Intellinet | 24-Port Gigabit Web-Smart | User manual | Intellinet 24-Port Gigabit Web-Smart Switch

Intellinet 24-Port Gigabit Web-Smart Switch
Gigabit
Web-Smart
Switch
user
manual
Models 524063
& 524087
Shown: Model 524063, 24-Port
INT-524063/524087-UM-0308-02
Thank you for purchasing the INTELLINET NETWORK SOLUTIONS™ Gigabit
Web-Smart Switch, Model 524063 (24-Port) or Model 524087 (16-Port).
This handy device lets you increase the speed of your network with 10/100/1000
Mbps auto-sensing ports that automatically detect optimal network speeds, and
it lets you increase the speed of your own work through user-friendly Web-based
management for uncomplicated administration.
Easy-to-follow instructions in this user manual help make installation of the switch
quick and simple, so you’ll also soon be enjoying the benefits of these additional
features:
• All RJ45 ports with Auto-MDIX (auto uplink) support
• Supports NWay auto-negotiation
• Broadcast storm control with multicast packet rate settings
• Store and forward switching architecture
• Packet filtering/forwarding rates: 1,488,000 pps (1000 Mbps), 148,800 pps (100
Mbps), 14,880 pps (10 Mbps)
• Supports port controls (speed, flow control and maximum frame size)
• Supports VLAN (tag-based and port-based)
• Supports link aggregation (trunking)
• Provides IEEE 802.1x port-based security
• Supports port mirroring
• 19” rackmount
• LEDs for power, link/activity, connection speed
• Supports IEEE802.1D Spanning Tree Protocol
• Supports static priority, ToS, 802.1p Class of Service with 4-level priority queuing
• Lifetime Warranty
Some of the following screen images have been modified to fit the format of this
user manual.
NOTE: For a quick install procedure, refer to the printed quick install guide enclosed
with this product.
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INTRODUCTION
Contents
hardware installation...............................................................................5
web-based browser management..........................................................6
Switch Access..................................................................................................6
Configuration....................................................................................................7
System....................................................................................................7 Ports......................................................................................................10
PVLANs................................................................................................. 11 802.1Q VLANs......................................................................................12 Aggregation...........................................................................................15 MAC Binding.........................................................................................17 ARL Table..............................................................................................18 Multicast................................................................................................18 RSTP.....................................................................................................21
Mirroring................................................................................................25
Quality of Service (QoS).......................................................................26
Filter......................................................................................................30
Rate Limit..............................................................................................31
Storm Control........................................................................................32
Monitoring.......................................................................................................33
Detailed Statistics..................................................................................33
RSTP Status.........................................................................................35
Maintenance...................................................................................................37
Warm Restart........................................................................................37
Factory Default......................................................................................37
Software Upload....................................................................................38
Logout...................................................................................................38
console management.................................................................................38
Direct Access..................................................................................................38
Logging On.....................................................................................................38
Command-Line Interface (CLI) Commands...................................................39
specifications................................................................................................43
CONTENTS
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safety & compliance statements
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with
the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at
his own expense.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: 1) This device may not cause harmful interference and 2)
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
CE Statement
This equipment complies with the requirements relating to electromagnetic
compatibility, EN 55022 class A for ITE, the essential protection requirement of
Council Directive 89/336/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the member
states relating to electromagnetic compatibility.
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REGULATORY STATEMENTS
hardware installation
Selecting a Site for the Switch
As with any electrical device, you should place the switch where it will not be
subjected to extreme temperatures, humidity or electromagnetic interference.
Specifically, the site you select should meet the following requirements:
• The ambient temperature should be between 32 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit
(0 to 40 degrees Celsius).
• The relative humidity should be less than 90 percent, non-condensing.
• Surrounding electrical devices should not exceed the electromagnetic field (RFC)
standards for IEC 801-3, Level 2 (3V/M) field stength.
• Make sure that the switch receives adequate ventilation. Do not block the fan
exhaust port on the switch.
• The power outlet should be within 1.5 meters of the switch.
• Do not place objects on top of the unit.
• Always avoid dust and dirt.
Connecting to Power
1.Connect the AC power cord to the receptacle on the back of the switch, then
plug it into a standard AC outlet with a voltage range from 180 to 260 V AC.
2. Disconnect the power cord if you want to shut down the switch.
Cabling
1. Ensure the power of the switch and end devices is turned off. Note: Always
ensure that the power is off before any installation.
2. Prepare cable with corresponding connectors for each type of port in use.
3. Connect one end of the cable to the switch and the other end to a desired device.
4. Once the connections between two end devices are made successfully, turn on
the power and the switch is operational.
hardware INSTALLATION
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web-based browser management
The Gigabit Web-Smart Switch switch provides an Administration Authority that
lets you configure and manage the switch remotely. This section describes how to
configure the switch using its Web-based browser management interface.
Switch Access
The advanced management capabilities of the switch can be accessed using a
standard Internet browser. To access the Web-based management interface,
configure the management station with an IP address and subnet mask that are
compatible with your switch.
The factory defaults are 192.168.1.254 for the IP address; 255.255.255.0 for the
subnet mask.
1. Activate your Web browser and enter the IP address (192.168.1.254) in the
address field.
2. Select the Administration Authority and key in the password. The factory default
for the password is “admin.”
After login, the initial menu screen displays. Click on the links on the left side of
each screen to access the various management functions.
Gigabit Web-Smart Switch
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Configuration
The Configuration menu includes the following subsections: System, Ports,
PVLANs, 802.1Q VLANs, Aggregation, MAC Binding, ARL Table, Multicast
Configuration, RSTP, Mirroring, Quality of Service, Filter, Rate Limit and Storm
Control.
System
This screen provides the current status of the device. Click “Apply” so any changes
that are made will take effect.
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S/W Version: This is the software version of this device.
H/W Version: This is the hardware version of this device.
