Wind River Workbench User`s Guide, 2.4

Wind River Workbench User`s Guide, 2.4

Wind River Workbench User's Guide

®

Wind River Workbench

U S E R ’S G U I D E

2.4

VxWorks Version

Copyright

© 2005 Wind River Systems, Inc.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of Wind River Systems, Inc.

Wind River, the Wind River logo, Tornado, and VxWorks are registered trademarks of

Wind River Systems, Inc. Any third-party trademarks referenced are the property of their respective owners. For further information regarding Wind River trademarks, please see:

http://www.windriver.com/company/terms/trademark.html

This product may include software licensed to Wind River by third parties. Relevant notices (if any) are provided in your product installation at the following location:

installDir/product_name/3rd_party_licensor_notice.pdf.

Wind River may refer to third-party documentation by listing publications or providing links to third-party Web sites for informational purposes. Wind River accepts no responsibility for the information provided in such third-party documentation.

Corporate Headquarters

Wind River Systems, Inc.

500 Wind River Way

Alameda, CA 94501-1153

U.S.A.

toll free (

U.S.

): (800) 545-WIND telephone: (510) 748-4100 facsimile: (510) 749-2010

For additional contact information, please visit the Wind River URL:

http://www.windriver.com

For information on how to contact Customer Support, please visit the following URL:

http://www.windriver.com/support

Wind River Workbench User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

11 Oct 05

Part #: DOC-15623-ZD-00

Contents

PART I: INTRODUCTION

1 Overview ..............................................................................................

3

1.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

3

1.2

Wind River Documentation .................................................................................

4

1.3

Road Map to the Wind River Workbench User’s Guide .................................

4

1.4

Understanding Cross-Development Concepts .................................................

5

1.4.1

Hardware in a Cross-Development Environment ...............................

5

1.5

Basic Eclipse Concepts ..........................................................................................

7

1.5.1

Window .....................................................................................................

7

1.5.2

Workspace .................................................................................................

7

1.5.3

Perspectives ...............................................................................................

8

1.5.4

Views ..........................................................................................................

10

1.5.5

Editors ........................................................................................................

11

1.5.6

Projects .......................................................................................................

11

1.6

Accessing Additional Interface Information ....................................................

12

iii

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials .......................................................

13

2.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

13

2.2

Starting Wind River Workbench .........................................................................

14

2.3

Tutorial: Creating a Project and Running a Program ......................................

15

2.3.1

Before You Begin .......................................................................................

15

2.3.2

Creating a Project .....................................................................................

15

2.3.3

Importing Source Files Into Your Project ..............................................

16

2.3.4

Building Your Project ...............................................................................

17

2.3.5

Creating a Connection Definition to the VxWorks simulator ............

17

2.3.6

Downloading the Program and Attaching the Debugger ..................

18

2.3.7

Setting Up the Device Debug Perspective ............................................

18

2.3.8

Setting and Running to a Breakpoint. ...................................................

20

2.3.9

Modifying the Breakpoint .......................................................................

21

2.4

Tutorial: Editing and Debugging Source Files .................................................

21

2.4.1

Before You Begin .......................................................................................

22

2.4.2

Introducing an Error into the Source Code ..........................................

22

2.4.3

Tracking Down a Build Failure ..............................................................

22

2.4.4

Rebuilding the Project .............................................................................

23

2.5

Tutorial: Using the Editor’s Code Development Features ..............................

23

2.5.1

Using Code Completion to Add Symbols to Your File .......................

23

2.5.2

Using Parameter Hints ...........................................................................

24

2.5.3

Using Bracket Matching to Clarify Syntax ...........................................

25

2.6

Tutorial: Tracking Items of Interest in Your Files .............................................

25

2.6.1

Creating a Bookmark on a Source Line in a File ..................................

26

2.6.2

Creating a Bookmark for an Entire File .................................................

26

2.6.3

Locating and Viewing Your Bookmarks ...............................................

26

iv

Contents

3 Setting Up Your Hardware ..................................................................

29

3.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

29

3.1.1

Overview of Host and Target Configuration Tasks .............................

30

3.1.2

Understanding Target Servers and Target Agents ..............................

30

3.2

Configuring Your Cross-Development System ................................................

33

3.2.1

Configuring Host Software .....................................................................

33

3.2.2

Verifying Serial Setup and Power ..........................................................

37

3.3

Setting Up a Boot Mechanism .............................................................................

41

3.4

Booting VxWorks ....................................................................................................

43

3.4.1

Default Boot Process ................................................................................

43

3.4.2

Entering New Boot Parameters ..............................................................

44

3.4.3

Boot Program Commands .......................................................................

46

3.4.4

Description of Boot Parameters .............................................................

47

3.4.5

Booting With New Parameters ...............................................................

50

3.4.6

Alternate Boot Methods ..........................................................................

52

3.4.7

Rebooting VxWorks .................................................................................

53

3.5

Configuring Host-Target Communication for Workbench ............................

54

3.5.1

Ethernet Connections ...............................................................................

54

3.5.2

Serial-Line Connections ...........................................................................

57

3.6

Troubleshooting VxWorks Problems .................................................................

60

PART II: PROJECTS

4 Projects Overview ................................................................................

63

4.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

63

4.2

Workspace/Project Location .................................................................................

64

v

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

4.3

Creating New Projects ...........................................................................................

64

4.3.1

Subsequent Modification of Project Creation Wizard Settings ..........

65

4.3.2

Projects and Application Code ...............................................................

65

4.4

Overview of Preconfigured Project Types .........................................................

66

4.4.1

Workbench Sample Projects ....................................................................

66

4.4.2

VxWorks Image Project ...........................................................................

66

4.4.3

VxWorks Board Support Package Project .............................................

67

4.4.4

VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects ...............................

67

4.4.5

Real-time Process Projects .......................................................................

68

4.4.6

VxWorks Shared Library Projects ..........................................................

69

4.4.7

VxWorks File System Projects .................................................................

69

4.4.8

Native Application Projects ....................................................................

70

4.5

Projects and Project Structures ............................................................................

70

4.5.1

Adding Subprojects to a Project .............................................................

71

4.5.2

Project Structures and Host File System Directory Structure ............

72

4.5.3

Project Structures and the Build System ...............................................

73

4.5.4

Project Structures and Sharing Subprojects ..........................................

74

4.5.5

Customizing Build Settings for Shared Subprojects ...........................

74

5 VxWorks Image Projects ......................................................................

75

5.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

75

5.2

Importing a VxWorks Image Project ..................................................................

76

5.2.1

Migrating a VxWorks Image Project ......................................................

76

5.3

Creating a VxWorks Image Project .....................................................................

77

5.4

VxWorks Image Projects in the Project Navigator ...........................................

80

5.4.1

Global Project Nodes ...............................................................................

80

5.4.2

Project Build Specs and Target Nodes ...................................................

80

vi

Contents

5.4.3

Build Output Folders ...............................................................................

82

5.4.4

Makefile Nodes .........................................................................................

82

5.4.5

Project File Nodes .....................................................................................

83

5.5

Configuring Kernel Components .......................................................................

84

5.5.1

The Kernel Editor .....................................................................................

85

5.6

Adding Application Projects to the VxWorks Image Project ........................

85

5.7

Notes on Board Support Packages (BSPs) .........................................................

86

5.7.1

Using the Simulator BSP .........................................................................

86

5.7.2

Using a Wind River or Third-Party BSP ...............................................

87

5.7.3

Using a Custom BSP for Custom Hardware ........................................

87

6 Boot Loader Project .............................................................................

89

6.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

89

6.2

Creating a Boot Loader Project ............................................................................

90

6.3

Boot Loader Projects in the Project Navigator ..................................................

91

6.3.1

Global Project Nodes ...............................................................................

91

6.3.2

Project Build Specs and Target Nodes ...................................................

91

6.3.3

Makefile Nodes .........................................................................................

92

6.3.4

Other Project Files ....................................................................................

92

7 ROMFS File System Projects ..............................................................

93

7.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

93

7.2

Creating a ROMFS File System Project .............................................................

94

7.3

ROMFS File System Projects in the Project Navigator ...................................

95

7.3.1

Global Project Nodes ...............................................................................

95

7.3.2

Project File Nodes .....................................................................................

95

vii

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

7.3.3

Configuring the ROMFS File System ....................................................

96

8 VxWorks Real-time Process Projects .................................................

97

8.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................

97

8.2

Creating a VxWorks Real-time Process Project ................................................

