null  User manual
THE
MAGAZINE
H
JULY
LISTENERS
FOR MUSIC
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60 CENTS
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A $
pE
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What's more, the new reel is actually heavier and stronger than
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reel
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Insert tape
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THEN PRESS THE "START" BUTTON!
Tape will grip and hold firmly
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In
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Move Out -of-Doors
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those lazy summer days and soft summer nights
times to spend relaxed on your patio or on the lawn
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And then is the time you hanker for Brahms upon the
summer breeze or Bach contrapunting to the bees or
even Petrouchka among the petunias or maybe jazz.
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A special heavy duty 8-inch loudspeaker reproduces
the frequency range below 2000 cycles. This unit
All frequencies above 2000 cycles are reproduced
by a horn -loaded compression driver h -f unit opening to the front of the projector.
your Hi Fi out-of -doors with you.
The Jensen HF 100 is a true 2-way high fidelity
projector that is professionally weather-proofed
can be mounted outside and left all -year round.
3 memos for long summer days:
1. Stop In at your high fidelity dealer's; he is
featuring Summer lil Fi Specials
many at
amazing savings.
2. Pick up a copy of the big 36 -page Jensen
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write direct to Jensen) you will find complete
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JULY 1957
I
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O C E A N S
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EXPORT: AD. AURIEMA, INC., 89 BROAD ST., NEW YORK
2
/
CANADA: CHARLES W. POINTON LTD., 6 ALCINA AVE., TORONTO
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
volume
number 7
7
This month's cover,
in estival festival mood, is by
Richard M. Powers.
ARTICLES
Manuel de Falla and the Spirit of Spain
26
Walter Starkie
Moslem. Ancient Christian. and gypsy
all contributed to the musical blend.
John M. Conly
Editor
Tanglewood: A Sunday Afternoon
30
Curt Leviant
Roland Gelati
Music Editor
The Muse in Summer Dress
30
Thomas J. N. Juko
34
Irving M. Fried
36
Edward Wagenknecht
81
John Hoke
.
Allison
Audio Editor
Miriam D. Manning
Managing Editor
Roy
F.
Sanity Fair
London's second audio show yields
interest and sonie lessons.
Joan Griff iths
Associate Editor
J. Gordon Holt
Technical Editor
Geraldine the Great
Americas first prima donna is still alive. but man)
of todai's listeners have not heard her voice.
Roy Lindstrom
Art Director
Frances A. Newbury
Manager, Book Division
C. G.
R.
D.
-Iller all. Bach means brook and Beethoven means
beet -field, so let's gel out of doors.
Over Hill and Dale
Adapting a pickup to play old Winders.
Burke
Darrell
James Hinton, Jr.
Robert Charles Marsh
Contributing Editors
R
E
PORT
S
Charles Fowler
Publisher
Music Makers
43
Warren B. Syar
Associate Publisher
Record Section
45
Records in Review; Discography of Manuel de Folla,
by Robert Charles Marsh
Claire N. Eddings
Advertising Sales Manager
Arthur J. Griffin
Circulation Manager
A
D
V
E
R
Roland Gelatt
T
I
S
The Tape Deck
68
Books in Review
75
Tested in the Home
77
Audax
Main Office
Claire N. Eddings, The Publishing House
Great Barrington, Mass. Telephone 1300.
New York
Bernard Covit, 280 Madison Ave.
Telephone: MUrray Hill 3 -4449 or 3.4450.
Chicago
John R. Rutherford d Associates,
Inc., 230 East Ohio St. Telephone:
Whitehall
D.
Darrell
tone arm kit
Radio Craftsmen Xophonic
Heathk it FM -3A FM tuner
Fisher CA -40 amplifier
N G
I
R.
KT
AUTHORitatively Speaking
Noted with Interest 12
Notes from Abroad 9
4
Letters
19
As the Editors See It 25
4 -6715
Los Angeles
Brand & Brand, Inc., 6314 San Vicente
Blvd. Telephone: Webster 8.3971.
Trader's Marketplace 86
Professional Directory 90
Audio Forum 94
Advertising Index 96
High Fidelity Magazine is published monthly by Audiocom, Inc., at Great
Barrington, Mass. Telephone: Great Barrington
1300. Editorial, publication, and circulation offices at: The
House, Great Barrington, Mass. Subscriptions:
per year in the United States and Canada. Single copies: Publishing
each. Editorial contributions will be welcomed by56.00
editor. Payment for articles accepted will be arranged prior 60to cents
the
Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied
by return postage. Entered as second -class matter April 27, 1951publication.
at the post office at Great Barrington, Mass., under the
act of March 3, 1879. Additional entry at the post office, Pittsfield,
Mass. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation. Printed
in the U. S. A. by the Ben Franklin Press, Pittsfield,
and contents of High Fidelity Magazine are fully protectedMass. Copyright C 1957 by Audiocom, Inc. The cover design
by copyrights and must not be reproduced in any manner.
www.americanradiohistory.com
JULY 1957
AUTHORitatively Speaking
essay on Manuel de Falla leads this issue's
contents, probably can be best described
as a peripatetic professor. In getting from
Dublin, where he was born in 1894, to
Austin, Texas, where he now lives and
Walter Starkie, whose commemorative
-
EICO is a pioneer (1945) in kit test equipment
leads the industry in distributor sales to trained and
critical users.
EICO has achieved this acceptance because
EICO engineering policy is to stress electrical and mechanical quality, soundness
and functional completeness.
they are justly
EICO prices are low b
related to costs and geared for volume
C.,
sales.
The same engineering and price policy underlies all
EICO high fidelity equipment. You can examine and
HF52
compare FICO at any of the 1200 neighborhood distributors and hi -fi specialists throughout the U.S.
Judge EICO's claims for yourself before you buy.
Write for FREE Catalog HF -7.
Master Control PREAMPLIFIER
WIRED $37.95
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with Power Supply: KIT $29.95
Does not add distortion or detract from wideband or
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facilities. Feedback scratch & rumble filters. equilizations, tone controls. Centralab Senior "Compentrol"
loudness control. concentric level control. 4 hi- level.
2 to -level switched inputs. Extremely flat widehand
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control & separate level control that does not
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AMPLIFIER complete with Preamplifier, Equalizer &
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IM Distortion: 1.3 %. Max Harmonic Distortion: be12-WATT Williamson-type INTEGRATED
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KIT $34.95
AMPLIFIER
Reap (20 w): ±0.5 db 20- 20,000 cps; Frees Reap
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&
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25 w pk. IM Dist.: 1.3% 41? 12
output transformer: grain- oriented steel, interleaved
±0.5 db
1 w: ±0.5 db 12-75,000 cps; 12 w:
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HFS1 TWO -WAY SPEAKER SYSTEM
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EICO
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ADDRESS
Jensen compression- driver exponential horn
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Brooklyn 11, N. Y.
Please send
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&
H.7
name of neighborhood
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NAME
ZONECITY
Prices 5% higher on West Coast
STATE
teaches, he has managed to cover southern
Europe and North America pretty thoroughly. There has been nothing staid about
his travels, either. Through the Balkans
and Spain he went on foot, living mostly
with gypsies and earning his living by
violin playing. These two junkets resulted
in the most popular of his many books,
Raggle -Taggle and Spanish Raggle-Taggle.
He had studied the violin seriously; he
won many prizes and at one time was considered the most promising of young Irish
violinists. Writing and teaching gradually
won him from music making, however. His
field as a teacher has been Spanish and
Italian literature. His books have encompassed subjects ranging from religious law
to primitive folkways. He has been granted
high honors by at least four national governments. How he became acquainted with
Falla he himself relates on page 26.
Curt Leviant, whose verse in praise of
Tanglewood appears on page 3o, was born
in Vienna and lives in Brooklyn, where
he is studying for his M. A. degree at
Brooklyn University. He has sold poetry
to various publications, including The Neu'
Yorker. Of interest may be the assignment
he managed to get when called to the
Army: he became a classical disc jockey.
Did you know the Army had 'em? We
didn't.
Thomas J. N. Juko, whose roundup of
summer music in America (page 3o) is
launched by Mr. Leviani s poem, is himself
a poet, having been awarded the Forbes
Rickard Prize for Poetry at Bowdoin, where
he studied under Robert P. Tristram Coffin.
He also won a graduate scholarship for
study at Oxford, of which he never has
taken advantage. (The money, he says,
will keep, and Oxford obviously will too.)
The last six years he has spent teaching
English and doing promotional work for
various musical organizations. He is now
principal of a public school in Dudley,
Massachusetts.
Edward Wagenknecht, whose tribute to
Geraldine Farrar you may read on page
36, is a professor of English at Boston
University. He has written innumerable
books, best known of which probably are
Cavalcade of the English Novel, Cavalcade
of the American Novel, and Longfellow:
A Full- Length Portrait. As anthologist, he
has produced The Fireside Book of Christmas Stories. At present he is working on
a biography of Theodore Roosevelt.
John Hoke, benefactor of people who want
to play old hill- and -dale cylinder records
with a G.E. pickup cartridge (see page
8i ) , is a motion picture photographer. At
the time he wrote, he was employed making
safety films and the like for the AAA. Now
he is in Chile, making films of equally
meritorious aim for the Internation Cooperation Administration. He had to leave
his Edison cylinders and G.E. gadget at
home. Tough.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
I
1
enti WIdelay petfolrna1cm e
oFthe GunbiQ
`°
Fiee-Any
Rb
¡F
I
At
OF THESE SUPERB HIGH -FIDELITY
12" COLUMBIA
(Lp)
RECORDS
-
If you join the Columbia (LP Record Club now
and agree to purchase 4 selections during the coming 12 months
LEVANT PLAYS GERSHWIN
RHAPSODY
IN BLUE
1i
l
Duke ELLINGTON
and his
orchestra
ELLINGTON
UPTOWN
Tir
nDIADEVMA áODSTxA
EUCGE aaaANDi.
THE KING OF SWING
BENNY
GOODMAN
LEONARD BERNSTEIN
FANCY
FREE
EL SALON MEXICO
HARRY JANES
GENF KRtBA
l101d9 HAMPTON
RUH
WILSON
ANDRE
KOSTELANETZ
Plays the Music of
.l-
JEROME
KERN
1937 -38 Jars Concert No. 2
LI'L
ABNER
rr,i, h.. uwe.ry P,Nwe..
,M
PERCY FAITH
PAUL WESTON
Muli,,e0
end Hi.
hen
C..Ia4r
CAA
scheherazade
rimtkpkprsakor
CAM.
ORMANOV.COMDUCTOR
Hollywood
,
V ES!
You may have, FREE, ANY 3 of these best. selling
112" Columbia m records. We make this unique offer
to introduce you to the money- saving program of the
Columbia © Record Club
.
a program that selects
for you each month the greatest works in every field of
music -performed by the world's finest artists, brilliantly
reproduced on Columbia In records.
HOW THE CLUB OPERATES: To enjoy the Club's benefits
mail the coupon, indicating which one of the four Club
Divisions best suits your musical taste: Classical; Jazz;
Listening and Dancing; Broadway, Movies, Television and
-
Musical Comedies.
Each month you will receive free the Club Magazine
which describes the current selections in all four Divi.
sions. You may accept or reject the monthly selection
for your Division
or you may take records from other
Club Divisions
.
thereby assuring you the widest
possible choice of recorded entertainment. Or you may
tell us to send you NO record in any month.
Your only obligation is to purchase four selections
from the more than 100 that will be offered during the
next 12 months. The records you want are mailed and
billed to you at only $3.98 (original cast Musical Shows
somewhat higher), plus a small mailing charge.
FREE BONUS RECORDS GIVEN REGULARLY: The three
records sent to you now represent an "advance" of the
Club's bonus system
given to you at once. After you
have fulfilled your membership obligation by purchasing
four records, you will receive an additional free Bonus
record of your choice for every two additional Club
selections you accept. Bonus records are superb 12"
Columbia ® records -the very best of the Columbia Q
catalog -just like those shown here.
Indicate on the coupon which three records you want
free, and the Division you prefer. Then mall the coupon at
once. You must be delighted with membership or you may
cancel It by returning the free records within 10 days.
...
-
COLUMBIA © RECORD CLUB
Terre Haute, Indiana
®C.I..eA 9.
AN $11.94 VALUE SENT TO YOU AT ONCE -MAIL ENTIRE COUPON
COLUMBIA f RECORD CLUB.
Dept. 267, Terre Haufe, Ind.
NOW!
CIRCLE THE NUMBERS OF THE
RECORDS YOU WANT
I. Tchaikovsky:
7. Ellington Uptown
Nutcracker Suite;
Duke Ellington and
3
Please send me as my FREE gift the 3 records Indicated here: (Select the records you want by circling 3
numbers in the list at the right)
...and enroll me in the following Division of the Club:
(check one box only)
Classical
Listening and Dancing
Q Broadway, Movies. Television
Cl Jags
and Musical Comedies
Each month you will send me the Columbia 6) Record
Club Magazine which describes the recorda offered In
all four Club Divisions. I have the privilege of accepting the monthly selection In the Division checked above,
or any other selection described. or none at all. My
only obligation is to purchase four records in the next
12 months at the regular list price plus a small mailing charge. After accepting four records, I will receive
a free Bonus record for every two additional records
I purchase. If not delighted with membership. I may
cancel within 10 days by returning all records.
Orchestra
The Sleeping
Beauty Ballet
Philadelphia Orchestra. Ormandy. cond.
perform
Skin Deep. T,heMooche.
Perdido -2 more.
8. Levant Plays Gershwin
2. The Voice
works -Rhapsody In
Blue: Concerto in F:
Frank Sinatra in 12
songs that first made
him famous
Lover,
Fools Rush In. etc.
3
King of Swing: Vol.
Benny Goodman and
Doris Day sings
-
3.
1
Original Orch.. Trio.
Quartet. Ridin' High.
Moonplow -9 more.
4.
L1'1 Abner
Percy Faith and
9. Day By Day
Bernstein: Fancy
Free-Ballet Suite:
Copland: El Salon
Mexleo: Milhaud: La
Creation du Monde
12
popular songs- including The Song is You.
Autumn Leaves. etc.
10.
his
Orchestra play music
from this gay hit show.
5.
An American in Paris.
Rimsky- Korsakov:
Seheherazade
Philadelphia Orch..
Ormandy, conductor. A
superb performance of
this exotic score.
II. Music efierome Kern
Andre Kostelanetz and
Orchestra Play 20
Bernstein his
Kern favorites.
bia Symphony In bril12.
liant performances of
Concert by the Sea
Erroll Garner in an
three modern works.
Leonard
Nam
(Please
conducting the Colum-
Print)
Address
City
Moonlight Becomes You
Here's mood music in
H1 -FI
Paul Weston
6.
lene
Stale
CANADA: Prices slightly higher
66
Address 1I -13 Soho St.. Toronto 2B
If you wish to have this membership credited
to an established Columbia Records dealer, .Dealer's
authorized to accept subscriptions, please 011
L in the
dealer's name and address:
and
his
Music from
Hollywood.
12 songs.
actual Jazz performance at Carmel. Calif.
Tench Me Tonight.
Where or When, I'll
Remember April
more.
-I
Nome
Dealer's Address
.
JULY 1957
5
www.americanradiohistory.com
Picture
Yourself With 9fEEf(LTooL
FLEETWOOD CUSTOM TELEVISION
-he
knows Fleetwood
likes its professional quality
FATHER
is made to the same quality standards as the broadcast
monitors Fleetwood makes for the television networks.
In a
Mother likes its unlimited installation possibilities
wall, a room divider, bookcase or piece of heirloom furniture
Fleetwood belongs beautifully!
anywhere she wants it
-
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AUDIO SPECIALISTS
GENERAL ELECTRONICS
4156 Piedmont Ave., Oakland
Phone: Olympic 5 -2711
Phone: AMherst 5.0447
DOW RADIO, INC.
1759 East Colorado Street, Pasadena
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NILES RADIO & TV CENTER
400 N. 4th Avenue, Tucson
Phone: MA 3 -2537
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Phone: AD 7 -1401
E.
BUSHNELL ELECTRONICS
12026 Wilshire Boulevard, los Angeles 25
Phone: BRadshaw 2 -7537
107 Santa Barbara Plaza, Los
Phone: AXminster 3 -8201
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525 No. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles 48
Phone: Oleander
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MIDWAY ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
2817 Crenshaw Blvd., Los Angeles 16
Phone: REpublic 1 -2451
BUSHNELL'S HARBOR HI -FI
3333 Newport Blvd., Newport Beach
Phone: Harbor 4681
CUSTOM AUDIO
2650 Avon Street, Newport Beach
Phone: Liberty 8 -8671
COAST ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
"STAIRWAY TO SOUND"
4166 Broadway, Oakland 11
Phone: Olympic 3 -7138
Free booklet
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4
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Phone: 6 -0128
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304 West Third Street, Santa Ana
Phone: KI 3 -2684
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CRENSHAW HI -FI CENTER
1
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222 West Portal Ave., San Francisco 27
Phone: MOntrose 4 -2830
NEWARK ELECTRIC COMPANY
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RYan
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405 -9 South Upper Street, Lexington
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100 N. Western Avenue, Chicago 80
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ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS, INC.
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THE RECORD HI -FI SHOP
Lewis Ave. Shopping Plaza, Waukegan
Phone: ON 2 -4445
A & L SOUND CO.
47 Osgood Street, Methuen
Phone: MU 2.0178
AI /CH/G. I N
K. L. A. LABORATORIES, INC.
7422 Woodward Avenue, Detroit 2
Phone: TRinity 4 -1100
R. L. KARNS ELECTRONICS
910 E. Fulton Street, Grand Rapids 3
Phone: Glendale 8 -5869
of installattion icleas available fronti
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
...You'll Like The PICTURE
HAS FEATURES THAT PLEASE EVERYBODY...
-
Everybody likes Fleetwood's exclusive Definition Control
that tailors picture texture to individual taste
from soft
and diffused to sharp and clear
Fleetwood's fully electronic remote control with contrast, brightness, volume,
channel selection, fine tuning and Definition Control
not just channel selection and volume control ... Fleetwood's
outputs for high fidelity sound.
...
-
-
See Fleetwood yourself
now at your Fleetwood Dealer.
For a free booklet of installation ideas, complete information and the name of
your nearest dealer, write:
9fEEIwooI®
C U S T O M
Crafted
T E L E V
S
I
I
O N
by CONRAC, INC.
Department A, Glendora, California
Export Division: Frater and Hansen, Ltd., 301 Clay St., San Francisco, Calif.
©
MINNESOTA
LEONARD RADIO, INC.
"AUDIO MART"
69 Cortlandt Street, New York
AUDIO KING COMPANY
OKLAHOMA
7
Phone: CO 7 -0315
1827 East Lake Street, Minneapolis 7
Phone: PArkway 9 -7451
MISSOURI
THE HIGH FIDELITY SHOWROOM,
6383 Clayton Road, St. Louis 17
Phone: PArkview 1.6500
Conrac, Inc. 1957
INC.
NEW HAMPSHIRE
TERMINAL RADIO CORPORATION
85 Cortlandt Street, New York 7
Phone: WOrth 4 -3311
CONCERT -CRAFT, INC.
P. O. 66, Brandywine Station, Schenectady 4
Phone:
FR 2 -8989
W. G. BROWN SOUND EQUIPMENT CORP.
521 -27 E. Washington St., Syracuse 2
Phone: 2 -8979
EVANS RADIO, INC.
P.O. Box 312, Route 3A, Bow Junction, Concord
Phone: CA 5-3358
NEW JERSEY
HI -FI HAVEN
28 Easton Ave., New Brunswick
Phone CH 9-5130
CASEY HI FI INSTALLATION CORP.
205 W. Englewood Ave., West Englewood
Phone:
TE
6-4200
NORTH CAROLINA
W. C. REID & CO.
143 South Main Street, Rocky
Mount
Phone: 6.4101
BUFFALO AUDIO CENTER
161 Genesee Street, Buffalo 3
Phone: MOhawk 1368
NEWMARK d LEWIS, INC.
43 Main Street, Hempstead, L. I.
Phone: IVanhoe -6890
HOUSE OF HI -FI
605 Plandome Road, Manhasset, L .1.
Phone: MA 7 -1376
ASCO SOUND CORPORATION
115 West 45th St. (Third Floor), New York 36
Phone: JUdson 2 -1750
HI -FI HO
Open Evenings
150 East 46th Street, New York 17
Phone: Plaza 5-2650
1
423 So. Webster, Norman
Phone: JEfferson 4 -8745
PENNSYLVANIA
TEN CATE ASSSOCIATES
6128 Morton Street, Philadelphia 44
Phone: GErmantown 8-5448
RADER & FASIG, INC.
704 Walnut Street, Reading
Phone: 4 -7831
RHODE ISLAND
GERTZ, INCORPORATED
257 Adelaide Ave., Providence 7
Phone: STuart -4200
1
BARBER AND HOWART CO.
East
OHIO
2915 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland 15
Phone: CHerry -5560
COUNTERPOINT
20971 Westgate (Westgate Shopping Center)
Cleveland 26
Phone: ED
Ave., Westerly
Phone: 2363
AUDIO CRAFT CO.
1
NEW YORK
THOMSON SOUND SYSTEMS
1
-6448
CUSTOM CLASSICS
13421 Euclid Avenue, East Cleveland 12
Phone: GL -0256
PIONEER ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
2115 Prospect, Cleveland 15
Phone: SU -9410
R. S. T. LABS
14511 Granger Road, Maple Heights
Phone: MOntrose 2 -3213
RICHARD J. SAUER
WASHINGTON
OLYMPIC ENGINEERING CO.
2008 Westlake Avenue, Seattle
1
Phone: Eliot 4650
HOUSE OF HI-FIDELITY
20TH CENTURY SALES, INC.
1021 W. First Ave., Spokane 4
Phone: MA 4 -0801
1
1
CUSTOM ELECTRONICS, INC.
1000 South Main Street, Dayton 9
Phone: ADams 3158
WISCONSIN
THE HI -FI CENTER,
INC.
4236 West Capitol Drive, Milwaukee 16
Phone: UPtown 1 -2113
HAWAII
TELCO LTD.
605 -607 South Queen Street, Honolulu
Phone: 50.2964
your Fleetwood' dealer or write: Conrac, Inc., Glendora, Cal.
JULY 1957
7
High Fidelity is
for your home
The Ballad
t
Because of its early cultist trappings, high fidelity re-
mains a mystery to many people. Some see it as complex,
cumbersome machinery; some think a knowledge of higher
electronics is required to operate it; and some believe a
large and somehow special room is needed for it to perform
as it should. These are all fables.
Today's high fidelity by Harman -Kardon is uniquely good
looking. The operating controls are so wisely organized that
each instrument performs at its maximum in the hands of
an intelligent layman. The very essence of their value is
that they reproduce music IN YOUR HOME
large or
small the way the composer wanted you to hear it.
-
-
Don't consider high fidelity a substitute for the concert
hall and its very special aura: the orchestra filing onstage,
the burst of applause as the conductor appears, the solemn
hush as he raises his baton and the presence of many sharing
the experience with you.
-
-
has its
the home
High fidelity, in its proper setting
own special and exciting values. The music you listen to
this new way is created from perfect program material,
broadcast or recorded under ideal conditions, and then
retold with flawless authenticity. Where many seats in a
concert hall provide a compromised performance, high
fidelity in your home can be perfect every time.
When you buy custom console high fidelity you are buying
three things: performance, furniture and the cost of assembly. In our models, as in anyone's, you pay for all three.
The same number of dollars spent on components would
buy more performance; but for those who desire the extra
convenience of a fine system in a fine furniture cabinet,
Harman -Kardon consoles are unexcelled.
Illustrated Harman -Kardon High Fidelity Models:
The Trend amplifier (Model A -1040) easily delivers 40 watts of hum -free,
distortion -free power from the new "Controlled H" circuit and generates
a conventional 20 watt instrument. A speaker selector
switch permits you to add an additional speaker system elsewhere in
the house. It also features: three position rumble filter; six position
loudness contour selector to provide precise balance for your own
hearing characteristics; Variable Speaker Damping to insure ideal matching of the amplifier and speaker; separate record and tape equalization
and enormously effective bass and treble controls to adjust for the
acoustics of your room. The Trend is enclosed in a brushed copper cage
only 133/4" wide x 91/4" deep x 4- 1/16" high.
less heat than
The Trend price is $125.00
The Theme. tuner (Model T-1040) is the ideal companion for the Trend
amplifier. It features: FM with sensitivity at the theoretical maximum;
Variable Interstation Noise Gate to eliminate noise between stations;
illuminated tuning meter; FM Rumble Filter; dual cathode follower outputs
with adjustable level controls. Finish and dimensions are the same as
The Theme price is $140.00
the Trend.
Genuine high fidelity can be purchased in two basic forms:
component high fidelity and integrated high fidelity.
Component High Fidelity: This form presents a system
including (a) a record player, (b) a tuner for picking up
AM and FM radio programs, (c) an amplifier to enlarge
these sources of sound sufficiently to excite (d) the speaker.
Because Harman -Kardon component high fidelity is strikingly attractive, because it is as simple to connect as a
lamp, because it is all performance with nothing spent on
non -performing cabinetry, it is your best high fidelity buy.
The Harman -Kardon Ballad console provides truly remarkable performance
in a compact, functional design which is equally at home in a modern
or traditional setting. The cabinet is constructed of five ply, bonded, fine
hardwoods and is available in mahogany, walnut or blonde finish. It
incorporates a 12 watt amplifier (18 watt peak), sensitive AM -FM with
Integrated High Fidelity Consoles: Until recently this form
was only obtainable from a limited number of high fidelity
specialists on a "built -to-order" basis. Today, Harman Kardon high fidelity systems are available, fully integrated
and factory assembled in fine furniture cabinets. These are
not mass -produced products. They are the custom -built
product of years of research by Harman -Kardon engineers.
complete Harman -Kardon component and package lines, indude information on high fidelity and guides on how and
where to buy high fidelity. Send for your copies now to
Dept. Il -07, Harman -Kardon, Inc., Westbury, New York.
8
Automatic Frequency Control; Garrard record changer with GE reluctance
cartridge and diamond needle; ported triple speaker system with horn
loaded dual tweeters; selector switch for extra speaker; record equalization; loudness contour selector; bass and treble tone controls and
The Ballad price is $400.00
rumble filter.
(slightly higher in blonde)
slightly higher In the Wet
prices
FREE:
IIWWWIIIP
!.
Beautiful, new fully illustrated catalogs. Describe
harman kardon
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
.Notes
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SENSATIONAL WOOFER, MID -RANGE, TWEETER COMBINATION
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3
-
What sort of music
draws overflow audiences to London's
ultramodern Festival Hall ( seating
capacity 2,714 for orchestral concerts,
3,172 for recitals when they put people
behind and on the platform) ? Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, of course.
American visitors all agree that our
programs are deadly, with the same
old symphonies turning in week after
week. But there are surprises. A
Scherchen concert, billed as "Strange
Orchestras," packed out to a wildly
enthusiastic audience. Program? Jolivet s Piano Concerto, Antheil's Ballet
Mécanique, Valise's Ionisation, Lam bert's Rio Grande -with only the
Firebird and Boléro to lend familiar
flavour. The only comparable phenomenon I know of is the popularity
of that exotic double bill, Walton's
Façade and Schoenberg's Pierrot Lunaire-a kind of highbrow's Car and
Pag! -which draws full houses in
London and Edinburgh.
But normally, by billing one unfamiliar work you can empty a hundred or two of seats. So the young
American Thomas Schippers found
when, making his London debut as
orchestral conductor, he spiced two
otherwise popular menus with Menotti's Island God Interlude and Barber's
latest concert recension of Medea.
Even the Semiramide Overture and
Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony could
not stay the public flight, though
Schippers induced for them orchestral
tone of glossy brilliance from the
Royal Philharmonic (who can be
sticky under any conductor not Beecham). An engaging young man who
plainly knew his business, he was liked,
and asked back. He also landed an
EMI Angel recording contract, and is
scheduled to direct the Philharmonia
Orchestra for discs of Bizei s Symphony and Prokofiev's Fifth Symphony
in May.
Continued on next page
Heavy 1M-Pound Alnico -V Magnat
$4950
quaQ to ttie best
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Radiating Elements for Smooth Response
Compression -Type Morn-Loaded Tw
Response: ± 5 db, 3545,000 Cycles!
Here's incomparable Hi -Fi speaker value - --the new
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for base reproduction, a special conical radiator for
mid -frequencies and a built -in compression -type
tweeter for highest frequencies. Includes L -pad
tweeter level control with calibrated dial and control knob. Full 1% -pound woofer magnet for solid
bass response; heavy rattle -proof frame. Overall
range is i 5 db, 35- 15,000 cps. First crossover at
2,000 cps; automatic crossover from mid -range to
tweeter at 4,000 cps. Cone resonance: 50 cps; power
capacity, 25 watts program material; impedance,
16 ohms. Diameter, 12- 1 /16'; depth, 8'. Uneonditionally guaranteed for one full year. 12 lbs.
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$9950
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walls of room to extend bass range; "Tri-Fi" speaker
covers whole spectrum of audible sound. Enclosure
measures 32 x 21 x 14 W. Speaker impedance, 16
ohms; power handling capacity, 25 watts. 44 lbs.
94 DZ 787. Blonde finish.
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with G.E. RPX052 -A Triple -Play Cartridge (diamond- sapphire styli); Knight -Klipsch enclosure
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ALLIED RADIO CORP., Dept. 49 -07
100 N. Western Ave., Chicago 80, III.
Ship the following KNIGHT HI -FI equipment
Send for it. Lists top
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$
Send FREE ALLIED Supplement No.
165
Name
Address
City
JULY 1957
Zone
State
J
9
www.americanradiohistory.com
NOTES FROM ABROAD
Continued from preceding page
hear the music
not the speaker...
JansZen
kkak*
It is interesting to note that women are more
sensitive than men to overtones in the higher
ranges. If your present music system includes
a dynamic tweeter, the resultant distortion
of these overtones may well be the cause of
your wife's complaints about the "shrillness"
or "loudness" of your music system.
The fact that the JansZen lets you hear the
music and not the speaker, eliminating
exaggerated and distorted highs, solves the
problem for the sensitive listener. The key
to JansZen's achievement is four electrostatic
radiators, each of which is a virtually massless,
stretched diaphragm driven over its entire
surface by an electrostatic field. The result is
completely uncolored sound for the first
time in speaker development.
WILLIAM WALTON's new Cello
Concerto, in its European première on
February i 3, with Piatigorsky and the
BBC Symphony under Sargent, drew
a full house, pleased the public, and
set critics by the ears. Donald Mitchell
in a preliminary Listener article applied a theory of T. W. Adorno s to
the work and pronounced it inferior
in that it failed to reflect the anxiety
of our age. Desmond Shawe -Taylor,
quixotic as ever, charged up to give
Messrs. Adorno and Mitchell a sprightly trouncing in a lively New Statesman
piece called "O.K. for Angst?". Meanwhile The Observer, which runs a two critic knockabout team, offered its
readers the two of them engaged in
polite but public sneers and reproofs
on consecutive Sundays. My own
view? The concerto is a shapely, thoroughly attractive work, filled with
warm feeling and beautiful craft.
A few days later, Londoners had the
chance of hearing the American
première of the
actually, the world
concerto, with the Boston Symphony
under Munch. This was in the twiceweekly series of recorded concerts
which the U.S. Information Service
presents in the American Embassy
Cinema. These are given on tapes
borrowed from the Library of the
Voice of America. They offer orchestral performances on Wednesdays and
operas from the Metropolitan on Saturday afternoons. It's a valuable service,
which keeps us in touch with much
contemporary American music and
with new performers. The Louisville
and Oklahoma Orchestras have been
featured in most of the new compositions.
-
-
WE LIKE to think (and sometimes
say) that the Covent Garden Orchestra
under the right man is possibly the
more verfinest orchestra in Europe
satile than the one in Vienna, where
Wozzeck is not played nearly so well!
There are no recordings yet which
show it at its best. But it is murmured
that RCA Victor, now linked with
English Decca, liked their performance of Britten's Prince of the Pagodas
so well as to want to work with them.
Prokofiev's Cinderella is the Orchestra's recording assignment. Conductor
will be Hugo Rignold, who returned
in May as musical director of the
-
Write for literature and the name of your nearest dealer
PRODUCT OF
NESHAMINY ELECTRONIC CORP., NESHAMINY, PA.
Export Division: 25 Warren Street, N.Y.C.
I
O
7. Coble: Sin,onlrice, N Y.
ballet company.
-
ANDREW PORTER
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
WORLD
FOR 20
LEADER
YEARS
Compact Chassis!
On One
30 -WATT AMPLIFIER
AUDIO CONTROL
FM -AM TUNER
2495°
Mahogany or
Blonde Cabinet, $19.95
Prices Slightly Blather In Far )West
A WORD
FROM
AVERY FISHER
Founder and President,
Fisher Radio Corporation
THE EISEIER
"500"
HI -FI ENTHUSIASTS
PEOPLE, OR PATIENTS?
ARE
nationally -known psychiatrist cornered me
at a concert and asked, "Do you know why men
go in for lai -fi ?" "Of course I know, Doctor,' I
replied. "It's because they like music!" "Young
man," he retorted, "you are quite wrong. They
really do it to isolate themselves from their wives."
A
In a recent address at a meeting of the Eastern
Psychiatric Research Association, Dr. II. Angus
Bowes of Quebec told the audience that he had
found high fidelity addiction "an interesting
maladjustment to the stress of our times."
It
is not for me to take scientific issue with these
good gentlemen. But I think I am quite near a
fundamental truth in stating what follows.
It has long been my belief that the human animal was never designed to withstand the stresses
of modern life- particularly those on our nervous system. If a hobby can be
msidered an
escape from those stresses, then cfortunate are
those who P osses.s a hobo
hobby. I ffeelI m
moreover
r
r that
the most fortunate of all are those who have
turned to music, and that musical Aladdin's
Lamp, high fidelity, for their release from the
tensions of the day. But does that make them
patients, rather than people? I think not. It is
entirely conceivable that there are millions of us
enjoying excellent mental health even though
we are possessed by an almost overwhelming
love of music, not only in concert form, but
created for us at our command whenever we
want it through the magic of high fidelity.
There is no truer truth obtainable
By man than corn es of music.
THE FISHER "500" is the most concise form in which you
can acquire world- renowned FISHER quality and versatility. This high fidelity unit features an extreme -sensitivity
FM -AM tuner, a Master Audio Control and a powerful 30 -watt
amplifier
all on one compact chassis! Simply add a record
player and loudspeaker and you have a complete high fidelity
system for your home. Its quality
in the finest FISHER tradition. Its appearance
the timeless beauty of classic simplicity.
-
-
-
OUTSTANDING FEATURES OF THE
"500"
Extreme sensitivity on FBI n d AM
Al suer for microaeeunte <naig.
Full wide -band FM detector tor maximum capture ratio.
Powerful.
30 -watt amplifier: handles 60 -watt peaks.
Unilorm response, 16 to 32.000
cycles.
4 inputs, including separate tape playback preampequdizer,
4, B
and 16 -ohm output match all existing speaker..
Recorder output ahead
of volume and tone controls.
7 Control., including 9-position Channel
Selector IAM. FM. AES, RIAA. LP. NAB. TAPE. AUX I and AUX 21,
Loudness Contour 14- position t. Volume. Ban, Treble, AC- Power, Station
Selector.
Beautiful. die -cut. brushed brass escutcheon and control panel.
Pin -point. channel indicator lights.
Smooth. flywheel tuning.
Largest,
eaato -read. slide -rule did, with logging scale.
High efficiency F31 and
AM antenna supplied.
IS tuned circuits.
14 tubes plus 2 matched
germanium diodes.
sire: 13I" w. x 13%' d. x 6i," high. wFIGHT: 26 Ibo,
-ROnERT DROWNING
P.S. Both doctors mentioned above are avid
high fidelity enthusiasts. Cod bless them.
WRITE FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
Y
JULY 1957
21
-25 44th DRIVE
L. I. CITY
1, N. Y.
of
Nercomb7
the quality
Dear yr.
at one time
to purchase
D
over my problem.
I cannot afford
the
In talking
rant.
mostly on
my money
system I really
to spend
amplifier.
advise me
than on the
some people
rather
speakers
D
since
pickup nor,
be that,
speaker or P
seems to
n vesting
line o! thinking more results by
in the
than
I will get
rather
speaker
are poorest.
tell me
in the best
but others
more heavily
logical
sounds
It soon
Can you help
amplifier.
a quandary
so I'm
..
differently
?.........
out
me
straighten
Dear Mr. Johnson:
There is no doubt but that this line of thinking is frequently encountered
and at first seems logical. Whether it is the right view depends on you
and perhaps how long it will be before you complete your goal.
If you look at each item as an investment, then you will agree that
those items currently at their lowest comparative state of perfection
will no doubt become obsolete more quickly. Those items most closely
approaching theoretical perfection now stand the best chance of remaining so until you buy the last and weakest link in the chain, which
by then may have undergone much improvement. I would therefore
advise you to buy those items which are currently at the highest state of
theoretical perfection first if you ever hope to have a well balanced top
quality system, and to safeguard your earliest investments. Perhaps
the following thought will be of some additional help:
The best amplifier can never be harmful to the performance of a
bad speaker; on the contrary, it will usually help it. A bad amplifier
can ruin your enjoyment of the finest loudspeaker; yet when connected
to
a
poor speaker, its defects may often pass unnoticed.
Working toward your ultimate system as you propose can bring you
much pleasure during and after attainment of your goal and is one of
the many advantages offered only by Hi -Fi Components.
Sincerely yours,
8C'6
Mr. Newcomb
EQViÓ
is
founder and President of
NEWCOMB AUDIO PRODUCTS CO., Hollywood's
lending manufacturer of precision products
for the control and amplification of sound...
since 1937! Alr. Newcomb will be happy to
answer your questions about high fidelity
amplifiers if you will write to him at
NEWCOMB AUDIO PRODUCTS CO.
Department W -7
6824 Lexington Avenue
Hollywood 38, California
Good Service
What to do about equipment which
goes sour is a major problem for
many people who do not live in the
big metropolitan centers where service
facilities are fairly readily available.
We have often said do everything you
can yourself, then write the factory. If
you bought your equipment from a
dealer, it is his responsibility first. But
if he cannot effect a satisfactory repair,
then write the manufacturer. The
manufacturers are well aware that service facilities are too few and far
between, and they are doing all they
can to encourage opening of dealerships and service centers. But- the
high -fidelity industry is still young.
Sometimes it seems remarkable how
much service is available, and how
much interest most manufacturers take
in the correct performance of their
products.
For example, here's a letter from
Dr. John Morris of Lynchburg, Va.,
which is indeed heart- warming: "I
thought it may be of interest to your
readers who live in small towns where
expert repair work is not available
to learn of my recent experience. I
have a component part set with an
Electro -Voice 15 -inch speaker. The
speaker was developing quite a distortion and our local repair man told me
it would be impossible to repair the
set locally. I wrote the distributor
in Richmond who had no facilities and
he suggested the factory. I had visions
of having to buy a new speaker for
want of proper repair facilities.
"Those wonderful Electro -Voice
people wrote back stating that they
would repair or replace it at no cost
to me if I would but send it to the
factory. They even paid the freight
back to me. The only expense I had
to pay was the express to the factory."
This is the way many things are
done and all should be done. There
are certainly times when they are not;
there are manufacturers in the high Continued on page 14
I2
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
20
WORLD
FOR
LEADER
YEARS
The Most Sensitive FM Tuner
In All the World !
MODEL FM -90X
$16950
Mahogany or Blonde
Cabinet, $17.95
Prices Slightly Higher
In the Far Wert
OTHER
FINE
FISHER
TUNERS
THE FISHER
Gold Cascode FM Tuner
THE FISHER
FM -AM Tuner
FM-90X
Model 80 -R
Renowned as the finest and most advanced FM-
\\I Tuner available. the 80 -11 justifies its repuTwo
tation by performing where others fail.
meters, for micro -accurate tuning FM sensitivity
of 1
microvolts for 20 db of quieting.
Better
than 1 microvolt sensitivity for AM.
Separate
front ends for FM and AM.
Adjustable selectivity for AM and variable AFC for FM. Inputs
for 72 ohm and 300 ohm balanced antenna. Super smooth flywheel tuning.
Shielded and shock Multiplex and cathode follower outputs.
mounted
Chassis,
$169.50
-
IF EVER an instrument represented the finest efforts, and greatest
success of radio design engineers
the FM -90X is it! In one
overwhelming sweep, it has rendered all other FM tuners in its price
range OBSOLETE! But performance is not all that the FM -90X offers.