Active IP Address: Displays the current effective IP address of the device.
Active Subnet Mask: Displays the current effective subnet mask of the device.
Active Gateway: Displays the current effective gateway of the device.
DHCP Server: If the device uses the DHCP server to connect to the network, the
system will display the IP address of the DHCP server. The default value is
0.0.0.0, indicating the DHCP is disabled.
Lease Time Left: Displays the real remaining lease time to the DHCP server.
DHCP Enabled: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). Specifies whether the IP
address is static or dynamically assigned via DHCP. “Enabled” is a special case
of a dynamically assigned IP address. DHCP is widely used in LAN environments
to dynamically assign IP addresses from a centralized server, which reduces
the overhead of administrating IP addresses.
Fallback IP Address: XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX, where XXX ranges from 0 to 255.
Default: 192.168.1.254. Specifies the IP address of this device. An IP address is
a 32-bit number that is notated by using four segments of numbers, each from 0
through 255, separated by periods. Only a unicast IP address is allowed, which
ranges from 1.0.0.0 to 233.255.255.255.
Fallback Subnet Mask: XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX, where XXX ranges from 0 to 255.
Default: 255.255.255.0. Specifies the IP subnet mask of this device. An IP
subnet mask is a 32-bit number that is notated by using four numbers from 0
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through 255, separated by periods. Typically, subnet mask numbers use either
0 or 255 as values (e.g., 255.255.255.0), but other numbers can appear.
Fallback Gateway: XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX, where XXX ranges from 0 to 255.
Default: 192.168.1.1. Specifies the default gateway IP address. It is only required
if you intend to manage the device from another LAN connected via an IP router.
The gateway address must be on the same IP subnet as this device.
Note: After applying a new IP address, a new login page will automatically
appear. Log in again to proceed to other configurations.
TFTP Server Enabled: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). When you want to
use the TFTP upgrade model from the console, enable this parameter.
Management VLAN: The number ranges from 1 to 4094. Default: 1. Modify this
parameter with care! It specifies the VLAN through which the switch can be
managed. By default, the switch is programmed to use VLAN 1 for management
and every port on the switch is programmed to use VLAN 1. If you modify a
switch port to use a VLAN other than the management VLAN, devices on that
port will not be able to manage the switch. If you change the management VLAN
without having at least one port that supports the new management VLAN
number, you will lose the ability to contact the management package. The
switch will immediately stop responding to any pings, tftp, Telnet and Web
sessions from the old management VLAN. For this reason, it’s suggested that
modification of VLAN management information be made early in the switch commissioning process, and via the console port.
Name: 16-character ASCII string. Default: admin. The system name can make it
easier to identify the switches within your network provided that all switches are
given a unique name.
Password: 16-character ASCII string. Default: admin. From here, you can modify
the default management password.
Console Inactivity Timeout (secs): 0 or 60 to 10000. Default: 0. Specifies when
the console will time out and display the login screen if there is no user activity.
A value of zero disables timeouts for console users. For console users, the
maximum timeout value is limited to 10,000 seconds.
Web Inactivity Timeout (secs): 0 or 60 to 10000. Default: 0. Specifies when the
Web management interface will time out and display the login screen if there is
no user activity. A value of zero disables timeouts for Web management users.
For Web server users, the maximum timeout value is limited to 10,000 seconds.
SNMP Enabled: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). This parameter enables
or disables SNMP access to the device. The device supports Simple Network
Management Protocol Version 1 and Version 2 (SNMPv1 and SNMPv2), which
provide access to devices over the network.
SNMP Trap Destination: XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX, where XXX ranges from 0 to 255.
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Default: 0.0.0.0. This is the IP address of the user’s SNMP management station
if it is configured to receive traps and notifications.
SNMP Read Community: Any 20 characters. Default: public. This parameter
identifies the MIB tree(s) to which this entry authorizes read access.
SNMP Write Community: Any 20 characters. Default: private. This parameter
identifies the MIB tree(s) to which this entry authorizes write access.
SNMP Trap Community: Any 20 characters. Default: public. This parameter
identifies the MIB tree(s) to which this entry authorizes access for notifications.
VLAN Mode: Either “Port-based” or “802.1Q VLAN” (default). Specifies the VLAN
mode to configure the 802.1Q-based vlan or the port-based vlan, or to close
the function. This device supports Virtual VLAN, which means the network can
be segmented into groups to reduce collisions caused by wide broadcasting.
The device supports both port-based VLAN and 802.1Q tag-based VLAN: Port based VLAN directs incoming packets to VLANs according to their ingress
ports; 802.1Q tag-based VLAN adds a tag to the header of the packet to direct
the packet to the right VLAN. Note: When you change the VLAN mode, the
system will reboot.
MAC Agetime (secs): 10 to 65535. Default: 300 seconds. This configures the time
a learned MAC address is held before being aged out.
ports
On this screen, you can configure the function of each port, including Mode and Flow
Control settings. Select the port number and set its function, then click “Apply” to save
the new settings to the device.
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Link: Displays the current link status of each port: “1000MFDX,” “100MFDX,”
“100MHDX,” “10MFDX,” “10MHDX” or “Down.” The field lights green and shows
the link speed if there is a valid connection on the port.
Mode: Options are “Auto speed,” “10M/Half,” “10M/Full,” “100M/Half,” “100M/Full,”
“1000M/Full” and “Disabled.” Default: Auto. Enabling .auto-negotiation (“Auto”)
results in speed and duplex being negotiated upon link detection; both end devices
must be auto-negotiation compliant for the best possible results. 10Mbps and
100Mbps fiber optic media don’t support auto-negotiation, so these media must be
explicitly configured to either half or full duplex. Full duplex operation requires that
both ends be configured as such; otherwise, severe frame loss will occur during
heavy network traffic. “Auto” supports all speed and duplex modes. Disabling a
port (for troubleshooting or to secure it from unauthorized connections, perhaps)
will prevent all frames from being sent and received on that port. Also, when
disabled, link integrity pulses aren’t sent, so the link/activity LED will never be lit.
