The Beginner`s Cooking Manual - SV

The Beginner`s Cooking Manual - SV
The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Revised copy 2012
Prepared by the Chronic Disease Prevention – Children & Youth Program, Health Living
Division, Public Health Services, City of Hamilton. Sponsored by Child and Youth
Workgroup of Healthy Living Hamilton.
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Disclaimer
The Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living – Beginner’s Cooking Manual was developed by
City of Hamilton Public Health Services and sponsored by the Child and Youth
Workgroup of Healthy Living Hamilton. The material contained in this Manual is provided
for general guidance only and while it may be used and reproduced by other individuals
and organizations, the City of Hamilton assumes no liability or responsibility for any loss
or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly by the information in this
Manual or resulting from unsafe food handling practices.
Healthy Living Hamilton was funded in part by the Government of Ontario. The views
expressed in these materials do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of
Ontario.
For more information about the Beginner’s Cooking Manual, please contact:
Chwen Johnson, MSc, RD
Public Health Dietitian
Chronic Disease Prevention
Healthy Living Division
Public Health Services
Tel: 905-546-2424, ext. 5020
Fax: 905-546-3658
Email: [email protected]
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Table of Contents
DISCLAIMER................................................................................................................................2
Background...............................................................................................................................6
Aim............................................................................................................................................6
The Lesson Plans .....................................................................................................................6
The Recipes..............................................................................................................................7
GROUP MANAGEMENT..............................................................................................................8
Helping Students To Set Ground Rules ....................................................................................8
Managing Your Group...............................................................................................................8
Contracting Good Behaviour.....................................................................................................8
Setting Your Standard...............................................................................................................9
Tips for Cooking with Kids.........................................................................................................9
Planning Ahead.......................................................................................................................10
Before Each Session...............................................................................................................10
Start /During Session ..............................................................................................................10
End of Session or During Meal Time ......................................................................................11
Facilitator Set-up Checklist .....................................................................................................11
Clean-up Checklist ..................................................................................................................11
SAMPLE FORMS .......................................................................................................................12
Sample School Letter..............................................................................................................13
Sample Participant Letter........................................................................................................14
Permission Letter ....................................................................................................................15
Attendance Sheet ...................................................................................................................16
Lesson Review Sheet .............................................................................................................17
Menu Mind Map ......................................................................................................................18
Task Assignment Sheet ..........................................................................................................20
LESSON PLANS ........................................................................................................................21
Lesson Plan 1 - Hand Washing, Kitchen Safety, Knife Safety ................................................22
Lesson Plan 2 - Danger Zone, Cross-Contamination..............................................................32
Lesson Plan 3 - Manual Utensil & Dishwashing......................................................................38
Lesson Plan 4 - Reading a Recipe, Kitchen Equipment..........................................................42
Lesson Plan 5 - Measuring Ingredients...................................................................................49
Lesson Plan 6 - Basic Table Manners, Setting a Table ..........................................................53
Lesson Plan 7 - Trimming the Fat, Taste the Flavour .............................................................58
Lesson Plan 8 - Dietary Fibre..................................................................................................60
Lesson Plan 9 - Vegetables and Fruit .....................................................................................62
Lesson Plan 10 - Healthy Eating.............................................................................................67
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BEGINNER COOKING CLUB RECIPES....................................................................................70
Salads .....................................................................................................................................71
Snacks ....................................................................................................................................77
Entrees....................................................................................................................................84
Breakfast.................................................................................................................................94
Vegetables ............................................................................................................................100
Desserts................................................................................................................................104
APPENDIX A ............................................................................................................................109
Certificate of Completion.......................................................................................................110
Student Evaluation Form.......................................................................................................111
Parent Volunteer Evaluation .................................................................................................113
APPENDIX B ............................................................................................................................115
Suggested Start-up Equipment .............................................................................................116
Additional resources:.............................................................................................................118
How to Cook Pasta ...............................................................................................................119
How to Blanch and Refresh Vegetables................................................................................120
How to Cook Rice .................................................................................................................121
Cooking Terms and Techniques ...........................................................................................122
ADDITIONAL HANDOUTS .......................................................................................................123
Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating ...............................................................................123
Trim the Fat, Taste the Flavour .............................................................................................123
Fat Facts ...............................................................................................................................123
Fit Fibre Into Your Day ..........................................................................................................123
5 to 10 a Day for Better Health..............................................................................................123
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Acknowledgements
Healthy Cooking, Healthy Kids – Youth Cooking Club Manual (2000) was co-written by Michelle
Tobias-Murray, BA, B. Ed. and the Nutrition Promotion Program, Public Health and Community
Services Department, City of Hamilton.
Public Health Services, Healthy Living Division, Chronic Disease Prevention, Children & Youth
Program and Healthy Living Hamilton would like to thank the following individuals and groups for
their valuable contribution to the revision of the Healthy Cooking, Healthy Kids – Youth Cooking
Club Manual to the Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living – Beginner’s Cooking Manual (2006):
•
The Child and Youth Workgroup of Healthy Living Hamilton.
•
The parents and administration from local schools running the program since 2000.
•
Veronica Kozelj, Public Health Inspector, Health Protection Division, Public Health
Services, City of Hamilton.
Healthy Living Hamilton was funded in part by the Ontario Ministry of Health & Long Term Care,
Community & Health Promotion Branch.
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Introduction
A cooking club is a great opportunity for everyone to learn how to prepare and enjoy healthy
recipes in a fun and inviting kitchen atmosphere. Cooking clubs for healthy eating was part of a
broader vision for healthy living in the City of Hamilton.
Background
Cooking clubs are popular for children between the ages of 11 to 13. Children at this age show
an eagerness to learn to cook. They are open to learn life skills and are beginning to take
increased responsibility for their health and well being. Healthy decisions about diet, activity and
tobacco use made early in life can result in less chronic diseases later in life.
Aim
Cooking clubs introduce children to healthy eating in a practical setting that encourages skill
development. The cooking club experience will help children:
• Identify and select healthy foods
• Understand how to prepare foods using good sanitary practices
• Prevent injury in the kitchen
• Learn basic food preparation skills
Cooking clubs give children a chance to appreciate healthy foods firsthand and gain confidence
in their ability to produce tasty and healthy meals.
The Lesson Plans
This manual consists of 10 lesson plans and 1 take-home introductory package. The first three
lesson plans are compulsory as they contain important information students must know
regarding food safety and sanitation. Facilitators can choose to implement some or all of the
remaining lesson plans with their group. Each lesson plan consists of the following 5
components:
•
•
•
•
•
Get Ready
Objectives
Key Points
Cooking Activity
Cleaning Activity
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outlines things to prepare before the class.
outlines goals of the lesson plan.
outlines potential discussion points of the lesson plan.
outlines cooking instructions and discussion points.
outlines things to do for cleaning and sanitation.
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Overheads for each lesson plan are provided to help facilitators summarize key points of the
lesson. A “Menu Mind Map” is included in the sample forms session. It can be used as a paper
activity for students while dinner is cooking or as a take-home assignment.
The Recipes
There are 30 recipes in the manual grouped into 5 categories: Salads, Snacks, Entrées,
Breakfasts and Vegetables. Recipes provide the amounts of ingredients required for serving 4,
8 and 12 persons. The facilitators will choose 1-3 recipes each week to try to create a balanced
meal with the group. For example, if you choose the recipe for spaghetti and meatballs, you can
purchase milk to drink and fresh fruit for dessert to create a simple balanced meal.
The sample task assignment sheet can be used to help divide up cooking tasks among club
members. For efficient use of time, try to choose recipes that require different cooking
equipment or tools.
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Group Management
Helping Students To Set Ground Rules
Providing a take-home introductory package for students and parents (sample provided) before
the first cooking session will enable the students to become familiar with some preliminary
ground rules. With the students, discuss which behaviors the club members will absolutely not
tolerate. For example, “No swearing”, “No horseplay”, “No teasing”. The fewer hard fast rules
you have, the less likely you are to corner yourself. Remember, this is an after school activity
and students are there to have fun. So a “No loud talking” rule may not be appropriate.
In addition, look at your facility for safety hazards. Do you need rules to protect club members
from personal injury? Do you need to have rules to protect personal property? Are there school
rules that you should be aware of? You will need to enforce these.
Managing Your Group
•
Convey your expectations
•
Ensure rules being followed
•
Make students accountable by having them sign an agreement (e.g. student contract)
•
Assign tasks and ensure their completion
•
Remind students to clean as they go
•
Be firm, but respectful
Contracting Good Behaviour
A student contract is included in the take-home introductory package. For this to be meaningful
for the club members, they should help to set the criteria for each behaviour concept outlined on
the handout “Positive Participation”. Student involvement in setting their own standards goes a
long way to building a partnership between students and facilitators. When students suggest the
standard for behaviour, they are more likely to commit to it. This also creates the expectation
that those around them also have to commit to this behaviour.
Facilitators can continue to build an atmosphere of mutual respect and mature behaviour by
dealing positively with students who disrupt others. For example, “ That’s an excellent point,
Jane, but you are interrupting Tom.” Remind students that they are young adults and that adultlike behaviour is what you expect from them. On the other hand, dangerous or malicious
behaviour should be dealt with swiftly. Depending on the severity of the behaviour, or the
responsiveness of the student to comply, this action should be done in one of the following
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ways: talk to the student in private about his or her behaviour, ask the student to leave, or call
the administrator on duty to remove the student. Do not get into a shouting match with a
student. Do not take the student off alone somewhere to talk to him or her. Discipline in view of
others. Adults, even in non-contentious situations, put themselves at risk (of accusations) when
alone with a student.
Setting Your Standard
Have the club members address facilitators by their last names (Mr. Mrs. Ms. etc.). By doing this
you maintain a position of authority, which you may be required to exercise in a disciplinary
situation. Generally, the students accept and expect to be on a last name basis with adults in
school related activities. The mutual respect that you build into your sessions is key to a
comfortable rapport with the students.
Modeling behaviour is also important. Your attitude towards the students, as a group or
individually, will be reflected in their attitudes. If you want students to be scrupulous about hand
washing, so must you be. If you want them to respect you, you must also respect them.
Finally, when assigning students to work with each other, take into consideration their
personalities and requests. If a student tells you they really can’t work with so-and-so, consider
their request. You may possibly avoid a lot of conflict. Be flexible when assigning groups.
Tips for Cooking with Kids
•
Show and Tell. Show them and explain to them everything you’re doing and why.
•
Give them tasks. Tell them what needs to be done and assign tasks.
•
Compliment them. Be encouraging and proud of their efforts – big or little.
•
Keep an eye on them. Never leave them unattended when they are cooking.
•
Teach them life skills. Explain to the kids how to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables,
why they should wash them, and how to store them.
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General Planning Notes for
Volunteers/Facilitators
Planning Ahead
Make copies of the take-home package to distribute to each student to review prior to the start
of the cooking club.
The following administrative forms should be completed or collected from participants prior to or
on the first day of the cooking club:
Locate or assemble First-Aid kit and have on hand for every session.
Permission Letter signed by participant’s parent/guardian. (in take-home package)
Student Contract signed by participant and parent/guardian. (in take-home package)
Create a student (participant) information binder with permission forms and health
information in case of emergency. Be sure to have this on hand at every cooking session.
Determine which parent volunteer(s) will be responsible for the student information
binder.
Before Each Session
Determine tasks for each parent volunteer: facilitation of lesson plans, shopping,
administration…etc.
Purchase groceries. Ensure that you can properly store them until the club meeting.
Photocopy the required number of recipes, handouts, “Menu Mind Map”. If your
photocopy budget does not allow you to give copies of everything to each student,
consider making and using overheads where practical.
Request for an overhead projector if necessary.
Check grocery list and supplies. Is there any equipment you don’t have that is absolutely
necessary?
Check your equipment. Is everything where it should be and in proper working order?
Decide where cooking stations will be for each group for the session.
If last session, prepare Certificates of Completion.
Start /During Session
Do a quick attendance. Are students who are not present accounted for?
Review ground rules, safety and sanitation guidelines from the take-home package.
Review lesson plan objectives, background information, recipes. Ask and answer
questions based on learning objectives.
Choose a tip from each category to be inserted into the “Menu Mind Map” as a paper
activity if time is permitted.
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Assign groups and tasks using Task Assignment Sheet. Combine duties if there are not
enough students for each task.
Remind groups to complete set-up checklist.
While dinner is cooking, complete a paper activity, e.g. puzzle or questionnaire (if time
permits).
Assign cleaning tasks.
End of Session or During Meal Time
Complete lesson review sheet with the whole group.
