Preliminary Beta Operation Manual

Preliminary Beta Operation Manual
Preliminary Beta Operation Manual
Hardware Revision 5 - 19th January 2011
Sync-Gen II is compatible with Mac OS-X 10.3.9 and later, Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7.
Sync-Gen II is provided in VST, AU, RTAS formats. TDM will be provided in the next Beta release.
RTAS and TDM Support: Pro Tools 7.0 and later.
MAC-OSX Installation
(1) Mount [Sync-Gen II OSX Setup.dmg] and follow the installer instructions on screen.
(2) In your host DAW Application assigning/inserting Sync-Gen II as a software instrument will
open/enable the Plug-In.
Windows Installation
(1) Double Click the [SyncGen_II_win_setup.exe] installer and follow instructions on screen.
(2) In your host DAW Application assigning/inserting Sync-Gen II as a software instrument will
open/enable the Plug-In.
NB: Vista or Windows 7 - be sure to use a folder owned by the user. Do not use [c:/program files]
for instance otherwise you will have to run your music application with Administrator Rights.
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Connections and Setup for Correct Operation
Sync-Gen II is a true Stereo Plug-in. Two separate channels of pulses are required for correct
operation when used with your Innerclock Systems synchronisation interface.

Channel One (Left Hand Side) provides the continuous sync signal from the Sync-Sequencer.

Channel Two (Right Hand Side) provides the individual transport pulses from the TransportSequencer and the DAW Host Application transport commands.
Soundcard Output Assignment
You will require a multichannel soundcard with a minimum of four discrete outputs for correct
operation of Sync-Gen II and your Innerclock Systems synchronisation interface. No special cables,
Output DC Coupling or any other electronic modification to your hardware is necessary.


Outputs 1+2 for your DAW Audio Playback
Outputs 3+4 for your Sync-Gen II Plug-in Playback
Correct Output Levels
The Innerclock Systems Sync-Lock and Cync-Lock synchronisation interfaces use sophisticated
electronics and software to accurately convert full frequency audio signals into precision
synchronisation clocks within 20 microseconds (0.882 samples @ 44.1 kHz).
A pulse output signal of -20dB is the ideal level for reliable and jitter-free sync generation. Too much
or too little input signal fed to the sync interface will lead to erratic and unstable synchronisation. If
your external hardware does not tempo slave-sync correctly, check the output levels of Sync-Gen II
in your DAW mixer window.
The output levels of Sync-Gen II are set correctly in the software preferences on first launch. Certain
soundcard outputs may be calibrated differently [-10dB, 0dB, +4dB] and you may need to adjust the
output levels of Sync-Gen II to match.
To do this see page 18 of this operation manual.
These new levels are stored within Sync-Gen II preferences and will remain set until changed.
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Specific Connections for the Interface Models
SYNC-LOCK


