Winter Coats Can Compromise Safety

Winter Coats Can Compromise Safety

Winter 2012-2013

Winter Coats Can Compromise Safety

‘Tis the season for bulky winter coats and snowsuits!

As the weather begins to chill, kids wear extra clothing, which can be dangerous when they are buckled into their child restraints. In the event of a crash, a winter coat or snowsuit could cause the straps to be too loose, increasing the chance the

Two children with their winter coats turned backward over the harness as recommended by NHTSA. child could be injured or even ejected from their car seat.

Photo courtesy of The Car Seat Lady — www.thecarseatlady.com

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) makes the following recommendation, “Ideally, dress your baby in thinner layers instead of a bulky coat or snowsuit, and tuck a blanket around your baby over the buckled harness straps if needed.” Please remember, this advice is not intended strictly for infants.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) offers a statement similar to the AAP’s, “Bulky clothing or heavy coats can prevent a snug harness fit. Always buckle the child in the seat first, and then place coats or blankets over the harness.”

Here are a few statements taken directly from child restraint manufacturer instruction manuals:

C

ontents



All Pro Dad 2

Baby Trend – “Do not dress your child in bulky clothing or other garments that will hinder the harness from being snug around your baby and properly latched between your child’s legs.”



PFS Quarterly Activity 2



New PFS 2

Chicco – “NEVER secure child in carrier with child dressed in bulky garments or heavy clothing. Heavy clothing can prevent harness from



Tech Tidbits 3 being properly tightened around child. To keep child warm, place a



This and That! 5 blanket over child AFTER you have properly secured and tightened harness around your child.”



New Products



7

Evenflo – “In cold weather, DO NOT dress the child in bulky clothing like snowsuits if the child is riding in a child restraint. This clothing makes it



Mark Your Calendar 10 difficult to properly tighten the harness to the child, which may allow the child to be ejected from the restraint during a crash.”

All Pro Dad Father & Kids Experience

The Automotive Safety Program and the Buckle-Up Bug joined the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute at this year’s All Pro Dad Father & Kids Experience at the Indiana Farm Bureau Football Center on September 3 rd

.

The afternoon was filled with fun and excitement as over 1,500 participants enjoyed fun zone activities, football drills, presentations on take-home fatherhood tips, including those on buckling up properly and no texting while driving.

Indianapolis Colts Quarterback Coach Clyde Christensen was among the speakers, as well as player Joe Reitz who was joined by his daughter.

For more information on All Pro Dad, visit www.AllProDad.com

.

Permanent Fitting Station (PFS) Quarterly Activity

During the fourth quarter (July – September) of the 2011-2012 grant year, Indiana’s network of permanent fitting stations reported a total of 2,620 inspections and distributed 893 car seats to children in need.

In addition, 107 Project L.O.V.E. vouchers were redeemed.

Thanks to all those involved, a total of 9,082 inspections were completed through our network of permanent fitting stations during the 2011-2012 grant year!

New Permanent Fitting Stations

Please join us in welcoming the following new sites to Indiana’s network of permanent fitting stations:

 Family Service Association

 LaPorte Fire Department

 Southport Police Department

 Newton County Health Department

Howard County

LaPorte County

Marion County

Newton County

Coordinated by Barb Hilton

Coordinated by Brian Gray

Coordinated by Lt. Robert Cole

Coordinated by Nancy Miller

Visit http://www.preventinjury.org/fittingStation.asp

for a complete listing of Indiana’s permanent fitting stations.

Please contact Marnita Louzon at [email protected]

or 1.800.543.6227 if you are interested in establishing a permanent fitting station.

Page 2

Automotive Safety Program Winter 2012-2013

Tech Tidbits

N

EW

B

OOSTER

S

EAT

R

ATINGS FROM THE

IIHS

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) released their 2012 booster seat findings on seat belt fit.

Of the 17 booster seats introduced this year, 15 earned the top rating of “B

EST

B

ET

” from the IIHS. This indicates manufacturers are designing seats to provide good safety belt fit for booster-age children. The three categories include:

B

EST

B

ET

– Boosters that correctly position belts on a typical 4-to-8-year-old child in almost any car, minivan or SUV.