Ask: What of tonight’s meal would you make at home?
Ask: Which recipes will we make next week?
Review clean-up list.
Complete clean up.
Check pantry supplies.
Ensure the kitchen is clean and all food and equipment has been put away properly.
Check and close up room.
If this is your last session, distribute certificates of completion.
Facilitator Set-up Checklist
Bags and backpacks put away.
Long hair tied back.
Outdoor coats removed, apron on.
No gum or candy.
Hands washed before handling food/equipment.
Recipe reviewed and understood.
Work areas wiped and sanitized.
Equipment and ingredients assembled.
Clean-up Checklist
Equipment washed, dried and returned to proper place.
Sinks and drains are food free and clean.
Countertops and cutting boards have been washed and sanitized.
Stove tops and burners are grease and stain free.
Stove elements and ovens are turned off.
Ingredients have been properly covered and put away.
Garbage and recyclable materials sorted and disposed of.
Linens have been put away or set aside for laundering.
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SAMPLE FORMS
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School Letterhead
Sample School Letter
Date:____________
Dear Parents,
__________________________ School is considering starting a weekly after school Beginner’s Cooking
Club. The cooking sessions can run for a series of 6 -10 weeks, with each session lasting about 2 hours.
A cooking club is a great opportunity for students in grades 6 through 8 to learn how to prepare and
enjoy healthy recipes in a fun, safe, and inviting atmosphere. Children aged 11-13 are eager to learn to
cook and are beginning to take increased responsibility for their own health.
Parent volunteers will:
• shop for recipe ingredients (each parent volunteer will not need to do this)
• guide the students through a series of nutritionally balanced food and kitchen safety rules each
week
• help students prepare a meal each week
• learn how to serve healthy foods on a budget
• share the meal with the club members
Students will:
• learn simple food preparation techniques
• prepare a meal and serve the food with proper table etiquette
• share the meal with their club member friends and parents
• help with clean-up
• take the recipe home to share and re-create with their family
Each session of the series of cooking classes will be held _________________________ (where). The
cost per student to join the club will be ________________________weekly. The student and parent
volunteers will be having supper at school the evening that the Beginner’s Cooking Club has its session.
Parents will need to arrange for pick-up of their child(ren) at the end of every session.
If you are interested in having your child participate in the club, or if you are interested in becoming a
parent volunteer, please sign the form below and indicate which day of the week is preferred for club
sessions.
Thank you for your interest.
School Principal:_________________________ School Public Health Nurse:_____________________
Student Name and Grade: ______________________________________________________________
Parent Name:________________________________
Yes. I am interested in a parent volunteer position. Phone number:________________________
Day of week preferred (please circle): MON
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WED
THU
FRI
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School Letterhead
Sample Participant Letter
_________________________(School Name) Beginner’s Cooking Club
Dear Parents:
___________________(School Name) is ready to cook! Your son/daughter expressed an
interest in our after-school Beginner’s Cooking Club. The cooking sessions will be offered
every _______, starting __________ (Date), for a series of ___ weeks, ending on_________.
Each session will run from ______ to _____ pm.
The Beginner’s Cooking Club is an opportunity for students in grades 6-8 to learn how to
prepare and enjoy healthy recipes in a fun, safe and inviting atmosphere. Students will:
™ Learn simple food preparation techniques
™ Prepare a meal and serve the food with proper table etiquette
™ Share the meal with their club member friends and volunteers
™ Help with clean-up
™ Take the recipe home to share and re-create with their family
Each session of the Club will be held in the ________________(location) . The cost per student
to join the club is $_______ weekly. Every session, students will get to eat what they have
prepared.
Please complete the attached permission form to have your child participate in the Club, submit
the indicated fee ($_____ total for all sessions), and have your child return all items to the office
on __________date.
Happy Cooking!
Principal
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Cooking Club Coordinator
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School Letterhead
Permission Letter
____________(School Name) Beginner’s Cooking Club
Student Name: ________________________________________________________________
Student’s Home Phone Number: __________________________________________________
Emergency Contact and Phone Number: ___________________________________________
Health Card Number (with version code): ___________________________________________
Family Doctor’s Name and Phone Number: _________________________________________
Food Allergies: _____________________ Food Intolerances:___________________________
Dietary Restrictions: ____________________________________________________________
Medical Conditions /medications necessary to note regarding performance in the Beginner’s
Cooking Club:
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
How will your child go home at the end of each session?
Must wait to be picked up.
Travel home has been arranged with: ________________________________________
I give permission for my son/daughter ___________________________________ to participate
(child’s name)
in the ____________________(school’s name) Beginner’s Cooking Club. I am submitting $____
with this form to cover the fee for the full 6 sessions.
Parent’s signature: ____________________________ Date: ___________________________
PRINT PARENT’S NAME: ______________________________________________________
Please submit all monies in an envelope labeled “Beginner’s Cooking Club” with your child’s
name.
PLEASE RETURN THIS FORM BY ____________________________(Date)
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Attendance Sheet
________(School Name) Beginner’s Cooking Club
Student
Date
Date
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Date
Date
Date
16
Date
Date
Date
Date
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Lesson Review Sheet
Planning and organization
Recipes
What went well?
What worked well?
What didn’t go well?
What didn’t work?
Next time remember to:
Next time remember to:
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Menu Mind Map
Choose a tip you learned today from each category and write into the proper
bubble on this weeks mind map.
Cooking Tip:
Lesson Plan #____
Safety Tip:
Sanitation Tip:
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Student Cleaning Schedule
Task
Wk 1/Name
Wk 2/Name
Wk 3/Name
Wk 4/Name
Wk 5/Name
Wk 6/Name
Wash
dishes/pots/utensils
Rinse
dishes/pots/utensils
Dry
dishes/pots/utensils
Put away
dishes/pots/containers
Clean
counter/stove/table
top
Students are expected to:
9 Wash and dry the utensils, equipment, dishes and pots they used for the recipe
9 Clean their work station
9 Scrape their plates after eating
9 Put away ingredients they used
9 Participate in cleaning rotation
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Task Assignment Sheet
Recipe:_______________________
#
Task
Responsible
Person (s)
1
2
3
4
5
6
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Lesson Plans
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Lesson Plan 1 - Hand Washing, Kitchen Safety,
Knife Safety
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
•
•
Participants will be able to state the importance of hand washing.
Participants will be able to model proper hand washing.
Participants will be able to state at least 3 tips for kitchen safety.
Participants will be able to state at least 2 tips for safe knife use.
Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
Welcome participants to the first cooking session. Introduce facilitators by the name they
wish to be addressed. Briefly describe your role and objectives of the Beginner’s
Cooking Club.
Ask students to introduce themselves, or introduce themselves to someone near them
that they do not already know.
With students, develop a list of ground rules. (Overhead #1)
Hand out the “Positive Participation” sheet, brainstorm the behavior criteria for the key
concepts in “Positive Participation”. Have students fill in the criteria for each concept.
(You may have to write criteria on a board or large piece of paper so students can quickly
fill in blanks).
Hand out student contracts. Review with students. Have them sign their names. Instruct
the students to take their contracts home to be signed by their parents to be returned the
following week.
Key Points to Cover
•
•
•
Discuss importance of hand washing:
- reduce risk of getting and giving common cold to others.
- help keep food safe.
- help prevent the spread of disease.
Demonstrate proper hand washing steps (Overhead #2)
Discuss when to wash your hands. (Overhead #3)
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•
Discuss tips for safe knife use. (Handout)
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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Student Contract
Name:
______________________
Cooperation:
I will cooperate with my club and team members to get work done
Responsibility:
I will be responsible for all work assigned to me (cooking and cleaning)
Respect:
I will show respect to all those working with me (teachers and students)
i.e. I will call adults by their last name (i.e. Miss, Mrs. Mr.)
Behaviour:
I will conduct myself according to the club rules and requirements
I agree to all of the above cooking club conditions.
Student Signature: ________________
Parent/Guardian Signature:
_______
Date:________________________________________________________
Please return to facilitator by next club meeting.
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Positive Participation
Discuss with your club members and facilitator the following statements:
Cooperative people are:
Responsible people are:
Respect others by:
Behaviour that is positive is:
____________________________________________________________________________
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Overhead #1
• Respect each other
• No running, no shouting
• No swearing, no horseplay, no teasing
• No gum chewing
• No loose hair, no loose sleeves
• Clean your work area
• Wash your dishes
• Wash your hands before cooking and eating
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Overhead #2
Wash Your Hands
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Overhead #3
Handwashing & Personal Hygiene
When to wash your hands
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Before touching food or utensils
Before eating
After eating
Before and after using the bathroom
After coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose
After touching your hair or face
After handling raw meat, poultry or fish
After handling toxic or hazardous substances
Personal Hygiene
ƒ
If you are sick (infectious), stay home.
ƒ
Arrive to cook with neatly clipped nails and clean clothing, hair, mouth and body
Before beginning to cook do the following in order:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Tie your long hair back.
Put on a clean apron. Wearing an apron reduces the possibility of food contamination
from outside sources.
Wash your hands with hot water and soap and dry them well.
If you have a cut or sore, keep it covered with a bandage.
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Handout
Tips for Safe Knife Use
9 Choose the right knife for the job. Do not use a large knife to peel potatoes, for example.
9 Always use a sharp knife. A dull knife requires more pressure and will slip away from food
more easily.
9 Always cut away from yourself.
9 Always cut on a proper cutting surface. Again, this will prevent the knife from slipping.
9 Place a damp cloth under your cutting board to prevent the board from moving.
9 Hold the knife firmly by the handle when using. This allows for greater control.
9 When chopping, mincing, dicing etc., keep the tip of the knife blade on or as close to the
cutting board as possible.
9 Never wave the knife around in the air when gesturing.
9 If you need to leave what you are doing, don’t take your knife with you.
9 To carry a knife: hold it by your side, firmly by the handle, tip pointing down.
9 If a knife begins to fall, never try to catch it – step back and let it fall.
9 Always wash knives separately from other dishes.
9 Never leave a knife in a sink of water where others may not see it.
9 Store knives safely in their proper place
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Handout
Basic Rules for Kitchen Safety
Prevent Burns:
• Always use dry oven mitts or potholders to lift hot things.
• Keep hot handles turned to the centre of the stove.
• When checking under the lid of a pot, tip the lid away from your face to allow
steam to escape.
• When walking past people with a hot pot, warn them it is hot.
• Ask for help when carrying hot items that are too heavy for you.
• Wear close fitting clothing and jewelry that does not dangle, this will prevent
getting caught on hot items.
• Wear an apron to keep clothing close to your body and away from heat
sources.
Prevent Cuts:
• Use the correct knife for the job.
• Always use a sharp knife, dull one requires more pressure and may slip.
• Wash knives separately and store in their proper place.
• Cut away from your body.
• Do not use knives to open cans, cut string or sharpen pencils.
• Sweep large pieces of glass with a broom and dustpan, pick-up smaller
pieces with a wet paper towel.
• If a knife begins to fall, never try to catch it – step back and let it fall.
• Always pay attention to what you are doing.
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Prevent Falls:
• Walk, do not run.
• Pick-up dropped food and wipe up spills immediately.
• Keep work area floors clear of objects you may trip over.
• Use a stepladder to reach high places.
• Never horseplay and always watch where you are going.
Prevent Electrical Shocks:
• Never use electrical equipment near water, or with wet hands. Be sure
electrical cords are not damaged.
• If a machine is not working, unplug it, report it to the person in charge and
place an “out of order” sign on it.
• Be sure an appliance is turned off before plugging it in.
• Never use a machine that you are unfamiliar with.
Prevent Poisoning:
• Use chemicals only after you have carefully read the label.
• Never store chemicals in cupboards with food.
• Always store chemicals in their original containers.
• When using chemicals on food preparation surfaces or tools, be
certain that all residue is rinsed completely away.
Prevent Fires:
• Keep flammables away from heat sources.
• Never leave cooking food unattended.
• Clean grease from stovetops and ovens.
• Make sure electrical equipment is in good working order.
• Make sure pilot lights in gas stoves are working.
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Lesson Plan 2 - Danger Zone, CrossContamination
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participants’ names off the attendance sheet.
Collect signed Student Contracts from participants.
Objectives
•
•
Participants will be able to explain what danger zone is and how to keep foods out of the
danger zone.
Participants will be able to explain cross-contamination and list at least 2 ways it
commonly occurs.
Key Points to Cover
•
•
•
Discuss the danger zone: (Overhead #4 & 5)
- The danger zone is the temperature range between 4°C & 60°C. (Overhead #6)
- Keep food out of the danger zone. Bacteria will multiply quickly in the danger zone.