Flow Control: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). This is useful for preventing
frame loss during times of severe network traffic. Examples of this include
multiple source ports sending to a single destination port or a higher-speed port
bursting to a lower-speed port. When the port is half duplex, it is accomplished
using backpressure, in which the switch simulates collisions, causing the sending
device to retry transmissions according to the Ethernet backoff algorithm. When
the port is full duplex, it is accomplished using PAUSE frame, which causes the
sending device to stop transmitting for a certain period of time.
Drop frames after excessive collisions: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default).
Enable to discard the frames after excessive collision.
Jumbo Frame Support: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default, or 1518 bytes).
Enable to adjust the size of Jumbo Frames to a maximum value of 9600 bytes.
pvlans
Configure the port-based VLAN members on this screen. You need to configure
the current VLAN mode on the System Configuration screen to be PVLAN.
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VLAN Configuration List: Options range from “VLAN Group 1” to ““VLAN Group
24” (default). Specifies the VLAN Group No. to configure its members.
VLAN Members: Options range from “Port 1” to “Port 24” and “Trunk 01” to
“Trunk 08” (default: none selected). These are ports that are allowed to be
members of the VLAN. A trunk can be selected as a VLAN member, but a trunk
group needs to be configured first. NOTE: Model 524063 (24-Port) allows up to
12 member ports per trunk; Model 524087 (16-Port) allows up to 8 member ports
per trunk.
Delete: Click to delete the current VLAN Group configuration.
Modify: Click to complete the current VLAN configuration.
802.1Q VLANs
A virtual LAN, or VLAN, is a group of devices on one or more LAN segments that
communicate as if they were attached to the same physical LAN segment. VLANs
are extremely flexible because they are based on logical instead of physical
connections. When VLANs are introduced, all traffic in the network must belong
to one or another VLAN. Traffic on one VLAN cannot pass to another, except
through an intranetwork router or Layer 3 switch. A VLAN tag is the identification
information that is present in frames in order to support VLAN operation.
Tagged vs. Untagged Frames
Tagged frames are frames with 802.1Q (VLAN) tags that specify a valid VLAN
identifier (VID). Untagged frames are frames without tags or frames that carry 802.1p
(Prioritization) tags only having prioritization information and a VID of 0. Frames
with a VID of 0 are also called priority-tagged frames. When a switch receives a
tagged frame, it extracts the VID and forwards the frame to other ports in the same
VLAN.
Native VLAN
Each port is assigned a native VLAN number, the port VLAN ID (PVID). When an
untagged frame ingresses a port, it is associated with the port’s native VLAN. By
default, when the switch transmits a frame on the native VLAN, it sends the frame
untagged, but can be configured to transmit frames on the native VLAN tagged.
VLAN Ingress and Egress Rules
Ingress rules are the rules applied to all frames when they are received by the
switch, as indicated below.
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Egress rules are the rules applied to all frames when they are transmitted by the
switch, as indicated below.
From here, you can configure the IEEE 802.1Q tag-based VLAN members. You
need to configure the current VLAN mode on the System Configuration screen to
be 802.1Q VLAN.
VLAN List: Options range from “1” (default) to “4094.” Specifies the VLAN ID to
configure its members. First you need to click “Add” to add your VLAN ID.
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VLAN Members: Options range from “1” to “24” and “Trunk 01” to “Trunk 08”
(default: none selected). These are ports that are allowed to be members of the
VLAN. A trunk can be selected as a VLAN member, but a trunk .group needs to
be configured first.
Delete: Click to delete the current VLAN Group configuration.
Modify: Click to complete the current VLAN configuration.
When your VLAN Mode option is 802.1Q tag-based VLAN, you need to configure
the VLAN member port’s attribute.
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VLAN Aware: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). When enabled, the VLAN aware attribute will be enabled; when disabled, the VLAN-unaware attribute will
be enabled. The native operation mode for an IEEE 802.1Q-compliant switch is
VLAN-aware. Even if a specific network architecture doesn’t use VLANs, the
system default VLAN settings allow the switch to still operate in a VLAN-aware
mode while providing functionality required for almost any network application.
However, the IEEE 802.1Q standard defines a set of rules that must be followed
by all VLAN-aware switches. For example:
• Valid VID range is 1 to 4094 (VID=0 and VID=4095 are invalid)
• Each frame ingressing a VLAN-aware switch is associated with a valid VID
• Each frame egressing a VLAN-aware switch is either untagged or tagged with
a valid VID (which means priority-tagged frames with VID=0 are never sent
out by a VLAN-aware switch)
It turns out that some applications have requirements conflicting with the IEEE
8202.1Q native mode of operation (e.g., some applications explicitly require
priority-tagged frames to be received by end devices). To ensure the required
operation in any possible application scenario and provide full compatibility with
legacy (VLAN-unaware) devices, the switch can be configured to work in a
VLAN-unaware mode. In that mode:
• Frames ingressing a VLAN-unaware switch are not associated with any VLAN
• Frames egressing a VLAN-unaware switch are sent out unmodified; i.e., in the
same untagged, 802.1Q-tagged format as they were received.
Ingress Filtering Enabled: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). When enabled,
checks whether the source port and this port are in the same VLAN, only allowing
the same VLAN members to forward packets. When disabled, it allows the
same PVID packets to receive.
Packet Type: Either “All” or “Tagged Only” (default: All). When selecting “Tagged
Only,” the port will only be allowed to receive the tagged frames. “All” allows all
packets to access this port.
PVID: Default: 1. Specifies the VLAN ID associated with untagged frames received
on this port. Frames tagged with a non-zero VLAN ID will always be associated
with the VLAN ID retrieved from the frame tag.
aggregation
This screen allows you to aggregate several Ethernet ports into one logical link
(port trunk) with a higher bandwidth. Aggregation can be used for two purposes:
• To obtain increased, linearly incremental link bandwidth
• To improve network reliability by creating link redundancy. If one of the aggregated
links fails, the switch will balance the traffic between the remaining links.