Connect whichever output of your soundcard is producing the continuous sync signal from
the Sync-Sequencer side of Sync-Gen II (Left Hand Side) to the [Audio Clock In] input of the
Sync-Lock.
Connect whichever output of your soundcard is producing the individual transport pulses
from the Transport-Sequencer and the DAW Host Application transport commands side of
Sync-Gen II (Right Hand Side) to the [Audio Start/Stop In] input of the Sync-Lock.
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Other Connections for Correct Operation
Y-Split for the Sync-Lock
On the Right Hand Side of the Sync-Lock there is a ¼” socket marked [Pulse Out]. This is a double
function TRS [Tip/Ring/Sleeve] dual mono socket. With your original Sync-Lock Kit and Sync-Gen II
LE package you will find a Y-Split adapter that provides access to both functions.
1. Footswitch
Because the Innerclock Systems synchronisation interfaces generate their outgoing sync pulses from
sample accurate DAW audio, there will be occasions when DAW playback stops mid-sequence. In
these instances, the sync interface is left ‘hanging’ waiting for the next audio pulse. Likewise, your
external Din Sync and Midi Clock slave devices will also be left ‘hanging’ waiting for the next clock
pulse. Pressing [Start] on your DAW again will not reset your slave devices correctly and instead they
will simply carry on playback from their previously ‘hung’ position. The Footswitch provides a
convenient way to force-reset the sync interfaces and your external hardware when required.
NB: The Footswitch must be connected for correct interface operation.
Special Note: Over the last thirty years of electronic music development, manufacturers of Midi
Clock and Din Sync enabled sequencers and drum machines have chosen different methods of
implementing external synchronisation. Most Midi Clock devices will correctly reset back to the
sequence start position when a Stop/Reset message is received. Some Din Sync devices and a
handful of Midi Clock slave devices do not. These devices stop correctly but do not reset themselves
back to the initial sequence start position. In these situations, after stopping DAW playback and/or
using the footswitch or manual Sync-Gen II [Stop] option – simply pressing [Stop] and [Play] again
on the specific external device will force it to reset and it will be ready for correct external sync
playback
.
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2. Pulse Output
The [Tip] output socket of the Y-Split adapter provides continuous 16th division [+5 Volt DC 20ms
Pulse Width] pulses whenever the Sync-Lock is receiving 24 PPQ pulses at its input. For 8th or 32nd
division pulses simply drive the Sync-Lock at 12 or 48 PPQ accordingly.
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LED Activity
There are four LEDs on the Sync-Lock.

Input Side
The two LEDs on the Left Hand Side of the Sync-Lock indicate when pulse signals are present at the
input. During correct operation, the [Audio Clock In] LED will be lit continuously and the [Audio
Start/Stop In] LED will flash whenever a transport pulse is received.