Its die -cast, three -dimensional, brass control -panel and its large,
make it a magnificent addition to your
brilliantly illuminated dial
-
high fidelity system, true to the FISHER tradition.
AMERICA'S ONLY FM TUNER WITH
GOLD CASCODE RF AMPLIFIER
FOUR IF STAGES
DUAL DYNAMIC LIMITERS
TWO TUNING METERS
PLUS: SILVER- PLATED RF SECTION
PLUS: WIDEST -BAND DETECTOR
THE FISHER
FM -AM
Tuner Model 80 -T
Unequaled, the SO-T is the most ad. arced FM.
AM Tuner with complete professional audio conEmploys identical FM -:1\t cirtrol facilities.
cuits as the 80 -R. The first tuner -control chassis
with a separate tape head playback preamplifier
(with NARTB equalization.1 Preamplifier equalizer can he used with lowest level magnetic cur Six record equalization settings.
tridges.
Four
Separate Bass and Treble Tone Controls
Cathode follower outputs to recorder
inputs.
and
amplifier.
JULY 1957
Chassis,
sae: 13ss" wide
x
10,"
deep x 6«s" high. SmPPINC MIGHT: 15 pounds.
WRITE FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER
RADIO CORP.
21
-25 44th DRIVE
L. I. CITY, N. Y.
$199.50
1
j
Where your problem
is a SPEAKER...
it's wise to select one from the
STROMBERG- CARLSON components
which are MATCHED to perfection
3 POPULAR MODELS
Planning to build your Hi -Fi to
an eventual perfection? You'll
be smart to standardize on the
"Custom Four Hundred "®speak er and component line. We're
confident each component from
speaker to preamplifier will come
out ahead in any comparison of
performance and price. All are
designed in the same laboratory,
made under the same quality control standards, styled in the
same modern manner, matched
to perform together perfectly!
8" RF460
Frequency response 45 to
. . . $20.00
14,000 cps. Power -handling capacity, 12 watts program
material. Curvilinear shape, molded cone with hard
center for improved treble response and wide -angle
coverage. Heavy Alnico V magnet provides higher flux
density in gap.
..
Coaxial mounting of tweeter
$49.95
and woofer. Frequency response 30 to 14,000 cps. Power handling capacity, 32 watts program material. Better
than 100 degrees angle of coverage. Aluminum spider
and Carpinchoe leather suspension. 20 ounce Alnico V
low -frequency and 2.15 ounce Alnico V high -frequency
12" RF471
unit magnets.
"There is nothing finer than
a Stromberg -Carlson "®
Find Your
Nearest Dealer
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 12
fidelity industry who do not give
this service, either intentionally or unintentionally (and do we hear about
them! ); but the point is that there
are many, many who do go way beyond normal standards to service their
customers.
Did you ever try writing the manufacturer of your car? Or of your
washing machine? Typewriter? When
you couldn't get the kind of service
you wanted from the dealer who's
right around the corner from where
you live? Well, we have, and all we
can say is that if there were more
high -fidelity manufacturers in other industries, the world would be a lot
better place!
Two quick examples: almost a year
ago, we were driving to the Washington audio show when a tire went soft.
The turnpike service station manager
signed a statement that the tire was
defective in manufacture; he had seen
the same defect with other tires of
that make. On our return home, the
dealer from whom the car had been
bought agreed; they too had had
trouble. The tire salesman agreed; a
new tire would be forthcoming immediately. We have seen the correspondence between the cire salesman
and his wholesaler, and from the latter
to the factory, but we have not seen
the promised new tire. Yet.
And the back -up lights on our
shiny new Chevvy did not work when
it was delivered in May, last year.
It took five months and seven trips
to the local dealer before the loose
connection was finally tightened
enough to stay tight. (We still have
the Chevvy, but we drive a Volkswagen most of the time. It doesn't
have any back-up lights.)
So: high -fidelity manufacturers, how
about taking on a few new industries?
Tube Saver
In The
Yellow Pages
15" RF465
... or
write for your nearest dealer's
"ro
°NNW
°r
14
Features the unique "Omega
gauss.
name and free literature.
S-C
... $89.95
Ring" horn -loaded 21/2" tweeter and separate
15" low-frequency woofer. Frequency response 30 to
20,000 cps. Power -handling capacity 35 watts program
material. Total magnetic flux at voice -coils is 20,000
M -Voice
Prices slated slightly higher in the West.
STROMBERG -CARLSON GD
A
DIVISION
OF GENERAL DYNAMICS CORPORATION
1719c UNIVERSITY AVENUE
ROCHESTER 3, N.Y.
m
sitDP4'
Particularly useful with television sets
is the Wuerth Tube -Saver, but it will
also increase tube life in hi -fi equipment and regular radios. Principle of
the thing is to let half -voltage warm
filaments and cathodes for ten seconds
before applying full voltage. It has
been shown that the initial surge of
full-voltage into cold tubes is cumulatively destructive; hence tube life
Continued on page 17
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
AUDIO CONTROL AND AMPLIFIER
WORLD
FOR 20
LEADER
YEARS
Complete in Every Respect!
ONE
COMPACT
CI -ASSIS
MODEL CA -40
$13950
Slightly nigher
Ike Far N'est
!PAI"'"
w.rr
'
FISHER
Quality
Tuners
THE FISHER
Master Control-Amplifier
Model CA -40
THE FISHER
FM Tuner Model FM -40
',Jr Nt.rrmnmutne l.no-rier.: :\ remarkable in-
strument. beautifully designed. yet modest in cost.
Staple circuitry and simplified controls make the
FM-40 exceptionally easy to use.
Meter for
micro-accurate, center-of-channel tuning.
72
and 300 ohm antenna inputs.
Sensitivity is 3
microvolts for 20 db quieting.
Outputs for
amplifier, tape and Multiplex.
Cathode follower output permits leads up to 200 feet.
Chassis, $99.50
"
to satisfy the most critical requirements of the
music connoisseur, as well as the professional engineer,
THE FISHER Model CA -40 is, without a doubt, the most versatile unit of its type available today. On one compact chassis it
offers the most advanced preamplifier with controls, as well as
a powerful, 25 -watt amplifier with less than 1% distortion at full
output! The Model CA -40 has provisions for six inputs and
offers complete equalization and preamplification facilities for
both records and tape. It features an exclusive FISHER First
TONESCOPE, to provide a graphic indication of Bass and Treble
Tone Control settings. In every respect flexibility, laboratoryquality performance, handsome two-tone styling the MASTER
CONTROL- AMPLIFIER reflects the creative engineering that has
made THE FISHER world- renowned for two decades. Truly,
the CA -40 will long serve as the ultimate standard of comparison
for amplifiers with control facilities. stzE: 123/4" x 101/4" x 5" h.
DESIGNED
1
-
-
THE FISHER
AM Tuner
Model AM -80
ll
iun :I
l mtr.' the AM -80 combines
the pulling power of a professional communications receiver with the broad tuning necessary
for high fidelity reception.
Meter for microaccurate tuning.
Less than one microvolt senA Pre
i.
sitivity for maximum output.
adjustable band -width.
Three-position
Dual antenna inputs.
Three inputs, cathode follower output.
Ideal
for all areas including those substantially beyond
the signal range of FM stations.Chassis,$119.50
JULY 1957
-
WRITE FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
21 -25
44th DRIVE
L. I. CITY 1,
N. Y.
>>
to the satisfied perfectionist...
Congratulations. Traditionally, the high fidelity enthusiast is a restless seeker after perfection, constantly
changing, altering. trading... But the man who owns JBL Signature loudspeaker components is different. He has reached
most JBL
a condition of serenity, confident that further search would be superfluous. Our records show that
Signature owners have previously owned other speakers. The man who uses a JBL Signature D130 knows he has the
the only one made with a four -inch voice coil. He knows that
most efficient fifteen -inch extended range loudspeaker available
he can employ the D130 as a superb low frequency unit when he progresses to the ultimate excellence of a
JBL Signature two -way divided network system by adding either an 075 or 175DLH high frequency unit. With an
acoustical lens he knows he has the only completely successful solution to the problem of high frequency beaming. And the
man who owns a Hartsfield knows he pos ^esses the most desirable loudspeaker system ever made. The man
with a JBL Signature loudspeaker enclosure in his living room possesses an exquisite piece of cabinet work
permanent home furnishing accessory -as well as a meticulously engineered acoustical enclosure. Yes,
you owners of JBL Signature loudspeaker components are to be congratulated ... on your taste,
judgment, and foresight. You still own the finest ever made.
-
-a
-
-
write
and in the foreseeable future
for the name and address of the Authorized JBL Signature Audio
Specialist in your community. He is standing by to fulfill your
dream of verbatim reproduction.
For the best sound available today
".nu," mean,
JAMES B. LANSING SOUND, INC.
3349
16
casitas avvenue, los angeles .0, californio
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 14
can be extended by starting at idle
rather than at full -throttle, so to speak.
The Wuerth unit plugs into the
standard house current outlet; hi -fi
or television equipment is then
plugged into the Tube-Saver. The rest
is automatic. It will handle up to
300 watts and costs $9.95.
Club in Cleveland
Gordon
Page, 1686 Catalpa Rd.,
Cleveland 12, Ohio was one of four
people to start, in 1938, a club which
was later named the Record Spinners.
The Club is still going, still has three
or four of its original members. This
must be some kind of a record, in
itself! Membership is limited, and by
invitation; there are now twenty -six
members.
Can anyone beat this record?
L.
Workshop for Rent
At 4t7 E. 75th St., in New York City,
you can rent your own woodworking
workshop! Here, in some 3,000 square
feet of space, Samuel L. Kuhn, a retired management engineer and longtime amateur woodworker, has assembled a fine battery of woodworking
tools, plenty of benches and storage
bins
and rents the facilities to
hobbyists. Sessions are set up in three
and a half hour periods, afternoons
and evenings. Cost is about $1.25 an
hour.
This seems to us an ideal place for
hobbyists to undertake speaker and
equipment cabinet projects. Drop a
line to Mr. Kuhn, at "Your Workshop," for further details.
-
What makes this
tuner outstanding?
One of the nation's leading electronic testing laboratories has reported that, to their
knowledge, the new Altec 306A is the most sensitive tuner ever manufactured. At the
Chicago High Fidelity Show, one of these tuners equipped with only 23" of 300
ohm antenna lead provided perfect reception on twenty -four FM stations, including
one in Grand Rapids, Michigan. This is a performance which we believe approaches
the theoretical limit of sensitivity that can be obtained at the present stage of electronic science.
But why is it so good? Its basic circuitry is quite conventional, using the latest
Foster -Seeley (Armstrong) detector circuit. The difference lies in the application
of these basic circuits; in the careful selection of the finest components regardless of
cost: in the hundreds of hours spent designing a chassis with the shortest possible
wiring distances between components; in the development and application of circuits
to achieve their full performance capabilities.
Among these extra points of superiority are a fully shielded six gang tuning condenser, complete isolation between the transformer and power mains, and a dry
rectifier of very long life and stability. Besides the Foster- Seeley detector, the FM
section features a "cascode" low noise RF stage, a triode low noise mixer stage,
AFC and two limiter stages. The AM section has three IF transformers with optimized coupling for flat pass band and maximum noise rejection and a special high
Q ferrite rod antenna. Naturally, the 306A far exceeds FCC radiation requirements
and is approved by Underwriters Laboratories for safety in the home.
The specifications given below reflect fully the quality inherent in the Altec 306A.
Compare them with any other tuner specifications, the superiority of this latest Altec
product will be obvious. See it at your nearest Altec dealer's showroom. Its quality
is fully evident in its beautiful appearance and craftsmanship.
NOTE: Sensitivity figures are given for the standard 300 ohm antenna, and can
not be compared with figures derived from special 75 ohm antennas. To convert
75 ohm antenna sensitivity to standard 300 ohm sensitivity, double the published
figure. For example: a 2.5 microvolt sensitivity on 75 ohm antenna is a 5.0 microvolt sensitivity on 300 ohm antenna.
Frequency Modulation- antenna: Standard
Right Angle Socket
You can now get right angle sockets,
designed for incorporation into printed
circuits. Neat idea; Cleveland Metal
Specialties makes them.
300 ohm maximum sensitivity: 1.1 microvolts
. quieting sensitivity: 2.5 microvolts for 20 db. 4.0 microvolts for 30 db . selectivity: 6 db
band width 185 kc, 20 db band width 300 kc . Irequcncy range: 87 -109 MC image rejection:
48 db
IF rejection: 72 db frequency response: ±0.5 db, 20- 20,000 cps distortion: Less
than ISi at 100!ó modulation, Less than 0.4tó at volt output
*standard 300 ohm antenna
1
Amplitude Modulation-
antenna:
connections . maximum sensitivity: 3
selectivity: 6 db band width 11.0 kc,
1675 kc . image rejection: 66.5 db .
Built -in Ferrite Rod "Loopstick" plus external antenna
microvolts loop sensitivity: 50 microvolts per meter
40 db band width 27 kc
frequency range: 534 kcIF rejection: 58.5 db distortion: Less than 1.5''F at
30% modulation . output:
volt cathode follower matched for 4411 and 339 power supply:
117 volts; 60 cycles; 65 watts
tubes: 2-6BQ7A,
each 6A134, 6BA6, 6AU6, 6AL5, 6BE6,
I2AU7
controls: Tuning; on -oil. AM. FM -AFC
1
Furniture Kits
If you have the urge to build a chair,
drop a line to a fellow by the name
of Hagerty, down in Cohasset, Mass.
He builds kits (you assemble them)
and for various relatively small
amounts you can get chairs, settees,
beds, tables, and what have you, all
in kit form. They're New England
Colonial in style.
JULY 1957
1
Price: less cabinet 1183.00; blond or mahogany cabinet $15.00
ALTEC FIDELITY IS HIGHEST FIDELITY
ALTE[
LANSING CORPORATION
Dept. 7H
1515 S. Manchester Ave., Anaheim, Calif.
161 Sixth Avenue, New York 13, New York
17
Distortion Free Performance
At All Listening Levels
MC-60
$198.50
Distortion free performance is yours with the McIntosh MC -60 -60
watt power amplifier. Unlimited listening pleasure, never before achieved,
is a result of the revolutionary Patented Bifilar Circuit *; This is
truly the
the Standard of Excellence. Hear it today and you too will know the difference.
U.
S.
Patent »2,477,074
C -8 paO6e44e ueae
AUDIO COMPENSATOR
$88.50
cabinet $8.00
C -8
The superior companion to the MC -60. The only
preamplifier with sufficient flexibility to properly
compensate all available recordings including such
environmental conditions as room acoustics, different
loudspeakers, etc., plus equalization for tape playback
heads. Make your music listening superlative with the
C -8 Professional Audio Compensator.
HF4.78-57
See veer 9140e/tided
Ne rlatoaI Dealer
or write for Detailed Specifications
IWlufoth
LABORATORY, INC.
In Canada manufactured under license by
McCurdy Radio Industries Ltd.
22 Front Street West
Toronto, Canada
4 Chambers St., Binghamton, N. Y.
NEW YORK
25 WARREN ST
CABLE: SIMONTRICE, NEW YORK
EXPORT DIVISION:
7.
N Y.
the ALTEC
BIFLEX principle
(A new development in loudspeaker design)
Biflex loudspeakers are the product of a new principle in loudspeaker design
developed by Altec. They have an efficient frequency range far greater than
any other type of single voice -coil speaker and equal to or exceeding the
majority of two or three -way units. This truly amazing frequency range, which
is guaranteed when the speaker is properly baffled, is the result of the Altec
developed viscous damped concentric mid -cone compliance.
This compliance serves as a mechanical crossover providing the single voicecoil with the area of the entire cone for the propagation of the lower frequencies and reducing this area and mass for the more efficient reproduction of
the higher ranges. Below 1000 cycles per second the inherent stiffness of the
Biflex compliance is such that it effectively couples the inner and outer sections
of the cone into a single integral unit. The stiffness of the compliance is
halanced to the mechanical resistance and inertia of the peripheral cone sec-
J. Gay and The Beggar's Opera
SIR:
Coinciding with the recent issue of the
American recording of The Beggar's
Opera (see HIGH FIDELITY, March )
there has been issued in England the
Ninth Music Book [reviewed in this
volume devoted entirely to
issue}
John Gay and The Beggar's Opera.
This activity surrounding Gay and his
masterpiece must indeed have some
kind of solid foundation, yet, John
Gay, although figuring in all histories
of music, was merely the writer of
three librettos and a handful of minor
-a
lyrics...
reproduction
up to 1000 cps
reproduction
above 1000 cps
.
That Gay's masterpiece has survived all changes of taste and fashion
cannot be due to chance alone; there
must be enduring qualities in a work
which at the time of its inception was
eagerly discussed by Swift, Pope, and
Congreve, which inspired Hogarth to
paint a whole series of pictures, and
which, with Fielding's political satires.
prompted Parliament to bring in the
Drama Censorship Act of 1737. Perhaps the real secret of its success is
the fact that it exerts an appeal on a
number of different levels, from the
very popular to the most sophisticated.... Brilliant satire, well -loved
melodies, a story of a highwayman
gallant and his two rival mistresses
-such a combination was assured of
becoming the talk of the town.
The plot is a slight affair, but it
gives scope for the creation of amusing
incidents and a gallery of lively characters. . . . In the play as a whole
there is a great realism and an almost
Elizabethan spirit of freedom, spiced
with highly- flavored dialogue. By virtue of its realism, The Beggar's Opera
provides a burlesque both of the artificial heroic drama of Dryden and
Otway and the oversentimental comedy
of Cibber and Steele. With a single
absurd line Gay effectively ridicules
the frenzied declamation so common in
tragedies of the period: "One kiss
tion so that the mass of this outer section effectively prevents the transmission
of sounds above 1000 cycles beyond the mid -compliance and the cone uncouples at this point permitting the inner section to operate independently for
the reproduction of tones above 1000 cycles. Proper phasing beween the two
cone sections is assured by the controlled mechanical resistance provided by
the viscous damping applied to the compliance.
In each of the three Biflex speakers, this mid -compliance cone is driven by
an edge -wound aluminum voice-coil operating in an extremely deep gap of
regular flux density provided by an Alnico V magnetic circuit shaped for maximum efficiency.
If you have not had an opportunity to listen to the Altec Biflex speakers,
do so soon. You will be surprised by their quality and efficiency. Compare
them with any single voice -coil speaker made; you will find them far superior.
You will also find them comparable to many higher -priced coaxial and three way speaker systems.
An Altec Biflex is the world's greatest value in high fidelity loudspeakers.
408A
412A
415A
Diameter:
81 /e"
1214"
1515¡"
Guaranteed
Frequency Range:
60 to 16.000 cycles
40 to 15,000 cycles
30 to 14,000 cycles
Price:
$27.00
$48.00
$63.00
ALTEC FIDELITY IS HIGHEST FIDELITY
Dept. 7H
ALTE[
1515 So. Manchester Avenue, Anaheim, Calif.
161 Sixth Avenue, New York 13, N.Y.
LANSING CORPORATION
Continued on page 2I
JULY 1957
r9
AS
IT
WAS
COMPOSED...
So should it be performed. As it is performed, so should it be
recorded. As it is recorded -so shall you hear it. A limited number
-
of AMI precision high fidelity sound systems are available. Each
has been painstakingly assembled- component by component
under the direct supervision of electro- acoustics engineers. Each
sound system is comprised of maximum performance components,
each precisely intermatched and balanced to conform with the
most rigid audio test standards yet set for a pre -engineered precision instrument. Each instrument is adjustable exactly to the
individual acoustical and spatial requirements of the listening
room in which it is installed. Write now for complete information,
literature, and the name of your dealer.
HORN SYSTEM:
EXCLUSIVE THREE-CHANNEL FRONT-LOADED EXPONENTIALhorn's
efficiently double
three -Tray frequency dividing network with crow -over at .550 cps and 4.000 cps:
corner
audio output of amplifier, 120 degrees wide angle dispersion. Acoustic engineered wall and 20,000
enclosures or completely integrated systems. High output 22 watt professional amplifier 20 tocartridge
cps ! 1.5 db. I.'f distortion (1.S'.ß at concert levels. Pre -amplification: GE variable reluctance
treble controls for definite
with 1 mil diamond and 3 nail sapphire stylii. Precision calibrated bass and
1A.4,
steps of cut and boost or infinite adjustment. Record equalization controls for 1.P LON, NAB, R
Fletcher- Munson Effect
boost
for
bass
automatic
early Columbia. Professional 3-step loudness control,
roll -off
correction. Separate continuously variable volume control. 12 db! octave high frequency four positionintermix
precision
control (scratch fi uteri. AM -EM tuner with AFC and tuning meter. 4 -speed satin
finish by fine
changer of advanced design. Blond or dark Honduras mahogany hand rubbed to
from eight hundred to
!ache hundred dollars
Ì
Incorporated
150(1 Union .41e71ue S. E.
Grand Rapids 2, Michigan
engineers. designers and manufacturers
of professional and commercial sound
systems since 1909.
furniture craftsmen.
20
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
PILOT
PILOT
LETTERS
Continued from page 19
and
-
then-one
-
and only
kiss
be ;gone
farewell!
Literary extravagance is parodied with delightful mockery in Polly -s
cry of horror when Mach.ath seem.
destined to be executed: " \\'as a rope
ever intended for this neck! O let
Mc throw my arms about it, and
throttle thee with love." Though perhaps unkind, this exposure of the ab
surditics into which c ni cmpur n
literature had lapsed wars a ncccssan
correct ivc.
Gays primary motive in writing
71.7e BC ,Q.:,11'.5 opera was to attack tilt
highly artificial Italian opera which
was then so firmly established as the
only suitable form of entertainment
for members of good society. Composers at that time were at the mercy
of the producer and singer. obliged to
sacrifice all musical considerations to
extravagance of staging and to the
provision of ornate arias that would
enable pampered cutII-,1i to flaunt
their virtuosity.
Gay's criticism may have been
largely destructive, but it undoubtedly
helped to pave the way for the later
reforms of Gluck and the humanist
approach of Mozart. It should be remembered, however, that there had
already been severe criticism of the
current operatic style.... The reason
why Gay succeeded where earlier
critics had failed was that he provided
a pleasing remedy in the form of a robust and more democratic alternative.
.
.
offers you peak performance
in high fidelity at low cost
COMPONENT
UNITS
1
'
Pilot engineering and ingenuity at its best! Tuner, amplifier and
preamp -audio- control built onto a single chassis for greatest
convenience in assembling a high fidelity system. Only the
speaker, and record player or tape recorder need be connected.
I
H F-42
Includes I M -:tM Tuner with tuned RF stage
and dual cascade limiter -discriminator FM
circuit for maximum sensitivity perfect
quieting even with fringe signals; precise
BEACON tuning indicator; AFC with disabling switch; 10 KC filter for AM; built -in
FM and AM antennas; flywheel tuning.
Preamp -Audio Control with hum -free DC
on tube heaters; tape head and phono inputs
with separate equalization; bass and treble
controls; loudness- contour and volume controls; tape recorder output.
Power Amplifier with less than 1% distortion
at 20 watts rated output (40 watts peak);
frequency response: 20 to 20,000 cycles,
±1db; built in rumble filter. Housed in handsome enclosure finished in brushed brass and
-
C
.
Corruption in political circles is
cleverly exposed by explaining in
terms of ministerial procedure Pcachum's system of selling members of his
own gang to the magistrates. Peaachum
confesses, with some degree of shame.
that "like great statesmen we encourage those who betray their
friends." At the time Th, 13c,:;,t'ar'
Opera was written, ministerial power
was shared by Sir Robert Walpole and
1.m -d Tuwnshend in much the same
way as Peachum and Lockit shared tilt
profits of their shameful trade.
Finally there is the charm of the
music, which, though it may not rise
to the sublime, is never banal. Most
of the sixty -nine songs are English,
Scots, or Irish airs which were familiar
to everyone, the remainder consist in:_:
of French ballads and a few opera( k
melodies like the march from Handel's
Continued
On
burgundy.
Dimensions: 4% "h x 13% "w x 12i()ed.
HF-30
Tuner with tuned HI' stage
$209,50 Complete
Includes FM -AM
for high sensitivity perfect quieting even
with fringe signals; precise BEACON tuning
indicator; AFC with disabling switch; 10 KC
filter for AM: built -in FM and AM anten-
-
nas; flywheel tuning.
Preamp -Audio Control with phono and auxiliary inputs, bass and treble controls. loudnesscontour and volume controls, tape recorder
output.
l5
Power Amplifier with less than
distortion
at 12 watts rated output (24 watts peak l;
and frequency response: 20 to 20.000 cycles,
±ldb: selector switch for independent or
simultaneous operation of two speaker systems. Housed in handsome enclosure finished
in brushed brass and burgundy.
Dimensions: 4!á "h x 141á"w x
4
$169.50 Complete
fF
Make your own performance test of these component units at your Pilot dealer.
For complete specifications, write to Dept. BV -7
next page
Prices slightly higher west of Rockies.
/Pilot
RADIO CORP.,
37 -06 36th St., Long Island City 1, N. Y.
Over 38 years leadership in electronics.
PILOT
PILOT
LETTERS
Continued from preceding page
and only
.lt is evident that Gay
Rinaldo.
selected these melodies before writing
the lyrics, since the latter were specifically designed to lit the the meter and
rhythm of the music. There are no
grounds for believing that Dr.
Pcpusch, who composed the overture
and added simple basses to the airs.
took any part in the actual choice.
(gay, already established as a writer of
songs. was quite capable of selecting
nnnia.1I material that could be made an
integral part of the work, and not
merely a pleasant addition to the play
offers you peak performance
in high fidelity at low cost
itself...
TUNERS
Traditional Pilot engineering and quality assure optimum
performance. All Pilot tuners feature Beacon tuning for
precise station selection. All Pilot tuners are also fully
shielded to conform with FCC radiation specifications.
A
FA -550
.
What cannot be disputed is that
The Beggar's Opera created a new
fashion in theater, and although there
have been numerous attempts in the
last two hundred years to emulate
Gay, no one has succeeded in achieving so lasting a pinnacle.
Noel Fisher
London
England
FM -AM
Has tuned RF stage and dual cascade limi-
ter- discriminator FM circuit for maximum
sensitivity;
perfect quieting even with
fringe signals; AFC with disabling switch;
10 KC filter for AM; flywheel tuning: built ìn FM and AM antennas. Features preampaudio control with five input channels; hum -
-
free DC on tube heaters; tape head and phono
inputs with separate equalization; bass and
treble controls; separate cathode follower
outputs for tape recorder and power amplifier. Housed in handsome enclosure finished
in brushed brass and burgundy.
Dimensions: 4 % "h x 14y2"w x 10.4 "d.
$159.50 Complete
Schnahel's Beethoven Sonatas
SIR:
In your April issue, under letters,
César Saerchinger expresses the hope
that the Schnabel Beethoven sonata
recordings may be available "to students of music in this and future generations- including those who are
unable to spend Sao at one fell
swoop."
1[ may' be of interest to you and
had inquired
Mr. Saerchinger that
about the possibility of RCA Victor
issuing the sonata series on single
records and that I received, on February twenty -second, the following
reply from them: "lt is our intention
to issue the remainder on single
records late this year if possible. \Vc
hope this will he of interest to you.I hope that more people make their
interest in a republication of the
Schnabel records at regular prices
known to the manufacturer.
Mrs. Winston Gottschalk
Lancaster, Pa.
1
FA -540 FM -AM
-
Has tuned RF stage for high sensitivity
perfect quieting even with fringe signals;
AFC with disabling switch 10KC filter for
AM; cathode follower output; phono and
auxiliary inputs; flywheel tuning; built-in
FM and AM antennas. Housed in handsome
enclosure finished in brushed brass and
burgundy.
Dimensions: 4% "h x
13 "w
x R?¡ "d.
$109.50 Complete
FM -530 FM
Only
-
Has tuned RF stage for high sensitivity
perfect quieting even with fringe signals;
AFC with disabling switch; cathode follower
output; phono and auxiliary inputs; flywheel
tuning: built -in antenna. Housed in handsome enclosure finished in brushed brass and
burgundy.
Dimensions: 4yß "h x 13 "w x
$89.50 Complete
Make your own performance test of these tuners at your Pilot dealer.
For complete specifications, write to Dept. BW-7
Prices slightly higher west of Rockies.
A/ot RADIO CORP.,
37 -06 36th St., Long Island City 1, N. Y.
Over 38 years leadership in electronics.
Mme. Helena
SIR:
Please refer to Arthur Knight's letter
concerning Edith Helena on page
twenty -four of HIGH FIDELITY, May
issue. Mr. Knight's continents are
rather belated, since Mme. Helena
[lied Nov. 27, 1956.
withheld so long'
We're afraid so.
Was his letter
Earl P. R,
Philadelphia,
Pa.
Our apologies.-
P.J.
Sorceress Music Wanted
SIR:
would very much appreciate your
help in tracking down a record of the
theme music from the French film
I do
Le Sorcière. .
. Unfortunately,
not know either the naine of the composer of the score, or the name of the
company which made the picture.
However, the film, which starred
Marina Vlady, Nicole Courcel, and
Maurice Ronet, contained both French
and Swedish dialogue with English
subtitles. With the subtitles it was
probably for English rather than
American consumption, as all references to money are in pounds rather
than dollars.
Robert Charlton
3553 Glenwood Place
Cincinnati 29, Ohio
1
.
PILOT
PILOT
and only
offers you peak performance
in high fidelity at low cost
AMPLIFIERS
Pilot- engineered Williamson -type circuits employing
specially wound output transformers to insure absolute stability and lowest distortion. Power specifications are conservatively rated, and amplifiers are
designed for continuous operation at full output.
t\a
Comments on Contributors
u
SIR:
A couple
of belated comments on
the March issue, plus a couple of more
timely ones on the April:
S. S. Schopenhauer, with whose views
I heartily agree, should be a little more
careful when he writes under an alias.
He lets slip that he lives in a Midwest
city of less than too,000, wherein is
located a large state university plus
two liberal arts colleges, one of national reputation. Where else but
Columbia, Missouri'
[Wrong guess. -Ed.1
I am afraid that Charles Burr leaves
a wrong impression in his article "A
Frame for Stanley Holloway" in the
April issue. He speaks of the Sam
Small stories "which Holloway invented for himself and which were
the basis for his first recordings." I
submit that the Sam Small character
was invented by the late Eric Knight
in his "Flying Yorkshireman" stories.
Finally congratulations to two Lon dons, George in the March issue and
Dr. Sol in the April, on well-written
and charming pieces, respectively
"Prima Donnas I Have Sung Against"
and "Is Opera Fair to Doctors ?"
ilfillc r
Howard
Toledo, Ohio
.
AA -920
Rated output with less than 1' :- distortion:
20 watts (40 watts peak); frequency response: 20 to 20,000 cycles, ±ldb, fias built in preamp and audio control with hum -free
DC on tube heaters; tape head and phono
inputs with separate equalization; 3- position
rumble and scratch filters; bass and treble
controls: loudness- contour and volume controls; plus tape recorder output. Housed in
handsome enclosure finished in brushed brass
and burgundy.
Dimensions: 4'% "h x 13', "w x 9 "d.
1699.50 Complete
AA -41 CA
Basic amplifier -rated output with less than
1% distortion: 20 watts (40 watts peak);
frequency response: 20 to 20,000 cycles,
±0.5dó; 6L6GB output tubes. Chassis and
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Dimensions: 4" x 12%"
x
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$59.50 Completo
AA-903B
Hated output with
less
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±1db. Has built-in pream, and audio control
with hum -free DC on tube heaters; tape head
and phono inputs with separate equalization;
2- position rumble and scratch filters; bass
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Housed in handsome enclosure finished in
brushed brass and burgandy.
Dimensions:
4?¿
"h
x 13 %
$79.95 Complete
"w x 9 "d.
AA-908
Basic amplifier -rated output with less than
1% distortion: 40 watts (80 watts peak);
frequency response: 20 to 20,000 cycles,
±0.1db; 6CA7 output tubes; provision for
selecting optimum damping factor. Chassis
and cover cage finished in brushed brasa.
Dimensions: 12v." x 8',í" x 61/2" high.
$125.00 Complete
Make your own performance tests of these amplifiers at your Pilot dealer.
For complete specifications, write to Dept. It X -1
Prices slightly
RADIO CORP.,
higher west of Rockies.
37 -06 36th St., Long Island City 1, N. Y.
Over 38 years leadership in electronics.
1. 4POLE SHADED "INDUCTION
this changer
constant speed with minimum vibra-
SURGE" MOTOR gives
these
ire the
tion. Will not cause hum even with
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lust
2. FULL MANUAL POSITION:
touch the switch and tone arm is
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features
3. ADVANCED GARRARD PUSHER
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the only device insuring positive,
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diameter, thickness or condition of
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4. PERFECTED
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made it
SPINDLES
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5. INTERCHANGEABLE
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The
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ING SWITCH
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GG -27
Send B.I.C. High Fidelity Plan Book.
Name
301
Turntable
$89.00
RC98
Super Changer
$67.50
Now there's
24
RC121
Mixer Changer
$42.50
a GARRARD
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
AS THE
EDITORS
SEE IT
Don't Be Amazed
THERE IS A QUESTION that has been addressed to
us lately with increasing frequency. It is a question
which anyone in our position and in his right mind
could recognize offhand as being impossible to answer.
Nevertheless we must try to answer it, for reasons which
will be apparent.
The question is this: how little can a person spend and
still have high fidelity?
The impossibility of answering this will be obvious at
once to seasoned readers
manufacturers and consumers
alike. High fidelity never has been defined. There is no
line of demarcation between it and medium fidelity. What
is high fidelity in one room is not high fidelity in another. And what about completeness, if you please? Does
high fidelity imply an FM tuner? A tape recorder? And
so on. No answer is possible.
The need for an answer, on the other hand, is posed
by the fact that the high -fidelity fellowship is no longer
the small informal fraternity it used to be, when a good
many of the customers knew many of the makers personally and were almost as well informed about their products and businesses as the latter were themselves. The
new (would -be) fi -folk, by contrast, don't know anything;
they don't know a pentode from a passacaglia. They
simply have fallen to the lure of owning custom- tailored
music equipment, especially since it costs, they've heard
tell, much less than ready -assembled phonographs of cornparable quality.
So far; so good. But there is another result of high
fidelity's having outgrown its hobbyhood. It is a money industry now, and there is a little hugger -mugger going
on in the side streets. To tempt the verdant neophyte
there have begun to appear, largely in classified advertisements in newspapers, offers of "genuine high fidelity,
SEPARATE components, completely installed, for an
AMAZING $89.50" and the like. As we initiates would
at once deduce, the men behind these ads are not in the
high- fidelity business at all. They are in the junk business.
Probably most of them simply have latched onto surplus
lots of obsolete public address equipment. But the neophyte
doesn't know enough to be frightened off by the $89.50
price tag. How should he?
So -how much must one pay for high fidelity?
Let us deal with the question incompletely, simply so
that you may have something to quote when someone asks
it of you. Let us rule out, to begin with, people who want
temporary equipment, later to be replaced. This category
includes college students, draftees, and small bachelors
(a P.G. Wodehouse term, meaning people who answer
advertisements for small bachelor apartments). We will
discuss only equipment that is to be more or less permanent. Further, let us arbitrarily confine ourselves to phono-
-
JULY 1957
graphic equipment. Tape recorders are fun, and are getting
better and less expensive all the time, but recorded tapes
are not for the neophyte budget -yet. And tuners must
be bought according to location: price becomes a function
of distance from the broadcasting station (I'm talking
about FM, of course).
Start with the record turntable, and let us remember we
are talking minima. Your neophyte friend can get a single play, three -speed turntable with arm, and base, for somewhere between $3o and $40. Next the phono cartridge,
where mentioning price is almost like mentioning a name:
$23 for a two- stylus magnetic (microgroove diamond; 78rpm sapphire). Ceramics may furnish competition here,
but only if the dealer can supply, at the right price, an
amplifier which will afford variable equalization for a
ceramic.
The amplifier (including preamplifier) will cost about
$60 for ten watts, the absolute high -fidelity minimum, or
about $70 for enough more power to drive a low -efficiency
speaker properly.
The loudspeaker system ought to run somewhere in the
neighborhood of $roo. Recall, please, that we are excluding
the tidy little space -saver boxes that several worthy manufacturers put out ( not without hope that their owners
later may buy $400 systems of the same make). If the
amplifier is rated at ten watts, the speaker unit probably
ought to be a simple single voice-coil model of high efficiency, housed in a reasonably large, very firm enclosure
of uncomplicated design. With a more powerful amplifier,
one of the low -efficiency transducers can be used
probably this raises the total cost a little. What may reduce
the total cost a little, call it fifteen per cent, is the purchase
of either amplifier or loudspeaker system in kit form ( is
your friend good at glueing or soldering ?).
And thus we come to $220 as the approximate cost of
a minimal high- fidelity rig, phonograph only, uncabineted
but for the loudspeaker, and uninstalled. A good dealer
may append a charge for testing, wiring, installation, and
service contract. This varies, but in our experience it is
almost always a good investment. And now we will sit
back to welcome letters telling us wherein we have erred.
Something had to be said, though. We don't like that
man with the amazing $89.50.
-
FOR PURPOSES of our own, in no way sinister, we would
like to receive letters from people who are planning
listening-rooms, perhaps in new dwellings. We want to
hear their ideas on choice of audio components, expenditure, style of décor, and (if you will excuse the rhetorical
pomposity) philosophy of use. We offer nothing in return,
but your notions will be read and heeded. They are
important to us.
J.M.C.
25
PAINTING BY IGNACIO DE ZULOAGA.
COURTESY OF SENORA OF ZULOA
Manuel de Falla and the Spirit of Spain
by WALTER STARKIE
IMET MANUEL DE FALLA for the first time
in the
summer of 1921. Disciples had warned me that the
master was remote, inaccessible, and did not welcome
visitors, so I set out for Granada, where he then lived in
one of the little cármenes in the Alhambra, well armed
with introductions. However, what really served as a
magic "Open Sesame' was a note from my friend, Don
Angel Vegue, collateral descendant of the great Venetian
dramatist Goldoni, which stated that I was on my honeymoon and begged the composer to do the honors of the
Alhambra to my Italian bride. As a result of this charming
appeal to Spanish gallantry, we were received with open
arms by Don Manuel and his devoted sister.
That evening we were feasted and wined, and the
Maestro sat down at the piano in his sanctum to play for
26
us works of Debussy, and his own nocturnes for piano
and orchestra, Nights in the Gardens of Spain. While he
played, he seemed to be listening to the echoes of his
music, and I always had the impression that for him
pause and silence were as important as the music itself.
His piano playing at times was markedly orchestral, as if
he wished to turn the keyboard into a symphony orchestra;
at other times he diminished the tone, producing the
thrumming effect of rich chords on the guitar or the
spiky effect of plucked notes on the plaintive bandurria,
the instrument of blind beggars since the minstrel days
of the fourteenth century. At the end of Debussy's Soirée
de Grenade he turned to my wife, saying: "How subtly our
Andalusian cante jondo has influenced the French master
in his music, and yet he never was in Spain except for
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
order to go to a bullfight in San Sebastian."
Later, under the trees, we listened to a cuadro flamenco
of singers, dancers, and guitarists from the gypsy caves
in the Sacro Monte, and the Granadine guitarist and composer, Angel Barrios, an excellent musician, gave us a
recital of his works. During the pauses between each piece
of music Falla would whisper to us to listen intently,
and we would again become conscious of the distant
murmuring of countless cascades, the song of the nightingales, and the occasional cry of the mochuelos or owls in
petulant dialogue.
The composer then spoke to us of Andalusian music
the strange oriental genre characterized by chromaticism
and surprising modulations, which was brought into Europe
in the Middle Ages by the Moslems and labeled by the
Western theorists musica ficta, that is to say, false music.
"Where do you find," Falla exclaimed, "greater rhythmic
variety than in the performance of a cuadro flamenco
with its singer, dancer, and guitarist? So varied are the
rhythms that very often both singer and guitarist remain
mute and leave the performance to the dancers, who produce counterpoints by heel -tapping ( taconeo) , hand -clapping (palmas sordas), and finger-cracking (pitos). The
Spanish idiom in music arose out of the ancient Andalusian
melodic influences, to which we should add the Madrid
street -song influences of the little operetta sketches of the
eighteenth century."
As he described Andalusian music and the oriental traditions of southern Spain, Falla spoke as one transfigured
by his theme. As a general rule he was taciturn and gave
the impression of one who lived alone, apart from the
world, but on that summer night in 1921 he was in a
reminiscent vein. He told us anecdotes of his old master
Felipe Pedrell, spoke of Glinka, his admiration for Spanish
music and his influence on the Russian "Five," and discoursed of the fascinating Granadine philosopher Ganivet.