98

8.3

VxWorks Real-time Processes in the Project Navigator .................................. 100

8.3.1

Global Project Nodes ............................................................................... 101

8.3.2

Project Build Specs and Target Nodes ................................................... 101

8.3.3

Makefile Nodes ......................................................................................... 101

8.3.4

Project File Nodes ..................................................................................... 102

8.4

Application Code for a VxWorks Real-time Process Project ......................... 103

8.5

Linking to VxWorks and Using Shared Libraries ............................................ 103

9 VxWorks Shared Library Projects ...................................................... 105

9.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 105

9.2

Creating a VxWorks Shared Library Project ..................................................... 106

9.3

Shared Libraries in the Project Navigator ......................................................... 108

9.3.1

Global Project Nodes ............................................................................... 108

9.3.2

Target Node ............................................................................................... 108

9.3.3

Makefile Nodes ......................................................................................... 109

9.3.4

Project File Nodes ..................................................................................... 109

9.4

Source Code for the Shared Library ................................................................... 109

9.5

Making Shared Libraries Available to Applications ....................................... 110

9.5.1

Configuring the Shared Library Project ................................................ 110

9.5.2

Configuring the Application Projects .................................................... 110

viii

Contents

10 VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects .............................. 113

10.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 113

10.2

Creating a VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project ......................... 114

10.3

Downloadable Kernel Modules in the Project Navigator .............................. 116

10.3.1

Global Project Nodes ............................................................................... 117

10.3.2

Project Build Specs and Target Nodes ................................................... 117

10.3.3

Makefile Nodes ......................................................................................... 118

10.3.4

Project File Nodes ..................................................................................... 118

10.4

Application Code for a VxWorks DKM Project ............................................... 118

11 VxWorks User-Defined Projects .......................................................... 121

11.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 121

11.2

Creating a User-Defined Project .......................................................................... 122

11.2.1

Linking to External Files ......................................................................... 122

11.3

Creating an Application for VxWorks ................................................................ 124

12 Native Application Projects ................................................................. 125

12.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 125

12.2

Creating a Native Application Project ............................................................... 126

12.3

Native Applications in the Project Navigator ................................................... 128

12.3.1

Global Project Nodes ............................................................................... 128

12.3.2

Project Build Specs and Target Nodes ................................................... 128

12.3.3

Makefile Nodes ......................................................................................... 129

12.3.4

Project File Nodes ..................................................................................... 130

12.4

Application Code for a Native Application Project ......................................... 130

ix

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

13 Working in the Project Navigator ........................................................ 131

13.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 131

13.2

Creating Projects ..................................................................................................... 132

13.3

Adding Application Code to Projects ................................................................. 132

13.3.1

Importing Resources ................................................................................ 132

13.3.2

Adding New Files to Projects ................................................................. 133

13.4

Opening and Closing Projects ............................................................................. 134

13.4.1

Closing a Project ....................................................................................... 134

13.5

Scoping and Navigation ........................................................................................ 135

13.6

Moving, Copying, and Deleting Resources and Nodes .................................. 136

13.6.1

Resources and Logical Nodes ................................................................. 136

13.6.2

Manipulating Files ................................................................................... 137

13.6.3

Manipulating Project Nodes ................................................................... 138

13.6.4

Manipulating Target Nodes .................................................................... 139

13.7

Project Navigator Quick Reference ..................................................................... 140

14 Advanced Project Scenarios ............................................................... 143

14.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 143

14.2

Resource Locations ................................................................................................. 144

14.3

Multiple, Unrelated Software Systems .............................................................. 145

14.3.1

Using Different Workspaces for Different Systems ............................. 145

14.3.2

Using the Same Workspace for Different Software Systems .............. 146

14.4

Complex Project Structures .................................................................................. 146

14.4.1

Project Assumptions ................................................................................ 147

14.4.2

Infrastructure Design ............................................................................... 148

x

Contents

14.4.3

Development ............................................................................................. 153

14.4.4

Finalization ................................................................................................ 158

PART III: DEVELOPMENT

15 Navigating and Editing ....................................................................... 167

15.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 167

15.2

Wind River Workbench Context Navigation .................................................... 168

15.2.1

The Symbol Browser ................................................................................ 168

15.2.2

The Outline View ..................................................................................... 169

15.2.3

The File Navigator ................................................................................... 169

15.2.4

Type Hierarchy View ............................................................................... 170

15.2.5

Include Browser ........................................................................................ 170

15.3

The Editor ................................................................................................................ 171

15.4

Search and Replace: The Retriever ..................................................................... 171

15.4.1

Intiating Text Retrieval ............................................................................ 171

15.5

Static Analysis ......................................................................................................... 172

16 Build Properties and the Build Console ........................................... 173

16.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 174

16.2

Accessing Build Properties ................................................................................... 175

16.2.1

Project Build Properties and Preferences Build Properties ................ 175

16.3

Build Support .......................................................................................................... 177

16.4

Build Targets ............................................................................................................ 178

16.5

Build Specs .............................................................................................................. 181

xi

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

16.6

Build Tools ............................................................................................................... 184

16.7

Build Macros ........................................................................................................... 188

16.8

Build Paths ............................................................................................................... 190

16.8.1

The Generate Include Search-Paths Wizard ......................................... 192

16.9

Build Properties for VxWorks Image Projects .................................................. 193

16.9.1

Build Specs for VIPs ................................................................................. 193

16.9.2

Build Tools for VIPs ................................................................................. 193

16.9.3

Build Macros for VIPs .............................................................................. 193

16.9.4

Build Paths for VIPs ................................................................................. 194

16.9.5

Link Order for VIPs .................................................................................. 194

16.10 Folder, File, and Build-Target Properties ........................................................... 194

16.11 Makefiles .................................................................................................................. 194

16.11.1 Derived File Build Support ..................................................................... 195

16.12 Build Console View ............................................................................................... 197

16.12.1 Saving Build Output ................................................................................ 197

16.12.2 Build Console Preference Settings ......................................................... 197

17 Building: Use Cases ........................................................................... 199

17.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 199

17.2

Adding Compiler Flags ......................................................................................... 200

17.2.1

Add a Compiler Flag by Hand ............................................................... 200

17.2.2

Add a Compiler Flag with GUI Assistance .......................................... 201

17.3

Building Applications for Different Boards ..................................................... 202

17.4

Creating Library Build-Targets for Testing and Release ................................ 203

17.5

Architecture-Specific Implementation of Functions ....................................... 206

xii

Contents

17.6

Executables that Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries ................................ 207

17.7

User-Defined Build-Targets in the Project Navigator ..................................... 210

17.7.1

Custom Build-Targets in User-Defined Projects .................................. 210

17.7.2

Custom Build-Targets in Workbench Managed Projects .................... 210

17.7.3

User Build Arguments ............................................................................. 211

17.8

A Build Spec for New Compilers and Other Tools ......................................... 211

17.9

Developing on Remote Hosts .............................................................................. 213

17.9.1

General Requirements ............................................................................. 214

17.9.2

Remote Build Scenarios ........................................................................... 214

17.9.3

Setting Up a Remote Environment ........................................................ 215

17.9.4

Building Projects Remotely ..................................................................... 215

17.9.5

Running Applications Remotely ............................................................ 216

17.9.6

Rlogin Connection Description .............................................................. 217

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target ............................... 219

18.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 219

18.2

A VxWorks Real-time Process from Host to Target ......................................... 220

18.2.1

Set Up the Project Structure for Real-time Processes .......................... 220

18.2.2

Add Code to the Real-time Process Project .......................................... 221

18.2.3

Add the Real-time Process to the Target File System .......................... 223

18.2.4

Build the System ....................................................................................... 224

18.2.5

Set up the Target Connection .................................................................. 224

18.2.6

Run the Real-time Process on the Simulator ........................................ 225

18.3

A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target ...................... 225

18.3.1

Set Up the VxWorks Shared Library Project ........................................ 225

18.3.2

Add Code to the Shared Library Project ............................................... 226

18.3.3

Add the Shared Library to the Run-Time Process ............................... 227

xiii

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

18.3.4

Modify the Code in the Real-time Process Project .............................. 230

18.3.5

Generate Include Search Paths ............................................................... 231

18.3.6

Add the Shared Library to the Target File System .............................. 231

18.3.7

Build the System Again ........................................................................... 232

18.3.8

Run the RTP with the Shared Library on the Simulator ..................... 233

PART IV: TARGET MANAGEMENT

19 Connecting to Targets ........................................................................ 237

19.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 237

19.2

The Target Manager View ..................................................................................... 238

19.3

Defining a New Connection ................................................................................. 238

19.4

The Registry ............................................................................................................. 239

19.4.1

Remote Registries ..................................................................................... 240

19.4.2

Registry Data Storage .............................................................................. 241

19.4.3

The Registry and Product Updates ........................................................ 241

19.4.4

Changing the Default Registry ............................................................... 241

19.5

Establishing a Connection .................................................................................... 242

19.5.1

Assumptions ............................................................................................. 242

19.6

Connect to the Target ............................................................................................. 242

19.6.1

The Kernel Shell ........................................................................................ 243

20 New Target Server Connections ......................................................... 245

20.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 245

20.2

Defining a New Target Server Connection ....................................................... 245

20.2.1

Wind River Target Server ........................................................................ 246

20.2.2

Target Server Connection Page .............................................................. 246

xiv

Contents

20.2.3

Object Path Mappings Page .................................................................... 250

20.2.4

Target State Refresh Page ........................................................................ 253

20.2.5

Connection Summary Page .................................................................... 254

20.3

Kernel Configuration ............................................................................................ 255

21 New VxWorks Simulator Connections ............................................... 257

21.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 257

21.2

Defining a New Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection ..................... 257

21.2.1

VxWorks Boot Parameters Page ............................................................. 258

21.2.2

VxSim Memory Options Page ................................................................ 258

21.2.3

VxWorks Simulator Miscellaneous Options Page ............................... 258

21.2.4

Target Server Options Page ..................................................................... 259

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections ............................................. 261

22.1

Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection ............................................ 261

22.2

Defining a New Wind River ISS Connection ................................................... 271

22.3

Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection ............................................... 275

PART V: DEBUGGING

23 Launching Programs .......................................................................... 285

23.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 285

23.2

Launching a Kernel Task or a Process ................................................................ 286