Output Side
The two LEDs on the Right Hand Side of the Sync-Lock indicate running status and tempo. The LED
under the DIN Sync socket lights [RED] when stopped and [GREEN] when playing. The LED under the
Midi Clock socket flashes [RED] at quarter note timing intervals.
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SYNC-GEN II
Overview
(1) Sync-Gen II is a purpose-specific, sample-position accurate and tempo-grid precise External
Tempo-Sync and Transport Control Generator/Sequencer Plug-in for the Innerclock Systems
Sync-Lock and Cynq-Lock external DAW synchronisation interfaces.
The Plug-in interface can be seen as three distinct sections:
(a) The Sync Pulse Sequencer
(b) The DAW Command Module and Transport Pulse Sequencer
(c) The Options and Manual Transport Control Section
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The Sync-Sequencer
The Sync-Sequencer is responsible for creating the raw audio pulses that allow the Sync-Lock and
Cync-Lock interfaces to generate their sample-accurate and grid-relative external tempo-sync. Midi
Clock and Din Sync require rapid PPQ (Pulses per Quarter Note) to keep time – 24 Pulses per Quarter
Note or 96 Pulses per Bar of 4/4. Working with such fast pulses in a traditional sequencer
environment is complicated because most of the pulses fall in between rhythmic grid positions. They
are not ‘heard’ as such but they must always be there to keep accurate tempo. The Sync-Gen II
Sync-Sequencer is unique because the interface allows the user to program and swing the sync
pulses in a variety of musically creative ways while the software always maintains the correct
number of outgoing pulses to keep everything perfectly in sync.
Global Settings
Global Swing: Minimum = 50% [OFF] Maximum = 75% [Full]. Change the value of these
thumbwheels using the mouse. The Swing setting here is applied across all bars in the pattern unless
they have specific swing settings of their own.
Global Swing Interval: [8ths] or [16ths]. This determines if the sync pulses generated by Sync-Gen II
swing in 8th or 16th note rhythmic intervals.
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Global Pattern Length: [1] thru to [8]. This sets how many bars will be looped within the pattern.
Global Pattern Rate: [12], [16], [24], [32] and [48]. Midi Clock and Din Sync slave devices require 24
PPQ (Pulses per Quarter Note) to match a Master DAW tempo at a 1:1 ratio. A setting of [24] which
is the default value provides a 1:1 tempo ratio between the DAW, your Innerclock Systems interface
and your external devices. If the DAW is playing at 120 BPM, the external devices will play at 120
BPM also. A setting of [48] or [12] will mean that external devices play at double and half the DAW
Tempo respectively. Settings of [16] and [32] provide for half time and double time external triplet
sync.
Individual Bars
Step Select and Status: There are 16 individual step switches and lamps across the top of the SyncSequencer section. By default all Steps are [On] and [Active]. An active step generates a specific
number of sync pulses as set by the [Pattern Rate] and/or [Bar Rate] thumbwheel selectors.
Individual steps may be switched on/off while the DAW is playing without altering sync stability.
Bar Indicator/Selector: Sync-Gen II provides a maximum of 8 bars of looped programmable Sync
Pulse generation. You may select any pattern Loop Length number [1-8] using the [Global Pattern
Length] Thumbwheel. Select any bar with a single mouse click. This shows the steps and the
individual parameter settings for that specific bar. Bars may be selected for editing while the DAW is
playing without altering sync stability.
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The Bar Indicators can have three colour modes depending on running status:
Full Red – This is the Bar that is currently playing and is also Active for Editing.
Red/Yellow – This is the Bar that is currently playing.
Yellow – This is the Bar that is Active for Editing .
Active Bar Edit: [On] or [Off]. Select any bar with the mouse and switch [Active Bar Edit] to [On].
The parameters [Bar Swing], [Bar Rate], [Bar Start Step] and [Bar Length] are now active and most
importantly override the Global Pattern settings for that specific bar only.
Bar Swing: Minimum = 50% [OFF] Maximum = 75% [Full]. Change the value of these thumbwheels
using the mouse. The swing setting here is applied only to the Active and Selected Bar.
Bar Swing Interval: [8ths] or [16ths]. This determines whether the pulses generated by Sync-Gen II
swing in 8th or 16th note rhythmic intervals for that specific bar only.
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Bar Rate: [12], [16], [24], [32], and [48]. This allows synchronized tempo changes for individual Bars
within a looped global pattern. Same information as for Global Rate - Slave Midi Clock and Din Sync
devices require 24 PPQ (Pulses per Quarter Note) to match a Master tempo at a 1:1 ratio. A setting
of [24] which is the default value provides a 1:1 tempo ratio between the DAW and your external
devices. If the DAW is playing at 120 BPM, the external devices will play at 120 BPM also. A setting of
[48] or [12] will mean that external devices play at double and half the DAW Tempo respectively.
Settings of [16] and [32] provide for half time and double time external triplet sync.
Bar Start Step: [1] thru to [16]. By default all bars start playback at Step 1. Changing this setting in an
Active Bar changes the Start Step number for that bar only.
Bar Length: [1] thru to [16]. An individual bar may have any set length between 1 and 16 steps.
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Pattern Management – Copy/Paste/Default/Preset/Save
Copy and Paste: Any individual bar settings may be copied to another. Select the bar you wish to
copy from with the mouse and click [Copy]. Now select the bar you wish to copy to and click [Paste].
Default: Click this button to return any selected bar to its default setting.
Preset: Clicking this button opens a new window that lets you:(a) Load the Default Sync-Sequencer Pattern.
(b) Load a previously created and saved Sync-Sequencer Pattern.
(c) Create a [New Preset] Sync-Sequencer Pattern.
Selecting [New Preset] brings up a new window:-
