for the
report or graph that will be generated.
iii. Disable the Show Graphs option located in the Styles section. Since
you are only interested in the reports you can hide the graphs from
the list.
iv. Expand the Installed Styles list and select LLA Position.
v. Click Generate... to display a report for time, latitude, longitude,
and altitude
vi. In the report, click the Save as quick report icon (
).
vii. Close the report.
b. Create an LLA Position graph for one of your vehicles.
i. Select the desired Object Type (e.g. Satellite, Aircraft, Missile, etc).
ii. Select at least one object for the report that will be generated.
Note: Use the Ctrl key to select multiple objects for the
report or graph that will be generated.
iii. Disable the Show Reports option located in the Styles section. Since
you are only interested in the graphs you can hide the reports from
the list.
iv. Expand the Installed Styles list and select LLA Position.
v. Click Generate... to display a report for time, latitude, longitude,
and altitude
vi. In the graph, click the Save as quick report icon (
).
vii. Close the report
c. Create and format a custom report.
i. Select the desired Object Type (e.g. Satellite, Aircraft,
Missile, etc).
ii. Select the Scenario Styles folder and click the Create new
report style icon ( )
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iii. Rename the new report Custom Report and hit Enter on the
keyboard to bring up the Report Style properties.
iv. Replace the asterisk, which means show all, with a partial
data provider name (e.g. Cartesian) and click Filter.
v. Expand ( ) the data provider group (e.g. Cartesian Position).
vi. If applicable, expand ( ) the desired coordinate system (e.g.
Fixed).
vii. Hold the Ctrl key and select the data providers in the list (e.g.
Time, x,y,z).
viii. Click the right arrow to copy the selected items to the Report
Contents list.
ix. Click OK to save the custom report style.
x. Select the new report style (Custom Report) and click
Generate.
ii. Change the units of the report.
i. Click the Reports Unit (
) icon on the reports toolbar or
right-click anywhere in the report and select Report Units...
ii. Select the Dimension you want to change on the left.
iii. Select the New Unit Value on the right.
iv. Click OK to update the report with the new units.
iii. Click the Save as Quick Report (
Quick Report.
iv. Click the Save as .csv (
Microsoft Excel.
) button to save the report as a
) button to save the report for use in
Did You Know? The "[scenario name] Styles" directory is different than the "My Styles" directory in
the Report and Graph Manager. Reports and graphs in the "My Styles" directory are available for
all scenarios the user creates and loads. Those in the scenario styles directory are only available for
that current scenario.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
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Part 6: Extend STK Capabilities
Connect and the STK Object Model
The STK Programming Interface offers a wide variety of options to automate and customize STK and to integrate
its technology into custom applications. The Connect module is a library of string commands for STK that are easy
to read, understand, and build.
Did You Know? You can use the commands in the Connect library to easily build applications that
communicate with STK.
Task: Use Examples to Familiarize Yourself with Automating STK
1. Launch the API Demo Utility.
a. Click the HTML Viewer tool icon (
HTML Viewer.
b. Click Browse (
) or extend the View menu and select
).
c. Click the Example HTML Utilities option on the left.
d. Browse to STK Automation -> API Demo -> APIDemoUtility.htm.
e. Select the API Demo Utility.htm and click Open.
2. Use the examples to familiarize yourself with Connect.
a. Use the examples to familiarize yourself with the STK API:
b. Select Connect/Object Model in the API Demo Utility.
c. Click on an Example on the left side of the API Demo Utility.
d. Click Run Code to execute the command.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
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Part 7: Share Your Work
Lesson 7.1: The Movie Timeline
Moving pictures can depict complex concepts and relationships that would be harder to understand using only
data. The Movie Timeline tool provides features and functions commonly used for movie making.
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Task: Use the Movie Timeline Wizard to Define the Output
1. Launch the Movie Wizard.
a. Extend the View menu, select Toolbars, and click Movie Timeline to add
the Movie Timeline toolbar.
b. Click the Record (
) button to launch the Movie Wizard.
2. Use the Movie Wizard to record your movie.
a. Choose the Filename & Format.
i. Select the format (e.g. Windows Media (*.WMV)).
ii. Click Save as... and save the video in the preferred directory (e.g.
MyVideo).
iii. Click Next>>.
b. Choose the Window to record.
i. Select the Window you want to record (e.g. 1 - 3D Graphics 1 Earth).
ii. Click Next >>.
c. Set the Resolution
i. Restore your 3D Graphics window (make sure it is not maximized).
ii. Select the desired resolution Preset (e.g. HDTV - 720p).
iii. Click Next >>.
d. Choose the Camera view
e. Define the movie Time & Length
i. Set the desired Start time.
ii. Set the End time (e.g. ten (10) minutes after the start time).
iii. Set the Movie playback length (e.g. five (5) sec).
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Notice how this changes the Step size / playback speed.
iv. Click the Preview Speed button to preview how the movie will look.
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Alter the Movie playback length and/or Step size until satisfied.
v. Click Next >>.
f. Define the movie Size & Quality
i. Select the Render quality (e.g. 3 X 3 - Good quality for Anti-aliasing).
ii. Click Next >>.
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g. Click the Begin Record button to record the movie.
h. When the recording is finished, click Yes on the Movie Timeline pop up to
play the recorded movie.
CZML Exporter
This plugin enables you to export supported STK objects and graphics from an STK scenario to Cesium. Supported
objects include 3D models, access lines, covariance ellipsoids, etc. You can find out more about the supported
objects you can import and even those you can't from our help page
(http://help.agi.com/stk/index.htm#czmlExport.htm)..
Did You Know? This requires STK 11.0.1 or later and the CZML Exporter UI Plugin.
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Task: Enable the CZML Exporter and Export the Scenario
1. Launch the CZML Exporter.
a. Extend the View menu.
b. Extend the Toolbars menu.
c. Click CZML Exporter to add it to the toolbar.
Note: If this option is not available, please download the CZML
Exporter https://www.agi.com/productexplorer/default.aspx#productid=12--catid=0--capid=0-typeid=3--modeling=0".
d. In the Cesium panel, specify the model server.
Note: AGI has already converted all of the default STK models
to gltf, which are hosted on assets.agi.com. If you would like to
convert a custom model, or set up a local model server, please
contact AGI support at [email protected]
2. Export CZML.
a. Select Export CZML.
b. Save to a file location on your machine.
c. Click OK on the Success message.
3. Navigate to the webpage.
a. In a web browser, navigate to Cesiumjs.org.
b. Click the Demos page.
c. Open the Cesium Viewer.
4. Load the saved scenario to the webpage.
a. Locate the saved CZML file.
b. Drag and drop the saved CZML file on to the Cesium Viewer.
5. Use the animation controls and timeline view to change the time.
6. Zoom to a specific object by double-click on the object.
Save STK Scenarios
STK users have the ability to save their work on their local machine or upload it to a web server-based STK Data
Federate. Associated files for each object and any analysis are generated during the creation process and are
saved in a user-specified location. The files can be packaged as Visual Data Files (VDF) that can be opened in STK
for additional modeling and analysis or presented with STK Viewer.
Did You Know? The catalog of facilities, satellite, and aircraft provided in the Standard Object
Database (SOD) are hosted on the SDF.
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Task: Save the Scenario as a VDF
1. Extend the File menu and select the VDF Setup tool.
2. Enable the Exclude Install Files option.
3. Click the Create VDF button.
AGI Techs Say: Check out AGI's Best Practices for Authoring a VDF to get the most out of your VDF.
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Become Level 1: STK Certified
Now that you have completed Fundamentals training, you are well-prepared to complete the STK Level 1: STK
Certification test. The STK Certification is the first level of certification and validates your ability to perform
fundamental skills needed to be productive with STK (free version).
What's in the Test?
The STK Certification test consists of one exercise scenario and you have 14 days from registration date to
complete Certification. The following objectives are tested:
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Model Your Systems - KML, Aircraft, Satellite, Sensor, Constraints
Analyze Your Systems - Access Tool, Report & Graph Manager, Quick Reports
Visualize Your Data - 3D Models, Stored Views, Timeline View
Extend STK - Connect and Object Model
Share Your Work - VDF, STK Data Federate, Movies, Snapshots
Once you earn your STK Certification, you will receive a Level 1: STK Certified gift. Register now on our on our
website (http://www.agi.com/training/#cert).
STK Level 2 - Advanced
STK Level 2 - Advanced training builds off of STK Level 1 - Beginner. You will take simulations from STK
Fundamentals a step further with advanced analysis tools to quantify and measure mission effectiveness.
Evaluation License
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain the
necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
The Level 2 - Advanced Training is a series of tutorials designed to take a user through the STK add-on modules.
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Tutorial
License Required
Add Fidelity with STK Pro Learn how to add terrain and imagery to the scenario.
STK Pro
Customize Analysis with Analysis Workbench Learn how to use Analysis
Workbench to build custom geometric, temporal, and logical operations through
STK.
Pro, AWB
Create an AzEl Mask from Images Learn how to display the sensor obscuration
from a mask file.
Pro
Compute Coverage Over Regions Learn how to analyze global and regional
coverage provided by various assets.
Pro, Cov
Build a Volumetric Object Learn how to build a volumetric object.
Pro, AWB
Perform Trade Studies with Analyzer Learn how to use Analyzer to automate STK
trade studies and parametric analyses.
Pro, Analyzer
Evaluate Communication Links Learn how to define and analyze detailed
communication systems.
Pro, Comm
Analyze Radar Systems Learn how to build radar system models to simulate and
analyze system performance.
Pro, Radar
Integrating STK with Matlab Learn how to control STK through an external
application like Matlab.
Integration
Model Aircraft Missions with Aviator Learn how to model a sequence of curves
parameterized by well known performance characteristics of aircraft.
Pro, Aviator (AMM)
Design Trajectories with Astrogator Learn how to use Astrogator to place a
satellite in orbit.
Pro, Astrogator
Once you have completed these tutorials, you will be ready to take the level 2 STK Master Certification test! Visit
www.agi.com/training/ (free for U.S. and Canada).
Note: For the STK 10 version of this training, visit
http://help.agi.com/StartTraining/StartTraining1013.htm
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Part 8: Add Fidelity with STK Pro
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
STK Pro introduces more sophisticated modeling through advanced access constraints, flexible sensor shapes,
complex visibility links, more object tracks, and digital terrain data. STK Pro allows users to:
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Constrain model behavior based on motion and geographic limitations including analytical and visual
terrain.
Define advanced sensor fields-of-view and fields-of-regard using custom geometry and pointing.
Build system networks using defined groups or sequential, multi-link relationships called "chains".
Analytical and Visual Terrain
AGI works with several sources of terrain data. When used with STK, terrain exploits sophisticated multidimensional interpolation algorithms to provide accurate 360 degree azimuth-elevation masks for access
calculations from any point on the Earth's surface. These algorithms also provide altitude information for userdefined facilities, places, and targets. Terrain, when used visually, allows a vivid 3D visual depiction of the Earth's
true surface relief and its effect on accesses and visibility. Terrain, when used for analysis, includes terrain elevation
data in the computation of an azimuth-elevation mask; the position of a facility, place or target; altitude reference
for an aircraft, facility, place, ship, or target; height above ground for a facility, place or target; boundary wall for an
area target or line target.
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Task: Add Terrain and Imagery to Determine its Impact on Line of Sight Visibility
1. Add Terrain and Imagery.
a. Create a new scenario with the default time period.
i. Click create a Scenario (
).
ii. In the New Scenario Wizard set the following options:
a. Name the scenario (e.g. "STK_Pro").
b. Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the
defaults.
b. Add analytical terrain to the scenario and disable Terrain Server.
i. Right-click on the scenario (
) and open the Properties (
).
ii. Select the Basic - Terrain page.
iii. Disable the Use terrain server for analysis option.
iv. Click the Add button and browse to the terrain data file (e.g.
hoquiam-e.dem).
a. The example file is located at C:\Program Files
(x86)\AGI\STK
11\CodeSamples\SharedResources\Scenarios\Events
Note: Before adding terrain to the scenario, you will
need to browse to C: \Program Files\AGI\STK
11\Code Samples and unzip the CodeSamples.zip
file. You need to have write permissions to build the
code samples, so you may need to move the
CodeSamples.zip to an area where you have write
permissions (e.g. Desktop).
v. Click OK to apply changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
c. Convert the terrain data file to a terrain inlay file (*.pdtt).
i. Click the Utilities menu and select Imagery and Terrain
Coverter...
ii. Select the Terrain Region page.
iii. Select the Terrain Source previously loaded in the scenario from the
drop-down list (e.g. hoquiam-e.dem).