- Keep hot food hot (60°C) and cold food cold (4°C).
- Do not allow hazardous food to be in danger zone longer than 2 hours when
preparing food.
Explain cross-contamination and how it commonly occurs (Overhead #6)
- Raw food or its juice come in contact with cooked food.
- Contaminated hands touching food.
- Using the same equipment to handle raw and cooked foods.
Discuss how to prevent cross-contamination. (Overhead #7)
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
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•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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Overhead #4
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Overhead #5
The Danger Zone
ƒ The Danger Zone is the range in which bacteria grow most rapidly.
ƒ The Danger Zone is from 4 degrees C – 60 degrees C
(40 degrees F – 140 degrees F).
ƒ It is very important to keep foods out of the Danger Zone.
ƒ Foods that have not been properly refrigerated or kept very hot for 2 hours
or more are usually in the Danger Zone.
ƒ Foods do not need to look funny or be foul smelling to contain a lot of
bacteria.
ƒ When in doubt throw it out.
ƒ Bacteria grow exponentially.
ƒ One single bacterium splits every 15 minutes.
ƒ Bacteria can increase from 1 to 1 million in five hours.
ƒ Bacteria, eat, produce waste and multiply.
ƒ Bacteria are not killed by refrigeration or freezing.
ƒ
High cooking temperatures will kill most bacteria.
ƒ
Eating food that has a high amount of bacteria can lead to sickness or
death.
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Overhead #6
Cross-contamination
What is cross-contamination?
Cross-contamination is when one food comes in contact with a surface or utensil that has been
contaminated by another.
How to prevent cross-contamination?
ƒ
When you use tools or a cutting board to prepare meats, poultry or fish, do not
re-contaminate that food after cooking by placing it on the same unwashed surface.
ƒ
Wash and sanitize a surface that has been used to prepare meat, poultry or fish before
using it again. Do this before moving onto the next task.
ƒ
Take special precautions with poultry, which could be contaminated with salmonella, and
ground beef, which could be contaminated with E. coli.
ƒ
It is best to have a cutting board to be used exclusively for meats, poultry and fish.
ƒ
Wash and sanitize a surface that has been used to prepare highly allergic goods such as
nuts, eggs or shellfish, surfaces before using it again.
ƒ
Use only clean utensils and equipment.
ƒ
When you have finished preparing one recipe, clean up completely before moving onto
the next.
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Overhead #7
Storing, Heating and Cooling Foods
ƒ
Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold.
ƒ
Store uncooked meat, poultry and fish below all other foods in the refrigerator,
especially from ready-to-eat foods.
ƒ
Refrigerator temperature should be: 40 degrees F (4 degrees C) or less at all times.
ƒ
Using a refrigerator thermometer will help keep food storage in this range.
ƒ
Do not put really hot containers of food in the refrigerator as it will increase the
temperature above 40 degrees F (4 degree C).
ƒ
Cool foods quickly before refrigerating by placing pot in a clean sink of very cold water.
Stir frequently. Leave container uncovered. This process is sped up if the pot is
placed on a rack to allow water to circulate under it.
ƒ
Frozen foods should not be thawed at room temperature, but in the refrigerator,
under cold running water, or in the microwave oven.
ƒ
Do not refreeze defrosted foods.
ƒ
When reheating foods they should be brought to a full boil before using.
ƒ
Do not taste foods with cooking utensils.
ƒ
Do not taste foods twice with the same spoon. Wash it properly or use another.
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Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 3 - Manual Utensil & Dishwashing
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
•
Participants will be able to explain dishwashing procedures using two or three
compartment sinks.
Participants will be able to clean dishes using 3-compartment sinks.
Participants will be able to follow proper procedures to clean work area.
Key Points to Cover
•
•
Discuss manual utensil & dishwashing using two and three compartment sinks.
Demonstrate the set up of sink(s) for dishwashing.
If your facility has only one sink for dishwashing, follow these steps:
1. Get 2 plastic bins large enough to accommodate cups, plates, cutting boards, knives. etc.
2. Use one sink for warm water and detergent.
3. Fill the first bin with clear water minimum 43°C for rinsing.
4. Fill the second bin with a sanitizing solution in it.
•
Discuss how to sanitize work area.- demonstrate how to prepare sanitizing solution using
household bleach e.g. 1 tablespoon per gallon of water. (Overhead #8)
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks
Help students get organized and manage time
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Overhead #8
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Sanitizing Solution for Dishwashing
A chlorine solution of not less than 100 p.p.m. available chlorine, at a temperature of not less
than 45 degrees C.
Examples using household bleach:
a) 1 tablespoon per gallon of water.
b) 1/2 ounce per gallon of water.
c) 1/2 teaspoon per litre of water (1000 mL).
d) 2 mL per litre of water (1000 mL).
Change water as often as necessary.
** The Hamilton Wentworth District Public School Board has a policy that does not allow the use
of bleach as a cleaning agent by custodial staff due to the environmental impact when used in
large quantities.
Public schools are to use a product called F-25, a concentrated quaternary ammonium chloride
product. The product is approved as a sanitizing agent by Public Health Services.
To sanitize equipment, utensils, cutting boards and surfaces at 200 ppm of active quaternary,
use 2ml of F-25 to 1 litre of water.
Sanitizing Solution for Work Sufaces, Equipment, Cutting Boards
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Mix 1 teaspoon (5 mL) of household bleach with 2 cups (500 mL) of water.
Do not add other cleaning products. Pour mixture into a spray bottle.
Label the spray bottle clearly.
Use the solution to sanitize equipment, work surfaces, cutting boards and utensils.
Wash your hands after completing sanitizing.
Prepare a new solution each time.
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 4 - Reading a Recipe, Kitchen
Equipment
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
Participants will be able to identify 4 parts of a recipe and follow recipe instructions.
Participants will be able recognize, and put a name to utensils commonly used in the
kitchen.
Key Points to Cover
•
•
Discuss how to read a recipe; introduce 4 parts of a recipe. (Overhead #9)
- Read the entire recipe – Get the ingredients ready to use.
- Arrange your ingredients in an orderly line on the counter.
Discuss kitchen equipment: (Overhead #10 & 11)
- Display an array of kitchen utensils on a table in front of the students. Introduce
each kitchen utensil, its name and function(s).
- Ask participants to choose all the utensils needed for today’s recipes.
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
Assign tasks.
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•
Complete clean-up list.
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Overhead #9
Reading a Recipe
A Recipe has 4 parts:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Name
Yield & preparation time
Ingredients
Instructions
Name
The name of the recipe tells you what the recipe is preparing.
Yield & Preparation Time
Yield tells you how many people you can expect to serve from a recipe or how much it makes.
Preparation time tells you how long it will take to prepare this recipe. Will it be ready when you
want it to be?
Ingredients
The ingredients section tells you what you need and how much. The ingredients section of the
recipe is very important to read well in advance of preparation.
Instructions
The instructions tell you what to do with the ingredients. Make sure you understand all terms
and techniques before you begin cooking.
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
For Reference
Kitchen Tools
Liquid Measuring cups
These are made of clear glass or plastic marked with lines that measure 1 or more cups or parts
of a cup and are used to measure liquids.
Dry measuring cups
These are made of metal or plastic and come in a set that includes ¼, 1/3, ½, and 1 cup sizes.
They usually nest one inside the other and are used to measure flour, sugar, and other dry
ingredients.
Measuring spoons
These come in metal or plastic sets. Most sets include spoons ranging from 1/8 teaspoon to 1
tablespoon. They can measure both liquid and dry ingredients.
Grater
For grating or shredding cheese, carrots, and other foods into fine or coarse pieces.
Strainer/Sieve
A bowl-shaped basket made of metal mesh and attached to a long handle. The tiny holes in the
strainer make it possible to separate liquids from solids.
Colander
A plastic or metal utensil shape like a bowl and punched with holes. It is used fro draining pasta,
vegetables, and other foods.
Wooden spoons
For gentle, no-clang stirring
Vegetable peeler
For taking skins off apples, potatoes, carrots and other vevegatles and fruits.
Metal spatula
For flipping omelets and pancakes; comes in metal or plastic for non-stick pans.
Baking sheet
A shallow, rectangular pan that usually measures about 15 by 10 inches. It is used for baking
cookies, thin cakes, and other items.
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For Reference
Wire whisk
For blending, egg beating, and stirring lumps out of sauce.
Paring knife
This is the smallest in the family of knives. It’s the knife that peels, seeds, pits fruits and
vegetables, swirls eyes out of potatoes, slits meat, de-caps strawberries, and cuts broccoli or
cauliflower into florets.
Chef knife
The most popular length is 6 to 8 inches long. Aside from any slicing and cutting tasks, these
large knives are used to make food small. They chop parsley (reducing leaves to a handful of
flakes), chop onions into dices and garlic into tiny minced particles.
Serrated knife
This knife has a wavy or saw-toothed edge. A long one is used for slicing bread, while smaller
sizes are for cutting tomatoes and citrus fruits.
Skillet
A wide, shallow pan that comes in sizes ranging from 6 to 10-inches. Most recipes call for a
small, medium, or large skillet rather than a certain size.
Tongs
For turning or grabbing just about any foods, especially fried foods, without piercing.
Pastry brush
For brushing with butter.
Muffin tin
A metal pan containing individual cups. Muffin pans come with small, medium, or large cups
with 6 or 12 cups each. They are used for making muffins and cupcakes.
Pizza cutter
A utensil with a round metal wheel on top and a wooden, plastic or metal handle. The sharp
wheel easily cuts through pizza, dough, and other bread products.
Rolling pin
A heavy wood cylinder-shaped tool with two handles. A rolling pin is used for rolling out dough
and pastry and for crushing crackers into crumbs.
Wok
A large, round pan with sloping sides. A wok is used for stir-frying and for Oriental-style dishes.
Wire cooling rack
A round or rectangular rack used for cooling muffins, breads, cookies, and other baked goods
after they come out of the oven.
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Overhead #10 / Handout
Useful Utensils
Here are some of the utensils you may want to have on hand:
Metal Spatula
Slotted Spoon
Large Spoon
Wooden Spoon
Paring Knife
Garlic Press
Chef’s Knife
Vegetable Peeler
Grater
Potato Masher
Dry Measuring Cups
Tongs
Pizza Cutter
Liquid Measuring Cup
Measuring Spoons
Juicer
Pastry Blender
Pastry Brush
Rolling Pin
Whisk
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Overhead #11 / Handout
Useful Utensils
Here are some of the utensils you may want to have on hand:
Strainer
Cookie Sheet
Egg Beater
Wire Cooling Rack
Colander
Loaf Pan
Cookie Cutters
Cake Pans
Steamer
Roasting Pan
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Wok
Casserole Dish
The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 5 - Measuring Ingredients
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
Participants will be able to state the proper way of measuring dry and liquid ingredients.
Participants will be able to demonstrate proper ways to measure different ingredient.
Key Points to Cover
•
Discuss how to measure different ingredients: (Overhead12 & 13)
- Using measuring cups and measuring spoons as visual aids for participants,
discuss relative sizes of the measuring cups and measuring spoons.
- Using water, flour or brown sugar, have the students follow along as a staff
person/volunteer demonstrates measuring different ingredients.
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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Overhead #12
Measuring Ingredients
For accurate measurement of liquid and dry ingredients use the following methods.
DRY INGREDIENTS: FLOUR, SUGAR, BAKING POWDER, SPICES
When measuring dry
Over the ingredients original
Fill cup(s) so that they are
container, level with a straight
ingredients, first select proper heaping full.
size(s) of measuring cups.
edge.
LIQUIDS: MILK, JUICE, WATER, ETC
Liquid measures are clear
Place cup on flat surface and
glass so that graduated
pour in liquid.
amounts can be easily read.
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Bend down and check the
amount at eye level.
The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Overhead #13
SHORTENING, PEANUT BUTTER, BROWN SUGAR
Use the correct size of
measuring cup.
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Firmly pack the ingredient in
a dry measuring cup by
pressing down on the
ingredient with a spoon or a
rubber spatula.
51
Form a flat surface across the
top by removing any extra
ingredient with the edge of a
knife or metal spatula.
The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Handout
Metric Conversion Chart
¼ tsp.
=
½ tsp.
=
1 tsp.
=
1 ½ tsp.
=
2 tsp.
=
1 Tbsp.
=
2 tbsp.
