Aurora Master Sold By 3s Multicolor Ocean Wave Light Projector, 12

Aurora Master Sold By 3s Multicolor Ocean Wave Light Projector, 12
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Aurora Master Sold By 3s Multicolor Ocean Wave Light Projector, 12 Led, Blue, Red,
Green, Multicolor, Mp3 Iphone Speaker Night Light Item# Amazon 01
 The dynamic waves on the ceiling is as real as looking up at the bottom of the sea
 Brings you the greatest atmosphere for relaxing and sleeping
 Function of Speaker: Play the soft music by plug in the mp3, smart phones and pads
 The projector can be shut down in 1 hour automatically
 It also brings you the best feeling when you are bathing in the bathroom
Estimated Value: $22.99 / Refundable Deposit: $5
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Brushes (Sensory): Great for Sensory Diets! Item # NAR 370400
Our white plastic sensory brush is an inexpensive option for those who are starting a brushing program. They have
been used for years to help people with sensory processing disorder, autism, and tactile challenges. This item is
inexpensive yet durable. They work well in the clinic or home.
Use them to help with children who are sensitive to touch. Use them as an alerting activity to prepare students with
special needs for learning. They are great for those who enjoy brushing and deep pressure touch. For those who
will be using a brushing program for several months, we recommend also purchasing the optional snap on handle.
We also offer a large selection of sensory toys and tools. Please check out our fidgets, calming vibration items,
swings, and tactile items. Unfortunately, we cannot answer specific questions about administering a brushing program. If you have specific questions, it's best to speak with a trained occupational therapist.
Estimated Value: $2.50 Purchase Price: $2.50
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Body Solid Full Foam Roller Item # FRCS 08
Perfect for balance exercises, stability exercises, strength training, home exercise,
and home physical therapy, as well as use in a clinical setting. Design enhances balance, body awareness, muscle re-education, muscular flexibility and
dynamic strengthAid for self massage of the upper and lower back, hip, ab and
adductors, plus calf, hamstring, glute and quad muscles Can be used effectively in many positions - supine, prone, sitting, kneeling, lying on your side, or
standing
Estimated Value $25—$35 / Refundable Deposit $5
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Cooperative Blanket ( Body Sock) Small 40”-46” Item # Nasco PE00727CQ
Learn spatial awareness through balance and resistance. Constructed of four-way stretch Lycra® with a reinforced
hook-and-loop entrance. Users find themselves in a private domain that affords kinesthetic exploration. As they
move, their shapes become amorphous and art-like. Because Lycra® is translucent, they can see the shapes being
created around them. Estimated Value: $34.95 / Refundable Deposit: $10
Cooperative Blanket (Body Sock ) Medium 47” -55” Item # Nasco PE00728CQ
Learn spatial awareness through balance and resistance. Constructed of four-way stretch Lycra® with a reinforced
hook-and-loop entrance. Users find themselves in a private domain that affords kinesthetic exploration. As they
move, their shapes become amorphous and art-like. Because Lycra® is translucent, they can see the shapes being
created around them. Estimated Value: $41.25 / Refundable Deposit: $10
Cooperative Blanket (Body Sock) Large 56”-65” Item # Nasco PE00729CQ
Learn spatial awareness through balance and resistance. Constructed of four-way stretch Lycra® with a reinforced
hook-and-loop entrance. Users find themselves in a private domain that affords kinesthetic exploration. As they
move, their shapes become amorphous and art-like. Because Lycra® is translucent, they can see the shapes being
created around them. Estimated Value: $44.25 / Refundable Deposit: $10
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FitBall Seating Disc, child size Item # Nasco SN02490CQ
An inflatable dynamic cushion, mimicking both the movement and shape of an exercise ball. Can be used slightly
underinflated in any seat to discourage fidgeting or on the floor fully inflated for balance training and strengthening of the lower extremities. The more inflated, the more movement. Made of tough, durable, latex-free PVC vinyl
that is virtually indestructible. 13" dia. Estimated Value: $25.95 / Refundable Deposit: $5
FitBall Seating Disc, adult size Item # Nasco SN02489CQ
An inflatable dynamic cushion, mimicking both the movement and shape of an exercise ball. Can be used slightly
underinflated in any seat to discourage fidgeting or on the floor fully inflated for balance training and strengthening of the lower extremities. The more inflated, the more movement. Made of tough, durable, latex-free PVC vinyl
that is virtually indestructible. 15" dia. Estimated Value: $25.25 / Refundable Deposit: $5
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
2
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Lycra Stretch Bands Item # FRCS 01
Your children will have so much fun flexing their muscles to the max with our Lycra Stretch Bands. Similar to the
resistance bands used in fitness classes, they encourage sensory integration, movement, heavy work, joint
compression and coordination. Use them at home, school, camp or the clinic. Keep one in your purse, drawer,
backpack and the car for when your travel needs call for a sensory break.
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Encourages active movement and heavy work
Provides gentle resistance and sensory integration
Combine with music for creative motion or dance
Estimated Value: $20 for set of 5 / Refundable Deposit: $5
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Noise Reduction Headphones Item # FRCS 04
From the start‚ caring for kids' hearing is important! These non-electronic headphones are specially sized for
children and reduce overall noise levels by 22 decibels. Estimated Value: $20 / Refundable Deposit: $5
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Peanut Ball Item # Nasco SN31164C2
A perfect saddle seat for children through teens who yearn to wiggle but need more stability than a traditional ball
chair, exercise ball chair or therapy ball. The Peanut Ball encourages balance and stabilization of the core for an
active learning posture. Like exercise ball chairs, the Peanut Ball enhances focus by supporting the user’s natural
desire for movement. Recommended for daily exercise, positioning and therapy programs. Estimated Value: $25$35 / Refundable Deposit: $5
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
3
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Pressure Vest X-Small Item # Flaghouse 34353
Snug-fitting neoprene vest features hook-and-loop fasteners for easy on/off. Body-hugging design provides allover, deep pressure and heightened body awareness, providing a calming sense of stability for the wearer. For accurate fit, measure around widest point of chest for width. Length is measured from shoulder waist. SIZE: 24"W x
12"L. Estimated Value $52.95 / Refundable Deposit $10
Pressure Vest Medium Item # Flaghouse 34355
Snug-fitting neoprene vest features hook-and-loop fasteners for easy on/off. Body-hugging design provides allover, deep pressure and heightened body awareness, providing a calming sense of stability for the wearer. For accurate fit, measure around widest point of chest for width. Length is measured from shoulder waist. SIZE: 36"W x
18"L. Estimated Value $74.95 / Refundable Deposit $10
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Sensory Discs - Multi-match Item # GUIDECRAFT-G99004
Designed to stimulate the senses, the Multi-Match Sensory Discs game teaches several skills at once. Children use
small hand-sized discs to feel the texture with their hands, then try to match them to patterns on the larger floor
disc. This game is most difficult played with closed eyes, however it can be changed for younger kids to a color
matching game or number matching as well. Small discs are imprinted with the written numbers which can be
matched by counting the patterns on the large discs.
This is a good game to keep children active indoors or outdoors because it involves both the mind and body. Kids
will love feeling the different textures and counting out the patterns on each disc.
Estimated Value $75 / Refundable Deposit $10
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Senseez Pillow Item # NascoSN35704CQ
Colorful, lightweight, fun-shaped pillow offers a gentle vibration when it is squeezed or sat
on. Great for younger students who have difficulty sitting still, are easily distracted, have tactile sensibilities, or have trouble relaxing or calming down. Smaller-sized pillow fits in
smaller chairs and booster seats. Material is tactile to the touch.