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iv. Click the ellipsis ( ) button to select the Output Data Directory (e.g.
current scenario directory).
v. Enter a filename (e.g. SaintHelens) in the Filename text field.
vi. Click Convert.
vii. Click Close to dismiss the Imagery and Terrain Converter.
d. Add visual terrain to the scenario.
i. Click the Globe Manager (
Globe Manager.
) icon or click the View menu and select
Note: You can drag and drop .pdtt files directly onto the
STK globe.
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ii. Click the Add Terrain/Imagery (
) button or right-click Earth in
the Globe Manager and select Add Terrain/Imagery...
i. Select the *.pdtt file (e.g. SaintHelens.pdtt) from the Path
drop-down list.
ii. Click Open.
iii. When prompted, click Yes to enable terrain for analysis.
iv. Right-click on the *.pdtt file in the Globe Manager and
select Zoom To.
2. Ensure that Ground Sites Consider Terrain.
a. Model a ground site (any type:
,
,
) on the terrain region using
one of the available insert methods (examples below)..
i. Insert a Place (
) and Search by Address (requires Internet (
) (e.g. Mount St. Helens, WA).
ii. Insert a ground site (any type:
,
,
region by using 3D Object Editing.
b. Ensure the ground site (any type:
its altitude.
,
,
) on the terrain
) considers terrain height for
i. Enable the Use terrain data for altitude option.
ii. Click OK to apply the changes and dismiss the Properties
Browser.
3. Create and Display Terrain Obscuration.
a. Right-click on the ground site (e.g. Mount_St_Helens_WA) and select
Properties (
).
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b. Define an azimuth-elevation mask and use it for an access constraint.
i. Select the Basic - AzElMask page.
ii. Use Terrain Data.
iii. Enable Use Mask for Access Constraint.
iv. Click Apply to apply the changes and keep the Properties open.
c. Display the azimuth-elevation mask at the ground site.
i. Select the 2D Graphics - AzElMask page.
ii. Enable the Show option beside the At Range option.
iii. Enter a max range for the mask display (e.g. ten (10) km).
iv. Click OK to accept the changes.
d. Mouse around the 3D Graphics window to take a look at the azimuthelevation mask display.
4. Ensure a Moving Vehicle Considers Terrain.
a. From the Insert STK Objects (
) tool, select Ground Vehicle (
choose the Define Properties method.
) and
b. Ensure the vehicle considers terrain along its route.
i. Select the Basic - Route page.
ii. Select Terrain as the Altitude Reference.
iii. Set a Granularity type (e.g. 0.01 km).
iv. Select Terrain Height as the Interp Method.
c. Insert waypoints (examples below):
i. Type in waypoint values.
i. On the Basic - Route page, click Insert Point twice to add
two waypoints manually.
ii. Enter values for the first waypoint (e.g. Lat = 46.23 deg, Lon =
-122.23 deg).
iii. Enter values for the second waypoint (e.g. Lat = 46.19 deg,
Lon = -122.13 deg).
iv. Click OK to dismiss the Properties browser.
ii. Use 3D Object Editing..
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i. Make sure the ground vehicle's Properties Browser is closed.
ii. Use the 3D Object Editing tool to model the ground
vehicle's route.
5. Determine if Terrain is Obscuring the View.
a. Compute Access (
vehicle (
) between the ground station (
) and ground
) and generate an Access report.
i. Open the Access (
) tool.
ii. On the Access page, click the Select Object... button and select the
ground site (e.g. Mount_St_Helens_WA) as the Access For object
(From).
iii. Select the ground vehicle (
) as the To object.
iv. Click the Compute button.
v. Click Access... in the Reports section of the Access tool.
b. Add intervals (
) to the Timeline View.
i. In the Timeline View toolbar, select Add Time Components (
).
ii. Add the ground vehicle's availability time span to the Timeline View.
i. Select the Ground Vehicle (
) on the left.
ii. Select AvailabilityTimeSpan in the Components for
section on the right.
iii. Click Apply to add the availability interval to the Timeline
View.
c. Animate (
) and mouse around the 3D Graphics window to visualize
when the terrain obstructs access.
d. Use the Slide Bar to scroll through the ground vehicle's route and visualize
when the terrain obstructs access.
Chain Objects
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STK Pro allows users to build system networks by defining sequential, multi-link relationships. Multi-hop links are
modeled by Chain (
Constellations (
) objects in STK. Chains model a list of objects (either individual or grouped into
) in order of access.
Did You Know? A Constellation (
) object allows you to group a set of related objects, such as a
group of facilities or satellites, into a single unit called a constellation. The objects that comprise the
constellation define it.
A Chain (
) object enables you to assign objects (either individual or grouped into constellations)
to the chain and define the order in which the objects are accessed. You can compute accesses to
an entire group of assets using the Chain object.
Task: Create a Multi-hop Link
1. Model a communications relay (
(examples below:)
a. Insert a satellite (
ANIK F2).
) using one of the available insert methods
) by searching the Standard Object Database (e.g.
b. Insert a satellite (
) by designing an orbit with the Orbit Wizard (e.g.
Type = Geosynchronous), Subsatellite Point = -90 deg).
2. Model the Multi-hop communications link using a Chain (
a. From the Insert STK Objects (
Define Properties method.
) object.
) tool, insert a Chain (
) object using the
b. Select the Basic - Definition page.
c. Define the order in which the objects are accessed.
i. Move (
) the first object in the chain (e.g. Mount_St_Helens_
WA) to the Available Objects list.
ii. Repeat the previous step until all chain objects are in the
Available Objects list in the correct order (e.g. Mount_St_
Helens_WA - Satellite - Ground Vehicle).
d. Click OK to accept the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
3. In the STK Object Browser, right-click on the Chain object and extend the Chain
menu. Select Compute Accesses to compute Chain access.
4. Generate a Complete Chain Access report.
a. In the STK Object Browser, right-click on the Chain object and click Report
& Graph Manager.
b. Select Complete Chain Access report in the Installed Styles list.
c. Click Generate... to display the complete chain access intervals.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
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Part 9: Create an AzEl Mask from Images
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
AzEl Mask Tool
The AzEl Mask tool generates static body masking (*.bmsk) files which are used to restrict visibility to a sensor. The
term body masking refers to line-of-sight obstruction caused by the three-dimensional model of the parent object
of the sensor or other objects in the scenario. The body masking files contain obscuration contours which are
generated based on six views generated from the point of view of an observer at the location of the sensor.
The six views can be thought of as containing projections of the obscuration objects onto the faces of a cube
centered at the sensor. Contours are constructed using an edge detection algorithm and stored along with
information describing the orientation of the view from which they were constructed. To affect visibility
computations, set the body masking file as the AzEl Mask file for the sensor and enable the sensor AzEl.
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Task: Create a Sensor AzEl Mask
1. Create a new scenario with the default time period.
a. Click the Create a new scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
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Enter a name for the scenario (e.g. STK_SensorAzElMasking).
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Use the default Start time.
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Set the Stop time to one (1) second.
c. Click OK.
2. Add visual and analytical terrain to the scenario.
a. Right-click on SensorAzElMasking (
) and select Properties (
).
b. Select the Basic - Terrain page.
c. Disable the Use Terrain Server for analysis option.
d. Click OK to apply the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
e. In the 3D Graphics window toolbar, click the Globe Manager (
also extend the View menu and select Globe Manager.
). You can
Note: You can drag and drop .pdtt files directly onto the STK
globe.
f. Click the Add Terrain/Imagery ( ) button or right-click Earth in the Globe
Manager and select Add Terrain/Imagery.
i. Ensure Local Files is selected.
ii. Click the ellipsis ( ) button and browse to C:\Program
Files\AGI\STK 11\Help\stkTraining\Imagery.
iii. Open StHelens_Training.pdtt.
iv. When prompted, click Yes to enable terrain for analysis.
v. Right-click on the *.pdtt file in the Globe Manager and select Zoom
To.
3. Ensure a ground site considers terrain.
a. Model a Place (
) object on the terrain region using the From City
Database method.
i. Insert Morton, Washington using the From City Database option.
b. Ensure Morton considers terrain height for its altitude.
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i. Right-click on Morton (
) and select Properties (
).
ii. Select the Basic - Position page.
iii. Ensure the Use terrain data for altitude option is enabled.
iv. Enter 20 ft (feet) in the Height Above Ground field.
v. Click Apply.
c. Define an Azimuth-elevation mask and use it for an access constraint.
i. Select the Basic - AzElMask page.
ii. Enable the Use Terrain Data option.
iii. Enable the Use Mask for Access Constraint option.
iv. Click OK to apply the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
4. Model a sensor on Morton.
a. In the Insert STK Objects (
) tool, select Sensor (
.
b. Select Insert Default as the Select A Method option.
c. Click the Insert... button to bring the Select Object window to the front.
d. Select Morton in the Select Object window.
e. Click OK.
f. Rename the sensor SatTracker.
5. Ensure SatTracker properties uses the parent object's AzElMask file.
a. Right-click on SatTracker (
) and select Properties (
b. Select the Basic - Definition page.
c. Set the Sensor Type to Complex Conic.
d. Set the Half Angles - Outer to 180 deg.
e. Click Apply.
f. Select the Constraints - Basic page.
g. Enable the Az-El Mask option.
h. Click Apply.
6. Display Terrain Obscuration.
a. Select the 2D Graphics – Projection page.
b. In Field of View, enable Use Constraints.
c. Select AzElMask.
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).
d. Click Apply.
e. Select the 3D Graphics – Projection page.
f. Set Space Projection to 50km.
g. Click OK to apply the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
h. Zoom To Morton and use the mouse to view the AzElMask constraints.
7. Model an obscuring object.
a. In the Insert STK Objects tool, select Facility (
.
b. Select Insert Default as the Select A Method option.
c. Rename the Facility object “Building.”
d. Zoom To Morton (
).
e. Use the 3D Object Editing tool to place Building in the middle of the white
structure across the street from Morton.
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8. Create a Sensor AzEl Mask.
a. Right-click on SatTracker (
) and extend the Sensor menu.
b. Select the AzEl Mask option.
c. In the AzEl Mask tool, locate the Obscuring Objects field and select
Building.
d. In the File: field, click the ellipsis (
) button.
e. Ensure the path goes to your scenario folder.
f. Enter MyBodyMask in File Name.
g. Click Save.
h. Change Window Dim: to 500.
i. Click Apply.
j. Ensure the AzEl Mask tool is not obstructing the Az/El Mask View window.
k. Click Compute.
l. Close the AzEl Mask tool and the Az/El Mask View window.
9. Ensure the Sensor uses the body mask file (*.bmsk) during access calculations.
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a. Right-click on SatTracker (
) and select Properties (
).
b. Select the Basic – Sensor AzEl Mask page.
c. Enable the Use MaskFile option.
d. Click the Mask File: ellipses (
) button.
e. Select MyBodyMask.bmsk and click Open.
f. Enable the Use Mask for Access Constraint option.
g. Click Apply.
10. Display Body Mask File Obscuration.
a. Select the 2D Graphics – Projection page.
b. In Field of View, use the Ctrl key to select SensorAzElMask and ensure
AzElMask is still selected.
c. Click OK to apply the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
d. Zoom To Building and view the obscuration.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
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Part 10: Customize Analysis with Analysis Workbench
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
Using Analysis Workbench ( ), you can build custom geometric, temporal and logical operations through a
graphical user interface to extend STK’s modeling and analysis. These tools serve as the building blocks for
advanced analysis through the click of just a few buttons. Use the STK Analysis Workbench to:
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Define new measures of effectiveness
Create custom calculations without any scripting
Trigger events based on temporal, geometric and logical function
The Time, Vector Geometry, and Calculation Tools are application-wide tools designed to streamline, organize,
and extend the fundamental computational capabilities of STK.
AGI Techs Say: When creating components for objects in Analysis Workbench, it is a good idea to
consider what objects those components should logically be created for (e.g. an angle with two
vectors originating from an object that should belong to that object.)