=
¼ cup (c.) =
1/3 cup (c.) =
½ cup (c.) =
2/3 cup
=
¾ cup
=
1 cup
=
1 ¼ cup
=
1 1/3 cup =
1 ½ cup
=
1 ¾ cup
=
1 2/3 cup =
2 cups
=
1mL
2 mL
5 mL
7 mL
10 mL
15 mL
30 mL
50 mL
75 mL
125 mL
150 mL
175 mL
250 mL
300 mL
325 mL
375 mL
425 mL
400 mL
500 mL
USING THE SCALE
30 g
454 g
=
=
1 oz.
1 lb.
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Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 6 - Basic Table Manners, Setting a
Table
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
•
Participants will be able to state at least 3 basic table manners.
Participants will be able to demonstrate good table manners during mealtime.
Participants will be able to correctly place plate, knives, forks, spoons, glasses on the
table during mealtime.
Key Points to Cover
•
•
Review the basic table manners for kids. (Overhead #14 & 15)
Demonstrate proper way of table setting. (Overhead #16/Handout)
- Gather a set of dinnerware and place them on the table in front of the students.
- Set the table according to the handout provided.
- Ask students to work in pairs and practice setting a table.
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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Overhead #14
Basic Table Manners for Kids
9 Wash hands before sitting down.
9 Sit up straight. Try not to slouch or lean back.
9 Keep your elbows off the table. Elbows take up table space and can be a
danger in knocking plates or glasses.
9 Put a napkin on your lap so that food doesn't get onto your clothes.
9 Wait until everyone is seated and served before starting to eat. If grace is
said, wait to eat until it is completed. Don't giggle during grace.
9 Eat with a fork unless the food is meant to be eaten with fingers.
9 Use utensils quietly without banging them on the table or plate.
9 Don’t stuff your mouth full of food; chew with your mouth closed.
9 Eat slowly, don’t gobble up the food.
9 Don’t speak with your mouth full of food.
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Overhead #15
Basic Table Manners for Kids
9 Don’t make any rude comments about any food being served.
9 Always say thank you when served something. Use the words“please” and
“thank you” when passing dishes to each other.
9 Ask politely for seconds if you want them.
9 Don’t reach over someone’s plate for something; ask for the item to be
passed to you.
9 Don’t pick anything out of your teeth, it’s inappropriate.
9 Burping is not considered polite.
9 Never wave or throw utensils.
9 If you need to leave the table, excuse yourself before going.
9 Wait until everyone has finished eating before getting up from the table.
9 Clear your plate from the table and take it into the kitchen.
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Overhead #16/Handout
Setting the Table
1. Put down the table cloth and the correct number of place mats, if these are
being used.
2. Arrange the place setting on top. A place setting is made up of all the items
each person needs for eating.
3. The plate goes in the centre of the place setting. The fork goes to the left of
the plate, with the tines pointing up. The napkin can go under the fork or to
the left of it. The napkin can also go on top of the plate. The knife is placed
to the right of the plate, with its sharp side pointing in. The spoon is set next
to the knife, and the beverage glass goes above the tip of the knife.
4. If more flatware is needed, place it in the order in which it will be used, from
the outside in.
5. If several dishes or courses are served at one meal, you may need extra
dishes, such as a small salad plate or bowl, or bread and butter plate. The
extra dish goes to the left and slightly above the fork or napkin. A cup and
saucer for hot beverages should go to the right of the spoons.
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Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 7 - Trimming the Fat, Taste the
Flavour
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
Participants will be able to state at least 2 health risks of a high-fat diet.
Participants will be able to state at least 2 ways to reduce dietary fat intake.
Key Points to Cover
•
Discuss health risks of a high fat diet
- heart disease, obesity, diabetes, osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, etc.
•
Discuss ways to trim fat from diet: (Overhead #17/Handout)
- Remove visible fat from meat before cooking.
- Use low-fat cooking methods.
- Use a nonstick pan or vegetable oil spray when cooking.
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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Overhead #17/Handout
Tips for Low-Fat Cooking
•
Remove all visible fat from meat before cooking.
•
Remove the skin from poultry before eating.
•
Drain browned ground beef and transfer to a dish lined with paper towels, blot cooked
meat all over with paper towels, transfer to a colander, then rinse with very hot water.
•
Chill soups and stews to make the removal of fat easier.
•
Instead of frying food, try low-fat cooking methods including broiling, braising,
barbecuing, steaming, stewing, poaching, roasting, baking, stir-frying, or grilling.
•
Reduce or eliminate butter, margarine or oil when preparing foods.
•
Use herbs, spices, vegetable stock, fruit juice or vegetables juice to flavour foods instead
of oil or butter.
•
Cook with plenty of grain products, vegetables and fruit.
•
Use a nonstick pan or vegetable oil spray when cooking eggs, pancakes, or other
breakfast items.
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Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 8 - Dietary Fibre
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads, handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
•
Participants will be able to state at least 2 health benefits of dietary fibre.
Participants will be able to identify high-fibre foods.
Participants will be able to state at least 2 ways to increase fibre intake.
Key Points to Cover
•
•
•
Discuss health benefits of fibre:
- Lower blood cholesterol levels, control blood sugar levels, prevent constipation,
prevent bowel problems, lower risk of certain cancers.
Discuss good sources of fibre: (Overhead #18/Handout)
- Wheat bran, bran cereals, whole grain products, vegetables and fruits, legumes,
oats, barley, psyllium.
Discuss ways to increase fibre intake:
- Start off the day with whole grain cereal.
- Use whole grain flour when baking.
- Snack on raw fruits and vegetable and whole grain crackers.
- Include legumes in the diet more often.
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
• Assign tasks.
• Complete clean-up list.
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Overhead #18/Handout
Good Sources of Fibre
Roll Oats
Legumes
Potato
Almonds
Mango
Turnip
Banana
Peas
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Apple
Whole Wheat Bread
Broccoli
Raisins
Brussels Sprouts
Strawberries
Pear
Brown Rice
Okra
All Bran
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Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 9 - Vegetables and Fruit
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participants’ names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
Participants will be able to state at least 2 benefits of eating vegetables and fruit.
Participants will be able to state the recommended daily intake for vegetables and fruit
and give examples of what counts as one serving.
Key Points to Cover
•
Discuss health benefits of eating 5-10 servings of vegetables and fruit per day:
- Can help reduce risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke.
•
Explain the recommended daily intake and the serving size. (Handout)
- Recommended daily intake: 5-10 servings.
- One medium-sized fruit, 125mL (½ cup) juice, 125mL (1/2 cup) raw, cooked,
frozen or canned vegetables or fruit, 250mL (1 cup) salad, 50mL (1/4 cup) dried
fruit.
•
Discuss ways to increase intake of vegetables and fruit. (Overhead #19 & 20/Handouts)
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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Handout
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Overhead #19/Handout
Tips To Help Your Kids Eat More
• Keep vegetables and fruit available and in sight.
• Include vegetables and fruit with meals and snacks.
• Offer vegetables and fruit when your child is most hungry or thirsty.
• Offer a variety of vegetable and fruit choices.
• Make vegetables and fruit bite-sized or as a “grab-and-go” snack.
• Offer an assortment of chopped vegetables with a low-fat dip or
salad dressing.
• Involve kids in shopping and preparing vegetables and fruit.
• Pay attention to how food is presented. Make it interesting, colourful
and appealing.
• Do not give up if your kids do not like certain vegetables or fruit the
first time, keep trying!
• Be a good role model, eat lots vegetables and fruit yourself.
• Use vegetables and fruit as ingredients (see suggestions next page)
whenever possible.
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Overhead #20/Handout
Different Ways to Offer Your Kids
ƒ Add sliced banana, berries, or dried fruit such as raisins to cereal.
ƒ Add fruit to salads; for example crushed pineapples with coleslaw;
Mandarin orange segments, strawberries, apple chunks or nectarine
slices to greens.
ƒ Add sliced kiwi, berries, orange sections or other chopped fruit to
yogurt.
ƒ Try muffins or snack breads made with zucchini, carrot, banana,
pineapple, apple, or apricots.
ƒ Add generous amounts of chopped vegetables to soups, casseroles,
stews, chili, omelets, spaghetti or lasagna.
ƒ Add lots of vegetable toppings to pizza.
ƒ Make a smoothie with yogurt, fruit and crushed ice.
ƒ Top desserts, such as frozen yogurt with chopped fruit or sliced
berries.
ƒ Replace pop with 100% unsweetened fruit juice.
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For Reference
Vegetable Cuts
Vegetables can be cut in a variety of ways. How you cut your vegetables can give a dish eye
appeal. In other words, it looks good to eat. Whatever shapes you decide on, they must be
uniform or similar sizes for even cooking. The following table will give you some ideas of cuts to
use for your stir-fry.
Medallions (or coins):
Cut on a diagonal:
*use for carrots or zucchini
*use for celery, or green onions
Matchsticks:
Dice (small, medium, or large):
*use for any vegetable
*very good for onions and peppers
Mince:
Half moons:
*use for garlic and ginger
* use for carrots or zucchini
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Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
Lesson Plan 10 - Healthy Eating
Getting Ready
•
•
•
•
Review general planning notes & set-up check list.
Assemble and photocopy (or make overheads) all resource materials needed for the
session: recipes, overheads & handouts. Organize these materials for easy distribution to
students.
Gather supplies needed for the chosen recipes.
Check participant’s names off the attendance sheet.
Objectives
•
•
Participants will be able to identify 2-3 key aspects of Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy
Eating.
Participants will be able to state at least 2 diet tips for a healthy eating.
Key Points to Cover
•
Discuss Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating (Handout)
- Four food groups.
- Recommended number of daily servings for each food group.
- Portion sizes.
•
Guidelines
- Enjoy a variety of foods from each group every day.
- Choose lower-fat foods more often.
Cooking Activities
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review recipes and tips.
Go over the steps necessary to produce the finished products.
Assign groups and tasks.
Help students get organized and manage time.
Demonstrate cooking techniques as needed.
Provide verbal cues or physical assistance for some steps in the recipes.
Cleaning Activity
•
•
Assign tasks.
Complete clean-up list.
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Handout
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The Beginner’s Cooking Club
2006
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Healthy Cooking, Healthy Living
BEGINNER COOKING CLUB RECIPES
SALADS
Caesar Salad
Tossed Salad
Basic Vinaigrette Dressing
Spinach-Orange Tossed Salad
Pasta Salad
68
70
71
85
73
SNACKS
Bruschetta
Pita Pizzas
Crispy Cheese Potatoes
Tacos
Cheesy Quesadillas
Tuna Melt on Pita
74
75
76
77
79
80
ENTREES
Pasta & Spring Vegetables
Chicken & Vegetable Stir-Fry with Rice Noodles
Beef & Broccoli Stir-Fry with Rice
Spaghetti & Tomato Sauce
Meatballs
Chicken Nuggets
81
82
84
86
88
89
BREAKFASTS
Potato Cheese Muffins
French Toast
Denver Scrambled Eggs
Pancake & Waffle Batter
Confetti Omelets
91
92
93
94
96
VEGETABLES
Stir-Fried Vegetables
Broccoli-Onion Casserole
Glazed Carrots
Sweet Pepper Trio
97
98
99
100
DESSERTS
Apple Crisp
Creamy Rice Pudding
Banana Bread
Fruit Salad & Orange-Honey Yogurt Sauce
101
102
103
104
LIGHT MEALS
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Apricot-Filled Oatmeal Bars
105
Salads
Caesar Salad
Preparation time: 35 minutes
Ingredients
Stale bread, cut into ½” cubes
(French, rye or Italian)
Vegetable oil
Garlic powder
Black pepper
Romaine lettuce, shredded
Dressing:
Vegetable oil
Lemon juice
Cold Water
Parmesan cheese
Clove garlic, finely chopped
Dry mustard
Granulated sugar
Salt and pepper
4 Servings
250mL/ 1 cup
8 Servings
500mL/ 2 cups
12 Servings
750mL/ 3 cups
5mL/ 1 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
1/2
10mL/ 2 tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
1
15mL/ 3 tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
1 1/2
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
1/2
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
60mL/ 4 tbsp
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
1
5mL/ 1 tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
5 mL/ 1 tsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
1 1/2
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Preheat oven to 200°F (95°C).
Drizzle the bread cubes with oil. Toss. Sprinkle with the garlic powder and pepper. Bake
at 200 °F (95°C) for 30 minutes or until crisp.
Wash and dry the romaine lettuce. Tear into bite-sized pieces. Place in large bowl and
set aside.
Add croutons to the romaine lettuce.
Whisk together the dressing ingredients in a small bowl.
Pour the dressing over the romaine lettuce and toss gently. Add salt and pepper to taste.
Serve immediately.