To set up port trunk groups, put the selected ports’ numbers into the same trunk group.
You can configure up to eight groups. Click “Apply” to complete the configuration.
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Group: Options range from “Group1” to “Group 8” or “Normal” (default). NOTE: The
trunk group number doesn’t affect port trunk operation in any way and is only
used for identification. The port of the normal group does not belong to any
trunk groups.
Port: Select any combination of numbers valid for this parameter (default: none
selected). This creates a list of ports aggregated in the trunk.
Procedure Recommendations and Limitations
Link aggregation is also known as port trunking or port bundling. The Gigabit WebSmart Switch provides these related features:
• Support for up to eight port trunks. NOTE: At least two ports are required to
compose a port trunk.
• Up to 12 ports can be aggregated in a port trunk for Model 524063 (24-Port); up
to 8 ports for Model 524087 (16-Port).
• Highly randomized load balancing between the aggregated links based on trunk
algorithm configuration.
Port trunks must be properly configured on both sides of the aggregated link. In
switch-to-switch connections, if the configuration on both sides doesn’t match (e.g.,
some ports are mistakenly not included in the port trunk), it will result in a loop. To
avoid this and ensure a successful configuration, the following procedure is strongly
recommended.
1.Disconnect or disable all the ports involved in the configuration; i.e., either being
added to or removed from the port trunk.
2.Configure the port trunk on both switches.
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3.Double-check the port trunk configuration on both switches.
4.Reconnect or re-enable the ports.
If the port trunk is being configured while the ports are still connected or enabled,
the ports will be disabled for a few seconds automatically.
Also, consider these function limitations when configuring port trunks:
• A port mirroring target port can not be a member of a port trunk. However, a
port mirroring source port can be.
• A DHCP relay agent client port can not be a member of a port trunk.
• Load balancing between the links of a bundle is randomized and may not be ideal.
For instance, if three 1000Mbps links are aggreagted, the result bandwidth of the
port trunk may not be precisely 3000 Mbps.
• A static MAC address should not be configured to reside on an aggregated port, ..
as it may cause some frames destined to that address to be dropped.
mac binding
This screen allows you to bind a MAC address to a specific port on the switch.
Static MAC addresses are usually configured to enforce port security (if supported),
and when a device can receive — but cannot transmit — frames.
Port Number: Options range from “Port 1” (default) to “Port 24.” Specifies the port
number to be bound with MAC addresses.
MAC Address: XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX, where XX ranges from 0 to FF. Default:
00-00-00-00-00-00. This is the MAC address that is to be statically configured.
VLAN ID: Options range from “1” (default) to “4094.” This is the VLAN identifier of
the VLAN upon which the MAC address operates.
Add: Click to add the item.
Delete: Click to delete the bound MAC address item.
Exit: Click to exit this configuration screen.
Note: When the current VLAN Mode option is not IEEE802.1Q tag-based VLAN,
the VLAN ID parameter will be disabled.
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arl table
This screen allows you to view MAC addresses of the MAC address table.
MAC Address: XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX, where XX ranges 0 to FF. Default: 00-00 00-00-00-00. Specifies the MAC address to search for.
Search: Click to start searching for the specified MAC address.
Note: The MAC address table consists of static addresses, dynamic addresses
and the device address.
multicast configuration
IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol) is used by IP hosts to report their
host group memberships to multicast routers. As hosts join and leave specific
multicast groups, streams of traffic are directed to or withheld from that host. The
IGMP protocol operates between multicast routers and IP hosts. When an
unmanaged switch is placed between multicast routers and their hosts, the multicast
streams will be distributed to all ports. This may introduce significant traffic onto
ports that do not require it and receive no benefit from it.
A device with IGMP Snooping enabled will act upon IGMP messages sent from the
router and the host, restricting traffic streams to the appropriate LAN segments.
The following figure provides a simple example of IGMP use. One “producer” IP
host (P1) is generating two IP multicast streams, M1 and M2. There are four
potential “consumers” of these streams, C1 through C4. The multicast router
discovers which host wishes to subscribe to which stream by sending general
membership queries to each of the segments.
In this example, the general membership query sent to the C1-C2 segment is
answered by a membership report (also referred to as a “join”) indicating the desire
to subscribe to stream M2. The router will forward the M2 stream onto the C1-C2
segment. In a similar fashion, the router discovers that it must forward M1 onto
segment C3-C4.
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A consumer may join any number of multicast groups, issuing a membership report
for each group. Hosts on the segment note membership reports from other hosts
and will suppress their own reports accordingly. In this way, the IGMP protocol
guarantees the segment will issue only one join for each group.
The router periodically queries each of its segments in order to determine if at least
one consumer still subscribes to a given stream. If no responses occur within a given
timeout period (usually two query intervals), the router will prune the multicast
stream from the given segment. A more usual method of pruning occurs when
consumers wishing to unsubscribe issue an IGMP “leave group” message. The
router will immediately issue a group-specific membership query to determine if
there are any remaining subscribers of that group on the segment. After the last
consumer of a group has un-subscribed, the router will prune the multicast stream
from the given segment.
IGMP Snooping Rules
When a multicast source starts multicasting, the traffic stream will be immediately
blocked on segments from which joins have not been received. The switch will
always forward all multicast traffic to the ports where multicast routers are attached
unless configured otherwise.
Packets with a destination IP multicast address in the 224.0.0.X range which are
not IGMP are always forwarded to all ports. This behavior is based on the fact that
many systems do not send joins for IP mulicast addresses in this range while still
listening to such packets. The switch will only send IGMP membership reports out
of those ports where multicast routers are attached because sending membership
reports to hosts could result in unintentionally preventing a host from joining a
specific group.