23.2.1

Defining the Target Connection ............................................................. 287

23.2.2

Defining the Kernel Task or Process to Run ......................................... 287

23.2.3

Specifying a Build Target to Download ................................................ 288

23.2.4

Specifying The Projects to Build ............................................................ 288

xv

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

23.2.5

Defining Debug Behavior ....................................................................... 289

23.2.6

Specifying Where Workbench Should Look for Source Files ............ 290

23.2.7

Configuring Access Methods ................................................................. 290

23.2.8

Using Your Launch Configuration ........................................................ 291

23.3

Reset & Download: Hardware Debugging Launches ..................................... 291

23.4

Launching a Native Application ......................................................................... 292

23.4.1

Specifying the Location and Arguments for Your Application ......... 292

23.4.2

Specifying Remote Settings ..................................................................... 292

23.4.3

Setting Environment Variables ............................................................... 293

23.4.4

Configuring Access Methods ................................................................. 293

23.4.5

Running Your Native Application ......................................................... 294

23.5

Relaunching Recently Run Programs ................................................................. 294

23.5.1

Increasing the Size of the Launch History List .................................... 295

23.6

Using Attach-to-Target Launches ........................................................................ 295

23.6.1

Attaching the Debugger to a Running Task or Process ...................... 296

23.6.2

Attaching the Debugger to the Kernel .................................................. 297

23.6.3

Attaching the Kernel in Task Mode ....................................................... 297

23.6.4

Attaching the Kernel in System Mode .................................................. 297

23.7

Suggested Workflow .............................................................................................. 298

24 Managing Breakpoints ........................................................................ 299

24.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 299

24.2

Types of Breakpoints ............................................................................................. 299

24.2.1

Line Breakpoints ....................................................................................... 300

24.2.2

Expression Breakpoints ........................................................................... 301

24.2.3

Hardware Breakpoints ............................................................................. 301

xvi

Contents

24.3

Manipulating Breakpoints ................................................................................... 303

24.3.1

Importing Breakpoints ............................................................................ 303

24.3.2

Exporting Breakpoints ............................................................................. 304

24.3.3

Refreshing Breakpoints ........................................................................... 304

24.3.4

Disabling Breakpoints ............................................................................. 304

24.3.5

Removing Breakpoints ............................................................................ 304

25 Debugging Projects ............................................................................ 307

25.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 307

25.2

Using the Debug View .......................................................................................... 308

25.2.1

Understanding the Debug View Display .............................................. 309

25.3

Coloring Views ....................................................................................................... 312

25.4

Stepping Through a Program ............................................................................... 313

25.5

Using Debug Modes .............................................................................................. 313

25.5.1

Setting and Recognizing the Debug Mode of a Connection .............. 316

25.5.2

Debugging Multiple Target Connections ............................................. 317

25.5.3

Disconnecting and Terminating Processes ........................................... 317

25.6

Understanding Source Lookup Path Settings ................................................... 317

25.7

Using the Disassembly View ............................................................................... 318

25.7.1

Opening the Disassembly View ............................................................. 318

25.7.2

Understanding the Disassembly View Display ................................... 318

25.8

Using the Kernel Objects View ........................................................................... 319

25.8.1

Understanding the Kernel Objects View Display ................................ 321

25.9

Run/Debug Preferences ........................................................................................ 322

xvii

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

26 Troubleshooting .................................................................................. 323

26.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 323

26.2

Startup Problems .................................................................................................... 324

26.2.1

Pango Error on Linux .............................................................................. 327

26.3

General Problems ................................................................................................... 327

26.3.1

Java Development Tools (JDT) Dependency ........................................ 327

26.3.2

Help System Does Not Display on Solaris or Linux ........................... 328

26.3.3

Help System Does Not Display on Windows ...................................... 328

26.3.4

Removing Unwanted Target Connections ............................................ 328

26.4

Error Messages ........................................................................................................ 329

26.4.1

Project System Errors ............................................................................... 329

26.4.2

Build System Errors ................................................................................. 331

26.4.3

Target Manager Errors ............................................................................. 334

26.4.4

Launch Configuration Errors ................................................................. 339

26.4.5

Debugger Errors ....................................................................................... 340

26.4.6

Static Analysis Errors ............................................................................... 340

26.5

Troubleshooting VxWorks Configuration Problems ....................................... 341

26.5.1

What to Check ........................................................................................... 341

26.6

Error Log View ........................................................................................................ 344

26.7

Error Logs Generated by Workbench ................................................................. 344

26.7.1

Creating a ZIP file of Logs ...................................................................... 345

26.7.2

Eclipse Log ................................................................................................ 345

26.7.3

DFW GDB/MI and Debug Tracing Logs .............................................. 346

26.7.4

Debugger Views GDB/MI Log .............................................................. 347

26.7.5

Debugger Views Internal Errors Log ..................................................... 347

26.7.6

Debugger Views Broadcast Message Debug Tracing Log .................. 347

xviii

Contents

26.7.7

Target Server Output Log ....................................................................... 348

26.7.8

Target Server Back End Log .................................................................... 349

26.7.9

Target Server WTX Log ........................................................................... 349

26.7.10 Target Manager Debug Tracing Log ...................................................... 350

26.7.11 Static Analysis Parser Logs ..................................................................... 351

26.8

Technical Support ................................................................................................... 351

PART VI: UPDATING

27 Integrating Plug-ins ............................................................................ 355

27.1

Introduction ............................................................................................................. 355

27.2

Finding New Plug-ins ........................................................................................... 356

27.3

Incorporating New Plug-ins into Workbench .................................................. 356

27.3.1

Creating a Plug-in Directory Structure ................................................. 356

27.3.2

Installing a ClearCase Plug-in ................................................................ 357

27.4

Using Workbench with ClearCase Views .......................................................... 360

27.4.1

Adding Workbench Project Files to Version Control .......................... 360

27.5

Downloading and Installing Java Development Tools (JDT) ....................... 361

27.5.1

Creating a JDT Directory Structure ....................................................... 361

27.5.2

Downloading the JDT SDK ..................................................................... 361

27.5.3

Making JDT Available to Workbench .................................................... 361

27.6

Managing Multiple Plug-in Configurations ..................................................... 362

27.7

Using Workbench in an Eclipse Environment .................................................. 363

27.7.1

Recommended Software Versions and Limitations ............................ 363

27.7.2

Setting Up Workbench ............................................................................. 363

xix

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

PART VII: REFERENCE

A Updating Workspaces on the Command-line .................................... 369

A.1

Overview .................................................................................................................. 369

A.2

wrws_update Reference ........................................................................................ 370

B Glossary ............................................................................................... 373

Index .............................................................................................................. 379

xx

PA R T I

Introduction

1

2

3

Overview .............................................................

3

Wind River Workbench Tutorials ......................

13

Setting Up Your Hardware .................................

29

1

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

2

1

Overview

1.1 Introduction 3

1.2 Wind River Documentation 4

1.3 Road Map to the Wind River Workbench User’s Guide 4

1.4 Understanding Cross-Development Concepts 5

1.5 Basic Eclipse Concepts 7

1.6 Accessing Additional Interface Information 12

1.1 Introduction

Welcome to the Wind River Workbench User’s Guide. Wind River Workbench 2.4 is an Eclipse

1

-based development suite that provides an efficient way to develop real-time and embedded applications with minimal intrusion on the target system.

Wind River Workbench is available on Windows, Linux, and Solaris hosts, but in this guide, screenshots and paths will be shown as on Windows.

1. Eclipse is an industry-standard framework for building development suites.

3

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

1.2 Wind River Documentation

A wide variety of documentation in many different formats is available to

Workbench customers. See the getting started for your platform for a description of the full document set.

1.3 Road Map to the Wind River Workbench User’s Guide

This chapter provides an overview of cross-development concepts, and an introduction to basic Eclipse terminology and functionality.

2. Wind River Workbench Tutorials

provides a tutorial that walks you through all the major features of Workbench: creating projects, building and debugging code, connecting to the VxWorks simulator, and running your program.

3. Setting Up Your Hardware

explains how to set up your host and target in

order to run your programs on real target hardware.

Part II. Projects

explains the Project System, including creating new projects, importing and exporting existing projects, and creating VxWorks images and user applications.

Part III. Development

describes the Editor, Static Analysis, and Build System

features of Workbench.

Part IV. Target Management

provides details about using the Target Manager, including how to configure a target server, and how to create and manage your target connections.

Part V. Debugging

explains Debugger functionality, including launch configurations, attaching the debugger to processes, working with breakpoints, displaying processes in the Debug and Disassembly views, and examining registers and memory. This section also provides Troubleshooting information, explaining how to respond to error messages you may see while using Workbench.

Part VI. Updating

describes how to incorporate Plug-ins, such as ClearCase,

into Workbench.

4

1 Overview

1.4 Understanding Cross-Development Concepts

Part VII. Reference

provides information about updating your workspace with the command-line, as well as a Glossary of Workbench and Eclipse terms for which you may want more information.

1

1.4 Understanding Cross-Development Concepts

Cross-development is the process of writing code on one system, known as a host, that will run on another system, known as a target.

Cross-development allows you to write code on a system that you have available to you (such as a PC running Linux, Windows, or Solaris) and produce applications that run on hardware that you would have no other convenient way of programming, such as a chip destined for a mobile phone.