G

OOD

B

ET

– Boosters that provide acceptable belt fit in most vehicles.

C

HECK

F

IT

– Boosters that may provide good fit for some children in some vehicles, but not as many as

B

EST

B

ET

or G

OOD

B

ET

.

N

OT

R

ECOMMENDED

– Boosters that do not provide proper belt fit. Consumers are advised to avoid them.

This study showed that “B

EST

B

ET

” boosters outnumbered seats in any of the three other categories for the first time since this study was released in 2008. “Booster manufacturers have risen to the Institute’s challenge to improve seat design, giving parents more choices than ever when shopping for a booster that will provide a good, safe fit for their children,” says Anne McCartt, Institute senior vice president for research. Overall, there were forty-seven (47) “B

EST

B

ET

” boosters for 2012, five (5) “G

OOD

B

ET

,” thirty-seven (37)

“C

HECK

F

IT

” and two (2) “N

OT

R

ECOMMENDED

;” totaling ninety-one (91) booster seats rated. The focus of this study was on belt fit, not crash testing. To assess belt fit, engineers at the Institute used a 6-year old test dummy of average size. To learn more about this study and to see which booster seats landed in each category, visit http://www.iihs.org

.

C

ONTINUE TO

B

UCKLE

U

P

— I

T

S

S

TILL

S

AVING

L

IVES

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) National Center for Statistics and Analysis released their Traffic Safety Facts in November on the overall results of seat belt use in 2012. The data showed that seat belt use reached 86 percent in 2012, up from 84 percent in 2011. In the Midwest, the seat belt usage was at 85 percent in 2012 compared to 83 percent in 2011. This information was taken from the

National Occupant Protection Use Survey (NOPUS), which is the only survey that provides nationwide probability-based observed data on seat belt use in the United States. The study was conducted by trained observers at randomly selected roadway sites throughout the U.S. Passenger vehicles were observed between

7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Observations were made either while standing on the roadside, or in the case of expressways, while riding in a vehicle.

According to the NHTSA’s Traffic Safety Facts: 2010 Data, research found that when lap/shoulder belts were used, they reduced the risk of fatal injury to front-seat passenger car occupants by 45 percent. Seat belts saved an estimated 12,546 lives in 2010. You can find more information at www.nhtsa.gov

.

Page 3

Automotive Safety Program Winter 2012-2013

Tech Tidbits (cont’)

CDC P

UTS

F

OCUS ON

C

HILD

I

NJURY

P

REVENTION

On October 19 th

, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released their Morbidity and Mortality

Weekly Report (MMWR) concerning years of potential life lost (YPLL) from unintentional injuries of children aged 0-19 years in the United States from 2000-2009. According to the study, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death among persons aged 0-19 years in the United States. There are approximately

12,000 deaths each year due to unintentional injury and another 9 million young persons are treated for nonfatal injuries in emergency departments. The leading causes of child injury include motor vehicle crashes, suffocation, drowning, poisoning, fires and falls.

The study reviewed death certificates for those injured in each state and nationally. The YPLL was calculated by subtracting the age at death from 75, showing the loss of potential years, and reported by state and nationally, by age, ethnicity and injury mechanism. The data showed that 115,613 deaths or about 1,000 per month were due to injury. Of these numbers, it showed males were double the risk as females and motor vehicle related injuries remain number one for those 19 years and younger.

The CDC developed the National Action Plan for Child Injury Prevention to attempt to spark action across the nation to reduce child injury. The overall goals of the action plan are to:



Raise awareness about the problem of child injury and the effects on our nation.



Highlight prevention solutions by uniting stakeholders around a common set of goals and strategies.



Mobilize action on a national, coordinated effort to reduce child injury.

To learn more, visit www.cdc.gov

. You can download the National Action Plan for Child Injury Prevention at http://www.cdc.gov/safechild/pdf/National_Action_Plan_for_Child_Injury_Prevention.pdf

.

M

ERCEDES

-B

ENZ

I

NTRODUCES

T

HEIR

V

ERSION OF THE

I

NFLATABLE

S

EAT

B

ELT

Early 2013, Mercedes-Benz will debut its “Beltbag,” an inflatable restraint system in the next S-Class.