About this writer, Falla said: "He possessed in a great
that state of
degree what the Andalusian calls his sino
tragic racial consciousness which we find in all Andalusians,
whether great or humble. Even the Indian gypsies when
they arrived in Andalusia from the East in the fifteenth
century learned to accentuate the underlying sadness, and
their traditional cante jondo is obsessed by the thought of
Death. Whereas the Arab does not think of Death, and
the Jew shuns the word for it, the gypsy is always singing
of funerals
is so obsessed by the theme of Death that
we even find the word alegrías ( joys) applied to certain
songs in flamenco style which are full of sadness. The
Gitano, as the Andalusian would say, tiene la alegría de
estar triste (rejoices in being sad).
."
Manuel de Falla y Matheu himself was not pure
Andalusian, in either blood or spirit: his second name,
Matheu, is Catalan; his teacher was Felipe Pedrell, who
came from Mediterranean Tortosa; and his friend of student
days was the guitarist- composer Tárrega, who came from
the neighboring Mediterranean city of Castellón de la
Plana. The Catalano- Mediterranean impressionism in
Falla's nature in conflict with the philosophic orientalism
of his Andalusian sino was destined to produce violent
tensions, and like César Franck he never succeeded in
a few hours in
-
-
...
.
JULY 1957
.
liberating himself entirely from his djinns, or as they are
called in Andalusia, duendes.
In his mid -twenties Falla entered upon his true vocation
by going to study composition with Pedrell, who largely
inspired his interest in Spanish folk music. In Madrid he
won a prize for piano playing, and in 1905 his La vida
breve won the prize in a national opera competition
organized by the Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Though
this short opera was not actually produced until 1913, in
France, it definitely marked the beginning of his reputation.
In 1907 Falla went as a student to Paris. He led there
a life of ill -paid drudgery, made the more irksome by
regular and tempting offers from opera companies to write
which he steadSpanish operas of the conventional kind
fastly refused. At the same time Joaquin Turina also was
studying in Paris, and I have heard the Sevillian master
relate how the great Isaac Albéniz inspired both young
Andalusian composers with his enthusiasm and optimism.
Turina met Albéniz in the early days of October 1907,
on the occasion of the first performance in the Salon
d'Automne of Turina's first work, the Quintet for Piano
and Strings. The work had already begun when the composer saw a fat black- bearded gentleman bustle into the
hall very much out of breath, accompanied by a slight
young man. In a moment of silence the fat gentleman
said in a loud stage whisper to the young man: "Is the
composer an Englishman ?" "No Señor, he's a Sevillian,"
replied the latter, surprised. As soon as the work ended,
the fat gentleman accompanied by the slight young man
went up to Turina and announced his name: "Isaac
Albéniz." Half an hour later the three, arm in arm,
walked through the Champs - Elysées to a bar in the Rue
Royale. "In that bar," said Turina reminiscently, "I underwent the most complete metamorphosis of my life. We
talked of our country, of Spain and of Europe, and I
left that bar with all my ideas completely transformed.
We three Spaniards, gathered together in a corner of Paris
in the early years of the century, had discovered our true
vocation in life, which was to devote all our energies to
the music of our own country. I have never forgotten
that evening, nor do I believe that thin young man ever
forgot it either. He was the celebrated Manuel de Falla."
During the Paris years Falla was helped also by friendly
advice from the French masters Debussy, Ravel, and Paul
Dukas. Soon his works began to attract the public. La
vida breve was produced at Nice 1913, caught on at
once, was performed in Paris at the Opéra -Comique the
following season. The public immediately recognized in
this miniature work a worthy pendant to Bizei s Carmen.
Falla's years in Paris had deepened his knowledge of
his art and affirmed his personality as composer. It was a
fruitful period, too, for in those years he sketched out the
Noches en los jardines de España ( Nights in the Gardens
of Spain), though it was not performed until 1916. Characteristic, too, of those nationalistic years in Falla's musical development were the Seven Spanish Songs (Sieta
canciones populares españolas). The first two songs, El
paño moruno (The Moorish Cloth) and the Seguidilla
murciana, picture the sun -drenched lands of Mediterranean
Spain, the orange groves of Valencia and Murcia, the palm
-
27
In 1915, during the Great War, Falla left Paris, where
he had worked since 1907, and returned to Madrid. In
succeeding years his fame grew throughout the world, a
high point being when Diaghilev produced The Three Cornered Hat with décor by Picasso. But Falla's interest
remained Spain.
In 1921
with his friend Ignacio de Zuloaga the
painter, the poet García Lorca, José Rodriquez Acosta, and
some others
he organized a festival of cante jondo to take
place the following summer in the Plaza de los Aljibes
on the Alhambra hill. On a little stage decorated with blue
and white tiles of Granada ware, native rugs, and gay
mantones richly embroidered, before an audience in broad brimmed Córdoban hats, black mantillas of fine lace flowing
gracefully over high combs and lovely shoulders, the rival
minstrels sang plaintively thrilling Andalusian airs. Simple
as these seem, they demand a high degree of artistry.
The rules to be observed by the competitors were drawn
up by Falla and his friends, and were strict. Cante jondo
was defined as the group of songs genuinely grown from
the Siguiriya Gitana, which possess significant qualities distinguishing them from the genre grouped under the term
flamenco. The prize- winner was a man of seventy-three
Diego de Morón, known as El viejo, who had walked all
the way from the town of Puente Genil (one of the
genuine homes of cante jondo in Andalusia) carrying the
same kind of stick he had used at the age of twenty to tap
the rhythms. Before a public including the most famous
folk singers ( cantaores) from all over Andalusia, El viejo
sang thirteen varieties of the siguiriya. Gypsies still tell of
adepts weeping for joy as they listened to the old man.
No one who witnessed that night's spectacle of the gypsies
dancing in the Alhambra by moonlight could fail to realize
the significance of the Festival which Falla had promoted
and which became a symbol of the past and future of
Andalusian folk art.
In the years from 1921 -1928 the continued presence
in Granada of Manuel de Falla and his disciple García
Lorca made an international attraction of the gitanos in
the Sacro Monte, bringing to the Albaicín poets, musicians,
painters, and dancers from every corner of the world, to
see what it was that so profoundly impressed Spain's
greatest composer and her greatest poet.
-
SPANISH TOURIST OFFICE
Moorish legacy: the Court of the Lions in the Alhambra.
trees of Elche, "Jerusalem of the West," with its world famous music drama, the "Festa," held in August on the
Feast of the Assumption. Each song consecrates a type of
folk melody- Asturias, Aragón with its martial Jota, and
Nana or cradle song, and finally the gypsy Polo, one of
the varieties of cante jondo. Cante jondo, which has been
well defined by a Spanish writer as "the drama of humanthe tragic
ity in chains," expresses -often savagely
sense of life. This Polo with its fierce impetuosity gives
intimation of the great work that was next to come forth
the ballet El amor brujo. This work marks the climax
of Falla's Andaluz- Oriental genius. It suggests the Kasidas
or short lyrical verses of the ancient Andalusian Moorish
poets, but here we have, as well as Andalusian and Arab
influences, that of the Indian cave -dwelling gypsies, who
had established themselves outside the walls of Granada
in the caves of the Sacro Monte, where they still dwell.
According to Falla, they had introduced a new element
into cante jondo, to be blended with the existing mixture
of Andalusian, Byzantine liturgical, and Arab elements.
El amor brujo swept the musical world off its feet
mainly by force of its barbaric rhythms and rich tonal
colors. However, these do not comprise its whole essence,
or that of La vida breve and El sombrero de tres picos
(The Three- Cornered Hat). In all three, Falla molded
his style on folk tunes, rhythms, and melismas. Yet
there is another aspect of his music just as important and
just as Spanish
is impressionistic. Goethe once said,
"The organ by which I understand the world is the eye."
Falla on the other hand seemed to hear at every pore:
not only the actual melodies and rhythms of his living
Spain, but also those that echoed faintly from Spain's
musical past. Another comment of Goethe which might
have been written to describe Falla is that he "possesses
a sense of the past and present as being one: a conception
which infuses a spectral element into the present."
-
-
-it
28
-
AFTER the Festival of cante jondo in 1922 we find
Manuel de Falla veering away in his music from
the Andalusian idiom and moving towards other traditions. Already in the Sombrero de tres picos, with its
picaresque rhythms, we find touches of a more Mediterranean Falla; but in his next work, El retablo de Maese
Pedro (Master Peter's Puppet -Show), he broke entirely
new ground. This puppet opera is based upon one of
the adventures in the second part of Cervantes' Don
Quixote. Don Quixote and Sancho Panza are at an inn
when a traveling showman arrives with his marionette
theater, and a performance is arranged in the stable of the
posada. The play which the puppets perform is the story
of the Romancero. The showman inside the little theater
pulls the strings for the puppets and the boy assistant
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
explains the action to the rustic audience. Don Quixote,
an old gentleman well versed in chivalry and ballad lore,
interrupts from time to time, and when Don Gaiferos
rides off with the captive Melisendra and the Moors ride
out in pursuit, the indignant Don springs up, sword in
hand, and joins the action, slashing the puppets to pieces
and wrecking the showman's theater.
In this opera Falla has carried still further the methods
he had employed in El amor brujo and La vida breve.
Nor only has he used themes that derive from folk songs,
but he has suggested the atmosphere of the sixteenth
century by indirect musical allusions to the melodies and
rhythms of the Cancionero Alusical (No. 323 of which is
a setting of the story of Don Gaiferos and Melisendra) and
rhythmic accompaniments of the ancient lutanists who
were Cervantes' contemporaries. Falla's music suggests on
the one hand the atmosphere of an auto sacramental of
the days of Lope de Vega, a function in the Cathedral
with organ voluntaries and improvisations; but also we
hear the comments of the crowd in the street outside, the
bickering of the altar boys, the voices of the men in the
neighboring inn. With extraordinary skill Falla uses, too,
the white voice of the trujamán, or boy assistant, as a
contrast to the booming voices that remind us of the
droning of the canons in the chapter of the Cathedral,
and as the boy rises to the climax of declamation his
flutelike voice rises like a paean in praise of God.
As Gomez de la Serna says, even the puppets of Master
Peter become symbolic, as they always do in the booths of
Spanish fairs; and the genius of Falla enables us to see
the fable as Doh Quixote saw it
an expression of heroic
and dramatic conflict. Hence the stormy music when Don
Quixote rises furiously to avenge the slight on Don
Gaiferos; but when the Knight's honor is satisfied, we
hear the shrill voice of the boy lamenting the loss of the
puppets which have been wantonly destroyed.
In this opera Falla has interpreted with grave humor
both the story and the literary style of Cervantes. The
music seems to follow every curve and line of the literary
style, and at times the listener feels as if the music has
given meaning to some passages which had remained obscure on the printed page.
The music of El retablo de Maese Pedro is Castilian,
whereas the music of the earlier Falla is Andalusian. But
what is Castile in Spain other than a central plateau held in
equilibrium by tensions pulling North, South, East, and
West? It is the tensions in the mind of Falla that produce his perfect equilibrium as a composer.
El retablo has the austerity and the intensity of a
classical Castilian work of art, and that note of classicism
appears to an even greater degree in the next work, the
Concerto for Harpsichord, dedicated to the queen of all
clavecinists, Wanda Landowska. Adolfo Salazar, one of the
pioneers in Spain's musical renascence, has pointed out that
Falla's music was drawn by natural affinity towards the
Neapolitan and Spanish music of Domenico Scarlatti, and
the last movement of the harpsichord concerto is certainly
a fragrant example of the eighteenth century. It is a joyous
Scarlattian movement, full of sudden rhythmic changes.
No less characteristic is the slow movement with its
-
evocation of the primitive ritualistic music of Spain. The
austere significance of the lento of the concerto becomes
evident when we note that at the end of the movement
Falla printed in the score the following inscription: "A.
Dorn. AICAIXXVI. In Festa Corporis Christi."
THE year 1928 was
a triumphal year. A Falla cycle
was given in Paris, at which I was so fortunate as to
be present. First of all we heard La vida breve with Ninon
Vallin singing the part of Soledad, the gypsy from the
Albaicin who dies at the wedding zambra of her faithless
lover. Then came the celebrated dancer, Antonia Mercé
( known on the stage as La Argentina) in El amor brujo,
performance which roused the French public to the
highest pitch of enthusiasm. Mercé, the most exquisite
and aristocratic dancer of the day, had done her utmost to
create and embody a stylized Andalusian Spain in her
dancing. Her dancing of El amor brujo exactly suited
Falla's score;
her gestures and rhythms were so flexible
that they became absorbed in the music; there was not the
slightest curve in the melody to which she did not give
plastic expression in her memorable performances.
After 1927 -1929 I used to meet Manuel de Falla in
Madrid at the Residencia de Estudiantes, where the
Retablo received one of the finest performances I remember.
In 1931 I again saw him, in Santiago Echea
House
of St. James
princely home of Ignacio de Zuloaga
in the Basque coast village of Zumaya. There I was struck
by Falla's increasingly monklike appearance, and by his
continual references in conversation to the mystical poems
of St. Theresa and St. John of the Cross and to the
sixteenth -century religious music of Victoria, Morales, and
Guerrero. I paid my last visit to the master in 1935 at
his cárnten in Antequeruela, the ancient Sephardic quarter
close to the Alhambra, below which stretches the wonderful panorama of the Vega of Granada. Now I was shocked
by the great change that had come over him. Since I had
last seen him, his face had become lined with suffering, and
I suddenly remembered that
Continued on page 86
a
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-the
De
Fallai remains
-the
are buried in the Cathedral at Granada.
SPANISH TOURIST OFFICE
Tanglewood:
A
Sunday Afternoon
Say: blankets and packed lunches,
sunbathers by the bunches,
and a beach is understood.
But add to these the tide of music
and the waves of song,
and, lo, a matinee at Tanglewood.
Munching their edible cargo
to the strains of a largo,
the whisperers philosophize:
Pizzicati are little pizza pies.
Then their eyelids flutter
and horizontal critics mutter and yawn
on this classical lawn.
Thus the Bach -yard bacchanal.
Yes, napping on a grassy bed
to a lengthy Passion
is quite the fashion
on the harmonic picnic, blanket spread.
And only when the revelers are all asleep
do you finally feel
the piano an icicle melting in the deep
and the flute a bird of erudite steel.
CURT LEVIANT
Teje Muse in Summer Dredd
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WITH A FAST HELICOPTER, Orsino, Duke of Illyria, could easily surfeit
by playing a frantic
if music indeed be the food of love
himself
game of Ports of Call, using the summer music festivals in America as his
by THOMAS J. N. JUKO
landing strips. The festivals to lure the listener this summer run the cadenza
from the jouncing jazz of Gerry Mulligan at Stratford in Ontario to the duodecitonic musings of the Ojai Festival orchestra under Copland in California. Music
is spreading like a contagious glissando over the landscape, even braving the urban
hurly -burly of St. Louis and Rochester; and the rural quiet will be rudely broken
by reverberations of Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Brubeck. Here follows notice
"Of what validity and pitch sce er," the listener may choose.
of "sweet sound "
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MUSIC MOUNTAIN presents its twenty-eighth season of classical and contemporary works for string quartet at Falls Village, Connecticut, every Sunday at
four in the afternoon from June 3o through September r. In an idyllic setting
of rolling hills and wide lawns will be heard the gracious playing of the Berkshire
Quartet, lately back from a very successful foreign tour under the sponsorship of
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
the Department of State. Outstanding musicians appear as assisting artists; the repertoire is largely standard classics; the performances invariably estimable.
In recent years, the Budapest String Quartet, the
Kroll Quartet, Rudolf Sorkin, Leonard Warren, Samuel
Barber, and the New York Pro Musica Antiqua have
appeared at South Mountain, Pittsfield, Massachusetts,
which will offer its series from July 19 through September 29, again with artists of national prominence.
Chamber music concerts will be presented at three
Saturday afternoons, July 20, 27, and August 3; Young
Audiences Concerts ( designed especially for parents
and children) at ten on Friday mornings, July 19 and
August 9; and Autumn Concert Series at three
Sunday afternoons, September 15, 22, and 29.
Intermission at South Mountain.
CAROLE GALLETLY
Fennel! and Eastman winds at Rochester.
JULY 1957
Basso Tozzi. conductor Pfoh! at Brerard.
Dizzy and friends at Music Barn.
31
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Jazz and folk concerts are to be held at Music Barn in Lenox, MassaSunday nights, major
chusetts from June 3o through September t
jazz concerts; Saturday afternoons, folk concerts. It was thought at the
time of this writing that the following jazz artists will head the list:
Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton, Gerry Mulligan,
George Shearing, Modern Jazz Quartet, Jimmy Guiffre, Dizzy Gillespie,
Max Roach, Oscar Peterson Trio, Sarah Vaughan, Dave Brubeck, and
Ella Fitzgerald. In addition to the regular jazz series, the first session
of the School of Jazz will be given, with John Lewis, Musical Director
an outof the Modern Jazz Quartet, as Executive Director. The School
growth of Music Inn's seven years of "Folk and Jazz Roundtables" at
which panels of anthropologists, musicologists, jazz historians, sociologists,
folklorists, and top jazz musicians studied the origins, development, and
styles of jazz and their relation to other folk music -will offer a threeweek session beginning August 12 which will be limited to forty musicians
and twenty auditors (nonplaying students).
The twentieth series of the Berkshire Festival at Tanglewood, Lenox,
Massachusetts, again presents the Boston Symphony Orchestra and guest
artists from July 3 through August t t. Special attention will be given to
the music of a single composer on each weekend-Bach, Mozart,
and works of contemporary
Tchaikovsky, Berlioz, Brahms, Beethoven
interest will be offered on the last four weekends. Charles Munch, Music
Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, will be the regular conductor,
with guests Pierre Monteux and Carl Schuricht.
The seventeenth session of the Norfolk Music School of Yale University at Norfolk, Connecticut, lasts from June 20 through July 31.
The School, limited to seventy students, sponsors weekly concerts and
lectures under the direction of Bruce Simonds.
The Empire State Music Festival begins its third summer concert series
at Ellenville, New York, on July 4, featuring eminent conductors and
last year Heitor Villa- Lobos,
soloists. Musicians of distinguished caliber
Lukas Foss, Leopold Stokowski, Milton Katims, Earl Wild, Thor Johnson,
appear at Ellenville.
and Igor Markevitch
Sponsored by the Eastman School of Music, the fourth annual season
of concerts by the Eastman Chamber Orchestra offers five programs at
Rochester, New York, Frederick Fennell conducting, from June 27
through July 25. The world première of Hovhaness' Concerto No. 8
for Orchestra will be given on July 25.
Frederick Fennell, who originated the Symphonic Wind Ensemble,
will also direct the Eastman Wind Ensemble Workshop at Rochester,
from July 7 through July 12. The Workshop will offer courses "to
all who may wish to organize a wind group for the first time or to
those who are interested in the further development of the already
established ensembles."
The twelfth season of the Brevard Music Festival, Brevard, North
Carolina ( thirty miles southwest of Asheville in the foothills of the Blue
the regular session of
Ridge Mountains) will be presented in two parts
the Transylvania Music Camp (from June 20 through August 4) and
the Gala Festival Series ( from August 5 through August 25 ). During
Continued on page 88
both periods, concerts will be presented on
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HERS REYNOLDS
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Donald Gramm sings at tiol, Creek.
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32
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
PETER sm
Landscape
u ith
I
IP
listeners: Sunday afternoon at Tangleteood.
Concert Hall at Stratford, Ontario.
Symphon) of the
Alpen't corrugated orchestra shtli.
Air under
cantas at Ellen pille.
London holds
a
painless audio show
...
Sanity Fair
by Irving M. Fried
LONDON'S Second Audio Fair was, by all odds, a resounding tribute to the resourcefulness and integrity
of the British. In sophistication, display facilities, and
products, it was as unlike their First Audio Fair, of 1956,
as our New York Audio Fair of 1956 was unlike our
famous first fair of 1949. And remember that this came
about in a country suffering severely from restrictions of
a tight economy, with fuel shortages, import blockages,
and nowhere near the market that the average American
manufacturer can count on.
The Second London Audio Fair was held at the Waldorf
Hotel, London \V1., a fine old hostelry with large rooms
for demonstration, spacious corridors, and a large ballroom.
The show started on Friday, April 12, and continued
through Monday, April 16, from 11 a.m. to lo p.m. At least
fifty thousand avid Englishmen, interspersed with visitors
from Sweden, the United States, Fri-dace, Germany, Belgium,
remarkand other non -Iron Curtain counties attended
able gathering in view of the belief that the average
Britisher has only a mild interest in custom high -fidelity
components. Many of the exhibitors were Il:bbergasted by
the turnout, and by the sales which resulted.
The average American has no idea of the cost of high
fidelity to the typical Britisher. One must remember that
to the quoted price of most units should be added a "Purchase tax" of fifty per cent or so. In addition, the income
of the average Britisher, today, leaves little margin for
the luxuries the American takes for granted. When a
Britisher buys high fidelity, he makes real sacrifices to
own it. I had the impression that these people were
genuinely interested in high fidelity, not merely titillated
-a
34
by the thought of acquiring another gadget or new hobby.
The modest circumstances and serious intent of the
people attending showed in the kinds of products displayed.
There were few, if any, displays of pure prestige items
no monstrous amplifiers or speakers, only one tri-channel
amplifying system, no gaudy preamplifiers with all sorts
of knobs.
Yet, despite their peculiar difficulties, the British have
come up with some very attractive and fine products.
Many of their components, such as turntables, changers,
speakers, and popular priced amplifiers, compare rather
favorably with anything we have. Only in the manufacture
of tuners and large amplifiers are we clearly in the forefront. Their loudspeakers in particular, though I realize
that their objectives are slightly more limited than ours,
sound a little better to me on the average than ours.
Why? I firmly believe the British are ahead of us in
several respects, just because of their handicaps. Knowing
they have limited resources and therefore harboring no
grandiose ideas of creating "concert halls in your home,"
tha British engineers and music lovers have adopted a sensible attitude toward the whole field of sound reproduction.
No one is striving for the impact of a concert performance,
with the actual aura; rather, the goal seems to be a pleasant,
believable simulacrum of the original.
This showed in each demonstration. Every manufacturer
had a booth in the large hall, where one could collect
literature, ask technical questions, and obtain tickets for
scheduled demonstrations in the individual rooms. The
demonstrations themselves were more like a recital than
anything produced at our audio shows. No individual
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
exhibitor made any attempt to dazzle the listeners with
masses of sound nor to go through technical gobbledygook
with any particular auditioner. Rather, each demonstration
was run in silence on the part of those in charge, with a
short question period after most, and was limited to a small
group. Queues formed before the doors of the rooms, which
were kept closed. A demonstrator thus was not faced with
the job of blasting his way through a competitor's demonstration; each demonstrator was able to carry on an intelligent audition of his particular units, under substantially the
same conditions that most listeners would normally encounter in their own homes.
The contrast with an American audio show (one of
which I had attended just a few days before) was incredible
no hysteria, no hoopla, and, better still, a complete
absence of the continuous overloading, blasting, and distortion of every type that plague our shows. In essence,
the British demonstrations took sensible account of the
limitations of reproducing equipment in general, and of
their own equipment in particular.
Now for a slightly more specific report on products
which should be of interest to us.
Pickups There is no really exceptional British cartridge. The Ferranti cartridge, from which great things
were expected several years ago, was absent, except in
the Quad demonstration room. Manufacture seems to have
ceased. The Recoton, Leak, and Lowther pickups were
about. Most of the demonstrators who had no prior loyalty
seemed to use the Danish Ortofon unit, better known here
as the ESL Professional. The only truly unusual unit was
the Connoisseur stereophonic pickup, which will be described in detail below.
Turntables and Changers Already famous in the
United States are such names as Garrard, Connoisseur,
and Collaro. Their showings were of products already
well known here; the only exception was a popular priced
Collaro transcription unit, using the Ronette cartridge.
Tuners FM is relatively new in England. Their
tuners are built for a market different from ours, one
that exists only near the major cities and only to bring
in the three BBC transmissions, each on its own, widely
spaced channel. The tuners are, then, relatively insensitive,
broad -tuning units, with rather startling over -all fidelity
(the BBC transmissions are much more carefully done
than is the usual FM broadcast here). Automatic frequency
control now is found in some designs; others use either
no tuning aid, or a hum -bucking signal mixer (Lowther),
or in a few cases, the popular tuning eye. Construction
seemed rugged. Most of the tuners were designed to draw
power from associated amplifiers. The American influence
here had already produced subsidiary power supplies, in
some cases; and one or two units showed substantial
American influence, with built -in power supplies, "pan cake" construction, and even covers.
Amplifiers Improvements in appearance over those
shown at the First London Audio Fair were amazing
again, probably, the result of American influence. Last
year, most of the amplifiers looked like the work of home
constructors; this year, several, such as the Leak, showed
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highly professional sleekness.
JULY
i957
As for power ratings, the British hi -fi neophyte may still
opine that "ten watts is enough," but only the budget units
are still ten-watt amplifiers. The famous old "Williamson"
circuit is virtually dead; only one manufacturer professed
to use it. Other small amplifiers were apparently more
stable than last year's designs, several manufacturers even
emphasizing this in their literature. Specifications generally
dwelt on harmonic distortion, rather than intermodulation.
The deluxe amplifiers were almost uniformly of the
well -known "Mullard" circuit, using EL34s as the output tubes. Manufacturers rated them from sixteen to
twenty -five "English" watts. I personally asked several of
their designers what difference there was between English
and American watts and got the following answers: a.
American watts are "peak," English are continuous ( this
from a naïve informer); b. American watts are the
maximum that can be obtained at any frequency, British
are power at a difficult frequency, like twenty cycles; c.
British ratings are conservative, because the market distrusts
high power ratings -and small power is the selling point
there, rather than large claims.
In any case, British amplifiers tend to produce more
than their rated outputs; and, from their constructional
appearances, I should say most would continue to do so
for a rather long time.
On the other hand, the more sophisticated and knowing
designers are conscious of the need for higher output
power than the British market currently seems ready for.
One manufacturer plans to jump the gun and bring out
an English version of the Dynakit in September. I believe
he will revolutionize the market.
Speakers Except for a few bad examples, the speakers
available to the British enthusiast seem to me, in general,
sweeter, smoother, and generally more pleasant to listen
to than their comparably priced relatives here.
First of all I would like to treat British progress in
electrostatics, which is of tremendous interest to us. Several
manufacturers exhibited electrostatics, either full range or
high frequency units. Leak, for instance, had an experimental tweeter, like the one of the year before, but he
announced that it would soon be replaced by a full range
electrostatic, currently in the test stage (a few people I
met had heard it, and seemed to have been much impressed). Goodmans had a full range unit, with about the
frontal dimensions of one of our small bass reflex cabinets.
It was quite pleasant to listen to, but the fact that it overloaded seriously on high volume peaks, led me to suspect
a shortage of power handling capacity.
Quad exhibited a slightly
Continued on page 83
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by Edward Wagenknecht
erakil
NO PRIMA DONNA holds such a position in our
world as Geraldine Farrar held forty years ago.
No singer now stirs the imagination of the American
people as she did then. At the Metropolitan Opera House
she and Caruso were the two singers who could always
be depended upon for a sellout, but it is even more remarkable that she was as glamorous a figure at every
crossroads in the hinterland as she was in New York.
She was one of the most famous women in the world;
she seemed to step up the tempo of life.
Those of us who experienced, in those days, the full
drama of her personality cannot help feeling a little
sorry for the generation that has grown up since her
retirement. We at least have been able to continue to play
her records; to many of them, even this has been denied.
Various performances by Miss Farrar have been included in RCA Victor's reprint LPs during recent years,
but lately the only ones still listed in the catalogue have
been the two selections from Manon contained in the
album Fifty Years of Great Operatic Singing (LCr 6701).
It is good news, therefore, that her Carmen records have
now been made available in a new Camden LP, Geraldine
Farrar in "Carmen," ( CAL 359 ) with Amato as the
Toreador and Martinelli whose "Flower Song" has been
included for good measure, as Don José. Even more interesting is a new record issued by Mr. William H. Seltsam,
through his International Record Collectors' Club, at
Bridgeport, Connecticut: Geraldine Farrar: Commemorating the Fiftieth Anniversary of her Metropolitan Debut,
November 26, 1906 (IRCC L 7010), which contains nine
of her Berlin recordings, with a spoken prologue recorded at her home in Ridgefield, Connecticut, October
20, 1956, in which she quotes from Longfellow's Morituri
Salntamus:
How beautiful is youth! how bright it gleams!
With its illusions, aspirations, dreams!
Book of Beginnings, Story Without End,
Each maid a heroine, and each man a friend!
36
These discs provide the occasion for my reminiscential
article. They cannot yield the reality of Farrar in her
prime, but a simulacrum is much better than nothing.
I can see her now as she swept out upon the concert
platform. She did not sidle or steal out as some singers do
nowadays; she took possession. There was no agonizing
pause, either, as if she must wait to see how the audience
would greet her; the greeting, all bows and smiles, was
hers. And let no one suppose that she solicited thus the
applause of her hearers; she simply accepted it as her
due. She was the queen of song come to preside over a
kingdom which recognized no pretenders.
The music was lofty always, and it was lofty clear
through, the second half of the program being on as high
a level as the first, with the encores as "standard" as the
programed numbers. That jackass word "long- haired" was
not yet in vogue; let me say, therefore, that there was no
heaviness about her performance, no sign of effort; she
simply assumed that you had come for beauty, that whatever you might be tomorrow, today, for this hour, your
imagination moved at high level, with the concert hall
an enchanted garden, a world apart.
The singer's appearance reinforced the song. "What,"
she once asked, "is the use of having a wonderful voice
if when you step on the stage you look like something
that has been delivered by auto truck?" I remember her
at one concert in a flame- colored gown, with a cascade of
red roses tumbling from her arm. Another she sang in
a powdered wig, with her hands in a tiny fur muff. Nobody ever played the prima donna game better than she
did; no one better recognized the public's real hunger
for glamour. Yet she never overdramatized her music,
never gestured, and she left her operatic arias where they
belonged, in the opera house. Lieder made up the backbone of her concert programs always, with French and
Russian songs added for those who wanted them, though
personally she cared little for them. She was generous with
encores but she would not repeat a number; neither would
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
In this, the third decade of Geraldine Farrar's retirement,
two new recordings bring back to us her voice in its prime,
and provoke from an old friend memories of glamorous years.
'Tr :r.u1/111Mi:,. »
As Marguerite in Faust.
CULVER
she make announcements. When an audience could not be
dismissed otherwise, she would come out at last wrapped
in her furs and wave good -by. Forced into speech once by
a particularly demanding crowd, she rebuked then gently:
"I am sorry, but you know the second cream puff never
tastes as good as the first."
It was an age of great prima donnas, but none of them
were in the least like her. Mary Garden's glamour ( like
her art ) was quite as undeniable, but whether it was her
Scottish birth or her roles or her personality or all three
together, Garden was ( compared to Farrar ) an exotic. It
was not that Geraldine did not trail European clouds of
glory behind her in the last great age of European romantic
splendor. She did just that. Had she not enthralled the
Imperial Court after making her debut at the Berlin
Royal Opera at nineteen? But she was an American girl
who had gone abroad to conquer Europe, not a European
who had come here to conquer us! That made a tremendous difference. Her father kept a store in Melrose, Massachusetts, when she was horn there on February 28. 1882;
later he became, as the father of an American singer should
be, a baseball player! She went to Europe in her teens on
borrowed money, her adoring ( and adored ) parents in
tow. ( "If you will only speak to me in your native
language," said the French landlady to whom she was
showing off her linguistic achievements, "perhaps I may
be able to understand you. ") Lilli Lehmann, greatest of
singers and most merciless of technicians, made ( after
God) an artist of her. The Berlin debut of October t5,
1901 was followed by engagements in Paris, Warsaw,
Monte Carlo, Stockholm, and elsewhere; on November 26,
1906 she sang Juliette at the Metropolitan and put the
city of New York into her pocket. In 1922, she left the
opera house; ten years later she stopped concert singing. At
her last Metropolitan appearance, on the afternoon of
Saturday, April 22, the "Gerry- flappers" unrolled banners
reading "None but you; none but you," and sent floating
through the auditorium balloons to which bouquets of
JULY 1957
roses were attached while great baskets of flowers were
handed up over the footlights and carried in from the
wings. After the performance one of these enthusiasts, as
she told me many years afterward, hung herself perilously
over a fire escape in the alley in order to see Miss Farrar
emerge from the stage door. This particular "Gerry- flapper"
was herself hardly an unknown; her name was Dorothy
Gish.
Contrary to popular opinion, Miss Farrar did not leave
the Metropolitan because she was jealous of Maria Jeritza's
position there. Jealousy was not in her line. Other prima
donnas squabbled over Metropolitan dressing rooms. Farrar
found a little place under the stairs that nobody else
wanted. "May I have that?" she asked, and, astonished
permission being granted, padlocked it for the duration of
her career. Her friends had known almost from the beginning that she would quit opera when she was forty; it had
always been part of the plan.
I myself first heard Geraldine Farrar sing one Sunday
afternoon in autumn in Chicago's fabled Auditorium. She
began with My Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair, and she
went on to such songs as Summer Fields, New Lore New
Life, In the Meadow, Eastern Romance, In the Silent Night,
The WVotrnded Birch, and The Snowdrop. The spirit of
the afternoon lives in the very titles of the songs, and the
effect of such a program in such a setting may be better
imagined than described. For me it was one of the series
of epiphanies which the best part of my life has comprised,
for it opened up to me the whole realm of concert singing,
and indeed of music itself in any serious sense of the
word. Among other things, it led to an attempt to make
a complete collection of Farrar records; for some time I
raided the "cut -out" stocks of dealers around Chicago; then
I discovered that the Victor Company (in those days, not,
alas, now), had the blessed and benevolent habit of making
special pressings of "cut -out" records and supplying them
to the customer at the regular price.
Though we had exchanged a few letters previously, my
37
real correspondence with Miss Farrar did not begin until
after I had published an article about her in a University
of Chicago magazine while I was a student there in the
early Twenties, and we did not meet until 1928, when I
was working on Geraldine Farrar: An Authorized Record
of Her Record, which was published in a limited edition
which she signed. Twenty years later I dedicated to her
my Joan of Arc: An Anthology of History and Literature.
The dedication page reads: "To Geraldine Farrar, in
memory of a photographically eloquent 'Joan; and in token
of a friendship which has endured for many years."
I doubt very much that Miss Farrar has ever lost a
friend once made, whether the friend be a fellow artist or
a man or woman from an utterly different N.alk of life. I
have known very few business men who handle their correspondence with such efficiency as she handles hers, and
always has. Even greeting cards must be carefully acknowledged, and the number of these she receives at Christmas
and upon her birthday keeps her chained to her desk so
long thereafter that one sometimes wonders whether it
would not be kinder to leave her alone! When I was
writing my book about her, I used to bombard her with
a continual stream of questions, all of which, though she
was on concert tour at the time, were answered as promptly
as they were received. All, that is, but one. One day I
received a brief note in which she said that she was very
busy; she could not send me the information I asked for
at once; she regretted the inconvenience, but if I would
be patient, she would send it as soon as possible. It came
the next day.
In the old days all Miss Farrar's letters were handwritten, in a bold, distinguished, highly individual script
that has not changed in the slightest degree since her girlhood. When she went to study in Germany, she wrote
a letter to Lilli Lehmann, asking to be considered as a
pupil. She received no reply. Thereupon her mother wrote,
and a reply came promptly. Yes, Madame Lehmann had
received Miss Farrar's letter, but she had not replied to it
since she had not been able to read it! In her early sixties,
however, Miss Farrar mastered two machines hitherto
the typewriter and the automobile, and
strangers to her
-
since then a great many of her letters have been typed.
Most of her letters to me have concerned music and the
theater and, increasingly during these latter years. public
affairs. Miss Farrar is a New England woman and she has
the New England reserve. She is not a sentimentalist; as
she sees it, passion is for the stage and the concert hall; she
does not gush. When her friends need her, however, she
is there.
Her beauty, her charm, and the excitement of her
personality being what they were, Farrar could have enjoyed an exceedingly spectacular career without being a
considerable artist at all. She was an artist nevertheless, a
very great one and a very serious one. For this we need
not take anybody's say-so, for the records remain to prove
it. At times during her career she was slighted, as all
artists are. The very fervor of her popular réclame provoked reaction. Aesthetic snobs, incapable of independent
judgment, assumed with her as they did with McCormack
that anything which appealed to so many people must be
second -rate. Annoyed by purist criticisms, she sometimes
played into the enemy's hands. "I leave mere singing to
the warblers," she once declared. "I am more interested in
acting myself." This was not so, of course, as she proved
when, after her retirement from opera, she resisted the
blandishments of Belasco and others who tried to lure
her to the legitimate stage. Her throat was weak, delicate;
she was not always at her best; there were times when she
suffered serious vocal difficulties. Her films, too, were
often used against her, for though Carmen, Joan the
Woman, and one or two more were fine things, the rest
were miserable material for a great artist.
Wild, utterly baseless stories were circulated about her;
in my youth I was always ready to fight at the drop of a
hat anybody who disparaged her either as an artist or
a woman. This sort of thing began in Germany, where the
gossips did not hesitate to involve even the Kaiser and
the Crown Prince. Once her father, speaking the only
kind of language he thought his hearer would understand, punished an editor. Once I myself cruelly allowed
a lady visitor to give me a fantastic account of why Miss
Continued on page 89
Farrar had recently missed
CULVER
Farrar
as
Carmen, at left, and
in conference with two other
greats,
Toscanini
and
the
Metropolitan's director, Gatti Casazza. She was considered
by associates the most reasonable of opera's prima donnas.
CULVER
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-
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Your selection of a new Bell Amplifier shows good taste.
Its sleek slim silhouette is set off with an attractive
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L
1957
39
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Horn:
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This is what happens to the diaphragm in the conventional high
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This Is a conventional high frequency driver with excellent response up to 4 or 5 kc. Beyond this,
destructive interference results from
the diaphragm's inability to act as a
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Increasingly higher frequencies
cause the phase to shift due to
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The Avedon Sonophase Throat Design
The Hoodwin Diffraction Horn
shows
how sound
st errs, speakers.
Figure
B
In Figure B two sound sources are shown. On
the axis, at point "x ", double the sound power
results as the resultant pressures ore in phase
disperses
equally in all directions from o single point
source.
and additive.
800
-6.
Figure
Figure D will show the deficiencies in horns of
wide lateral dimensions compared to the wavelength being emitted. Any horn mouth can be
considered as a group of small point sources of
sound. They must beam the sound down the
axis by their very nature.
-i 2'
1
_L
R
D
~
a
CROSSOVER
E
In Figure E are shown representative horns,
illustrating that horns must have a certain length,
as well as cross sectional area along this length
and at the mouth to load the driver diaphragm
down to the lowest frequencies to be reproduced. The lower we go, the longer must be
the horn and the greater the mouth area.
This is one more example of the 'Listeneered' superiority of
Figure
F
Figure F shows that narrowing the horizontal
area and extending the vertical dimension of
the horn mouth preserves the loading area
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gieeZYokr
all
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Ask your E-V dealer to show you how to dial in these new VHF
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why your finest choice is Electro- Voice. Send for Bulletin 120-F77.
But in Figure C, if the distance between the two
sources is '.2 wavelength or greater, the sound
from the two sources will be considerably out
of phase for points off the axis resulting in
decreased sound pressure.
3h.
1,000 CPS
CROSSOVER
SOVER
1,200 CPS
C
T
4'
L
CPS
CROSSOVER
Figure
r.5
tell the diffraction horn story:
Figure
- This
ae
I)ifiraction horns insure balanced levels
of both right and left
Figure A
Figure A
IwMo.sd d
This is the Electro-l-oice development
which is used in all E-V horns to disperse sound equally in all lateral directions from a single point source. This is
especially important in stereophonic reproduction to preserve the undistorted
depth and width of the original sound.
The unique throat design illustrated here
overcomes t he problem of diaphragm deformation with a longer sound path from the
center of the diaphragm. This restores the
proper phase relationship. This is especially
important above 12 kc, where sound must
be taken from the center of t he diaphragm
and from the outer edge simultaneously.
These drawings
A
ELECTRO- VOICE, INC.
Export:
13 East
40th Street, New York 16, U.S A.
BUCHANAN, MICHIGAN
Cables: ARLAB
Contest
(or, Down Memory
Lane with Sargent -Rayment)
complete, save for one thing. All of our samples
of the SR 7 have disappeared.