1.4.1 Hardware in a Cross-Development Environment

A typical host is equipped with large amounts of RAM and disk space, backup media, printers, and other peripherals. In contrast, a typical target has only the resources required by the real-time application with perhaps some small amount of additional resources for testing and debugging.

Working on the Host

You use the host just as you would if you were writing code to run on the host itself—to manage project files; edit, compile, link, store multiple versions of your real-time code, and configure the operating system destined to run on the target.

Connecting the Target to the Host

A number of alternatives exist for connecting the target system to the host, such as

Ethernet, serial, and JTAG. See

3. Setting Up Your Hardware

for more information

about setting up your hardware.

5

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Running Your Application Code

Run-time code is the code that is intended for the final application. The run-time includes the kernel, your application-specific code, and some selected library code.

The term run-time does not usually refer to the target agent, although you will typically include it during development and debugging. See

3.1.2 Understanding

Target Servers and Target Agents

, p.30 for more information about the target agent.

Workbench allows you to avoid the cumbersome process of downloading your complete run-time code each time you make a change by allowing you to download and run individual application modules as they are developed. You can even run application modules on the host in the integrated target simulator,

Wind River VxWorks Simulator, if target hardware is not available.

Advantages of Using Wind River Workbench

Wind River Workbench ensures the smallest possible difference between the performance of the target you use during development, and the performance of the target after deployment, by keeping most development tools on the host.

A fundamental advantage of using Wind River Workbench is that your application does not need to be fully linked. Code that is only partially completed can be downloaded for incremental testing and debugging; application modules do not need to be linked with the run-time system libraries, or even with each other. The host-resident shell and debugger can be used interactively to invoke and test either individual application routines or complete tasks.

Workbench loads the relocatable object modules directly, and maintains a complete host-resident symbol table for the target. This symbol table is incremental: the target server incorporates symbols as it downloads each object module. You can examine variables, call subroutines, spawn tasks, disassemble code in memory, set breakpoints, trace subroutine calls, and so forth, all using the original symbol names.

Wind River Workbench shortens the cycle between developing an idea and implementing it by allowing you to quickly download your incremental run-time code and dynamically link it with the operating system. Your application is available for symbolic interaction and testing with minimal delay.

The Workbench debugger allows you to view and debug applications in the original source code. Setting breakpoints, single-stepping, examining structures, and so on are all done at the source level, using a convenient graphical interface.

6

1 Overview

1.5 Basic Eclipse Concepts

1.5 Basic Eclipse Concepts

Wind River Workbench is based on the Eclipse Platform, an industry-standard framework for building development suites.

This section provides a very brief overview of some of the Workbench components inherited from Eclipse.

1.5.1 Window

The term window refers to the desktop development environment. You can open more than one window at a time by selecting Window > New Window (each window will see the same projects and workspace.) A Workbench window can contain one or more perspectives.

1.5.2 Workspace

Workbench uses a workspace to store your current working environment. Some of the items that are saved with the workspace include the set of open projects, and the size and location of views.

The workspace also contains information about the current session, including the types and positions of your views when you last exited Workbench, current projects, and installed breakpoints.

The default location of your workspace is installDir\workspace, but it can be located elsewhere if necessary. If you want to run two or more copies of

Workbench, each must have its own workspace.

Maintaining More Than One Workspace

If you want to run two independent copies of Workbench (to keep some projects and files completely separate from others) you must establish a second workspace.

This is not a required step for the tutorial in

2. Wind River Workbench Tutorials

.

1.

Launch Workbench as described in

2.2 Starting Wind River Workbench

, p.14.

2.

Select File > Switch Workspace to open the Select a workspace dialog.

3.

Select the directory where you want your workspace to be located, then select

Make New Folder

. Type the name of your new workspace, then click OK.

1

7

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

NOTE:

The path to each of your workspaces must be unique. If you want a new workspace to be located in the installation directory alongside your original workspace, it must have a unique name (for example, workspace2 or

newWorkspace

). If it is located in a different directory, it can have the same name as the original: workspace.

1.5.3 Perspectives

A perspective groups together an editor area and one or more views that are convenient to have available while working on a particular task.

For example,

Figure 1-1 shows the Application Development perspective, which is

designed to help you create projects, browse files, and edit and build source code.

Figure 1-1

Application Development Perspective

8

1 Overview

1.5 Basic Eclipse Concepts

It includes the Project Navigator on the top-left side of the screen, the Outline view on the top-right, the Target Manager on the bottom-left, and the Stacked view (also known as a tabbed notebook) on the bottom-right with the Tasks view visible.

To open a new perspective, select Window > Open Perspective > Other and choose a perspective you want to explore, or click the Open a perspective icon in the upper right corner of the Workbench window, select Other, and choose a perspective.

Figure 1-2 shows the Device Debug perspective, which contains views that are

useful when you are running and debugging programs, including the Debug and

Breakpoints views, and a tabbed notebook containing the Local Variables, Watch, and Register views. These views replace the Outline view of the Application

Development perspective.

Figure 1-2

Device Debug Perspective

1

The Application Development perspective opens by default, but you can switch between perspectives by selecting an icon in the shortcut bar along the top right edge of the Workbench window. When you start Workbench for the first time, the

9

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Open a perspective

icon and the Application Development tab appear as shown in

Figure 1-3

.

Figure 1-3

Perspectives Shortcut Bar

As you open perspectives, their icons appear in the shortcut bar. To see them all side by side, click to the left of the Open a Perspective icon and drag to the left until all open perspectives are visible.

To customize a perspective, you can open, close, and move views to create a comfortable work environment, then select Window > Save Perspective As and give your perspective a name. That configuration of views will be restored the next time you open your perspective. You can further customize your perspective by selecting Window > Customize Perspective.

You can restore a perspective to its default configuration by selecting

Window > Reset Perspective

.

1.5.4 Views

Views reside in perspectives, and allow you to display, manipulate, and navigate the information in Workbench.

Certain views appear in particular perspectives by default, but you can add any view to any perspective by selecting Window > Show View, then either selecting the view you want, or selecting Other, selecting the perspective containing that view, then choosing the view from the list.

There are two things to remember when using views:

Only one view (or editor) can be active at a time. The title bar of the active view is highlighted.

Only one instance of a type of view can be present in a perspective at a time

(but multiple editors can be present to view multiple source files).

Many views have their own menus. To open the menu for a view, click the down arrow at the right end of the view's title bar. Some views also have their own tool bars. The actions represented by buttons on view toolbars only affect the items within that view.

10

1 Overview

1.5 Basic Eclipse Concepts

Moving and Maximizing Views

Move a view by clicking either its title bar or its tab in a stacked notebook, and dragging it to a new location.

There are several ways to relocate a view:

Drag the view to the edge of another view and drop it. The area is then split, and both views are tiled in the same area. The cursor changes to an appropriate directional arrow as you approach the edge of a view.

Drag the view to the title bar of an existing view and drop it. The view will be added to a stacked notebook with tabs. When you drag the view to stack it, the cursor changes to an icon of a set of stacked folders.

If you drag a view over a tab in an existing view, the view will be stacked in that notebook with its tab at the left of the existing view. You can also drag an existing tab to the right of another tab to arrange tabs to your liking.

To quickly maximize a view to fill the entire perspective area, double-click its title bar. Double-click the title bar again to restore it.

1.5.5 Editors

An editor is a special type of view used to edit files. You can associate different editors with different types of files such as C, C++, Ada, Assembler, and Makefiles.

When you open a file, the associated editor opens in the perspective’s editor area.

Any number of editors can be open at once, but only one can be active at a time. By default, editors are stacked in the editor area, but you can tile them in order to view

source files simultaneously (see

15. Navigating and Editing

for more information

about Editors).

Tabs in the editor area indicate the names of files that are currently open for editing. An asterisk (*) indicates that an editor contains unsaved changes.

1.5.6 Projects

Workbench uses projects as logical containers and as building blocks that can be linked together to create a software system. The Project Navigator lets you visually organize projects into structures that reflect their inner dependencies, and therefore the order in which they are compiled and linked.

1

11

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

1.6 Accessing Additional Interface Information

For more information about the Workbench interface, press F1 (or CTRL+F1 on

Linux, or the Help button on Solaris) to open a dialog (called an infopop) containing a brief description of the current view. At the bottom of many infopops, you will see links to sections of Workbench documentation with more information on the same topic. You can also access the help system by selecting

Help > Help Contents > Wind River Documentation

.

For more information on Eclipse functionality, see the Eclipse Workbench User Guide under Help > Help Contents > Wind

River Partner Documentation > Eclipse Platform Documentation

, as well as the

Eclipse web site at

www.eclipse.org

.

12

2

Wind River Workbench

Tutorials

2.1 Introduction 13

2.2 Starting Wind River Workbench 14

2.3 Tutorial: Creating a Project and Running a Program 15

2.4 Tutorial: Editing and Debugging Source Files 21

2.5 Tutorial: Using the Editor’s Code Development Features 23

2.6 Tutorial: Tracking Items of Interest in Your Files 25

2.1 Introduction

This chapter provides tutorials designed to introduce you to Wind River

Workbench and to familiarize you with its views and development concepts. The

VxWorks Simulator is used to execute the sample programs, and no special hardware or system setup is required.

In the course of these tutorials, you will:

Create a project.

Import source files.

Build a project.

Connect to a simulator.

Set breakpoints.

Step through code.

13

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Set a Watch variable.

Run code.

Edit source files.

Track build errors.