Options here are as follows:(a) [Current Settings] – This creates a new Sync-Sequencer Preset with all the current edits and
settings.
(b) [Init Settings] – This creates a new Sync-Sequencer Preset with Default settings.
(c) [Cancel] – This takes you back to the Main screen without creating a new Sync-Sequencer
Preset.
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Name: Clicking on the [Name] tab lets you edit the new Sync-Sequence name.
Save: This button saves the new Sync-Sequence and Name into the Preset List.
The DAW Command Module and Transport Sequencer
Almost identical visually to the Sync-Sequencer section, the Transport Sequencer follows the same
operational principles but generates individual sequenced Start and Stop pulses for every active
step. This unique feature allows you to decide where you want your slave devices to Start, Stop and
Re-Start anywhere within a sequence pattern. The DAW Command Module converts DAW Transport
commands automatically into pulses for true set-and-forget external synchronisation.
Global Settings
DAW Master Follow: [On] or [Off]. When this is set to [On] Sync-Gen II generates Start and Stop
pulses that follow the host DAW Transport commands automatically.
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Global Pattern Length: [1] thru to [8]. This sets how many bars will be looped within the pattern.
Global Pattern Rate: [12], [16], [24], [32], [48]. A setting of [24] which is the default value provides a
1:1 tempo ratio between the DAW, your Innerclock Systems interface and your external devices. A
setting of [48] or [12] will mean that the Transport Sequencer runs at double and half the DAW
Tempo respectively. Settings of [16] and [32] provide for half time and double time.
Individual Bars
Active Bar Edit: [On] or [Off]. Select any bar with the mouse and switch [Active Bar Edit] to [On].
The parameters [Bar Rate], [Bar Start Step] and [Bar Length] are now active and most importantly
override the Global Pattern settings for that specific bar only.
Step Select and Status: There are 16 individual step switches and lamps across the top of the
Transport-Sequencer section. By default all Steps are [Off]. An active step generates a single
transport pulse. Individual steps may be switched on/off while the DAW is playing without altering
sync stability.
Bar Indicator/Selector: Sync-Gen II provides a maximum of 8 bars of looped programmable
Transport Pulse generation. You may select any pattern Loop Length number [1-8] using the [Global
Pattern Length] Thumbwheel. Select any bar with a single mouse click. This shows the steps and the
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individual parameter settings for that specific bar. Bars may be selected for editing while the DAW is
playing without altering sync stability.
The Bar Indicators can have three colour modes depending on running status:
Full Red – This is the Bar that is currently playing and is also Active for Editing.
Red/Yellow – This is the Bar that is currently playing.
Yellow – This is the Bar that is Active for Editing .
Bar Rate: [12], [16], [24], [32], and [48]. This allows the Transport-Sequencer to run at different
synchronized tempo ratios for individual bars within a looped global pattern. A setting of [48] or [12]
will mean that the Transport Sequencer runs at double and half the DAW Tempo respectively for
that specific bar. Settings of [16] and [32] provide for half time and double time.
Bar Start Step: [1] thru to [16]. By default all bars start playback at Step 1. Changing this setting in an
Active Bar changes the Start Step number for that bar only.
Bar Length: [1] thru to [16]. An individual bar may have any set length between 1 and 16 steps.
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System Lock: [On] or [Off]. This locks or unlocks the entire screen against accidental changes.
Pattern Management – Copy/Paste/Default/Preset/Save
Copy and Paste: Any individual bar settings may be copied to another. Select the bar you wish to
copy from with the mouse and click [Copy]. Now select the bar you wish to copy to and click [Paste].
Default: Click this button to return any selected bar to its default setting.
Preset: Clicking this button opens a new window that lets you:(d) Load the Default Transport-Sequencer Pattern.
(e) Load a previously created and saved Transport-Sequencer Pattern.
(f) Create a [New Preset] Transport-Sequencer Pattern.
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Selecting [New Preset] brings up a new window:-
Options here are as follows:(d) [Current Settings] – This creates a new Transport-Sequencer Preset with all the current edits
and settings.
(e) [Init Settings] – This creates a new Transport-Sequencer Preset with Default settings.
(f) [Cancel] – This takes you back to the Main screen without creating a new TransportSequencer Preset.
Name: Clicking on the [Name] tab lets you edit the new Transport-Sequence name.
Save: This button saves the new Transport-Sequence and Name into the Preset List.
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The Options and Manual Transport Control Section
Manual Start: Clicking this tab manually Starts and/or Re-Starts Sync-Gen II regardless of DAW
running status. Quantize and MIDI Assignment options are available for this feature.
Manual Stop: Clicking this tab Stops Sync-Gen II regardless of DAW running status. Quantize and
MIDI Assignment options are available for this feature.
Options: Clicking the [Options] tab opens a drop down menu that shows the following:-
Display
(a) PopUp On
When ticked/active and the mouse is clicked over any adjustable parameter the corresponding
values and name (if set) are shown on screen.
(b) PopUp Name On
When ticked/active the PopUp shows the full name of the selected parameter as well as the
corresponding value.
(c) GUI Update: [Low, Mid, Fast]
This sets how rapidly the Sync-Gen II screen interface refreshes.
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Misc
(a) Init settings from current settings:When you create a preset you can choose "current setting" or "init settings". Selecting this option
saves the current settings as the default when creating a new preset.
(b) Sync Advance, Stop/Start quantize:-
Clicking on this tab opens a new window that shows the following:-

