Multi-Sport Coaching Manual - Parker Parks and Recreation

Multi-Sport Coaching Manual - Parker Parks and Recreation

Multi-Sport Coaching

Manual

Table of Contents

Introduction to Multi-Sport ................................................................................................. 3

Picture Packets .................................................................................................................... 3

Team Rosters ....................................................................................................................... 3

Class Times.......................................................................................................................... 3

Class Locations .................................................................................................................... 3

Don’t forget the Treats! ...................................................................................................... 4

Contact Information ........................................................................................................... 4

Schedule & Game Locations .............................................................................................. 4

Coaching Drills, Tips, and Suggestions............................................................................. 4

Soccer-Related Games .................................................................................................... 5

Basketball Related Drills and Games ............................................................................ 7

Baseball Related Games ................................................................................................ 9

Tag Games .....................................................................................................................10

Optional Kinder Games and Activities ......................................................................... 12

Additional Resources ......................................................................................................... 13

Fitness and Your 4 to 5 year-old ....................................................................................... 13

Fitness and My Child .................................................................................................... 13

Introduction to Multi-Sport

Thank you for volunteering as a coach in our youth sports program. Multi-sport is designed to offer a variety of team sport experiences to 4 to 6 year old children. As in all of Parker’s Kinder programs, the format is designed to be instructional and fun for the participants. Our goal is to introduce kids to each sport and develop a love for physical activity. It would be to your advantage to get as many parents involved as possible.

The first half of each session is designated for drills and practice. The last half is meant to be a scrimmage against each other. Individual sessions are completely customizable to the coach’s preference and the following drills are simply suggestions to get you started. We do ask that you try to stick to the schedule as the supervisor will set up the venue and provide the equipment according to the scheduled activity.

Picture Packets

Team pictures June 14 and 15, 2013. Please show up 10 minutes before your scheduled time, which is located on the flier included in your packet.

A coach’s plaque will be provided to each head coach free of charge with their

• team picture on it.

As we are contracted with PMI Sports Photography, no other photographer may take and sell pictures to your team.

Team Rosters

Only those on your roster are authorized to practice or play with your team.

PLEASE take roll to ensure only people on your roster are practicing with your team. An alphabetical roster of the entire kinder program is included in your packet so you can direct those not on your roster to the correct location.

Classes will begin the week of May 31 and end the weekend of July

26/27.

If the phone numbers or email address on your roster are incorrect, or if a child is not in the correct age group, please call or email us.

Class Times

Class times are Friday evenings or Saturday mornings for 1 hour each.

Please end your class on time so the next class can begin at their scheduled time.

All classes should allow the kids to participate in instructional activities and games

(keep them active as much as possible).

Class Locations

All classes will be held at the Parker Fieldhouse. The venue will change throughout the season and we encourage you to meet your kids near the Turf field bleachers each week. Each class has been assigned a designated location for the day. Please note that we will communicate with you if we make changes to the schedule. We ask that you practice on the field assigned each week so that other programs are able to operate smoothly as well. It will be easy for your participants to locate you if you provide them a copy of the venue locations.

Please start and end on time as there may be a team following your session. We encourage you to begin with a warm-up and sport introduction for the day.

Highlight important skills related to the sport. All other details for the day are a personal decision. We have included ideas for skill building, but please know that you are not limited to our ideas. Have fun with the instruction...Feel free to use balloons, fun tag games, and teamwork activities to educate the group.

Don’t forget the Treats!

Snacks, a great idea! Share the responsibility and designate parents to bring snack and drink each week to share after the session.