Compare file history.

Debug a project.

Rebuild and rerun your code.

These tutorials assume a basic understanding of embedded projects and debugging concepts. They also assume that you have the Workbench software

(with VxWorks support) installed correctly on your host, and that the software is installed in the default location and with the default settings.

For definitions of unfamiliar terminology, see

B. Glossary

.

2.2 Starting Wind River Workbench

1.

Before you can run the tutorials, you must start Workbench.

On Windows:

Start > Programs > Wind River > Wind River

Workbench 2.4 > Wind River Workbench 2.4

On Linux and Solaris:

Open a terminal window, then navigate to your Workbench installation directory. From the command line, type:

./startWorkbench.sh

2.

When you start Workbench for the first time, Workbench creates a new registry database

1

. A dialog appears telling you how to migrate your registry settings from a previous registry to the new one

2

.

3.

Click OK. The Wind River Workbench welcome screen appears.

4.

Select the Start arrow to open a second welcome screen containing links to useful destinations, including the Workbench window itself.

1. A new database will also be created in /tmp if the default database is not accessible.

2. If you did not have a previous version of Workbench installed and therefore do not have registry settings to migrate over, you can safely ignore this dialog.

14

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials

2.3 Tutorial: Creating a Project and Running a Program

5.

To follow these tutorials, select the Workbench arrow. Workbench opens and displays the Application Development perspective.

2

2.3 Tutorial: Creating a Project and Running a Program

This tutorial uses the ball sample program, written in C. This program implements a set of balls bouncing in a two-dimensional grid. As the balls bounce, they collide with each other and with the walls. You see the balls move by setting a breakpoint with the property Continue on break at the outer move loop, and watching a global grid array variable in the Memory window.

First, you will create a new project in your workspace, then you will import the ball source files into it from their directory in the Workbench installation.

2.3.1 Before You Begin

Workbench preserves its configuration when you close it, so that at next launch you can resume where you left off in your development.

If you experimented with opening perspectives and moving views before starting this tutorial, switch back to the Application Development perspective by clicking its icon in the upper right corner of the Workbench window. If its icon is not visible, drag the shortcut bar to the left (your cursor will turn to a double-headed arrow) or click the double-right arrows (a dropdown list will open).

To reset the perspective and its views to their default settings, select

Window > Reset Perspective

.

2.3.2 Creating a Project

1.

Select File > New > VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project. The

Project

dialog appears.

15

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

2.

Enter ball in the Project Name field, then click Next. If this is your first

Workbench project, skip to step

5

.

3.

If you have previously created any projects before starting this tutorial, the

Project Structure

dialog appears. Here you can choose to make your new project a subproject of an existing one, or to make an existing project a subproject of your new one. Click Next.

4.

If you have any existing projects, the Build Defaults dialog appears. Here you can choose whether your project should use the build defaults from an existing project of the same type, or from the default Workbench template. Click Next.

5.

The Build Support dialog appears. Click Next to accept the default settings.

6.

The Build Specs screen appears. Click Deselect All, then select the check box next to the VxWorks simulator build spec for your platform and compiler (you can select more than one if you want). Click Next.

On Windows, select SIMNTdiab or SIMNTgnu

On Linux, select SIMLINUXdiab or SIMLINUXgnu

On Solaris, select SIMSPARCSOLARISdiab or

SIMSPARCSOLARISgnu

7.

The Build Target screen appears. By default the build target name is the same as the project name, but you can customize it if you prefer. Click Next.

8.

The Static Analysis screen appears. Leave these options checked for now.

Click Finish to create the project files. The new ball project appears in the

Project Navigator.

2.3.3 Importing Source Files Into Your Project

Next, import the ball sample project files.

1.

Right-click the ball project folder, then select Import. The Import wizard appears.

2.

Select File System and click Next. The File System page of the Import wizard appears.

3.

Click the Browse button next to the From directory field. The

Import from directory

page appears.

4.

Navigate to the installDir\workbench-2.4\samples directory. Select ball, then click OK. The File system page reappears, with the ball folder in the left pane and the files in that folder in the right pane.

16

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials

2.3 Tutorial: Creating a Project and Running a Program

5.

Select the check box next to ball. This automatically selects all the files in the right pane. Because you are importing into the ball project, ball appears in the

Into folder

field. Click Finish.

6.

To see the contents of the ball project folder, click the plus next to it in the

Project Navigator. You will see the project files in black, and the build targets in blue. Any files that appear in gray are read-only.

2.3.4 Building Your Project

1.

Build the ball project by right-clicking the ball folder in the Project Navigator and selecting Build Project from the context menu.

2.

The first time you build a project, a dialog appears asking if you want

Workbench to generate include paths (for more information about include paths, see

16.8.1 The Generate Include Search-Paths Wizard

, p.192). You do not

need to do this for the tutorial, so click Continue.

3.

Build output displays in the Build Console tab at the bottom of the screen, and the output file ball.out appears in a subdirectory of ball called

ball.out (SIMNTdiab_DEBUG)

.

NOTE:

The string SIMNTdiab_DEBUG reflects the active build spec, and the fact that debug mode flags are turned on by default. If you selected a different build spec, or turned off debug mode flags, the string will be different.

2

2.3.5 Creating a Connection Definition to the VxWorks simulator

You create and manage connections to a target, including the VxWorks simulator, using the Target Manager.

NOTE:

If you installed VxWorks support when you installed Workbench, a

VxWorks simulator connection definition named vxsim0 automatically appears below default(localhost).

This is a valid connection definition, but to understand how to manually create new target connections, continue with this tutorial.

1.

To create a new target connection definition, click the Create a New Target

Connection

icon on the Target Manager toolbar, or right-click in the

Target Manager and select New > Connection.

17

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

2.

In the New Connection wizard, select Wind River VxWorks Simulator

Connection

, then click Next.

3.

Continue clicking Next to accept all of the default configuration settings, then click Finish to create your connection definition. Because the

Immediately connect to target if possible

box is selected by default,

Workbench attempts to connect to the simulator.

Workbench displays [connecting......], then [connected] once the connection is made. A VxWorks simulator window opens

3

, and the connection appears under default(localhost), with the type of target displayed under the connection.

You are now ready to run the sample program.

2.3.6 Downloading the Program and Attaching the Debugger

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click the build target ball.out, then select

Debug Kernel Task

. The Debug launch configuration dialog appears, with

ball.out

already filled in as part of the Name of the launch.

2.

Type main in the Entry Point field (or select it from the drop-down list), then click Debug.

3.

Several events now occur: Workbench automatically switches to the

Device Debug perspective, runs the ball program on the simulator, attaches the debugger, executes the program up to main( ), and then breaks.

For more information about using the other tabs and fields in the launch

configuration dialog, see

23. Launching Programs

and Wind River Workbench User

Interface Reference: Launch Configuration Dialog.

2.3.7 Setting Up the Device Debug Perspective

As with the Application Development perspective, the views in the Device Debug perspective can be repositioned to suit your needs.

To set up the Device Debug perspective to match this tutorial:

1.

The action of the ball program is viewed in the Memory view, so select

Window > Show View > Memory

.

3. You do not need the VxWorks simulator window for this tutorial, so minimize it if you wish, but do not close it. For more information, see Wind River VxWorks Simulator User’s Guide.

18

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials

2.3 Tutorial: Creating a Project and Running a Program

The Memory view appears in the lower-right corner of the Workbench window, in the tabbed notebook with the Local Variables and Watch views.

2.

Click on the title bar of the Memory view and drag it to the left, over the tabbed notebook containing the Tasks view and the Build Console. Wait for an icon of a set of stacked folders to appear at the cursor, then drop the view.

2

3.

Right-click in the Memory view and select Display > Items size - 8 bytes.

4.

Resize the Memory view so you see at least 10 rows (place the cursor over the top border of the view, and when it becomes a double-headed arrow, click and drag upwards).

5.

Resize the view horizontally so you see one column in the Address pane, two columns in the Binary pane (the central section of the Memory view) and one column in the Text pane (the right-hand section of the view). The view should look similar to

Figure 2-1

.

Figure 2-1

Resizing the Memory View

6.

In the Watch view, click the Name column, then type grid and press ENTER.

The memory address of the grid global variable appears in the value column.

19

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

7.

Type the memory address of the grid global variable into the Memory view address bar and press ENTER.

8.

To initialize the program, click the Step Over icon in the Debug view twice so the Memory view displays an empty box. If necessary, resize the Memory view horizontally or vertically to frame the box correctly, as shown in

Figure 2-2

.

NOTE:

If the box does not appear, make sure the address you entered in the

Memory

window is that of the grid global variable.

Figure 2-2

Initializing the ball Program

As the program runs, characters representing different types of balls (two zeros, two @ signs, and two asterisks) appear in this empty box, bounce around, and collide with each other and with the walls.

2.3.8 Setting and Running to a Breakpoint.

1.

In the Project Navigator, double-click main.c to open it in the Editor. Scroll past the three initialization for loops and set a breakpoint at the while statement by double-clicking in the vertical ruler to the left of it.

A blue dot appears in the vertical ruler, and the Breakpoints view displays the module and line number of the breakpoint.

2.

With the breakpoint set, run to it by clicking the Resume button in the Debug view. Workbench stops when it hits the breakpoint.

3.

Examine the Memory view. You should see the six characters of the sample program (representing balls) in the box. Click Resume again; colored

20

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials

2.4 Tutorial: Editing and Debugging Source Files

highlights indicate changes in ball position since the Memory view was last refreshed.