Notes: tasty additions include hard-boiled eggs, chick peas, or thinly sliced red onions.
Substitutions:
Substitute one 10 oz. package of fresh spinach for Romaine lettuce.
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Equipment: Caesar Salad
Equipment
– Caesar
• Serrated
knifeSalad
• Small, sharp knife
• Measuring spoons
• Measuring cups
• Baking sheet
• Large mixing bowl
• Wire whisk
• Small bowl
• Cutting board
• Clean tea towels
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Tossed Salad
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Ingredients
Lettuce
Tomato
Carrots
4 servings
1/2
1/2
2
8 servings
1
1
4
12 servings
1 1/2
1 1/2
6
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Wash the lettuce in a colander under running cold water.
Wash tomato & carrots.
Tear lettuce into bite size pieces.
Dice tomatoes into small cubes.
Peel and slice carrots into pieces.
Mix lettuce, carrots and tomato together. Add salad dressing and toss.
Substitutions:
For extra nutrients use Romaine lettuce.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Colander
Small, sharp knife
Vegetable peeler
Cutting board
Large mixing bowl
Tongs
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Basic Vinaigrette Dressing
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Ingredients
Red wine vinegar
Vegetable oil
Water
Granulated sugar
Cloves of garlic, finely chopped
Salt
Pepper
4 servings
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
1
2mL/ ½ tsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
8 servings
125mL/ ½ cup
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
2
5mL/ 1 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
12 servings
175mL/ ¾ cup
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
3
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
Directions:
1. Mix the ingredients in a clean glass jar, put the lid on and shake.
2. Pour over salad greens and toss.
Note: This dressing can be prepared in advance and stored in the refrigerator.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
Liquid measuring cup
Measuring spoons
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Clean glass jar with lid
or plastic container with
tight fitting lid
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Spinach-Orange Tossed Salad
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Ingredients
Baby spinach
11oz (325mL) can mandarin
orange sections, drained
Sliced fresh mushrooms
Olive oil
Lemon juice
Poppy seeds
Salt
Toasted slivered almonds
4 servings
8 oz/ 6 cups
1
8 servings
16 oz/ 12 cups
2
12 servings
24 oz/18 cups
3
250mL/ 1 cup
45mL/3 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
1mL/ 1/4 tsp.
175mL/ ¾ cup
500mL/2 cups
90mL/6 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
5mL/1 tsp.
2mL/1/2 tsp.
325mL/ 1 1/3cups
750mL/ 3 cups
125mL/ ½ cup
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
500mL/2 cups
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Place spinach in a large salad bowl. Rinse with cold water and pat dry.
Add mandarin orange sections.
Slice fresh mushroom and add to spinach.
Toss lightly; cover and chill.
For dressing, in a screw-top jar combine salad oil, lemon juice, poppy seeds, and salt.
Cover and shake well. Chill.
6. Shake again and pour the dressing over the spinach-orange mixture.
7. Toss salad lightly to coat.
8. Sprinkle toasted almonds over top.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Colander
Paper towels
Cutting board
Small, sharp Knife
Large salad bowl
Screw-top jar
Tongs
Can opener
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
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Pasta Salad
Preparation time: 35 minutes
Ingredients
Low-fat sour cream
Low-fat mayonnaise
Lemon juice
Honey mustard
Minced fresh dill
Salt
Black pepper
12-oz medium shell pasta
Imitation crabmeat or tuna
Diced red pepper
Diced green pepper
Chopped green onions
4 servings
75mL/ ¾ cup
75mL/ ¾ cup
10mL/ 2 tsp.
10mL/ 2 tsp.
10mL/ 2 tsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
dash
625mL/2.5 cups
227g/ 0.5 lb.
75mL/ ¾ cup
75mL/ ¾ cup
75mL/ ¾ cup
8 servings
150mL/ 2/3 cup
150mL/ 2/3 cup
20mL/ 4 tsp.
20mL/ 4 tsp.
20mL/ 4 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
1 mL/ ¼ tsp.
1250mL/5 cups
454g/ 1 lb.
150mL/2/3 cup
150mL/ 2/3 cup
150mL/ 2/3cup
12 servings
250mL/ 1 cup
250mL/ 1 cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
1875mL/7.5cups
681g/ 1.5 lbs.
250mL/ 1 cup
250mL/ 1 cup
250mL/ 1 cup
Directions:
1. In a small bowl, combine sour cream, mayonnaise, lemon juice, honey mustard, dill, salt,
and pepper. Refrigerate dressing until ready to use.
2. Cook shells according to package directions. Drain well. Rinse with cold water and drain
again. Transfer pasta to a large bowl.
3. Add crabmeat or tuna, bell peppers, onions, and dressing. Mix well.
4. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small bowl
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Large size pot
Large bowl
Wooden spoon
Colander
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Snacks
Bruschetta
Preparation and cooking time: 10 minutes
Ingredients
Medium tomato
Medium onion
Olive oil
Black pepper
Italian seasoning
Parmesan cheese, grated
Sliced French bread
4 servings
2
1/2
10mL/2 tsp.
dash
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
4 slices
8 servings
4
1
20mL/ 1 tbsp.
dash
30mL/ 2 tsp.
30mL/2 tbsp.
8 slices
12 servings
6
1 1/2
30mL/ 2tbsp.
1 mL/¼ tsp.
45mL/3 tbsp.
45mL/3 tbsp.
1 2 slices
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
Chop tomatoes and onion into small pieces.
Mix all ingredients together.
Put 15mL (1 tbsp) mixture on the top of bread and bake in oven at 350°F (175°C) for 5-7
minutes.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Measuring spoons
Serrated knife
Medium bowl
Wooden spoon
Baking sheet
Oven mitts
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Pita Pizzas
Preparation and cooking time: 45 minutes
Ingredients
Pita style bread (pocket)
Green pepper, finely chopped
Tomato sauce
Mushrooms, sliced
Onion, finely chopped
Medium tomato, chopped
Part-skim mozzarella cheese,
shredded
Dried Basil
Dried oregano
Salt & Pepper
4 servings
2
50mL/1/4 cup
175mL/ ¾ c
50mL/ ¼ c
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
1/2
125mL/ ½ cup
8 servings
4
125mL/ ½ cup
375mL/ 1 ½ cups
125mL/ ½ cup
50mL/ ¼ cup
1
250mL/1 cup
12 servings
6
150mL/ 2/3 cup
550mL/ 2 ¼ cups
150mL/ 2/3 cup
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
1 1/2
375mL/ 1 ½ cups
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2mL/1/4 tsp
2 mL/1/4 tsp
5mL/1 tsp
5mL/ 1 tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
Place pita bread on a baking sheet.
Spread tomato sauce on each pita. Sprinkle evenly with basil, oregano, salt and pepper.
Put onion, green pepper and mushrooms on top of each pita. Sprinkle with cheese.
Bake until cheese melts (about 20 to 25 minutes).
Equipment:
.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Soup spoon
Measuring cups
Baking sheet
Spatula
Chef’s Knife or pizza
cutter
Grater
Oven mitts
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Crispy Cheese Potatoes
Preparation and cooking time: 30 minutes
Ingredients
Idaho potatoes, thinly sliced
Salt
Pepper
Reduced-fat cheddar cheese,
grated
4 servings
1.0 kg / 2.2 lbs
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
1 mL/ ¼ tsp.
50mL/ 1/4 cup
8 servings
2.0kg/ 4.4lbs
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
125mL / 1/2 cup
12 servings
3.0kg/6.6 lbs
5 mL/1 tsp.
5mL/1 tsp
175mL/ ¾ cup
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Line a baking sheet with foil for easy cleanup.
Wash the potatoes well, but don’t peel them. Pat dry.
Slice the potatoes into thin slices.
Place potato slices on a baking sheet. Do not overlap slices. Sprinkle with salt and
pepper.
5. Bake in over 20-25 minutes or until potatoes are tender.
6. Sprinkle cheese over potato slices. Return baking sheet to oven and bake until cheese is
melted, about 1 to 2 minutes. Serve right away.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Aluminum foil
Paper towels
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Cutting board
Baking sheet
Chef’s Knife
Oven mitts
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Tacos
Preparation and cooking time: 35 minutes
Ingredients
Lean ground beef
Medium onion, chopped
Green pepper, chopped
Cloves of garlic, finely chopped
Ground cumin
Chili powder
Canned tomatoes, mashed
Taco shells, soft/hard shells
Low fat cheddar cheese, grated
Salsa, mild, medium or hot
Low fat sour cream
Lettuce, shredded
4 servings
225g/ 0.5 lb.
1/2
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
1 1/2
2mL/ 1/ 2 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
150mL/ 2/3 cup
5
125g/ ¼ lb.
125mL/4 oz.
125mL/4 oz.
1/2
8 servings
450g/ 1 lb.
1
75mL/ 1/3 cup
3
5ml/ 1 tsp.
5ml/ 1 tsp.
300mL/ 1 ¼ cup
10
250g/ ½ lb
250mL/ 8 oz
250mL/ 8 oz
1
12 servings
675g/ 1.5 lb.
1 1/2
125mL/ ½ cup
4 1/2
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
425mL/ 1 ¾ cups
15
375g/ ¾ lb.
375mL/ 12 oz.
375mL/ 12 oz.
1 1/2
Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
2. Put cheese, salsa, sour cream and lettuce in separate bowls in the refrigerator while
preparing the meat.
3. In a large frying pan, brown the meat with the onion, garlic and green pepper. Drain off extra
fat.
4. Stir in the cumin, chili powder and mashed tomatoes. Heat through for 5 minutes.
5. Place the taco shells on a baking sheet and warm them in the oven for 5 minutes.
6. Put the meat mixture in a bowl. Serve with the taco shells and toppings. Let everyone make
his or her own tacos.
Substitutions:
Substitute ground turkey for lean ground beef.
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Equipment: Tacos
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Large frying pan
Wooden spoon
2 French knives
Grater
Cutting boards
Can opener
Potato masher
Liquid measure cups
Dry measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Baking sheet
2 small bowls
4 serving spoons (use soup spoons for toppings)
Spatula
Oven mitts
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Cheesy Quesadillas
Preparation and cooking time: 25 minutes
Ingredients
8-inch (20 cm) whole wheat flour tortillas
Shredded part-skim Mozzarella cheese
Green onions, chopped
Green pepper, chopped
Salsa
Lettuce, chopped
4 servings
4
125mL/ ½ cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
50mL/1/4 cup
1/4
8 servings
8
250mL/ 1 cup
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
125mL/1/2 cup
1/2
12 servings
12
375mL/ 1 ½ cups
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
175mL/ 3/4 cup
1
Directions:
1.
2.
Preheat oven to 350° F (175°C)
Sprinkle tortillas with cheese, green pepper and green onions. Layer another tortilla on
the top and press edges together.
Place tortillas on a baking sheet and bake at 350° F (175°C)
for 10 minutes or until crisp.
Remove from oven and cut into 6 wedges. Top with salsa and shredded lettuce.
3.
4.
Substitutions:
Monterey Jack cheese (low fat) for Mozzarella.
Sweet red pepper for green pepper.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grater
Knives
Baking sheets
Small bowl or plate
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Cutting board
Oven mitts
Spatula
Pizza cutter
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Tuna Melt on Pita
Preparation and cooking time: 20 minutes
1 serving = 1 pita
Ingredients
4 servings
Light mayonnaise
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
15 cm (6”) pita bread
4
Cans (213g/7.5oz) flaked water1
packed tuna, drained
Chopped celery
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
Minced green onion
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
Chopped dill pickles
1
Grated low-fat cheddar cheese
125mL/ ½ cup
8 servings
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
8
2
12 servings
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
12
3
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
2
250mL/ 1 cup
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
3
375mL/1 1/2 cup
Directions:
1. Heat the broiler with the oven rack 10cm (4-5”) from the element.
2. Spread 5mL (1tsp.) of mayonnaise on each pita.
3. Combine tuna, celery, green onions, pickles and remaining mayonnaise in a small mixing
bowl.
4. Spread the tuna mixture over the pitas and sprinkle evenly with the grated cheese.
5. Place on a baking sheet and broil for 3 minutes or until hot and bubbling.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Measuring spoons
Small mixing bowl
Cheese grater
Baking sheet
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
Cutting board
Small, sharp knife
Oven mitts
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Entrees
Pasta with Spring Vegetables
Preparation and cooking time: 40 minutes
Ingredients
Olive oil
Green onions, chopped
Carrots, peeled, sliced
Basil
Green pepper, diced
Chicken broth
Broccoli, cut into florets
Cornstarch (optional)
Cold Water
Pasta, cooked
Salt & pepper
4 servings
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
3
2
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
1
375mL/ 1 ½ cup
1 each
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
1L/ 4 cups
Dash
8 servings
30mL/2 tbsp.