Now this makes us truly sad because we feel that
our Model Seven symbolizes the way -ahead engineering and advanced styling that SR built into its
units from the very start. Therefore, in an all -out
effort to bring the Lucky Seven home again we take
It's not that we're overly sentimental here at SR,
but there comes a time when something makes you
look back. With us it was when we moved to our new,
larger plant. We had to go through our manufacturer's attic rather ruthlessly (you collect some odd
things in 30 years of business), and, like most people,
we stopped to look feelingly at each item.
Ah, what memories ... 78 R.P.M. Aeolian records,
love letters from early SR customers tied daintily with
antenna wire, an exponential horn modelled after
faded but unmistakable
a tulip ... Then, suddenly
photo of the long -lost SR 7 (see above).
Here, at last, was a link with the past Our manifest
pleasure in announcing our
I
GIANT CONTEST
Nothing to buy!
-
-a
No puzzles to solve!
One gigantic prize: a
!
SR
destiny (namely Hi -Fit declared in 1928, re- affirmed
1957. (The in- between years found us devoting our
skills and facilities mainly to communications and
in
new,1957
model of the winner's choice!
military radio.)
Our growth has been steady and life would be
ENTRY COUPON: Cut
out and paste on the back of photo
SARC3ENT- RAYMENT CO.
4926 East 12th Street. Oakland
1,
C
Calif.
T
E
S
STATE
U
L
E
did) we
be surprised if it
4.
The
photo which bears the earliest
2.
addition, is
postmark and which,
acceptable liskeness of the
judged a
SR 7 will n be cawarded the prize in accordance with the following procedure.
5.
In c
of
be given.
will be notified by mail
w
and osked n tor ship his Model Seven to
expense, together with
us at
indication r of the SR model desired
Upon receipt of the equipment in good
condition (the gear need not actually
work, although with on SR we wouldn't
7. The contest closes
gust 71, 1957.
3. The
ADDRESS
R
T
1. Entries mud be made in the form of
recognizable snapshot of your SR 7.
the
with the entry coupon pasted
bock (of the photo, that is). DO n NOT
SEND ANY EQUIPMENT!
The
NAME (please print)
L
N
o
Yes, I want to help find the Lost Cord that ties SR to its glorious
Past! Here is my entry. I, too, remember Hi -Fi when it was a toddling industry, and this photo proves it. I understand that if I win
you will notify me by mail, with full instructions on how to ship
my SR 7.
CITY or POST OFFICE
O
S
will
send out
the prize posthaste and prepaid.
decision of the judges regard.
ing acceptability of entries is
will
final.
duplicate awards, ties
6. All entries become the property of
the Sargent.Rayment Company and
none may be returned.
Of
midnight, Au.
employees of Sorgent.Royment,
9.
their advertising agency and their respective families ore not eligible. No
nepotism here.
The
J
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Gelati
EVER SINCE THE RCA -EMI rupture
was announced last year, people in
the record industry have been speculating about the eventual allocation of
EMI's catalogue of "His Master's
Voice" (HMV) recordings in this
country. Both members of the EMI
family on this side of the Atlantic,
Angel and Capitol, seemed anxious to
get it, but which company was to be
awarded the plum remained a matter
of rumor until a few weeks ago. Then
EMI's engaging director of artists and
repertoire, David Bicknell, flew into
New York from headquarters in London with The News. Both companies
will draw upon the HMV catalogue,
but the major share will go to Angel.
The general line of demarcation
seems to be this. HMV artists who are
American citizens and or residents will
appear on the Capitol label; European
HMVers will appear on Angel. To
get down to cases, Capitol will be publishing the recordings of Artur Rod zinski, Yehudi Menuhin, and Shura
American citizens, all
Cherkassky
under contract to HMV, while Angel
will be publishing the recordings of
Victoria de los Angeles, Dietrich Fischer- Dieskau, Myra Hess, and other
European HMV musicians.
The last HMV recordings to appear
here on the RCA label were released
in June. The first HMV recordings on
Angel and Capitol will come out this
fall. Angel plans to issue the new
HMV Pelléas ( with De los Angeles
and Souzay) , Rossinï s Le Comte Ory,
an album entitled Royal Ballet Silver
Jubilee, and two Fischer -Dieskau recordings (a Hugo Wolf recital and
Mahler's Songs of a Wayfarer) before
the end of 1957. Capitol will concentrate at first on Yehudi Menuhin;
planned for release this fall are his
recordings of the ten Beethoven violin
sonatas (with Louis Kentner, piano)
and the Paganini No. 2 and Vieux temps No. 5 concertos.
In addition to current productions,
Angel will also dip into the tremendous back catalogue of HMV material.
A regular program of historical reissues will begin next January. Angel
has tentatively titled the series "Great
Performances of the Century,"
tur y," but
-all
JULY 1957
any alternative suggestions will be
welcomed by the Dario Sorias. No details yet as to repertoire, but there are
certain to be some Schnabel and Kreisler items, also a collection of Spanish
songs performed by Conchita Supervia,
and excerpts from Dame Nellie Melba's farewell appearance at Covent
Garden in 1926.
David Bicknell acknowledges that
his biggest task now is to rebuild the
HMV roster of artists to its erstwhile
prominence. Many of the major Red
Seal musicians now active began their
large -scale recording careers under
-
Heifetz, Horowitz,
HMV contracts
Landowska, and Rubinstein among
them
but most eventually shifted
contractual allegiance to RCA Victor.
Now that the Victor -HMV alliance is
no more, Mr. Bicknell must build up
a new "stable." He knows it will not
be easy. There is less top-ranking
talent available today than thirty years
ago and far more competition to contend with.
Incidentally, Capitol's lesser share
of the HMV catalogue is owing in part
to its own involvement in an accelerated domestic recording program.
Lloyd Dunn, Capitol v.p., informs us
that his company has considerably
augmented the budget for classical recordings and sales. More releases and
more "name" artists are apparently in
the offing. As a result, Capitol will
go slowly with its HMV resources for
the time being. This department suspects, however, that in due course a
steady stream of new HMV -originated
opera recordings will be appearing on
the Capitol label.
-
EMI's most potent competitor, both in
England and in the export trade, is
English Decca, better known in the
United States as London Records, a
comparatively young company which
in the course of the past decade has
built up a large and distinguished
catalogue almost from scratch. The
story of this company's early years has
now been told in an absorbing little
book written by the world's most qualified authority, E. R. Lewis, who has been
at the helm of English Decca from its
inception almost thirty years ago. Its
title: No C.I.C. The initials stand for
Britain's Capital Issues Committee,
which must approve any capital flotation exceeding .fro,000. "Ted" Lewis
believes that his story could never have
been written had such governmental
restraints on finance been in force a
quarter century ago.
You can understand why when you
follow the financial saga of Decca' s
first decade in his book. The company
was launched at the height of the 1929
boom and got under way just as the
record business began to crumble.
Decca was continually running out of
cash and seemed often on the point
of collapse, but Mr. Lewis and his
associates managed always to squeak
through, and in the trough of the
Depression they started -out of sheer
an
American company,
bravado
Decca Records Inc., that is today one
of our largest corporations.
"Ted" Lewis skims lightly over
Decca- London's recent history and has
little to say about its remarkable success in the classical field. Opera has
been his company's forte, and it is
fitting that his book should appear
simultaneously with the fiftieth complete opera recording to be issued here
by London, If Barbiere di Siviglia,
taped in Florence last September.
Remy Van Wyck Farkas, London's
director of artists and repertoire, says
that the best seller among these fifty
sets has been the Vienna -made Fledermaus conducted by Krauss. Close to
50,000 have been sold in the United
States. The Italian operas starring
Renata Tebaldi are not far behind,
and over -all they account for the bulk
of London's operatic sales. 568,000
Tebaldi LPs have been sold here to
-
date.
Despite the fact that all the standard
operas are now in ehe catalogue, there
is to be no letup in Decca- London's
recording program. This year's schedule calls for Gioconda, Andrea Chénier,
Fanciulla del West, Gianni Schicchi,
Goyescas, Elektra, Arabella, and Act
Ill of Walkiire (with Flagstad and
Edelmann). At this rate it won't be
long before Decca- London announces
its hundredth opera.
43
A
The second side of the record traverses
very similar ground in a series of independent, short orchestral pieces; in fact,
Fuguing Tune No. 5 is identical in substance with the finale of the symphony,
but is different in scoring. This repetition
of ideas in varying contexts strengthens
rather than weakens the impressiveness of
the whole. The performances are excellent,
and the recording is superior to most of
those Adler has made with the Viennese
A.F.
orchestras.
DVORAK: Serenade for Strings, in E,
Op. 22
Fantasia on
Williams:
1-Vaughan
"Greensleeves "; Fantasia on a theme
by Talfis
Boyd Neel Orchestra, Boyd Neel, cond.
UNICORN UNLP 1044. r2 -in. $3.98.
There are, in fact, two string groups bearing the name of the Boyd Neel Orchestra:
one is the original English organization
founded in 1932 by Dr. Neel; that heard
on the present disc is a Canadian ensemble
this conductor has led since becoming head
of the Toronto Conservatory.
Neel treats the charming Dvofák just
a trifle more tenderly than Arthur Winograd did in his recording for M -G -M, reviewed in the June issue, and the Unicorn
recording has a bit more resonance than
M- G -M's. I myself prefer the easygoing
style that Winograd adopts in the Scherzo
to Neel's fairly wide contrasts in tempo,
but on the whole a choice between the two
versions depends on their respective couplings: the Dvofák Serenade for Winds,
Cellos and Contrabass or the two Vaughan
Williams fantasias.
The Fantasia on Greensleeves is Ralph
Greaves's arrangement for two flutes, harp,
and strings of Vaughan Williams' settings
of two popular old English folk songs,
Greensleeves and Lovely Joan, from his
opera Sir John in Love. The whole short
fantasia is affectingly simple, and is presented in that spirit.
The Talfis Fantasia, one of the composer's best -known works, receives a vibrant
performance, in which it is revealed in a
more dramatic light than that shed upon
it by other conductors. Neel is also most
successful in pointing up the many varied
tone colors and antiphonal effects achieved
by the composer through the use of double
P.A.
string groups of unequal strength.
FAURE: Dolly, Op. 56 (orch., Henri
Rabaud): Masques et Bergamasques,
Op. 112; Pelléas et Mélisande, Op. 8o
Orchestre du Théátre National de l'OpéraComique, Georges Tzipine, cond.
ANGEL 35311. 12 -in. $4.98 (or $3.48).
Like Ravel's Ala Mère l'Oye, Faurë s Dolly
is a suite of short entertainments for
children, originally written as piano duets
for a young friend. Though it has undeniable charm, this music lacks the magic
of Ravel's Mother Goose Suite, which that
composer himself orchestrated. Atasques et
Bergamasques, composed when Fauré was
seventy-six, is a pleasant, often elegant
suite of orchestral excerpts in his neoclassical style. Neither represents Fauré
at the height of his creative powers. The
suite of four excerpts from his incidental
46
music to Maeterlinck's Pelléas et A1élisande,
on the other hand, is one of his most
sensitively inspired works. The interpretations by Tzipine of the first two suites are
marked by grace and insight, while that of
P.A.
the last is lacking in refinement.
M -G -M
WESTMINSTER XWN 18357. 12 -in. $3.98.
3370. 12 -in. $3.98.
The Gottschalk revival began in the same
kidding spirit that dictated the revival of
hiss-the- villain melodramas fifteen years
ago, but the old genius- charlatan's genuinely musical qualities have won out,
and this is the second large anthology of
his piano music to appear on records in
recent months. As Eugene List did in his
Gottschalk collection issued by Vanguard,
Miss Behrend stresses the composer's interest in folklore, presenting the astonishing
Banjo, a piece of pure ragtime composed
half a century before Scott Joplin, the
equally astonishing Bamboula, the West
Indian Serenade, the Pasquinade, the Bananier, and the Souvenir de Porto Rico.
She also plays three of the sentimental
Ricordati, the Berceuse, and
salon pieces
The Last Hope. Her final selection, not
duplicated in the Vanguard release, is The
Union, a fantasy on patriotic airs dedicated
to General George B. McClellan. All the
virtuosos of the midninereenth century
wrote such things for the American trade
Wieniawski and Ole Bull no less than
the pianists; but though it was an extremely
popular and widely practiced genre, this is
the only example of it on discs. Until
you have heard The Star Spangled Banner,
Yankee Doodle, and Hail, Columbia played
simultaneously and adorned with cannonading runs in the manner of Liszt, you
haven't lived.
Miss Behrend's interpretations are extremely able if, in some cases, less incisive
and colorful than Liszt's, and the recording
A.F.
is excellent.
-
-
ADVERTISING INDEX
61
Angel Records
51, 59
Audio Fidelity Records
Columbia Records ..
44
6o
Concord Record Corp.
Crowell- Collier Record Guild
55
51, 59
Dauntless International
Decca Records, Inc.
_
Epic Records
High Fidelity Record Annual
Leslie Creations
Livingston Electronic Corp.
London Records
Louisville Philharmonic Society
Mercury Record Corp.
Music Mountain, Inc.
Nuclear Products Co.
RCA Custom Division
RCA Victor Division
Record Market
Record Review Index
Schwann, W.
Vanguard Recording Corp.
Vox Productions, Inc.
Westminster Recording Co.
Ernest Levy, piano.
UNICORN UNLP 1036. 12 -in. $3.98.
Nos. 6, in G; 37, in D; 5o, in C.
Nadia Reisenberg, piano.
GOTTSCHALK: Piano Music
Jeanne Behrend, piano.
E
Sonatas for Piano: Nos. 32,
in B minor; 46, in A fiat; 50, in C;
51, in D.
Recorded by Peter Bartók at M.I.T., the
Levy set has a triple advantage of better
sound, better playing, and more interesting
plus the consideration of offermaterial
ing four works rather than three.
Perhaps the best way to contrast the
two artists is to see how they play the finale
of Sonata No. 5o (the one work they
offer in common), which is among the
very best of Haydn's musical jokes. Levy
projects it forcefully in full, with bright
sounds that ring in the spacious hall. He
tells the story quickly, as if eager to arrive at the punch line, and underlines the
main elements of the humor. Miss Reisenberg speaks in sounds that are rather
brittle and dry by comparison, and she is
rather coy, as if unsure whether she can
score a success purely on the merits of her
material.
Levy's stylistic confidence and the excellence of the sonatas he plays lead to
performances of authority and consistent
R.C.M.
musical interest.
-
HINDEMITH: Sonatas for Piano: Nos.
I and 3
Paul Badura-Skoda, piano.
WESTMINSTER XWN 18200. 12 -in. $3.98.
-
One does not know which to mention first
the music, the performance, or the recording. All are superlative. The sonatas
are among the loftiest and most dramatic
works which Hindemith has to his credit;
their scope, depth, and richness of content
place them in a direct line of descent from
Beethoven's last sonatas. Such, at least, is
the impression they produce in BaduraSkodá s wonderfully plastic and vivid interpretation. To my knowledge, a finer
registration of piano tone does not exist;
its entire range of color and shading is
presented with something very close to perA.F.
fection.
-
See
LOTTI: Crucifixus (for six voices)
Martin: Sacred Mass for the Kings of
France.
Go
58
64
66
66
_
54
65
56
65
65
62
49, 53
66
Go
61
5o
61
6o
MARTIN: Sacred Mass for the Kings of
France
tLotti: CruciJixus (for six voices)
Jean Giraudeau, tenor; Marie- Claire Alain,
Messrs.
organs;
Girod,
Marie -Louise
Haneux, Bastardy, Pirot, trumpets; Les
Chanteurs de Saint-Eustache, R. P. Emile
Martin, cond.
CONCORD 4001. 12 -in. $4.98.
The Reverend Father Emile Martin, a
thirty- seven -year-old French choral conductor, completed and first presented his
Sacred Mass for the Kings of France in
195o, passing it off as the work of an
composer,
seventeenth- century
obscure
Etienne Moulinié. The deception continued
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
through several performances, including
one in the 1951 festival celebrating the
2,000th anniversary of the founding of
Paris. A fellow choral conductor, Felix
Raugel, uncovered the hoax when he challenged Father Martin on the authenticity
of the work at a meeting of the French
Musicological Society shortly after the festival performance. Renamed Evocation, the
Mass survived the loss of its historical
background, its regal title, and the scandal
surrounding its true origin, and it has
been performed many times since 1951.
It is a skillfully written work that
achieves considerable eloquence when the
choir, trumpets, and organs combine in
producing some brave, royal sounds. But
how much better by far is the brief Lotti
piece that follows, in its direct, economical,
and poignant reflection of the text. Satisfactory performances, beautifully recorded.
R.E.
MENOTTI: The Unicorn, the Gorgon,
and the Manticore
Vocal and instrumental ensemble, Thomas
Schippers, cond.
ANGEL 35437/L. 12 -in. $5.98 (or $3.48).
guests by playing in succession two recordings of the first movement, one by
Beecham and the other by Koussevitzky.
The mystery was how two such musicians
could adopt such different tempos, one
being practically twice as fast as the other.
(Question: Which was too fast and which
too slow ?) Van Beinum's pace sounds just
right, not only here but in the rest of the
symphony. The one weak spot in this
issue is the liner notes, which are poor.
N.B.
MOZART: Symphony No. 38, in D, K.
504 ( "Prague"); Symphony No. 39,
in E flat, K. 543
Bamberg
cond.
Symphony,
Joseph
Keilberth,
-
energy and heat. Yet-one senses
this
is neither cold nor lacking in energy.
There are fine and beautiful things in
these performances, and there are moments
of dry, stodgy playing in which the possibilities of the work seem to have been
ignored. As documentation of German
Mozart style it's excellent, but purchasers
ought to compare it with other editions to
see if this point of view is a congenial
one.
R.C.M.
RESPIGHI: Fontane di Roma; Impressioni Brasiliane
Philharmonia
Orchestra, Alceo
Galliera,
cond.
ANGEL 35405.
12 -in.
$4.98 (or $3.48).
$4.98.
A more relaxed and lyrical statement of
Sir Thomas Beecham has said that "there
are at least fifty ways to play every Mozart
symphony "; here are two examples of one
way, the four- square German style. Its
not Beecham's Mozart, for it lacks the
singing line he finds everywhere in the
composer's music. Yet-in places
this
does sing, and most expressively. Nor is it
the Mozart of Toscanini, overflowing with
lacks the intensity and excitement which the
Maestro produced, but offers in its place
TELEFUNKEN LGX 66054.
12 -in.
-
The Fountains than Toscanini's. Galliera
greater delicacy and a more sensuous
melodic line. I, for one, find these qualities
preferable.
The Brazilian Impressions is a minor
work of the composer with some fine
pages to make up for the somewhat routine
ones. The middle movement describes a
A wittily stylized bit of neoclassicism poles
apart from the brutally obvious verismo
on which Menotti has been hammering in
his recent stage works. This is a ballet
score in the form of twelve short madrigals
linked by instrumental interludes; a small
chorus and nine instruments are employed.
As usual, the book is by Menotti himself. It tells of a town and a poet. The
poet walks a unicorn on a Sunday afternoon, and so the townsfolk must walk
unicorns too. On another Sunday the poet
appears with a gorgon: unicorns go out
gorgons come in. The poet's third promenade involves a manticore, but by this time
the townspeople are aroused at the death
rate among the rare, fantastic creatures the
hero discards so airily. They go to his
castle to protest, but there find him dying
poetically, surrounded by the unicorn, the
gorgon, and the manticore of his fancy.
Like some of Menotti's opera librettos.
this fable seems to say something but probably doesn't; it is, however, a persuasive
excuse for some polished, beautifully
shaped and admirably tasteful music, full
of urbanely satirical barbs. The performance is of the best, and so is the recording.
A.F
.
MOZART: Serenade in D, K. 320
( "Posthorn "); Symphony in A, K. 20
I
Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra, Eduard van Beinum, cond.
EPIC LC 3354. 12 -in. S3.98.
delightful performance of the Posthor
serenade. The tempos are crisp, the playing is elegant. The sound is better than
in the London recording; and if the string
body is a bit buxom here, it is to be preferred, I think, to the skinny strings (only
one on a part) of the otherwise excellent
Westminster version. Moreover, the present disc throws in a symphony for the
same price- the charming little K. 201,
also excellently performed. One remembers, back in the pre -LP days, mystifying
A
JULY 1957
n
Sure and the Nocturne Caine from Ireland
THE QUEST for LP repertoire has turned
up some strange, forgotten items in the
last seven years. This disc contains some
really out-of-the-way music. Can there be
anything more forgotten than the piano
concertos of John Field? Field (17821837) was an Irish -born pianist -composer
who lives in the history books because he
wrote nocturnes that Chopin knew and
imitated. He studied with Clementi, drifted
to Russia, became a popular teacher there,
gave a few concerts with great success, and
acquired the reputation of being an eccentric. The reputation seems to have been
deserved. He also lives in history because
of a comment he made on hearing Chopin's
music. "A sick -room talent," he snorted.
Of course, he had an axe to grind, too.
Here he was, exiled in Russia, while
Chopin not only copied his style of nocturne writing but also made a big hit
with it in Paris. That Field could not forgive.
Field's E flat Concerto, the first of seven,
had been completed by 1832, for he
played it that year on a return visit to
London. It sounds like a composite of
Weber, Hummel, and Moscheles, and carries with it a good whiff of the oncoming
romantic rush. His writing for the solo
piano is extremely interesting, containing
.ts it does elaborately ornamented passages
.r la Chopin.
But we mustn't make too
much of those passages, which also abound
in the piano music of Hummel. And Field
had nowhere near the harmonic ingenuity
of Chopin, not to mention Hummel, who
is a neglected minor master.
This E flat Concerto has a certain charm,
but on the whole it is a dated period piece,
probably of more interest to the specialist
than to the listener who wants an emotional
experience. As for the nocturnes, they have
a design that Chopin carefully studied, and
there are a couple of devices
the trick,
fur instance, of using an accented passing
-
--
OF
ARCHIVE
John Field
-
note or suspension as an integral part of
the melody
that also went into the
Chopin nocturnes. Otherwise the harmonies in the Field nocturnes are quite
conventional. Whatever his imagination
for keyboard figuration, it did not extend
to the more important elements of music.
This disc (and also Grove's Dictionary)
gives the G major Nocturne as No. 12;
in the standard American edition (Schirmer) it is No. 14. Bianca offers clear,
tasteful performances of the music. Her
runs are sharp, her phrasing flexible, and
she does not wham the daylights out of
the piano. The recorded sound on the
side devoted to the concerto is fine. but the
piano in the nocturnes emerges with a
decided shatter.
HAROLD C. SCHONEERG
FIELD: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 1, in E flat; Nocturnes (5):
Nos. r, in E flat; 2, in C minor; 4, in
A; 5, in B flat; 12, in G
Sondra Bianca, piano; Philharmonia Orchestra of Hamburg, J. Randolph Jones,
cond.
M -G -M
E
3476. I2 -in. 33.98.
47
reptile institute, and the introduction of
the Dies Irae comes as an inspired bit of
imagery.
Recording is first -rate but on a lower
volume level than other recent discs from
this company.
R.C.M.
SCHUBERT: Quartet No. r5, in G, Op.
r6r
anything, better than the four Russians of
the Budapest ensemble, and the Angel
disc is noteworthy for its warm and agree-
earns him an additional edge over Blom stedt.
able recorded sound.
Norfolk, Connecticut, Festival
R.C.M.
SIBELIUS: Pelléas el Alélisande. Op.
46: Suite: The Oceanides, Op. 73; Symphony No. 7, in C, Op. ro5
S4.98 (or S3.48).
Schubert's last quartet has never been his
most popular, probably due to a lack of
the sustained lyric elements that make his
other works so appealing to a large audience. Nonetheless, it is a grand and wonderful thing with a mercurial scherzo and
one of those swirling final movements
so characteristic of the composer. These
qualities will make an immediate impression, and in later hearings the substance
and strength of the earlier movements will
become clear. The mysterious invocation in
the opening pages is surely one of the
finest passages in quartet literature, for
example, but familiarity may be needed to
breed respect.
The only rival edition is one by the
Budapest Quartet published a few years
ago. The I lungarians play the work, if
Collectors of Sibelius' works still cherish
fondly several 78 -rpm volumes of Sibelius
Society discs containing Beecham's magnificent
and in some cases still definitive
interpretations. The British baronet has,
however, committed relatively few of the
Finnish master's compositions to micro groove, and one hopes that henceforth he
will give more attention to this music.
The incidental music that Sibelius wrote
for Maeterlinck's Pellrar et ,llélisaude is
among his most direct and appealing scores.
All but the third movement, On the Sea
Shore (omitted also from the Blomstedt
version for Urania), is included here.
Beecham's interpretation is exceptionally
delicate and sensitive, as befits the music,
and the more carefully engineered recording
- -
is
a
sea-
calmer than those
painted by Debussy in La filler or Wagner
in The Flliag Dutchman. Sir Thomas
pours more oil on the waters by conducting it in rather too calm a fashion.
Unlike Beecham's unfortunate encounter
with the ingenious, one- movement Seventh
Symphony for Columbia some fifteen years
ago, the story of the current version is quite
different today. With his own well -rehearsed orchestra and the benefit of modern
reproduction, he gives a beautifully proportioned account of the symphony. Everything is carefully planned, with one section leading logically, never abruptly, into
the next. The tempos are properly slower
than those on his old Columbia disc, and
the emotional climaxes are kept well within bounds. In short, the conductor has
given us one of the very finest Sibelius
Sevenths in the catalogue.
P.A.
scape
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Thomas
Beecham, cond.
ANGEL 35458. 12 -in. $4.98 (or S3.48).
Hungarian Quartet
ANGEL 45005. 12 -in.
The Oceanides, composed for the 19t4
considerably
STRAUSS, RICHARD: Feuersnot. Op.
50: Lore Scene. Der Rosenkavalier:
Waltzes. Don Juan. Op. 20: Till
Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche, Op. 28
Continued on page 50
La .finta semplice: Romantic Farce by a Sophisticate of Twelve
ing pages of Breitkopf and Härtel's Collected Edition. But the work is now on
records and my set, at any rate, is not
going to gather much dust. The opera
and unmistakably by the
is a charmer
creator of Don Giovanni and Figaro. The
dark, moody coloring of Giacintá s aria,
"Che scompiglio " ( bassoons and divided
violas) recalls with a vividness that quickens the pulses "Or .rai chi l'onore"; the
saucy music of the maid Ninetta is blood
kin to that of Despina and Susanna; and
everywhere in the score is evident that
delight in tone painting which Mozart was
never to abandon: amoretti flutter in the
violins and a dog barks sullenly in the
-
,
CDLONDIA RECORDS
Bernhard Paumgartner
over but good things
The latest of them is
this almost complete recording of the master's first opera halla, La Jinni semplice
(The Pretended Simpleton), a merry complex burlesque about two pairs of lovers,
two ludicrous brothers, and their feignedly
stupid sister that examines the amorous
passions with the eighteenth century's typical
unsentimentality. It was begun when Mozart was twelve years and four months old
and finished four months later. Critics, confronted with this extravagant fact, have
taken the easy way out: a boy of that age
cannot possibly write good opera; he
doesn't know enough about the stage, about
life; his characters will be mere puppets
without subtlety or cunvictian. So, La lima
.re,nNice was relegated to the dust -gather-
Year is
THEareMozart
still coming.
48
cellos.
The defects in the work are largely the
result of an opera hulla tradition which the
young master followed without question.
Chief among them is the regrettable fact
that there is very little ensemble singing.
Then also, the arias themselves do not carry
forward the action of the opera but are,
as it were, philosophical asides, dealing
generally with the tricks of love and the
necessity of keeping the upper hand. This
static quality is exaggerated in the recorded
version since all of the secco recitative has
been cut, and one aria follows another in
quick succession. But given a tradition
which the mature Mozart did more than
any other composer to improve (Così fart
tune is the greatest of all ensemble operas) ,
the ingenuity, the variety is astonishing.
The recording itself is by no means a
It should not, of course, be
bad one.
compared with the fine recordings that
the five major Mozart operas have been
given at one time or another. La Jima
semplice does not have a tradition of performance as these works do; it has not been
allowed to gather that soft patina which
more than a hundred years in the opera
house has given to them. It is much fairer
to compare this recording to that of other
out -of- the -way Mozart operas, to the Haydn
Society's Idomeueo, to Period's La fr,rta
giardiuiera. Il re pastore, and La cleme,,zza
di Tito, or Polymusic's ?aide.
Such a comparison puts this new Epic
release far and away ahead of its contenders. The orchestra is better than good,
it is brilliant: Paumgartner has never done
a finer job of conducting, and it is a delight to sit, score in hand, and listen to
the clean, exact beauty of the strings.
Walter Raninger and Edith Oravez obviously understand the Italian they are
singing and their voices are of a warmth
and purity that is demanded by the music.
Dorothea Siebert and Alois Pernerstorfer
are distinctly below them vocally, but both
have a delightful sense of hulls style. The
only unredeemable member of the group
is August Jaresch, whose pronunciation
of Italian leaves much to be desired and
whose onetime tenor has now settled into
an uncomfortable anonymity. Herr Jaresch
is, however, only a small part of what remains a splendid whole.
Here is an opera for the devoted and
the adventurous. No one on whom the
marvelous child of Salzburg has worked
his magic will want to pass it up.
DAVID JOHNSON
MOZART: La finta semplice, K. 31
Dorothea Siebert (s), Rosina; Edith Oravez
(s), Donna Giacinta; Karin Küster (s),
Ninetta;
George Maran
Fracasso;
( t ) ,
August Jaresch (t), Don Polidoro; Alois
Pernerstoler ( bs) , Don Cassandro; Walter
Raninger (bs), Simone. Camerata Academics des Salzburger Mozarteums, Bernhard Paumgartner, Cond.
EPIC SC 6021. Two t2 -in. 59.96.
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49
Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy,
cond.
COLUMBIA ML 5177. r2 -in. 53.98.
Feuerruot, an opera in one act dating from
1901, is all but unknown in this country,
and this excerpt, lushly Tristanesque as recorded here, is the only music from the
score in the current catalogue.
(Indeed
an earlier Beecham recording of this orchestral interlude is the only previous representation of the work on discs.) The
excerpt is quite lovely and gives interest
to what would otherwise be a rather
disappointing record. Ormandy's Don Juan
seems to be suffering from a glandular
deficiency (or maybe its vitamins); his
Till appears guilty of no more than corn pound mopery. More vital accounts of
these tone poems, as well as of the Rosen kavalier waltzes can be found on other
The volume level of the music has been
held low so as to permit the maximum
use of each side through variable grooving,
and in order to get a really big sound
quite a bit of amplification is needed. The
tapes appear to have been reprocessed in
a concrete echo -chamber which produces an
over -all richness that in music like this
is insufficient compensation for a. lack of
R.C.M.
clarity in detail.
ander Tikhonov (b), Foka; Levon Khachaturov (b), Potap; Alexei Korolev (bs),
Mamyrov; Mikhail Skazin (bs), Zhuran;
Genadi Troitzky (bs), Kichiga. Chorus of
the Stare Radio, Claudia Ptiza and Maria
Gondar, chorus masters. Orchestra of the
Moscow Philharmonic, Samuel Samosud,
cond.
WESTMINSTER OPW 1402. Four I2 -in.
TCHAIKOVSKY: The Enchantress
Natalia Sokolova (s), Nastasia; Varvara
Gradova (s), Polya; Veronika Borissenko
The Enchantress (called here The Sorceress) is Tchaikovsky's seventh opera,
coming just after the vigorously inventive
Mazeppa and a few years before the brilliant Pique Dame. Nastasia, the heroine,
is no professional enchantress: her witchcraft is that of her personal beauty. She
is an innkeeper and runs what is apparently
the only cheerful establishment in the
whole province of Nizhni -Novgorod. The
Governor, Prince Nikita, goes to see her,
persuaded to do so by his fanatically puritan secretary who is determined to see
the inn put out of business, but the unexpected result of the visit is that the
Prince falls in love with the girl. His
son, Yuri, bent on avenging his mother's
grief and dishonor, also visits Nastasia,
and he too becomes a victim of her enchantment. while the girl, like a good
operatic character. has already been in love
with him for some time even though
she has never laid eyes on him before.
The result of these ill -advised attempts to
cross social borders is that Nastasia is
poisoned by her rival, the Princess, while
her young lover is stabbed by his rival,
his own father.
In skeleton form this plot is only
moderately foolish, but the clumsy librettist, I. V. Shpazhinsky, compounds and enhances every potential inanity. Characters
appear in an unmotivated manner and then
disappear again equally unaccountably, and
there is at least one scene that has no relevance to anything that occurs before and
after. While there are outstandingly good
passages
the third act duets for Nastasia,
first with the elder and then with the
younger prince, and much of the last act
in other places there are bouts of mere
noise-making sì la Francesca da Rimini,
and the long stretches of genre music required for the inn scene hardly seem up
this essentially aristocratic composer's alley.
The performance is acceptable, though
none of the singers is a cultivated technician and few display more than routine
dramatic understanding. The most satisfying interpretations are those of the two
main female roles, with Borissenko especially good as the Princess. The principal
men are less fine, but I very much enjoyed
the singing of Alexei Korolev as the
Anthony Comstock -like secretary. The
Moscow Philharmonic includes some excellent players, notably the solo flute and the
solo horn (the latter cultivates a most
lavish vibrato), but the strings sound thin,
an unfortunate effect to which the mediocre
engineering certainly contributes. The conductor is not impressive, and I very strongly
suspect that a more authoritative presence
in the pit might have achieved a finer
performance with the same cast.
A libretto comes with the album, but
the translation of the Russian into English
is at once infelicitous and illiterate. C.M.S.
(ms), Princess Evpraksia Romanovna;
Anna Matushina (ms), Nenila; Georgi
Nelepp (t), Prince Yuri; Pavel Pontriagin
Sarafim Sladkopevtzev
(t),
Usmanov (t), Lukash;
Mikhail Kisselev (b), Prince Nikita DaniKudrna: Alexl::h: Pavel K,,rnhkuv (h
(t),
Paisi;
Balakin;
discs.
Alexei
1
.
4 VANGUARD
RECORDINGS
THE
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ZWe
Ifeaturing
Bach gu'a
the counter-tenor
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MYand THE DELLER CONSORT
Exclusive Vanguard -Bach Guild Recording Artists
Purcell:
The
Ode for
Three Ravens
St. Cecilia's Day Elizabethan folk songs
with Chorus, Orchestra,
Tippett cond.
"One of the great recordings in the steadily
growing Purcell
canon."
Don't miss MUSIC OF PURCELL,
JENKINS AND LOCKE
BG -517
with lute and guitar
VRS -479
'The recital is an unqualified triumph."
- Saturday Review
- N. Y. Her. Trib.
BG -559
-
Don't miss THE WRAGGLE TAGGLE GYPSIES VRS -1001
Tallis:
The English
Madrigal
School
Lamentations
of Jeremiah,
and Five Hymns
VOL.
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miss
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THE
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THE CONCERTO, SONATA AND CANTATA
Six works of Albinoni, Torelli, Vivaldi, A. Scarlatti, Stradella
Niels Brincker, tenor, and soloists and orch. of the Societas Musica,
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ITALIAN
BAROQUE
available es four reewith notes
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Vocal soloists -Deller, Cantelo, McLoughlin, Ward
Instrumentalists -Bream (lute), Dupre (gamba), Vaughan (Harpsichord)
Ambrosian Singers London Chamber Players
1 -12"
BG -567
THE ART OF FRESCOBALDI
Gustav Leonhardt, harpsichord and organ
B6.565/6B
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Don't miss THE CRIES OF LONDON -BG -563
ELIZABETHAN AND JACOBEAN MUSIC -- BG -539
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BG -553 and BG -554
WILLIAM BYRD AND HIS AGE BG-557
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-
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Continued on page 52
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jui.v 1957
TCHAIKOVSKY: Pique Dame, Op. 68
Valeria Heybalova (s), Liza; Anne Jeninek
(s), Masha; Sofiya Jankovich (s), Prilepa;
Melanie Bugarinovich (ms) , The Countess;
Verchevich
(ms), Governess;
Maria
Biserka Tzvcych (ms), Paulina, Milovzor;
Alexander Marinkovich (t), Hermann;
Drago Petrovich (t), Chekalinsky; Zhika
Yovanovich (t), Chaplitsky; Nikola Jan chich (t), Master of Ceremonies; Jovan
Gligor (b), Tomsky, Zlatogor; Dushan
Popovich (b), Yeletsky; Alexander Veselinovich (bs), Surin; Vlada Popovich (bs),
Narumov. Chorus of the Yugoslav Army;
Children's Chorus of Radio Belgrade; Orchestra of the National Opera (Belgrade),
Kreshimir Baranovich, cond.
LONDON XLLA 44. Four 12 -in. S19.92.
Pique Darne belongs to the company of
operas crippled by their librettos. Push kin's fantastic tale of the young army officer
whose compulsive gambling leads quickly
to three tragic deaths was transformed by
Tchaikovsky's not-too- talented brother Modest into an operatic plot at once conventional and muddled. Even so, opportunities remained for the composer to write
some of his best music -and his best in
the period of his final masterpieces, that of
The Nutcracker and the Pathétique, could
be very impressive indeed.
In its finest moments, Pique Dame undoubtedly has better scenes than Eugene
Oniegin, even though the earlier and
better -known work is more successfully
integrated and sustained. The scene in the
Countess' room and the later scene in
which her ghost reveals the winning card
sequence to the young officer are virtually
unsurpassed in any of the operatic literatures. The music for the eighteenth -century masque is Tchaikovsky's most moving
offering to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart,
the spirit whom he loved and worshipped
beyond anything in the world. Pique
Dame, if not a miracle as a whole, is at
least a succession of smaller miracles.
The opera deserves a better recording
than the one London has issued. Jovan
Gligor and Biserka Tzveych do commendable work; Melanie Bugarinovich has
a rich mezzo- soprano voice, but she uses
it only to sing notes; Marinkovich in the
role of Hermann, the officer, is occasionally
effective in the hushed parlando of the
dramatic scenes, but his real singing is
distressing. The remainder of the cast is
mediocre and worse, and Baranovich's conducting is inadequate from the first note
to the last. The Belgrade orchestra is not
good, and the listlessness of the whole
business affects even the children's chorus
C.M.S.
and particularly their boy leader.
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: Fantasia on
"Greensleeves "; Fantasia on a theme
by Tallis -See Dvoiák: Serenade for
Strings, in E, Op. 22.
VIVALDI: Concertos from Il Cimento
dell 'Amonia e dell 'Invenzione, Op.
8: Nos. 5, in E flat; 6, in C; 7, in D
minor; 8, in G minor
Felix Ayo, violin; I Music!.
EPIC LC 3343. t2 -in. $3.98.
Having recorded The Seasons, the first four
concertos of The Trial of Harmony and
52
Invention, the Musici now offer the next
four from that set of twelve. This middle
batch is not quite up to the level established
by the famous group that precedes them,
nor is there anything in them as lovely as
the slow movement of No. i 1, but all four
are well worth an occasional hearing. The
Musici play with their customary warmth
and rhythmic vitality, Mr. Ayo is more than
equal to anything Vivaldi demands of him,
and the sound is good.
N.B.
WALTON: Symphony
Philharmonic
Promenade Orchestra, Sir
Adrian Boult, cond.
WESTMINSTER XWN 18374. I2 -in. S3.98.
Sir William Walton's only symphony was
composed in 1935, in the high tide of
English enthusiasm for Sibelius. The influence of the Finnish composer is strong
in these pages, but they have their own
strength of texture, concision of form, and
general freshness and drive. This is no
mere echo of Sibelius, but one of the most
distinguished English symphonies of modern times. The interpretation is completely
authoritative and so is the recording. A.F.
RECITALS AND
MISCELLANY
ANITA CERQUETTI: Operatic Recital
Verdi: Aida: "O patria mia." I Vespri
Siciliani: "Merce, dilette amiche" Bolero.
Bellini: Norma: "Casta diva." Spontini:
Agnese von Hohenstaufen: "O Re dei
Cieli!" Verdi: Nabucco: "Ben io t'invenni,
o fatal scrim." Einani: " Ernani involami."
Puccini: Tosca: "Vissi d'arte." Verdi: La
forza del destino: "Pace, pace mio Dio!"
Anita Cerquetti, soprano; Orchestra of the
Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, Gianandrea
Gavazzeni, cond.
LONDON LL 16oí. I2 -in. $3.98.