2

2.3.9 Modifying the Breakpoint

Next, change the behavior of the breakpoint so that at each break, the display will refresh (to show the bouncing balls) without stopping execution.

1.

Right-click the breakpoint in the vertical ruler and select

Breakpoint Properties

from the context menu (or right-click the breakpoint in the Breakpoints view and select Properties). The Line Breakpoint Properties dialog appears.

2.

Select the checkbox next to Continue on Break, change the Continue Delay to

50

, then click OK.

3.

Now click the Resume button and watch the balls bounce in the Memory window.

4.

To stop the program, open the Breakpoint Properties dialog again, clear

Continue on Break

, then click OK. The balls may bounce once more after you click OK, but they will stop.

2.4 Tutorial: Editing and Debugging Source Files

This tutorial demonstrates how Workbench can help you with some of the most basic activities in development: editing code, building your project and noting where the build fails, and tracking and fixing errors.

21

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

2.4.1 Before You Begin

To set up Workbench for this tutorial, switch back to the default Application

Development perspective as described in

2.3.1 Before You Begin

, p.15.

2.4.2 Introducing an Error into the Source Code

Because the ball sample program is shipped without errors, you must introduce one into the sources in order to view a failed build.

1.

In the Project Navigator, double-click main.c to open it in the Editor.

2.

Select main( ) in the Outline view. The Editor switches focus to display it.

3.

Delete the semicolon (;) after the call to gridInit( ) so that it reads as follows: gridInit()

NOTE:

The status bar at the bottom of the Workbench window displays the line number and column (61:16) where your cursor is located in the Editor.

4.

Right-click in the Editor and select Save to save the file.

5.

Click the X on the tab (at the top of the view) to close the main.c file.

2.4.3 Tracking Down a Build Failure

1.

Build the ball project by right-clicking the ball folder in the Project Navigator and selecting Build Project from the context menu. Build output appears in the Build Console tab at the bottom of the screen.

2.

When the build encounters the error you created in the main.c file, the build fails. Workbench displays a red icon containing a white X in several places:

In the Build Console, which comes to the foreground and displays information about the error, including the general location where the problem is suspected to be.

In the Project Navigator, which displays red error markers to alert you that the build failure was in the ball project, and that main.c is the file containing the error.

In the Problems view, which displays a description of the error, including the filename, folder, and line number.

22

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials

2.5 Tutorial: Using the Editor’s Code Development Features

3.

Double-clicking the red icon in any of these locations opens the main.c file in the Editor, with the focus at (or near) the line suspected of containing the error.

4.

Replace the semicolon after gridInit.

5.

Save and close the file.

2.4.4 Rebuilding the Project

This time, right-click the ball folder at the top of the project tree and select

Rebuild Project

. The project compiles with no errors.

2

2.5 Tutorial: Using the Editor’s Code Development Features

The Wind River Workbench editor provides code completion, parameter hints, and bracket matching that can help you develop your code.

2.5.1 Using Code Completion to Add Symbols to Your File

Code completion automatically suggests methods, properties and events as you enter code.

To use code completion, begin typing in the Editor. Right-click in the Editor and select Source > Content Assist. You can also use CTRL+SPACE to display a pop-up list containing valid choices based on the letters you have typed so far.

For example, in ball’s main.c:

1.

Position your cursor inside the function main( ) to the right of the first { character and press ENTER. Note that the cursor automatically indents beneath the brace.

NOTE:

You can change indentation, brace style, and other code formatting options by selecting Window > Preferences > Workbench > Editors >

Wind River > Workbench Editor > C/C++ Code Formatter

.

2.

Begin typing grid and invoke code completion: g, r, CTRL+SPACE.

23

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

A dialog appears with suggestions, and as you continue to type the i and the

d

, your choices narrow:

Select gridAddBall( ) and press ENTER to add the function to the file.

2.5.2 Using Parameter Hints

Parameter hints describe what data types a function accepts. When you add a function using code completion, or when you enter a function name and an open parenthesis, the Workbench Editor automatically displays any available parameter hints.

24

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials

2.6 Tutorial: Tracking Items of Interest in Your Files

2

You can also request parameter hints as you enter your code by right-clicking in the Editor and selecting Source > Parameter Hints, or by using the

CTRL+SHIFT+SPACE

keyboard shortcut.

2.5.3 Using Bracket Matching to Clarify Syntax

Bracket matching helps you read and troubleshoot complex syntax by highlighting related parentheses, square brackets, and braces.

If you position your cursor before an open bracket or after a closing bracket, a rectangle will enclose the corresponding bracket to make it easier to find. You can jump between the opening and closing brackets by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+P.

Bracket matching operates on the following characters:

( )

, [ ], { }, " ", /* */, < > (C/C++ only)

2.6 Tutorial: Tracking Items of Interest in Your Files

Adding a bookmark to a source file is similar to placing a bookmark in a book: it allows you to find an item you are interested in at a later time by looking in the

Bookmarks view. Open the Bookmarks view by selecting Window > Show View

> Bookmarks

.

25

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

You can create a bookmark on a particular line of code within a file, or you can bookmark the file itself.

2.6.1 Creating a Bookmark on a Source Line in a File

1.

To create a bookmark on a line of code in your file, right-click in the Editor gutter to the left of the item you want to keep track of, then select

Add Bookmark

.

2.

In the Add Bookmark dialog, enter a meaningful comment to help you identify it later, then click OK. A small bookmark icon appears in the Editor gutter, and a marker, or annotation, appears in the overview ruler at the right edge of the Editor showing your bookmark relative to its position in the file.

An entry also appears in the Bookmarks view.

Hovering over the bookmark icon shows you the text you entered, and clicking the annotation on the right will return the Editor’s focus to this position if you scroll to a different line in the file.

2.6.2 Creating a Bookmark for an Entire File

1.

To create a bookmark for a file, right-click it in the Project Navigator and select

Add Bookmark

.

2.

In the Add Bookmark dialog, enter a meaningful comment to help you identify it later, then click OK.

3.

The file will not look any different in the Project Navigator, but the comment you typed, the filename, and the folder appear in the Bookmarks view.

2.6.3 Locating and Viewing Your Bookmarks

1.

To see the bookmarks in all your projects, open the Bookmarks view by selecting Window > Show View > Bookmarks.

2.

To open the file that contains a particular bookmark, double-click the bookmark (or right-click it and select Go To). The file opens in the Editor with the bookmark location highlighted.

This chapter has been a brief introduction to basic operations with perspectives, views, and editors, and simple debugging capabilities. The rest of this guide

26

2 Wind River Workbench Tutorials

2.6 Tutorial: Tracking Items of Interest in Your Files

provides more in depth information about these and other features of Wind River

Workbench.

2

27

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

28

3

Setting Up Your Hardware

3.1 Introduction 29

3.2 Configuring Your Cross-Development System 33

3.3 Setting Up a Boot Mechanism 41

3.4 Booting VxWorks 43

3.5 Configuring Host-Target Communication for Workbench 54

3.6 Troubleshooting VxWorks Problems 60

3.1 Introduction

This chapter explains how to configure your host and target, including how to download a VxWorks image and boot your target.

For a discussion of common configuration and setup problems and tips for how to solve them, see

26.5 Troubleshooting VxWorks Configuration Problems

, p.341. For

definitions of terminology that may be unfamiliar to you, see

B. Glossary

.

You do not need much of this chapter if all you want to do is connect to a target that is already set up on your network. If this is the case, read

3.2 Configuring Your

Cross-Development System

, p.33 and then proceed with

3.4 Booting VxWorks

, p.43.

29

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

3.1.1 Overview of Host and Target Configuration Tasks

Host Configuration Tasks

You will need to complete these configuration tasks once per host:

Install Wind River Workbench.

Configure TCP/IP for your host.

Configure a method for transferring a VxWorks image to your target, such as

FTP on Windows and Linux or

rsh

on Solaris.

Target Configuration Tasks

You will need to complete these configuration tasks once for each new target:

Install the VxWorks boot loader for your target (see the Wind River Workbench

On-Chip Debugging Guide for details).

Set up one or more physical connections between your target and host.

Define a Workbench target server to connect to the new target.

Normal Operation

You will need to repeat these tasks each time you want to re-initialize your target during development:

Boot VxWorks on the target. VxWorks includes a target agent, the interface between VxWorks and all other Wind River Workbench tools, by default.

Launch or restart a Workbench target server on the host.

NOTE:

Paths to Workbench directories and files are prefixed by installDir in this guide. Substitute the actual path to your Workbench installation directory.

3.1.2 Understanding Target Servers and Target Agents

Wind River Workbench host tools such as shells and debuggers communicate with the target system through a target server. A target server can be configured with a

30

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.1 Introduction

variety of back ends, which provide for various modes of communication with the

target agent. On the target side, VxWorks can be configured and built with a variety of target agent communication interfaces.

Your choice of target server back end and target agent communication interface is based on the mode of communication that you establish between the host and target (network, serial, JTAG, and so on). The target server must be configured with a back end that matches the target agent interface with which VxWorks has been configured and built. See

Figure 3-1

for a detailed diagram of host-target communications.