Estimated Value $34.95 / Refundable Deposit $10
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Sensory Peapod—Autism Products Item # FRCS 02
Durable, inflatable Pea Pod Jr. is made with super-strong vinyl and has tough triple-welded seams for added
strength. Most children can get in the “pod" themselves, applying deep, even pressure to many sensitive areas of
the body. Some children like to gently rock side-to-side for a “cocooning-calm.” The velvety surface is made with
comfortable flocked vinyl. Surface-washable. Small - 48", Medium/Large 60", Giant 80"
Estimated Value $68.99 / Refundable Deposit $10
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Tactile Sensory Ball Item # FRCS 06
Smooth yet bumpy is how we describe our Tactile Sensory Ball. This eye-catching exercise ball is covered with hundreds of
small bumps that make regular exercise ball activities even more stimulating! Just sitting on the ball strengthens core muscles,
body awareness, balance and attention. A perfect therapy ball for those who need to awaken their sensory system, and for sensory-seekers who crave additional sensory stimulation. Estimated Value $25-30 / Refundable Deposit $5
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Tactile Massage Rolls Item # Nasco SN30995CQ
There are endless uses to these durable tactile rings and rolls! The roll has sensory "bumps" for those who require
modest tactile stimulation. Estimated Value $16 for set of 2 / Refundable Deposit $5
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Therapy Ball (Danskin) Item # FRCS 07
Use our therapy ball as a balance ball for core strengthening or as a giant ball for kicking, rolling and just playing
around. Exercise balls are wonderful, fun and highly therapeutic. They strengthen core muscles and provide great
seating options for kids who need to wiggle. Use as a balance ball when fully inflated to develop proper posture
and sitting habits.
Challenges balance and righting reactions
Good for children who are sensory seekers and need a good bounce
Good for children who are sensory under-responsive and need good core positioning
Estimated Value $20-$25 / Refundable Deposit $5
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
5
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Time Tracker Visual Timer & Clock Item # Nasco TB21381M
Helps students learn to manage play time, homework, timed tests, independent reading, and time outs. Allows
quick programming of three colored lights and six sound effects that alert students of the time remaining. Red,
yellow, and green colored segments give visual reinforcement to the passing of a specific period of time. Features
180° viewing and a large, easy-to-read LDC display. Offers volume control and pause feature. When not in timer
mode, it’s a clock. Estimated Value $38.95 / Refundable Deposit $ 10
Time Tracker Mini Item # Nasco 1506314CQ
Set it and go! Simple timer offers unique visual and auditory indicators, including a warning alarm. Operates easily
with just two dials - tool alarm time and warning time. Provides flexibility with total alarm time range of five minutes to two hours, in five-minute increments. Counts down until the colored light glows and the alarm sounds. Supports visual-only timing by adjusting volume or turning sound off completely.
Estimated Value $20.65 / Refundable Deposit $5
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Trampoline (Pure Fun) Item # HayNeedle HN-JZP018
This Pure Fun mini trampoline, which features a handrail, is a great choice when you want to combine your everyday workout routine with optimal safety. The galvanized steel handrail is great if you have problems balancing and
adds an additional safety factor to the 40-inch trampoline, which also features a secure, patented T-joint no-weld
system. The trampoline's feet are padded for additional stability, and it can hold up to a maximum weight of 220
pounds. You're sure to have a great time bouncing around on this trampoline.
Estimated Value $89.99 / Refundable Deposit $15
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
6
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Twilight Turtle Calming Constellation Night Light Item # Nasco SN30866C
Create a magical, relaxing environment with a full night sky projection on the ceiling and walls. Ideal for a sensory
room or place in an individual resident’s room to calm and relax. Also helps reduce fear of the dark. The plush
turtle’s shell projects in three soothing colors: blue, green, and soft amber. Features a 45-minute sleep timer.
Includes Star Guide to identify constellations. Estimated Value $30.25 / Refundable Deposit $10
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Vibrator Mitt Item # Nasco NA10108C
Provides a soft vibrating massage for relaxation and sensory stimulation. This is especially helpful for listless residents prior to preparing for daily activities. Offers a choice of two sensory materials - an ultra-soft fabric on one
side and synthetic sheepskin on the other. Since the unit is pressure
activated, no on-off switch is needed. Estimated Value $24.25 / Refundable Deposit $5
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Weighted Lap Belt/Pad Item # FRCS 03
The Weighted Lap Belt is a great way to provide a bit of proprioceptive input and deep pressure to assist the somewhat fidgety child during sitting activities. The Weighted Lap Belt is ideally used to gain regulation and calmness
in order to improve attention and participation in tasks at home, school or during therapy activities.
Estimated Value $89.95 / Refundable Deposit $20
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Weighted Blanket- Twin Size Item # Fun & Function CF5631
With its soft fabric covering and calming deep pressure, this twin-sized weighted blanket is perfect for individual
use. Estimated Value $129.99 / Refundable Deposit $20
Weighted Blanket – Regular Size Item # Fun & Function WR2370
Wrap yourself in calming pressure with this cozy weighted blanket. With a choice of sizes
everyone can find the perfectly sized weighted blanket.
Estimated Value $219.99 / Refundable Deposit $20
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
7
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Weighted Fleece Vest: Small Item # Nasco SN30844CQ
Ages 2-3
Used to calm and provide great sensory input for children, as the weight functions as a
reassuring deep hug! Keeps students warm, cozy, and secure. Weights are safely positioned inside the vest and can be added or removed. Includes 2 lbs. of weight. Navy.
Estimated Value $50.25 / Refundable Deposit $10
Weighted Fleece Vest: Medium Item # Nasco SN30845CQ
Ages 4-6
Used to calm and provide great sensory input for children, as the weight functions as a reassuring deep hug! Keeps
students warm, cozy, and secure. Weights are safely positioned inside the vest and can be added or removed. Includes 2 lbs. of weight. Navy. Estimated Value $55.95 / Refundable Deposit $10
Weighted Fleece Vest: Large Item # Nasco SN30846CQ
Ages 7-11
Used to calm and provide great sensory input for children, as the weight functions as a reassuring deep hug! Keeps
students warm, cozy, and secure. Weights are safely positioned inside the vest and can be added or removed. Includes 2 lbs. of weight. Navy Estimated Value $62.75 / Refundable Deposit $10
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Weighted Gel Lap Pad Item # Nasco SN31957CQ
Pads provide the deep pressure points students require in order to feel grounded, enabling them to sit better for
longer periods and pay closer attention for improved learning. Vinyl-covered pads clean easily with spray-andwipe cleansers and disinfectants. Although the gel is nontoxic, it should not be chewed or ingested. Estimated
Value $43.95 / Refundable Deposit $10 for pair / $5 for 1
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Weighted Vest: Small Item # Nasco SN32215CQ
Ages 2-3
Funky and comfortable weighted vest can be used to calm and provide great sensory input for children, as the
weight functions as a reassuring deep hug. Estimated Value $45 / Refundable Deposit $10
Weighted Vest: Medium Item # Nasco SN30848CQ
Ages 4-6.
Funky and comfortable weighted vest can be used to calm and provide great sensory input for children, as the
weight functions as a reassuring deep hug. Estimated Value $51.25 / Refundable Deposit $10
Weighted Vest: Large Item # Nasco SN30849CQ
Ages 7-11.
Funky and comfortable weighted vest can be used to calm and provide great sensory input
for children, as the weight functions as a reassuring deep hug.
Estimated Value $53.50 / Refundable Deposit $10
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
8
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Yacker Tracker Item # Nasco SN00172J
A self-monitoring traffic light sound meter! Green light turns to yellow as a warning, and then turns to red as noise
in the room goes above the level set by the teacher. Decibel sensitivity control ranges from 50dB to 110dB. Optional audible “quiet please” (in four languages) or siren can also be used, or record your own message. Delayed
alarm function has the siren sound when noise continues for more than two seconds. Lights can be automatically or
manually adjustable. Includes meter to track the number of times sound exceeds set level, long-lasting LED lights,
reset button, AC adapter, and optional face clings for lights. Estimated Value $ 103.25 / Refundable Deposit $15
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Are We There Yet? Travel Activity Ring
Engage your child's mind and creativity while passing the time on the road!