For some time now, during discussions of
current, highly publicized prima donna
rivalries, the name of an obscure but purportedly formidable singer has been increasingly. mentioned as a high contender
in the operatic race: the young Italian dramatic soprano Anita Cerquetti. Miss Cerquetti has some performances in Chicago
to her decided credit, but to most listeners
on this side of the ocean she is known,
The present
if at all, by name only.
record, her first, should go far toward alleviating that obscurity. Here you will
find natural gifts and ability of no ordinary
caliber. The new soprano has a volume
of sound and a brilliancy of execution that
command immediate notice; her ringing,
challenging tones ride securely on the
breath stream with never a waver. The
voice may remind seasoned record fans of
Celestina Boninsegnti s in its uninhibited
grandeur. However, Miss Cerquetti is a far
more musicianly singer than her compelling
but unpredictable predecessor. Her scale
is even throughout with no ugly break into
the chest register, and her musicianship
seems altogether dependable.
Miss Cerquetti is at her best in the
"Casta Diva," with its exquisite floating
pianissimo tones and its high notes
strengthened with a hint of steely effulgence. London would do well to record
a complete Norma with this artist. The
dreaded high C of Aides Nile aria is
majestically attained, and technical dexterity, though not completely free of minor
blemishes, is present in the finely paced
Bolero from I Vespri Siciliani.
Last summer Miss Cerquetti enjoyed
great success in the role of Abigaille in
Verdi's Nab, cco, when that difficult opera
was revived at the Arena in Verona. The
great scella presented here is frightening in
its dramatic demands and requires a special
type of voice and singing. It contains, for
example, a terrifying, sudden two- octave
downward plunge from a high C, which
the soprano manages superbly. Even more
rare, in fact never before recorded, is the
aria "O Re dei Cieli!' from Agnese eon
Hohenstaufen, Spontini's last opera, in
which he sought to compete with the German influences of Weber and Marschner.
I happened to be present when this aria
was recorded by Miss Cerquetti in Florence
last September, and I well recall how orchestra and recording technicians burst into
long and spontaneous applause at its conclusion.
Whatever defects are found in this collection seem due more to inexperience than
to anything else ( Miss Cerquetti is still in
her early twenties). Thus, she has not
learned how to "sit" on some of her lower
tones, and she displays occasional excess of
dramatic turbulence, as in the aria from
La forza del destino. The ultimate repose
and wisdom of the seasoned artist are not
yet here, but Miss Cerquetti is well on her
way with this extraordinary exhibition.
The sound and the balance achieved by
London stand firmly up to a complete
realization of the new soprano's possibilities. This recital is a "must" for anyone
interested in big, important voices.
MAX DE SCHAUENSEE
VICTORIA DE LOS ANGELES: Operatic Recital
Emani
Verdi: Emani: "Sorta e la notte
...
involami!"; Otello: "Era più calmo .
Ave Maria." Puccini:
Piangea cantando
La Bohème: "Si. mi chiamano Mimi";
"Addio." Boito: Mefistofele: "L'altra notte
in fondo al mare." Rossini: La Cenerentola:
"Nacqui all'affano." Mascagni: Cavalleria
Rusticana: "Voi lo sapete o mamma."
Catalani: La 1%/ally: "Ebben, ne andrò sola
e lontana."
Victoria de los Angeles, soprano; Rome
Opera House Orchestra, Giuseppe Morelli,
cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1920. 12 -in. S3.98.
...
When older opera lovers nostalgically speak
of the so- called Golden Age, stating sadly
that the art of song is dead, they should
be told in no uncertain terms that at least
a dozen of today's singers could have held
their own during any era of distinguished
vocalism. Among these, Victoria de los
Angeles has an undisputed place. The eight
Italian arias or scena, presented in this
collection do more to establish the versatility and validity of this Spanish so-
Continued on page 54
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RCAvICTa
RCAVICTTi5
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Skitch Henderson and Orch.
SKETCHES BY SKITCH
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Sour Kraut in Hi -Fi
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Timeless standards done up in Skitch's lush,
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barrel of crazy musical fun in German band polkas, waltzes and drinking songs.
A
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Alfredo Mendez in a happy combination
Latin rhythms and the rich sound of organ.
DIAHANN
CARROLL
HAROLD
ARLEN
SNUGGLED ON YOUR SHOULDER
LEO DIAMOND his harmonica and orch.
Wistfully beautiful musical statements on
the harmonica by talented Leo Diamond.
A
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- Dixieland, of course -and the fun begins!
new Broadway discovery brings style and
feeling to twelve of Air. Arlen's greatest.
A
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Ronnie Binge. a top British arranger, in an
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The first gentleman of Afro -Cuban music
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New Low45 Economy Package Album Prices:
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JtILY t957
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RCA%ICTOR
DiOCORRpRpiORDI
AMERICA
53
prano's art than anything she has recorded
thus far. Here are the roulades indispensable for Rossini, the virtuosity demanded by Verdi and Boito, the pathos
necessary for Puccini and Catalani, and the
passion inherent in Mascagni. Throughout,
the exquisite freshness, the luminous patina
of the De los Angeles voice -quite unlike
ever enany other before the public
chant the ear.
Victoria de los Angeles is fundamentally
a modest, unaggressive artist. It is probably
because of this fact that Desdemoná s wonderful closing scene from Otello is so
ideally suited to her voice, style, and feeling. Indeed, the music might have been
written expressly for her. I venture to state
that, despite the formidable competition,
she comes closest, among all who have
recorded this scene, to the composer's intention. You may therefore be taken off
your guard by the assurance, the technical
aplomb in the sinLer's voicing of the final
-
rondo from La Cenerentola, which calls
upon range and flexibility in patterns of
astounding difficulty. Equally impressive
is her aria from Verdi's Eruani, often a
booby trap for ambitious sopranos.
This artist's Mimi is justly admired in
New York; in the present recital she more
than lives up to her reputation, as she
molds phrases of haunting loveliness in
chiamano Mimi- and the " Addio."
Santuzza s aria is given with a fire not
generally associated with this classic singer;
still, she manages to preserve an even vocal
line, despite Mascagni's torrid eruptions.
Completing the collection are the air
from La Wally and the demanding prison
ballad from Alefirtofe/e. Others may have
plumbed more deeply the emotional marrow of these scenes, but few have sung
them with so much genuine distinction.
The Rome Opera Orchestra, conducted by
Giuseppe Morelli, provides sympathetic
background, while the admirably balanced
lre xusic of
SI) path
«r superlatietc high fidelity
-
Vol. 1
Navarra
La Procesion del Roc.o
La Oracion del Torero
Ten Basque Dances
ESPAÑA
(Albeniz)
(Turina)
(Turina)
..
...
.... (Guridi)
Atoulto Argento conducting Orquesto Nacional de
11.1585 53.98
España.
ESPAÑA
- Vol.
Andaluza
....
Espana Rhapsody
Spanish Dances
(Rimsky-NOrsakov) ( Opus 34)
(Granados) (Opus 37)
(Chabrier)
_.. (Moszkowski) (Opus 12)
_
_
.
Ataullo Argento conducting London Symphony Orch.
11.1682
$3.98
-
(Manuel de Falla)
(Turina)
Sinfonia Sevillana
Atoulto Argenta conducting Orquesta Nacional de
Espana.
11.1688 53.98
.
ESPAÑA - Vol. 4
...
Fernando
Jacinta
(José
Serrano)
Ana Maria
Iriarte
Carlos Munguia
Julita Bermejo
Marichu Urreta
_... Ana Maria Fernandez
Rafael Maldonado
.
Paca
Señorita
._.
_
Ataullo Argenta conducting Orquesto
fonica. Conductor:
LA
DOLOROSA
53.98
Recording
Dolores
Rafael
El
(José
Serrano)
Ana Maria
Prior
__
Nicasia
__
.... ....
._.
Perico
.
._.
_.
Fray Lucas
Symphonic Synthesis on Themes of José Serrano
Fantasia on Themes of José Serrano
11 -1693
$3.98
Iriarte
Marichu Urreta
_. Gregorio Gil
Carlos S. Luque
fonica. Conductor: Atoulto Argento.
Free libretto Spanish -English.
XL
l1483
$4.98
fonica. Conductor: Indolecio Cisneros. Free libretto
Spanish -English.
+.LL -1616
- Complete
EL ULTIMO
(Soutullo y
ROMANTICO
Vert)
Aurora
Encarnácion
Enrique
Ceferino
- Complete
$4.98
Recording
Teresa Berganza
Ines Rivadeneira
Gines Torrano
Gerardo Monreal
Gregorio Gil
Recording
-_.
Tomas ...
Carlos Munguia Coros Cantores de Madrid and Gran Orquesta Sin
Ines Rivadeneira Ionica. Conductor: Indolecio Cisneros. Free libretto
.. __.
...
Teresa Berganza Spanish -English.
__..
Juana _.. ._..
X1.I-1645 $4.98
Gerardo Monreal
..
...
Ana Maria Fernandez
_.
Manuela
Coros Cantores de Madrid and Gran Orquesta Sin EL BAILE DE LUIS ALONSO
(Giminez)
Luis Alonso
Maria Jesús
_
ionica. Conductor: Ataullo Argenta.
- Complete
LA BODA DE LUIS ALONSO
(Giminez)
Luis Alonso
Maria Jesús
..__...
Recording
Carlos Munguia
Ines Rivadeneira
.... ....
....
Paco
Gregorio Gil
_...
Rafael Maldonado
Miguelito
Ana Maria Fernandez
Picúa
Coros Cantores de Madrid and Gran Orquesto Sin -
...
_
.
fonica. Conductor: Ataullo Argenta.
Free libretto Spanish -English.
54
XLL -1482
$4.98
Marche de Fite.
Robert Owen, organ.
WESTMINSTER XV('N 18363.
12 -in. S3.98.
Mr. Owen, who made Vol. III in the
Aeolian -Skinner King of Instruments series,
returns under Westminster's auspices, playing the same organ I the Aeolian-Skinner
at Christ Church in Bronxville, New York
where he is organist and choirmaster) and
one of the same pieces ( Vierne's Carillon
de Irettminster). This disc. a companion
to Westminster's Toccatas for Piano, devotes itself to French works of the latenineteenth and early- twentieth centuries
that are or could be considered as being
cast in the toccata mold. Variety is supplied by the inclusion of the whole of
Boëllman's famous Suite Gothique, with
the three movements that lead up to the
final Toccata, and by two works in slower
tempo, the Cortège and the Marche. One
is not surfeited by the driving brilliance
of the standard toccata, but one is surfeited by the rich harmonic style that pervades the music. The organ and Mr.
Owen's performances on it are first -rate, and
Westminster has reproduced the sound
with even more definition and clarity than
R.E.
did the Aeolian-Skinner engineers.
THE SPOKEN WORD
Carlos Munguia
Manuel Ausensi
.. Julita Bermejo
Coros Cantores de Madrid and Gran Orquesto Sin-
VOl. 5
Atoulto Argenta conducting Gran Orquesto Sinfonica.
42, No. 5. Vierne: Carillon de Westminster, Op. 54, No. 6. Mulet: Toccata, Tu
es Petrus; Carillon- Sortie. Boëllmann: Suite
Gothique. Roget: Cortege Funèbre. Büsser:
Ataullo Argenta.
- Complete
(Giminez) LA CALESERA
Complete Recording (Alonso)
(Chapi)
Maravillas
Pilar Lorengar
(Giminez)
Teresa Berganza
Elena
(Giminez)
Rafael
Manuel Ausensi
(Chapi)
Piruli
Julita Bermejo
(Granados)
Gangarilla ._. L...
Gerardo Monreal
(Luna)
Gregorio Gil
Calatrava
(Breton)
de Camera Coros Cantores de Madrid and Grin Orquesto Sin LL -1689
ROBERT OWEN: Toccatas for Organ
Widor: Toccata from Fifth Symphony, Op.
Coros Cantores de Madrid and Gran Orquesta Sin-
-
Torre del Oro- Intermezzo
Tambor de Granaderos -- Prelude
El Bailo de Luis Alonso -Intermezzo
La Boda de Luis Alonso -Intermezzo
La Revoltosa -Prelude
Goyescas Intermezzo
La Picara Molinera- Intermezzo
...
La. Dolores -Jota
La
El
de Madrid.
Recording
_.
Juana
ESPAÑA
Vol. 3
The Three Cornered Hat
ESPAÑA
- Complete
CLAVELES
Rosa
Gore
2
Capriccio Espagnol
-
LOS
.
sound seems like perfection to these ears.
MAX DE SCHAUENSEE
4ÌIVD01Y
BIBLICAL READINGS
The Book of Judith, read by Judith Anderson; the Book of Ruth, read by Claire
Bloom.
CAEDMON TC 1052.
12 -in.
55.95.
Each side of this record offers an entire
book of the Bible, read by an actress of
outstanding reputation. Judith Anderson's
strong, rhetorical, and commanding voice
is ideally suited to telling the bloody,
melodramatic tale of Judith: how, by
trickery, she made her way into the tent
of Holofernes, Nebuchadnezzar's command er-in- chief; how she slew him with a
fauchion during his state of after -dinner
inebriation. Claire Bloom's voice is less
striking, but by no means less poetic or
less moving in its own way. It also is
especially appropriate for the pastorally
beautiful story of Ruth, the lovely Moabitess who came to Bethlehem and there
attracted Boaz in whose field she gleaned
barley and who eventually became his
wife and the great -grandmother of David,
King of Israel.
Ruth is probably much better known to
most Bible readers than Judith, whose story
does not appear in the Authorized Version.
RECOaDS
539 West 25th 5t., New York I, N. Y.
Continued on page 56
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
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CARMICHAEL
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MUSIC
BY
RICHARD
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EUGENE ORMANDY and the Philadelphia Orchestra in a fabulous Strauss
Name
LI
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Zone... State
GREATEST
GERSHWIN.
in Blue.
-
and the Netherlands Phil. Orch.
G
126
and dynamic rhythms.
HOLIDAY
Rose and
FOR
138
David
G
STRINGS:
his Orchestra. Shimmering strings and sparkling melodies
by "America's favorite music maker ".
Intermezzo, La Ronde, Laura, etc. G 146
Five Tone Poems. Sir
SIBELIUS:
Adrian Boult, one of England's
greatest conductors, interprets Sibelius' most famous tone poems. The Philharmonic Promenade Orchestra of London. Finlandia, Oceanides, etc.
G 141
Piano Concerto No. i in
CHOPIN,
E Minor. One of Chopin's richest
Romantic, vigorous and haunting music works glows with
melody and beauty
performed under Jonel Perlea by the in this superb Interpretation
by
Vienna Philharmonia Orch.
G 140
Mewton-Wood.
G 127
HOAGY SINGS CARMICHAEL.
Address
The
THE
sensational pianist Philippe
Entremont plays the Rhapsody
program: Don Juan, Rosenkavalier Album also includes Piano Concerto
waltzes, Till Eulenspiegel, etc. G 269 in F and An American in Paris. G 123
DANCE! Khatchaturian,
STRAVINSKY, The Firebird and
Borodin, Rimsky-Korsakov and
FALLA, Love by Witchcraft. Be- SABRE
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and sen- Mussorgsky. All the barbaric splendor
suous gypsy rhythms! Walter Goehr of the East -painted in wild melodies
BIG BAND SWING. BENNY GOOD"mood" and popular albums. I need
MAN, TOMMY DORSEY, COUNT
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each featured selection I accept I will
BROADWAY SPECTACULAR: Norpay the Charter Member's price of only
man Leyden and his Orchestra.
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TCHAIKOVSKY: Romeo and Juliet,
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1812 Overture, Marche Slay.
with the three albums I have checked, I may
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JULY 1957
-
Crowell-Collier Record Guild
Dept. 5014
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to get big label recordings at
The Duke of Iron and
Smooth, sophisticated Hoagy CALYPSO!
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magnificent band! Two Sleepy People, and subject matter
far cry from
Skylark, Rockin' Chair, etc.
11266 usual watered -down versions.
G 1421
-a
55
record, Brubeck plays Brubeck, is heard
within the Quartet format for the first time.
He is still a relatively minor pianist, in jazz
terms, but he has shaken off the clichés that
made his earlier Quartet Work tiresome and
occasionally he manages to move along in a
lithe, leathery fashion rather like that of
John Lewis. He is working here, as he did
in his solo album, with his own composiingratiating cameos that frequently
tions
cradle felicitous little melodies.
A prime cause for the shift in Brubeck's
orientation in the Quartet is, I would
suspect, the presence of drummer Joe
Morello. He has brought to the group
an alert, brimming rhythmic sense that
it has never had before and it may well
be that, by relieving Brubeck of the need
to provide the impetus for the group.
he has enabled the pianist to realize a
published...
recently published
1956
High Dielitg
INDEX
A complete index to all classical.
semiclassical. jazz, and spoken
word record reviews which appeared in HIGH FIDELITY Magazine in /956.
Arranged alphabetically by composer or by collection -title, with
the issue and page on which you
will find the review you wish.
500
EACH
1954 and 1955 Indexes also
available at 500 per copy.
HIGH FIDELITY Magazine
Great Barrington, Mass.
Enclosed find
NEW WORLD OF SOUND
-
RECORD REVIEW
ONLY
A
Please send me
copies of the
1954 Index
copies of the
1955 Index
copies of the
1956 Index
Name
potential previously inhibited. Morello is
a joy to hear throughout this disc. He is
a drummer who engenders excitement without leaving his proper place in the group
as a whole.
It is some measure of the merit of this
disc that only after all this has been said
does one get to Paul Desmond who, on
earlier Brubeck discs, more often than
not provided the only warm, creative glow.
He is, on these selections, absolutely superb,
playing with an imaginative and technical
skill that surpasses even the excellent work
he has done in the past. This is the
Brubeck Quartet's best work on discs.
AMFITHEATROF
THE MOUNTAIN,' DANIELE
EXOTIC SOUnD TRACES
Now hear Victor Young's exotic score
mirror the incredible beauty, terror,
hatred and love that made Omar Khayyam's life an exciting adventure -and
makes this fabulous Paramount film
one of the most exciting ever seen on
the screen. Also double -featured: Dan
iele Amfitheatrof's brilliant music for
the film "The Mountain." Dazzling
Hi.Fi.
DL 8449
Address
BUDDY COLLETTE: Calm, Cool and
Collette
No C.O.D.s or charge orders please
a.
P.
aiILE
Winston Walks: If She Had Stayed: They
Can't Take That Array from Me: Undecided: Flute in D: The Continental:
Three and One: Night in Tunisia: Johnny
Walks: Perfidies: Morning Jazz.
R':
ARTn
SAISIS E ASS
FOR
Buddy Collette, flute, clarinet, alto and
tenor saxophones; Dick Shreve, piano; John
Goodman, bass; Bill Dolney, drums.
ABC -PARAMOUNT 179. 12 -in. 43 min.
THS KINGS 07 PRANCE
ANTONIO LRTTI: CRHCIIIZUS (A CINQ)
S3-98.
'DECCA
RECORDS
"A,&.A,
.0
SLA "r,
édignirrdtet
10=H1F1Oj
Nice Day
LECUONA:
Minor Deviation: Change It: I'll Remember April: Blues for Howard: Fall Wind,:
Danzas
Afro-Cubanas,
Danzas Cubanas.
A Nice Dá1:
Over the Rainbow: Don Friedman, piane.
in place of Shreve. Joe Peters, drums, in
Some personnel as above.
Andalucia (Suite
Espagnole)
José Echmri:. Piano.
XWN
18435
place of Dolney.
HOLY HOAX
TIME MAGAZINE, May 6th, says, "One of the
most elaborate of modern musical hoaxes in
a reverent and earsplitting performance."
Originally hailed as a newly discovered work
of Moulinie, Martin finally confessed it was
his own spare -time creation. R. P. Emile
Martin: Sacred Mass For The Kings of France.
Concord #4001. L.P. 12 ". $4.98.
SEE THE DEALER YOU LOVE BEST
AND
The
HEAR THESE
OTHER
CONCORD
DILLIES:
Restoration Sophisticate. Sixteen deucedly
titilating, naughty old English catches. .4003.
L.P. 12 ". $4.98. The Dolt-Yourself- H.M.S. Pinafore. Is singing G & S your secret desire? Complete with musical score included in album.
.3001. L.P. 12 ". $3.98.
See your dealer or
write for these records
and complete listing of all releases.
CONCORD RECORD CORPORATION
Bureau ,-17, 519
iiO
S.
Fifth Ave., Mt. Vernon, N.
Y.
There Will Never Be Another You: Moten
Swing: Buddy Boo: Collette; Calvin Jackson. piano; Leroy Vinnegar, bass; Shelly
Manne, drums.
CONTEMPORARY
3531.
12 -in.
40 min.
04.98.
DE FALLA:
Ritual Fire Dance,
and Complete
Piano Music.
Versatility can often be a deceptive cover
for a musician with several minor talents.
jazz muBuddy Collette is a rarity
sician who stands out on at least three
instruments. He is one of the very few
flutists who plays with strength in the
jazz idiom. He is a clarinetist of warmth
and skill, and on the alto saxophone his
playing is precise, polished, and very
flowing. Tenor saxophone, which he plays
about as frequently as the other three in-
José Echdni :. piano.
XWN 18434
-a
struments, is his least satisfying horn.
Working with three different small
groups on these two discs, Collette is the
Anthology of
CANTE
FLAMENCO:
Cantes con Baile,
Cantes de Levante,
Estilos de Malaga,
Cantes Matrices.
Vol. 1-WP 6052
Vol. 11-WP 6053
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
The ANGEL
Summer Bandstand
nostalgic foot- tappers and stirring
marches for summer listening
SUPPE: 6 OVERTURES
Philharmonia Promenade Orch.
Angel 35427
WALDTEUFEL WALTZES
Philharmonia Promenade Orch.
Angel 35426
PHILHARMONIA POP CONCERT
Cond. on Karajan
Angel 35327
ANGEL'S "BAND WAGON" SERIES
The Scots Guards
(35271)
Scots Guards on Parade
( 35337)
The Coldstream Guards
(35370)
Carabinieri Band of Rome
(35371 )
Paris Garde Républicaine
Albums
I
35051) &
(
2
(35260)
ANGEL
RECORDS
at all good town & country dealers
dominant figure in each and the performances generally rise or fall on his work
alone. Thus, on the ABC disc, Undecided
is brightly projected by his alto, Role in D
gains a delightfully deliberate air from
his flute, while his clarinet propels The
Continental in a warm, mellow manner.
But 1/ She Had Stayed, on which he plays
tenor, is moribund.
Long Playing Record Catalog
O
reference in the
selection of
long playing records
Attached
Lore Is Here to Stay: Blue: It's the Talk
al the Torn: Alournin' B1tte.r-. Prelude to
a Kiss: Sentimental Journey: You Turned
the Tab /es on Ale; My Inspiration: Noll
That You're Gone: Lirnehouse Blues;
Aloanin' Lou: Serenade in Bloc.
Deane Kincaide, cond.
COLUMBIA CL 983. 12 -in. 41 min. S3.9S.
A few months ago Wild Bill Davison
joined the fashion parade by recording
some cornet solos with string accompaniment. The experiment was a partial success since Davison proceeded in his customary brash style and consequently was
not cloyed to death by the strings, as frequently happens in these matches. Having
survived the rigors of this test, one hoped
that Davison would return to more appropriate, slam -bang surroundings.
Here he is back with strings again, but
with a difference. instead of doing battle
alone, Davison has enlisted as cohorts trombonist Cutty Cutshall and clarinetist Bob
Wilber, thus creating the traditional small group front line. Moreover, he has a
typically Condonian rhythm section
Gene Schroeder, piano; Barry Galbraith,
guitar; Jack Lesberg, bass; Don Lamond,
drums. With this plethora of jazz talent
on hand, the strings are reduced to a function which turns out to be rather useful
providing a pleasant ooze in which the
three soloists squirm around sensuously
before flaring up in a high -flying, guttoned statement. It makes for an interesting and somewhat different series of contrasts than normally turns up in jazz.
As before
as ever
Davison is devilishly Davison. Cutshall is magnificently
authoritative. And Wilber, only recently
accredited to the Condon Mob, plays a
pretty and polished clarinet.
-
-
WRITTEN
TO ORDER
An article by Leonard Burkat of
the Boston Symphony Orchestra
administrative staff on some of the
economic facts of the composer's
life today, with observations on
commissioning music
from
Louis XIV to Louisville and
from Rasoumovsky to
Koussevitzky.
-
More music lovers consult Schwann- before they buy
-than any other publication. All available long
conveniently listed for quick and
Ploy
ds a
easy reference under the following classifications:
Classical
Ballets
Collections
Instrumental
Folk Music
Spoken
Popular
Children's
Operas
Musicals
get your copy monthly from your
regular record dealer.
Be sure to
SCHWANN
137
Newbury Street
JULY 1957
PLAYING
RECORD CATALOG
Boston 16, Mass
by!
WILD BILL DAVISON: IY'ith Strings
-
SCHWAN N
hi -fi
to relax
-
...
music that soothes
and music that
excites... fora vacation of many moods!
SPLIT PERSONALITY
VX 25.470
Squire Mason and his orchestra
Italian favorites served
ttp with plenty of spice!
THE ITALIAN SCENE
A Concert of Italian Band Music
Corpo Bandistico dell' Azienda Tramv aria
di Milano - Franco Lizzio, conductor VX 25.480
in high gear,
they make smooth listening
IMPERIAL KREISLER
Bronislaw Gimpel, Violin
and String Orchestra
VX 25.150
the French "cats" night to howl!
'N' ROLL A LA FRANCAISE
Benny Rock and his orchestra
ROCK
VX 25.310
VX 25.300
FRANKLY FRENCH
PIXIE FROM PARIS
Other July Jazz
Genevieve with Gianni Monese and
his orchestra
Blowing Hard: The thorny but intriguing
Thelonious Monk is back with Brilliant
It's heavenly fare
Corners ( Riverside 12.226. t 2 -in. 42
min. 54.98) on which a quintet (Ernie
Henry, Sonny Rollins, Oscar Pettiford,
Max Roach, and Monk) plays Monk -arranged Monk compositions. Monk's ensemble writing is as gnarled and knotty
as most of his conceptions but it can be
very rewarding. On this disc he has produced " a near-ballad with guts.' Pant,onica,
while the title selection is a fascinating
mixture of lugubrious harmonies and
flighty rhythms. Sonny Rollins' hard tenor
is only an incidental contributor to this
collection but it is a strong, propulsive force
in the vigorous and salty collection called
Max Roach Plus Four ( EmArcy 36098.
Iz -in. 36 min. S3.98). He seems to be
a musician who works best in the inspiring
VX 25.490
you'll fall for this
beguiling Gaul ... Genevieve!
when Feyer plays "Fair"
HEAVENLY ECHOES OF
"MY
FAIR LADY"
George Feyer, piano, with rhythm
accompaniment
r
V} 25.340
TWO "VOXAMPLES"
Best
and
of the
Best le These Artists
THIS IS NOVAES
THIS IS FEYER
...
....
$
SNP -1
SFP -1
each
richly illustrated Catalog -Book
Each with
236 {fest 55th Street, New York 19, N. Y.
61
The
feet
soprano
eta"
and
ln allas
dues
lt00 one
most
of bet
memorable
toles.
at. 359
surroundings provided by Roach, Ray
Bryant, Kenny Dorham, and George Morrow; on Saxophone Colossus I Prestige
7079. t2 -in. 39 min. S4.95), wherein he
works with a rhythm section alone, he has
little to say in the course of some overly
long tracks.
Another tenor, Zoot Sims, who plays
with a more gracious tone, has the help
of Nick Travis' trumpet and a rhythm section as he wends his swinging tray through
a group of pieces on Zont.' ( Riverside
40 min. S4.98). Lee
t 2 -in.
12 -228.
Konitz, normally an alto saxophone specialist, devotes one side of Lee Konitz
Inside Hi -Fi ( Atlantic 1258. 12-in. .11
min. S4.98) to a stronger, more fully
rounded projection than once was his way
on alto. while on the other side he tries
his hand at the tenor, playing with a
rough tone and a driving attack that have
a great deal of unpolished charm. The
current comeback of altoist Art Pepper is
not advanced appreciably on Art Pepper
BIG NAME RECORDINGS AT
THE BIG NAME PRICE!
Ten Superb
Stainer
Performances on
C00
RCA Camden Each 121 t Long Play
Only
1.98
11011
two of America's greatest voices,
Richard Crooks, Lawrence Tibbett, join in an inspiring performance. Long Play CAL -235
The complete Verdi opera, performed by the La Scala Opera
Company. Long Play CCL -101 (3
Long Play Records) $5.98
THE
ART
OF
ELIZABETH
RETHBERG
like II Bacio,
One Day When We Were Young,
others. Long Play CAL -279
Lovely
melodies
Includes arias from Otello,
Faust, The Masked Ball, Die Fledermaus. Long Play CAL-335
Selections from Faust, Rigoletto,
La Traviata, and other favorites.
Long Play CAL -320
Meets the Rhythm Section -Miles Davis'
(Contemporary
rhythm section, that
3532. 12 -in. 43 min. S4.98). His playing is matter -of -fact and not particularly
communicative.
is-
Intimate Stuff: Joined by two drummers,
the New York jazz Quartet ( Mat Mathews.
Herbie Mann, Joe Puma, Whitey Mitchell)
ventures into West Indian and Latin American rhythms on The Neu. York Jazz Quartet Goes Native (Elektra 118. 12 -in. 31
min. S4.98). The group as a whole swings
harder than it did on its previous disc, and
Mann elicits some striking flute effects that
would have done credit to Esy Morales. It
is a stimulating collection hut, what with
its south-of-the-border emphasis. it is only
peripherally jazz. Even more peripheral is
Jimmy Giuffre's latest. The Jimmy Giuffre
3 ( Atlantic 1254. i2-in. 40 min. S4.98).
His associates are Jim Hall, guitar, and
Ralph Pena, bass, with Giuffre running
between clarinet, tenor, and baritone saxophones. This collection carries Giuffre's
introverted tendencies further than they
have gone before and, while there are what
might be termed jazz breaks in the selections, there is little jazz feeling about them
in general.
Something New: The John Plonsky
Quintet, led by a fluent trumpeter, shows a
blithe, modern -tinged attack on Cool Alan
Cool ( Golden Crest 3014. 12-in. 32 min.
The group's instrumentation
53.98)
trumpet, accordion, baritone saxophone,
bass, and drums-makes for an intriguing dark brown, earthy sound which manages to avoid turning ponderous or somber.
It's a light- hearted group with the humorous insight that can be inspired to create
a good jazz piece by memories of Laurel
and Hardy. Pianist Dave Hildinger's Quintet is rough and enthusiastic on The Young
Moderns ( Baton 120.4. 12 -in. 36 min.
S3.98), but some of its material is more of
.
DOROTHY MAYNOR
sings
SPIRITUALS
THE
ART
and
SACRED SONGS
OF
LUCREZIA
BORI
From Puccini, Verdi and Thomas,
to Mozart and Johann Strauss.
Long Play CAL -343
Memorable arias: Carmen, Faust,
Otello, other operas; plus songs.
Long Play CAL -283
Bach, Handel or simple spiritual
MARTINELLI SINGS "BY REQUEST"
These magnificent albums are
available now, at your
RCA Camden Record dealers,
Selections from Andrea Chenier,
I Pagliacci, II Trovatore, others.
Long Play CAL -274
62
-
a magnificent and moving
voice. Long Play CAL -344
NATIONALLY ADVERTISED PRICES.
-
burden than is absolutely necessary.
Johnny Glasel, a relatively neglected young
trumpet player, has been granted an LP,
Jazz Session (ABC- Paramount 165. t2 -in.
31 min. S3.98), but for a trumpeter who
has shown marked taste and polish on
other occasions, much of this seems unimaginative and slapdash.
a
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
HIGH FIDELITY DISCOGRAPHY No. 34
A Selective Discography of Manuel de Falla
by ROBERT CHARLES MARSH
Manuel de Falla was
a perfectionist. What he feared was not that he would fail to write enough
music to insure his reputation but that he uould allow himself to publish a composition he
would later regard as below his standards of excellence. Such an attitude does not make for a
prolific output. All of Falla's mature works could be issued on about eight long -play records.
What is important about Falla is not the volume of his scores but the artistry they represent.
His Spain is not that of an unsophisticated painter of exotic tiens, for his vision and technique
received their final polish during seven years in Paris. Yet Falla's Spain is in many
ways
the purest, the truest given us in music. Spurning local color and the clichés of national style,
he takes us at once to the Iberian essence.The discography that follows is selective in
that it discusses, for the most part, only records of particular interest or merit currently available, rather than giving a comprehensive view of the recording history of
the composer.
OPERAS
Falla wrote five works in operatic form.
The first, a zarzuela entitled Los Amores
de la Ines, was produced in 1902 and
failed rather spectacularly. La Casa de
tócame Roque might have had a greater
success, but Falla did not permit its production. His fourth opera, Fuego Fatuo,
based on music of Chopin, was unpublished
and remains unperformed. His third and
fifth operatic scores, La rida breve and
El retablo de Maese Pedro, are usually
regarded as the whole of his output in
that medium.
LA VIDA
BREVE
[Life
is Short)
Bearing this for the first time, one is likely
"But why is this never performed?" The first one to ask that question,
I have no doubt, was the composer.
No
fine score ever had to wait longer, its
to exclaim:
JULY 1957
stature once acknowledged, to find a staging. Submitted in 1909 in a competition
held by the Madrid Academy of Fine Arts,
it promptly won first prize and then
just as promptly sank into oblivion. When
Falla left for Paris in 1907, the score was
still unperformed and seemed likely to
remain so indefinitely. Fame came to the
composer in Paris through his Four Spanish
Pieces; his circle of friends widened into
the most influential groups in the French
capital;
but La rida breve remained
in
wraps. Finally in 191 3
eight years after
it had been heralded as the "best Spanish
lyric drama"
it was produced at Nice.
Later that year it was heard in Paris. Even
so its place in the repertory has been
insecure. The RCA Victor recording
made by HMV in Barcelona
is the first
of its complete score.
The cast is not all up to the same level,
but it is capable, and where strength is
-
-
-
-
-
required it is completely secure. Halfter
conducts an excellent orchestra; the many
choral passages are beautifully sung; and
its central role is exquisitely projected by
the sensitive artistry of Victoria de los
Angeles.
Anyone who enjoys opera ought to find
the personal discovery of La vida breve
most rewarding.
Victoria de los Angeles (s); Rosario
Gomez (ms); Pablo Civil (t); Emilio
Payá (b) ; and others.
Capilla Clásica
Polifúnica and Orquesta Sinfonica de la
Opera de Barcelona, Ernesto Halfter cond.
Two 12 -in. RCA VICTOR LM 6017 (with
recital of Spanish songs). 57.96.
-
EL RETABLO DE MAESE PEDRO
Peter's Puppet Show]
[Master
Best characterized as
"a chamber opera,"
this short work in one act is a dramatic
63
The second volume in
the indispensable
record
guide series
HIGH FIDELITY
Record
Annual:
1956
Edited by Roland Gelait
Here is the new volume in the
planned series of High Fidelity
Record Annuals which will keep
you fully informed about the
thousands of long- playing records released each year.
Contains classical, semiclassical,
and spoken word record reviews
which appeared in HIGH FIDELITY
Magazine from July 1955 through
June 1956, assembled for greatest
convenience.
Covers both the performances of
artists and the quality of the recordings.
Organized for easy reference. Composers' names are arranged alphabetically. Performers' names are indexed.
realization of one of the most characteristic
and amusing scenes in Don Quixote. Full
appreciation of the work demands, I suspect,
that one see as well as hear it, so he may
follow the two levels of action provided
by the simultaneous presentation of the
puppet play and the stage drama. Reduced
to the purely auditory dimension, much
appears to be lost- striking and lovely
though the music is. However, an invisible Retablo is better than none at all,
and there is room for gratitude that the
opera has been recorded several times
often enough to produce one exceptional
edition and a couple of good ones.
The Angel set is distinguished by a fine
Don Quixote sung by Manuel Ausensi and
able direction by Eduardo Toldra. The
recorded sound is perhaps too resonant,
less cleanly placed in space than that of
the London ( Ducretet- Thomson) edition,
but this is a minor fault. The sealed package album offers a very helpful libretto
that adds considerably to the enjoyment of
the music. Finally, the Angel set is well
cast in the two supporting roles.
Halffter, in the London edition, produces clean, emphatic sound that is reproduced in kind, and he provides an effective reading of the score; but his Don
Quixote ( Chano Gonzalo) is less forceful
than is desirable and the tenor is similarly
unable to make much of an impression. If
coupling is of any importance, the reverse
of this record contains a better Amor hrujo
than the Angel, but neither is the outstanding recording of that work.
-Lola Rodriguez Aragon (s); Gaetano
Renom (t); Manuel Ausensi (b); Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Francasse,
Eduardo Toldra, cond. ANGEL 35089/I.
(with Amor brujo). $5.98 (or $3.48).
-Blanca Maria Seoane (s); Francisco
Navarro (t) ; Chano Gonzalo (b) ; Orchestre du Théâtre des Champs -Elysées, Halffter,
cond. LONDON DTL 93010 (with Amor
brujo) . 53.98.
-
An invaluable shopping aid.
More information about more
records for less money than in
any other record review collec-
EL AMOR BRUJO [Love by Witchcraft]
tion.
Written in Spain, after the outbreak of
Only $4.50
If you missed the 1955 Annual it is
still available at S4.95HIGH FIDELITY Magazine
The Publishing House
Great Barrington, Mass.
for which
Enclosed please find $
please send me postpaid:
HIGH FIDELITY RECORD ANNUAL 1956
copies @ $4.50 each
HIGH FIDELITY RECORD ANNUAL 1955
_..
_. _.
.
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please.
)
Foreign orders sent at buyer's risk. Add 55c
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Canadian.
NAME
ADDRESS
64
ORCHESTRAL MUSIC
war in 1914 made Paris uncongenial, this
ballet with vocal solos was designed for
the special talents of Pastora Impero, an
Andalusian gypsy artist. It was first produced in Madrid with uneven success, and
it has in the intervening years become
more of a concert than a stage work.
Presentations without dancers normally
exclude four of the sixteen numbers; the
"complete" recorded editions are, in effect,
twelve sections as rearranged for large
orchestra in the sequence chosen by the
composer for concert purposes. There is
evidence of slight augmentation of this suite
in the Ansermet version.
Approaches to the score range from
the broad and forthright to the subtle and
evocative, and it is the latter point of view,
I think, that best shows the stature of the
music. Ansermet, as one would imagine,
captures this mood beautifully and sustains
it with greater effect than any of his rivals.
He also has the best soloist, the most
polished orchestra, and has been given
the best balanced recording. Second place
goes to Brancos performance with the
Ansermet: authoritative and evocative
in El sombrero de tres picos, complete.
Madrid Symphony, third to Argenta's somewhat overly restrained version.
-Marina De Gabarain (ms) Orchestre de
la Suisse Romande, Ernest Ansermet, cond.
LONDON LI. 1404 ( with the Spanish Dance
from La rida breve and four other short
orchestral works). S3.98.
-Ines Rivadeneira (c); Madrid Symphony
Orchestra, Pedro de Freitas Branco, cond.
LONDON DTL 93010 (with El retablo de
Alaese Pedro). S3.98.
-Ana Maria Iriarte (ms); Orchestra du
Conservatoire de Paris, Ataulfo Argenta,
cond. ANGEL 35089/L (with El retablo de
¿Maese Pedro). $5.98 (or $3.48).
;
EL SOMBRERO DE TRES PICOS
[The Three -
Cornered Hat]
Conceived by the incomparable Serge
Diaghilev, this greatest of Falla's ballets was first produced with the French title
Le Tricorne at the Alhambra Theater, London, in July of 1919. Choreography was
by Massine, and the décor and front curtains were designed by Picasso. During the
1914 -18 war the Diaghilev company was
largely confined to neutral countries. Diaghilev himself was interned in Venice until
1915, when the intervention of King
Alfonso of Spain allowed him to leave
to arrange the Spanish, Portuguese, and
South American seasons of 1916-18. The
Iberian visits stimulated him to the creation of this magnificent Spanish ballet. The
most important revival of the work was
that of the Sadler's Wells company in February 1947, with Massine once more in
the role of the miller and Margot Fonteyn
as his wife.
Ernest Ansermet conducted the first performance. To say that he knows the
tradition is misleading: he created it. His
recording of the entire score is therefore
a definitive edition.
The usual concert excerpts from the
work are the two opening dances and
finale of Part I1. They make an attractive suite, but the entire score is so fine
that it seems pointless to abbreviate it
in this manner. None of the recorded performances are better than Ansermet's in the
complete set, but the Markevitch-Philharavailable in two couplings, Angel
monia
IS first rate.