Contact Information

Parker Recreation Center

303.841.4500

Parker Fieldhouse

303.805.6300

Mainstreet Center

Bob Bullock

, Sports Manager

Errin Koon

, Sports Coordinator

Ryan Daberkow

, Sports Coordinator

WEATHER LINE

303.805.7728

303.805.6311

303.805.6308

303.805.6314

303.805.3288

Schedule & Game Locations

Date Activity

5/31 or 6/1 Introduction to parents and team; Soccer

Location

TURF

6/7 or 6/8 Soccer TURF

6/14 or 6/15 Beginning Throwing & Catching/Kickball - PICTURES TURF

6/21 or 6/22 Baseball/Tee Ball/Whiffel Ball TURF

6/28 or 6/29 Flag Football, Tag games, Capture the flag

7/5 or 7/6 BREAK FOR 4 th of JULY WEEKEND

7/12 or 7/13 Basketball

7/19 or 7/20 Volleyball; Dodgeball games

TURF

OFF

GYM

GYM

7/26 or 7/27 Coaches Choice – Please contact Errin ASAP if you are interested in a gym sport as she will have to reserve the gym. Also, please let her know what equipment you think you will need so it is available prior to the start of the session.

GYM or

TURF

Coaching Drills, Tips, and Suggestions

Young children love the idea of a "new" game ‚ so it is a good idea the change the rules of the game or change the type of activity within the same sport every 10 to 15 minutes to keep your players interested. Instructions have to be broken into little steps and kept very simple and brief. If you cannot do it and show it in about 20 seconds, then do it in stages, demo part one of the activity, then expand to part two, etc. Below you will find drills and activities for each sport/game offered over the Kinder Multi-Sport Season as well as additional ideas to keep the kids active.

Soccer-Related Games

The key to Mini-Mite and Kinder soccer drills is for every player to have a ball and to teach a variety of activities and drills that include every player. Pick one aspect of the game (dribbling, or shooting, or passing) and build your practice session around that.

Numbers

This exercise is good for 1 on 1 dribbling skills and the kids defending can rest a bit.

Divide the kids into 2 teams and assign each child on each team a number. So, if you have 10 kids, assign each kid a number between 1 and 5 so each team has a number 1, a number 2, etc. Try to make sure the kids with the same number are evenly matched. Set up two very wide "goals" with pylons or cones. Spread the 5 kids on each team across each goal line. Call out one or more numbers, and those kids come out to play (i.e. Kid

#1 vs. Kid #1) and the rest of the kids stay spread across the goal line as defenders.

Throw a ball from the sideline into the center and let the #1’s play it until a goal is scored, the defenders stop it, or it goes out of bounds. Then switch numbers.

Variation: Colors. Give each kid on each team different colored pinnies, armbands, or stickers to place on shirts and the same colors to Team 2. Instead of having matching numbers, you’ll have matching colors to help younger kids who may have trouble remembering numbers.

Monkey in the Middle

All players form a circle and choose someone (the "Monkey") to be in its center. The players forming the circle pass one ball between them while the person in the center tries to gain control of the ball. When this happens, the person from the circle who last touched the ball goes to the center. Some level of competitiveness develops but never on an individual basis and the "loser" quickly gets a chance to redeem themselves.

Ice Monster

Mark off an area for the game to be played and select one kid to be the "Ice Monster".

Give the rest of the kids their own ball and have them dribble around within the field.

The "Ice Monster" attempts to touch each player's ball, at which point, that player

"freezes" with their foot on the ball. If a player's ball goes out of bounds, they also freeze.

The last remaining unfrozen player gets to be the new “Ice Monster” for the next round.

Cops and Robbers

Select two kids to be the Cops and the rest of the kids to be Robbers. Have the Robbers, each with a ball, line up on one side of the field; the Cops should line up somewhere near midfield facing the Robbers. The object is for the Robbers to dribble to the other side without having a Cop tackle the ball away. If a Robber loses his ball to a Cop, he goes to jail (designate a small area with cones off to the side or use a Goal structure.) Have the

Robbers repeat the crossings until there are only 2 left. Make these guys the new Cops, pull everyone out of jail and start over.

Pirate (or Monster)

This is another keep-a-way game. Set up each kid with their own ball inside a circle; setup a circle with cones; or, if available, use the center circle already drawn on the fields.