Whether you're headed cross-country or just down the street, SimplyFun's Are
We There Yet? ring will enrich the time you spend traveling together.
When you hear the words, "Are We There Yet," it creates a specific image,
doesn't it? Here's something that can solve that problem!
Basic Game Play:
This is a collection of 50 activities to pass the time - any time - but especially
when traveling. They're perfect for trips in the car, plane, bus, or train because
they don't require a lot of room or materials.
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
BOOK INVENTORY
Autism Interventions – Book Item # Southpaw 271233
Autism Interventions is a practical and valuable tool offering holistic, dynamic, and effective intervention strategies and treatment plans to improve the functioning of individuals with autism in the following areas: sensory
processing, motor control, motor planning, speech-language skills, social skills, functional skills, educational
strategies and behavioral strategies.
A clinical reference work/supplementary text geared toward occupational and other therapists/teachers who work
with children with autism. Provides up-to-date research findings and the latest in teaching and communication
techniques. The text is structured in a layered approach, so that each chapter builds on the previous one to present
complex information in an easy-to-read and easy-to-use format.
The editors offer strategies they have found to be successful, practical and easy to implement. Sensory-based techniques included in this edition address underlying deficits in postural control, muscle strength, coordination, motor
planning and sensory processing. Numerous photographs offer illustrations of the types of techniques covered.
Estimated Value $67 / Refundable Deposit $10
Building Bridges through Sensory Integration – Book Item # Southpaw 271021
Perfect for those working with young children, but broad enough to be adapted for older children and adults. Provides creative techniques and useful tips while offering innovative strategies and practical advice for dealing with
everyday challenges, including managing behaviors, improving muscle tone, developing social skills, selecting
diets - and more!
Written by three occupational therapists whose areas of expertise include sensory integration, autism, learning disabilities, and enhancing motor skills, Building Bridges through Sensory Integration offers a combination of theory
and strategies for parents, therapists, and teachers. The ideas in this book evolved as they searched for resources to
provide simple activity suggestions and accommodations for the children in their own practices.
Part one includes the theory of sensory integration, occupational therapy’s role in treatment of sensory issues, and
information on the sensory systems.
Part two supplies numerous checklists to use in screening for sensory difficulties, strategies for managing challenging behaviors, ideas for self-care skills, adaptations for different settings, suggested activities for sensory diets, and
make-it-yourself equipment ideas.
Estimated Value $34.95 / Refundable Deposit $10
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
10
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Is it Sensory or is it behavior? – Book Item # Southpaw 271005
This book provides information and strategies for distinguishing between sensory-based and non-sensory-based
behaviors, as well as intervention techniques. Topics addressed include causes of behavior, sensory integrative
dysfunction, environmental factors that impact behavior, managing challenging behaviors and implementing sensory diets. The case studies and worksheets included offer practical suggestions when working with children.
Estimated Value $65 / Refundable Deposit $10
The Out of Sync Child – Book Item # Southpaw 0270
An easy-to-read yet comprehensive book about Sensory Integration Dysfunction. Written by Carol Stock
Kranowitz, a teacher with over 20 years of experience, this is a wonderful resource for parents, teachers and any
other professionals interested in learning about SI dysfunction. Case examples of children and their behavior are
given throughout. Topics include: recognizing SI dysfunction at home and school, what is and what is not SI dysfunction, diagnosis and treatment, plus much more. Estimated Value $14.95 / Refundable Deposit $5
The Out of Sync Child Has Fun – Book Item # Southpaw 271010
Carol Stock Kranowitz continues her significant work with this companion volume, featuring more than one hundred playful activities to help strengthen all children’s neurological development. These activities are a great way
to counteract Sensory Integration Dysfunction at home, work or at school.
Estimated Value $15.95 / Refundable Deposit $5
Understanding Your Child’s Sensory Signals – Book Item # Southpaw 271225
A practical, daily application handbook for parents, teachers and caregivers to help understand sensory signals versus behavior and how you can help! The handbook provides essential and useful information for over 110 sensory
signals and simple everyday sensory strategies and techniques to help ALL children; including SPD, autism spectrum disorders, ADD/ADHD, APD and developmental disabilities. This handbook provides
guidance and understanding as to why children do what they do in regards to unique sensory
processing differences and needs. Estimated Value $16.95 / Refundable Deposit $5
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Simply Fun Laugh & Learn
Betcha Can’t Win
Step right up and roll the dice! This colorful “boardwalk” theme creates a
fun carnival like game experience. Roll as many times as you like to try to
match the sum on the Number Cards but be careful there is a price to pay!
Betcha Can't Win is game for children who like addition and are good at
strategy. Many children with autism are good at math and enjoy dice games,
so this game may appeal to them. One aspect that makes the game more complicated is the need to "secure" a card, or allow other players to try to win the
card before the player's next turn. Players can watch who has taken what
cards and use strategy in deciding whether or not to try to capture a new card or take an unsecured card
from another player. This element may make the game challenging for children who like a straightforward game.
Children who are good at addition will strengthen that skill playing Betcha Can't Win. On each turn,
they are able to add up different values on dice rolled in order to try to equal the value of the unsecured
cards. Also, since the dice have dots representing amounts, children can also use counting to determine
values. The more they play, the more the children will learn patterns for combining dice quickly to determine a total value.
Betcha Can't Win is based on addition, which is concrete and clearly rule based. Additionally, the game
has relatively simple rules to guide a player's strategic thinking. Thus, children with autism who like
math or other activities with clear, concrete rules will likely enjoy playing Betcha Can't Win.
For many children with autism, numbers provide a type of language that is predictable and nonthreatening. Once they have the essential addition skills (i.e. adding up to 30), they will enjoy the ability to demonstrate their reasoning by manipulating numbers as they roll and select dice to create matching values
to the cards. Also, children can use non-verbal reasoning in assessing how well another player is doing
in order to determine whether to try to take an unsecured card from that player. If children enjoy dice
counting games, they will most likely do well with Betcha Can't Win.
Big N Little
Slide tiles to find a baby that pairs with its mommy. Features twenty-five different mommy & baby pairs, each starting with a different letter of the alphabet, in
both upper and lower cases.
Tibbar's Big and Little involves manipulating sliding tiles to uncover mom and
baby animal pictures, with corresponding capital and small letters. Children who
are good at spatial reasoning and have a good memory for pictures or letters will
like this game. Children will also enjoy sliding the tiles to uncover new pictures. Adults can help children learn letter-sound association by having the child name the animal and the letter the animal starts
with. For example, "Zebra. It starts with a capital Z. This baby zebra starts with a small z."
Some children are good at matching colors, picture and other visual items. Tibbar's Big and Little is a
good game to hone mastering skills because players match similar, but not exactly the same, items such
as upper and lower case numbers, and adult and baby animals.
Children who have a good memory for pictures or letters will like this game. For example, if children
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
are good at concentration games, they will be good at Tibbar's Big and Little with the fun twist of sliding
the tiles to uncover new pictures.
Children who are skilled at remembering sequences or where something is hidden will build on memory
skills with Tibbar's Big and Little. As play progresses, the player may remember where a matching image is and then can visualize how to move the tiles in order to reveal the image within 5 moves.
Some children are good at spatial reasoning and problem-solving, such as playing with building blocks,
puzzles and games like checkers. They can use those skills playing Tibbar's Big and Little. As play progresses, the player may remember where a matching image is and then can determine how to rearrange
the tiles in order to reveal the image within 5 moves.
Corner Center Match
There is no "taking turns" in Corner Center Match! All players race to match
the corner on their cards to the shape and color on the card in the center of
the table. Don't forget to check the back sides of your cards if you get stuck,
but be quick!