Vector Geometry Tool
Use the Vector Geometry Tool (VGT) to build custom geometric models from any combination of out-of-the box
or user-created vectors (
components.
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), points (
), angles (
), planes (
), axes (
), and coordinate system (
)
Define unique system access constraints
Build custom platform and payload orientations
Import and export data in any reference frame
Did You Know? Dr. Sergei Tanygin, senior advisory software developer, is the technical lead for
VGT. Sergei currently holds four patents, including one for VGT called “Method and Apparatus for
Creating Elements and Systems for Description of Position and Motion of Bodies in ThreeDimensional Space to Support Orbital Maneuver Analysis.”
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Task: Create a Targeted Vector from a Fixed Location to a Vehicle
1. Create a new scenario.
a. Click the Create a Scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
i. Enter a Name for the scenario (e.g. STK_AWB).
ii. Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the defaults.
c. Click OK.
2. Model a ground site (any type:
(examples below)
,
,
) using one of the available methods:
a. Insert a Place (
) and Search by Address (require Internet (
Mount St. Helens, WA).
)) (e.g.
3. Model a moving vehicle (
,
,
) that has visibility to the ground site using
one of the available methods (examples below).
a. Insert an aircraft (
) by clicking the waypoints in the 3D Graphics
window (e.g. create a route around Mount St. Helens).
4. Compute Access between the moving vehicle and ground site.
a. Open the Access tool (
).
b. On the Access panel, click the Select Object... button and select the
moving vehicle as the Access For object (From).
c. Select the ground site as the "To" object (e.g. Mt. St. Helens).
d. Click the Compute button.
e. Click Access... in the Reports section to generate an Access report.
f. If there is no access, modify the vehicle's orbit, route, or trajectory.
5. Click the Analysis Workbench (
Analysis Workbench.
) icon or extend the Analysis menu and select
6. Create a displacement vector (
) from the moving vehicle to the ground site.
a. Select the Vector Geometry tab.
b. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) to make that object the Parent
object.
c. Click the Create New Vector (
) button.
d. Ensure the Type to Displacement (default).
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e. Enter a name for the vector (e.g. ToMtStHelens) in the Name field.
f. If the Parent is not the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft/Aircraft1), click the
Select... button to choose the correct parent.
g. Click the ellipsis (
) button to select the Origin Point.
i. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1).
ii. Select Center on the list.
iii. Click OK.
h. Click the ellipsis (
) button to select the Destination Point.
i. Select the ground site (e.g. Mount_St_Helens_WA).
ii. Select Center in the Points For: list.
iii. Click OK.
i. Click OK to save the vector properties and dismiss the Add Geometry
Component window.
7. Create an angle (
Z vector.
) between the targeted vector and the moving vehicle's Body
a. On the Vector Geometry tab, select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) and
make it the Parent object.
b. Click the Create New Angle (
) button.
c. If the Type is not set to Between Vectors... , click the Select... button to
select Component Type.
d. Enter a vector name (e.g. pointingAngle) in the Name field.
e. If the Parent is not the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft/Aircraft1), click the
Select... button to choose the correct parent.
f. Click the ellipsis (
) button to select the From Vector.
i. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) on the left.
ii. Select the new Displacement Vector (e.g. toMtStHelens) in the My
Components directory on the right.
iii. Click OK.
g. Click the ellipsis (
) button to select the To Vector.
i. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) on the left.
ii. Click to expand the Body axes on the right, and select the Z Vector.
iii. Click OK.
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h. Click OK to save the angle properties and dismiss the Add Geometry
Component window.
8. Display the custom vector components for the moving vehicle in the 3D Graphics
window.
a. Open the moving vehicle's Properties... (
).
b. Select the 3D Graphics - Vector page.
c. Click the Add... button.
i. Select a desired vector or angle (e.g. toMtStHelens Vector, Body Z
Vector, pointingAngle Angle).
ii. Click the Insert button to add it to the selected list.
iii. Repeat the previous steps until all components are in the Selected
List.
iv. Click OK to dismiss the Add Geometry Component Window.
d. Enable the Show option to display the desired components (e.g. Body
Axes, toMtStHelens Vector, Body Z Vector, pointingAngle Angle).
Note: To also display the angle value in the 3D Graphics
window, click on the angle component in the list and enable the
Show Angle Value option.
e. Click OK to apply the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
f. Right-click on the object and select Zoom To to see the object and the
vectors.
Note: Vectors are displayed using the objects 3D Graphic - Vector page. If the
vectors or axes are not listed, you can add them.
Calculation Tool
Use the Calculation tool to combine system data with algebraic, functional, and calculus operations to extend
models and define new data providers with custom algorithms from 20 mathematical operations.
Operations available in the Calculation tab of the Analysis Workbench include:
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Scalar calculations (
)
Conditions (
)
Parameter sets ( )
Did You Know? Calculation Components are time-dependent quantities that produce
computational results and can be reported, graphed, transformed, and analyzed.
Warning: You need to have completed the Vector Geometry Tool lesson before you attempt the
following tasks.
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Task: Create a New Condition for when the Angle between the moving vehicle and a fixed
location
1. Add a Scalar Calculation (
above.
) that references the angle created in the lesson
a. Click to select the Calculation tab.
b. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) to make it the Parent object.
c. Click the Create New Scalar Calculation (
).
d. If the Type is not set to Angle, click Select... to select Angle as the
Component Type.
e. Enter a scalar name (e.g. pointingAngleScalar) in the Name field.
f. If the Parent object is not the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft/Aircraft1), click
Select... to choose the correct parent object.
g. Click the ellipsis (
) button to select the Destination Point.
i. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) on the left.
ii. Select the custom angle (e.g. pointingAngleScalar) in the Angles for:
list on the right.
iii. Click OK.
h. Click OK to save the scalar properties and dismiss the Add Calculation
Component window.
AGI Techs Say: Scalar calculations, in particular, allow users to
create new calculations using various functional operations as
well as calculus, e.g., differentiation and integration.
2. Add a Condition (
) that references the angle created in the lesson above.
a. On the Calculation tab, select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) to make it
the Parent object.
b. Click the Create New Condition (
) button.
c. If the Type is not set to Scalar Bounds, click Select... to choose Scalar
Bounds as the Component Type.
d. Enter a condition name (e.g. above80degrees) in the Name field.
e. If the Parent is not the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft/Aircraft1), click Select...
to choose the correct Parent object.
f. Click the ellipsis (
) button to select the Origin Point.
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i. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) on the left.
ii. Select the custom scalar (e.g. pointingAngleScalar) in the Scalar
Calculations for: list on the right.
iii. Set the Operation to Above Minimum.
iv. Set the Minimum option to the desired value (e.g. 80 deg).
v. Click OK.
g. Click OK to save the condition properties and dismiss the Add Calculation
Component window.
3. Create a report that lists the times when the defined condition is met.
AGI Techs Say: The Quick Report Manager is available from the
Analysis menu and an object's right-click menu.
a. On the Calculation tab, right-click on the new condition (e.g.
above80degrees) and select Report/Graph.
b. Click the Report/Graph button to generate the report.
c. Click Close to dismiss the Calculation Report/Graph window.
4. Add the condition to the Timeline View.
a. If your Timeline View is not open, extend the View menu and select the
Timeline View.
b. Select Add Time Components (
) in the Timeline View toolbar.
c. Select the STK moving vehicle object (e.g. Aircraft1).
d. Select AvailabilityTimeSpan in the Components For section. Click Apply.
e. Expand the condition (e.g. above80degrees) and select any
SatisfactionIntervals.
f. If the moving vehicle's availability time span is shorter than the scenario
time period, right-click on the vehicle's availability time span interval and
select Center.
Note: Use the Start Time of the SensorOnTimes interval to set
the reference time instant.
Time Tool
Use the Time tool (inside the Analysis Workbench) to create and manage any time instance (
), interval (
) or
interval collection (
) as a named entity for use as a model property or calculation object. Time components can
be added to the Timeline View and used anywhere that a time interval is relevant within STK. Relevant locations
within STK could be display times for a sensor or temporal constraints for an analysis. With the Time Tool, users
can:
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Create event triggers using logical operations, time shifts, times of extremum, satisfaction times, etc.
Manage system simulation using relative mission times
Visualize any time component in a dedicated window
AGI Techs Say: Time components can be added to the Timeline View which provides a new way
to display and operate on time components. They can be added via the Timeline View menus or
dragged and dropped into the Timeline View from the Analysis Workbench window.
Did You Know? Time is fundamental to most computations in STK and is used in reporting and
graphing. Time is also used in static and dynamic visualizations as well.
Warning: You need to have completed the Calculation Tool lesson before you attempt the
following tasks.
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Task: Create a Custom Interval Set that defines Tracking Opportunities
1. Add an Interval List (
satisfied.
) that defines the times the condition created above is
a. Click to select the Time tab.
b. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1) to make it the Parent object.
c. Click the Create New Interval List (
).
d. Click Select... to choose Merged as the Component Type. Click OK.
e. Enter an Interval List (e.g. visibilityTimes) in the Name field.
f. If the Parent object is not the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft/Aircraft1), click
Select... to choose the correct parent.
g. Select the two Components in the Time Components field.
h. Click OK.
i. Click the Add... button and add the Access Intervals between the moving
vehicle and the ground site as the first Time Component.
Note: The Access Intervals time component is found under
Access objects.
i. Select the Access between the moving vehicle and the ground site.
ii. Select AccessIntervals in the Components For list.
iii. Click OK.
j. Click the Add... button and add the previously created condition (e.g.
above80Degrees) as the second Time Component.
i. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Aircraft1).
ii. Expand the condition (e.g. above80Degrees) and select
SatisfactionIntervals in the Components For list.
iii. Click OK.
k. Set the Operation to Minus.
Note: Subtracting intervals is done using the Merged interval
list type.
l. Click OK to save the scalar properties and dismiss the Add Calculation
Component window.
2. Add the interval (
) to the Timeline View.
a. If your Timeline View is not open, extend the STK View menu and select
Timeline View.
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b. In the Timeline View toolbar, select Add Time Components (
c. Select the STK moving vehicle object (e.g. Aircraft1).
d. Select the new interval list (e.g. visibilityTimes). Click OK.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 55 of 107
).
Part 11: Compute Coverage Over Regions
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
STK Coverage
The STK Coverage module allows you to analyze the global or regional coverage provided by one or more assets
(facilities, vehicles, sensors, etc.) while considering all access. Specific results are generated based on detailed
access computations performed to user-defined grid points within an area of coverage.
Case Study
There are two case studies that showcase AGI's Coverage capability: Missile
Flight Test Planning and Analysis with STK and Joint Navigation Warfare Center's
Common Operating Environment.
Using STK Coverage you can:
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Select regions of interest.
Define coverage assets (satellites, ground facilities, etc.).
Define the time period of interest.
Determine and report measures of coverage quality.
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Task: Define Coverage and Compute Accesses from the Assets to the Grid
1. Create a new scenario with the default time period.
a. Click the Create a Scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
i. Enter a Name for the scenario (e.g. STK_Coverage).
ii. Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the defaults.
c. Click OK.
2. Model an Area Target (
l
) using one of the available methods.
Insert an Area Target using the Select Countries and US States method.
a. Select United_States in the list on the left..
b. Click Insert.
c. Click Close to dismiss the Select Countries and US States window.
3. Model at least one moving vehicle (
,
,
) that passes over the area target
during the analysis time using one of the available methods.
a. Insert a Satellite (
) using the Define Properties method and click OK to
accept the default parameters and dismiss the Properties Browser.
b. Insert an Aircraft (
) by typing in waypoint values.
Example waypoint values
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First waypoint: Lat = 39 deg, Lon = -120 deg.
Second waypoint: Lat = 40 deg, Lon = -77 deg.
4. Model a default sensor (
) on the moving object.
a. In the Insert STK Objects (
) tool, select sensor (
).
b. Select the Insert Default as the Select A Method option.
c. Click the Insert... button.
d. Select the moving vehicle in the Select Object window.
e. Click OK.
5. Insert a Coverage Definition (
) using the Define Properties method.
Note: You may need to add the Coverage Definition object to
the Insert STK Objects tool. To do this, click the Edit Preferences
button and select it from the New Object tool.