One player without a ball is the Pirate. Everybody starts dribbling around while the

Pirate tries to steal a ball from any player and pass it out of the circle. Once the Pirate steals the ball from Child A, the original Pirate AND Child A are now Pirates and go after the others.....then three, then four. Finally only one player is left with a ball. He/she becomes the Pirate the next game.

Variation: Bomber. Just like above except the "It" player has a ball and tries to roll/throw it at the other player's ball and knock it out of the circle.

Coaching points: concentrate on the player's close dribbling and screening techniques.

Kick out

Give each child a ball and set them up inside a small circle. Everyone dribbles within the circle and tries to kick everyone else's ball out while protecting their own ball. The players cannot kick someone else's ball out if their ball isn't in the circle. When a ball gets kicked out of the circle, that child leaves the circle until it only two kids are left. The coach may participate to keep the game from becoming too competitive, as the ones eliminated early may feel bad.

Egg Hunt

Start with more balls than players. Have the players line-up across one end of the field.

Take their balls and spread them out around the field, these are the eggs. At the other end of the field is a goal called the "basket". Blow the whistle and turn them loose. The object of the game is to get all the "eggs" in the basket as quickly as possible using their feet. They are all on the same team, and aren't allowed to take a ball away from another player. Time them to see how fast they can accomplish the task.

The kids really like this game. The more balls (eggs) the better. You should see them score, and turn right around and go back for more balls.

Marbles

Split your team into two groups and line them up behind two opposing lines. Each player should have a ball. Place an unusual color (or size) ball in the middle. This is the marble

(a #2 soccer ball works well). Have them try to move the marble across the other team's line by striking it with a ball. After the game starts, don't require them to use their own ball, they are free to use any other ball they can find.

At first the players may get really excited and kick the marble. If this happens, call timeout and put it back.

Variation:

eliminate the teams and play it in a circle. The game is over when the ball exits the circle.

Basketball Related Drills and Games

Quick

Have the kids form a circle with you in middle. The kids copy you running in place, jumping, moving around etc. When you say “quick” they have to get into the defensive position. However if you say “get down” they should continue to do whatever they were doing beforehand. Anyone who either does not get into the defensive position on “quick”, or who stops what they were doing on “get down”, is “out”. They are only out if you see them.

Heads Up Direction Change

Have the kids space themselves along the center court facing you. You should be off of the court at center court. Instruct your players to move while dribbling in whichever direction you move - side to side, forward and backwards. Change direction without words so they have to keep their eyes on you. As they progress change directions more quickly and move faster.

Redlight-Greenlight

Have a group of kids start at one baseline; don't bunch them too closely together. Each child in the group has a ball. When the facilitator shouts green light the children dribble forward, blue and they dribble left, yellow they dribble right and of course red they stop.

Just as in the regular Redlight-Greenlight game, they are out if they do not get the directions right.

For the younger kids just learning, tell them this is not a race. When 'red light' is said, let them pick-up their dribble. If the younger kids aren’t following, eliminate right and left directions and simply have them move forward or stop. As the level of play increases, different variations could be things like walking backwards, making it a race, using opposite hands, or any errors in dribbling having the player to go back to start.

You can also use a whistle; one blow signifies 'green light' and two whistles mean 'red light'. The kids should keep dribbling throughout the whole drill.

Pin-Ball

Players start in a confined area (i.e. the key). Each player has two clothes pins clipped on the back of their jerseys at about shoulder blade level.

On command, everyone goes after the clothes pins on everyone else. The winner is player with most pins after a set amount of time (1 to 5 minutes).

This drill helps young players with aggressiveness and hustle. Add dribbling to the mix as they start to progress their skills.

Keep It Bouncing

While dribbling, the kids try to tap the other players' ball out of bounds. Double dribbling is not allowed. If a player’s ball goes out of bounds or they get called out for

double dribbling, have them run a lap, or high five all the parents; after their

“punishment” have them join back in!

Make sure the kids keep their head up and use both arms. The more they try to tap away other players’ balls (instead of just protecting their own) the better dribblers they become.