Sync-Advance: [-250 thru to +250 samples]
In this box you can enter a number between -250 and +250. This value represents the amount of
push (positive value) or drag (negative value) that is applied to the Sync-Gen II sync pulses
against the DAW tempo grid. Use this feature to compensate for any sync-offset in your external
devices.
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
Manual Transport Quantize Interval: [Next Bar, Next Half Bar, Next Quarter]
Use the mouse to select one of the three available rhythmic intervals. This sets how Sync-Gen II
will respond to Manual Start and Manual Stop.
(c) Sync. Advance Enable
When ticked and active this enables the amount of sync push or drag as set in the Sync Advance
Window.
(d) Out Level
Clicking on this tab opens a new window that shows the following:-

Output Level Settings: [1-16]
These two parameters set the master output level for the Sync Pulses [Left] and Transport
Pulses [Right] of Sync-Gen II. Default settings are [Left-03] and [Right-01]
(e) Swing Blur: [Off, Small, Medium]
When set to [Off] any swung pulses within a bar are exactly the same in terms of rhythmic timing.
When set to [Small] each second set of swung pulses has a small degree of random push or pull
applied to the timing of the sync pulses. Because the initial and subsequent odd pairs of pulses
are still grid-accurate, the overall resulting feel is very tight against the DAW audio playback but
the subtle movement in the even pairs makes for a more natural swing. A setting of [Medium] is
more pronounced.
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Midi Panel Settings
All parameters inside Sync-Gen II may be assigned a Midi Controller.
Clicking on this tab opens a new window that shows the following:-
Click on the [Parameters] Tab and select any parameter you wish to control remotely. Next click the
[Learning] button so that it is lit green [Active] and then press or turn your Midi Controller or Midi
Key to assign it to that parameter. Click [OK] to return to the main screen.
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Additional Information
Why is tight rhythm synchronisation so important?
If you use a computer for making music there are many reasons you may wish to connect an external
sequencer or drum machine to it so they can play together in time for performance or recordings.
Over the last 40 years of recorded music, much of what has been produced in almost any genre you
can think of has been done using synchronized electronic instruments. Certain styles like Acid House,
Techno and Trance came about through the connecting and synchronizing of various rhythm and
sequencing instruments in the early 1980s. During that period there have been many electronic
instruments developed that are unique in the sounds and rhythms they produce and the way we
interact with them as creative performance devices.
The modern DAW Application owes its very existence to this same heritage.
Early sequencing programs like Cubase or Notator Logic on the Atari 1040ST used the emerging
power and technology of computers to offer the same creative compositional features as their
earlier hardware ancestors but with even more scope and flexibility. Move forward to today and
much of what we see in Logic Pro, Cubase, Pro-Tools, Sonar and Ableton Live use the same concept
but with far more processing power and even more creative scope. Despite modern Plug-Ins and
Virtual Instruments emulating much of what has gone before, musicians and producers still use
vintage and current external hardware to make music. Take a look at eBay and see the prices paid
today for a Linn LM-1, a Mini Moog or a TB-303. These instruments are still in very high demand
despite high quality audio samples and virtual software versions of them being available for a
fraction of their current real-world dollar value. Getting a genuine vintage or retro analogue sound is
an important factor as is the creative performance potential and interface aspect of these
instruments. The way we interact with external hardware is different from software and invites
hands-on interaction between players and instruments.
With the DAW taking centre stage as the creative hub of the modern music studio and with so much
quality external hardware being available to us to use in our music making, it follows that we still
need to connect them in a way that accurately keeps time.
Because Tempo and Rhythm are most important in this application we need a Rhythmic Timing
Reference rather than an Absolute Timing Reference like MTC (Midi Time Code) or SMPTE between
the computer music application and the outside world.