This restraint is designed to reduce injury to rear-seated passengers in frontal impact collisions.

When sufficient force is detected in a frontal impact crash, a gas generator inflates the shoulder belt to nearly three times its original width, which in turn will reduce chest forces. This seat belt works much like the inflatable seat belt that can be found in Ford and Lexus vehicles; however, the Mercedes-Benz beltbag only works with frontal impact collisions whereas Ford’s inflatable seat belts are triggered by both frontal and side impact crashes. Mercedes says the front seat airbags are sufficient; therefore, the beltbag is not being considered for front-seat occupants. It is currently unclear how the beltbag will affect child restraints.

Page 4

Automotive Safety Program

Winter 2012-2013

This and That!

Safe Ride News is accepting pre-orders for the 2013 LATCH Manual, to be delivered in January. You can order your LATCH Manual by visiting http://www.saferidenews.com/srndnn/ and clicking on

“Catalog/Order Form” on the left side of the page. Nancy Beaumont from Safe Ride News would love to see a photo of your tattered, personalized, old LATCH manuals with details on what you love about your manual. She can be reached at [email protected]

.

Children’s Safety Network has updated their resource guide on child passenger safety. The guide contains data, research articles, updates on policy and legislation, evidence-based prevention strategies, tools for program planning and a list of national organizations that address child passenger safety. You can find this excellent resource at http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org/sites/childrenssafetynetwork.org/files/ChildPassenger_Resourc eGuide2012.pdf

.

Take a moment to familiarize yourself with the Manufacturers Alliance for Child Passenger Safety

(MACPS) as they provide important information concerning the child passenger safety field. The

MACPS has 15 members from various CR companies. Currently, they are offering a CPS educational grant. The application is due by Jan. 15, 2013 and can be found at http://www.saferidenews.com/srndnn/CPSTsProfessionals/ManufacturersAllianceforCPS/tabid/352/De fault.aspx

. By visiting this site, you can also find information on CR usage statements from MACPS, as well as the 2013 calendar of CPS events nationally, regionally and statewide.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a new mobile App to help parents ensure their kids are buckled up as securely as possible on every trip. The App can be downloaded at www.itunes.apple.com

.

Parents Central, the website from NHTSA dedicated to “keeping kids safe,” now has Spanish content on its site. You can find this information at http://www.safercar.gov/parents/carseats.htm

by selecting the

“ASIENTOS DE SEGURIDAD” tab and you will be directed to the Spanish page.

According to SafetyBeltSafe U.S.A., another near-death strangulation took place in New York in October, due to a safety belt with a switchable retractor getting wrapped around the neck of a child. The boy had 8 layers of belt around his neck when officers were able to save his life with a pocket knife. If you do not have SafetyBeltSafe U.S.A.’s flyer on seat belt entanglement, you can print it off by visiting http://www.carseat.org/Resources/646_L-S_belt_warning.pdf

. This is a great resource to include in packets of information given to parents/caregivers.

You have a new opportunity to earn 1 CEU by completing the following quiz, “New Technologies in

Occupant Protection with an Emphasis on Vehicle Technology Online Session” on the Safe Kids website at www.safekidswebinars.org

.

As of November 5, 2012, the total number of U.S. hyperthermia (heat stroke) deaths of children left in cars was 29, including the death of a 3-month old child left in a hot car in Greenfield, IN. From 1998present, a total of 556 deaths were due to hyperthermia in the United States. You can find detailed information concerning this issue at http://ggweather.com/heat/ .

Page 5

Automotive Safety Program Winter 2012-2013

This and That! (cont’)

Spanish instructions are available for the Hippo car seat and can be found at http://www.snugseat.com/Files/filer/manuals/Hippo_Manual_Spanish.pdf

. You can also visit www.snugseat.com

and click on “manuals & instructions” on the right side of the page.

Children’s Safety Network released an infographic on child passenger safety, which includes information on child traffic fatalities, child safety restraints, cost benefit of prevention programs and legislation.