35008 of 35152
-Suzanne Danco (s) ; small male chorus;
Orchestre de la Suisse Romande. Ansermet,
cond. LONDON LL 598. $3.98.
-
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
NOCHES
EN LOS
JARDINES DE ESPANA
[Nights in the Gardens of Spain)
Begun in Paris in 1909 and completed after
Falla's return to Spain at the beginning of
the 1914 -18 war, this set of "symphonic
impressions for piano and orchestra' is not
only among the most popular of the composer's works but provides ideal representation of the influences which molded his
art. Here is the Impressionist element,
absorbed fully in the Parisian environment, and here as well is the Andalusian
fire smoldering with its glowing heat.
The music is supremely evocative, and
a performance must capture this element
to do it justice. On the other hand, there
is a gypsy bravura to its melodic line, and
this must not be lost either. Of the seven
recordings currently available, three are of
undeniable merit. Novaes plays the piano
solos with the greatest feeling for the style,
the greatest vitality and strength. The
Vienna Pro Musica Symphony and Hans
Swarowsky support her ably, but orchestra
and conductor reveal that their grasp of
Spanish style is an acquisition, rather than
anything in the blood, and they are apt to
underline things which require no such
emphasis.
lorda is on firmer ground, but his
British orchestra seems unable to realize
all that he may himself feel, and his
English soloist
Curzon
is repeating a
lesson carefully learned rather than singing in his native wood -notes wild. The
resultant performance is good but not per-
-
-
fect.
To Halfter this is music far subtler than
the other conductors see it; to his French
orchestra it is kin to Debussy. Pianist
Ciccolini, alas, lacks the force fully to
complete the pictures in this mood.
Coupling may decide the issue (the
Halfter comes automatically with the only
Homenajes). Most people probably will
prefer the Novaes. All three sets are
acceptable.
-Guiomar Novaes, piano; Pro Musica
Symphony ( Vienna), Hans Swarowsky,
cond. VOX PL 8520 (with Grieg: Piano
Concerto). S4.98.
_Clifford Curzon, piano; New Symphony
Orchestra (London), Enrique Jorda, cond.
139, (with Grieg: Piano
Concerto) 53.98.
-Aldo Ciccolini, piano; Orchestre National
de la Radiodiffusion Française, Halfter,
cond. ANGEL 35134 (with Homenajes).
54.98 (or 53.48).
LONDON
LL
.
CONCERTO FOR HARPSICHORD AND CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
If you are interested in
Falla chose this solo instrument, not out
of misguided antiquarianism, but because
he wanted a tonal color and a texture that
it ideally supplied. He matched it with
a small orchestra of flute, oboe, clarinet,
violin, and cello, thus permitting balanced
sonorities in which the delicacy of the solo
part could easily be heard, yet allowing
the harpsichord in forte passages to appear
loud in relation to the other instruments.
Stylistically this work, completed in 1926,
is about as far removed from Nights in
the Gardens of Spain as one could expect
a single creative intellect to get. It is a
piece of absolute music, only occasionally
suggesting Spanish materials, and the influences of the neoclassicist Stravinsky and
of Domenico Scarlatti are both in evidence.
The available recording appears to be
quite a good one.
-Sylvia Marlowe, harpsichord; Concert
Arts Players. CAPITOL P 8309 (with
music by Rieti and Surinach). 53.98.
CONTEMPORARY
MUSIC
or would like to
learn about
-this
-
LOUISVILLE ORCHESTRA
Robert Whitney, Conductor
These "collectors item" recordings are engineered by Columbia Masterworks technicians. All are contemporary music. with
the
the
...
HODMENA .1 ES
sions of living composers the world over.
1) Fanfare on the name, E. FernJnde_.
Arbris
2) Pour le Tombeau de Debussy
3) Pour le Tombeau de Paul Dukas
4) Pedrelliana
This collection of orchestral versions of
works composed between 1920 and 1939
makes up the final score completed and
published by the composer. He appeared
in public as a performer for the last time
when he led the world première of this
suite at Buenos Aires in 1939; although he
lived for seven more years, Falla died
with his last score- Atlántida
incom-
-
plete.
The second movement was written first
with the title Elegia de la
Guitarra. The original version, especially
as played by Segovia on DECCA 9638, is
far more evocative than the orchestral
setting. The second and third movements
both exist in piano editions.
This appears to be the first edition
of the orchestral suite on records. The
work does not contain the elements that
lead to great popular success, but it is
interesting nonetheless
particularly in the
final movement, where Falla salutes his
teacher Felipe Pedrell, whose scholarship
laid the groundwork for the Spanish
OFFER LIMITED-SEND TODAY FOR
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September 1. the Berkshire String Quartet and noted guest artists
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JULY 1957
closely with
composer working
orchestra to achieve a true and sensitive
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only. they represent a priceless collection of
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65
nationalist school. Halffter's performance
gives the impression of having too much
gloss outside and too little blood inside.
It does, however, give a reliable account of
a work that repays exploration.
-Orchestre National de la Radio diffusion
Française, Halfter, cond. ANGEL 35134
(with Nights in the Gardens of Spain).
$4.98 (or 53.48).
Spain had produced a serious composer
capable of making an impact on the international musical scene.
Most listeners will prefer the vitality
of Pressler's recording, though the sound
of the piano is not entirely satisfactory. De
Grooi s performance is quite different: at
moments sluggish, at others more sensitive and evocative than its rival.
-Menahem Pressler, piano. M -G -M E
3071 (with collection of Falla piano
pieces) . 53.98.
-Cor De Groot, piano. EPIC LC 3175
(with other Spanish piano works). $3.98.
PIANO MUSIC
FOUR SPANISH PIECES
Written in Paris and published in 1909,
served to introduce Falla to
the greater world of music. Short though
they are, they gave sufficient evidence that
these works
FANTASIA
by the composer for either
as the performer
Rarely played in either form, its
was intended
piano or
harpsichord,
desired.
single harpsichord recording ( Concert Hall
G 16) eluded my search. Reflecting Falla's
studies under Pedrell, the idiom of the
work is one supported by musicology, and
thus differs markedly from the conventional
devices of those writing "Spanish" pieces
from afar. This is Andalusia as seen from
within.
Pressler's performance is an energetic
and capable one.
-Menahem Pressler, piano. M -G -M E
( with
collection of Falla piano
3071
pieces). $3.98.
BETICA
truly brio keyboard work, this Fantasia
A
SONGS
SIETE CANCIONES POPULARES ESPANOLAS
[Seven Spanish
Popular Songs]
rarely quoted Spanish folk music.
His usual practice was to draw upon it as
a point of departure for his treatment of
thematic materials of his own invention.
In this set of songs he actually used folk
materials, although the form the songs
take and the way in which they are harmonized reflect still the cosmopolitanism of
the composer's point of view, so that the
resultant composition bears his unmistakable imprint.
None of his music has been recorded
more frequently, and it is therefore something of a surprise to find that only the
Merriman set remains in the current caralogue. It is undeniably gtxrd, although the
balance between the singer and the piano
is Odd in that it places the former sonically
some distance to the rear of her accompanist, Gerald Moore.
If, however, one plays the old Parlophone
edition made in the 193os by Conchita
Supervia, even the faulty sound cannot
conceal the greater impact achieved by an
artist who has a fuller and more spontaneous command of the style than Miss
Merriman. The LP reissue of this on
DECCA DL "510 has been withdrawn, but
there are rumors that it will appear anew
on the Angel label.
-Nan Merriman (ms); Gerald Moore,
with Spanish song
piano. ANGEL 35208
recital). 54.98 (or S3.48).
Falla
LENNY HERMA
BAND on
BEST SELLING
STEREOPHONIC TAPE*
THE HARRISON
274
MADISON
Dear
CATALOG
OF RECORDED
AVENUE
TAPES
NEW YORK
I6, 2.4.0. yOHK
April
An:
MUrraY Hill
&SW
22, 1957
We have
lust conducted
HARRISON
CATALOGa survey among
sfalrng
OF
which
EheDvtTAPES. with
1n
E
LSNaEselll tthee
the Purtitles
era came
for
ithe appeared
as outetendin sellers otesechah
to to rmulete
often enouoh
not enough
a
statistical
^
LThere Wes,
to make it
re
however,
make possible
port suitable for publication.
outstanding.
came
that this
P as
n
the
eoesedh`Hen Pipes of iinformation
pass it along
would interest
¡
to ya,
Lenny Herman's
you,
He
d ! am
picture
cover of the
summer issue
wh!N
picture
Bove regard
he Catalog,
an good
will be out the loon.
wishes,
very soon.
a
o/
.
NPH: roh
Mc Arthur
C
LIVEN
Cordially
`A/' -'-sw
°pes
1
Record Market
Pubis Harrison
Box 202
PRODUCTS
Cabdweq NewOjersey
CORP.
eiset
etr41sMp5
O -RECORD
Are these Lenny Herman tapes
in your stereo library:
LENNY
HERMAN and
THE
RETAIlINO
THIS MONTH'S
IF YOU
RECORDS
/I
MIGHTIEST
1083
LITTLE BAND IN THE LAND"_.
1088
MUSIC IN MOTION (Vol. I)
1089
MUSIC IN MOTION (Vol. II)
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A MUSICAL TRIP AROUND THE WORLD
HIT TUNES THROUGH THE YEARS.. .....1094
AND SOUND
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66
LESLIE CREATIONS
Dept. 289 -I
Lafayette
$995
riar
Hill. Pa.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
ookshop
Save yourself time and trouble by ordering your
books directly from us. Just fill in the coupon
below and mail it to us with your remittance.
On this page you will find listed titles of miniature musical scores and a wide
variety of books on music. Each book is published in England by Penguin Books.
clearly printed, sturdily bound, and modestly priced.
Each is a paperback
-
British Music of Our Time -Ed. by A. L. Bacharach. Essays
on contemporary British composers, and the origins and future of
modern British music. A156- 35e
Chamber Music -Ed. by Alec Robertson. A guide to the
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present day. A372
The Concerto -Ralph Hill. An appreciation of the most freviolin,
and cello concertos. A249
piano,
quently heard
850
Robert !!ling. Over 1,500 entries
A Dictionary of Music
instruments,
musical
forms,
on
defining musical terms, articles
composers, etc. R4 -65e
Going to a Concert- Lionel Salter. The orchestra, its instruments, and types of music explained for the young concertgoer.
Illustrated. PS85
650
Jazz -Rex Harris. A survey of jazz, from the early drum
rhythms of Africa to present day Western Music. A247 -85C
Mozart's Letters -Ed. by Eric Blom. These letters, which can
be read as biography, throw new light on the man and the musi850
cian. A238
Music in England -Eric Blom. A history to the present day.
A107
35e
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Music Ho!
Constant Lambert. A provocative treatise on the
modes and vagaries of contemporary music by a famous British
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Opera- Edward J. Dent. An introduction to opera, giving a
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The Penguin Part -Song Book Leslie Woodgate. A new collection of over sixty songs arranged for groups of mixed voices,
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The Penguin Song Book Leslie Woodgate. One of the best
collections of traditional students' songs, folk songs, spirituals, and
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Philharmonic Thomas Russell. The inside story of a symphony orchestra
its personnel, organization, etc. A264
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The Puffin Song Book Leslie Woodgate. A new song book
for children containing many favorites ranging from Sing a Song of
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K. Holland. The life and times of England's
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--
Bach
Brandenburg Concerto, No. 3, in G. sc2
Brandenburg Concerto, No. 4, in G. SC22
Brandenburg Concerto, No. 5, in D. sC29
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Overtures:
Symphony
Symphony
Symphony
Symphony
Symphony
650
850
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Coriolan and Egmont. SC3
650
No. 1, in C. SC9 -650
No. 7, in A. sc18 -St.00
No. 3, in E flat. SC23
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No. 2, in D. SC24 -850
No. 9, in D (Choral). SC28 -51.95
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Variations on a Theme of Haydn. SCt7 -650
Concerto for Violin, in D. SC25
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Franck
Symphonic Variations.
SC26
Haydn
Symphony
Symphony
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Symphony No. 41, in C (Jupiter). Selo -650
Overtures: Magic Flute and Don Giovanni. SC15
Symphony No. 39, in E flat. sc16
-85e
Concerto for Violin, in E minor. SCI4 -850
Fantasy -Overture, Romeo and Juliet.
Wagner
Siegfried Idyll. Sc 13 -65e
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Book Department
HIGH FIDELI1Y Magazine
Great Barrington, Mass.
NAME
850
Concerto for Piano, in A minor. SC19 -950
Tchaikovsky
Overtures: Der Freischütz and Oberon. sc8
Minimum order for the scores and books listed above -three or more titles. Please include
5e for postage and handling ( toc on foreign orders, except Canadian) for each title ordered.
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Schumann
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No. rot, in D (Clock). Sc4
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No. too, in G. sc27 -850
No. 94, in G (Surprise). SC3o -850
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67
by
R. D. DARRELL
the tape lied
-
Note: As usual, all tapes reviewed are
unless specifically noted as
7.5 ips and
stereo -are z -track single- channel reprefixed to
cordings. The symbol
a review indicates stereo tapes. If a date
in parenthesis is appended to the review,
it refers to the issue of HIGH FIDELITY
in which the corresponding disc review
appeared.
STEREOPHONIC
TAPE
ALIGNMENT
SONOTAPE SWB AL 101. 7 -in.
St1.95.
I
don't really regret my last month's enthusiasm in welcoming the little Stereo phony Balancing Tape (T 5o). for that low priced a-in. reel remains an extremely useful tool for checking a home stereo system.
But its now harder for me to give full
weight of praise to a far more ambitious
and large -scaled test -and -demonstration reel,
costing considerably more, but infinitely
more versatile, as well as running to some
24 minutes as contrasted with the earlier
tape's q1/2.
Sonotapes genuine masterpiece of technical ingenuity includes, first, a long series
of signal -generator tones: 15 kc for azimuth alignment of the playback heads; a
series of spot frequencies, 5o cps to 15 kc,
preamplifier equalization
for checking
(NARTB characteristics);
a
15-kc /3o -cps
"sweep" first on the separate channels and
then on both together; a sustained 3 -kc
tone for wow and flutter testing; and a
44o -cps "A" for checking tape -transport
as evaluated by aural
speed accuracy
comparison with the live tones of an "A"
tuning fork supplied as part of the tape
an inspiration which no manupackage
facturer of test discs ever has had the good
sense to anticipate.
But since most of these test tones (except
of course the last) are best utilized only
in conjunction with such electronic test
gear as vacuum -tube voltmeters and oscilloscopes, the major portion of the present
tape is designed for ear judgments and
intermittent tones,
alone:
evaluations
snatches of conversation, typewriter sounds,
and bits of music to check track synchronization, proper channel connections, dynamic channel balancing, and optimum
speaker placements. There are also more
extensive musical selections, mostly drawn
from current stereo Sonotapes, to demonstrate the available frequency spectrum and
transient- response characteristics of one's
home system, of which the opening of
Beethoven's Fifth, first cutoff above 8 kc,
-
-
68
then cutoff below 2:2D cps, and finally
wide -open. is particularly effective. But the
most startling and perhaps controversial
item of all is the schizophrenic finale which
combines the last pages of Tchaikovsky's
both running
Fourth with a subway train
at full blast. Purportedly a check of maximum loudness capabilities, this is actually
a "psychiatrist's special" such as even Mr.
E. D. Nunn has never dreamed of. Everyone with tender ears is solemnly warned
to skip it. But if you occasionally relish a
hi-fi battle of sound for its own sake, you
one of the most
as I
may find this
exciting, if frantically nerve-wracking, sonic
jolts you've ever experienced.
But to dwell on this would be to distort
the basic value of the tape, ignore its helpful spoken commentary and directions by
Lloyd Moss, and fail to do justice to the
excellent accompanying booklet, which
combines detailed technical notes plus an
uncommonly sensible and informative illustrated essay by Kurt List on "How to Get
the Most out of Stereophonic Sound." The
complete package comes as close to literal
and absolute indispensability as any aid
to better audio -system operation and listening enjoyment I've come across.
-
-
do-
BACH, Johann Bernard: Overture
(Suite) in D
(Bach, Johann Christian: Amadis de
Gaule, Suite
Zimbler Sinfonietta, Richard Burgin, cond.
BOSTON (via LIVINGSTON) BO 7-6 BN.
7 -in. S1t.95.
of The Music of the
Bach Family introduces only two of the
fourteen Bachs represented in the four disc LP album (Boston BUA r), it serves
as a piquant appetizer for an eventually
complete stereo taping. Incidentally, it also
throws disconcerting illumination on the
Janus -like aspects of current tape publication. One is that of notable technical sophistication and artistic validity: both the
engineering and musicianship here are wellnigh flawless. But the other, that of commercial merchandising and labeling, is at
best naïve and at worst barbarous; when a
listener wants to find out just what he is
enjoying, there are only a few printed lines
on the reel -box cover, and these not only
give no detailed information on the musical
contents, but retitle the Johann Christian
work Amadis des Gaules and mis -ascribe
it to Johann Christoph. Are the producers
unaware that the project supervisor, Dr.
Karl Geiringer, provided extensive an-
Although this Vol.
1
notations for the disc releases? Or do they
assume that stereo listeners have exclusively
aural interests, and care nothing about
musical details and sources?
But my wrath on this score evaporated
quickly enough when I turned to the music itto Johann Bernard's grave Lentement
self
(in French overture style, with a deliciously
lilting middle section), bouncy %tlarche,
gracious Pauepieds I & II, broadly eloquent Air, proudly stepping La JoTe, and a
Caprice which begins in the solemn vein
of the opening but soon switches to a
wondrously invigorating finale. This is the
first music by Johann Sebastian's distant
cousin I have ever heard, and all I can add
is that I hope it won't be the last.
Much less distinctive, for all their rococo
prettiness, are the Lentement, Gavottes I &
I1, and Tambourin which make up the
suite drawn from Johann Christian's French
opera of 17,9. But here winds and drums
augment the sonic attractions of the Bostonian chamber ensemble and exploit even
more effectively than Bernard's strings and
harpsichord the radiant warmth of the
stereo medium. The whole reel is a must
for the library of every devotee of early
and late eighteenth-century music. (March
1957)
-
BRAHMS: Symphony No. 2, in D.
Op. 73
Frankfurt Opera Orchestra, Carl Barnberger. cond.
CONCERT HALL CHT /BN 23. 7-in. $17.90.
In marked contrast to the mellowness (and
to my mind somewhat overripe romanticism) of the recent Munch stereo version
of this symphony, Bamberger's muscular
reading (not yet available on LP) and the
present more open and sharply focused recording reveal an almost wholly different
work. The Frankfurters are no Bostonians,
to be sure, and although they play well,
their attacks are often less precise than
those of Munch's players and their tonal
coloring lacks the poetic nuances of the
more polished Munch taping. Yet Bamberger's performance strikes me as far
more individual, provocative, and dramatic.
At any rate, Brahmsians now have a welcome choice between a dreamily romantic
approach and a more invigorating one, to
each of which appropriately calculated engineering impartially extends the stereo
richly
in one instance
blessings of
in the other
spacious tonal blending and
of
sonic
delineation
boldly sculptured
-
-
- -
detail.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
HAYDN: The
Seven Last Words of
Christ, Op. 5r
Schneider Quartet.
BERKSHIRE BH
tot6.
7 -in.
56.95.
Originally released as Haydn Society HSQ
39 as part of the Schneiders' complete series
of Haydn quartets, this 1953 recorded per-
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Edouord van Remoortel, conductor
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SYMPHONIC DANCES, OP. 64
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Edouord van Remoortel, conductor
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NOVAES PLAYS CHOPIN
Nocturne. Waltzes, Etudes
Gupomar Novaes, piano
PMC 1014
PETE SEEGER SINGS
Folk Songs with 5-string banjo
PMC
1015
formance possibly may be surpassed in LP
form by the current RCA Victor version
(LM 1949) played by the Boston Symphony String Quartet, but it certainly has
not been superseded. The present taping
is so superior, indeed, to the earlier disc
processing that it is hard to believe this
is not a quite recent recording, so purely
and warmly does it convey the sonorities
and songfulness of the Schneider group's
restrained expressiveness. No music for
impatient, distracted listeners, of course,
this long unhurried succession of slow
movements (varied only at the very end
by the brief "Earthquake" finale) offers to
more contemplative spirits a pure tonal
evocation of the passion and pathos of
Gethsemane. (Mar. -Apr. 1953)
JOIN THE
STEREOPHONIC
MUSIC SOCIETY
and enjoy these
benefits:
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STEREOPHONIC TAPES
SAVINGS ON
MONAURAL TAPES
FREE MUSIC MAGAZINE
LISZT: Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra: No. r, in E flat: No. 2. in A
SUBSCRIPTION
Alfred Brendel, piano; Pro Musica Symphony
Orchestra
(Vienna), Michael
Gielen, cond.
PHONOTAPES- SONORE S 701 -2. Two 7 -in.
NO
ONE CENTRAL SOURCE FOR
511.95 each.
EVERY RECORDED TAPE;
The existence of outstanding recent stereo
performances of these concertos, by Rubinstein and Entremont respectively, makes
them unlucky choices for Phonotapes' debut
in the new medium. Nevertheless, both
versions are brave challenges to their premore significantly
demdecessors and
onstrate engineering qualities which set a
high technical standard for Phonotapes'
stereo future. Brendel's work is new to me.
but he obviously is a skilled pianist well
schooled in the Viennese traditions. To my
taste, he lingers too lovingly on Liszi s
sentimentalities and tends to be a bit heavy handed in the bravura passages, yet he is
effectively accompanied in both works and
recorded throughout with magnificent tonal
solidity and authenticity. There is a truly
natural concert -hall sonic spaciousness here
( although
as always when the soloist is
centered, his instrument sounds considerably more than life- size), and both tapes
have the novel advantage of a brief preliminary test tone which is a convenient
aid in enabling the listener both to balance
the two channels of his home reproduction
system and to "cue" aurally the visually
indeterminate tape location of the beginning of the recorded performance iaclf.
-
EVERY STEREO TAPE
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
FREE MEMBERSHIP
BONUS TAPE NOW!
-
MOZART: Quartet No.
14, in
Limited Edition Stereotape
by CONCERTAPE
from every stereocon -dining highlights
catalogce along
phonic tape in the Concertape
aspect
short
of
heard in thi s reel.
recording
.
$6.00 -Half year membership
$9.00 -Full year membership
USE THIS
OISTRAKH CAMEO
Encores by Prokofiev, Kodaly, Wagner, Suk played
by the violin virtuoso David Oistrakh
PMC 1017
FORM
TO: STEREOPHONIC MUSIC SOCIETY, Inc.
303 Grand Avenue, Palisades Park, N. J.
GENTLEMEN: Please enroll me for a
6 month period
as a member of the
1
nic Music Society. I understand that I am under no obligaticn to
purchase any specified minimum of tapes
Stereophoyear
under the Society's group purchase Dlan.
of my membership I am entitled
to a free one -year subscription to Tape
Recording magazine, as well as quarterly
listings of all recorded stereophonic and
monaural tapes currently on the market.
As part
(,.
Write for complete Cameo listing.
PHONOTAPES INC.
248 West 49th St., New York 19, N. Y.
JULY 1957
El Check
for El $6.00 is
Money Order
$9.00
enclosed herewith (payable to the Stereophonic Music Soc., Inc.)
My
Fine Arts Quartet.
CONCERTAPES 23 -4 A. 7 -in.
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MEMBERSHIP
APPLICATION
K. 387
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MINIMUM PURCHASE
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The Fine Arts performance of the first of
Mozart's six Haydn quartets has never appeared on microgroove, although it was
first released a couple of years ago in a
single-channel Webcor taping. In that
form it was deservedly praised (by C. G.
Burke) for its "deft straightforwardness";
Continued on next page
N
ADDRAME ESS
CITY
ZONE
MAKE OF RECORDER
Stereophonic
Stacked
L
STATE. ..._..
Staggered
Monaural
Please send additional information
concerning the Society.
J
69
the
ANNOUNCING THE NEW
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Continued from preceding page
and the "airy mellowness" which he also
found in it is further enhanced by stereo's
simultaneous abilities to blend four stringed
instruments into a harmoniously woven
sonic fabric and yet to differentiate clearly
among the individual tonal strands. It is
the latter characteristic in particular which
lends such special distinction to the otherwise homogeneous cello artistry of George
2923-4, Sept.
,pkin here.
( Webtor
1955)
MOZART: Symphonies: No. r8, in
F, K. r3o; No. 21, in A, K. 134
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7J
RCA VICTOR: Even the delicate precision
and tonal polish of Monteux and the Boston Symphony can't make Delibes's Sylvia
and Coppélia ballet suites seem to me more
than intolerably insipid. First issued on LPs
in The Ballet miscellany, LM 6:13, of
1954, later by themselves on LM 1913,
these recordings are hardly exceptional
technically (the timpani sound a bit
wooden at times), but this can't disguise
the Bostonian sonic richness nor what
many consider the ingratiating charms of
Monteux's readings (cc 3o, 7 -in., $10.95).
Curiously enough, the 1952 Carnegie Hall
Toscanini recordings of the Freischütz and
Oberon Overtures, and that to La forza del
destino, stand up better in some ways today
although this may be largely ascribed,
perhaps, to their more colorful and
sonorous scoring. The overture to Euryanthe is also included (as in the still larger
Toscanini Omnibus, LM 6026, Dec. 1955,
in which the LP versions of all these works
appeared), but, while recorded less than
a year earlier, it is not as effective sonically.
Interpretatively, the Oberon is somewhat
too hard- driven for my tastes, but Frei schütz and Forza must unquestionably rank
high among the late Maestros unanimously
acclaimed triumphs. (AC 27. 5 -in., S6.95)
-
Ask your
Concertone
dealer for
3
It's been so seldom in concert that I've
heard middle -period works like these played
with authentic Mozartean buoyancy, or
heard them in recordings which preserve
their proper sonic dimensional proportions
(to say nothing of their air-borne lightness), that the combination of Leinsdorf's
interpretative zest with stereo's divination
of the golden mean between aural inflation
and constriction bewitches me completely.
I had never before realized the prodigal
measure of effervescence, lyric grace, and
humorous quirkiness that Mozart concentrated in these two brief 1772 Salzburg
symphonies. Leinsdorf's performances surely will rank close to the very finest of
those in his entire Mozart series when these
eventually appear on Westminster LPs, but
no single -channel listener will ever know
the added radiance and lift with which
they are invested by stereo sound.
REEL MUSIC NOTES
little as $795.00
doo.
Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of London, Erich Leinsdorf, cond.
SONOTAPE SWB 8018. 7 -in. $11.95.
,
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
i.Pu/4e
G
HEATHKIT...
BECAUSE IT'S SUCH GREAT FUN ... AND BECAUSE
WE GET SO MUCH MORE FOR OUR MONEY!"
Every day more and more people (just like you) are finding out wily it's smart
to "do -it- yourself" and save by building HEATHKIT high fidelity components.
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at approximately one-half the usual cost by dealing directly with the manufacturer, and by doing their own assembly work. It's real fun -and it's real
easy too! You don't need a fancy work shop, special tools or special knowledge
to put a Heathkit together. You just assemble the individual parts according
to complete step -by -step instructions and large picture- diagrams. Anyone can do it!
Heathkit Model
SS-1
Speaker System Kit
This high fidelity speaker system is designed to
operate by itself, or with the range extending unit
:
listed below. It covers the frequency range of 50
to 12,000 CPS within
5 db. Two high -quality
Jensen speakers are employed. Impedance is 16
ohms, and power rating is 25 watts.
Can be built in just one evening.
Shpg. Wt. 30 lbs.
$3995
Heathkit Model
SS -1 B Speaker System Kit
This high fidelity speaker system kit extends the
range of the model SS -I described above. It employs a 15' woofer and a super -tweeter to provide
additional bass and treble response. Combined frequency response of both speaker systems is x 5
db from 35 to 16,000 CPS. Impedance is 16 ohms,
and power is 35 watts. Attractive
styling matches SS -I. Shpg. Wt.
.$
95
99
80 I hs.
HEATHKIT
"LEGATO" SPEAKER SYSTEM KIT
Months of painstaking engineering by Heath and
Altec- Lansing engineers has culminated in the design of the Legato, featuring "CP" (critical phasing)
and
$10.00 dwn.
$8.40 mo.
"LB"
(level balance). The result is a new kind
of high fidelity sound, to satisfy even the most
critical audio requirements. Two high -quality 15'
theater -type speakers and a high- frequency driver
with sectoral horn combine to cover 25 to 20,000
cycles without peaks or valleys. "CP" and "LB"
assure you of the smooth, flat audio response so
essential to faithful reproduction. Choice of two
beautiful cabinet styles below.
"Legato" Traditional Model
HH -1 -T
Styled in classic lines to blend with period furniture
of all types. Doors attractively paneled. African
mahogany for dark finishes unless
you specify imported white birch
for light finishes. Shpg. Wt. 246 lbs.
$34500
"Legato" Contemporary Model HH -1 -C
This tine cabinet features straightforward design to
blend with your modern furnishings. Slim, tapered
struts run vertically across
the grille cloth to produce
a strikingly attractive shadowline. Wood parts are
precut and predrilled for
simple assembly. Supplied in
African mahogany for dark
$34.50 dwn.
$28.98 mo.
finishes unless you specify
imported white birch for
light finishes.
Shpg. Wt.
231
lbs.
$32500
$32.50 dwn.
$27.30 mo.
HEATH COMPANY
A
Subsidiary of Daystrom, inc.
BENTON HARBOR 8, MICHIGAN
JULY ):957
71
ZAhrviAtie HEATHKIT`
It's Easy (and fun) to Plan Your Own Hi -Fi Installation
By Choosing the Heathkit Components
That Best Suit Your Particular Needs.
As the world's largest manufacturer of electronic equipment in kit form. Heath
Company can provide you with a maximum variety of units from which to
choose. You can select just the amplifier you need from five different models.
ranging in power from 7 watts to 25 watts, some with preamplifiers, and some
requiring a separate preamplifier. You can pick your speaker system from four
outstanding high fidelity units ranging in price from only $39.95 to $345.00. You
can even select a fine Heathkit FM or AM Tuner! Should there be a question
in your mind about the requirements of an audio system, or about planning
your particular hi -fi installation, don't hesitate to contact us. We will be pleased
to assist you.
MATCHING CABINETS
,
,
.
The Heath \M tuner, FM Tuner
and Preamplifier are housed in
matching satin -gold finished cabinets to blend with any room decorating scheme. Can be stacked one
oser the other to create a central
control unit for the complete high
fidelity system.
t_
J
':
MODEL FM -3A
solow
MODEL WA -P2
MODEL BC -1
..
.
PRE -ALIGNED TUNERS
A unique feature of the Heathkit AM and
FM Tuners is the fact that both units are pre aligned. A signal generator is not necessary!
IF and ratio transformers are pretuned at the
factory, and some front -end components are
preassemble(' and pretuned. Another "extra"
to assure you of easy kit assembly.
HEATH COMPANY
A Subsidiary of Daystrom, Inc.
BENTON HARBOR 8, MICHIGAN
We invite you to take adEASY TIME PAYMENTS
swuage of the Heath lline Payment Plan on any order
...
amounting to S90.00 or more. Just IO'; down and the balance in
payments. WRITE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.
e
72
telse monthly
fj
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
HIGH FIDELITY SYSTEM
HEATHKIT HIGH FIDELITY FM TUNER KIT Features
A(i(
and stabilized. temperature -compensated oscillator.
Sensitivity is IO microvolts for 20 dh of quieting. Modern
circuit covers standard FM band from 88 to 108 mc. Employs ratio detector for efficient hi -fi performance. Power
supply is built in. Illuminated slide rule dial for easy
tuning. Housed in compact satin -gold enamel cabinet.
Features prealigned transformers and front end tuning
unit. Shpg. Wt. 7 lbs.
MODEL FM -3A
52595
Incl. Excise Tax (with cab.)
$2.60 dwn., 52.18 mo.
HEATHKIT BROADBAND AM TUNER KIT This fine AM
Tuner was designed especially for use in high fidelity
applications. and features broad bandwidth, high sensitivity and good selectivity. Employs special detector circuit
using crystal diodes for minimum signal distortion. even
at high levels. Covers 550 to 1600 Lc. RF and IF coils are
prealigned. Power supply is built in. Housed in attractive
satin -gold enamel cabinet. Shpg. Wt. 8 lbs.
MODEL BC -1
$2595
Incl. Excise Tax (with cob.)
$2.60 dwn., $2.18 mo.
HEATHKIT HIGH FIDELITY PREAMPLIFIER KIT This preamplifier meets or eseceds specitirwons for even
the most rigorous high fidelity applications. It provides
a total of 5 inputs. each with individual level controls.
Hum and noise are extremely low. t,ith special balance
control for absolute minimum hum level. Tone controls
provide 18 db boost and 12 db cut at 50 cps. and 15 db
boost and 20 dh cut at 15.000 cps. Four-position turnover and four- position rolloff controls for "LP ". "RIAA ",
"AES ", and "early 78" equalization. Derives power from
main amplifier. requiring only 6.3 VAC at IA and 300
VDC at IOMA. Beautiful satin -gold enamel finish. Shpg.
Wt. 7 lbs.
$1975
MODEL WA -P2 (with cab.)
$1.98 dwn., $1.66 mo.
O
HEATHKIT ADVANCED -DESIGN HI -FI AMPLIFIER KIT
This fine 25-watt high fidelity amplifier employs KT66
output tubes by Gcnalex and a Peerless output trasformer for top performance. Frequency response db from
5 to 160.000 cps at
watt. Harmonic distortion less than
1% at 25 watts, an IM distortion less than 1% at 20 watts.
Hum and noise arc 99 db below 25 watts. Output impedance is 4. 8 or 16 ohms. Extremely stable circuit stilb
"extra" features.
I
1
MODEL W -5, Consists of W -5M
plus WA -P2 Preamplifier
Shpg. Wt. 38 lbs.
Express only
dwn.
$79. J 0 $7.95
$6.68 mo.
C
MODEL W -5M
55975
Shpg. WI.
55.98 dwn.
$5.02 mo.
31 lbs.
Express only
HEATHKIT DUAL -CHASSIS
'(I -watt
HI -FI
AMPLIFIER KIT 'Phis
Williamson -type amplifier cmplo( s the
fa non, Acrosound model TO -300 output transformer. and
uses 5881 tubes. Frequency response is
dh from 6 cps
to 15(1 kc at
watt. Ilarmonie distortion less than 1S'í at
21 watts. and IM distortion less than 1.3% at 20 watts.
Output impedance is 4. 8 or 16 ohms. Hum and noise are
I
I
88 db below 20 watts.
MODEL W -3: Consists of W -3M
plus WA -P2 Preamplifier
Shpg. Wt. 37 lbs.
Express only
X69. JC 0
MODEL W -3M
549
7554.98
dwn.
$4.18 mo.
Shpg. Wt. 29 lbs.
Express only
$6.95 dwn.
$5.84 mo.
O
HEATHKIT SINGLE-CHASSIS HI -FI AMPLIFIER KIT This
20 -watt Williamson -type amplifier combines high performance with economy. Employs Chicago- Standard output transformer and 5881 tubes. Frequency response
I
db from 10 cps to 100 Lc at I watt. Harmonic distortion
less than I5Ç and IM distortion less than 2.7(i at full
output'. Output 4. 8 or 16 ohms. Hum and noise -95 db
below 20 watts.
MODEL W -4AM
MODEL W -4A: Consists of W -4AM
75 $3.98 dwn.
$39
plus WA -P2 Preamplifier
Shpg. Wt. 35 lbs.
Express only
$59.50
J J
$3.34 mo.
Shpg. Wt. 28 lbs.
Express only
55.95 dwn.
$5.00 mo.
HEATHKIT 20 -WATT HIGH FIDELITY AMPLIFIER KIT
Features full 20 watt output using push -pull 6L6
tubes. Built -in preamplifier provides four separate inputs.
Separate bass and treble controls. Output transformer
tapped at 4. 8. 16 and 500 ohms. Designed for home use.
but also fine for public address work. Response is
db
from 20 to 2(1.000 cps. Ilarmonic distortion less than 1';
at 3 db below rated output. Shpg. Wt. 23 lbs.
O
1
$3550
MODEL A -9B
$3.55 dwn., $2.98 mo.
O
HEATHKIT ELECTRONIC CROSS -OVER KIT This device
separates high and low frequencies electronically, so
they may be fed through two separate amplifiers driving
separate speakers. Eliminates the need for conventional
cross -over. Selectable cross -over frequencies are 100,2_00.
400. 700, 1200. 20111) and 3500 cps. Separate level controls
for high and low frequency channels. Attenuation 12 db
per octave. Shpg. Wt. 6 lbs.
$$11.90 dmwno..,
51895
MODEL XO -1
O
.59
HEATHKIT 7 -WATT ECONOMY AMPLIFIER KIT Qualities
for high fidelity even though more limited in power
-
V
than other Heathkit models. Frequency response is
dh from 20 to 20.0(10 cps. l'ush -pull output and separate
bass and treble tone controls. Good high fidelity at minimum cost. Uses special tapped -screen output transformer.
MODEL A -7E: Some as A -7D except one
more tube added for extra preamplification. Two inputs, RIAA compensation
and extra gain.
Shpg. Wt. 10 lbs.
Incl. Excise Tax
el
`P 9.95
I
MODEL A -7D
5179 5
$151.80
awn.
.51
mo.
Incl. Excise Tax
Shpg. Wt. 10 lbs.
$2.00 dwn.
$1.68 mo.
HOW TO ORDER
Just identify kit by model number
and send order to address below.
Write for further details if you wish
to budget your purchase on the
HEATH "IINIF PAYMENT PLAN.
THEATH COMPANY
A
Subs ;Arary of Dayst'rorn. Inc.
BENTON HARBOR
8, MICHIGAN
Please send Free HEATHKIT catalog.
Name
Address_
L
City
JULY 1957
& Zone
B-300 or B-302A
one of these for monaural
-
Each, in its class, is unrivalled
for realism and listening ease
B-400
or paired for stereo
for wide -angle stereo
T.
B -304
ceÌot a Rite ylli sre gifilem
SALES COMPANY
BOZAK
DARIEN, CONNECTICUT
EXPORTS: ELECTRONICS MANUFACTURERS'
74
...
.. .
Nee S'utesl
THE R.
.. .
EXPORT COMPANY
PLAINVIEW
NEW YORK
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Jgoolks rn Reví'ew
ALTHOUGH the very first lecture
on music appreciation probably
followed by not more than a few
minutes the first performance of the
first composition, it's more than likely
that the primeval songsmith's tribal
audience found the verbal explanation
as incomprehensible as the music itself. At any rate, we know that the
musicians of innumerable later epochs
preferred to shroud their art in impenetrable veils of mystery. Eventually, however, musicologists as well
as composers began to recognize
the paying -market potentialities of a
general interested but uninformed
public and hopefully ventured on the
publication of tutorial Lectures on
Music with Particular Regard to Amateurs (Nägeli, 1824), Music Brought
Within Everybody's Reach (Fétis,
1830), and the like. Toward the
end of the nineteenth century, the
term "music appreciation" came into
common use, and the rush to stimulate,
instruct, and guide novice listeners became a stampede. And now, there's
been a sudden renewal of activity in
the release of appreciation books,
which makes a couple of the safest
recommendations again or more easily
available, as well as bringing us an
exceptionally large-scaled and trustworthy new work.
Learning to Listen
I'm particularly happy to greet the
revised, second, edition of Aaron Cop land's What to Listen For in Music
( McGraw -Hill, $3.95 ),
which ever
since its appearance in 1939 has been
my first and easiest choice of a single
"best" appreciation book. If you already own either the original edition
or the Mentor paperback reprint of
1953 (now withdrawn), you'll hardly
need the new version, since it's basically unchanged, adding only a couple
of short supplementary chapters (on
listening to contemporary and to film
music) and bringing up -co -date the
lists of "recommended listening"
( without specific LP citations) and
bibliography. But if you don't already know Copland's text in some
form, or have tattered its pages
JULY 1957
through constant use, the new edition
is sure to be an exciting as well as
valuable investment.