Corner Center Match is an excellent game for the child who is good at seeing
details and can see how parts of a shape are related to whole shapes. The
players only need to identify two characteristics, color and shape to be able to
play the game. The game requires some speed, as all players play simultaneously. Therefore, the child
who can quickly determine the shape and color of the center symbol and find a corner match has an advantage over other players. Some children with autism can see patterns easily, so Corner Center Match
may be a good game for children with this skill.
Children who excel at matching visual parts to wholes can do well with this game. An example of part to
whole matching is seeing part of an animal (ex: tail of a horse) and knowing the whole animal. This type
of matching is key to success in this game.
Children who like to focus on or are good at picking out details can use those skills in Corner Center
Match. The entire game is built around matching the part and color of a shape to the whole shape on the
face up card. Some children with autism can see patterns easily, so Corner Center Match may be a good
game for children with this skill.
Children with good memory for shapes will do well in Corner Center Match. This is because they need
to recall four different shapes on each card in their hand, looking for a match to the face up card on the
pile.
Corner Center Match does not require abstract or analogous thinking. All of the cards have clear color
and shape, so children who prefer concrete and literal activities may feel comfortable with this game.
Corner Center Match is a good game for the child who is good at seeing details, matching colors and can
see how parts of a shape are related to whole shapes. Reasoning with shape and color does not require
any verbalization. Rather, Corner Center Match benefits children who can think and act quickly, because
all players are racing to place their cards down first.
Corner Center Match is a good game for the child who is good at seeing details and can see how parts of
a shape are related to whole shapes. The players only need to identify two characteristics, color and
shape to be able to play the game. Some children with autism can see patterns easily, so Corner Center
Match may be a good game for children with this skill.
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
13
SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Cross Lanes
In Cross Lanes, place your card at a 90 degree angle covering a card value
that is one higher or one lower than the value of your card. Cover two halves
in any orientation and score a Spare or a Strike. Be the first player to place
all of your cards and win the game. Be careful if you don't have a play or a
Gutterball may be headed your way!
Cross Lanes is a good card game for children who like to make patterns and
can see different spatial and number options. A player selects a card from his
hand that has a number that is one higher or lower than a number on a card on the table. This card is
placed at a 90° angle across one or two cards on the play area to score points. This requires analyzing
the numbers on the players’ cards, as well as the numbers and orientation of cards on the play area.
Cross Lanes is a good game for practicing visual memory skills as players need to look for and remember number combinations and card orientation on the play area. Children who are good with pattern recognition and enjoy playing with numbers will likely enjoy playing Cross Lanes.
Many children with autism like to place objects in a sequence. Those children can use that skill to do
well at Cross Lanes. On every turn, players are looking to place cards numerically one higher or lower
than cards on the play area. Thus sequencing knowledge is an essential feature of playing Cross Lanes.
Some children with autism enjoy activities that have clear rules for guiding their experience. Because
Cross Lanes is based on number sequencing, it is good for children like this who like math.
Cross Lanes does not require verbalization. Children, who are good at problem-solving and logical
analysis, yet are uncomfortable talking about their thoughts or reasoning may enjoy the game.
Many children with autism are good at thinking in three dimensions and solving problems using spatial
orientation. Those children can build that strength with Cross Lanes as they look for the best orientation
of a card to score the most points.
Some children enjoy playing with and manipulating small objects such as cards. Cross Lanes involves
the ability to place cards with good precision on top of other cards, so children with good dexterity can
hone that skill with Cross Lanes.
Duo Dash
Excitement in the Zoo!
The animals are loose and must be brought back into the enclosures as fast
as possible. If only someone could remember where the animals were
last! Dash quickly as you and the other players turn over tiles to collect
pairs of animals. Find pairs according to the Goal Tiles. Match a valid pair
and receive a positive point, collect a wrong pair and receive a negative
point. Score the most points at the end of 3 rounds and win!
Duo Dash is good for children with good attention to detail and quick responses. The goal for each
round is to make pairs of matches, but the criteria (ex: color or animal) for the pairs changes each round.
Players must turn tiles quickly with only one hand, note what animal and color is on the tile, turn it back
over and repeat with additional tiles. When pairs are found that match the goal, the player takes them.
Players have several memory skills working at once: memory for the goal, memory for what has been
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seen, memory for where it was seen, and how many matches are needed. The game requires focused attention and speed.
Duo Dash is good for children who are good at matching. The goal for each round is to make matching
pairs, but the criteria (ex: color or animal) for the pairs changes each round. Players must turn tiles
quickly with only one hand, note what animal and color is on the tile, turn it back over and repeat with
additional tiles. When pairs are found that match the goal, the player takes them.
Children who have a good memory for pictures will use that skill playing Duo Dash. In addition, players
will practice and strengthen other memory skills simultaneously, including memory for the goal, memory for location, and how many matches are needed.
Children who have a good memory for pictures will use that skill playing Duo Dash. In addition, players
will practice and strengthen other memory skills simultaneously, including memory for the goal, memory for location, and how many matches are needed.
Duo Dash is a fast action game where players try to find matching images in a race to be first. This requires players to quickly visualize the location of different animals and colors that they have turned
over. This type of visualizing is strength for some children with autism, and they can hone that skill with
the speed element of Duo Dash.
Some children prefer activities that are very literal. For those children, Duo Dash can be a good match.
On every turn, players are literally trying to find identical matches based on criteria like animal or color.
Duo Dash involves spatial problem solving where players need to remember the location of images they
have turned over. Children who are good at games like concentration will likely enjoy and do well at
Duo Dash.
Players must turn tiles quickly with only one hand, note what animal and color is on the tile, turn it back
over and repeat with additional tiles. Therefore, Duo Dash may be a good match for children who have
good dexterity and like games such as concentration.
Head of the Herd
Are you a law abiding Moose? Observe your fellow "meese" carefully to keep
up with their actions, but don't get caught breaking the law of the herd. The
last two players finish the game in a competition called "Duck Duck Moose!"
Silly, hectic, and hilarious!
Paying attention to others is essential in Head of the Herd. Children who cannot listen to or watch others' actions will not be able to play this game successfully.
Directions for the game change frequently. New rules are implemented with each turn of a Law of the
Land card and new actions are performed with each of the Head of the Herd cards. In addition, speed is
required. The game is not recommended for children who have difficulty following directions.
Children who have echolalia often have difficulty attending to others meaning or intentions.
Head of the Herd is not be appropriate for children who can't attend to others actions or words.
Many of the tasks in the game require producing complex levels of language (e.g., story creation, rhyming, words starting with specific letter, etc.). The game is not recommended for children with language
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production concerns.
Children need to keep several social rules in mind at all times, and these rules change frequently. The
game is not recommended for children who cannot pay attention to and follow complex social rules.
Maintaining social interaction is required throughout the game, so it is not recommended for children
with this issue.
The game may easily lead children to be frustrated or overwhelmed because of the social demands. Not
recommended for this issue.
Not recommended for children who only want to do preferred activities, as the type of activities involved in the game change constantly.
Constant change in the game actions would make this game too challenging for children who have difficulty with transition.
Children need to constantly monitor their actions and those of others. Not recommended for children
who have difficulty doing this.
High Tail It
Cross the river, circle the board, pivot over other 'Roos and cross the river
again. Be the first player to complete the journey with all FIVE of your Kangaroos and win the game!
Children who like chess and checkers will like High Tail It. The game involves moving five kangaroos around the board by jumping over other kangaroos forward, sideways, or diagonally. Players use all kangaroos on the
board strategically to get their five kangaroos around the board first. Children
who are good at visual scanning and can see potential jump patterns will like this game. Players need to
pay attention to other players' moves in planning their strategy. The game has clear rules and no surprises, so children will like the predictability of how the game is played.