The infographic can be found at: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org/sites/childrenssafetynetwork.org/files/ChildPassSafety2012.pdf

Research in Action, a newsletter by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Research Institute, will become a blog in early 2013. The blog will provide more news and commentary about various pediatric injury prevention topics to include child passenger safety, teen driver safety, violence prevention, recovery from injury and traumatic stress and public policy. To sign up for the

Research in Action newsletter, visit http://www.research.chop.edu/programs/injury/newsletter/index.php

and provide your contact information.

If you are not a member of the CPSPList, we recommend you join this child passenger safety forum.

The List is a professional discussion forum for CPS Practitioners and Advocates to discuss and share information relevant to child safety in and around vehicles. To subscribe, visit http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/CPSPList/ with a Yahoo ID.

In November, the List of Recalls and Replacement Parts for Child Restraints from SafetyBeltSafe U.S.A. was updated. The new list can be viewed at http://www.carseat.org/Recalls/179NP.pdf

.

Abstracts are being accepted for the 9 th

Annual KIDZ IN MOTION (KIM) Conference.

The 2013 conference will be held in Santa Ana Pueblo (Albuquerque), New Mexico, Aug. 27-29.

The form needs to be submitted online at www.kidzinmotion.org

by February 15, 2013. If you have any questions, contact [email protected]

.

Graco is updating their car seat handle requirements for usage in the car for all rear-facing only child restraints. They now allow the use of the handle in any locked position on Graco Infant SafeSeat,

SnugRide 22, SnugRide 30, SnugRide 32, SnugRide 35and the new SnugRide Click Connect 40.

This is retroactive. The change does not apply in Canada, where the handle must always be used in the locked upright position.

Safe Kids is looking for secret shoppers to contact their customer service department to help them identify what is working well and what needs improvement in terms of the customer service provided. If you are interested in being a secret shopper, you can contact Kerry Chausmer at [email protected]

.

Page 6

Automotive Safety Program Winter 2012-2013

N

EW

P

RODUCTS

Britax Highway 65 Convertible





















Rear-facing: 5-40 lbs., 48 inches or less

Forward-facing: Up to 65 lbs.

Side impact protection

Harness Ultra Guide System (HUGS)

Rear and forward-facing recline

Two buckle positions

Built-in lock-offs

Certified for aircraft travel

MSRP: $249.99 www.britaxusa.com

Safety 1st Able Convertible



















Rear-facing: 5-40 lbs.

Forward facing: 22-65 lbs.

QuickFit no rethread harness system

3-position reclining base

5-point harness with center front adjust

5 harness heights

Lumbar body pillows

MSRP: $149.99 www.djgusa.com

Page 7

Automotive Safety Program Winter 2012-2013

N

EW

P

RODUCTS

(

CONT

’)

Eddie Bauer Sport Convertible



















Rear-facing: 5-40 lbs.

Forward-facing: 22-40 lbs.

Side impact protection

5-point center front adjust harness

Adjustable comfort pillows

Infant body insert

Certified for aircraft travel

MSRP: $79.99 www.djgusa.com

R

ECALLS

Evenflo – Models: Big Kid

® booster seats, 30911173AD,

3091967AD, 30911118AD and 30911120D

Shipped between August 6, 2012 and September 18, 2012

Fail to conform to FMVSS 213 “Child Restraint Systems”

Subject seats were originally manufactured solely for purposes of retail display and not to be sold at retail.

Therefore, the seats were packaged without the instruction manual or the required registration card.

However, the seats were inadvertently shipped to

Evenflo’s institutional customers (i.e. hospitals, government agencies) to be given to families.

None of the affected units were sold at retail stores.

Without the instruction manual the seat may be used improperly. Should the owner not file a registration with the child seat manufacturer due to lack of information on how to do so, they may not be notified of a safety recall. Either condition puts the child at an increased risk of possible injury in the event of a crash.

The affected seats have a label stating: “DISPLAY ONLY –

NOT INTENDED FOR SALE,” located on the back of the booster seat headrest.