Multicast routers use IGMP to elect a master router known as the querier: the one
with the lowest IP address. All other routers become of non-queriers, participating
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only to forward multicast traffic. When the querier election process is complete, the
switch simply relays IGMP queries received from the querier.
When sending IGMP packets, the switch uses its own IP address, if it has one, or
an address of 0.0.0.0, if it doesn’t have any assigned IP address (e.g., when sending
packets on a non-management VLAN). NOTE: IGMP Snooping switches perform
multicast pruning using a multicast frame’s destination MAC multicast address,
which depends on the group IP multicast address: IP address W.X.Y.Z corresponds
to MAC address 01-00-5E-XX-YY-ZZ, where XX is the lower 7 bits of X and YY and
ZZ are simply Y and Z coded in hexadecimal.
IP multicast addresses such as 224.1.1.1 and 225.1.1.1 will both map onto the same
MAC address 01-00-5E-01-01-01. This is indeed a problem for which the IETF
Network Working Group currently has offered no solution. Users are advised to be
aware of and avoid this problem.
From here, you can configure your Static Multicast Groups.
MAC Address: XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX, where XX ranges from 0 to FF. Default:
00-00-00-00-00-00. This is the multicast group MAC address.
VLAN ID: Options range from “1” (default) to “4094.” This is the VLAN identifier of
the VLAN upon which the multicast group operates.
Ports: Select any combination of numbers valid for this parameter (default: none
selected). These are ports to which the multicast group traffic is forwarded.
Add: Click to add a new static multicast group.
Delete: Click to delete the item.
Static Multicast Group Table: From the static multicast table, you can view all of
the current static multicast groups’ information.
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rstp
The Gigabit Web-Smart Switch provides these RSTP-related features:
• Industry-standard support of the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, which features
a compatibility mode with legacy STP.
• Superior performance, as RSTP will recognize a link failure and put an alternate
port into forwarding mode within milliseconds.
• RSTP may be enabled on a per-port basis.
• Ports may be configured as edge ports, which allows rapid transitioning to the
forwarding state for non-STP hosts.
• Path costs may be hard-configured or determined by port speed negotiation, in
either the STP or RSTP style.
• Full bridge (historically, a device implementing STP on its ports has been referred
to as a bridge, and the device uses the terms bridge and switch synonymously)
and port status provide a rich set of tools for performance monitoring and
debugging.
RSTP Operation
The 802.1D Spanning Tree Protocol was developed to allow the construction of
robust networks that incorporate redundancy while pruning the active topology of
the network to prevent loops. While STP is effective, it requires that frame transfer
must halt after a link outage until all bridges in the network are sure to be aware of
the new topology. Using 802.1D-recommended values, this period lasts 30 seconds.
Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (IEEE 802.1w) was a further evolution of the 802.1D
Spanning Tree Protocol. It replaced the settling period with an active handshake
between bridges that guarantees topology information to be rapidly progagated
through the network. RSTP also offers a number of other significant innovations:
• Topology changes in RSTP can be originated from and acted upon by any
designated bridges, leading to more rapid propagation of address information;
unlike topology changes in STP, which must be passed to the root bridge before
they can be propagated to the network.
• RSTP explicitly recognizes two blocking roles — alternate and backup port roles
— including them in computations of when to learn and forward; while STP
recognizes one state — blocking — for ports that should not forward.
• RSTP bridges generate their own configuration messages, even if they fail to
receive one from the root bridge. This leads to quicker failure detection, but STP
relays configuration messages received on the root port out its designated ports.
If an STP bridge fails to receive a message from its neighbor, it cannot be sure
where along the path to the root a failure occurred.
• RSTP offers edge port recognition, allowing ports at the edge of the network to
forward frames immediately after activation while at the same time protecting them
against loops.
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• While providing a much better performance than STP, IEEE 802.1w RSTP still .. .
required up to a few seconds to restore network connectivity when a topology
change occurred. A revised and highly optimized RSTP version (which this switch
supports) was defined in the IEEE standard 802.1D-2004 edition and now reduces
network recovery times to just milliseconds.
RSTP States and Roles
RSTP bridges have roles to play, being either root or designated. One bridge, the
root bridge, is the logical center of the network. All other bridges in the network are
designated bridges. RSTP also assigns each port of the bridge a state and a role.
The RSTP state describes what is happening at the port in relation to address
learning and frame forwarding. The RSTP role basically describes whether the
port is facing the center or edges of the network and whether it can currently be
used or not.
There are three RSTP states: discarding, learning and forwarding.
The discarding state is entered when the port is first taken into service. The port
does not learn addresses in this state and does not participate in frame transfer.
The port looks for RSTP traffic in order to determine its role in the network. When
it is determined that the port will play an active part in the network, the state will
change to learning.
The learning state is entered when the port is preparing to act as an active member
of the network. The port learns addresses in this state but does not participate in
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frame transfer. In a network of RSTP bridges, the time spent in this state is usually
quite short. RSTP bridges operating in STP compatibility mode will spend 6 to 40
seconds in this state.
After learning, the bridge will place the port in the forwarding state. The port both
learns addresses and participates in frame transfer while in this state.
From here, you can configure the RSTP.
System Priority: Options range from “0” to “61440.” Default: 32768. This setting
provides a way to control the topology of the STP-connected network. The desired
root and designated bridges can be configured for a particular topology. The
bridge with the lowest priority will become root. In the event of a failure of the
root bridge, the bridge with the next-lowest priority will then become root.
Designated bridges that (for redundancy purposes) service a common LAN also
use priority to determine which bridge is active. In this way, careful selection of
System Priorities can establish the path of traffic flows in normal and abnormal
conditions.
Hello Time: Enter a value from 1 to 10. Default: 2. This is the time between
configuration messages issued by the root bridge. Shorter hello times result in
faster detection of topology changes at the expense of moderate increases in
STP traffic.