6
4
15mL/1 tbsp.
2
750mL/3 cups
2
30mL/2 tbsp.
90mL/6 tbsp.
2 L/ 8 cups
Dash
12 servings
45mL/3 tbsp.
9
6
25mL/5 tsp.
3
1.125L/4.5 cups
3
45mL/3 tbsp.
125mL/ ½ cup
3 L/ 12 cups
Dash
Directions:
1.
Bring water, salt and little bit of oil to boil and add pasta. Cook pasta while preparing
vegetables.
2.
Heat oil in frying pan over medium heat. Add green onions and carrots; cook for 3
minutes.
3.
Add basil and green pepper. Mix and cook for 4 minutes.
4.
Add chicken stock (broth) and broccoli. Add salt and pepper and cook for 4 minutes.
5.
Dissolve cornstarch in cold water; incorporate into sauce and cook 1 minute. Correct
seasoning.
6.
Serve over hot pasta.
Substitutions:
Choose fresh vegetables depending on seasons. Use sweet red or yellow peppers, asparagus,
snow peas or zucchini.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 large pot
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Slotted spoon
Vegetable peeler
Large frying pan
Small, sharp knife
Colander
Cutting board
Spatula
Small bowls
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Chicken and Vegetables Stir Fry with
Rice Noodles
Preparation and cooking time: 50 minutes
Ingredients
Chicken breast, boneless and
skinless
Broccoli, cut into small pieces
Vegetable oil
Carrots, thinly sliced
Celery, thinly sliced
Bovril (chicken flavor)
cornstarch
Cold water
Soy sauce
Black pepper
Rice noodles
4 servings
175g/ 1/3 lb.
375mL/1 ½ cups
5mL/1 tsp.
250mL/ 1 cup
250mL/ 1 cup
1 pkg.
10mL/2 tsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
125g/ 4 oz.
8 servings
350g/ ¾ lb.
750mL/ 3 cups
10mL/ 2tsp.
500mL/ 2 cups
500mL/ 2 cups
2 pkg.
20mL/ 4 tsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
5mL/1 tbsp.
250g/ 8 oz.
12 servings
525g/ 1 ¼ lbs.
1125mL/4½ cups
15mL/ 3 tsp.
750mL/ 3 cups
750mL/ 3 cups
3 pkg.
30mL/ 1 tsp.
125mL/1/2 cup
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
375g/ 12 oz.
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Cut chicken breast in small thin strips. Put aside.
Turn on stove to high heat. Half fill a medium saucepan with water and heat to boiling.
Cook broccoli in boiling water for 3 minutes. Drain. Put broccoli in cold water and drain
again.
Turn on stove to medium-high heat. Heat oil in a large fry pan. Add chicken strips and
stir-fry until chicken is cooked (5-6 minutes). Add chicken Bovril once chicken is cooked.
Add a little bit of water if the mixture looks dry.
Add broccoli, carrots and celery to the chicken. Stir-fry until vegetables are crisp-tender,
about 6 to 8 minutes.
Mix cornstarch, water and soy sauce in a small bowl. Stir into the chicken and vegetables.
Cook and stir until sauce boils and thickens. Add pepper to taste.
Meanwhile, in a large pot of boiling water, cook the rice noodles until tender but firm; drain.
Serve the chicken mixture over the rice noodles.
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Equipment: Chicken & Vegetable Stir Fry
with Rice Noodles
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chef’s Knife
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Colander
1 medium sauce pan
Vegetable peeler
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
2 small bowls
Large frying pan or
wok
Large pot
Wooden spoon or
spatula
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Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry with Rice
Preparation and cooking time:40 minutes
Ingredients
Beef, round or sirloin, thinly sliced
Broccoli, cut into small pieces
Vegetable oil
Gingerroot, peeled, finely chopped
Cloves garlic, peeled and finely
chopped
Cooked rice
Marinade:
Soy sauce
Water
Sesame oil (optional)
Sauce:
Stock or water
Soy sauce
Granulated sugar
Cornstarch
4 servings
350g/ ¾ lb.
1
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
3
8 servings
700g/ 1 ½ lbs.
2
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
6
12 servings
1050g/2 ¼ lbs.
3
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
9
1 L/ 4 cups
2 L/8 cups
3 L/ 12 cups
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
5mL/ 1 tbsp.
30mL/2 tbsp.
10mL/ 2 tsp.
10mL/ 2 tsp.
45mL/ 3tbsp.
15mL/ 3 tsp.
15mL/ 3 tsp.
75mL/ 1/3 cup
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
150mL/2/3 cups
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
250mL/ 1 cup
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
Directions:
1. To make the marinade, whisk together the soy sauce, water and oil.
Toss with the beef strips to coat. Refrigerate.
2. Wash and cut broccoli florets into bite-sized chunks. Steam the broccoli, uncovered,
above a small amount of boiling water for 3-5 minutes. Drain and spread on a baking
sheet to cool.
3. Prepare ginger and garlic.
4. To make the sauce, whisk together stock, soy sauce, sugar and cornstarch. Set aside.
5. In a wok or large frying pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Swirl gently to coat the
sides of the pan. Cook the ginger and garlic in the hot oil for 10 seconds.
6. Add the beef. Stir fry the beef for 2 to 3 minutes until almost cooked through.
7. Add broccoli and continue to stir fry for 5 minutes. Then add the sauce and continue to
stir fry until clear and thickened.
Substitutions:
Substitute Chinese broccoli or rapini for broccoli.
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Ingredients: Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry with Rice
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small wire whisk
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
Cutting board
Chef’s knife
Paring knife
Large bowl
Small bowl
Fork
Vegetable steamer
Baking sheet
Colander
Small pot
Large pot
Large frying pan or wok
Medium pot with lid
Wooden spoon or spatula
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Spaghetti & Tomato Sauce
Preparation and cooking time: 60 minutes
Ingredients
Medium onions, chopped
Garlic cloves, finely chopped
Vegetable oil
Canned tomatoes, 28 oz./796 mL
Tomato paste, (5.5oz/156mL can)
Dried basil
Dried oregano
Red pepper flakes
Sugar
Salt & Pepper
Spaghetti
4 servings
1
2
5mL/1 tsp.
1
1/2
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2 cups/ 112g
8 servings
2
4
10mL/ 2 tsp.
2
1
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
10mL/ 2 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
4 cups/ 225g
12 servings
3
6
15ml/1 tbsp.
3
1 1/2
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
15mL/ 3 tsp.
3mL/ ¾ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
6 cups/ 337g
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Prepare onions and garlic as directed.
In a large pot, heat the oil. Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil until soft.
Add the tomatoes, tomato paste, basil, oregano, red pepper flakes and sugar. Break the
tomatoes up with a potato masher.
Heat to boiling, stirring constantly; then reduce the heat and simmer uncovered for 20 to
30 minutes until the sauce begins to thicken.
Add salt, pepper and more seasoning if needed.
* To cook dry spaghetti: Bring large amount of water to a boil; add spaghetti and cook according
to package directions or al dente (tender but firm), about 10minutes. Drain well.
Note: Add extra vegetables to this sauce such as 2 to 3 stalks of chopped celery, a grated
carrot or ½ chopped green pepper.
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Equipment: Spaghetti & Tomato Sauce
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Potato masher
Large pot
Large frying pan
Wooden spoon
Measuring spoons
Colander
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Meatballs
Preparation and cooking time: 55 minutes
Ingredients
Egg
Dried breadcrumbs
Small onions, finely chopped
Salt
Pepper
Lean ground beef
4 servings
1
50mL/¼ cup
1
2mL/½ tsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
450g/1 lb.
8 servings
2
100mL/ ½ cup
2
5mL/ 1 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
900g/ 2 lbs.
12 servings
3
150mL/ 2/3 cup
3
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
1350g/ 3 lbs.
Directions:
1.
2.
Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
In a large bowl, beat together the egg and breadcrumbs. Stir in the onion, salt and
pepper. Add the meat and knead with wet hands until well blended.
Pinch off 1 large tbsp. (golf ball size) of meat mixture and form into a ball and place on a
baking pan until you have 20 meatballs. (Note: to prevent meat from sticking to your
hands, wet your hands before shaping the meatballs.)
Bake for 25 minutes or until browned and no longer pink inside.
3.
4.
Substitutions:
Substitute ground turkey for lean ground beef.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Large bowl
Wire whisk
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Baking pan
Oven mitts
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Chicken Nuggets
Preparation and cooking time: 40 minutes
Ingredients
Herb-season bread crumb
stuffing
Parmesan cheese
Margarine
Low-fat butter milk
Black pepper
Boneless chicken breast
4 per serving
4 servings
435mL/ 1 ¾ cups
50mL/ ¼ cup
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
50mL/ ¼ cup
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
1 lb./454g
8 servings
875mL/ 3 ½ cups
1310mL/ 5 ¼ cups
12 servings
125mL/ ½ cup
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
125mL/ ½ cup
2mL/ ½ tsp.
2 lbs/908g
175mL/ ¾ cup
135mL/ 9 tbsp.
175mL/ ¾ cup
4mL/ ¾ tsp.
3lbs/1362g
Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 450°F(232°C)
2. Measure stuffing mix into resealable plastic bag. Seal bag and place on flat surface.
Crush crumbs by rolling and pressing rolling pin over bag.
3. Open bag and add Parmesan cheese. Reseal bag and shake to mix thoroughly. Set
aside.
4. Melt margarine.
5. Place melted margarine, buttermilk, and pepper in medium shallow bowl. Stir well with
spoon. Set aside.
6. Rinse chicken breasts and pat dry with paper towels.
7. Place chicken breasts on cutting board. Cut chicken with small, sharp knife into 16
chunks of equal size.
8. Dip each chicken chunk into buttermilk mixture, covering all sides. Let extra buttermilk
mixture drip off. Place 3 dipped chunks at a time into bag of crumbs. Seal bag tightly and
shake until chicken pieces are evenly coated with crumbs.
9. Place coated nuggets on an ungreased baking sheet. Repeat with remaining chicken
chunks.
10. Place baking sheet in oven. Bake nuggets 5 minutes on each side.
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Equipment: Chicken Nuggets
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Resealable plastic
bag (1 gallon size)
Rolling pin
Small saucepan
Medium shallow bowl
Mixing spoon
Paper towels
Cutting board
Small sharp knife
Baking sheet
Oven mitts
Tongs
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Breakfast
Potato Cheese Muffins
Preparation and cooking time: 30 minutes
Ingredients
All-purpose flour
Granulated sugar
Baking powder
Salt
Eggs
2% milk
Cooked mashed potatoes
Grated light cheddar cheese
Margarine, melted
1 serving = 1 muffin
6 servings
250mL/ 1 cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
10mL/ 2 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
1
175mL/3/4 cup
75mL/ 1/3 cup
75mL/ 1/3 cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
12 servings
500mL/2 cup
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
20mL/ 4 tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
2
375mL/ 1 ½ cups
150mL/ 2/3cup
150mL/ 2/3cup
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F). Line 12 muffin tins with paper cups or spray with
vegetable oil spray.
2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt.
3. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, beat the eggs well with an electric mixer or a wooden
spoon.
4. Stir in the milk, mashed potatoes, grated cheese, and melted margarine. Mix well
5. Add the egg mixture to the flour mixture and stir just until mixed.
6. Spoon the batter into the paper lined muffin tins and bake at 200°C (400°F) for 25
minutes, or until firm and slightly browned.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Muffin pan
Muffin paper cups
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
Cheese grater
Potato masher
Vegetable peeler
Large mixing bowl
Medium-sized mixing bowl
Wire whisk
Wooden spoon
Large spoon
Oven mitts
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
French Toast
Preparation and cooking time: 20 minutes
Ingredients
Beaten eggs
2% milk
Granulated sugar
Ground cinnamon
Whole wheat bread slices
4 servings
3
175mL/ ¾ cup
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
0.5mL/1/8 tsp.
8
8 servings
6
325mL/ 1 1/3 cups
30mL/2 tbsp.
1 mL/ ¼ tsp.
16
12 servings
9
500mL/2 cups
45mL/3 tbsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
24
Directions:
1. In a shallow bowl beat together eggs, milk, sugar, cinnamon and ¼ tsp. salt.
2. Dip bread in egg mixture, coating both sides.
3. In a skillet, cook bread on both sides in a small amount of hot butter, margarine, or oil over
medium-high heat till golden brown; add more butter as needed.