(Continued on next page)

Page 8

Automotive Safety Program Winter 2012-2013

R

ECALLS

(

CONT

’)

(continued from previous page)

Evenflo will mail owners who have received an affected Big Kid booster seat a remedy kit that includes a consumer registration card, an instruction manual, and an overlabel to cover the current label stating:

“DISPLAY ONLY – NOT INTENDED FOR SALE.”

The remedy kit will be provided free of charge. Notification began early in October, 2012.

Owners may contact Evenflo at 1-800-233-5921 or at safety.evenflo.com

.

If owner believes that Evenflo has failed or is unable to remedy the noncompliance without charge within a reasonable time, they can contact the following: Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety

Administration (NHTSA), 1200 New Jersey Ave., S.E., Washington, DC 20590, call the toll free

Auto Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-424-9153) or visit http://www.safercar.gov

.

Britax Advocate 70-G3

Britax Boulevard 70-G3 Britax Pavilion 70-G3

Britax – Models:

Advocate 70-G3 E9LG81A, E9LG83N, E9LG83P, E9LG83X, E9LG83Y, E9LL21A, E9LL23P, E9LL23Y

Boulevard 70-G3 E9LJ91A, E9LJ91M, E9LJ91S, E9LJ92E, E9LJ93P, E9LJ93S, E9LK91A

Pavilion70-G3 E9LK31A, E9LK31Q, E9LK32D, E9LK32Z, E9LK33Q, E9LL11A, E9LL11Q,

E9LL12D, E9LL12Z

Manufactured: June, 2012 through August, 2012

These seats were manufactured with a softer chest pad material that may be bitten or chewed into pieces by a child using the seat. If the child bites off a piece of the softer pad, it could be a choking hazard, resulting in injury or death.

Britax will provide owners with replacement HUGS pads that are made from a firmer material and instructions on how to replace the pads free of charge.

To view a video on how to remove and replace the HUGS chest pads, visit: www.BritaxUSA.com/support/safety-notices and select the product from the menu on the right side.

Owners may remove the HUGS pads and continue using the seat until replacement pads are received.

The safety recall is expected to begin shortly. Owners may contact Britax Customer Service Department at 1-888-427-4829 with questions or to request replacement pads in the event their restraint is not already registered with Britax.

Page 9

Automotive Safety Program Winter 2012-2013

Mark Your Calendar

NHTSA Child Passenger Safety Technician

Training

January 31 – February 1 / February 7-8, 2013

Rushville Police Department

Rushville, IN

Cost: $75

Contact: Stephanie Martindale - (317) 852-1190 [email protected]

2013 Lifesavers Conference

April 14-16, 2013

Colorado Convention Center

Denver, CO

National Conference on Highway Safety Priorities www.lifesaversconference.org

Safe Travel for All Children: Transporting

Children with Special Healthcare Needs

April 12-13, 2013

Denver, CO (Exact Location TBD)

Cost - $200.00

Contact: Bryanna Grant - (800) 755-0912 [email protected]

www.preventinjury.org

2013 Indiana Injury Prevention Conference and 17 th

Annual Child Safety Advocate Awards

June 6-7, 2013

The Alexander Hotel

Indianapolis, IN

Cost - $100.00

Contact: Judith Talty - (800) 543-6227 [email protected]

www.preventinjury.org

9 th

Annual Kidz In Motion (KIM) Conference

August 27-29, 2013

Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort & Spa

Albuquerque, NM

National Conference Dedicated to

Child Passenger Safety Professionals www.kidzinmotion.org

A N E W S L E T T E R D E D I C A T E D T O P R O V I D I N G I N F O R M A T I O N , N E W S A N D O P I N I O N S O N A U T O M O T I V E S A F E T Y

Automotive Safety Program

Fesler Hall 207

1120 South Drive

Indianapolis, IN 46202

Phone: 317.274.2977 or 1.800.KID.N.CAR

Fax: 317.274.6710 www.preventinjury.org

Layout: Charles Akerland

Editors: Judith Talty, April Brooks

Writers: April Brooks, Marnita Louzon

Special Needs Update: Jody Yoder

The Automotive Safety Program is dedicated to ensuring that all vehicle occupants in Indiana are transported safely.

The Program is funded by the Governor’s Council on Impaired & Dangerous Driving.

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