Like checkers or traditional chess, the more you play High Tail It the more easily you can see the options for jumping your kangaroos, as well as anticipating the moves of other players. Children need to
establish and remember the pattern they select for their jumps. Children who are good at patterning
games and spatial reasoning will be able to use and sharpen that ability playing High Tail It.
Children who are good at creating sequences will use that skill as they build sets of moves to jump their
kangaroos around the board. They can use other players' kangaroos and position their own so that they
can sequence their jumps to gain greater distances.
Children with autism often have good visual spatial reasoning and are good at games like checkers and
chess. These children can hone this ability playing High Tail It as they visualize the results of possible
moves and think about options for their next turn based on the moves of other players.
Some children are good at logic and reasoning, but do not like to discuss or verbalize their thinking. In
High Tail It, children analyze the locations of all of their own and other players' kangaroos to determine
optional moves. They then select the move that gains them the most distance or the most strategic position. However, they do not need to discuss and talk about their reasoning and strategy.
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Children who like to play with small objects like blocks or action figures can use that skill in High Tail
It. The spaces on the board and the kangaroos are small. There can also be many kangaroos on the board
at one time, so good fine motor skills enable the child to maneuver successfully around and through the
various arrangements of kangaroos.
Hue Turn
Can you see your pattern on the board? If not, add a peg or make a Hue
Turn to get the pattern you need to score your card! Patterns show two, three
or four peg positions with complex patterns worth more points than simple
ones. See how good your pattern recognition is. The player with the most
points at the end of the game wins!
Hue Turn is great for children who have strength in visual spatial matching.
Children with autism often are good at seeing details and finding a match.
This game enables children to make picture-object matches at their chosen level of difficulty. However,
children also need to be able to envision what a pattern would look like if a peg was turned over. This
may be difficult for some children who are literal thinkers. The game can be played so that children can
shift their card orientation to find more potential matches on the board or must keep the card in one orientation. This option can make finding a match easier or more difficult, as needed for individual levels
of ability.
Hue Turn is great for children who have a strength in visual matching. Children with autism often are
good at seeing details and finding a match. This game enables children to make picture-object matches
at their chosen level of difficulty as they try to find an arrangement of pegs that matches a pattern on one
of their cards. However, children also need to be able to envision what a pattern would look like if a peg
was turned over. This may be difficult for some children who are literal thinkers.
Like checkers or chess, the more you play Hue Turn the more easily you can see the patterns that the
pegs can make. Children who are good at patterning games will be able to use and sharpen that ability
playing Hue Turn.
In Hue Turn, players have cards with dot patterns, and they try to match that pattern to pegs on the game
board. This includes turning over pegs in order to make the match. Thus, children who enjoy activities
involving making patterns will likely find Hue Turn a fun and engaging game.
When trying to match a pattern on a card to the pegs on the board, players need to visualize what would
happen if they flipped over different pegs. Children, who learn well by visualizing or replaying actions
in their mind, will likely enjoy using that ability in Hue Turn.
Nonverbal reasoning is needed, but no direct communication is required, making Hue Turn a good game
for children who have difficulty communicating what they are thinking. Players need good spatial reasoning skills in order to do well playing Hue Turn, but do not need to verbally explain their choices.
Rather, they can demonstrate the accuracy of their thinking by showing their card to the other players
while pointing out the matching pattern on the game board.
Hue Turn is great for children who have strength in spatial reasoning. Many children with autism are
good at seeing and figuring out how objects are oriented in space. This game enables children to use this
skill as they try to find an arrangement of pegs that matches a pattern on one of their cards. However,
children also need to be able to envision what a pattern would look like if a peg was turned over. This
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may be difficult for some children who are literal thinkers.
Some children with autism like fine motor activities like playing with building toys and constructing
puzzles. When playing Hue Turn, players need to be able to move, flip and position the pegs with a good
level of precision. Thus, children with good dexterity will display their skills playing Hue Turn.
Some children with autism like fine motor activities like playing with building toys and constructing
puzzles. When playing Hue Turn, players need to be able to move, flip and position the pegs with a good
level of precision. Thus, children with good dexterity will display their skills playing Hue Turn.
Katachi
Walk tiles back toward your corner by matching color, shape or size. The
first player to stack three shape tiles on top of their corner tile and one on the
adjacent tile wins!
Katachi is a good game for children who can think about patterns with multiple characteristics. Players need to be able to keep shape, color, and size in
mind as they plan a sequence toward their target goal. Children with the ability to shift their thinking from one characteristic to another and who can be
flexible in thinking about optional paths will do well with this game.
Katachi is a game of visual matching. Players match the symbols on the dice to find corresponding
matches on the board tiles. As there are three potential matches (e.g., color, shape, and size) for each tile,
children who can keep these 3 variables in mind for a match will enjoy this game.
Children create their own sequence of movements on the board by making matches in sequence. Children who like to create their own path will enjoy this game.
Children visualize various paths prior to moving their tile. This enables them to select the best option for
reaching their goal.
The rules are simple in Katachi, so if the child is able to focus on identification of a shape, size and/or
color match, the game will be easy to understand.
All of the characteristics of the tiles are clearly seen. The only abstract elements are symbols for any
size, shape or color. With prompting for these abstract symbols, children with autism should be able to
understand the elements of the tiles.
Children with autism often have an ability to see spatial relationships. In Katachi the child needs to combine characteristics of the tiles with the spatial relationships to create a path to the goal. If they can keep
all elements in mind, they will do well with this game.
Kilter
Kilter is not just hilarious family fun, it's also an introduction to levers and
predicting outcomes. Each player tries to safely distribute weighted cubes
onto the precariously balanced seesaw. If it tilts, your turn is over - and you
have to take any pieces that fall! This game also teaches patience - reinforcing when to resist that impulse to press your luck too far!
Kilter is a game of balance, logic, and prediction. It requires players to use
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fine motor to stack small blocks of different sizes and colors on the Seesaw in an attempt to be the first
person to get rid of all their blocks. Children who like to manipulate real objects and construct with
blocks will like this game. Spatial awareness and reasoning are needed because players must understand
the relationship of the sizes and weights of the different colored blocks, and be able to predict what will
happen when a specific block is positioned on an arm or on top of another block. Players can learn about
gravity and balance in "chunks" as they master the game. Children who are good at visualization and
"replaying" actions in their minds in order to make good decisions will enjoy Kilter. Children who do
not like to or are not able to communicate well will benefit from this game, because they can show their
nonverbal reasoning skills without having to talk to other players.
Children who have good balance awareness and fine motor skills will enjoy Kilter. Players must carefully place blocks to avoid knocking any off and to avoid tipping the Seesaw. Doing this well draws on a
child's sensory memory of pressure, balance and touch.
Children who are good at visualizing the effects of a possible action will be able to use that skill in Kilter. On each turn, players need to consider what might happen if they place a block on a certain spot.
Additionally, children who can mentally replay previous actions will be able to modify their play based
on what they remember of cause-and-effect actions performed by themselves and others.
Kilter requires players to stack small blocks of different sizes and colors on a balancing arm in an attempt to place all of their blocks on the Seesaw. Therefore, children who like to manipulate real objects
will enjoy Kilter. Also, Kilter does not require any symbolic or abstract thinking, so it appeals to children who prefer to be literal.
Players who learn from previous experiences can also use trial-and-error as a basis for incrementally
learning principles of gravity and balance. For example, if a player experiences placing a large block on
small block as consistently resulting in the large block falling or sliding, the player can combine that
"chunk" of information with the memory of the results of other block placements in order to maximize
their turn.
Children who do not like to or are not able to communicate well are able to benefit from Kilter, because
they can show their nonverbal reasoning skills, i.e. placing their blocks on the Seesaw successfully,
without having to talk to other players.
If children enjoy spatial reasoning and problem solving, and are spatially astute, they will be able to use
those strengths in Kilter. These strengths are needed because players must understand the relationship of
the sizes and weights of the different colored blocks, and be able to predict what will happen when a
specific block is positioned on an arm or on top of another block.