The opening "Preliminaries," "How
We Listen," and "The Creative Process
in Music," together with the concluding "From Composer to Interpreter to
Listener," again impress me on rereading them as close to the best and truest
talk I've ever read or heard on the
subject. And if the more conventional
sections of "The Four Elements," "Musical Texture and Structure," and
"Fundamental Forms" hardly live up
to the electrifying promise of the
terminal chapters (or the author's
claim that a composer is necessarily
better equipped to explain his craft
than any noncreative teacher), the information he provides is refreshingly
concise, reliable, and free from both
the banalities and hocus -pocus of too
many elementary approaches. Best of
all, the whole treatment is gratifyingly
adult and practical, as well as perceptive. Copland simplifies, of course, and
shrewdly dodges the quicksands of
needless technicalities, but everything
he says is said with point and without
any attempt to "butter-up" the reader
who is treated throughout not as
a half- witted child but as a reasonably
intelligent being capable of mastering
lucidly presented fundamentals.
Another equally legitimate and effective approach is to write directly for
a normally perspicacious child. And
if this is done without condescension,
there is no reason whatever why any
novice listener of mature years (who,
despite his age, is no less innocent than
a child in the specific area of musicianship) cannot profit immensely by such
a primer. I'm now delighted anew to
find that Lionel Salter's fine Going to
a Concert (originally Dobson, London, 1950
reprinted as a paperback
by Penguin "Puffin Story Book" No.
85, 65¢) still impresses me as favorably as it did on my first encounter.
There is almost nothing here that
smacks of the selfconsciousness or
mawkishness of the usual children's
book, while there is a concentrated
wealth of clearly presented and extremely useful information on what
goes on both behind the scenes and
-
-
-
on -stage at any musical performance
a well nigh ideal introduction.
The latest large -scale work, David
D. Boyden's An Introduction to
Music (Knopf, $7.50), in thoroughness of detail in what it covers, as
well as in sheer bulk (some Soo pages,
32 excellently chosen and reproduced
photographic illustrations, and some
165 musical examples or line drawings), is outstanding indeed. It is,
naturally, a quite different kind of
appreciation book from the more provocative ones by Copland and Salter,
being frankly a college -level textbook, primarily designed for use in
a classroom course devoting at least
one semester to "The Fundamentals"
and one or two more to a historical survey of "The Development
and Repertory of Music." As such, its
most effective utilization is under a
teacher's supervision. The home student who masters Boyden's course by
himself will be substantially rewarded,
but it's going to cost him heavily in
patience and perseverance.
GRACE NOTE
Hinrichsen Music Book No. 9.
If your taste for these fascinating grab bags of diverting essays and illustrations has not been stimulated by earlier
editions, it certainly will be now with
the ninth issue, devoted entirely to
John Gay, the ballad opera in general,
and the Beggar's Opera in particular.
Besides the leading essay by Geoffrey
Handley -Taylor and Frank Granville,
the editor's Preamble, a verse prologue
by Sir A. P. Herbert, an "appreciation"
by John Drinkwater, and a 6 -page
bibliography, there are some 130 annotated reproductions of old playbills
and musical manuscripts, Hogarth's
pictures, the complete set of "Beggar's
Opera" playing cards, etc. An ideal
gift for anyone who relishes the
Pepusch -Gay work itself, on or off
records, and who has wondered about
its sources and fabulous history, this
Ninth Music Book cannot fail to be
of absorbing interest to every reader
captivated by the odd byways of the
musical past (Hinrichsen, $5.00).
R.D.D.
75
All new ultra- compact amplifier
SONOTONE HFA -150
15 -WATT
POWER AT A
No amplifier on the market today can compare with
the all -new Sonotone HFA -150. Full 15 -watt power
-superb sound -plus more new, useful "firsts" than
any other amplifier at any price.
ONLY 3" HIGH -12" WIDE! For the first time, a
complete power and control amplifier this compact
...without an iota of performance being sacrificed to
compactness. The ultra -smart cabinet cover is available in a choice of colors- another Sonotone first!
SIX INPUTS! Now, for the first time, you can buy a
quality amplifier in this price range that gives you
single switch choice of 6 inputs. Three of these in-
10 -WATT
PRICE!
puts have individual pre-set level controls!
SEPARATE CONTOUR CONTROL! For the first time
you get new, exclusive push -pull rumble and noise
filters. Bass, treble and volume controls with a separate continuous contour control, infinitely variable
from flat to 26 db of contour compensation.
The Sonotone HFA -150 is, unquestionably, the
greatest value in fine high fidelity components in
many years. Make seeing and hearing it a "must "!
$79 s0 NET
ONLY
Optional cover
$3.50 Net
Write for detailed information without obligation to:
Electronic Applications Division
SONOTON E CORPORATION
ELMSFORD, N. Y.
76
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Equipment reports appearing in this sectiorn are prepared by members of HIGH FIDELITY'S staff. on the basis of actual use in
conjunction with a home music system, and the resulting evaluations of equipment are expressed as the opinions of the reviewer
only. Reports are usually restricted to items of general interest, and no attempt is made to report on items that are obviously
not designed for high-fidelity applications. Each report is sent to the manufacturer before publication; he is free to correct
the specifications paragraph, to add a comment at the end of the report, or to request that it be deferred (pending changes
in his product), or not be published. He may not, however, change the report. Failure of a new product to appear in TITH may mean
either that it has not been submitted for review, or that it was submitted and was found to be unsatisfactory. These reports may
not be quoted or reproduced, in part or in whole, for any purpose whatsoever, without written permission from the publisher.
r
tI(lux K'l' "Done Arm
hit
SPECIFICATIONS
furnished by manufacturer): an assembly kit for
the Audax PRO-12 or PRO -16 pickup arms. Dimensions: 16 -in. arm;
15 in. long by 2 high, over-all.
12 3/16 in. from base to stylus.
Offset angle: 20 °. Adjustable stylus force counterweight. Removable
plug -in universal cartridge shell. Arm height adjustable from
3/4
to 2 1/2 in. Prices: KT-12
$14.55; KT -16
$17.55. MANUFACTURER:
The Audak Company, 500 5th Ave., New York 36, N. Y.
(
-
-
1
Audak is, as far as I know, the first company to offer a
pickup arm in kit form, but the difference in price between
the Audak KT series arms and their ready -assembled Model
PRO counterparts suggests that this might become a very
popular form of pickup merchandising. The cost saving on
these kits amounts to almost 50 ,';-" of the ready -built items,
and the kits are so easy to assemble that no one with average
manual dexterity need hesitate to tackle the project. Timed
by stopwatch, I took precisely 11 minutes and 28 seconds to
assemble and install our sample 16 -inch arm.
The universal cartridge shell is, as a matter of fact, one
of the major differences between the PRO series arms and
Audak's original transcription arm (TITHed in Feb. 1955).
The original arm was designed specifically for Audax cartridges, and would accept no other. The new arms will
take either the Audax cartridges or, by means of the detachable
cartridge shell, practically any other cartridge having the
standard 1/2-inch mounting centers. The new arms also
have a knurled thumbscrew -adjustable counterweight, providing correct stylus force for any cartridge used.
Once the KT arm is assembled, installation is as simple
as that for any other arm, but the means provided for accurately setting it up are unusually clever. Included with
the kit is a small cardboard tube that fits snugly over the
turntable spindle (with a record on the turntable). The tube
projects an inch or so into the air, and represents the height
of the arm base pinnacle when the arm's height is correctly
adjusted. Arm height is set by laying a straightedge across
The assembled Audax PRO -16 pickup arm kit.
between the tube and the top of the arm base, and then
shimming up the base with cardboard spacers (also supplied)
until the straightedge lies parallel to the turntable. Next,
the distance between the arm base and the turntable spindle
is set according to the instructions (to provide correct
tracking), and finally the arm is fastened to the motor board
with the shielded cable either passing through the board or
out through a slot at the side of the base.
The bearings on this arm are extremely free -moving, although it is a rather tricky matter to adjust the vertical pin
hearings for the best compromise between low friction and
minimal play. (The hearings are large enough to be adjusted
by fingertip manipulation, although screwdriver slots are also
provided.) Frequency response tests with a calibrated pickup cartridge indicated a high degree of freedom from both
torsional and sectional arm resonances, and the fundamental
resonance ( present to some degree in all arm and cartridge
combinations) was quite low both in amplitude and in frequency. The arm's mass is high, so this peak is kept below
a safe 20 cycles with highly compliant cartridges.
Apparently because of a typographical error, the stylus
overhang distance specified in Audak's instructions was not
quite correct for minimum inner -groove tracking error.
All in all, an excellent buy in a rugged, highly versatile
arm. Plaudits to Maximilian Weil for being first to offer
a pickup arm in kit form.
J.G.H.
-
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: All current instruction sheets for the
KT Series arms now
list the arm -base -to- turntable-center distance
which gives the correct stylus overhang for optimum tracking.
Heath FM -3A FM Tuner Kit
(furnished by manufacturer): an FM -only self powered tuner kit. Controls: tuning knob; combined AC on -off and
volume control. Outputs: one fixed -level, 0.12 volts @ 47,000 ohms;
one variable -level, up to 1.5 volts @ 15,000 ohms. (Both output levels
for 30% modulation, 100 uy input). Distortion: 1.7% @ full modulation, for 100,000 uy input; less for lower modulation or lower input
voltage. Sensitivity: 20 db quieting for 10 uy input (unaligned) or
8 uy (aligned). Tubes: 6X4, 6BQ7A, 6U8, 2 -6CB6, 6ZL5, 6C4. Dimensions: 12 9/16 in. long by 33'e high by 57/e deep, over-all. Price:
$25.95. MANUFACTURER: The Heath Company, Benton Harbor, Mich.
SPECIFICATIONS
Radio - frequency circuits are in many ways unlike those for
audio frequencies, and physical construction techniques are
generally far more critical. Misplacement of a hookup wire
or a circuit component by a fraction of an inch may, in
some parts of an FM tuner circuit, cause a significant reduction
in sensitivtiy, a tendency to produce spurious responses, or
even undesired oscillations. Working the "bugs" out of a
new tuner design to make it suitable for assembly -line production is a major task; how much more difficult to do it
for a tuner kit that will be assembled by thousands of individual buyers! Yet, in the latest FM tuner kit by Heath
the model FM -3A
this has apparently been accomplished.
The objective has been achieved, at least in part, by conservative design. No attempt has been made to obtain the
ultimate in sensitivity, for example; and a reasonably sure
10- microvolt figure is certainly preferable to one that may
vary between 5 and 50 /Iv, depending on fortune. The
circuit has been kept simple, employing only 7 tubes in all,
thus reducing the number of things that can go wrong. A
lot of headwork in the design department, followed by many
-
-
JULY 1957
77
Clipping
www.americanradiohistory.com
instrumental sound, but was very effective on large -scale,
distant recordings. This is as it should be, since large -hall
acoustics contribute nothing to inherently intimate sounds.
On choral and large orchestral works the effect of the
Xophonic can be thrilling. The more echo there is in a
recording, the more is added by the Xophonic; it takes its
cue, so to speak, from the record -maker's intention. The
effect is not the same as that obtained from true stereo, but it
is something you couldn't get from single- speaker reproduction.
The sound from the Xophonic is clean enough to preclude
much chance of its degrading that of your own speaker system, but the delay that it adds to the sound can blur
details in complex transient sounds. This is another reason
why it should be operated at low volume, and should be
used only with recordings which call for massive effect.
Xophonic won't take the place of true stereophonic sound.
but for those who want to get an illusion of increased realism
from some monaural sources but can't afford stereo, this
should be given a careful hearing.- J.G.H.
COMMENT: We feel that your evaluation of the
Xophonic is excellent. However, we do believe the last paragraph
is based on a false assumption: that the Xophonic is intended to
take the place of stereo reproduction. Actually, Xophonic is not a
substitute for stereo; it is rather a method of re- creating the reverberation of a concert hall, while stereo reproduces the sense of
spaciousness and directionality. Indeed, stereo and Xophonic have
been used together to produce a truly fabulous sound! However,
the audiophile should keep in mind that, whereas stereo requires
special source material (multiple-channel tape or discs), the reverberation effect of Xophonic can be added to any monaural or multichannel source.
We are currently starting production of a new model of the
Xophonic which is capable of increased bass range. It is primarily
the bass and lower-middle ranges that are involved in reverberation
phenomena.
MANUFACTURER'S
Fisher CA -40 Control Amplifier
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer): a complete control
unit and power amplifier combined on a single compact chassis.
db, 17 to 30,000 cps
Rated power: 25 watts. Power response: -_+=
@ 25 watts. Frequency response: ± 0.5 db, 10 to 90,000 cps.
Sensitivity: 0.3 volts into high -level inputs, .005 volt on low-level
inputs, for 25 watts out. Distortion: harmonic less than 1.0% @
25 watts, 0.5% @ 20 watts; IM less than 1.0% @ 15 watts, less
than 0.2% @ 5 watts. Hum and noise: with volume control full off,
better than 90 db below full output; on phono input, better than
60 db below 10 my input. Inputs: total of six, for Mag Phono, Tape,
Mic, Tuner, Aux 1, and Aux 2. Controls: bass ( ±15 db, 50 cps);
treble ( ±15 db, 10,000 cps); AC power; LF filter (Flat, 40 cps, 90
cps); HF filter (Flat, 8 kc, 4 kc); volume; loudness compensator
(0 to +18 db @ 50 cps and +5 @ 10 kc); input level -sets for
Phono, Tuner, and Aux 1. Outputs: 4, 8, 16 ohms to speaker; cathode
6BW4.
12AX7, 12AU7A, 4
follower to Tape recorder. Tubes: 3
One switched AC convenience outlet. Dimensions: 123/4 in. wide
by 10 3/8 deep by 5 high. Price: $139.50. MANUFACTURER: Fisher
Radio Corp., 21 -21 44th Dr., Long Island City 1, N. Y.
1
-
The LOUDNESS CONTOUR control is a four-position switch
that varies the amount of compensation introduced at various
VOLUME control settings. In its OFF position, the LOUDNESS
control introduces no compensation at any volume setting.
As the LOUDNESS control is advanced, it still has no effect
at the full -volume settings, but it introduces progressive
amounts of compensation ( both bass and treble) at reduced
volume levels. Thus, with the VOLUME. and input level -set
controls properly adjusted, the LOUDNESS control allows the
amount of compensation to be varied for an optimum match
to any high- or low- efficiency speaker system.
The TAPE input connection to the CA -40 is intended for
direct connection to the playback head on a tape deck, and
the preamp then supplies the correct equalization for NARTB
recorded tapes. A tape recorder with its own playback preamp
would feed into one of the AUXILIARY inputs on the CA -40.
Other unusual (although not unique) features of the
CA -40 include DC- powered tube heaters (eliminating the
necessity for selecting hum -free input tubes), shockmounting
of the early stages, and inverse feedback circuits around every
stage in the entire amplifier circuit. Probably as a direct
result of the latter, the CA- í0's distortion at normal operating
levels was found to be extremely low; I measured 0.0S%
intermodulation at 1 watt output. Other bench tests indicated
very good low- and high - frequency power response, a high
degree of bass stability, and an observable tendency toward
damped high -frequency oscillation on square waves.
The CA -40's sound was quite clean at all levels approaching its rated output, with a sumptuous, well-controlled low
-
The first thing you notice about the CA -40 is its intriguing tone control "visualizer," which gives graphic indications of tone control settings. The large dial across the
front of the CA -40 is backed by a decibel /frequency scale
(as is used for plotting frequency response curves). Superimposed on this is a long, flexible spring -steel strip ( painted
white), fastened to the panel at its midpoint ( 1,000 cycles),
and with its ends attached to the tone controls. Thus, as the
bass control is turned clockwise, the left -hand end of the
indicator lifts upward, producing a semblance of the response
curve with its bass range boosted. Since the db scale on the
indicator panel is not calibrated numerically, I was a little
surprised to find quite a close correspondence between the
measured response and that indicated on the panel.
At least for the 50- and 10,000 -cycle points chosen for
measurement, the horizontal lines on the panel are in almost
exact 10 -db increments. So if you want 5 db of boost at
50 cycles, you don't have to whip out the db meter and audio
oscillator and set the control for a measured 5 db boost;
8o
you just set it until, at the 50 -cycle point, the indicator lies
midway between the Flat position (the center line on the
scale) and the next highest line. The same relationship also
seems to hold for the high -frequency range. At 10,000 cycles,
each horizontal line on the panel represents about 10 db of
boost or cut. Really an ingenious innovation, and one that
will prove highly attractive to those users who feel "at
home" with response curves and such. The tone control
system, by the way, is a variation of the popular Baxendall
circuit, which varies the inflection point rather than the
over -all balance of the sound.
Two three -position lever switches on the front panel serve
as bass and treble range filters, for suppression of turntable
rumble or record surface noise. When either switch is set
to one of its Cutoff positions, an illuminated indicator,
marked FILTER, lights up on the front control panel. A
third indicator, at the bottom of the panel, shows the setting
of the INPUT SELECTOR switch.
The CA -4o's panel shows its frequency response.
end and a somewhat crisp-sounding high end. The high -frequency filter, which is very effective in minimizing roughness
in recorded sound, introduces a slight peak at the cut -off
point when set to its 8 kc or 4 kr positions.
The CA -40 is better suited for use with a speaker not
overly efficient at the high end, and it will no doubt appeal
very strongly to people who wish to see, as well as to hear,
J.G.H.
what their tone controls are doing.
-
HIGH FIDEI-ITY MAGAZINE
Over Hill and Dale with a Converted GE
COLLECTOR of vintage
THE
may be fully aware that the
discs and recorded rarities
tape recorder revolutionized
commercial recording techniques and paved the way toward
higher and higher fidelity, but to him the tape recorder's
most precious virtue is that it enables him to obtain recordings
that are literally impossible to buy, provided these can be
borrowed for an evening of copying.
A modern phonograph is designed to play lateral recordings- ones on which the sound is recorded as side -to -side
motions of the groove-and it won't play any other type
of recording without damage to both the pickup and the
record. However, all cylinder records and some very early
discs were modulated by varying the depth of their groove,
cutting a series of hills and dales into a groove that is
otherwise essentially straight. Since there are no lateral
motions, a modern pickup cannot play them properly, let
alone play them safely.
Vertical magnetic pickups are available, but they are
strictly studio equipment, and are quite costly. It is, however,
possible to convert a GE variable reluctance pickup into a
hill -and -dale pickup, and for a minimal expenditure of time
and money.
In a single -stylus GE cartridge, the stylus tip is mounted
at the end of a flexible steel cantilever, whose opposite end
is soldered to a base pin that is inserted into the cartridge
body. At either side of the stylus are a pair of metal pole
pieces, and it is the movement of the cantilever back and
forth between these pole pieces that generates the pickup's
output. If the stylus moves up and down in a groove,
its position between the pole pieces does not vary, so no
signal is produced. However, if we turn the cartridge on its
side, vertical stylus motion relative to the record surface will
vary the stylus' position relative to the pole pieces. Obviously,
however, with the pickup lying on its side, its stylus will not
contact a record surface, so we must add an extension to the
stylus assembly, to reach from the cantilever to the groove.
The extension can be made from an ordinary .003 replacement stylus for the GE pickup.
One starts by unsoldering the replacement stylus' cantilever
from its base pin, and then flicking off any excess solder
from the cantilever while it is still heated. The cantilever will
he found to have two right -angle twists along its length, and
SOLDERED
JOIN
Figure r. In the converted
pickup, the cantilever assembly from a replacement
stylus is used as a right angle extension of the main
stylus bar.
EXTENTION
CANTILEVER
VERTICAL
STYLUS
the one nearest the stylus must be removed. Straighten it
with a small pair of needle-nose pliers, and then, being
extremely careful not to damage the stylus, bend the cantilever
close to its tip until the stylus is pointing away from and in
line with its cantilever, as shown in figure 1.
Now use a sharp lead pencil to make a mark across the
main cantilever (in the pickup cartridge) at a point directly
opposite the rear edges of the cartridge pole pieces. The
extension cantilever must be attached somewhere behind this
pencilled line if it is to avoid interference with the pole pieces.
Remove the main stylus assembly from the pickup, turn
it upside down, and clamp its base pin gently but firmly in
a vise. (Alternatively, it can be affixed to a block of wood
by pressing its base pin into a small hole drilled in the wood.)
JULY 1957
by JOHN
L.
HOKE
Gently scrape clean about 1/16 inch of the cantilever's length,
behind the pencilled mark, and then tin it, using a very hot
soldering iron and as short a heating period as possible.
Now orient the assembly so that the stylus end is to your
left, and lay the extension cantilever across it, as diagrammed,
with the extension pointing toward you and the stylus tab
aimed to your left. Touch the soldering iron quickly to the
junction point and sweat the two cantilevers together.
Because of the length of the extension, it will generate
considerable needle talk and severe high- frequency resonances
unless measures are taken to damp it. A few small triangular
ve
-
T
VIeC
vz'
,
DI
3/4'
2
1/e'
711°
L
I/44.-
I
Figures 2a (left) ar d 2h. An adaptor bracket for side- n ¡ornrling the converted cartridge in a standard pickup arm.
pieces of cellulose tape attached between the cantilevers will
serve the purpose, as well as providing additional rigidity for
the whole assembly. Trim the edges of the tape closely, so
they will clear the borders of the cartridge's stylus slot.
Before replacing the assembly in the cartridge, bend the
main cantilever far enough to one side so that it will rest
lightly against the lower pole piece when installed in the
tilted cartridge. This bias is to compensate for the flexing
that will take place when the force of the counterbalanced arm
acts against the record surface.
That completes the conversion.
If the user has on hand a pickup arm which uses a knurled
compression screw to lock the cartridge in place, installation
of the converted unit is a simple matter. A short length of
wire will have to be attached to one of the cartridge contact
pins, to tie across to the arm contact that no longer touches it.
To install the converted cartridge in a conventional pickup
arm, the bracket shown in figures 2a and 2h will have to he
fabricated from a sheet of aluminum. The two small holes,
which should be drilled before the aluminum is folded into
shape, are to pass the pickup mounting screws which will
hold the bracket in place. When the bracket is affixed to
the pickup arm, attach the signal leads to the cartridge and
lay it into the corner directly under the narrow ledge, A, in
figure 2b. Then take a soft pencil eraser, cut from it a block
measuring 1 by ;/ by Vs inches, and slide this between the
cartridge and the angle formed between the bracket top and
its downward -hanging flange, B. The bent rubber strip should
be seated so as to fold over the edge of the cartridge, as shown
in figure 2b.
Now set the pickup on a record, view it from in front,
and gently bend the extension cantilever until the stylus is
vertical to the record surface. Then adjust the arm counterweight until the main cantilever ( in the cartridge) lies
mid -way between the pole pieces. This will provide sufficient tracking force to ride most hill -and -dale recordings, but
if greater downward force is required at any time, a thin
strip of fine sponge rubber inserted between the main
cantilever and the upper pole piece will allow the force to be
considerably increased without driving the cantilever off center.
íi I
Why you need every feature of these
UNIVERSITY
FOLDED -HORN ENCLOSURE
KwiKits
...in performance,
mechanical design, construction and
ease of assembly, these new KwiKits
are unquestionably the very finest
enclosure kits -at any price!
Because
for 12 " speakers and systems
... for 12" or S" speakers and systems
KEN -12...
KEN-15
1
ROOM- BALANCED PERFORMANCE
PRECISION MECHANICAL DESIGN
HEAVIER CONSTRUCTION
I:xterior and
interior
elements. even the
cleats. fit snugly within close tolerance "rab-
I
KwiKit acoustic design and tilted
baffle combine direct speaker radiation and rompen
sated rear horn loading in a was that blends
.
bass, middle and Irride ranges perfectly
for uniform rest se throughout the listening
areas of a room.
PLACE ANYWHERE IN ROOM
beted" grooves. Cluing
and screwing of earl,
piece results in reliably airtight. permanent
joints. No nails used.
No pencil mark inns
necessary. Mitering and
plenty of glue blocks
Heavy Y," first grade, fully cured lumber for top. bottom. sides and back .
used in
w
I commonly
not flimsy
"kits." Bigger. sturdier as touch as
3(1% loonier titan others in the sane
price class. Eliminates spurious remittances so detrimental to grit ieving
!:'
-
bracing for truly
rigid construction.
.cod
4
richer, cleaner bas- reproduction.
PROFESSIONAL RESULTS
FOOLPROOF ASSEMBLY
GENUINE KORINA VENEER
Underside clew shows how
advanced design. self-contained folded horn extends
to the front of the cabinet,
projecting low frequencies
"ut into the room ... not
back
into
a
corner.
splashed against the walls.
Small slot in base is resis-
tively controlled vent
which equalizes woofer diaphragm excursions in coco.
pression chamber. KwiKits
are therefore independent of r'an furnishings.
shape or placement and can be used against a
even up in the air!
flat wall, in a corner
...
KEN-12
151hDx211/,Wx291/2H
KEN -15
1B1 /aDx29Wx351 /aN
$44.75 User Net
59.50 User Net
Adopter lormtg.l2 "spkrs.in KEN.15$1.5G User Net
82
.for
a
luxurious finish in any
desired color.
DECORATIVE FRONT MOLDINGS
do ignc.l to ..mydntent and
All
enhance any decor.
pieces are pre -eut and pre -drilled...
engineered to go together quickly. All
you need is a screwdriver! Baffle board
blank plugs and adapters
is pre-cut
supplied for easy installation ,d additional components as jour system expands.
Your Kwikit includes all required hardware.
Idanlie wood, glue. ,onlpaper. Tutor x ins
...
!Minn. easyno.fol low rsts tier ions ond....p.
vial allention is gisen In packaging of Kwikit,
to ineu.e .afe. inlac, d, li. e. y to v .r door.
LISTEN
atioaceir.
TEXTURED GRILLE FABRIC
vtui- itc ond .t; ti- tically correct to present high frequency
attenuation.
For any wide- range, coaxial, diffaxial or
multi- speaker system ... if it's a kit that
you want, it's KwiKit you need!
ts
661
UNIVERSITY LOUDSPEAKERS, INC., 80 SOUTH KENSICO AVENUE, WHITE PLAINS,
N.
Y.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
KwiKits ... the perfect
complement for P.S.E.,
University's Progressive Speaker Expansion.
There are reasons
SANITY FAIR
Continued from page 35
modified
version of
Wonder" of
a
"Walker's Little
I thought it
L-.7
F
of the finest, most knowing approaches
to the problems of speaker design that
ever have heard; it has a completely
1
MODEL KEN -12
takes any 12" wide -range or woofer cone
speaker and any tweeter or mid -range speakers
A
Idole rut
B Ill.nok
out for HF -21)6.
plug sop.
plied when tweeter isn't 1,4 C \dopier supplied rut out for I \'I' -3.
IiLud. plug supplied.
Adapter supplied rut out for I IIy).
Adapter
supplied gut «n1 for new 11 -61N0 I
.
G -Takes
D
E
312.
ux(
:
Itilfu.inme.I2. \1: -122 l)i0axinI .
,o1. range speuL.- t-.end G12\\ woofer.
-13
6200.6201
F
I
MODEL KEN -15
takes any 15" wide -range or woofer cone
speaker and any tweeter or mid -range speakers
A Idol.- gut out
B
for 11F -216.
blank plug supplied when twerler isn't used.
.\d.ipter sup.
plied rut out for II XT-5. D
plug supplied.
Adapter supplied rut out for GRW or Ihffusione -R.
Adapt.r supplied rut out for I IIN/.
Adapter supplied rut out for new 11.601 horn.
Takes 313, 6303. l)iflusironr -13 Uilfaxiuls, and
E
InkC
F
G
H
C -15W, C.63W,
A
homogeneous, smooth characteristic that
begins to simulate the classically English
concept of a speaker's function voiced
so many years ago by the great P.G.A.H.
Voigt
the "window in the wall,"
through which one hears a pleasant reproduction of music. In a small room,
about eight by twelve feet, it put out
a reasonable volume, with very good
-
definition (there was only a slight
trace of the usual speaker resonance),
and with a complete and refreshing
openness, particularly noticeable on
voice recordings and on a tape of the
Saint -Sai ns Cello Concerto.
I understand that it still presents unsolved problems with respect to output
level, frequency range, and manufacture,
but I believe the speaker, if and when
it is made available here, can he enthusiastically recommended to listeners
who want moderate volumes with the
minimum of the conventional speaker
distortions. The projected price in England implies that it would sell for somewhere between S300 and S-100 here.
None of the British electrostatic makers
seemed interested in disclosing target
dates for commercial production, and
won't speculate
your guess is as good
bass
as
-
mine.
WHY THE
year ago.
was rather more impressive than a year
ago, though one of the officials told me
the only difference was a slightly smaller
room! As was so last year, the Quad
exhibit was by far the fair's most popular, and gaining entry to a demonstration
was always difficult. I personally consider the Walker electrostatic to be one
,,B
.
DYNAKIT
50 Watt Hi -Fi Amplifier Kit
SOUNDS BEST
1.
New High Stability Circuit
Superior transient response with greater clarity
and definition. Designed for all speaker loads
including electrostatic
2. Pre -Assembled Printed
Circuit Board
Assures fool proof assembly in less than
hours and guarantees faithful reproduction
3
of
performance specifications.
3. Superior Components Featuring
the A -430 Dynaco Transformer
And of course the following minimum specifications thot can be exceeded by any home
constructor
Power Output: 50 watts continuous rating,
10(1 watts peak. Distortion: under 1% at 50
watts, less than
harmonic distortion at
any frequency 20 cps to 20 kc within 1 db
of maximum. Response: Plus or minus .5 db
6 cps to 60 kc. Plus or minus .1 db 20 cps
to 20 kc. Square Wave Response: Essentially
undistorted 20 cps to 20 kc. Sensitivity: 1.5
volts in for 50 watts out. Damping Factor:
15. Output Impedances: R and 16 ohms.
Tubes: 6CA7 /EL -34 ( 2) (655(í's can also
be used
6ANR, 5114G6. Size: 9" a 9" z
63/4" high.
I
1
Of course, the electrodynamic designers in England have not given up,
and I suppose that these will he with
us for a good many more years. Among
the names familiar to knowledgeable
11
audiophiles:
Irbarfedaie
showed Mr. Briggs's latest
free- standing three -way
system. It is a smooth unit, avoiding
cabinet resonances (a subject on which
the British are a great deal more uncompromising than we).
Tannoy showed their excellent line of
dual concentric speakers, unchanged and
sounding fine in heavily built and insulated cabinets.
innovation,
C
MODEL KEN -15
takes any 12" wide-range or woofer cone speaker
when 12" adapter hoard (optional) is used
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a
Lowther exhibited
slightly improved
TP1 reproducer, which they termed
"the outstanding electrodynamic development of our time." It might well be, for
its reproduction was among the most
convincing at the Fair. There also was
shown a PW -2 horn, a modernized vera
Coutin/red on next page
JULY 1957
DYNAKIT Mark
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In Canada: A. C. Simmonds and Sons, Ltd.
Toronto, Ontario
Please send me complete details on
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ARU Enclosure Kits.
Name
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Continued from preceding page
sion of the famous old PW -1 horn, the
very first corner horn in England, and
the unit with which Mr. Voigt started
the whole cult of high fidelity there.
Then, too, they showed a new driver,
the PM6, mounted in an "Acousta" Horn
Cabinet, which is Lowther's first popular priced combination
and a very
good one.
Goodmans, in addition to the electrostatic, demonstrated other combinations,
using the Acoustic Resistance unit. The
three -way particularly impressed me.
Notable among the other speakers
demonstrated were several with names
not well known here:
The Grampian 12-inch cone speaker,
made by a company known here only
for a very fine feedback cutter, is a
-
superbly engineered single -cone speaker,
very similar in certain respects to the
well -known Wharfedale.
The Vitavox DU120 is a new 12 -inch
design with a completely in- ph-fse tweeter system using all direct radiating elements, and evidently incorporating long
and careful consideration of the qualities
of certain British and American speakers.
The over -all sound was quite smooth
and wide- range; it is hoped that this
speaker will soon he available here.
Philips created a stir of interest by exhibiting amplifiers without output transformers, and speakers with high impedance voice coils to match. At the moment, the experimental possibilities are
interesting; OTL systems are not new,
however, in America. Incidentally, they
also had a sleek- looking and fine- sounding magnetic pickup of unusual design.
The G.E.C. Periphonic Speaker system
a luxury unit, uses two of the G.E.C.
metal cone speakers and several "presence" units in a totally new arrangement.
The over -all results were impressive.
The Plessey "Ionophone,"the invention
of Mr. S. Klein (of Paris), was available
last year, and was again demonstrated.
In this one, a quartz glass tube ionizes
the air directly; coupled to a short horn,
it provides the most perfect high -frequency reproduction I have ever heard.
The problem of matching it with a suitable woofer and midrange, unfortunately,
is far from solution. I understand a
quite similar device will soon he available in this country, as the super- tweeter
to end all super-tweeters.
Tape Recorders The standard
British semiprofessional unit is the
Wright and Weaire tape deck, used on
the Ferrograph that is known in America. There are a few lower priced units,
which have little to offer us. In addition,
Simon Sound and M.S.S. make units of
clearly professional quality; the latter in
particular is used in the most exacting
professional applications.
Typical
Stereophonic Sound
-
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High Fidelity:
a practical guide
by
Charles Fowler
Here is the practical expert advice needed by everyone who
has, or expects to have, a high fidelity system. Starting with an
introduction ro sound, the author
then describes the various links
in the hi -fi chain, explaining
their features and specifications
so as to provide the most helpful
criteria for evaluating, and for
selecting and matching components. S4.95
Order your copy today!
Book Department
HIGH FIDELITY Magazine
Great Barrington, Mass.
Enclosed please find S
please send me postpaid
HIGH
GUIDE.
for which
copies of
A
PRACTICAL
FIDELITY:
No C.O.D.s or charge orders.
pleas-. Foreign orders sent at buyer's risk.
Add 55c per book for postage on foreign
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S-100:)1120 watt amplifier
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Control
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front panel
equalization
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equalization
Inputs, selectable,
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6
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Tape -monitor
switch
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Damping factor
selection
IM distortion at
20 watts
<
1.0
12dbroct
scratch
to ter
12db /oct
rumble ,
filler
Cathode follower
s
1.0 1.0
1.4
J
1.0 2.0
2.0 1.2
1.6
1.5 2.1
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recording
output
s'
Phono sensitivity
mol tor lull
output
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Unused inputs
shorted to prerent crosstalk s
6
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*With sharp turnover provid
6
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inverse feedback or l doctor.
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Data is manufacturers' published spe iRcations or
current "flat-cabinet" amplifiers (20 or more watts/.
Technical literature available on request. Write Dept. H.7
5her4vooa
ELECTRONIC LABORATORIES,
INC.
2802 West Cullom Avenue, Chicago 18,
Illinois
In New York, hear "Accent on Sound" with
Skip Weshner. WBAI -FM. week nights.9 P.M.
V=711'.
The
complete
hone
music
center
British stereo tape systems are very
much like ours; results vary from
mediocre to quite impressive. EMI produced a fair grade of sound in their
home units, which I suppose are of much
more modest quality than their professional equipment.
The Stereophonic surprise, however,
was the Connoisseur system, using specially prepared records. I should say that,
provided it can be manufactured economically and will stand up in the field,
their system could conceivably he the
answer to the problem of the high cost
of stercophony.
At the heart of the Connoisseur system is an ingenious crystal cartridge,
with two sections, joined to the stylus
by mechanical linkages in such a way
that lateral undulations of the stylus
generate voltage in one; and vertical
movements of the stylus activate the
other. The special record is then cut in
two planes, laterally (as we know modem records), and vertically (the "hill
and dale" method of the old Edisons
and electrical transcriptions). Of course,
the signal from one microphone is cut
vertically into the record; from the other,
laterally. It is claimed that cross-talk
between channels is down 25 db, which
is considered acceptable for stereophonic
recording.
This system demands a very quiet
turntable. A Standard Connoisseur was
used, along with two Wharfedale 12inch speakers mounted toward the ceiling. The spokesman pointed out that
Connoisseur was not so much after complete right and left placement of instruments, but that they were concerned with
obtaining the power and sweep of an
orchestra, sans the usual "tricks." The
vertical mounting of the speakers, he
made clear, was necessary, because for
proper blending, it was absolutely essential to avoid a definite point source.
In summation, I should say that this
approach toward stereophonic sound
summed up the entire British approach
toward high -fidelity: limited objectives,
the goal being a natural -sounding approximation of the original, with a
minimum of fuss, commotion, and misdirection; but always with a delight in
the pure quality of the equipment and
its construction. I was, frankly, much
impressed by most of their exhibition,
and feel that we here would do well to
adopt some of the sane attitudes toward
high fidelity evidenced at the London
Audio Fair of 1957.
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JULY 1957
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FACTS ON
DE FALLA
1RAI)ER'S AIARIíIa'YLACE
Continued front page 29
FAIRCHILD
PROFESSIONAL
PRODUCTS
MODEL 202 TURRET -HEAD ARM
Which is the best arm? This depends
on what use it will be put to. We think
our Model 280A is the best arm for
home music systems since its features
have been designed specifically for this
purpose. Similarly, we feel that our
Model 202 Turret -Head Transcription
Arm is the best possible arm for use in
the broadcasting
industry.
and
recording
The most unusual feature of the 202
Arm is the fact that three Fairchild
Cartridges can be mounted in its revolving head or turret. The small knob
on the front of the arm can be turned
to rotate the desired cartridge into
playing position and as this is done,
the stylus pressure is automatically
changed for standard, microgroove or
vertical. This means that a studio can
have an LP, a 78 and a vertical cartridge mounted in one arm and select
them as rapidly as needed. It eliminates the need for extra loose cartridges or multiple arms and switches
and does away with confusing turntable installations.
The 202 Arm uses a simple spring
counterbalancing system so that the
vertical stylus force remains constant
over a relatively wide range of arm
height. A highly improved version of
viscous damping is used in the lateral
plane only. Damping is made independent of temperature variations by
the use of a bi -metal fitting which adjusts the shear area to compensate exactly for viscosity changes as the temperature rises or falls. The result is
constant damping control, elimination
of sluggishness, proper tracking of
warped records and increased overall
performance.
There ore many other features of this
arm that will appeal to users of high
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that of a fine instrument and its long
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high quality, performance and depend-
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$75.00
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If you would like further details, please write
FAIRCHILD
RECORDING EQUIPMENT COMPANY
Long Leland City 1, New York
S6
he used to say his favorite painter was
Zurbarán, whose saints wear somber
habits, while through their pale faces
shines the light of the spirit. I longed to
ask the composer where had gone the
demons that possessed him when he was
writing the Ritual Fire Dance in El
amor brujo, or The Nights in the
Gardens of Spain. The Falla I now
met was not the man I had known hefore. The Granada Falla saw now, I
told myself, was no longer the city
dominated by the Moorish towers of the
Alhambra, but the sixteenth- century
spiritual community where lived St.
John of the Cross. I heard him quote in
a low voice from the poetry of that great
mystic, and began to understand the
inner peace that he had discovered in
solitude.
Nevertheless, when he began to talk
of his future work, his livid face would
light up and a glimmer of the old fire
would return to his sunken eyes. I was
told by friends in Granada that his
eccentricities and obsessions had increased in later years, and they added
that he wrote most of his music in the
silent watches of the night before dawn.
At eight o'clock every morning a cab
would come to take him to Mass at a
neighboring church. Yet in spite of his
mysticism he maintained his profound
interest in musical developments elsewhere. I was surprised to see how intently he studied the music the Norwegian composer Halvorsen had written
for the Hardanger fiddle, a violin strung
with four stopped and four sympathetic
strings. He talked to me also of Grieg,
for whose music he had genuine affection. He admired the Norwegian composer for having been able to adapt his
tone structure to themes which could
hardly he distinguished from genuine
folk music. I thought to myself that the
same might he said of much of his own
music. Just as GrieFs music evokes the
soul of Norway in its essence, so does
Falla's evoke the soul of all Spain.
I paid my last visit to
WHEN
in 1935, he was busily working at
Here's the place to huy, swap, or sell
audio equipment. Rates are only 35t
a word (no charge for name and address) and your advertisement will
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Remittance must accompany copy and
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HAVEN,
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low prices. 28
HI -FI
and finest
Write for information on unique
that offers professional advice and
Easton Ave., New Brunswick, N. J.
New Jersey's newest
HIGH FIDELITY, NUMBERS 1 THRU 48, 527.50 postpaid. E. C. Gordon, Box 76, Hq. Sqdn. Section
AMFPA, APO 323, San Francisco, Calif.
REAL BARGAINS in nome brand hi -fi equipment.
some
demonstration equipment
Some new
some used. All guaranteed as represented. Send
for list. Audio -Vision Company, 1276 Old Coast
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Highway, Santa Barbara, Calif.
UNHAPPY WITH
already
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"HI"
HI -FI PRICES?