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i. Define the Coverage Definition.
ii. Use the area target (
) to define the grid.
i. On the Basic - Grid page, set the Type option to Custom
Regions.
ii. Click the Select Regions... button.
iii. Move (
) the area target (e.g. United States) in the Area
Targets list to the Selected Regions field. You can also
double-click the area target you'd like to move.
iv. Click OK to dismiss the Select Regions window.
v. Click Apply to apply changes and keep the Properties
Browser open.
iii. Define the grid Point Altitude.
i. On the Basic - Grid page, locate the Point Altitude section.
ii. Select the Altitude above Terrain option from the dropdown list.
iii. Keep the altitude at the zero (0) km default value.
iv. Click Apply to apply changes and keep the Properties
Browser open.
iv. Akssign the vehicle(s) as Assets.
i. Select the Basic - Assets page.
ii. Click the object(s) in the Assets list (e.g. Aircraft1 or Satellite1)
and click Assign.
iii. Click Apply to apply changes and keep the Properties
Browser open.
v. Disable the option to Automatically Recompute Access.
i. Select the Basic - Advanced page.
ii. Disable the Automatically Recompute Access option.
iii. Click OK to apply changes and dismiss the Properties
Browser.
vi. Right-click the Coverage Definition (
) object in the Object
Browser, select the CoverageDefinition menu, and click compute
Accesses.
AGI Techs Say: Constraints can be applied to each grid point by selecting an object or the instance
of an object. If you select an object, the constraints set for the object are also applied to used by all
points within the grid.
Coverage Quality
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While the coverage definition (
) defines the problem, the Figure(s) of Merit (
) allows you to evaluate the
quality of coverage provided by the selected set of assets (defined for the coverage definition object) over the
coverage area and then provide a method for summarizing and viewing the resultant data.
To evaluate coverage quality, you will first need to set basic parameters that determine the way in which quality is
computed, which involves:
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Choosing the method for evaluating the quality of coverage provided.
Setting measurement options.
Identifying the criteria needed to achieve satisfactory coverage.
Did You Know? Figures of Merit can exhibit two types of behavior: dynamic and static. The
dynamic behavior of a Figure of Merit allows you to compute values corresponding to a specific
time. Not all Figures of Merit can exhibit dynamic behavior. Those which do not exhibit dynamic
behavior are not able to compute time-dependent information.
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Task: Measure the Quality of Coverage
1. Create a simple Coverage Figure of Merit.
a. Attach a default Figure of Merit (
) to the Coverage Definition (
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Figure of Merit (
).
).
Note: You may need to add the Figure of Merit object to
the Insert STK Objects tool. To do this, click the Edit
Preferences button and select it from the New Object
tool.
ii. Select Insert Default from the Select A Method list.
iii. Click the Insert... button.
iv. Select the Coverage Definition (
dialog.
) object in the Select Object
v. Click OK.
b. Right-click on the Figure of Merit in the Object Browser, and rename the
object (e.g. FOM_SimpleCoverage).
c. Display the Static Graphics only.
i. Right-click on the Figure of Merit (
) and select Properties (
).
ii. Select the 2D Graphics - Animation page.
iii. Disable the Show Animation Graphics option. By default, both
animation and static graphics are displayed.
iv. Click OK to accept the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
d. Generate a Percent Satisfied report for the Figure of Merit (
i. Right-click on the Figure of Merit (
select Report & Graph Manager.
).
) in the Object Browser and
ii. Disable the Show Graphs option located in the Styles field. You are
only interested in the reports so you can declutter the Styles window
by removing the graphs.
iii. Expand ( ) the Installed Styles directory and select Percent
Satisfied.
iv. Click Generate... to display the percent and area satisfied.
e. Display Animation Graphics.
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i. Right-click the Figure of Merit (
) and select Properties (
).
ii. Select the 2D Graphics - Static page.
iii. Disable the Show Static Graphics option.
iv. Select the 2D Graphics - Animation page.
v. Enable the Show Animation Graphics option.
vi. Select Accumulation Up to Current Time from the drop-down list.
vii. Click OK to accept the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
viii. Animate (
) the scenario and watch the grids highlight as they
meet the satisfaction criteria.
2. Create a Number of Accesses Figure of Merit.
a. Attach a default Figure of Merit (
) to the Coverage Definition (
i. In the Insert STK Objects tool (
), select Figure of Merit (
).
).
Note: You may need to add the Figure of Merit object to
the Insert STK Objects tool. To do this, click the Edit
Preferences button and select it from the New Object
tool.
ii. Select Insert Default from the Select A Method list.
iii. Click the Insert... button.
iv. Select the Coverage Definition (
dialog.
) object in the Select Object
v. Click OK.
b. Right-click on the Figure of Merit in the Object Browser, and rename the
object (e.g. FOM_NumAccesses).
c. Define the Figure of Merit.
i. Select the Basic - Definition page.
ii. Select the desired Figure of Merit Type (e.g. Number of Accesses).
iii. Select the desired Compute method (e.g. Total), if applicable
(depends on the Figure of Merit type).
iv. Click Apply to apply the changes and keep the Properties Browser
open.
d. Display the Static Graphics only.
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i. Select the 2D Graphics - Animation page.
ii. Disable the Show Animation Graphics option. By default, both
animation and static graphics are displayed.
iii. Select the 2D Graphics - Static page.
iv. Enable the Show Contours option.
v. Click the Remove All button to remove the default levels in the Level
Attributes field.
vi. Enter the desired Start, Stop, and Step levels.
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Start = Minimum FOM value in Grid Stats report.
Stop = Maximum FOM value in Grid Stats report.
Step = 1.
vii. Click OK to accept the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
e. Generate a Percent Satisfied report for the Figure of Merit (
i. Right-click on the Figure of Merit (
select Report & Graph Manager.
).
) in the Object Browser and
ii. Disable the Show Graphs option located in the Styles field. You are
only interested in the reports so you can declutter the Styles window
by removing the graphs.
iii. Expand ( ) the Installed Styles directory and select Grid Stats.
iv. Click Generate... to display the static Figure of Merit range.
f. Display Animation Graphics
i. Right-click the Coverage Definition (
) and select Properties (
).
ii. Select the 2D Graphics - Static page.
iii. Disable the Show Static Graphics option.
iv. Select the 2D Graphics - Animation page.
v. Enable the Show Animation Graphics option.
vi. Select Accumulation Up to Current Time from the drop-down list.
vii. Enable the Show Contours option.
viii. Click the Copy Static Levels button.
ix. Click OK to accept the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
x. Animate (
) the scenario and watch the grids highlight as they
meet the satisfaction criteria.
AGI Techs Say: The static behavior for a Figure of Merit specifies the value of quality over the
entire coverage period. Depending on the size of the coverage problem being analyzed, the
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computation of the static values for each grid point can be time consuming. For this reason, the
static values are cached to allow for rapid generation of reports and modifications to graphical
representations once the static values have been computed. The computed static values will also be
saved and restored with the scenario if the SaveMode of the parent Coverage Definition object is
set to "Save accesses."
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
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Part 12: Build a Volumetric Object
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
Volumetrics
The Volumetric object is used to combine spatial calculations and volume grids that enable you to:
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Report and graph calculations over time and across grid points
Visually depict volumes representing various values interpolated across grid points
The spatial calculations and volume grids are defined using the Spatial Analysis tool in Analysis Workbench. This
tool allows you to create calculations and conditions that depend on locations in 3D space which are, in turn,
provided by user-defined volume grids.
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Task: Build an Area of Operations
1. Create a new scenario with the default start time and a one (1) second stop time.
a. Click the Create a new scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
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Enter a name for the scenario (e.g. STK_Volumetric).
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Leave the default analysis Start time and change the stop time to
one (1) second.
c. Click OK.
2. Enable Terrain for Analysis.
a. Enable Terrain for analysis if you have Terrain Server (requires Internet (
)).
i. Open the scenario's (
) properties (
).
ii. Enable the Azimuth/Elevation mask option.
iii. Click OK.
b. Enable Terrain for analysis if you don't have Terrain Server.
i. Open the Globe Manager.
ii. Click the Add Terrain/Imagery button.
iii. Click the ellipsis button and browse to the location of the PDTT file.
(Typically, <STK Install Folder>\AGI\STK11\Help\stktraining).
iv. Select the StHelens_Training.pdtt and click Open.
v. Click Yes when the warning pops up to Use Terrain for Analysis.
3. From the Insert STK Objects tool, select Area Target (
Target Wizard (
) and select the Area
). This will define the Area of Operations.
a. Use the Insert Objects Tool to use an Area Target Wizard (
Area Target (
) to define an
).
b. Set the Area Type to Ellipse.
c. Set the Semi-Major Axis and Semi-Minor Axis to 1500 km.
d. Set the Latitude and Longitude of the Centroid (e.g. Latitude: 46.6 deg
Longitude: -122.3 deg).
e. Click OK.
4. Model a place object using the City Database and enable the terrain mask and
position above ground for the place.
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a. Search the City Database for Morton.
b. Insert Morton, Washington.
c. Open Morton's (
) properties (
).
d. Select the Basic - Position page and change the Height Above Ground to 20
ft.
Note: You are raising the height of the place above the terrain
to represent the height of the sensor.
e. Select the Basic - AzElMask page.
f. Enable the Use: Terrain Data option.
g. Enable the Use Mask for Access Constraint option.
h. Click OK.
5. Build a complex conic sensor with a vertical field-of-view that will be used to
constrain the volumetric object.
a. Insert a sensor attached to Morton.
b. Open the sensor's (
page.
) properties (
) and select the Basic - Definition
c. Set the Type to Complex Conic and set the Outer Half Angle to 180 deg.
d. Select the Constraints - Basic page.
e. Enable the Az-El Mask option.
f. Select the 2D Graphics - Projection page and enable the Use Constraints
option.
g. Select the AzElMask option.
h. Select the 3D Graphics - Projection page and set the Space Projection to 50
km.
i. Click OK.
6. View the sensor field-of-view in the 3D Graphics window and see how the terrain is
affecting the sensor's field-of-view.
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Task: Create Components for the Volumetric Object.
1. Insert a Volumetric (
) object using the Insert Default method.
2. Create a Spatial Component for the area target using Analysis Workbench that is
used to create a grid that visualizes the Volumetric object.
a. Create a Cartographic Grid Reference frame to constrain the area.
i. In the Object Browser, right-click on the Area Target (
Analysis Workbench...
) and select
ii. Select the Spatial Analysis tab.
iii. Click the Create New Volume Grid button.
iv. Ensure the Type is set to Cartographic (default).
v. Enter a name for the volume grid (e.g. SmartCartographic) in the
Name field.
vi. If the Parent object is not set to Area Target, click the Select... button
and choose the correct parent object.
vii. Click the Set Grid Values button and set the Altitude options. (e.g.
Minimum 160 km, Maximum 2000 km, Number of Steps 20).
viii. Click OK to save the volume grid properties and dismiss the Add
Spatial Analysis Component window.
ix. Click OK to close Analysis Workbench.
b. Visualize the Simple Cartographic component.
i. Right-click Volumetric (
) in the Object Browser.
ii. Open Volumetric's properties (
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).
iii. Select the Basic - Definition page.
iv. Click the ellipsis button in the Volume Grid section.
v. Select Area Target from the Object List.
vi. Select SimpleCartographic as the Volume Grids for: Area Target
option.
vii. Click OK.
viii. View the Simple Cartographic grid in the 3D Graphics window.
3. Create a Volume Grid to constrain the cartographic reference frame to the sensor
field-of-view.
a. In the Object Browser, right-click on the Area Target (
Analysis Workbench...
) and select
b. Select the Spatial Analysis tab.
c. Click the Create new Volume Grid button.
d. Click the Select... button to choose Constrained as the Component Type.
e. Click OK on the Component Type window.
f. Enter a name for the volume grid (e.g. SensorFOV) in the Name field.
g. If the Parent object is not set to Area Target, click the Select... button and
choose the correct parent object.
h. Click the ellipsis button in the Reference Grid field.
i. Select Area Target as the Object and select Simple Cartographic as the
Volume Grids For: AreaTarget option.
j. Click the ellipsis button in the Spatial Condition field.
k. Select the Sensor as the Object and select Visibility as the Spatial Condition
For: Sensor.
l. Click OK to save the volume grid properties and dismiss the Add Spatial
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Analysis Component window.
m. Click OK to close the Analysis Workbench.