This game requires fine motor skills as the players must carefully place blocks to avoid knocking any
off. If children like building with blocks and trying to balance objects or doing other precise fine motor
activities, they will be very good at Kilter.
Kilter requires players to stack small blocks of different sizes and colors on a balancing arm in an attempt to place all of their blocks on the Seesaw. Children who like to manipulate real objects and construct with blocks will like this game.
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Linkity
In this fast-paced card game, everyone plays at once to build word associations. Apple relates to Slice. Slice relates to Golf, but in a different way! Be
the first to get rid of your cards to win.
Linkity is a game of word associations that can be played by children who
know the alphabet and can identify the first letters of words. Children may
make connections that many find unusual, but are still logical. That will just
make the game more fun! Although all play at the same time and speed is a
component, this aspect can be modified, if needed, to allow turns.
Players need good skills in making sound/letter association to come up with words that may be associated with the word named. A player with a good vocabulary (and memory) is at an advantage.
Players may determine new word associations by visualizing the word named and actions or objects connected to it. Children with autism may make unusual associations based on the sound pattern of the
word, pictures they have seen, previous experiences or books they have read. Have them explain the
connections between the words for an insight into their unique thinking patterns.
Understanding phonics and the relation of the letter to the initial sound is needed to generate other words
with the same initial letter and sound.
My Mine
Take a trip back to the gold rush days and strike it rich with My Mine. Roll
the dice to earn the biggest claim possible. Stake your claim and collect the
most gold nugget to win the game but don't be fooled, roll for too long and
lose your claim.
My Mine is a good game for children who like dice games. No addition is
involved; players just try to get three of a kind on their dice. This makes My
Mine a good way to introduce a game of chance. Some risk is involved, and
children need to think about whether to roll their remaining dice again to try earning more nuggets or to
keep what they have and end their turn. The risk aspect of the game may be challenging for children
with autism as they may not like the ambiguity involved in each turn. The opposite may also be true. If
the child enjoys throwing the dice and studying the result, they may lose track of the strategy aspect of
the game.
Players need to be able to do simple matching by comparing numbers or symbols on the dice rolled in
My Mine. They also need to draw the correct number of gold nuggets based on the total number of dice
they set aside. Thus, children who are good at matching can use that skill successfully in My Mine.
Children will need to use visual memory related to numbers in My Mine. Visually, they will need to understand how a number symbol, such as "3", equals the corresponding number of objects, such as three
gold nuggets. If the child has difficulty with this type of memory, My Mine can be a good game for
teaching counting and number to object correspondence.
Some children enjoy collecting and organizing objects. For those children, My Mine can be a very comfortable experience as they collect and organize their gold nuggets during the game.
My Mine involves risk and reward strategic thinking. Children need to think about whether to throw
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their remaining dice again to try earning more nuggets or to keep what they have and end their turn. For
some children with autism, this is a strength and skill they can hone during the game. The risk aspect of
the game may be challenging for other children as they may not like the ambiguity involved in each turn.
The opposite may also be true. If the child enjoys rolling the dice and studying the result, they may lose
track of the strategy aspect of the game. Either way, the game can still be fun for children with autism
with a little support.
The literal part of My Mine is physically collecting gold nuggets based on the dice a player has rolled.
For children who prefer literal, direct activities, My Mine can be very enjoyable. However, children do
need to understand how a number symbol, such as "3", equals the corresponding number of objects, such
as three gold nuggets. This is a form of abstract thinking. If the child has difficulty with this, My Mine
can be a good game for teaching counting and number to object correspondence. As an added bonus for
children who like tactile experiences, the gold nuggets are fun to hold and play with.
Nonverbal reasoning is needed, but no direct communication is required, making My Mine a good game
for children who have difficulty communicating what they are thinking. Rather, children are able to
demonstrate their thinking by setting aside dice, re-rolling or selecting gold nuggets from the mine or
other players.
Pack It
Grab your backpack and get ready to go on a hike! Others may join you so
know when to keep going and when to stop and collect some miles traveled
points. Watch out for the Hazard Cards, you may need to have some Bear
Spray handy!
Prepare your backpack with the best cards you can. When you are ready, take
a hike! Match the cards drawn on the hike to what's in your backpack to continue, or risk losing your precious supplies! Be the last player to leave the
hike to collect the cards drawn, adding miles to your score. The player with the most miles traveled wins
the game!
Perspectives
Move the brightly colored Game Tiles around on the board to create
one or more patterns from your “Perspective”. Solve your Pattern
Cards even when it is not your turn but pay close attention and be quick
so you do not miss out on a winning opportunity!
Children who are good at matching patterns will like this game. Children
with good spatial reasoning who like to manipulate concrete objects, such as
blocks, to create designs may do well with this game. Perspectives requires
children to examine multiple colored block patterns (on their cards) and either find or create matching
pattern(s) on the game board. The more matching patterns children can see on the board, the better their
score will be. Nonverbal reasoning is needed, but no direct communication is required, making this a
good game for children who have difficulty communicating what they are thinking.
Perspectives is good for children who are strong at visual matching. The game board is populated with
colored square tiles in a large grid. Then, the players try to match patterns on their cards with patterns
they see on the game board. And, if possible, the player can move one tile to create one or more matching patterns.
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Perspectives builds on children's short term memory for patterns. As children look at their cards, they
will memorize the pattern and then look for it on the game board. The better they get at this strength the
child will be able to memorize the patterns on several cards at once, as well as how the patterns appear
different if the cards are rotated 90 or 180 degrees.
On their turn, players may try to create a pattern or multiple patterns that match one or more cards in
their hand. To do this, they will move a tile to create the correct sequence of colors. Thus, children who
enjoy and are good at putting objects in order or sequencing will find Perspectives fun and engaging.
For children who like activities with clear rules and boundaries, Perspectives is well suited. That is because winning is based on following, i.e. matching, the patterns and the rules are very straightforward.
Either you have made or matched the pattern(s) or not.
Children who prefer concrete and literal activities, Perspectives is a good choice. First, the game involves wooden square tiles that children can move around the game board. Second, the patterns they are
looking for and creating are very clear and concrete. Third, Perspectives does not require any interpretation, analogy or strategy. While it is straightforward, players who love to find and create patterns will
enjoy the different levels Perspective provides and enjoy trying to win the game by matching the most
patterns.
Nonverbal reasoning is needed, but no direct communication is required, making Perspectives a good
game for children who have difficulty communicating what they are thinking. Children are able to create
or find the patterns on the game board and demonstrate their spatial reasoning by placing cards face up
on the table that match patterns on the game board.
Perspectives involves a high degree of spatial problem solving, as players move tiles around to match
patterns on their cards, or move their cards around looking for pattern matches on the game board. Children who enjoy spatial problem solving will be able to demonstrate and hone this strength playing Perspectives.
Children with good spatial reasoning who like to manipulate concrete objects, such as blocks, to create
designs may do well with Perspectives. Perspectives requires children to examine multiple colored block
patterns (on their cards) and either find or create matching pattern(s) on the game board. In particular,
children who like playing with blocks, arts and crafts and manipulatives will like moving tiles around to
create matching patterns.
Ribbit
Colorful frogs jump for joy as they leap on a friend's back for a ride to the
finish pond. Each player secretly chooses one frog tile that tells them which
color frog they will be racing. Players draw cards and move frogs based on
the color and symbols. The first frog to leap into the pond wins the game!
Featuring five custom-cut wood frogs, 52 cards and a colorful game board,
Ribbit strengthens number and color recognition, decision-making and strategy in ages 5 and up.
Ribbit will appeal to children who like tangible objects and moving toward a goal. Children have a secret frog they are trying to get to the finish line, yet they may move any of the frogs in addition their
own. On their turn, players select a move depending on what they think will advance their frog or fool
other players into guessing which is their frog. The idea of bluffing may be difficult for children with
autism, but the game can be played successfully without subterfuge. Children like the aspect of stacking
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frogs and jumping the stack along the lily pads.