Max Age: Enter a value from 6 to 40. Default: 20. This is the time for which a
configuration message remains valid after being issued by the root bridge.
Configure this parameter with care when many tiers of bridges exist or when
slow speed links (such as those used in WANs) are part of the network.
Forward Delay: Enter a value from 4 to 30. Default: 15. This is the amount of time
a bridge spends learning MAC addresses on a rising port before beginning to
forward traffic. Lower values allow the port to reach the forwarding state more
quickly, but at the expense of flooding unlearned addresses to all ports.
Force Version: Either “Normal” (default) or “Compatible.” Select the version of
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Spanning Tree Protocol to support: Normal only supports Rapid Spanning Tree
Protocol; Compatible supports both STP (802.1d) and RSTP.
Protocol Enabled: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). Enabled means you’re
enabling RSTP for this port as per the configuration in the RSTP Port Configuration
menu. STP may be disabled for the port only if the port does not attach to an
STP-enabled bridge in any way. Failure to meet this requirement will result in an
undetectable traffic loop in the network. A more desirable alternative to disabling
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the port is to leave STP enabled but to configure the port as an edge port. A
good candidate for disabling STP would be a port that services a single host
computer. You can enable RSTP of all aggregations.
Edge Port: Either “Enabled” (default) or “Disabled.” Edge ports are ports that do
not participate in the Spanning Tree, but still send configuration messages. Edge
ports transition directly to frame forwarding without any listening and learning
delays. The MAC tables of edge ports do not need to be flushed when topology
changes occur in the STP network. Unlike an STP-disabled port, accidentally
connecting an edge port to another port in the spanning tree will result in a
detectable loop.
Path Cost: Enter a value from 0 to 2147483647, or “Auto” (default). Setting the cost ..
manually provides the ability to preferentially select specific ports to carry traffic
over others. Leave this field set to Auto to use the standard RSTP port costs as
negotiated (20,000 for 1Gbps links, 200,000 for 100Mbps links and 2,000,000
for 10Mbps links); or the standard STP port costs as negotiated (4 for 1Gbps
links, 19 for 100Mbps links and 100 for 10Mbps links).
mirroring
Port mirroring is a troubleshooting tool in which all traffic on a designated port is
copied, or mirrored, to a target port. If a protocol analyzer is attached to the target
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port, the traffic stream of valid frames on any source port is made available for
analysis.
Select a target port that has a higher speed than the source port. Mirroring a
1000Mbps port onto a 100Mbps port may result in an improperly mirrored stream.
Frames will be dropped if the full duplex rate of frames on the source port exceeds
the transmission speed of the target port. Since both transmitted and received
frames on the source port are mirrored to the target port, frames will be discarded
if the sum traffic exceeds the target port’s transmission rate. This problem reaches
its extreme in the case where traffic on a 1000Mbps full duplex port is mirrored
onto a 100Mbps half duplex port. Note: Invalid frames received on the source port
will not be mirrored. These include CRC errors, oversize and undersize packets,
fragments, jabbers, collisions, late collisions and drop events.
Mode: Either “Tx” (default) or “All.” The All mode causes all frames received and
transmitted by the mirrored port to be transmitted out of the sniffer port; Tx mode
causes all frames transmitted by the mirrored port to be transmitted out of the
sniffer port.
Source Port: Options range from “Port 01” to “Port 24.” The selected port is the
port being monitored.
Mirroring Port: Options range from “Port 01” to “Port 24.” The selected port is the
port where a monitoring device should be connected.
Quality of Service
QoS (Quality of Service) enhances communication quality by giving precedence to
certain classes of packets. This device provides Disabled, 802.1p, DSCP and Port
QoS modes. The inspection phase results in the QoS of individual frames being
determined. When these frames are forwarded to the egress port, they’re collected
into one of the priority queues according to the QoS assigned to each frame.
QoS weighting selects the degree of preferential treatment attached to different
priority queues. The ratio of the number of higher QoS to lower QoS frames transmitted
can be programmed. If desired, the user can program that lower QoS frames are
transmitted only after all higher QoS frames have been serviced.
From here, select a QoS mode and click “Apply” to put settings into effect.
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Prioritize Traffic: Options are “Custom” (default), “All Low Priority,” “All Normal
Priority,” “All Medium Priority” and “All High Priority.” This screen allows you to
quickly configure the 802.1p priorities.
802.1p Value: Ranging from 0 to 7, these are the values of the IEEE 802.1p priority.
Priority: Options are “low,” “normal,” “medium” and “high.” Default: according to the
Priority Traffic option. This is a QoS assigned to received tagged frames with
the specified IEEE 802.1p priority value.
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Prioritize Traffic: Options are “Custom,” “All Low Priority,” “All Normal Priority,”
“All Medium Priority” and “All High Priority” (default). This screen allows you to
quickly configure the DSCP priorities.
DSCP Value: Enter a value from 0 to 63. This is a Differentiated Services Code
Point (DSCP) – a value of the 6-bit DiffServ field in the Type-of-Service (ToS)
field of the IP header.
Priority: Options are “low,” “normal,” “medium” and “high.” Default: according to the
Priority Traffic option. This is a QoS assigned to received tagged frames with
the specified DSCP.
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Prioritize Traffic: Options are “Custom,” “All Low Priority” (default), “All Normal
Priority,” “All Medium Priority” and “All High Priority.” This screen allows you to
quickly configure the Port priorities.
Priority: Options are “low,” “normal,” “medium” and “high.” Default: according to the
Priority Traffic option. Specifies the default QoS priority for each port.
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filter
Mode: Options are “Disabled” (default), “Static” and “DHCP.” Specifies the source
IP address filter model. Disabled allows all packets to be forwarded; Static allows
packets with the specified source IP address to be forwarded while other packets
are discarded; DHCP allows packets with a DHCP server assigned as the
source IP address to be forwarded.