4. View the volumetric object with the constrained grid.
a. Right-click Volumetric (
) in the Object Browser.
b. Open Volumetric's properties (
).
c. Select the Basic - Definition page.
d. Click the ellipsis button in the Volume Grid field and select the Area Target
on the left and the constrained volume grid (e.g. SensorFOV) on the right.
e. Click OK.
f. Click the ellipsis button in the Spatial Calculation field and select the Area
Target on the left and the Altitude on the right.
g. Click OK.
h. Click Apply to apply the changes and keep the Properties Browser open.
5. Compute the Volumetric object.
6. Visualize the Volume Grid between 160 km and 2000 km.
a. In the Volumetric properties, select the 3D Graphics - Grid page.
b. Disable the Show Grid option.
c. Select the 3D Graphics - Volume page.
d. Enable the Spatial Calculation Levels option.
e. Click the Insert Evenly Spaced Values... button.
f. Insert evenly spaced values (e.g. Start: 160, Stop: 2000, Step: 200.
g. Click the Create Values button.
7. Display a legend.
a. Select the 3D Graphics - Legends page.
b. Enable the Show Legend option.
c. Click OK.
8. View the Spatial Calculation levels in the 3D Graphics window.
Page 69 of 107
9. Generate a Satisfaction Volume report to view the percent satisfied.
a. Right-click on the Volumetric object and open the Report & Graph
Manager.
b. Generate a Satisfaction Volume report.
AGI Techs Say: There are several example scenarios using Volumetrics on our Resources page.
Did You Know? Volumetrics can import user-supplied data such as weather? Check out this
tutorial for more information.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 70 of 107
Part 13: Perform Trade Studies with Analyzer
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
STK Analyzer
The STK Analyzer (
) module is an integrated software solution that automates STK trade studi;es and
parametric analyses by blending the engineering analysis capabilities of Phoenix Integration, Inc.'s ModelCenter
with STK.
Case Study
Phoenix Integration used AGI software to understand acquisition program costs
in the context of Department of Defense affordability mandate. You can read
more in this case study: Cost/Performance Trade Studies Improve DoD
Affordability Compliance.
Analyzer enables STK users to easily perform trade and optimization studies, as well as post-processing functions.
The Analyzer module provides the tools to understand the design space of your system through an easy-to-use
GUI style interface, eliminating the need for scripts or programming. STK Analyzer provides a set of analysis tools
that:
l
l
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Enable you to understand the design space of your systems.
Enable you to perform analyses in STK easily without involving programming or scripting.
Introduce trade study and post-processing capabilities.
Did You Know? Analyzer has its own toolbar! Just right-click in the toolbar area and enable the
Analyzer toolbar from the drop down. On the toolbar, you'll find buttons to open Analyzer, the
Parametric Study tool, and the ability to open previously generated trade studies.
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Task: Perform a Trade Study
1. Create a new scenario.
a. Click the Create a Scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
i. Enter a Name for the scenario (e.g. STK_Analyzer).
ii. Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the defaults.
c. Click OK.
d. Insert a facility (
) (e.g. using the Insert Default method).
e. Insert a satellite (
l
l
) using the Define Properties method.
On the Basic - Orbit page, adjust the Inclination to orbit over the
facility (e.g. 40 deg).
Click OK to accept the default parameters and dismiss the Properties
Browser.
f. Insert a Sensor (
2. Generate an Access (
) on the Satellite (e.g. using the default method).
) report.
a. Open the Access tool (
)l.
b. On the Access panel, click the Select Object... button and select the sensor
on the moving vehicle (e.g. satellite1-Sensor1) as the Access For object
("From").
c. Select the ground site as the "To" object (e.g. Facility).
d. In the Reports field, click the Access button. This will compute access, and
generate an Access report.
Note: If your report says "No Access Found," modify your
vehicle properties so that the vehicle has access to the ground
site.
e. In the Timeline View toolbar, click the Add Time Components (
) button.
i. If your Timeline View is not open, extend the STK View menu
and select Timeline View.
f. Select the Access (
) object.
g. Select AccessIntervals in the Components for section.
h. Click OK to add the Access Intervals to the Timeline View and dismiss the
Add Time Components tool
3. Define Analyzer variables.
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a. Extend the Analysis menu, extend the Analyzer menu, and select Analyzer (
).
b. Select one or more input variables.
i. Select the moving vehicle (e.g. Satellite1) in the STK Variables list.
ii. Click on the variable (e.g. Propagator (TwoBody) in the STK
Property Variables General tab.
iii. Move or double-click the name to add it to the Analyzer Variables
field.
iv. Repeat the previous step until all desired input variables are in the
Analyzer Variables field.
c. Select one or more output variables
i. Expand Access in the STK Variables list and select the moving
vehicle - sensor to ground site access.
ii. Expand the data provider (e.g. Access Data) in the Data Provider
variables tab.
iii. Select the desired variable (e.g. expand Duration and select sum)
and move or double-click the name to add it to the Analyzer
Variables field.
iv. Repeat the previous step until all desired output variables are in the
Analyzer variables field.
4. Design a Parametric trade study.
a. Click the Parametric Study ( ) button on the STK Analyzer window to open
the Parametric Study dialog.
b. Define the Design Variables.
i. Click and drag the desired input variables (e.g. SemiMajorAxis) in
the Components list and drop it in the design variable (
) box.
ii. In the Design Variable text fields, enter the desired values.
(e.g:
)
c. Define the Responses.
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i. Click and drag the desired response variable (e.g. Access_Data
Duration sum) in the Components list and drop it in the Responses
section.
d. Click Run... to run the study and watch the 2D and 3D Graphics windows
and Timeline View change with each iteration.
5. Create a Carpet Plot trade study.
a. Click the Carpet Plot ( ) button on the STK Analyzer window to open the
Parametric Study dialog.
b. Define the Design Variables.
i. Click and drag the desired input variables (e.g. SemiMajorAxis and
Inclination) in the Components list and drop it in the design
variable (
)
ii. In the Design Variable text fields, enter the desired values.
(e.g:
)
c. Define the Responses.
i. Click and drag the desired response variable (e.g. Access_Data
Duration sum) in the Components list and drop it in the Responses
section.
d. Click Run... to run the study and watch the 2D and 3D Graphics windows
and Timeline View change with each iteration.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 74 of 107
Part 14: Evaluate Communication Links
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
STK Communications
The Communications module allows you to define and analyze detailed communications systems. You can
incorporate detailed rain models, atmospheric losses, and RF interference sources in your analyses and generate
detailed link budget reports and graphs. Communications modeling in STK includes:
Case Study
There are two case studies that showcase the use of AGI's Communications
module: NASA Space Communication Network Architecture Analysis
andStudying Mobile Ad-Hoc Network Communications Architectures.
l
l
l
l
l
l
Modeling communications links under dynamic conditions.
Performing communications link budget analysis.
Presenting parameters, analysis, link behavior, and antenna patterns graphically in 2D, and when possible,
3D.
Dynamically animating link parameter behavior.
Determining an object's geometric or refractive/radio line-of-sight visibility.
Performing system- level engineering.
These capabilities can be expanded upon by integrating Communications with commercially available network
modeling and simulation applications. Such integrations allow for communications analysis down to the protocol
layer to be fused into an entire mission construct modeled in STK. You can model and assess network-protocollevel aspects such as:
l
l
l
l
Buffering
Routing
Rate control
Quality-of-service frameworks
Page 75 of 107
Task: Model Communication Equipment and Calculate Link Budget
1. Create a new scenario with the default time period.
a. Click the Create a new scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
l
Enter a name for the scenario (e.g. STK_Comm).
l
Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the defaults.
c. Click OK.
2. Model a ground site (any type,
station.
,
,
) that will model ground control
a. Insert a Place (
) by typing in the location (e.g. Latitude = 46.28 deg;
Longitude = -122.22 deg).
b. Insert a Place (
(
) using the Search by Address method (requires Internet
)) (e.g. Johnston Ridge, WA).
c. If using a Place, open its Properties and select the 3D Graphics - Model
page.
d. In the Detail Thresholds field, move the slider for All to the right.
3. Model a satellite (
)that has visibility to the ground site.
a. Insert a satellite using the Orbit Wizard method.
b. Ensure the orbit has at least one pass over the ground site.
4. Compute Access between the moving vehicle and ground site to assure access.
a. Open the Access (
) tool.
b. Click the Select Object... button and select the moving vehicle as the
Access For object ("From").
c. Select the ground site as the "To" object.
d. Click the Compute button.
e. Click Access... in the Reports area to generate an Access report.
f. If there is no access, modify the moving vehicle's orbit, route, or trajectory.
5. Model a simple transmitter (
) on the satellite (
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).
a. Insert a Transmitter (
) on the satellite (
i. Select Transmitter (
).
) in the Insert STK Objects (
) tool.
ii. Select Define Properties as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Select Object window to the front.
iv. Select the satellite in the Select Object window.
v. Click OK. You will notice that the default transmitter is a simple
transmitter.
b. Change the transmitter's frequency (2 GHz) and EIRP (20 dBW).
i. On the Basic - Definition page, select the Model Specs tab.
ii. Enter the desired two (2) GHz Frequency value in the textbox.
iii. Enter the desired 20 dBW EIRP value in the textbox.
iv. Click OK to apply the changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
6. Model a two (2) degree Simple Conic Sensor (
) on the ground site targeted
towards the satellite which acts as a pointing device for the ground antenna.
a. Insert a sensor (
) on the ground site.
i. Select Sensor (
) in the Insert STK Objects (
) tool.
ii. Select Define Properties as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert... to bring the Select Object window to the front.
iv. Select the ground site in the Select Object window.
v. Click OK.
b. Change the sensor's field-of-view to a two (2) degree Cone Half Angle.
i. Select the Basic - Definition page.
ii. Enter the desired two (2) deg Cone Half Angle value in the text
field.
c. Change the sensor's pointing to target the moving vehicle.
i. Select the Basic - Pointing page.
ii. Change the Pointing Type to Targeted in the drop-down list.
iii. Move (
) the satellite to the Available Targets list. You can also
double-click the satellite to move it to the Available Targets list.
Page 77 of 107
AGI Techs Say: Sensors are used to point transmitters and receivers.
The easiest way to ensure that the transmitter and receiver
communicate with one another (in a geometric sense) is by attaching
them to sensors that point toward the objects they want to
communicate with.
7. Model a complex receiver (
) with a parabolic antenna on the ground site's
sensor and display the volume graphics.
a. Insert a receiver (
) on the ground site's sensor.
i. Select Receiver (
) in the STK Insert Objects (
) tool.
ii. Select Define Properties as the Select A Method option.
iii. Click Insert to bring the Select Object window to the front.
iv. Select the sensor on the ground site in the Select Object window.
v. Click OK.
b. Change the receiver Type to Complex Receiver Model.
i. Select the Basic - Definition page.
ii. Click on the ellipsis (
) button beside the Type option.
iii. Select the Complex Receiver Model and click OK.
iv. Click Apply to accept the changes and keep the Properties Browser
open.
c. Change the Antenna type to Parabolic with a 1.6 m diameter.
i. On the Basic - Definition page, select the Antenna tab.
ii. Click on the ellipsis (
) button beside the Type option.
iii. Select the Parabolic and click OK.
iv. Enter the desired 1.6m Diameter in the textbox.
v. Click Apply to accept the changes and keep the Properties Browser
open.
d. Display the Volume Graphics.
i. Select the 3D Graphics - Attributes page.
ii. Enable the Show Volume option.
iii. Enter the desired 0.1 km Gain Scale (per dB) in the text field.
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iv. Enable the Set azimuth and elevation resolution together
option.
v. Enter the desired one (1) deg resolution in the text field.
8. Compute Access (
) from the transmitter (
a. Open the Access (
) to the receiver (
).
) tool.
b. Click the Select Object... button and select the transmitter on the moving
vehicle as the Access For object ("From").
c. Select the receiver on the ground site's sensor as the "To" object.
d. Click Access... in the Reports area to generate an Access report.
e. Right-click on the first Start Time.
f. Extend the Start Time menu and select Set Animation Time.
g. Bring the 3D Graphics window to the front.
h. Click Step Forward (
) in the Animation Toolbar a few times to allow the
volume graphics of the antenna pattern to exit terrain.