Ribbit involve simple matching of a picture of a colored frog card in the player's hand to the colored
frogs on the board.
If children want to play strategically, they can try to remember what frogs have been moved by which
players. Establishing the pattern of moves may reveal which frogs belong to which players.
Ribbit involves a unique type of sequencing, namely, stacking frogs and moving the entire stack forward
or backward. Children who like sequencing, especially stacking, will like the option to stack frogs and
move the whole pile.
Some children with autism learn well by thinking through options and recalling prior actions in activities
like building blocks and checkers. In Ribbit, remembering what other players have done helps children
figure out which frogs belong to which players.
In Ribbit, a player's card indicates which frog to move and how to move it forward or backward. Then,
players physically move the frogs along the simple path. This is a very concrete, tactile feature of the
game that will appeal to children who prefer literal activities.
Children use nonverbal reasoning to determine which frog to move based on cards in their hand. In addition, they are deciding whether to move their frog forward or bluff other players by moving their frog
backward. However, they do not need to talk about their logic or strategy.
Although the path to the end is straight forward, players use spatial reasoning to compare different frogs'
positions and determine which frog would be best to move on each turn. Thus, children who are good a
spatial reasoning will have an advantage playing Ribbit.
Children who enjoy fine motor activities like building blocks may enjoy playing Ribbit which requires
stacking frogs and moving them on the game board. The frog tokens are large, so refined fine motor
skills are not needed.
Share a Berry
Players take turns flipping over their 4 Berry Path tiles, collecting the number of strawberries shown from the Big Berry Basket and threading them
onto their string. When players begin turning over their River Path Tiles,
they must remove the number of strawberries from their string and pass them
to another player as directed by the bear on the tile. It's fun to "Share a
Berry!"
Share-A-Berry is a good choice for a child with autism who likes manipulating objects, lining things up, and counting. It reinforces early number recognition and use of + and symbols. Children also practice giving their "berries" to other players. This is helpful for children who
may have difficulty sharing.
Turns are simple and require only that the child turn over the next tile on his/her path and follow the visual directions on the card. The routine pattern of play is easy for children to understand and helps them
learn to associate picture cues with following directions. Determining the winner is done by comparing
the number of beads (or length of bead string) to other players. This concrete approach teaches amount
by both counting and visual comparison, which reinforces learning number concepts for children.
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Share a Berry requires children to turn over and look at the picture on their path. They then match the
number on the card to the real objects, or "berries" they put on their string.
The action of threading the bead requires the child understands how to orient the bead and string in order
to combine them. Children feel a sense of accomplishment with each bead added.
Threading the beads at each turn leads to a longer and longer string of beads. There is no right order of
beads, only the right number, so children are reinforced for saying the right number by getting to add
that number of beads to their string.
The game is very concrete, with pictures and objects (berries) as the key components of the game. The
berries are a concrete representation of the numbers, thus, building number concepts in a concrete way.
The winner is also determined by a visual comparison of amounts of beads strung.
Simple spatial problem solving is involved at the end of the game when players compare the length of
their strings of beads to see whose has longest.
Children who like lining things up and stringing beads will enjoy putting the "berries" on the string during their turn. This will be a motivating factor to play the game!
One advantage of Share a Berry is that the entire game is set out at the start. No card drawing or movement of pieces needs to be tracked. The same routine is followed on each turn. The simplicity and routine of play is an advantage for children who like sameness.
Manipulating and making a long string of beads is motivating to children who like manipulating small
objects and putting them in a sequence.
Sneaks
Round up a group of friends and get ready for some fast-paced fun! The action heats up as players wildly pass cards around the table to collect four
cards of the same kind. Once you have the right set, grab a sneaker, sit back
and laugh while everyone else scrambles to snatch one too. Get stuck without
sneakers too many times and you're out! Be the last player in the game to
become the 'sole' survivor.
Sneaks requires players to match the numbers on cards in their hand to get
four of one kind. The first person to get four of a kind grabs a sneaker from the play area. This signals to
all other players to race to pick up the rest of the sneakers. Children who are quick at spotting a number
match and keeping an eye on the actions of other players will be good at Sneaks.
Sneaks is a game requiring players to match the numbers on cards in their hand to get four of one kind.
Thus, it is a good match for children who are good at matching numbers or symbols. In addition, colors
on the cards assist the players in making matches.
The goal of Sneaks is to be the first person to get four of one kind. For children who enjoy grouping like
things together will build on visual mapping skills playing Sneaks.
Even though Sneaks involves numbers, it is a very literal game. Players are matching the numbers, not
doing math. Therefore Sneaks appeals to children who enjoy literal activities and can also be a good inMission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
troduction to numbers for children who are just learning early math concepts.
Some children are good at logic and reasoning, but do not like to discuss or verbalize their thinking. In
Sneaks, children use their logic to determine what card to pass to the player on the left while trying to be
the first to create four of one kind. However, they do not need to discuss and talk about their reasoning
and strategy.
For children who have good dexterity, especially those who enjoy playing with cards, will be able to
emphasize dexterity playing Sneaks.
Sneaks follows the same routine every game. Pick up card on your right and discard to person on your
left. It is a very rhythmic, set way of playing and, therefore, may appeal to children who prefer predictable activities.
Take Your Pick
Just how well do you know your fellow players? Read a card with two words
that describe another player. Serious or silly? Blizzard or hurricane? Can you
guess which word is most like him? If so, you both score points! Play with those
you think you know and those you'd like to know better.
"Here are games that you can learn to play in about two minutes, but can keep
you talking, laughing, and learning about each other for hours!"
Basic Game Play:
One player is chosen as the "subject." Other players guess which one of two
options best describes the subject. They decide on their card which option the subject will pick and then
ask the subject if they choose "this one or that one." If they guessed correctly, they receive a point. Each
player gets a chance to be the subject. Game play can be adjusted for small or large groups.
Tibbars Everyday Big Board
Teach days of the week, months in a year, daily weather, seasons and time.
Start each morning off right with this important learning lesson. Interactive
and all-in-one, lay it flat on a table or hang on a bedroom wall!
The board does not require interaction, but adults may need to assist in its
use.
Sit or stand at an angle to the child, so direct eye contact is not needed.
Combine short verbal instructions with visual and physical examples of each step. Take each part of the
board one at a time and walk through the content.
Use hand-over hand guidance if needed, so children feel the actions as the content is being discussed.
For example, if talking about the weather help the child move the dial to the appropriate section.
Check for comprehension by asking the child to show you what to do next.
Provide a model. For example, count each day up until the appropriate date. Then say, "Yesterday it was
the 27th, where the peg is. Today we move the peg to the next number. What is the next number?" This
models for the child how to determine the date.
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
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Respond to immediate echolalia (repeating what was just said) by rephrasing the child’s response into a
correct format, so the child can hear and repeat that phrase. For example if the adult says, "What day is
it?" and the child repeats, "What day is it?" the adult says, "Tuesday. Today is Tuesday."
Delayed echolalia (repetition of previously heard comments) may have a hidden meaning or association.
Look for connection in the phrase used to the current situation. For example, the child says, “After these
messages we’ll be right back!” Think what the repeated phrase is associated with for the child. Try to
interpret what is meant and rephrase it for the child. For example, you might respond by saying, “It
sounds like you want a break for a few minutes. Is that what you mean? You can tell me, ‘I need a
break.’”
Use a motivation toy or object to gain the child’s attention. For example, hold a toy next to the place on
the board you want the child to look. The child gets to hold the toy after completing the task on the
board.
Use the child’s finger to point to what needs attention. They will attend to their finger first, and then the
adult can point out the object they are pointing at. For example, help the child point to the season and
say, "Is it summer or winter?"