Hot Hands

The players cannot dribble the ball in this game! Have the players in a small area and give one child the ball to pass to another player. The player who receives a pass can take two steps and then has to pass the ball to someone else. As soon as the next player receives a pass, he/she has to pass the pall. Have the players count out loud the steps he/she takes.

If the player exceeds the two steps, the coach stops the game and this player is replaced by someone on the bench (if there are any). Or you can have a form of “punishment” that allows them to complete another drill (i.e. shoot a basket, dribble down the side line, etc.) and then rejoin the group.

Gopher Ball

Have the players start at half court circle or free throw circle. Then have them lay down on their stomach with their eyes closed. Toss one basketball into the air and blow a whistle. The players have to pop up and scramble for ball. This teaches players to react quickly to a loose ball and go quickly into Offense.

Bean Bag Relay

Separate the kids into 2 to 4 teams. Using half of the court spread the teams along the center line, each team in their own single-file line. Give each team one ball.

Place different colored bean bags in the circle at the key in a pile. Each team should be assigned one color.

On the coaches command one player from each team dribbles into the key. While still dribbling, the players must bend down and pick up one bean bag each. Then they must dribble back to their team, deposit the bean bag and give the ball to their next team member.

This process continues until all bean bags are gone. Once a team has collected all of their bean bags they can steal bean bags from the other teams. After two minutes (or any other pre-determined set of time) the team with the most bean bags wins!

Note: Only one bean bag is able to be taken at a time. You can use any other item to collect if you don’t have bean bags available.

Ball Scramble

Give each player a basketball. On command, everyone drops their ball and runs to half court, the bleachers, around the gym etc. and returns to the area they started. While the

players are running, the coach removes one ball and the player without a ball is “out.”

With fewer players, start to reduce the area.

Baseball Related Games

Basic Throw and Catch (This is a good place to utilize your parents!)

Step 1: Accept as a fact that there are kids who are deathly afraid of a baseball. No amount of pleading or bribery will erase that fear. Let these kids begin to learn to catch and throw using a tennis ball, and don't ostracize them for their fear.

Step 2: Begin with an "on one knee” exercise. Separate two players by roughly seven paces. Have them both on one knee. For right-handed throwers, the right knee is on the ground; for left-handers, the left. Instruct the players to throw by reaching behind them and touching the ball to the ground, then raising their arms and completing the throwing motion, tossing the ball to their partners.

Being on one knee and touching the ground emphasizes the most basic parts of throwing: the back foot is planted, the arm is extended and the ball is thrown.

Step 3: Fielding: Use a drill to emphasize keeping thumbs together above the waist, little fingers together below the waist, and at the waist, whichever way is best for the child.

This places the hands in the correct position to field a ball, avoiding those awkward moments when a child tries to catch balls thrown at his head with the heels of his glove because he has his little fingers together (and hopefully avoids the bloody noses as well).

The drill can be done by having the player move his hands to various positions while in the appropriate configuration. Then start playing soft toss with him, varying where the ball is thrown.

Step 4: Repeat these drills. After a time, it will be apparent which players are ready to move up to actually playing catch, which players are ready to play catch with a tennis ball, and which players need to spend a lot more time on the basic drills.

Step 5: Have fun with it. In the end, learning new skills, with catching and throwing the most basic, having a good time, and gaining a new degree of self-confidence are really the goals of Kinder sports.

Relay Race

This is a good conditioning drill and helps players work on making good turns when taking extra bases.

Split your team into 2 equal squads. Have half the team at home and half at second.

Have the first player in each line start with the ball in his hand. On your signal the first player of each team will start running around the bases. When he or she reaches the spot they started from they will hand the ball to the next player. The next player then runs around the bases. The first team to get all players completely around, wins.

Teaching Players to Watch the Ball

Draw a large black dot on the ball. Using a tee, have the batter concentrate on hitting the dot and watching the dot until after their swing is complete. Using the tee helps to keep their swing level and having them watch the ball after they hit it will teach them to keep their eye on the ball. Repetition is the key.

Controlling Swarming

Draw large circles in the infield dirt; for the indoor turf, use jump ropes, cones or other markers to create the sections. Have one player stand in each of the areas and "guard their area."