IP Address: XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX where XXX ranges from 0 to 255. Default:
0.0.0.0. Specifies the packets’ source IP address to be allowed forwarding. An
IP address is a 32-bit number that is notated by using four numbers from 0
through 255, separated by periods. Only a unicast IP address is allowed that
ranges from 1.0.0.0 to 233.255.255.255.
IP Mask: XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX where XXX ranges from 0 to 255. Default: 0.0.0.0,
Specifies the packets’ source IP address range to be allowed forwarding. An IP
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subnet mask is a 32-bit number that is notated by using four numbers from 0
through 255, separated by periods. Typically, subnet mask numbers use either
0 or 255 as values (e.g., 255.255.255.0), but other numbers can appear.
DHCP Server Allowed: Either “Enabled” or “Disabled” (default). When the DHCP
option is configured, enable these parameters; otherwise, the DHCP packets
will be discarded and the port will discard all packets.
rate limit
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Policer: Options range from “128” to “3698 Kbps” or “None” (default). This is the
rate at which received frames will start to be discarded by the switch.
Shaper: Options range from “128” to “3698 Kbps” or “None” (default). This is the
maximum rate at which the switch will transmit frames on this port. The switch
will discard frames in order to meet this rate, if required.
storm control
This screen allows you to configure the rules for Storm Control, which limits ICMP
Rate, Learn Frames Rate, Broadcast Rate, Multicast Rate, Multicast Rate and
Flooded Unicast Rate.
ICMP Rate: Options range from “No Limit” (default) to “1K” to “32768K.”
Learn Frames Rate: Options range from “No Limit” (default) to “1K” to “32768K.”
Broadcast Rate: Options range from “No Limit” (default) to “1K” to “32768K.”
Multicast Rate: Options range from “No Limit” (default) to “1K” to “32768K.”
Flooded Unicast Rate: Options range from “No Limit” (default) to “1K” to “32768K.”
Note: No Limit means all frames will not be limited. Specify the appropriate limit
rate of the frame type.
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Monitoring
Detailed Statistics
View the detailed transmitting and receiving status of each port by clicking the port’s
hyperlink. Click “Clear” to clear all statistics; click “Refresh” to renew them.
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Receive Total Panel
Rx Packets: The number of received good packets (Unicast+Multicast+Broadcast)
and dropped packets.
Rx Octets: The number of octets in received good packets (Unicast+Multicast+
Broadcast) and dropped packets.
Rx High Priority Packets: The number of received High Priority good packets
and dropped packets.
Rx Low Priority Packets: The number of received Low Priority good packets and
dropped packets.
Rx Broadcast: The number of good Broadcast packets received.
Rx Broad- and Multicast: The number of good Broadcast and Multicast Packets
received.
Rx Error Packets: The number of any type of erroneous packets.
Transmit Total Panel
Tx Packets: The number of transmitted good packets.
Tx Octets: The number of octets on a transmitted good packets.
Tx High Priority Packets: The number of transmitted High Priority good packets.
Tx Low Priority Packets: The number of transmitted Low Priority good packets.
Tx Broadcast: The number of transmitted Broadcast packets.
Tx Broad- and Multicast: The number of transmitted Broadcast and Multicast
packets.
Tx Error Packets: The number of any type of erroneous packets.
Receive Size Counters Panel
Rx 64 Bytes: The number of received packets with size of 64 octets.
Rx 65-127 Bytes: The number of received packets with size of 65 to 127 octets.
Rx 128-255 Bytes: The number of received packets with size of 128 to 255 octets.
Rx 256-511 Bytes: The number of received packets with size of 256 to 511 octets.
Rx 512-1023 Bytes: The number of received packets with size of 512 to 1023 octets.
Rx 1024- Bytes: The number of received packets with size of 1024 to maximum
octets.
Transmit Size Counters Panel
Tx 64 Bytes: The number of transmitted packets with size of 64 octets.
Tx 65-127 Bytes: The number of transmitted packets with size of 65 to 127 octets.
Tx 128-255 Bytes: The number of transmitted packets with size of 128 to 255 .octets.
Tx 256-511 Bytes: The number of transmitted packets with size of 256 to 511
octets.
Tx 512-1023 Bytes: The number of transmitted packets with size of 512 to 1023
octets.
Tx 1024- Bytes: The number of transmitted packets with size of 1024 to maximum
octets.
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Receive Error Counters Panel
Rx CRC/Aligment: The number of packets received which meet all the following
conditions:
• Packet data length is between 64 and 1518 octets inclusive.
• Packet has invalid CRC.
• Collision Event has not been detected.
• Late Collision Event has been detected.
Rx Undersize: The number of received packets that meet all the following conditions:
• Packet data length is less than 64 octets.
• Collision Event has not been detected.
• Late Collision Event has not been detected.
• Packet has valid CRC
Rx Oversize: The number of packets received with data length greater than 1518
octets and valid CRC.
Rx Fragments: The number of packets received which meet all the following
conditions:
• Packet data length is less than 64 octets, or packet without SFD and is less than
64 octets in length.
• Collision Event has not been detected.
• Late Collision Event has not been detected.
• Packet has invalid CRC.
Rx Jabber: The number of packets which meet all the following conditions:
• Packet data length is greater that 1518 octets.
• Packet has invalid CRC.
Rx Drops: The number of received packets that are dropped.
Transmit Error Counters Panel
Tx Collisions: The number of transmitted packets for which Collision Event has
been detected.
Tx Drops: The number of transmitted packets that are dropped.
Tx Overflow: The number of packets transmitted with data length greater than 1518
octets and valid CRC.
rstp status
This displays the switch’s RSTP parameters. Click “Refresh” to renew the status.
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Port: Any combination of numbers — corresponding to port numbers as seen on
the switch’s front panel — valid for this parameter.
VLAN ID: Displays a value from 1 to 4094 or “None” (default).