Figure 3-1

Wind River Workbench Host-Target Communication

3

Shell Debugger Browser

Other

Tools

WTX

PROTOCOL

Target Server

TARGET SERVER

BACK ENDS

HOST

TARGET (board or simulator)

WDB TARGET AGENT

COMMUNICATION

INTERFACES

WDB

RPC

Network

Comm

Interface

AGENTS

WDB

Serial

Serial

Comm

Interface

WDB

Target

Agent

VxWorks

WDB

Pipe

Pipe

Comm

Interface

Non-WDB

Back End

Non-WDB

Agent

31

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Target Agent Modes

All of the standard target server back ends included with Workbench connect to the target through the target agent. Thus, in order to understand the features of each back end, you must understand the modes in which the target agent can execute. These modes are called user mode, system mode, and dual mode.

In user mode, the agent runs as a VxWorks task. Debugging is performed on a per-task basis: you can isolate the task or tasks of interest without affecting the rest of the target system.

In system mode, the agent runs externally from VxWorks, almost like a ROM monitor. This allows you to debug an application as if it and VxWorks were a single thread of execution. In this mode, when the target run-time encounters a breakpoint, VxWorks and the application are stopped and interrupts are locked. One of the biggest advantages of this mode is that you can single-step through ISRs; on the other hand, it is more difficult to manipulate individual tasks. Another drawback is that this mode is more intrusive; it adds significant interrupt latency to the system, because the agent runs with interrupts locked when it takes control (for example, after a breakpoint).

In dual mode, two agents are configured into the run-time simultaneously: a user-mode agent, and a system-mode agent. Only one of these agents is active at a time; switching between the two can be controlled from either the

Workbench debugger (see

25.5 Using Debug Modes

, p.313) or the host shell (see

Wind River Workbench Command Line User’s Guide: Using the Host Shell).

In order to support a system-mode or dual-mode agent, the target communication path must work in polled mode (because the external agent needs to communicate to the host even when the system is suspended). Thus, the choice of communication path can affect what debugging modes are available.

Communication Paths

The most common VxWorks communication path—both for server-agent communications during development, and for applications—is TCP/IP networking over Ethernet. That connection method provides a very high bandwidth, as well as all the advantages of a network connection.

Nevertheless, there are situations where you may wish to use a non-network connection, such as a serial line or a ROM-emulator connection. For example, if you have a memory-constrained application that does not require networking, you may wish to remove the VxWorks network code from the target system during

32

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.2 Configuring Your Cross-Development System

development. Also, if you wish to perform system-mode debugging, you need a communication path that can work in polled mode.

Note that the target server back end connection is not always the same as the connection used to load the VxWorks image into target memory. For example, you can boot VxWorks over Ethernet, but use a serial line connection to exploit a polled-mode serial driver for system-mode debugging.

You can also use a non-default method of getting the run-time system itself into your target board. For example, you might burn your VxWorks run-time system directly into target ROM, as described in the VxWorks Programmer’s Guide:

Configuration and Build. Alternatively, you can use a ROM emulator to quickly download new VxWorks images to the target’s ROM sockets. Another possibility is to boot from a disk locally attached to the target; see the VxWorks Programmer’s

Guide: Local File Systems. Individual Board Support Packages (BSPs) may provide other alternatives, such as flash memory; see the reference information for your

BSP.

For a tutorial that explains how to use Wind River ICE or Wind River Probe to load the run-time system onto your target, see Wind River ICE for Wind River Workbench

Hardware Reference or Wind River Probe for Wind River Workbench Hardware

Reference.

3

3.2 Configuring Your Cross-Development System

Before VxWorks can boot an executable image obtained from the host, the network software on the host must be correctly configured (see

Configuring Host Software

, p.33), your target must be connected and powered up (see

Verifying Serial Setup and

Power

, p.37), and the boot loader must be loaded onto your target.

3.2.1 Configuring Host Software

For your target to communicate with the Workbench host tools, you need to have a Wind River registry, TCP/IP, and FTP running on your host.

The following sections describe these procedures in more detail.

33

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Establishing the VxWorks Target Name and IP Address

You can configure the server that provides Domain Name Service (DNS) so that your computer uses that server to translate system names to network IP addresses.

Consult your operating system documentation on how to configure your system to take advantage of DNS.

If you do not have a domain name server at your site, you can specify how to map machine names to IP addresses in a file called hosts

(C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts on Windows, /etc/hosts on Linux and Solaris) which records the names and IP network addresses of systems accessible on the network from the local system (otherwise, you would have to identify targets by IP address).

Each line consists of an IP address and the name (or names) of the system at that address.

For example, suppose your host system is called mars and has Internet address

90.0.0.1, and you want to name your VxWorks target phobos and assign it address

90.0.0.50. The hosts file must then contain the following lines:

90.0.0.1

90.0.0.50

mars phobos

This configuration is represented in Figure 3-7 .

!

CAUTION:

If you are in a networked environment, do not pick arbitrary IP addresses for your host and target as they could be assigned to someone else.

Contact with your system administrator for available IP addresses.

Configuring FTP on Windows

To use the default VxWorks configuration and boot VxWorks over the network, you must have an FTP server running on the host where the VxWorks system image is stored, and the FTP server must have a user ID and password defined that your VxWorks target can use to identify itself.

Workbench includes an FTP server application, WFTPD. Start this FTP server from the Windows Start menu by selecting

Programs > Wind River > VxWorks 6.0 > FTP Server

.

Before an FTP client can connect to WFTPD, you must complete the following steps:

1.

Open the WFTPD window and select Security > Users/rights (

Figure 3-2 ).

34

Figure 3-2

WFTPD Security Menu

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.2 Configuring Your Cross-Development System

2.

WFTPD displays the User / Rights Security Dialog box shown in

Figure 3-3

.

Click the New User button; another dialog box (also shown in

Figure 3-3

) appears where you can enter whatever arbitrary name you wish as the user ID for the VxWorks boot ROM. Be sure to use this same name when you assign

the user (u) VxWorks boot parameter described in

3.4.4 Description of Boot

Parameters

, p.47.

Figure 3-3

Adding a New User for WFTPD

3

3.

After you specify the user name and click OK, WFTPD displays a third dialog

box where you can specify a password ( Figure 3-4

). Use any memorable arbitrary string, and be sure to use this same string when you assign the

ftp password (pw)

VxWorks boot parameter described in

3.4.4 Description of

Boot Parameters

, p.47.

Because the password does not display as you type it, you must type it twice to be sure the correct password is recorded.

35

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 3-4

WFTPD Password Dialog Box

NOTE:

Your password must not be an empty string.

4.

After defining the new user ID and password, be sure to fill in the

Home Directory

text box ( Figure 3-5 ). The VxWorks boot loader does not

require this information, but WFTPD refuses to connect to a client unless you specify a home directory. Any directory will be fine, as long as you permit sufficient disk access for the VxWorks boot loader to read the boot image on your Windows disk.

Figure 3-5

WFTPD Home Directory

5.

Close the User / Rights Security Dialog box by clicking Done.

NOTE:

You can run the FTP server as a restricted user, but you cannot add new users and passwords if you are a restricted user. A non-restricted user must add the new users and passwords for you.

6.

To enable logging of FTP activities, select Logging > Log Options and select the types of activities you want to log. The log file will be saved in the home directory you specified above.

When you have finished configuring your FTP settings, leave the FTP server running. It must be running on your host when your target tries to access the vxWorks image.

36

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.2 Configuring Your Cross-Development System

Becoming Familiar with the Wind River Registry

The Wind River target server registry is a service that keeps track of running target servers. The registry must be running for Workbench tools to communicate with

VxWorks targets. Workbench development tools communicate with the target server using TCP/IP, which in turn communicates with the VxWorks target over the selected communication method (such as serial, Ethernet, or TMD). The registry is always required, independent of the link between the target server and the VxWorks target.

Workbench starts the default registry automatically, though if required you can

connect to a registry running on a networked host instead (see

19.6 Connect to the

Target

, p.242 for details about connecting to other registries).

You can tell that the Wind River registry is running on your host system if:

The registry icon is displayed in the Windows system tray.

Running the ps command on Linux or Solaris shows wtxregd.ex in the jobs list.

To shut down the registry:

Right-click the registry icon in the Windows system tray and select Shutdown.

Type killall wtxregd.ex in a Solaris terminal window.

Type wrenv.linux -p workbench-2.3 wtxregd stop in a Linux terminal window.

For detailed information about the operation of the Workbench registry, and its command options, see the online reference entry for wtxregd

(Help > Help Contents > Wind River Documentation > References > Wind Riv

er Workbench Host Tools API Reference

).

3

3.2.2 Verifying Serial Setup and Power

Hardware settings are specific to your target and host. This section describes in general terms the types of hardware connections you must make to follow the instructions in this book, but be aware that you may need to make adjustments to accommodate your specific cross-development system.

Configuring your target hardware may involve the following tasks:

Protecting your equipment against electrostatic discharge.

Setting switches and jumpers on the target CPU board.

37

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Connecting a serial cable and/or an Ethernet cable, if the target supports networking.

Connecting a power supply.

Perform the following general procedures as appropriate for your particular target hardware. For details, see the target reference for your BSP (such as

installDir/vxworks-6.1/target/config/bspname/target.ref) and the documentation provided by your target system’s manufacturer.

NOTE:

If you are using a Wind River ICE or Wind River Probe emulator to connect to your target, see the Wind River ICE for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference or Wind River Probe for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference for information about how to connect to your target.