9. Generate a Link Budget report (
receiver (
) between the transmitter (
) and the
).
a. Ensure the transmitter on the moving vehicle is selected as the Access For
object and the receiver on the ground site's sensor is set as the "To" object.
b. Click the Link Budget... button in the Reports area to generate a Link
Budget report.
c. Enter a smaller step size (e.g. 1 sec) in the Step text field. This updates the
report step size.
d. Locate the Bit Error Rate (BER) and determine the quality of the
communications link. (e.g. 1.000000e-10 or lower)
10. Create a new custom graph for your transmitter to receiver access that displays
the carrier to noise ratio (C/N).
a. Click the Report & Graph Manager... button in the Access tool.
b. In the Object Type drop-down list, select Access..
c. Select the transmitter to receiver Access object that will be the focus of the
graph.
d. Select the Scenario Styles directory and click the Create new graph style (
) button.
e. Rename the graph CN and click Enter on the keyboard to bring up the
Graph Style properties.
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f. Replace the asterisk (*) with C/N and click Filter.
g. Expand ( ) the Link Information data provider.
h. Select the C/N data provider.
i. Move (
) the C/N data provider to the Y Axis.
j. Click OK to save the custom graph style.
k. Select the new graph style and click Generate... .
l. Enter a smaller step size (e.g. 1 sec) in the Step text field. This updates the
graph step size.
Now that you have done communications from one moving vehicle (satellite), try it with other
moving vehicles like aircraft or ground vehicles.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 80 of 107
Part 15: Analyze Radar Systems
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
STK Radar
The Radar module allows users to build radar system models, to simulate their performance in mission scenarios,
and to analyze their performance.
Case Study
Agilent combined two industry-leading electronic design automation (EDA)
tools, AGI's STK software and SystemVue from Agilent, to enable repeatable
testing and hundreds of "what if" scenarios. You can read more in this case
study: Reducing Flight Testing While Improving Effectiveness.
STK Radar also allows you to model an important characteristic of radar targets - radar cross section (RCS)- to
calculate and display access and to generate reports and graphs of radar system performance.
Radar simulates both monostatic and bistatic radar systems and supports operations in Synthetic Aperture Radar
(SAR) and/or Search/Track modes. Targets may be assigned multiple frequency-dependent radar cross sections
to coincide with the various bands in operation in the scenario.
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Task: Model a Radar and Measure The Quality
1. Create a new scenario (or skip to step 6 if continuing from the previous lesson).
a. Click the Create a new scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
l
Enter a name for the scenario (e.g. STK_Radar).
l
Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the defaults.
c. Click OK.
2. Disable Terrain Server.
a. Open the scenario's (
) properties (
).
b. Select the Basic - Terrain page.
c. Disable the Use terrain server for analysis option.
d. Click OK.
3. Insert a satellite (
) that has a large radar cross section (RCS).
i. Insert a Satellite using the From Standard Object Database method.
i. Insert a Satellite using the From Standard Object Database
method.
ii. Enter 25544 (International Space Station) as the Name or ID.
iii. Click Search.
iv. Select ISS (ZARYA).
v. Click Insert.
AGI Techs Say: When you use AGI's Online Database to
insert the ISS, the orbit may appear jagged. This is
because the orbit step size is set to 300 sec. If you would
like a smoother appearance to the orbit, change the step
size to 60 seconds.
ii. Apply a realistic Radar Cross Section to the Satellite.
i. Open ISS_ZARYA_25544's (
) Properties (
).
ii. Select the RF - Radar Cross Section page.
iii. Disable the Inherit option.
iv. Set the Swerling Case to IV.
Note: Swerling Case IV probability density
function approximates an object with one large
scattering surface with several other small
Page 82 of 107
scattering surfaces. The RCS varies from pulse
rather than from scan to scan.
v. Set the Constant RCS Value to 402 sqm.
vi. Click OK.
Did You Know? You can use an external Aspect Dependent RCS file (*.rcs) to
define the radar cross section for a track. Several example files are available in
this directory: (<STK install folder>\Help\STK\text).
AGI Techs Say: The duty cycle of a radar is the ratio of the pulse width to the pulse-repetition
period. The default value for Pulse Width is 0.1 microseconds.
Page 83 of 107
Task: Create a Radar site that has three separate faces, each scanning a 120 degree
azimuth and an elevation of two (2) degrees to 89 degrees.
1. Insert a place (
) object using the City Database.
a. Using the City Database, search for the city Omaha.
b. When the search results appear, select Omaha, Nebraska.
c. Click Insert.
2. Insert a radar (
) object using the Default method and set it's properties.
a. Attach a radar (
) to Omaha (
).
b. Rename the Radar object 0_120deg.
c. Open 0_120deg's (
) Properties (
).
d. Select the Basic - Definition page.
e. Select the Antenna tab.
f. Select the Model Specs tab.
g. Set the Type to Phased Array.
h. Select the Element Configuration tab.
i. Set the Number of Elements to (X: 39; Y: 39).
j. Select the Beam Direction Provider tab.
k. Ensure Beam Steering is enabled.
l. Move (
) ISS_ZARYA_25544 to the Selected list.
m. Select the Transmitter tab.
n. Enable the Frequency option and set it to .35 GHz.
o. Set the Power to 60 dBW.
p. Click Apply.
3. Constrain the Radar.
a. Select the Constraints - Basic page.
b. Set the Min value for the Azimuth Angle option to zero (0) deg.
c. Set the Max value for the Azimuth Angle option to 120 deg.
d. Set the Min value for the Elevation Angle option to two (2) deg.
e. Set the Min value for the Elevation Angle option to 89 deg.
f. Click OK.
Page 84 of 107
4. Reuse the Radar object and reorient the fields-of-view.
a. Select 0_120deg (
b. Select Omaha (
) radar and click the Copy (
) and click Paste (
) button.
) twice.
c. Rename one of the new Radar objects 120_240deg and other radar to 240_
360deg.
d. Open 120_240deg's (
) properties (
).
e. Select the Constraints - Basic page.
f. Set the Min value for the Azimuth Angle option to 120 deg.
g. Set the Max value for the Azimuth Angle option to 240 deg.
h. Click OK.
i. Open 240_360deg's (
) properties (
).
j. Set the Min value for the Azimuth Angle option to 240 deg.
k. Set the Max value for the Azimuth Angle option to 360 deg.
l. Click Apply to accept the changes and keep the Properties Browser open.
5. Save (
) your scenario.
6. Visualize the antenna pattern.
a. Bring the Properties for 240_360deg (
) to the front.
b. Select the 3D Graphics - Attributes page.
c. Enable the Show Volume option in the Volume Graphics field.
d. Enable the Show Wireframe option.
e. Set the Gain Scale (per dB) to 0.1 km
f. Set the Gain Scale Offset to ten (10) dB.
g. Enable the Set azimuth and elevation resolution together option.
h. Set the Azimuth Resolution to 0.5 deg.
i. Set the Azimuth Start to -120 deg and the Stop to zero (0) deg.
j. Set the Elevation Start to one (1) deg and the Stop to 88 deg.
k. Click OK.
Note: By changing the azimuth and elevation values, you see the
sector that antenna is covering.
7. Bring the 3D Graphics window to the front and Zoom To Omaha (
Page 85 of 107
).
a. Zoom In or Out to view the Antenna pattern.
b. When finished, open 240_360deg's (
Show Volume option.
) properties (
) and disable the
c. Click OK.
Task: Track the International Space Station.
1. In the Object Browser, right-click ISS_ZARYA_25544 (
a. Expand Omaha (
) and select Access (
) and select all three radar (
) objects.
b. Click the Report & Graph button.
2. Create a custom graph that shows the probability of detection (PDET).
a. In the Object list, only select one of the three accesses. (ex. Satellite-ISS_
ZARYA_25544-To-Place-Omaha-Radar-0_120deg only).
b. Right-click on the MyStyles directory.
c. Extend the New menu and select Graph.
d. Rename the graph, PDET.
e. Expand the Data Provider called Radar SearchTrack.
f. Select S/T PDet1 and Move it to the Y-axis.
g. Click OK.
h. In the Objects List, multi-select all three (3) accesses.
i. Select the PDET custom graph and click Generate.
Note: On the graph, you can zoom in to one of the tracking
periods. You can determine if only one or multiple faces of the
radar site track the ISS.
AGI Techs Say: A search track value greater than 50% is acceptable for
probability of detection (S/T PDet1 = 0.50).
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 86 of 107
).
Part 16: Integrating STK with Matlab
Integrating STK and MATLAB
The STK Integration module allows you to control STK from an external application, such as MATLAB. There are
several options for how to integrate STK and MATLAB, although the most common method is using Microsoft
COM. Using the COM interface, MATLAB users can connect to STK's Object model and Connect interfaces.
AGI Techs Say: The Object Model can easily be explored using the .get and .invoke commands
from the MATLAB prompt. Additionally, there are code snippets in the STK Help for the STK Object
Model.
Did You Know? There are several MATLAB code samples installed with STK. They can be found in
C:\Program Files (x86)\AGI\STK 11\CodeSamples\Automation.
AGI Techs Say: The STK Programming Interface help system has several code snippets to assist
you.
AGI Techs Say: A recorded PowerPoint presentation (https://p.widencdn.net/ysl141m/Part16_
Integration_JB)and MATLAB script accompanies this lesson. It is recommended that you follow the
presentation while performing the tasks.
Page 87 of 107
Task: Create a New Instance of STK from Inside MATLAB
Let's use MATLAB to create a new instance of STK.
1. Launch MATLAB.
2. Select the Home tab.
3. Click the Open button.
4. Browse to the location of the saved script file.
5. Open the STK_MATLAB_Script.m file.
MATLAB is up and running. You can use the MATLAB script file to build a simple STK scenario
from which you will extract data into MATLAB.
When connected to STK via MATLAB, while creating your variable, using the Tab key after
periods enables Intellisense, which displays all of the options available off of the current
object. Try it.
1. Create a new instance of STK11.
2. In MATLAB, type the following code into the Command window:
app = actxserver('STK11.application')
3. Click Enter.
app.UserControl = 1
4. Grab a handle on the STK application root.
root = app.Personality2
5. Click Enter.
Page 88 of 107
Task: Create a New STK Scenario from Inside MATLAB
Now that you have launched STK via the MATLAB interface, let's see if we can create a new
scenario and set the time period via MATLAB.
1. Create a new scenario, analysis period, and reset the animation time.
2. In MATLAB, place your cursor to the left of the percentage sign for Task 2.
3. Select CTRL + Enter.
%%
%Task 2
4. Create a new scenario.
scenario = root.Children.New('eScenario','DIY_Matlab')
5. Set the analytical time period.
scenario.SetTimePeriod('Today','+24hr')
6. Reset the Animation Time.
root.ExecuteCommand('Animate * Reset')
Task: Insert and Configure Objects
With a new scenario created, it's time to populate the scenario with objects. Take a moment
to create a target and a LEO satellite using MATLAB.
1. In MATLAB, place your cursor to the left of the percentage sign for Task 3.
2. Select CTRL + Enter.
%%
%Task 3
3. Add a target object to the scenario.
target = scenario.Children.New('eTarget','GroundTarget');
4. Move the Target object to a desired location.
target.Position.AssignGeodetic(50,-100,0)
5. Add a satellite and configure its properties.
satellite = scenario.Children.New('eSatellite','LeoSat')
6. Propagate the satellite object's orbit.
root.ExecuteCommand(['SetState */Satellite/LeoSat Classical
TwoBody "',scenario.StartTime,'" "',scenario.StopTime,'" 60 ICRF
"',scenario.StartTime,'" 7200000.0 0.0 90 0.0 0.0 0.0'])
Page 89 of 107
Task: Compute Access Between Objects
You have a scenario with a target object and a satellite object. You can determine when the
satellite object can access the target object.