Path Cost: Displays a value from 0 to 2147483647 or “None” (default). This is the
cost offered by this port. If the Bridge RSTP cost style is STP, 1Gbps ports will
contribute 4, 100Mbps ports will contribute 19 and 10Mbps contribute a cost of
100. If the cost style is RSTP, 1Gbps ports will contribute 20,000, 100Mbps ports
will contribute a cost of 200,000 and 10Mbps ports contribute a cost of 2,000,000.
Edge Port: Displays either yes or no.
P2P Port: Displays either yes or no. Default: None. RSTP uses a peer-to-peer
protocol that provides for rapid transitioning on point-to-point links. This protocol
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is automatically turned off in situations where multiple STP brdges communicate
over a shared (non-point-to-point) LAN. The bridge will automatically take point to-point to be true when the link is found to be operating full duplex. The point to-point parameter allows this behavior or operates a point-to-point link, but
cannot run the link full duplex. It will force the parameter false when the port
operates the link full duplex, but is still not point-to-point (e.g., a full duplex link to
an unmanaged bridge that concentrates two other STP bridges).
Protocol: Displays either RSTP or STP.
Port State: Displays Non-STP, Disabled, Learning, Forwarding, Blocking or
Discarding to indicate the STP status of the port.
• Non-STP: STP is disabled on this port.
• Disabled: STP is enabled on this port, but the link is down.
• Learning: The port is learning MAC addresses in order to prevent flooding when
it begins forwarding traffic.
• Forwarding: The port is forwarding traffic.
• Blocking: The port is used in the STP topology, but isn’t forwarding traffic.
• Discarding: The link is not used in the STP topology, but is standing by.
Maintenance
Warm Restart
Yes: Click to reboot the device in software reset.
factory default
Yes: Click to reset the switch to the default configuration.
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software upload
Browse...
Browse...: Click to find the new firmware file you want, then click “Upload” to
upgrade the firmware and reboot the switch system. IMPORTANT: During the
upgrade process, don’t turn off the power or any function on the Web page.
logout
Click to exit the Web management interface.
console management
The Gigabit Web-Smart Switch switch provides a console interface for local
configuration through its RS232 port. This is an internal, character-oriented user
interface for system administration, such as resetting factory configuration or changing
some settings.
Direct Access
Direct access to the administration console is achieved by directly connecting a
terminal or a PC equipped with a terminal-emulation program (such as HyperTerminal)
to the switch console port. When using the management method, configure the
terminal-emulation program to use the following default parameters:
• 115200bps
• 8 data bits
• No parity
• 1 stop bit
Logging On
Enter the factory default password. The user default password is “admin”; the super
password is “superword.” Or enter a user-defined password if you change the
factory default password later.
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Note: The super password can’t be modified; and only one console user can log
on to the switch at a time.
Command-Line Interface (CLI) Commands
The console management interface is based on command lines. After you log in to
the system, the root directory displays. Enter “?” to show all commands.
If you’re not sure about the correctness of a command entry, enter “?” or a space
and the system will list possible commands and descriptions, as shown on the
screen below. Common commands and their resultant screens with options follow.
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Enter the IP address, IP mask, IP gateway or VID according to the above format.
help
This displays command syntax information.
System
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System Configuration
System Restore Default
System Reboot
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IP Configuration
IP Setup
IP Ping
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console management
specifications
Standards
• IEEE 802.1d (Spanning Tree Protocol)
• IEEE 802.1p (Traffic Prioritization)
• IEEE 802.1q (VLAN Tagging)
• IEEE 802.3 (10Base-T Ethernet)
• IEEE 802.3u (100Base-TX Fast
Ethernet)
• IEEE 802.3ab (Twisted Pair Gigabit
Ethernet)
• IEEE 802.3ad (Link Aggregation)
• IEEE 802.3x (flow control for full duplex
mode)
• Port Aggregation/Trunking:
- Model 524063: 8 groups, with up to
12 member ports per trunk
- Model 524087: 8 groups, with up to
8 member ports per trunk
• Broadcast Storm configuration with
ICMP rate, broadcast rate, multicast
rate, flooded unicast rate
• Port Filter configuration
General
• Media support:
- 10Base-T Cat3, 4, 5 UTP/STP RJ45
- 100Base-TX Cat5 UTP/STP RJ45
- 1000Base-T Cat5e UTP/STP RJ45
• Packet filter/forwarding rate:
- 1,488,000 pps (1000 Mbps)
- 148,800 pps (100 Mbps)
- 14,880 pps (10 Mbps)
• MAC address table: 8192 entries
• Backplane speed:
- Model 524063: 48 Gbps
- Model 524087: 32 Gbps
• Switch architecture: store and forward
• Certifications: FCC Class A, CE
Power
• Internal power supply: 100 – 240 V AC,
50/60 Hz
• Power consumption: 30 Watts (max.)
Configuration Options
• Port link speed: 10 Mbps, 100 Mbps,
1000 Mbps or auto-negotiation
• Flow control on/off per port
• VLAN
• Port Mirroring
LEDs
• Power
• Link/Act
Environmental
• Metal housing, 19” rackmount, 1U
• Dimensions: 440 (L) x 205 (W) x 44
(H) mm (17.3 x 8 x 1.7 in.)
• Weight: 3.7 kg (8.0 lbs.)
• Operating temperature: 0 – 40°C
(32 – 104°F)
• Operating humidity: 10 – 90% RH,
non-condensing
• Storage temperature: -40 – 70°C
(-4 – 158°F)
Package Contents
• GigabitWeb-Smart Switch
• Quick installation guide
• Setup CD with user manual
specifications
43
INTELLINET NETWORK SOLUTIONS™ offers a complete line
of active and passive networking products.
Ask your local computer dealer for more information or visit
www.intellinet-network.com.
Copyright © INTELLINET NETWORK SOLUTIONS
All products mentioned are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
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