Midi was introduced in 1983 so if you have an external hardware instrument made any time after
that you would most likely do this using Midi Clock.
[TR-909/MPC-60/MPC-3000/Elektron Machine Drum/Roland MV-8800/Roland Fantom etc]
If you have vintage instruments made prior to this you would most likely use Din Sync or Sync-24
which uses Analogue Voltage Pulses on a 5 Pin Din Socket to achieve the same result.
[Roland TB-303/TR-808/TR-606/Sakata DPM-48/Korg KPR-77/Kawai R-100 etc]
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If your instrument has neither Midi nor Din Sync but still allows external synchronization there will
be connections that allow separate external Analogue Voltage Triggers to drive the Start/Stop and
clocking directly.
[Linn LM-1/Linndrum/Roland SH-101/System 104 Sequencer/System 700/Moog 960/Analogics
ACS etc]
Tempo-Sync in the 21st Century
All good computer DAW applications provide Host Midi Clock to the outside world for Tempo
Synchronization. None provide Din-Sync or Analogue Voltage Triggers directly. To generate Din-Sync
or Voltage Triggers from a DAW for vintage gear you must use external hardware conversion of the
Host Generated Midi Clock. There are stand alone converters like our very own Sync-Shift MKII.
Other stand alone units include devices by Kenton, Encore, the Korg KMS-30, Roland SBX Series and
Garfield Electronics etc. Some sequencers and drum machines also provide internal Midi Clock
conversion. The conversion process itself will always introduce a certain amount of delay and poor
converter design introduces sync jitter and results in sloppy timing in your external devices.
From this brief summary you can conclude that the only way to get Tempo-Sync to all the external
electronic musical devices that exist on the planet from any DAW application of your choice is via
Midi Clock.
USB and FireWire
Have a look at the back of your PC or MAC – no Midi Ports. What we do have however are loads of
USB and FireWire ports and you must connect a dedicated interface to one of these to enable your
DAW application to generate Midi Clock to the outside world. There are dedicated Midi-Only
interfaces and most if not all external soundcards provide at least one Midi Output too. All good. Or
is it? As good as any DAW Application may be at keeping things in time within the computer itself,
keeping time with the outside world is a very different thing. The issues of Midi Clock Sync in a
modern software environment is a lengthy and involved topic. Take a look at our website for ways to
check for yourself just how good or bad your Midi Clock stability really is.
Sloppy Timing
If you connect external hardware (or even another computer application) to a DAW with rough Midi
Clock you get sloppy timing. There is a simple test for this. Take any external sequencer or rhythm
unit and program in a quarter note rim shot pattern or use any sound with a fast attack. Now record
a few bars with the unit running under its own sync into a two track editor like Bias Peak or Sony
Media Sound Forge. Zoom in and put markers right at the start of each sound on the timeline. Set
the preferences to view the timeline in samples and take a note of the numbers between each
quarter note. They should be close to equal depending on how good your hardware is.
Now connect your Midi Out from your DAW USB or FireWire port and do the same test but this time
run your external hardware slaved to the DAW generated Midi Clock. Have a look at the numbers
and compare the results.
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Recorded Audio is out of time.
The above example shows how poor DAW Midi Clock can make for a rough groove in a live
performance or studio Improvisation but the very same issue also applies when using DAW Midi
Clock to record external audio back into the DAW itself. Let’s say you borrow an AKAI MPC-3000 to
record some tight beats into your DAW Application. Listening back, the groove sounds sloppy. You
zoom into the recorded waveform and the beats don’t line up with the quantize grid properly and
need editing or re-timing to make it sit properly. It sounds nowhere near as tight as when the MPC3000 was playing by itself, and you must spend time and effort correcting the result.
Latency
DAW generated Midi Clock will usually fire before your soundcard audio has time to get to the
speakers. This can be anywhere between 3ms and 25ms on a bad system. You can compensate for it
by ear in the DAW Application but it’s a less than rewarding experience.
The Sync-Gen II DAW Synchronisation System addresses all these issues.
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Hardware Specifications
SYNC-LOCK
Physical