1. Browse to the The STK's Programming Interface help files.
2. Locate and manually enter code into MATLAB to compute an access between two
STK Objects using the IAgStkObject interface. The access is between the satellite
object and the target object.
a. The location of the required code snippets is STK Programming Interface > Using Core Libraries -> STK Object Model -> MATLAB Code Snippets.
b. Locate the STK Objects -> Access page.
c. Type the following code
access = satellite.GetAccessToObject(target)
access.ComputeAccess
3. Retrieve access interval start/stop times.
4. In MATLAB, place your cursor to the left of the percentage sign for Task 4.
5. Select CTRL + Enter.
accessDP = access.DataProviders.Item('Access Data').Exec
(scenario.StartTime,scenario.StopTime);
accessStartTimes = accessDP.DataSets.GetDataSetByName('Start
Time').GetValues
accessStopTimes = accessDP.DataSets.GetDataSetByName('Stop
Time').GetValues
Task: Retrieve Satellite Altitude During Access
1. Retrieve and view the altitude of the satellite during an access interval.
2. In MATLAB, place your cursor to the left of the percentage sign for Task 5.
3. Select CTRL + Enter.
satelliteDP = satellite.DataProviders.Item('LLA
State').Group.Item('Fixed').ExecElements(accessStartTimes
{1},accessStopTimes{1},60,{'Time';'Alt'})
satellitealtitude = satelliteDP.DataSets.GetDataSetByName
('Alt').GetValues
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
For additional MATLAB training with STK, refer to "Using MATLAB for STK Automation", a PDF document included in
the STK installation directory in the ObjectModel\pdf folder.
Page 90 of 107
Part 17: Model Aircraft Missions with Aviator
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
Lesson 17.1: Aviator
Aviator provides an enhanced method for modeling aircraft - more accurate and more flexible than the standard
Great Arc propagator.
Case Study
The U.S. Marine Corps used AGI's software as a pre-mission planning tool to
optimizeexpensive combat assets (UAVs, planes) and protect warfighters in
Afghanistan's physically challenging terrain. You can read more in this case
study: U.S. Marine Corps Combat Development Command Fields STK-Base UAS
Tool in Afghanistan.
With Aviator, the aircraft's route is modeled by a sequence of curves parameterized by well known performance
characteristics of aircraft, including cruise airspeed, climb rate, roll rate, and bank angle. The precise state of an
aircraft at any given time can be computed analytically - swiftly and without excessive data storage needs.
An aircraft using Aviator is defined by the type of aircraft and by the mission it performs. This structure allows you
to utilize an aircraft for muchmore than simple linear travel.
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Task: Create a New Aviator Scenario, Model a Runway, Location to Fly Over, and an
Aircraft with the Aviator Propagator
1. Create a new scenario with the default time periodl.
a. Click the Create a new scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
l
Enter a name for the scenario (e.g. STK_Aviator).
l
Define the analysis start and stop times or accept the defaults.
c. Click OK.
2. Add Analytical Terrain to the scenario.
a. Right-click on the scenario (
) and open the Properties (
).
b. Select the Basic - Terrain page.
c. Click the Add button and browse to the terrain data file (e.g. PtMugu_
ChinaLake.pdtt).
a. The example file is located at <STK Install
Folder>/Help/stktraining/sampls/SeaRangeResources
Note: Depending on the desired terrain file, you may need
to change the file type when browsing.
Note: The STK Install folder is different depending on what
version of STK you have installed. The STK 64 bit version
install folder is C:/Program Files/AGI/STK 11.
d. Click OK to apply changes and dismiss the Properties Browser.
3. Load ARINC424 Runways using the Aviator Catalog Manager.
a. Open the Utilities menu and select Aviator Catalog Manager.
b. Expand Runways and select ARINC424 Runways.
c. Enable the Use Master Data File and click the ellipsis (
) button.
d. Browse to <STK Install Folder>/Help/stktraining/samples.
e. Select FAANFD18 and click Open.
f. In the Aviator Catalog Manager, click Save.
g. Close the Aviator Catalog Manager.
4. Insert a Ship (
) object using the Define Properties (
) method.
a. Change the Altitude Reference to MSL.
b. Change the Route Calculation Method to Specify Time.
c. Click Insert Point.
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d. Set the Latitude to 33.5 deg.
e. Set the Longitude to -120 deg.
f. Click Insert Point.
g. Add three (3) hours to the Time and Click OK. The ship's location will be
used as one of the aircraft's waypoints. We need to make sure that the ship
exists during the aircraft's entire flight.
5. Model an aircraft with the Aviator Propagator.
a. Insert an aircraft using the From Standard Object Database method.
b. Type Hornet in the Name field and click Search.
c. Select FA-18C_Hornet and click Insert.
d. Close the Search Standard Object Database.
6. Define an aircraft route using the Aviator Propagator.
a. Open FA-18C_Hornet's (
) Properties (
).
b. Right-click on Phase 1 and select Insert First Procedure for Phase (
button.
)
c. In the Select Site Type field, select Runway from Catalog.
i. In the Filter field, type mugu and click the Enter key on your
keyboard.
ii. Select POINT MUGU NAS (NAVAL BASE VEN 03 21) and click Next.
iii. Select Takeoff in the the Select Procedure Type field.
iv. Set the Runway Altitude Offset to seven (7) feet.
v. Enable the Use Terrain for Runway Altitude option.
vi. Click Finish.
vii. Click Apply.
d. When the Flight Path Warning appears, set the Globe Reference to MSL
and click OK.
e. Right-click on the Takeoff procedure and select Insert Procedure After (
i. Select STK Object Waypoint and link to Ship1 (
).
ii. Set the Offset Mode to Bearing/Range (relative to North).
iii. Set the Range to ten (10) nm.
iv. Click Next.
Page 93 of 107
).
v. Select Enroute (
).
vi. Set the name to Fly 10 nm from Ship.
vii. Disable the Use Aircraft Default Cruise Altitude.
viii. Set the MSL Altitude to 15000 ft.
ix. Set the Nav Mode to Arrive on Course.
x. Set the Arrive on Course option to 180 deg (True).
xi. Click Finish.
xii. Click Apply.
f. Right-click on the Fly 10 nm from Ship procedure and select Insert
Procedure After.
i. Select the End of Previous Procedure option.
ii. Click Next.
iii. Select the Basic Maneuver page and set the name to Straight to 2
nm.
iv. Ensure the Strategy is set to Straight Ahead and enable the
Downrange stop condition.
v. Set the Downrange stop condition to two (2) nm.
vi. Click Finish.
vii. Click Apply.
g. Right-click on the Straight 2 nm procedure and select Insert Procedure
After.
i. Select the End of Previous Procedure (
) option.
ii. Click Next.
iii. Select the Basic Maneuver option and set the Name to Weave.
iv. Set the Strategy to Weave and enable the Downrange Stop
Condition.
v. Set the Downrange Stop Condition to one (1) nm.
vi. Click Finish twice.
vii. Click Apply.
h. Right-click on the Weave procedure and select Insert Procedure After.
i. Select the End of Previous Procedure (
ii. Click Next.
Page 94 of 107
) option.
iii. Select Basic Maneuver and set the Name to Loop.
iv. Set the Strategy option to Loop.
v. In the Load Factor option, set the Bottom of Loop option to five (5)
G-SeaLevel.
vi. Click Finish.
vii. Click Apply.
i. Right-click on the Loop procedure and select Insert Procedure After.
i. Select the End of Previous Procedure (
) option.
ii. Click Next.
iii. Select Basic Maneuver and set the Name to Left Turn.
iv. Set the Strategy option to Simple Turn.
v. Click Finish.
vi. Click Apply.
j. Multi-select the Weave and Loop procedures.
k. Right-click on the two procedures and extend the Copy, Paste, Edit menu.
l. Select the Copy Procedures option.
m. Right-click on the Turn Left procedure and select Insert Procedure After.
i. Select the Super Procedure (
) option.
ii. Set the Name to Repeat Maneuvers.
iii. Click Next.
iv. Click the Load Procedures from Clipboard button. You will notice the
two procedures are added.
v. Click Finish.
vi. Click Apply.
n. Right-click on the Repeat Maneuvers procedure and select Insert
Procedure After.
i. Select the Runway from Catalog option.
ii. In the Filter field, type mugu and click Enter on your keyboard.
iii. Select the POINT MUGU NAS (NAVAL BASE VEN 03 21) option.
iv. Click Next.
v. Select Landing.
vi. Change the Approach Mode to Intercept Glideslope.
Page 95 of 107
vii. Set the Runway Altitude Offset to seven (7) ft.
viii. Enable the Use Terrain for Runway Altitude option.
ix. Click Finish.
x. Click Apply.
o. Check Fuel State.
i. Right-click on the Landing procedure and select Profile Data at Final
State.
ii. Locate the Fuel Consumed and note the value.
iii. Close the Profile Data at Final State window.
p. Enable dynamic wind from NOAA ADDS Service (internet required (
i. Click the Mission Wind Model (
)).
) button to enable wind.
ii. Change the Model type to NOAA ADDS Service.
iii. Click the Manage Data... change.
iv. Click the Add Current Forecast button.
v. Click OK to accept and dismiss the ADDS Message Properties.
q. Enable dynamic wind from NOAA ADDS Service (No internet).
i. Click the Mission Wind Model (
) button to enable wind.
ii. Set the Wind Speed to 50 nm/hr.
iii. Click OK.
r. Recheck the Fuel State.
i. Right-click on the Landing procedure and select Profile Data at Final
State.
ii. Locate the Fuel Consumed and note the value.
iii. Close the Profile Data at Final State window.
s. Add Crosswinds to the Mission Profile Window.
i. Right-click on the Mission Profile Window.
ii. Select Profile Options/Properties.
iii. Enable the Secondary Y Axis.
iv. Select Course Crosswind.
v. Click OK.
t. Return to the 3D Graphics window and Reset (
Page 96 of 107
) the animation.
u. Zoom To the FA-18C_Hornet (
v. Play (
).
) the animation and watch the flight.
Note: As you watch the nose of the aircraft, you will see crosswinds
affect the aircraft. This is called a crab angle.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 97 of 107
Part 18: Design Trajectories with Astrogator
Required Product Licenses: This training requires additional licenses to complete. You can obtain
the necessary license for the training by visiting http://www.agi.com/eval or calling AGI support.
Astrogator
STK Astrogator is a specialized analysis module for interactive orbit maneuver and spacecraft trajectory design. It
supports an unlimited series of events for modeling and targeting a spacecraft's trajectory, including impulsive
and finite burns and high-fidelty orbit propagation, while providing the ability to target specified and optimized
orbit states that reference customizable control and result parameters.
Case Study
STK Astrogator was used to plan a series of maneuvers to get NASA's LADEE
spacecraft to the Moon. Learn more in the case study: AGI Software for NASA
Ladee Flight Dynamics System.
A Mission Control Sequence (MCS) - defines the trajectory as a sequence of events ("segments"), functioning as a
graphical programming language in which each segment dictates how Astrogator calculates the trajectory before
passing the spacecraft's state on the next segment. Some of the MCS segments available include:
l
Initial State ( ) - This segment can be used to define the initial conditions of your MCS, or of a
subsequence within the MCS.
l
Launch (
) - This segment can be used to model a simple spacecraft launch from Earth or another central
body.
Follow ( ) - This segment can be used to set the spacecraft to follow another vehicle (Satellite, Launch
Vehicle, Missile, Aircraft, Ship, or Ground Vehicle) at a specified offset, and to separate from that vehicle
upon meeting specified conditions.
l
Maneuver (
l
l
) - This segment can be used to model a spacecraft maneuver.
Propagate (
) - This segment can be used to model the movement of the spacecraft along its current
trajectory until meeting specified stopping conditions
The Component Browser provides access to all available, customizable elements needed to construct a
trajectory with Astrogator. This includes MCS segments, propagators, stopping conditions, central bodies, engine
models, and more.
Page 98 of 107
Task: Model a Spacecraft Object Using STK Astrogator
1. Create a new scenario with a two (2) day analysis interval.
a. Click the Create a new scenario (
) button.
b. In the New Scenario Wizard, set the following options:
l
Enter a name for the scenario (e.g. STK_Astrogator).
l
Define the analysis start and stop times so the stop time is two (2)
days after the start time.
c. Click OK.
2. Insert a new satellite (
) with the Astrogator Propagator.
a. Insert a new satellite (
) using the Define Properties method.
b. Open the Properties (
) of the Satellite (
).
c. Select the Basic - Orbit page, and set the Propagator to Astrogator.