Gently hit or throw the ball into the field. The player to whom the ball comes closest to, or the circle the ball comes closest to, fields the ball. In the event the ball travels between two circles, or right down the middle, the player who jumps first and calls it, gets it and the other has to back off. Having the players “call the ball” may be a bit too advanced for

Kinder programs, but if they are progressing nicely, try having them call it.

Kickball

Another baseball alternative, kickball requires little beyond a makeshift diamond and a textured rubber ball. A pitcher rolls the ball and the kicker kicks it as far as possible.

Kickball is a bit friendlier than whiffle ball in that kicking is much easier than hitting a ball thrown to the batter.

Pickle

Also called Run the Bases, Monkey in the Middle, or Rundown; this surprisingly fun game requires nothing more than a ball (any kind) and two bases. The base runner tries to run between the two bases without getting tagged out by the defensive players.

Tag Games

These games are designed to be played along with football since most kids have a hard time adding the ball to the concept of flag football. Let them try it out for a while and here are some suggestions for other games to play.

No Ball Football

Divide the players into two teams with equal numbers on each side, each team wearing matching flags. Mark two end zones at both ends of the play area. Designate one team to start on offense and have them stand on their goal line. The defensive team then lines up on the opposite goal line.

The leader blows the whistle and the offensive players attempt to run through the defensive players to the opposite goal line. At the same time, defensive players chase the offensive players and attempt to pull as many of their flags as possible. Once past the goal line, the offensive players are safe and can stop running.

At the conclusion of the round, the leader counts the numbers of flags pulled. Have the teams switch and play again. The objective is to pull more flags than the opponent

Punt & Pass Relay

Each player begins with a football on the goal line which is designated as the starting line.

On a signal, each player either punts or throws the ball down the field as far as possible.

The players then move up to the spot where their ball has stopped.

On the next signal, each player again punts or throws his ball as far as possible toward the finish line, and then moves up to that spot.

Play continues until each player has successfully crossed the finish line.

Elimination Tag:

All players are assigned to Team A and Team B. The coaches are best to make the teams based on running ability. The teams should have a uniform (pennies) that distinguishes them from each other. The coach should decide if team A or team B will be ‘it’.

The players must run within a designated area in the gymnasium or on the field. The team that is ‘it’ has 2 minutes (or a predetermined length of time) to tag the other players on the other team. If they are tagged they are out of the game, and stands around the boundary watching the game.

After the predetermined amount of time has expired, the other team is ‘it’ and they have the same purpose of tagging the other team. This continues until one player is left standing. The winning team is the one with the remaining player.

Everybody’s IT Tag

This game is just how it sounds: everyone is “it”! Give everyone a set amount of space to run around in. Have the players chase after one another and tag each other. If a player is tagged, they must sit on the ground where they were tagged. Once a player gets tagged, anyone who was tagged by that player can get up and continue playing.

For example, if Player A tags Players E, H, and Z they all have to sit down in the spot they were tagged. However, if Player X tags Player A, A has to sit down and Players E,

H and Z can play again. Once Player X is tagged, Player A can stand back up and play.

You can play this game until only 1 person is left standing, or after a set amount of time has passes. This is a great game because it keeps players constantly moving, paying attention to each other and it gives kids multiple opportunities to stay in the game.

Simon Says Tag

The coach will assign one player to be ‘it’ at the start of the game. The child who is “it”’ decides if they will run, jump, walk, hop, crab walk, or any other type movement to tag the other players.

The other kids must mimic the movement of the person who is ‘it’. They must continually watching the person who is ‘it’ because they can change their movement at anytime. If the ‘it’ player begins the game walking, all kids must be walking. If the ‘it’ player decides to jump, all other kids must jump and this continues throughout the game.

Once the ‘it’ player tags another student, the new ‘it’ person decides on the type of movement.