¼” Audio Clock Input x 1
¼” Audio Start/Stop Input x 1
DC Power Input x 1
5 Pin Midi Clock Output x 1
5 Pin Din Sync Output x 1
Analogue Trigger Output x 1 via ¼” TRS Dual Mono Socket
Force-Stop Footswitch Input x 1 via ¼” TRS Dual Mono Socket
Weight: 330g
Dimensions: 114 x 43 x 77 mm
Electrical










Input Impedance: 10k
Input Socket Type: 6.5mm Unbalanced - Phase Independent
Threshold Level Range: 350mV - 1.4V
Optimum Input Level: 500mV
Power Supply: 9v DC Negative Tip 50mA
Start/Stop Input to Output Conversion Time: 20 uSec
Clock Input to Sync Output Conversion Time: 20 uSec
Trigger Output Type: +5v DC/20ms
Trigger Socket Output Impedance: 1k
Footswitch Type: Boss/Roland DP2
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Hardware Specifications
CYNQ-LOCK
Physical









¼” Audio Clock Input x 1
¼” Audio Start/Stop Input x 1
DC Power Input x 1
5 Pin Midi Clock Output x 5
5 Pin Din Sync Output x 5
Analogue Trigger and Reset Output x 1 via ¼” TRS Dual Mono Socket
¼” Force-Stop Footswitch Input x 1
Weight:
Dimensions:
Electrical










Input Impedance: 10k
Input Socket Type: 6.5mm Unbalanced - Phase Independent
Threshold Level Range: 350mV - 1.4V
Optimum Input Level: 500mV
Power Supply: 9v DC Negative Tip 50mA
Start/Stop Input to Output Conversion Time: 20 uSec
Clock Input to Sync Output Conversion Time: 20 uSec
Trigger Output Type: +5v DC/20ms
Trigger Socket Output Impedance: 1k
Footswitch Type: Boss/Roland DP2
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Design: David Lackey and Warren McAlister for Innerclock Systems Pty Ltd
Code: Xavier Oudin for Xils Lab
All text and images copyright Innerclock Systems Pty Ltd 2010.
No text or image in this document may be reproduced in part or in full without prior written consent.
www.innerclocksystems.com
This document is a preliminary Beta release. It is confidential for registered Innerclock Systems Beta Testers only and is not intended for
general public disclosure. If you have received this document in error for any reason, please delete or destroy and notify Innerclock
Systems by email at [email protected]
In the interests of product improvement Sync-Gen II specifications and design are subject to change without notice.
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