3. Set the Satellite's Initial State in the MCS to Keplerian with a 0.015 Eccentricity.
a. Select the Initial State in the Mission Control Sequence (MCS).
b. Select Keplerian from the Coordinate Type drop-down list.
c. Enter 0.015 in the Eccentricity text field.
4. Create a new Periapsis stopping condition for the existing propagate (
segment and remove the duration stopping conditions.
)
a. Create a new Periapsis stopping condition.
i. Select the existing propagate (
) segment in the MCS.
ii. Click the New... icon ( ) in the Stopping Conditions section on the
right or right-click on the existing Duration stopping condition and
select New... ( ).
iii. Select Periapsis in the New stopping condition window and click
OK.
b. Remove the Duration stopping condition.
i. Select the Duration stopping condition in the Stopping Conditions
section on the right.
ii. Click the Delete icon ( ) or right-click on the Duration stopping
condition and select Delete ( ).
c. Right-click on the propagate segment in the MCS, select Rename, and
rename it PropToPeriapsis.
Page 99 of 107
AGI Techs Say: You can set multiple stopping conditions for a
propagate segment. Astrogator stops propagating the satellite when it
meets one of the stopping conditions.
5. Click Run Entire Mission Control Sequence (
MCS.
) on the MCS toolbar to run the
6. Insert a new maneuver segment(
) after the first propagate segment (
a Delta V Maneuver value of 1,000 m/sec along the Velocity Vector.
) with
a. Click on the first propagate segment to highlight it and click Insert Segment
( ) on the MCS toolbar or right-click on the first propagate segment and
select Insert After... from the menu.
b. Select Maneuver in the Segment Selection window and click OK.
c. Set the Delta V Maneuver to 1,000 m/sec.
d. Keep the default for the Attitude Control as Along Velocity Vector
option.
AGI Techs Say: There are two different types of Maneuvers available,
impulsive and finite. The Impulsive maneuver calculates a state by
adding the defined delta-v vector to the velocity of the final state of the
previous segment. The finite maneuver is basically a propagate
segment with thrust.
7. Insert a new apoapsis propagate segment (
maneuver segment (
) named PropToApoapsis after the
).
a. Insert a new Propagate segment in the MCS.
i. Click on the Maneuver segment to highlight it and click Insert
Segment ( ) on the MCS toolbar or right-click on the Maneuver
segment and select Insert After... from the menu.
ii. Select Propagate in the Segment Selection window and click OK.
b. Create a new Apoapsis stopping condition.
i. Select the new Propagate (
) segment in the MCS.
ii. Click the New icon ( ) in the Stopping Conditions section or rightclick the existing Duration stopping condition and select New...
iii. Select Apoapsis in the New stopping condition window and click
OK.
c. Remove the Duration Stopping Condition.
i. Select the Duration stopping condition in the Stopping Conditions
section on the right.
Page 100 of 107
ii. Click the Delete icon ( ) or right-click on the Duration stopping
condition and select Delete ( ).
d. Right-click on the propagate segment in the MCS, select Rename, and
rename it PropToApoapsis.
e. Give each segment a unique color.
i. Double-click the segment in the MCS or right-click the segment and
select Properties...
ii. Select the desired color in the Color drop-down menu from the Edit
Segment window.
iii. Click OK to dismiss the Edit Segment window.
8. Click Run Entire Mission Control Sequence (
MCS.
) on the MCS toolbar to run the
Target Sequences
Target Sequence (
) are used to calculate and subsequently define the required maneuver characteristics
necessary to meet specified or optimal mission parameters. Once a target sequence is inserted into the MCS, it is
defined in three steps:
l
l
l
Insert the segments that define the controls or results of the targeting calculation inside the target
sequence.
Select the target sequence and define one or more profiles. These target profiles set the type of search
algorithm that is used or could alter the properties of the targeted segments to affect the course of the
MCS run without halting the trajectory creation.
Configure the target sequence by accessing the properties of each profile.
A target sequence runs the segments nested within it and applies profiles to the run according to its configuration.
When applying a search profile such as a Differential Corrector, the target sequence adjusts the targeted values
over multiple iterations in an attempt to converge at a solution within the defined tolerance. The results of a target
sequence are applied to the MCS to produce a trajectory that meets the goals you need to achieve.
Page 101 of 107
Task: Use a Target Sequence to Raise Your Orbit
1. Add a target sequence (
segment (
) named RaiseOrbit after the PropToApoapsis
).
a. Click on the PropToApoapsis segment to select it.
b. Click Insert Segment ( ) on the MCS toolbar or right-click
PropToApoapsis and select Insert After... from the menu.
c. Select Target Sequence in the Segment Selection window and click OK.
2. Add the maneuver and PropToApoapsis segments to the new target sequence.
a. Drag and drop the Maneuver (
nest it.
) segment into the Target Sequence to
b. Drag and drop the PropToApoapsis segment into the Target Sequence
after the Maneuver to nest it.
3. Select the maneuver's Delta V Magnitude as a Control Parameter (
).
a. Click on the Maneuver segment within the Target Sequence in the MCS.
b. Click the Target icon (
) to the right of the Delta V Magnitude to make it
the independent variable. The selection is confirmed by the appearance of
a check mark over the icon (
).
4. Add the Altitude of Apoapsis as a new Result for the PropToApoapsis segment.
a. Click on the PropToApoapsis segment within the Target Sequence in the
MCS.
b. Click Results... below the MCS to bring up the User-Selected Results
window.
c. Expand ( ) Keplerian Elems and select Altitude of Apoapsis.
d. Click Insert Component (
) to select it as the dependent variable.
e. Click OK to close the User-Selected Results window.
5. Configure the Target Sequence.
a. Access the Differential Corrector profile's properties for the Target
Sequence.
i. Select the Target Sequence, RaiseOrbit, in the MCS.
ii. In the Profiles section on the right, click the Properties icon (
) to
open the Variables page or right-clicking the Differential Corrector
and select Properties... from the menu.
b. Set up the Targeter.
Page 102 of 107
i. Select the Use option in the Control Parameters and Equality
Constraints (Results) sections.
ii. Set the Desired Value for the Altitude of Apoapsis to 7500 km.
iii. Click OK to dismiss the Differential Corrector Properties window.
iv. Change the Action to Run Active Profiles in the drop-down list.
6. Click Run Entire Mission Control Sequence (
MCS.
) on the MCS toolbar to run the
7. Click Apply Changes in the Profiles and Corrections section of the parameters
to apply the current values.
8. Click Run Entire Mission Control Sequence (
MCS to look at the final trajectory design.
Page 103 of 107
) on the MCS toolbar to run the
Task: Use a Target Sequence to Raise the Altitude at Periapsis
1. Add a target sequence (
sequence (
) named RaiseAltitude after the RaiseOrbit target
).
a. Click on the RaiseOrbit segment to highlight it and click Insert Segment ( )
on the MCS toolbar or right-click on RaiseOrbit segment and select Insert
After... from the menu.
b. Select Target Sequence in the Segment Selection window and click OK.
c. Right-click on the new Target Sequence in the MCS, select Rename, and
rename it RaiseAltitude.
2. Insert a new maneuver segment (
) within the RaiseAltitude target sequence (
).
a. Click on the target sequence's Return Segment ( ) to select it and click
Insert Segment ( ) or right-click on the target sequence's return segment
and select Insert After... from the menu.
b. Select Maneuver in the Segment Selection window and click OK. Keep the
default Delta V Magnitude and Attitude Control.
3. Select the maneuver's Delta V Magnitude as a Control Parameter.
a. Click on the Maneuver segment within the Target sequence in the MCS.
b. Click the Target icon (
) to the right of the Delta V Magnitude to make it
the independent variable. The selection is confirmed by the appearance of
a check mark over the icon (
).
4. Insert a new periapsis propagate segment (
target segment's maneuver segment (
) named PropToPeriapsis after the
).
a. Insert a new Propagate Segment in the RaiseAltitude target sequence.
i. Click on the Maneuver segment to highlight it and click Insert
Segment ( ) on the MCS toolbar or right-click on the Maneuver
segment and select Insert After... from the menu.
ii. Select Propagate in the Segment Selection window and click OK.
b. Create a new Periapsis stopping condition.
i. Select the new Propagate (
) segment in the MCS.
ii. Click on the New icon ( ) in the Stopping Conditions section or
right-click on the existing Duration stopping condition and select
New...
Page 104 of 107
iii. Select Periapsis in the New Stopping Condition window and click
OK.
c. Remove the Duration stopping condition.
i. Select the Duration stopping condition in the Stopping Condition
section on the right.
ii. Click the Delete Segment icon ( ) or right-click on the Duration
stopping condition and select Delete.
d. Right-click on the new propagate segment in the MCS, select Rename, and
rename it PropToPeriapsis.
5. Add the Altitude of Periapsis as a new Result for the PropToPeriapsis segment.
a. Click on the PropToPeriapsis segment within the Target Sequence in the
MCS.
b. Click Results... below the MCS to bring up the User-Selected Results
window.
c. Expand ( ) Keplerian Elems and select Altitude of Periapsis.
d. Click Insert Component (
) to select it as the dependent variable.
e. Click OK to close the User-Selected Results window.
6. Give each segment a unique color.
a. Double-click the segment in the MCS or right-click the segment and select
Properties...
b. Select the desired color in the Color drop-down menu from the Edit
Segment window.
c. Click OK to dismiss the Edit Segment window.
7. Configure the Target Sequence.
a. Access the Differential Corrector profile's properties for the Target
Sequence.
i. Select the Target Sequence, RaiseAltitude, in the MCS.
ii. Select the Default Profile (Differential Corrector).
iii. In the Profiles section on the right, click the Properties icon (
) to
open the Variables page or right-click the Differential Corrector and
select Properties... from the menu.
b. Set up the Targeter.
i. Select the Use option in the Control Parameters and Equality
Constraints (Results) option.
Page 105 of 107
ii. Set the Desired Value for the Altitude of Periapsis to 3000 km.
iii. Click OK to dismiss the Differential Corrector Properties window.
iv. Change the Action to Run Active Profiles in the drop-down list.
8. Click Run Entire Mission Control Sequence (
MCS.
) on the MCS toolbar to run the
AGI Techs Say: By default, the 3D Graphics window displays the
iterations of a search profile during an MCS run before it converges on
a final solution.
9. Click Apply Changes in the Profiles and Corrections section of the parameters
to apply the current values.
10. Click Run Entire Mission Control Sequence (
MCS to look at the final trajectory design.
) on the MCS toolbar to run the
11. Add a final propagate segment at the end of the MCS that ends after a half day.
a. Insert a new Propagate segment in the MCS.
i. Click on the RaiseAltitude target sequence in the MCS and click
Insert Segment ( )on the MCS toolbaror right-click on the
RaiseAltitude target sequence and select Insert After... from the
menu.
ii. Select Propagate in the Segment Selection window and click OK.
The default Duration stopping condition is a half day (43200 sec).
b. Click Run Entire Mission Control Sequence (
run the MCS.
) on the MCS toolbar to
AGI Techs Say: View the Astrogator's Guild (http://www.astrogatorsguild.com) for additional
tutorials, scenarios, blogs, and white papers.
Warning: Don't forget to save your work!
Page 106 of 107
Become Level 2: STK Master Certified
Now that you have completed Comprehensive training, you are well-prepared to complete the STK Level 2
Certification test. The STK Master Certification is the second level of certification and validates your ability to
perform more advanced STK modeling and analysis through use of add-on modules (Pro, Coverage,
Communications, Integration, Aviator).
What's in the Test?
The Level 2 - STK Master Certification test consists of four scenario development exercises and one bonus
exercise. There are multiple choice questions for each exercise. You have 14 days from registration date to
complete Master Certification. The following objectives are tested:
l
l
l
Model Your Systems - Advanced Aircraft (Aviator), Advanced Satellite (Astrogator), Missile, Sensor,
Constellation, Chain, Advanced Constraints, Terrain, Communications, Radar, RF Environment models, STK
External Propagator, Vehicle Attitude
Analyze Your Systems - Access Tool, Report & Graph Manager, Custom Reports, Coverage, Figure of Merit,
Analysis Workbench (Vector Geometry Tool)
Extend STK - Connect commands to model objects, enable constraints, and generate reports
Once you earn your STK Master Certification, you will receive an STK Master Certification and an insulated thermos!
Register now on our on our website (http://www.agi.com/training/certification).
Page 107 of 107
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