4. Serve with maple-flavoured syrup.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Shallow bowl
Wire whisk
Skillet
Spatula
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Denver Scrambled Eggs
Preparation and cooking time: 10 minutes
Ingredients
Diced cooked ham
2-oz can mushroom stems and
pieces, drained
Chopped onion
Chopped green pepper
Butter or margarine
Eggs
2% milk
4 servings
250mL/ 1 cup
1
8 servings
500mL/2 cups
2
12 servings
750mL/3 cups
3
50mL/ ¼ cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
8
75mL/ 1/3 cup
125mL/ ½ cup
50mL/ ¼ cup
50mL/ ¼ cup
16
150mL/ 2/3 cup
175mL/ ¾ cup
90mL/6 tbsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
24
250mL/1 cup
Directions:
1. In a 10-inch skillet, cook ham, mushrooms, onion, and green pepper in butter or
margarine over medium heat for about 5 minutes or till vegetables are tender but not
brown.
2. Beat together eggs, milk, ¼ teaspoon salt, and dash pepper, add to skillet.
3. Cook, without stirring, till mixture begins to set on the bottom and around edges.
4. Using a large spoon or spatula, lift and fold partially cooked egg mixture so uncooked
portion flows underneath.
5. Continue cooking over medium heat about 4 minutes or till eggs are cooked throughout
but are still glossy and moist.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
10-inch skillet
Wooden spoon
Fork or wire whisk
Spatula
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Can opener
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Pancake and Waffle Batter
Preparation and cooking time: 30 minutes
Ingredients
All-purpose flour
Baking powder
Granulated sugar
Salt
Low-fat plain yogurt
Baking soda
2% milk
Egg whites
Vanilla extract
Butter
1 serving = 2 pancakes
4 servings
250mL/ 1 cup
7ml/1/1 ½ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
75mL/ cup
2mL/1/2 tsp.
175mL/ ¾ cup
1
2mL/1/2 tsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
8 servings
500mL/ 2 cups
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
125mL/ ½ cup
5mL/ 1 tsp.
325mL/ 1 1/3 cups
2
5mL/ 1 tsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
12 servings
750mL/ 3 cups
20mL/2 tsp.
20mL/ 2 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
250mL/1 cup
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
500mL/2 cups
3
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
Directions:
1. In a large mixing bowl combine the flour, baking powder, sugar and salt.
2. In a measuring cup add the baking soda to the yogurt and let it foam.
5. In a small mixing bowl stir together the milk, egg whites, vanilla and melted butter until
blended.
6. Add the yogurt mixture and the milk mixture to the flour mixture and stir until blended.
Mixture should be thick and slightly lumpy; thin the batter with milk if it is too thick.
7. Lightly spray a large skillet or griddle with vegetable oil spray and preheat to medium heat.
8. Scoop 50mL (1/4 cup) pancake mix for each pancake onto the hot griddle. When bubbles
on the surface of the pancakes start to pop and the edges are golden, turn the pancake
and cook the other side.
Substitutions:
Add any of the following to the batter: 1 cup (250mL) of blueberries, fresh peach slices or sliced
bananas and/or substitute ½ cup (125mL) of the flour with oat bran, whole wheat flour or
cornmeal.
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Equipment: Pancake and Waffle Batter
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Large mixing bowl
Measuring cups
Small mixing bowl
Wire whisk
Wooden spoon
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
50mL-scoop
Large skillet
Spatula
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Confetti Omelets
Preparation and cooking time:20 minutes
Ingredients
Green bell pepper
Onion
Cherry tomatoes
Fresh basil leaves
Eggs
1% milk
Grated cheddar cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
Non-stick cooking spray
4 servings
45mL/3 tbsp.
45mL/3 tbsp.
12
2
4
50mL/ 1/4 cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
8 servings
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
24
4
8
125mL/ 1 cup
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
12 servings
125mL/ 1 cup
125mL/ 1 cup
36
6
12
175mL/ ¾ cup
90mL/ 6 tsp.
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
Finely chop bell pepper, onion and tomatoes. Slice basil into threads.
Whisk together eggs, milk, salt and pepper.
Heat non-stick skillet on medium-high heat. Coat skillet with cooking spray. Sauté
chopped vegetables, except basil, until onions are transparent.
Pour egg mixture and basil into skillet with vegetables and cook until egg solidifies
around edges. Lift edges occasionally to allow egg mixture to cook under omelet.
When done, sprinkle with cheese and fold in half. Continue to cook until done.
4.
5.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Whisk
2 medium bowls
Non-stick skillet
Spatula
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
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Vegetables
Stir Fried Vegetables
Preparation and cooking time: 40 minutes
Ingredients
Mixed vegetables e.g. onions,
sweet green pepper, carrots, celery,
zucchini, mushrooms, bean sprouts
Vegetable oil
Soy sauce
4 servings
750mL/3 cups
8 servings
1500mL/ 6 cups
12 servings
2250mL/ 9 cups
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
15mL/1 tbsp.
50mL/ ¼ cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
Directions:
6.
7.
8.
9.
Wash all vegetables.
Cut up vegetables. Keep the vegetables separate from each other.
In a wok or large frying pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat.
Add vegetables starting with the firmer vegetables. Stir fry for 1 to 2 minutes between
each group of vegetables.
Toss with the soy sauce and serve immediately.
10.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Vegetable peeler
Large frying pan or a wok
Spatula
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Broccoli-Onion Casserole
Preparation and cooking time: 60 minutes
Ingredients
10-oz package frozen cut
broccoli
Medium fresh onion, cut into
wedges
Butter or margarine
All-purpose flour
Salt
2% milk
3-oz package cream cheese,
cut up
Shredded American cheese
Butter or margarine
Soft bread crumbs
4 servings
1
8 servings
2
12 servings
3
2
4
6
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
0.5mL/ 1/8 tsp.
125mL/ ½ cup
85g/ 3 oz
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
1mL/ ¼ tsp.
250mL/1 cup
170g/ 6 oz
45mL/3 tbsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
2mL/ 1/2 tsp.
375mL/1½ cups
255g/ 9 oz
50mL/ ¼ cup
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
125mL/ ½ cup
125mL/ ½ cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
250mL/ 1 cup
175mL/ ¾ cup
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
375mL/1½ cup
Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350° (175°C).
2. Cook broccoli according to package directions. Drain well; set aside.
3. Cook onion in boiling salted water about 10 minutes or till tender. Drain; set aside.
4. In the same saucepan melt the 2 tbsp butter. Stir in flour, salt, and dash pepper.
5. Add milk. Cook and stir till thickened and bubbly. Cook and stir 1 to 2 minutes more.
6. Add cream cheese; stir till melted.
7. Stir in broccoli and onions.
8. Turn into 11/2 –quart casserole. Top with American cheese.
9. Melt the remaining 2 tbsp. butter, toss with crumbs. Sprinkle over casserole.
10. Bake in the oven for 35 to 40 minutes.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
2 medium sauce pans
Colander
Wooden spoon
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Cheese grater
1 ½ quart casserole
Oven mitts
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Glazed Carrots
Preparation and cooking time: 25 minutes
Ingredients
Medium carrots
Butter or margarine
Brown sugar
Snipped parsley
4 servings
6
30mL/2 tbsp.
75mL/ 1/3 cup
15mL /1 tbsp.
8 servings
12
60mL/ 4 tbsp.
150mL/ 2/3 cup
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
12 servings
18
90mL/6 tbsp.
250mL/ 1 cup
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
Directions:
1. Cut carrots in half crosswise then lengthwise into 2 or 3 sticks.
2. In a medium pot, simmer carrots in a small amount of boiling salted water for about 10
minutes or till crisp-tender. Drain.
3. In a saucepan, melt the butter, stir in brown sugar till dissolved.
4. Add carrots. Cook over medium-low heat about 10 minutes, turning often.
5. Sprinkle with snipped parsley.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Cutting board
Chef’s knife
Medium pot
Colander
Medium saucepan
Measuring spoons
Table spoons
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Sweet Pepper Trio
Preparation and cooking time:10 minutes
Ingredients
Olive oil
Garlic, minced
Balsamic vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste
Green bell pepper, sliced
Red bell pepper, sliced
Yellow bell pepper, sliced
4 servings
15mL/1 tbsp.
10mL/2 tsp.
10mL/2 tsp.
8 servings
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
20mL/ 4 tsp.
20mL/ 4 tsp.
12 servings
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
2
2
2
4
4
4
6
6
6
Directions:
1. Remove stem and seeds from peppers; slice into strips.
2. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
3. Add peppers and garlic and sauté for approximate 3 minutes; peppers should still be
somewhat firm.
4. Add vinegar and season with salt and pepper.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
Small, sharp knife
Cutting board
Measuring spoons
1 large skillet
Spatula
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Desserts
Apple Crisp
Preparation and cooking time: 60 minutes
Ingredients
Apples, peeled and sliced
Rolled oats
All-purpose flour
Brown sugar
Ground cinnamon
Butter
4 servings
0.625L/2 ½ cup
50mL/ ¼ cup
30mL/2 tbsp.
50mL/1/4 cup
1mL/1/4 tsp.
30mL/2 tbsp.
8 servings
1 ¼ L/5 cups
125mL/ ½ cup
60mL/4 tbsp.
125mL/1/2 cup
2mL/1/2 tsp.
50mL/1/4 cup
12 servings
1.875L/7 ½ cups
175mL/3/4 cup
90mL/6 tbsp.
175mL/3/4 cup
5mL/1 tsp.
75mL/1/3 cup
Directions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350◦F (175◦C).
2. Place the apples in a medium baking dish.
3. In a bowl, mix the rolled oats, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and butter or soft margarine
until combined. Sprinkle over the fruit.
4. Bake for 40 minutes or until the fruit is tender.
Substitutions:
Substitute peaches, pears or rhubarb for apples.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Vegetable peeler
Paring knife
Cutting board
1 medium baking dish
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Large bowl
Wooden spoon
Oven mitts
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Creamy Rice Pudding
Preparation and cooking time: 40 minutes
Ingredients
Cooked rice
Water
Skim milk powder
White sugar
Raisins
Ground cinnamon
Salt
Vanilla extract
4 servings
500mL/ 2 cups
375mL/ 1 ½ cup
250mL/ 1 cup
50mL/ ¼ cup
50mL/ ¼ cup
2mL/ ½ tsp.
1 mL/¼ tsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
8 servings
1L/ 4 cups
750mL/ 3 cups
500mL/ 2 cups
125mL/ ½ cup
125mL/ ½ cup
5mL/ 1 tsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
15mL/ 1 tbsp.
12 servings
1.5L/ 6 cups
1125mL/ 4 ½ cups
750mL/ 3 cups
175mL/ ¾ cup
175mL/ ¾ cup
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
20mL/ 4 tsp.
Directions:
1.
3.
Put cooked rice, water, skim milk powder, sugar, raisins, cinnamon and salt into a
medium saucepan. Mix well.
Turn stove on to low heat. Cook and stir until pudding is creamy. This will take about 20
minutes.
Stir in vanilla. Sprinkle with cinnamon. Serve warm.
∗
If you don’t have two cups of leftover cooked rice, follow these directions:
2.
Put 1 cup (250mL) rice, 2 cups (500mL) water and 1 tsp. (5mL) salt into a medium saucepan. Turn
on stove to high and heat to boiling. Turn heat to low, cover and simmer until rice is tender. This will
take about 20 minutes and all the water will be absorbed.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
1 medium sauce pan
Liquid measuring cup
Dry measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Wooden spoon
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Banana Bread
Preparation and cooking time:60 minutes
Ingredients
Margarine
Sugar
Egg
Overripe bananas
All-purpose flour
Whole-wheat flour
Salt
Baking soda
Wheat germ
Chopped nuts (optional)
12 servings
1/2 cup / 125mL
175mL / ¾ cup
2
5
250mL/ 1 cup
250mL/ 1 cup
5mL/ 1 tsp.
10mL/ 2 tsp.
125mL/ ½ cup
250mL/ 1 cup
Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
2. Grease two 8 ½ -inch loaf pans.
3. Cream margarine and sugar in the bowl with a whisk. Add eggs and bananas and blend
until bananas are thoroughly mashed.
4. In a separated bowl, sift the flours, salt and baking soda. Stir in wheat germ and nuts, if
desired.
5. Add dry ingredients to the banana mixture and blend just until mixed. Pour batter into
prepared pans, divided evenly.