Extend the child’s action to make a correct response. For example, if the child says," 9", the adult can
say, "Yes it is 9 o'clock" .
Reinforce attention and actions by commenting on what was done correctly. For example, “You are
right! It is still August. We are not at the end of the month yet.”
No speech is required to demonstrate understanding. Children can move the dials and pegs on the board.
However, speech should be elicited along with the child's manipulations. Attempt to get the child to imitate initial sounds or words.
Provide at least 10 seconds wait time for the child to process or produce responses. It may take longer to
formulate a thought or response for children with special needs.
Doing all the tasks on the board at one time may be frustrating for some children. Break up the tasks
with an activity in between each.
Practice a phrase to ask for help and role play situations in the game where it is needed.
Provide techniques for self-calming, such as holding a special toy.
Unravel
Kites are a fun way to spend an afternoon in the park - if only the wind
wouldn't keep tangling up the strings! Race against the other players each
round to be the first to figure out who is holding the kite shown on the die
roll. This is a great way for kids to practice holding attention and mentally
tracing a route in their heads.
Unravel is a game for children who pay attention to details. Children must
visually track a kite string from the kite down through whirls and twirls to the
character holding the string. Although fingers are not supposed to be used, modifications can be made to
allow children to trace the line with a finger. The strings also can be shortened to make the task easier.
Children have to be on the lookout for a yellow balloon or orange parrot, as the presence of one of these
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
alters the turn. Players try to grab the token with the matching item on it.
Children who are good at matching images and colors will use visual matching skills in Unravel as they
try to match the image on the die to the kite, parrot, or balloon on the game board.
Unravel is not a memory game, but require players need to remember to look for the picture of the balloon or parrot if yellow or orange is rolled. If this is too challenging for the child, remove the parrot and
balloon tiles from the game.
Unravel is very concrete in that the child merely has to follow the line, i.e. kite string, visually. If
needed, the player can trace the string with a finger.
Unravel involves spatial problem solving. Children win the game by tracking their kite string through its
twists and turns to the character who is holding it. Thus, children who are good at visual tracking and
spatial reasoning may do well at Unravel.
The game is to be played visually, but will require fine motor skills if modified for the child to use a finger to trace the string.
Walk the Dog
Grab a leash and get ready to Walk the Dogs! Each player collects dogs
from the front or back of a long line by drawing and playing cards. But, beware of the dog catcher who may steal some of your favorite dogs. To win,
collect five of the same breed in a row, or have the most dog points in your
own line. Woof!
Children often like grouping things that are alike and arranging them in a
rows. Dogs are a great interest for many as well. This game will be a fun one
for children of all levels! Children only need to be able to count how many dogs they can take and interpret from the symbol on the cards whether to take the dogs from the front or back of the dog line up.
Strategy involves which card from the players hand should be selected, but use of this strategy is not
necessary to play. One frustration for some children may be the use of dog catcher cards, which result in
loss of a player's largest group of dogs. If this is too frustrating for the child, eliminate these cards, or
introduce them gradually.
Children need to match the pictures on the cards to the number and location of dogs to select. Children
may like this aspect because it is a concrete form of "reading" the cards.
Children who enjoy putting things in order or a sequence will put those skills on display in Walk The
Dogs! They can help set up the game by placing all the dogs in a conga line. During gameplay they get
to build their own line of dogs based on the cards they draw.
Walk The Dogs is highly concrete due to the 63 included miniature dog figures. The essence of the game
is selecting, matching and lining up your dog figures. Children who prefer activities and language to be
literal will find Walk The Dogs to be very comfortable to play. One frustration for some children may be
the use of dog catcher cards, which result in loss of a player's largest group of dogs. If this is too frustrating for the child, eliminate these cards.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
Walk The Dogs involves spatial problem solving as players need to select and orient dog figures to make
5 in a row. Children who are good a spatial thinking and patterns will take advantage of those skills in
the game. Some children love to play with small objects and toys. These children will enjoy playing with
the 63 cute dog figures included in Walk The Dogs. They can set up the game each time by placing all
the dogs in a conga line, or they can just free play with the figures to make up their own activity. During
gameplay they get to build their own line of dogs based on the cards they draw.
Word Bits
In Word Bits, words begin as one to four letter bits rolled on the letter dice.
Pick a category card and make a word using those word bits that fit the category. Everyone plays at once, so be the first to call out your word to win the
card. This game promotes quick thinking while building spelling and vocabulary skills.
Word Bits is a good game for children who have the ability to mentally arrange
and reorganize symbols (letters) in their minds. Children who have a good understanding of spelling rules will also do well if they can conceive of a word to include the letters on the
dice. Children who read well may have a good decoding skills, but may not always comprehend the
words they read. If this is the case, they may have difficulty matching the letters to a word in a specific
category. For these children, it may be a good idea to start play without the cards and then add in categories that are of interest to the child.
Word Bits includes many different categories ranging from dog breeds to anything about summer. Thus,
having a good memory and ability to classify words into different categories (ex: retriever, poodle, collie; or sun, beach, pool) is an important strength children can use to play the game. Additionally, children will need to be able to generate words from only a few letters, so memory for letter-sound associations is important. Feel free to remove Category Cards for which children do not have much knowledge.
Children who like word play and are good at spelling will be able to use those strengths in Word Bits.
Children will also need to have a good vocabulary in order to identify winning words. Players must first
generate a word containing the letters rolled, then spell it correctly in order to receive a point.
Children who enjoy sequencing, especially spelling words from the correct sequence of letters, will like
playing Word Bits. During play, children name words that contain certain letters. Then, they need to
spell the word aloud in order to demonstrate that the word contains the letters.
Children who can visualize word sequences in their minds and reorganize letters mentally have great
skills for playing Word Bits. Please note that players need to be able to select words that fit specific
categories such as breed of dogs. Therefore, they will need the ability to understand categories and know
a variety of items that would fit in those categories.
Children who are good at phonics rules will be able to use that strength to spell the words they generate.
The words that do not follow phonetic patterns will be more challenging. For children who have difficulty spelling, consider allowing them to skip that requirement of the game.
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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SENSORY & THERAPY LENDING LIBRARY INVENTORY
What If? Conversation Rings
100 important discussions to have with your kids ahead of time. Get them
thinking about acting safely, building positive relationships and handling
their emotions.
What If? addresses issues of safety emotional and social problem solving
through questions. These topics are exceedingly difficult for many children with autism and other types of special needs to understand. However, introducing one question for discussion may be a good way to provide information on these topics to the child. Just asking and discussing
once will not be enough. Questions should be revisited to see if the child remembers the discussion and
possible responses.
Children need to be able to focus on the topic at hand for the cards to be meaningful.
A weighted vest worn during the game may provide additional pressure input and thus reduce fidgeting
due to sensory needs. Pressure can be calming when used for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Practice a phrase to ask for help and role play situations in the game where it is needed.
Provide techniques for self-calming, such as holding a special toy.
Let’s Chat Conversation Rings
98 thought-provoking and interesting questions to get you chatting. Wonderful dinner talks, memorable road trips, and unforgettable conversations, all on one little ring!
Let's Chat introduces conversational topics on a variety of topics. Conversations are exceedingly difficult for many children with autism and other
types of special needs to understand and be able to contribute to. However, introducing one topic for discussion may be a good way to provide
information on these topics to the child. Keep the conversation to just a
few turns. Pick and choose the topics, focusing on those of interest to the
child.
The child needs to be calm and attentive prior to any discussion of social topics. Keep the talk short.
A weighted vest worn during the game may provide additional pressure input and thus reduce fidgeting
due to sensory needs. Pressure can be calming when used for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Practice a phrase to ask for help and role play situations in the game where it is needed.
Provide techniques for self-calming, such as holding a special toy.
Mission to provide trained respite providers, special needs education, and strength based support services for
children with disabilities to promote family stability.
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