Optional Kinder Games and Activities

Team sports are a great way for your kid to make friends, learn about group dynamics, and build character. However, they can also be a pain to organize players and kids often get bored with one game. Here are a few game ideas to keep the kids active and having fun when you run out of sport-specific games to play.

Batty Bowling (Good in the gym or turf)

Find a number of silly or odd items that can be knocked over by a ball, such as a plastic milk carton, a candlestick, a stand-up doll, a plastic vase of flowers, a pizza box, a tower of empty cans, an umbrella stand, an empty oatmeal container, and a book. Line them up like bowling pins and let the bowlers try to knock them over with volleyballs, tennis balls, or golf balls.

Name-It Ball (Good for gym games)

Have players form a circle. Give one player a rubber ball. That player selects a category, such as "candy bars." He or she then bounces the ball to another player in the circle, who must catch the ball, state an item from the category, such as "Snickers," and keep the ball moving to the next player. If the player can't name an item, holds the ball too long, or repeats an item, he or she is out.

Drag your Teammate (Good in the gym or turf)

Divide the group into two teams. Give each team a blanket. Have one player from each team lie down on the blanket. The teams must drag the body on the blanket from one end of the yard to the other. Whoever crosses the finish line first, wins.

Teach the Parents

During the last practice of the season have a scrimmage between the parents and the players (with the coaches helping the players). The kids love this game and it serves a couple of purposes. They get a chance to show their parents what they can do and they enjoy beating their parents. (The parents never win, the coaches make sure of that....)

Also, since many of the parents have not played all sports, it shows them how difficult the game really is. The hope is that a parent may now think twice before "yelling" at a child for missing and "easy" shot in a game. Everybody seems to enjoy this scrimmage.

Just plain GAMES!

For warm-ups, play games which are not sport-specific, but promote physical activity and are a lot of fun. Simon says, freeze tag, team tag, take-away, duck-duck-goose, etc.

Remember that the kids aren't showing up to play a specific sport; they're showing up to have fun so make it fun for you and for them!

Fitness and Your 4 to 5 year-old

By the time kids are 4 and 5 years old, they have mastered many of their basic movement skills, such as running and jumping, and have plenty of energy to put those skills to good use. During these years they will continue to refine their movement skills and build on the basics to learn more complex tasks.

Take advantage of your child's natural tendency to be active. By encouraging your child to participate in physical activities in these early years, you are setting the stage so that your child leads a fit and healthy lifestyle now and down the road.

Fitness and My Child

The National Association of Sports and Physical Education recommends that every day preschoolers should:

• get at least 60 minutes of structured physical activity (adult-led activity) get at least 60 minutes of unstructured physical activity (free play) not be inactive for more than 1 hour at a time (unless sleeping)

It's important to understand what your child can do and what skills are appropriate for this age. Engage your child in activities that fun and challenging, but not beyond your child's abilities. Preschool children are learning to hop, skip, and jump forward. They are eager to show off how they can balance on one foot (for 5 seconds or longer), catch a ball, or do a somersault.

Your child may also enjoy swimming, hiking, dancing, and riding a tricycle or bicycle with training wheels. All of these activities help develop skills and coordination. It is important that your child engage in a variety of activities to encourage a wide range of movement and skills.

Many parents look to organized sports as a way to get preschoolers active. But the average 4- or 5-year-old has not mastered even the basics, such as throwing, catching, and taking turns. Even simple rules may be hard for a 4- or 5-year-old to understand, as any parent who has watched their child run the wrong way during a game can attest to.

Starting too young can be frustrating for a child and may discourage future participation in sports. But if you decide to sign your 5-year-old up for soccer or other team sport, be sure to choose a peewee league that emphasizes the fundamentals.

No matter what the sport or activity, remember that fitness should be fun. If your child isn't having fun, ask why and try to address the issue or find another activity your child does enjoy.

Additional Resources

• www.ParkerRec.com

– Coaches and Parents Resource page

• www.eteamz.active.com/baseball/instruction/tips/index.cfm

? (Baseball) www.wecoachkids.com

(All sports) http://www.nays.org/ (National Alliance for Youth Sports)

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