6. Bake loaves for 50 minutes.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 x 8 ½-inch loaf pans
Measuring spoons
Measuring cups
Wire whisk
Sieve
2 medium mixing bowls
Oven mitts
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Fruit Salad with Orange-Honey
Yogurt Sauce
Preparation and cooking time: 10 minutes
Ingredients
Fresh fruit e.g. melon, bananas,
grapes, orange sections, apple
Sauce:
Low-fat plain yogurt
Orange rind, grated
Orange juice
Liquid honey
Vanilla extract
4 servings
1 L/ 4 cups
8 servings
2 L/ 8 cups
12 servings
3 L/ 12 cups
250mL/1 cup
5mL/ 1 tsp.
15mL/1 tbsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
2mL/ ½ tsp.
500mL/ 2 cups
10mL/ 2 tsp.
30mL/ 2 tbsp.
50mL/ 4 tbsp.
5mL/ 1 tsp.
750mL/ 3 cups
15mL/ 3 tsp.
45mL/ 3 tbsp.
90mL/ 6 tbsp.
7mL/ 1 ½ tsp.
Directions:
1.
2.
Wash, peel, and cut fruit into bite size pieces in a bowl.
In a separate bowl, combine yogurt, orange rind, orange juice, honey and vanilla; mix
well.
Add orange-honey yogurt sauce to the fruit, mix together and serve in individual bowls.
3.
Note: Any kind of fresh fruit is wonderful with this tasty, easy-to-make sauce. Choose fruits
depending on the season.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Paring knife
Cutting board
Vegetable peeler
Liquid measuring cup
Measuring spoons
Large bowl
Small bowl
Grater
Wooden spoon
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Apricot-Filled Oatmeal Bars
Preparation and cooking time: 40 minutes
Ingredients
All-purpose flour
Quick-cooking rolled oats
Brown sugar
Baking soda
Butter or margarine
Apricot preserves
15 servings
175mL/ 3/4cup
175mL/ 3/4cup
125mL/ 1/2cup
1mL / ¼ tsp
75mL / 1/3 cup
125mL / ½ cup
30 servings
375mL/1 ½ cups
375mL/ 1 ½ cups
250mL/ 1 cup
2mL/ ½ tsp.
150mL/ 2/3 cup
250mL/ 1 cup
Directions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Stir together flour, oat, brown sugar, and baking soda.
Cut in butter or margarine till mixture is crumbly.
Pat 2/3 of the crumbs in the bottom of an ungreased 13x9x2-inch baking pan;
Spread with preserves. Sprinkle with remaining crumbs.
Bake in a 375°F(190°C) oven for 25 to 30 minutes.
Cool on a wire rack. Cut into bars.
Substitution:
Omit apricot preserves and use raisin filling. For raising filling, in a saucepan combine ¼ cup
granulated sugar and 1 tbsp. cornstarch. Stir in 2 cups raisins and 1 cup water. Cook and stir till
bubbly. Spread atop crumb mixture. Continue as directed.
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sieve
Medium mixing bowl
Wooden spoon
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
13x9x2” baking pan
Table Knives
Wire cooling rack
Oven mitts
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Appendix A
Certificate of Completion
Student Evaluation Form
Parent Volunteer Evaluation Form
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Certificate of Completion
Awarded to
____________________________________
For successfully completing the
Beginner’s Cooking Club Program
Principal
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Date
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The Beginner’s Cooking Club
Student Evaluation Form
Name of School: ___________________
Program Dates: _____________________
Please circle one response.
1.
I enjoyed being in the Beginner’s Cooking Club.
Not at all
2.
Most of the time
All of the time
A little bit
Most of the time
All of the time
A little bit
Most of the time
All of the time
The recipes were easy to follow?
Not at all
6.
A little bit
I received enough instructions on how to prepare a recipe?
Not at all
5.
All of the time
I have learned hand-washing and some food safety, food preparation and cooking
skills.
Not at all
4.
Most of the time
I would recommend the Beginner’s Cooking Club to other students.
Not at all
3.
A little bit
A little bit
Most of the time
All of the time
A little bit
Most of the time
All of the time
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I liked the recipes?
Not at all
The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
7. My 3 favorite recipes were: (Please check three)
_____ Caesar Salad
_____Tossed Salad
_____ Basic Vinaigrette Dressing
_____Spinach-Orange Toss Salad
_____ Pasta Salad
_____Bruschetta
_____ Pita Pizzas
_____Crispy Cheese Potatoes
_____ Tacos
_____ Cheesy Quesadillas
_____ Tuna Melt on Pita
_____ Pasta & Spring Vegetables
_____ Chicken & Vegetables Stir-Fry with Rice
_____ Beef & Broccoli Stir-Fry with Rice _____ Spaghetti & Tomato Sauce
_____ Meatballs
_____ Chicken Nuggets
_____ Potato Cheese Muffins
_____ French Toast
_____ Denver Scrambled Eggs
_____ Pancake & Waffle Batter
_____ Confetti Omelets
_____ Stir-Fried Vegetables
_____ Broccoli-Onion Casserole
_____ Glazed Carrots
_____ Sweet Pepper Trio
_____ Apple Crisp
_____ Creaming Rice Pudding
_____ Banana Bread
_____ Fruit Salad & Orange-Honey Yogurt Sauce
_____ Apricot-Filled Oatmeal Bars
8. Do you have a recipe that you would like us to put in the Beginner’s Cooking
Manual?
9.
The part I liked best about the club: (Please check one)
____ Lessons
____Cooking
____Eating the food
____Learning new things
Others_________________________________________________________________
10.
Do you have any suggestions for future classes?
Thank you!
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The Beginner’s Cooking Club
Parent Volunteer Evaluation
Name of Organization______________________________
Date:____________________
The purpose of this questionnaire is to get your feedback on the Beginner’s Cooking Club and the Cooking Manual.
Please circle one response. (Questions 1-6 are to be completed by the facilitator)
1.
The lesson plans were clear;
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
I knew what I had to do.
2.
It did not take a long time to prepare for
the lessons.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
3.
The manual contained useful handouts
and overheads.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
4.
The manual contained basic information
on cooking and food safety.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
5.
The distribution of the Student Take
Home Package prior to the start of class
was useful.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
6.
The sample forms were handy and
useful.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
7.
There were enough recipe varieties to
choose from.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
8.
Most recipes were easy for beginners to
follow.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
9.
The cooking kits contained adequate
equipment/resources.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
10. The cooking kits were easy to manage.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
11. The task and time for grocery shopping
was manageable.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
12. The cost to purchase ingredients for
most recipes was reasonable.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
13. The Student Cleaning Schedule was
useful to help organize tasks among
students.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
14. Most students participated in the
cleaning tasks.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
15. Overall, it has been a valuable
experience to participate in the cooking
club.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
16. I have gained some knowledge and
skills from the Beginner’s Cooking Club.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
17. I would like to help again if another
cooking class starts.
Strongly Agree
Agree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
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Do you have any suggestions for improvement?
Thank you!
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The Beginner’s Cooking Manual
Appendix B
Additional Resources & Handouts
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Suggested Start-up Equipment
2-3 Corningware dish sets ( large & small plates, cups and saucers)
2-3 sets of cutlery ( soup spoons, small spoons, forks and knives)
2 large pots
3 chopping knives
3 cutting boards
baking dish
baking sheet(s)
1-2 basin(s)
bread knife
can opener
colander
dish cloth
dish rack
dish soap
drink jugs
foil wrap
grater(s)
ladle
lifter
loaf pan
measuring cups (dry)
measuring cups (liquid)
measuring spoons (2)
mixing bowls (large and small)
oven mitts
paper napkins
paper towel
potato masher
salad bowl/serving spoons
salad dressing jar (glass jar with lid)
scouring pads
small serving bowls (4)
spatula – small
storage bins
storage containers for dry and refrigerated foods
tea towels
vegetable peeler
whisk
wok or large frying pans
wooden spoons
refrigerator thermometer
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scissors*
stapler*
staples*
fire safety equipment*
first aid kit*
*Schools can loan these items to you.
Some pantry items to start with:
Rice, sugar, baking powder, chicken bouillon, oil, rolled oats, salt, pepper, flour, baking soda,
spices.
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Additional resources:
“Clueless in the Kitchen. A Cookbook for Teens”. Evelyn Raab. Key Porter Books Limited,
Toronto, 1998.
“Kid’s Choice Cookbook”. Colleen Bartley & John Pateman. Lifescan Canada Ltd.1995.
www.epicurious.com
Kellogg's Web site www.missionnutrition.ca
Dietitians of Canada www.dietitians.ca
Health Canada www.hc-sc.gc.ca
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How to Cook Pasta
1. To cook 454 g pasta use a 6 – 8 L pot. Brings at least 4 L of cold water to a
full boil.
2. Add 25 mL of salt to the boiling water.
3. Add your pasta. Stir with a slotted spoon or tongs, to prevent sticking, until
water returns to a full boil.
4. Begin to count cooking time, as indicated on the box, stirring occasionally.
Do not cover the pot.
5. When cooking time is up, check pasta for doneness. Do not throw it against
the wall to see if it sticks! Bite it. Does it have a crunchy centre? If so, it is
not ready.
•
Pasta should not be mushy either. Properly cooked pasta should be tender but firm to the
bite. This is called “al dente”.
•
Drain the pasta into a colander that has been placed in a clean sink.
•
Do not rinse the pasta with cold water unless you are using it for a salad, using it later,
or stuffing it.
•
Toss or serve the well-drained, still hot pasta with your prepared sauce.
•
Freshly cooked pasta is best served immediately, so have your sauce ready before your
pasta is cooked, if possible.
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How to Blanch and Refresh Vegetables
1. Bring a pot of cold water to a full boil.
2. Place your cleaned and prepared vegetable into the pot. Do not cover.
3. Bring water back to a boil. Your vegetable is now blanched.
4. Immediately drain vegetable in a colander and plunge into a bowl or
clean sink full of very cold water (refresh).
Why blanch and refresh?
•
This process partially cooks foods that are to be re-heated at a later time (to blanch is to
partially cook an item very briefly in boiling water).
•
It helps to preserve the colour, taste and nutrients.
•
When you refresh the partially cooked vegetable you stop the cooking process. Now
when you add your vegetable later you do not risk over cooking it in the reheating
process.
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How to Cook Rice
1. Wash and drain rice several times until water is somewhat clear. Drain well.
2. Combine rice and cold water (approximately 1 – 2 cups of water per cup of rice
depending on the desired firmness of rice) in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat,
uncovered.
3. Reduce heat to low, and simmer until almost all water has evaporated and crater-like
holes appear in the rice. Cover saucepan and simmer for about 20 minutes.
4. Remove from heat and let stand 8-10 minutes to complete final cooking.
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Cooking Terms and Techniques
Beat:
Blend:
Boil:
Broil:
Chop:
Coat:
Dice:
Drain:
Fold:
Fry:
Garnish:
Grate:
Grill:
Knead:
Marinate:
Mince:
Mix:
Pinch:
Puree:
Sift:
Sauté:
Season:
Separate:
Shred:
Simmer:
Stir:
Toss:
Whisk:
Make a smooth mixture by stirring vigorously with a fork, spoon, whisk or
electric mixer.
Mix or stir two or more ingredients together to make a smooth mixture.
Cook a liquid over a high heat until bubbles rise to the surface.
Cook under “broiler” (top heating element) in the oven.
Cut into pieces with a sharp knife.
Cover or roll food in another ingredient.
Cut into very small (5mm or ¼ inch) squares.
Pour off or strain liquid from food.
Mix gently with a rubber scraper or spoon by lifting the bottom of the
mixture outwards and over the top.
Cook in an open skillet.
Decorate food with colourful additions such as parsley or fruit.
Rub food against a grater to make very small bits.
Broil under high heat or over hot coals.
Work dough by pressing and folding it with hands.
Let food soak in a flavourful liquid.
Chop or cut into very tiny pieces.
Combine two or more ingredients together until well blended.
A small amount of seasoning that you can hold between your thumb and
forefinger.
Process or grind food into a smooth pulp in a food processor or blender.
To pass flour or other dry ingredients through a sieve or sifter before
measuring.
(or stir-fry) Cook in a skillet over medium to high heat while stirring
constantly.
Flavour food by sprinkling with herbs and spices.
Remove egg yolk from egg white before cooking.
Cut into very thin strips.
Cook slowly at a low heat.
Mix with a spoon in a circular motion.
Mix food by lifting gently with salad tongs or two spoons.
Beat or stir food with a wire “whisk”.
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ADDITIONAL HANDOUTS
Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating
Trim the Fat, Taste the Flavour
Fat Facts
Fit Fibre Into Your Day
5 to 10 a Day for Better Health
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