So
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Write already to Key Electronics Co.,
120 Liberty St., New York 6, N. Y.
YOU LIKE TO COLLECT RECORDS, you should
send for our free catalog of Wrought Iron Record
Cabinets holding over 250 albums. Leslie Creations, Dept. C209, Lafayette Hill, Pa.
IF
Amorite
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED.
Speaker Service, 70 Vesey St., N. Y. 7. BA7 -2580.
TAPE
Hi -Fi components, tapes at
Free catalogue. Carston, 215-H
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RECORDERS;
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E. 88 St., N.
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TO 52, EXCEPT 3,
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ALL COPIES HIGH FIDELITY. S40. A
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All seam-
less aluminum. 510.95 ppd. Wholesale Supply Co.,
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HIGH FIDELITY: NOS. 1 -48, $25 plus postage., M.
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Falla
his choral work L';1tl,rntida, based on
the epic poem by the Catalan priest poet, Jacinto Verdaguer. The poem describes the story, told by an old man to
a young Genoese, of Atlantis, the lost
continent sunk in the sea beyond the
west coast of Spain. The Genoese youth
then sees the new world rising before
him. His name is Christopher Columbus,
and inspired by the words of the old
hermit, he sets out in his three caravels
to discover the new world. No theme in
poetry or music opens greater vistas to
the artist than the myth of the engulfed
with your recorder. Amaz-
ing book gives full instructions. $2.00. Guaranteed. Research Association, Box 610 -HF, Omaha,
Nebr.
hru
6, S25.00. Pick up.
HIGH FIDELITY VOL. 1
Charles Heller, 210 S. Flower St., Los Angeles 12,
Calif.
PICKERING FLUXVALVE 1957 Model Turnover Diamond- Sapphire Cartridge. Brand new, unable to
use. Will sell for just $33.00. Russell Forbes, 3
Mohawk Rd., Marbelhead, Mass.
HIGH FIDELITY COPIES -49, except 8, S20, freight
collect. W. J. Jensen, 4009 Delmar Dr., Kansas City
15, Mo.
1
RECORDERS WHOLESALE! FREE CATALOG! Tapes:
1200' 51.39; 1800' 51.85. Towers, Box 155, Philadelphia 5, Pa.
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FOR SALE TO
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continent, told once upon a time by
Plato and still haunting the race memory
of those who visit the salty marshes of
the Camargue with its wild bulls and
white Arab horses sacred to Poseidon.
But the L'Atla77tida of Manuel do
Falla
There was an old woman
Who lived in a shoe
Had so many children
She knew not what to do
The children were naughty
And so filled her with dread
That the little old woman
Wished she were dead
A simple solution
Which brought happiness
Was the prompt installation
of Norelco . . F.R.S.
,
These wonderful speakers .)t
(Twin -coned and true) _T.,/
Produced marvelous music
Throughout the shoe
The effect ... tranquilizing
The children ... asleep
Now the little old woman
Good order can keep
For the full throated music
Resounds through the shoe
The children are spellbound
As you will be too
So go to your dealer
Do it today
And find out how "Hi -Fi"
Your victrola can play
also was closely connected
with
Mallorca, La is/it de la Calma, where he
went in his later years hoping to work
in peace, away from a world which had
become troublesome to him. There he
composed his Fanfare for Wind Instruments and Percussion, for the jubilee of
his close friend, Enrique Fernández
Arbós, conductor of the Madrid Symphony Orchestra. There also he produced the Ballad of Mallorca for unaccompanied chorus, the music based on
Chopin's F major ballade, whose andantino theme resembles a Mallorcan
folk barcarolle.
The sudden cataclysm of the Civil
War, the murder of his beloved friend
Federico García Lorca, and his many
ailments brought Don Manuel close to
death in the 1930s. He rallied, however, and was able in 1940 to set out
for Argentina, where he spent the rest
NOV YOU
been known only to design engineers!
The PERI-50 engineering is "built in"
through the revolutionary new deep -etched
copper circuit board -a development of
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of his life at the house of a sister at
Alta Gracia in the hills near Córdoba.
He died on November 14, 1946. His
The DEEP -ETCHED copper circuit board
replaces all wiring and guarantees that
body was brought back to Spain and
buried in his birthplace, Cádiz. Spain
ever since has been waiting impatiently
for the first performance of the composer's last utterance. Falla died leaving
the work unfinished.
His disciple,
Ernesto Halfter, was entrusted with the
task of completing it.
Manuel de Falla, though a lover of
peace and solitude, lived an imaginative
life of fierce intensity. The spirits with
whom he felt closest affinity were Saint
John of the Cross and the painter Zurbarán, whose ascetic ideals Falla tried
to embody in his art. But, despite his
austerity, all through his life he was the
prey of Arab demons, or djinns, and
even the influence of the mystic poet
every PERI.50 AMPLIFIER built will perform
-
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whether built by amateur, audiophile
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EVERYTHING PROVIDED
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ANYONE can build and hear the laboratory
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transient response and stability.
GUARANTEED TO PERFORM
TO THESE SPECIFICATIONS:
POWER OUTPUT 50 watts cont. - 100 watts peak.
DISTORTION - Intermodulation distortion less than
1.0% at 50 watts, less than 0.25% at 35 watts.
FREQUENCY RESPONSE 6 cps to 60,000 cps
within .0 .5 DB. ±0.1 DB from 20 cps to
35,000 at any level from 1 milliwatt to 50 watts.
POWER RESPONSE less than 0.1% harmonic
distortion at SO watts from 20 cps
to 25.000 cps and flat within I DB.
SENSITIVITY 50 watts output from 0.75 volt RMS
input 100 watts output from 1.0 volt RMS input.
impedances. Priced from $6.75 to
$59.98. Blueprints are available for
the do- it- yourself enclosure builder.
Norelco Enclosures are available in
three sizes, priced from $33.75 to
$119.95.
wroe today to Dept. K7 for brochre
and or,ces of theta uni0 rpeo&.,,
NORTH AMERICAN PHILIPS CO., INC.
High Fidelity Products Division
230 Dully Ave. Hicksville, L. I., N. Y.
JULI' 1957
- including
an Ungar soldering iron and solder! All
flore%o *crcRef Speakers are available in 5 ", 8" or 12" sizes in standard
ADD TO... and improve ony sound system
with /yore /cO' FULL RESPONSE SPEAKERS
can recreate in your own home
the breathtaking realism in sound that has
and the ascetic painter could not drive
them away. The war Falla fought with
these demons of the Infidel was pitiless
because they were Spanish too, and old
and potent. Perhaps it is the struggle
within him between Cross and Crescent
that gives his music the drama that stirs
us so deeply.
Ì
SQUARE WAVE RESPONSE essentially
undistorted on speaker load at frequencies
20 cps to 35,000 cps. Damping Factor - 15.
Output impedances 8 ohm and 16 ohm.
--
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TUBE COMPLEMENT Two EL-34.one 6ANS one 5U4
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87
SUMMER
Continued front page
32
Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons, featuring such artists as
Leonard Pennario, Grant Johannesen,
and Isaac Stern. Performances of Carmen and Elijah are scheduled for the
Gala Festival Series. The Brevard Festival Orchestra plays under the direction
of James Christian Pfohl, conductor of
the Charlotte (North Carolina) Symphony Orchestra and of the Jacksonville
( Florida) Symphony Orchestra.
The Peninsula Music Festival will
hegin its fifth season under its DirectorFounder, Dr. Thor Johnson, permanent
conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony
Orchestra, on August 10 and will offer
a series of nine concerts through August
25. The Festival concerts, built around
the forty -five member chamber symphony and presenting distinguished
guest artists, are held at Gibraltar Auditorium, Fish Creek, Wisconsin, at the
entrance to the Peninsula State Park on
the shores of Green Bay. Several works
by American composers have been corn missioned for the 1957 series.
Already well under way is the twentythird consecutive season of six evening
Music Under the Stars
concerts
given by the Little Symphony Orchestra
of St. Louis, Missouri, in the Quadrangle
-
of Washington University.
The
he
sound
of
the organ
is
"King of Instruments "-an AeolianSkinner organ installation.
one of the most difficult to reproduce, because of
its
wide
tonal and dynamic range, and because of the large amount of fundamental energy
that appears at extreme bass frequencies.
At a recent public demonstration, staged by the Audio League at St. Mark's Church,
Mt. Kisco, N. Y., the recorded sound of an AeolianSkinner organ (from stereo tape) was
instantaneously alternated with that of the "live" instrument. The reproducing
equipment selected included four AR1 speaker systems. Here is some of the press
comment on the event:
77teSàtun1pRecuw
(David Hebb)
"Competent listeners, with trained professional ears, were fooled into
thinking that the live portions were recorded, and vice versa....
The extreme lqw notes were felt, rather than heard, without any
'loudspeaker' sound ..."
AUDIO
(Julian D. Hirsch)
"Even where differences were detectable at changeover, it was usually
not possible to determine which sound was live and which was
recorded, without assistance from the signal lights.... facsimile
recording and reproduction of the pipe organ in its original
environment has been accomplished."
oaadlocrof t:
was such a negligible difference (between live and recorded sound)
that, even when it was discerned, it was impossible to tell whether
the organ or the sound'system was playing!"
"lt
is
The price of an AR -1 two -way speaker system, including cabinet,
$185.00 in mahogany or birch. Descriptive literature is available on request.
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH, INC.
SS
24 Thorndike St., Cambridge 41, Mass.
-
Beginning
June 21, concerts are held on successive
Friday nights with an orchestra cornposed of approximately thirty musicians
who play with the "big" St. Louis Symphony during the winter season. Max
Steindel, resident conductor, opened
the series; Theodore Bloomfield, conductor of the Portland ( Oregon) Symphony Orchestra, will make his first
appearance in St. Louis, conducting the
second and third programs; and Jascha
Horenstein will return for his third guest
appearance to conduct the final three
concerts.
The Aspen Music Festival is presenting its concert series at Aspen, Colorado,
from June 26 through September 1,
with guests Alexander Uninsky, Vronsky
and Babin, Adele Addison, Phyllis Curtin, Jennie Tourd, Mack Harrell, Reginald Kell, and William Primrose. To
celebrate the seventy -fifth birthday of
Igor Stravinsky, works by Stravinsky will
he emphasized throughout the season.
Joseph Haydn will he the classical composer to receive special attention. Concerts are in the Amphitheater at four
in the afternoon evey Wednesday,
Saturday, and Sunday, under the musical
direction of Izler Solomon. Every Friday there will be a Young Artists Concert presented by advanced students of
the Aspen Music School, associated with
the Festival.
In Canada, the Stratford Shakespearean Festival will begin its five -week
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a
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Stratford for its North American première with Peter Pears in Benjamin Britten's opera The Turn of the
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and Pears will pair for two recitals in
August. The Symphony Orchestra of the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation will
perform at four Wednesday night concerts with leading Canadian conductors
and soloists. Jazz concerts, included in
the Festival for the first time last season,
will spotlight Count Basic and his orchestra, singer Billie Holiday, Toronto's
Ron Collier Quintet, the Gerry Mulligan Quartet, and pianist Teddy Wilson.
Da capo, the heeding hills and valleys
will resound this summer with their
antiphonal answers to Orsino's appeal
to the musicians attending: ". . . play
on! Give me excess of it . .
in 1947
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GERALDINE THE GREAT
Continued front page
38
concert engagement in our city: then,
when she had quite finished, I called
her attention to a signed photograph of
the singer on the wall behind her, whereupon she began at once to discuss what
In this
a great artist Miss Farrar was!
particular case, it was a dreadful sore
throat that had caused the trouble, and
I knew the facts because a close friend
of mine was the physician who had cared
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One night at the Metropolitan Miss
Farrar and Giovanni Martinelli were
singing Zaza. They had often done it
before but never like this! Through a
long scene, Martinelli, the supposedly
ardent lover, sat glued to the little sofa
around which the action revolved, while
Miss Farrar circulated about him, leaned
over the back of the sofa, sat on the
arms until they creaked, and in short put
forth every blandishment to inflame a
man who seemed remarkably lethargic
toward her. There were unfavorable
comments concerning the "vulgar" way
she had played the scene that evening.
What had happened was that at the
beginning Martinelli had leaned over to
her and whispered, "Cara Geraldina, I
cannot move. My suspenders have
The AR -2 is the
first application of the acoustic
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We would like to suggest, as soberly as we in-
comparison between the AR -1 and any
existing bass reproducer, that you compare the
AR -2 with conventional speaker systems which
are several times higher in price. No allowances
vite
at all, of course, should be made for the AR -2's
small size, which is here an advantage rather
than
a
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pcint of view of
reproducing quality.
broken."
The vulgar "business" was all improvisation. It was a choice between
this and no "business" at all!
See
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MISS FARRAR
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made, I think, a larger number of
records than any other prima donna of
Continued on next page
Literature is available on request.
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her time except Alma Gluck. The acoustical horn did not treat her as well as
it did Gluck and McCormack, the ideal
recording voices of the acoustic era, but
she fared much better than such sopranos as Melba, Eames, or Gadski. The
horn had difficulty with some of her
tones ( I have, for example, never heard
a copy of "Tu me dirais" or Thy Dear
Eyes which did not blast), but the
beauties that have been caught and preserved are very wonderful for all that.
They are worth training your cars for
too, if you know only the modern era
in recording.
Miss Farrar began her recording in
Germany where, between 1904 and
1906, she made at least eighteen discs
for the German Gramophone Company,
thirteen of them operatic selections (including three duets with Karl Jörn and
one with Wilhelm Grüning) and the
rest songs. In 1907 she began to record
for Victor. Between then and 1923
Victor issued seventy -two solo records,
thirty -seven duets with Caruso, Clement,
Homer, Journet, Scotti, and others, and
four concerted numbers. She made sixty four operatic records for Victor. Faust,
Carmen, and Madama Butterfly together
account for thirty -two of these; the rest
are from Don Giovanni, Le Nozze di
Figaro, Mignon, Mefistofele, Tannhäuser,
Les Contes d'Hoffman, Roméo et Juliette, Thais, La Bohème, Tosca, Le
Donne Curiose, 11 Segreto di Susanna,
Die Königskinder, and Zaza. "Star of
Love" from Fritz Kreisler's Apple Blossoms was the closest she ever came to
the "popular" level.
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CHANGE
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If you plan to move soon, please
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Give old address as well as new,
clipping stencil imprint from wrapper of last copy received.
She recorded very few lieder for
Victor; the sales department was dubious about them. When, in 1932, Mr.
William H. Seltsam founded the International Record Collectors' Club, his
first release was an unpublished recording of Der Nussbaum and Ouvre tes
)eux bleus, both great Farrar concert
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Farrar's few light opera records are
emotionally exciting, they never find her
at her vocal best: nor do the brief
phrases of Le domino noir particularly
suit her voice. The Roland aria, however, like the R1eftstofele, has a rich,
brooding quality, showing the "darker"
aspect of her attractive lower register,
later to be shown in her Victor recording of Tosca's "Vissi d'arte," perhaps
the most splendid of all her dramatic
favorites. Besides reissuing a great many
previously published records, Mr. Seltsam has since put all Farrar collectors in
his debt by making available some
twenty otherwise unpublished sides, including a magnificent ( but unfortunately incomplete) 1927 electric recording of "Dove sono," a Bohème duet with
Caruso CO soave fanciulla"), and the
only American recording of Juliette's
Vahe. There are also several recordings
of Miss Farrar's speaking voice' and one
record in which she plays piano accompaniments for her friend Marion Telva
singing Zueignung and ich liebe dich.
Many of Miss Farrar's IRCC records
have been autographed by the singer and
some labels carry photographs of the
singer and her insigne.
Mr. Seltsam's recent recorde (already
referred to) will give modern collectors
the best chance they have had to learn
what Miss Farrar sounded like at the
beginning of her career, already an accomplished artist but with the morning
dew still upon her voice.
Of the materials included in this
record, only the selections from Faust
and Mefistofele were later rerecorded by
Victor. The two most unusual numbers
are, of course, the selection from Der
Roland von Berlin, the opera which
Leoncavallo wrote in 1901 at the command of the Kaiser, and the selection
from Le domino noir. Though Miss
New
"TOWARDS
PERFECTION
IN SOUND"
records.
The Faust aria is lovely and spirited,
but probably the most "brilliant" selection of the lot is the Traviata. Violetta
was Miss Farrar's second role in Berlin
Continued on next page
1.7OOI) com1. This k an IRCC microgroove
prising on the A side Geraldine Farrar Comment,
(
Record., of her Teacher, Lill:
Lehmann. which was originally presented on
WQXR by Stephen Fassets, Dec. 10, 1939, and.
on the B side: ( 1 ) The Four Marguerite., ( Schubert. Gounod, Berlioz, Boito: NBC, Mar. IO.
1935); (2) The Legend of the Dogwood Tree
(Farrar); ( 3) The Little C.hri,tnta, Donkey ( Farrar) All the material on the B side had previously
been issued by IRCC as 78s. Very few copies of
this record remain at the present writing.
on the Career and
.
2. Geraldine Farrar: Commemorating the Fiftieth
Annirer tang of ber ,lletropo/iras Opera Uebut, Nor.
Intro26, 1906 ( IRCC L 7010)
A side:
ductory Remarks and Romeo et Juliette: Valle
in French; (2) Fan,::: Jewel Song
( Gounod)
(Gounod) in German; 13) Der Roland ron Ber-
(I)
.
lin: Fahr nob!.! Trantgetell.'
Italian.
I
Leoncavallo) in Ger-
llefiuolele. L'altra tone
man; 14)
B side:
1
(
Boito)
in
1) Fana: Love Duet, with Karl
Joern (Gounod) in German; (2) Rigoletto: E il
to/ del!' anima, with Karl Joern ( Verdi) in Italian;
( 31
Tanuhaeuser: Gepriesen lei die Stunde, with
Karl Joern Wagner) , in German; (4) Le Domino
Noir: Aragonaise ( Auber) in German; (5) La
Trattata. Follie.' follie.' ( Verdi) in Italian.
(
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GERALDINE THE GREAT
Continued from preceding page
(on November 29, 1901, with Jiirn as
and it is good to hear how
she did it. There is vivid drama in the
Taunhün.rer number, and the Rigolctto
nf-
Alfredo),
%%%
duet is sweet, restrained, and impassioned. Myself I enjoy the vibrant enthusiasm of Karl Jiirn's voice, though
know it is not to all tastes: there are
times when he almost drowns out Miss
Farrar, especially in the Tauuhün.rer.
Farrar first sang Carmen at the Metropolitan on November 19, 1919, with
Caruso, Amato, Alda, Rothier, Reiss,
and Braslau, Toscanini conducting. It
was her first appearance in the role
anywhere. Although the connoisseurs
generally liked her better in more
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Kiiig.rkider than they did in either
Caruun or Butterfly, these latter will
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probably he the roles always most closely
associated with her in the popular imagination. ( If I had to give up all Farrar
records except one, the two arias from
Die Küuigskinder arc what I would hold
on to.)
For that matter, even Miss Farrar
spoke of Carmen in her first autobiography, Geraldine Farrar: The Store of
an American Singer, published in 1916,
as "a role I had always longed to sing
and which favored me as I had rarely
been favored," and when, in 1915, she
signed the fabulous motion picture contract which provided that she should
receive two dollars for every minute the
sun shone while she was in southern
California, it was Carmen that was
chosen, under Cecil B. de Mille's direction, for her film debut. After her retirement from the Aetropolitan, too, it
was a condensed version of this opera
that she elected to take upon the road.
Her Carmen, in opera house and film
studio alike, was primitive, simple,
direct, and elemental, with none of the
psychological subtleties some singers
have injected into the role.
The new Camden offering contains all
Miss Farrar's Carmen records, and all
save
one
were
recorded
1914 -19I6.
The exception is Micaela's air, which
harks hack to 1908, when Miss Farrar
sang Micaela at the Metropolitan to the
Carmen of Maria Gay. One can hardly
wish that this beautiful number, which
is fitted into its proper place in the
opera, had been left out, but it is a
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little startling to have Miss Farrar not
only shift characters at this point but
also shift to an obviously younger, less
"dramatic" voice.
It is fine that the scene between
Carmen and José toward the close of Act
II should include not only the well known "Halte lei!" duet with Martinelli
but also the succeeding "Au quartier
pour l'appel," which, though listed in at
least one catalogue, was never issued by
Victor, though it was made available for
special pressings and, still later, was
published through IRCC. Personally I
like Miss Farrar's Habanera better than
most of her admirers do, though I do
not care for either it or the very vigorous
"Chanson Bohème" so much as I do for
the Seguidilla, the wistful "Lei bas dans
la montagne," or the thrilling, menacing
" Voyons que j'essaie." The equivalent
of three twelve -inch 78s is given to the
closing scene, with both Miss Farrar and
Martinelli playing up to the hilt, and
Amato too in the little singing there is
for him.
"So all things pass away, but those
were beautiful days!" Thus Theodore
Roosevelt, once, looking back upon the
years that brought him to fame.
Through the miracle of modern technology we can now save a good deal out
of the past that once would have had
to be left to perish. It would be too
much to suppose that Miss Farrar can
ever mean to our children what she
meant to us. Nobody would expect that,
least of all the clear-eyed, fiercely honest
woman who is the subject of this article.
She is on record as having found her
career every bit as satisfying in experience as it was in anticipation, but she
also feels, as she looks back upon it,
as though it had been lived by another
woman. Life gave her all she could
hold; she was never disposed to ask for
more. Quite frankly contented with
her own period, she is sincerely grateful
that her career as artist was not cast
in these latter days. It has never been
her way to outgrow old friends or old
associations. The last time I visited her
I
noticed a signed photograph of the
last Emperor of Germany upon her
piano. "I see," I remarked, "you have
restored the Kaiser." "Restored!" she exclaimed, "He has never been away! He
stood there all through World War I."
This steadfastness is in all her attitudes. Once she told me that she was
cleaning her own house because she
could not find a girl who wanted to stay
out in the country. "What would your
mother say," I asked, "if she knew you
were doing your own cleaning ?" "My
mother," she replied serenely, "would say
that I had returned to first principles."
That is why retirement has been no
tragedy to Geraldine Farrar: she has
continued to grow. And that too is
why she is still as interesting at seventy five as she was forty years ago.
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a
a
RECORD CHANGER?
SEND COUPON
for the answer
to this important question
PLUS FREE STROBE DISC!
r
REK -O -KUT COMPANY, INC.
Dept. SR, 3801 Queens Blvd.,
L. I. C. 1,
N.Y.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
ZONE
STATE
MY DEALER IS
L
y.
J
}
your high -frequency dis-
way off. the tweeter may he defective or
may need replacing with one haring
smoother response and lower distortion.
Third, if your phonograph assembly
is located where you can hear needle
TURNTABLE
or
if
tortion disappears when you turn the
triaxial speaker's super-tweeter all the
...
throw kindling- length logs
into the enclosure until its internal volume is reduced to the point where there
is more air -damping on the speakers
bass, I could
getting severe high -frequency distortion from my hi -fi system,
particularly when playing the inner
grooves of records. My turntable and
pickup arm are level, and I have tried
varying the pickup stylus force from
4 to 7 grams, but to no avail.
My triaxial speaker system used to
give a nice, diffused sound source, but
I am now very much aware of an annoying point source effect. I have not
moved the loudspeaker's position in the
room, and my amplifier and associated
equipment seem to he operating properly. Can you suggest what might be
"We recommend Bugen," says Voll
Hetherington of Boston's Radio
Shack. "Long experience has shown
that Bogen equipment is exceptionally free of maintenance problems,
and that Bogen specs are delivered
as written. We are secure in selling
Bogen components."
than at present. Or, I could add an
electronic crossover and convert to hiamplifier operation. This would give me
the added advantage of being able to
add "presence" to the flat response of
the Bozak system, should I so desire.
Will either of these things help, or
do you have another suggestion?
Alvin Dais
Sidney,
Neb.
Reducing the volume of your speaker
enclosure will restrict the bass range
of the system, but here is how you might
go about tightening the bass response
from your Bozak system, without interfering with its bars range. Take two
16 -in. square pieces of sheet glass wool
(the type without paper backing), and
cut in the middle of each a round hole
just large enough to fit around the
magnet pots on the back of the woofers.
Fit these over your woofers (bringing
the speaker leads through the holes in
the squares), and tack the glass wool
to the rear surface of the front panel,
around the edges of the woofers. Then
fill most of the volume of the enclosure
with triangular pieces of sheet glass
wool. cut to about fire inches per side.
Don't forget to make sure that your
woofers are connected in phase.
talk from it with your volume control
turned all the tray off, this will markedly
contribute to the trouble that you are
haring. The pickup should be operated
either in a closed cabinet or in a room
adjoining that in which you listen.
Finally, your amplifier and control
unit should be checked at a qualified
audio service agency, and if found to
have more than 0.3'2i. 1M distortion
from the phono input to the speaker
output (60 & 6,000 cps, 4:1 ratio output), the amplifier should be serviced
or replaced with one having lower distortion.
SIR:
I am going to try my nasty best to put
you on the spot.
I am a nontechnical reader. I don't
know anything about decibels and volts
and feedback, and I care less. I am
uncommonly dense when it comes to
technical matters, and if I find some-
SIR:
A record equalizer consists essentially of
a circuit offering a varying amount of
opposition to the signal corning from
a phonograph pickup.
The equalizer is a network of resistors
and condensers which are so arranged
as to produce an impedance which varier
with the frequency of the signal passing
through it. An R1AA equalizer, for
instance, offers extremely high opposi-
My rig consists of a Weathers pickup
turntable, Mcsystem, Components
Intosh C -8 and MC -30 preamp and
amplifier, and a Bozak dual -woofer,
three -way speaker system in a 15 cubic foot, properly padded enclosure.
The bass is quite full and deep, but
it is not, in my opinion, sufficiently crisp
or tight. I reason that, to tighten the
thing difficult to understand I simply
cease trying to understand.
Now that you know what you're up
against, here's my question. How does
a
record equalizer work?
William Schickley
Bronx, N. C.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
A
PRICE
R EX
SHALWAYSE RIGHT
1H
Mail
THE
SUP ERMARKE1
20'-',
Deposit
NEW BOGEN DB 20 DF
HI FIDELITY AMPLIFIER KIT
Kit version of the most famous 20 watt amplifier
on the market. Rated #1 by leading research
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sound reproduction in a single amplifier. 5 position loudness contour selector; 7 position record
equalizer; DC on preamp filaments; 5 feed back
loops; rumble filter; variable damping factor;
response 20- 20,000 cps + .7 db; hum
75 db;
distortion 0.3 °, at 20 watts. Complete
full
step -by -step instructions, all tubes ft,
$69.50
parts. limited quantity available.
Above model factory wired
S108.00
Cover for above amplifier
$8.25
Grammes HiFi Amplifier Kits
10 Watts, 18 watts peak, Resp.
-
db. Preamp.,
inputs. Hum -80 db. 2%
,.
Harm. Dist at 10 watts. Com.
plete
with
_
detailed step by
step instruction manual, all resistors, condensers, tubes, wire 8 solder. Easy to
make, 2- 12AX7, 2 -6V6, 8 5Y3. Bass 8 $24.95
Treble boost. Limited quantity.
20. 20,000 cps
at
a_
e
,
,,
1
4
FM -AM TUNER KIT
Easy to assemble. Professional
ii
quality performance.
tuned
--
IF stages.
3
1
8" deep.
instructions
Complete with step- by- step$3295
A
J
FM TUNER ONLY -$26.35
COVER-$3.95
These units are ideal in combination with any of
the Hi-Fi Amplifier Kits listed above.
Building Your Own Hi-Fi System? SEND US YOUR
LIST OF COMPONENTS. We will give you a
PACKAGE QUOTATION ON THEM.
AIREX RADIO CORP.
64 Cortlandt
St. N.Y.
7, N.Y. CO
7 -2137
pre- finished
Kits
i
Anyone cm assemble it in about
-and
uses
permits
a
PFK-300
screw-
driver to put together a furniture- finished Klipsch speaker enclosure, indistinguishable from factory -assembled Rebel 3, 4 or
5. Also available as conventional, unfinished kits.
Write for Complete Catalog!
.
. 16 other hi -fi kits .
. 29
quipment cabinets... 4 matched speaker
20 hi -fi accessories.
36 pages
.vstems
...
fur
--
any
car-
-.
make
cartridce.
KT -12 $14.55 NET
factory -assembled
KT -16
$17.55 NET
factory- assembled
524.00 NET.
530.00 NET
And
rt
Iran,
n.c
511
orict.y .t roui
1ow,c
(Popular Electronics)
.
.r
.
.
LISTENING QUALITY
IS EVERYTHING!
Impartial Lab reports on the new Aidar
Ili -Q7 magnetic cartridge:
A leading recording studio:
"Because readings showed
an amazing total lack
SIR:
seem to be getting too high a hiss
level from my preamp -control unit. Can
you suggest what might he causing this
trouble, and what I might do about it?
Alan Pomel
Roxbury, Pa.
distortion, check repeated 3
times"
of
I
tests were
Consumer sheet:
"Good frequency
and transient rePractically
no
high
frequency distortion. Low inter modulation dissponse.
If the excessive noise level from your
preamplifier is of a random, sputtering
variety rather than being a steady hiss.
it is probably caused by a noisy preamplifier tube, a leaky coupling capacitor.
or a noisy early -stage plate or cathode
resistor. A steady hiss may indicate that
an early stage resistor is defective or
that the unit's design is at fault.
If you have had any previous experience in .servicing high -fidelity equipment. you might try to locate this trouble
yourself. Otherwise, the safest thing to
do would be to return your preamp to
the manufacturer for -service.
-
tortion.-
and
Listening quality is everything
Audax Hi -Q7 has it to a degree not
equalled by any other pickup.
MAR it yourself . . -there it no
nay! Net $47.70, with one Chrost
Diamond and a Sapphire
lhhcr
models as low as $20.70 Net.
But.
.
.
t
.
.
STYLI IS-BA LANCE
SIR:
need only
I
min-Selector-Index-
adjustment
.1
ANY
dates
"This really worts
would like to use a biampliher set-up
with my Altec 604C speaker, and plan
to use the Heath XO -1 electronic crossover with it.
However, the recommended crossover frequency for this speaker is 1,600
cycles, and the Heath crossover does not
provide this setting. Could I use the
Heath's 1,200-cycle or 2,000 -cycle crossover setting without impairing performance or damaging the speakers?
Fred Bauer. Jr.
Memphis, Tenn.
I
Now you
50 °0!
save
instant
stylus pressure. Nerdy -designed
lb Rising
tridge
permits
all-imtylus- tu- grimve align
portant
t
ment
glance. Acownmo-
designed by
Paul Klipsch
TONE ARM
NOW IN KIT FORM
double
Foster -Seely
discriminator, automatic frequency control 8 defeat. 7
tubes plus rectifier. Distortion less than %. Hum
level -70DB. Sensitivity 6 microvolts for 20 DB
quieting on FM 8 20 microvolts on AM. FM selectivity 200KC band width 8 DB down; AM 8KC
band width 5 DB down. 5ta" high x 9t/2" wide
x
AUDAX
tion to the passage of tones in the
vicinity of 10,000 cycles. and its impedance decreases at a uniform rule as
the frequency passing through it decreases. When the frequency gets down
to the vicinity of 2.000 cycler. the impedance of the equalizer levels out and
starts level until it reaches 500 cycles,
at which point its opposition once again
begins to decrease at a uniform rate.
Finally, at 50 cycles, the equalizer's impedance levels out and remains constant down to the lowest frequency of
the amplifier in question.
The effect of the equalizer. then. is
to cat down the treble response of the
signal with a relation to the ntiddl.
frequency range. and to boost the Gass
region with respect to the middle range,
providing an over -all frequency response
which is exactly opposite to that recorded originally on the disc.
"
(Audio Maga-
Stop
zine)
cleturmation
of record
grooves! Only Audax Stylus -Balance cast
give you the all- important certainty el
correct stylus pressuse- ALWAYS. Pre-
cision- calibrated
like a pharmacist',
balance. Works with any am
and
cartridge. Gold Finish. Net $4.00.
LISTENING QUALITY CUTTERS
Flat to 11,11(111 cps. Distortion 0.6% ar Itlllo
des. Fully mt xlu lates groove with input .a
about 16 db with 220 lines. Ts up r..
ohms. Two models:
Net $111.00
Net 575.00
H - 5
H - 4
Any above item. when shipped Item New York, add 40c.
Using the Heathkit electronic crossover,
you could operate your Altec 604(
equally well at 1,200 or 2,000 cycles.
If there is any audible difference between these tu-o po.sition-r, simply use
that which sounds the hest.
4
99 North
Ith Street
Brooklyn 11, N. Y.
.,tes I mon u lue tus
JULY
i957
500 -5th Ave., New York 36, N.Y. Att. Mr. H.
enclose 25c for handling & postage
L I
please send FREE $1.00, 22 -page
"ELECTRONIC PHONO FACTS" by pioneer Maximilian Weil.
Send FREE latest catalog 8 name of
nearest dealer.
1
of cabinets and kits for hi. fi
o division of 05H Wood Products Co., Inc.
er
AUDAK COMPANY
TTT+40-1T+
I
Name
Address
City
__
_
Zone
.
..
_.
95
ADVERTISING INDEX
Advertiser
Key
No.
YOUR PRESENT HI -FI
EQUIPMENT for
the new
Page
AMI Inc..
Acoustic Research, Inc.
Airex Radio Corp.
Allied Radio Corp.
5
Altec Lansing Corp.
6 American Cancer Society
7.. American Electronics, Inc.
Indexed
8. Angel Records
9 Audak Company
zo Audio Devices, Inc.
Inside Front
s
2.
3
4
II
20
88, 89
95
9, 90
5o
17, 19
53
54
93
7o
on 46
95
Audio Exchange
96
Indexed on 46
56
57
Marantz Co.
59
18
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
Mercury Record Corp.
Indexed on 46
Minnesota Mining and ManuInside Back Cover
facturing Co.
67
Music Listener's Bookshop
Indexed on 46
Music Mountain
6o
Bell Sound Systems, Inc.
39
61
Berlant Recorders
Bogen, David, Co., Inc.
Book Department
62
63
17.
18
Bozak, R. T. Co.
British Industries Corp.
70
94
84
74
z9
Cabinart
20
Classic Electrical Co.
100 Watt peak
21
Famous Bogen circuitry
22
Columbia Records
5
Columbia LP Record Club, Inc.
7o
Concertone Recorders
Concord Record Corp.
Indexed on 46
_
6, 7
Conrac, Inc.
Crowell- Collier Record Guild
Indexed on 46
Watt Amplifier
Outstanding "Full Control" flexibility
Beautiful modern compact design
Outstanding hi fi value
$115
7
23
24
25
92
24
95
90
Indexed on 46
_.
_
Dauntless International
Indexed on 46
26 Decca Records, Inc. Indexed on 46
83
27 Dyna Company
12
BUY BOGEN AT AUDIO EXCHANGE
AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF AUDIO
EXCHANGE'S UNIQUE SERVICES
EICO
Liberal Trade-Ins
28
29
3o
Attractive Time Payment Plan
31
(Metropolitan N.
32
40. 41
Electro- Voice, Inc.
_.. Indexed on 46
Epic Records
7o
Ercona Corp.
SUCH AS
Only)
Consultants
Y. Customers
Expert Meticulous Hi
Fi
Famed Service Department (only for
equipment bought from us)
Write Dept. HF-7 for our unique Trade -Back
plan, Trading information and catalog.
audio exchange
THE TRADING ORGANIZATION
OF THE HI -FI FIELD
159.19 Hillside Ave., Jamaica 32, N. Y.
AXtel 7.7577
near subway
367 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains. N. Y.
WHite Plains 8.3380
next to Fix theatre
METER PARKING AT BOTH STORES
EdiTall
Electro -Sonic Laboratories, Inc.
33
Fairchild Recording &
Eqpt. Corp.
34
Ferrograph
35
36
Fisher Radio Corp.
Fleetwood Television
(Conrac, Inc.)
Friend's ..
18
37
38
Garrard Sales Corp.
General Science Service Co.
Goodman's Loudspeakers
39
Gray Research and
Development Co.
40 Harman- Kardon, Inc.
41... Heath Co.
42 Hi -Fi Headquarters
43.
44
45
46
47
.
85
86
70
33
24
4
7o
It,
13, 15
6, 7
90
84
91
8
71, 72, 73
90
90
High Fidelity House
High Fidelity Record Annual
Indexed on 46
Hollywood Electronics
90
93
Holt Radio
90
House of Hi -Fi
48 .JansZen
49 Jensen Mfg. Co.
.
to
Neshaminy Electric Corp.
12
Newcomb Audio Products Co.
North American Philips Co., Inc. 87
Nuclear Products Co.
Indexed on 46
48
64
65
66
.
2
23
.
71
87
90
Professional Directory
Indexed on 46
RCA Custom
RCA Victor Division
72
.
73
Indexed on 46
Indexed on 46
Record Market
Record Review Index
Indexed on 46
94
Rek -O -Kut Co.
84
Rockbar Corp.
74
75
38
76. Santa Monica Sound
77 Sargent -Rayment Co.
90
42
Indexed on 46
Schwann. W.
79
Scott, Herman Hosmer, Inc.
78
79
8o
_.
.
Sherwood Electronic
Laboratories, Inc.
81 Sonotone Corp.
82 Stephens TRU -SONIC INC.
46
83
84
.
85
76
Back Cover
93
69
Stereo by Holt
Stereophonic Music Society
Stromberg-Carlson
14
85
29
86
87
Tannoy, Ltd.
Tech Lab _
Techmaster Corp.
Trader's Marketplace
88
University Loudspeakers, Inc. 82, 83
89
Vanguard Recording Society, Inc.
Indexed on 46
Vox Productions, Inc.
Indexed on 46
90
92
7o
89
86
91 ..Westminster Recording Co.
Indexed on 46
Io
z
90
69
Peck, Trevor, Co., Ltd.
Phonotapes, Inc.
Pickering & Co., Inc.._. _.
21, 22,
Pilot Radio Corp...
Printed Electronic Research, Inc.
67
68
69
70
90
24
92
58
14
7
z5
16
35
96
55
Audiogersh Corp.
DB 130
90
93
16
Lansing, James B., Sound, Inc.
.91
Lectronics ..
Indexed on 46
Leslie Creations
Livingston Electronic Corp.
Indexed on 46
London Records.. .Indexed on 46
Louisville Philharmonic Society
Indexed on 46
52
z3
_.
Page
Kierulff Sound Corp.
Klipsch & Associates
51
Cover
I2. Audio Fidelity Records
Bogen
Advertiser
Key
Ne.
47_ World Radio Lab
..
90
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we cannot bill single copies.
SOLVED!
A recorder head worn by conventional tape can cause you to hear
the same lack of sharpness you see here.
"Scotch" Brand Magnetic Tape reduces head abrasion to assure
years of clear audio pleasure.
End loss of resolution, reduce head wear
with "Scotch" Brand's built -in dry lubrication
.
/
r
.
You asked for it and "Scotch" Brand is first to
bring it to you! Built -in silicone lubrication to minimize loss of resolution, absolutely eliminate tape
squeal and save your machine's delicate magnetic
head from abrasion.
Only "Scotch" Brand Magnetic Tapes perform this
essential lubricating job for you, because only
"Scotch" Brand has silicone lubrication that lasts
the life of the tape. And what a difference this built -in
safety feature makes! "Scotch" Brand Magnetic Tapes
glide smoothly, easily over your recorder head, while
the head itself is protected from the abrasive action
you get with conventional tapes.
Treat your machine to a reel of "Scotch" Brand
soon and hear the difference. FREE TAPE TIPS...
write Dept. CW -77.
ONLY "SCOTCH" BRAND HAS SILICONE
Sound signal at left, which has lost its shape, is made by machine
with worn magnetic head. Clearly defined square wave signal at
right was made by identical type recorder whose head is "Scotch"
Brand-protected.
LUBRICATION
The term "Scotch" and the plaid design are registered trademarks for Magnetic Tape
made in U.S.A. by MINNESOTA MINING ANO MFG. CO., SI. Paul 6, Minn. Export
Sales Office: 99 Park Avenue, New York 16, N.Y. © 3M Co., 1957
TRJQM IC
no bark... no growl... no yelp from these
a rich and robust bass response that gives a majestic voice to music reproduction. Adding
Tru -Sonic woofer to your speaker system means unearthing buried sound ... bringing out the
rock -bottom of the audio spectrum. Whether it's the Tru -Sonic 15" 103LX or the 12" 120LX,
both are produced of the finest materials and are engineered for superb bass realism.
Just
a
Listen...you'll always hear more from:
eSTEPHENS
'WNW- /SONIC
8538 Warner Drive, Culver City, California
INC.
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