Protecting Equipment from Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)

You should always discharge the static electricity that may have collected on your body before you touch integrated circuit boards, including targets and network interface cards (NICs).

Electrostatic discharge precautions include:

■ touching the metal enclosure of a plugged-in piece of electrical equipment

(such as a PC or a power supply in a metal case)

■ placing your equipment on, or standing on, an anti-static mat wearing an ESD wrist strap

!

CAUTION:

Failure to take proper ESD precautions can degrade target hardware over time, leading to intermittent errors or hardware failure.

Setting Board Switches and Jumpers

Many CPU and Ethernet controller boards still have configuration options that are selected by hardware jumpers, although this is less common than in the past. These jumpers must be set correctly before VxWorks can boot successfully.

You can determine the correct jumper configuration for your target CPU from the information provided in the target information reference for your BSP, and in the target system’s documentation.

38

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.2 Configuring Your Cross-Development System

Connecting a Serial Cable and Configuring the Terminal View

Most targets include at least one on-board serial port. Wind River Workbench includes a Terminal view that you can use to open a serial connection from within

Workbench, just as you would with any other terminal emulation program such as hyperterminal, minicom, or telnet.

To configure the Terminal view:

1.

Stop any other program already using the serial port.

2.

If it is not already running, start Workbench.

3.

If it is not already visible, open the Terminal view (select

Window > Show View > Terminal

).

4.

To get a better view of what is happening in the Terminal view, double click on the tab at the top of the view. The view will expand to fill the Workbench window.

3

5.

If the default settings shown at the top of the view are correct for your board, click the green Connect icon.

If the settings need to be adjusted, click the square Settings button to open the

Terminal Settings

dialog.

39

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

6.

Configure the terminal settings as appropriate for your system:

Connection Type

Select Serial.

On Linux, if you are not running your Linux host as a root user, make sure the permissions are set correctly for you to access the serial port (if you do not have permissions set correctly, only the NET option is available under

Connection Type

).

To set them, issue one of the following commands (depending on which port you plan to use):

$ chmod 666 /dev/ttyS0

$ chmod 666 /dev/ttyS1

Port

Set the port to the port you are using. Defaults are COM1 on Windows,

ttyS0

on Linux, and /dev/cua/a on Solaris.

Baud Rate

Configure the baud rate to match the speed of your connection.

Data Bits

Default on all platforms is 8.

Stop Bits

Default on all platforms is 1.

Parity

Default on all platforms is None.

40

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.3 Setting Up a Boot Mechanism

Flow In

Default on all platforms is None.

Flow Out

Default on all platforms is None.

7.

Click OK to open a serial connection to your target.

8.

To disconnect from your target, click Disconnect.

To reopen the connection with the existing settings, click Connect.

After initially configuring the boot parameters and getting started with VxWorks, you may wish to configure VxWorks to boot automatically without a terminal.

Refer to the target system hardware documentation for proper connection of the

RS-232 signals.

Connecting a Cable for the Ethernet Connection

Always make sure you use the correct cable:

■ when connecting your board directly to your host, use a crossover cable

■ when connecting your board to a LAN, use a non-crossover cable

!

CAUTION:

Be sure to follow ESD precautions (see

Protecting Equipment from

Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)

, p.38) whenever working with integrated circuit

boards, including targets and NICs.

3

Connecting A Power Supply

For standalone targets, use the power supply recommended by the board manufacturer.

3.3 Setting Up a Boot Mechanism

Workbench is shipped with the following VxWorks images, compiled both with the Wind River Compiler and with the GNU compiler: vxWorks

41

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

vxWorks_rom vxWorks_romCompress vxWorks_romResident

In every case, you will need to create your own boot medium.Your board will require one of the following media:

ROM

Most boards boot from ROMs.

For cases where boot ROMs are used to boot VxWorks, install the appropriate set of boot ROMs on your target board(s). When installing boot ROMs, be careful to:

Install each device only in the socket indicated on the label.

Note the correct orientation of pin 1 for each device.

Use anti-static precautions whenever working with integrated circuit devices. For more information, see

Protecting Equipment from Electrostatic

Discharge (ESD)

, p.38.

Floppy Disk

Some BSPs for systems that include floppy drives use boot diskettes instead of a boot ROM. For example, Pentium systems usually boot from diskette.

Flash Memory

For boards that support flash memory, the BSP may be designed to write the boot program there. In such cases, an auxiliary program to write the boot program into flash memory is supplied by the board vendor.

For specific information on a particular booting method, see

Help

> Help Contents > Wind River Documentation > Guides > Operating Sy

stem > VxWorks BSP Developer's Guide

. Instructions for making a floppy disk for booting a Pentium target are in the target.ref file for the BSP.

You may also wish to replace a boot ROM, even if it is available, with a ROM emulator. This is particularly desirable if your target has no Ethernet capability, because the ROM emulator can be used to provide connectivity at near-Ethernet speeds. Contact Wind River for information about support for ROM emulators.

42

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.4 Booting VxWorks

3.4 Booting VxWorks

Once you have configured your host software and target hardware, you are ready to boot VxWorks.

With your target connected to your host and a serial connection open in the

Terminal view, click Connect (see

Connecting a Serial Cable and Configuring the

Terminal View

, p.39).

NOTE:

If you are using a VxWorks image configured for a network connection (the default), you must have an FTP server running on the Windows host where the

VxWorks system image is stored. See

Configuring FTP on Windows

, p.34 for more

information.

3

3.4.1 Default Boot Process

When you boot VxWorks with the default boot program (from a ROM, a diskette, or another medium), you must use the VxWorks command line to provide the boot program with information that allows it to find the VxWorks image on the host and load it onto the target. The default boot program is designed for a networked target, and needs to have the correct host and target network addresses, the full path and name of the file to be booted, the user name, and so on.

Unless your target CPU has non-volatile RAM (NV-RAM), you will eventually find it useful to build a new version of the boot loader that includes all parameters required for booting a VxWorks image. In the course of developing an application, you will also build bootable applications

When you power on the target hardware (and each time you reset it), the target system executes the boot program from ROM; during the boot process, the target uses its serial port to communicate with your terminal or workstation. The boot program first displays a banner page, and then starts a seven-second countdown, visible on the screen as shown in

Figure 3-6

.

43

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 3-6

Boot Program Banner Display

Unless you press any key on the keyboard within that seven-second period, the boot loader will attempt to proceed with a default configuration, and will not be able to boot the target with VxWorks.

3.4.2 Entering New Boot Parameters

To interrupt the boot process and provide the correct boot parameters, first power on (or reset) the target; then stop the boot sequence by pressing any key during the seven-second countdown.

The boot program displays the VxWorks boot prompt:

[VxWorks Boot]:

To display the current (default) boot parameters, type p at the boot prompt:

[VxWorks Boot]: p

A display similar to the following appears; the meaning of each of these parameters is described in

3.4.4 Description of Boot Parameters

, p.47.

44

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.4 Booting VxWorks

boot device unit number processor number host name file name

: ln

: 0

: 0

: mars

: c:\temp\vxWorks

1 inet on ethernet (e) : 90.0.0.50:ffffff00 inet on backplane (b) : host inet (h) gateway inet (g)

: 90.0.0.1

: user (u) : fred ftp password (pw)(blank=use rsh) :secret flags (f) target name (tn) startup script (s) other (o)

: 0x0

: phobos

:

:

This example corresponds to the configuration shown in

Figure 3-7

. The p command does not actually display the lines with blank fields, although this example shows them for completeness.

Figure 3-7

Boot Configuration Example

c:\temp\vxWorks

HOST TARGET

mars

user:

fred

90.0.0.1

phobos

90.0.0.50:ffffff00

Ethernet

90.0.0.x subnet

To change the boot parameters, type c at the boot prompt:

[VxWorks Boot]: c

In response, the boot program prompts you for each parameter. If a particular field has the correct value already, press ENTER. To clear a field, enter a period ( . ),

1. Pre-built VxWorks images are available in

installDir\vxworks-6.2\target\proj\bsp-compiler\default, but in this example the vxWorks file has been copied to c:\temp.

45

3

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

then press ENTER. To go back to change the previous parameter, enter a dash (-), then press ENTER. If you want to quit before completing all parameters, type

CTRL+D

.

Network information must be entered to match your particular cross-development system configuration. The Internet addresses must match those in the hosts file on your system (or those known to your Domain Name Server), as described in

Establishing the VxWorks Target Name and IP Address

, p.34.

If your target has non-volatile RAM (NV-RAM), the boot parameters are stored there and retained even if power is turned off. For each subsequent power-on or system reset, the boot program uses these stored parameters for the automatic boot configuration.

3.4.3 Boot Program Commands

The VxWorks boot program provides a limited set of commands. To see a list of available commands, type either h or ? at the boot prompt, followed by

ENTER

:

[VxWorks Boot]: ?

Table 3-1 describes each of the VxWorks boot commands and their arguments.

Table 3-1

VxWorks Boot Commands

Command

h p c

Description

Help command—print a list of available boot commands.

?

h

.

@

Boot (load and execute file) using the current boot parameters.

Print the current boot parameter values.

Change the boot parameter values.

l

Load the file using current boot parameters, but without executing.

Go to (execute at) hex address adrs.

g

adrs

d

adrs[, n] Display is omitted, the default is 64.

46

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.4 Booting VxWorks

Table 3-1 VxWorks Boot Commands (cont’d)

Command

m

adrs

e v

N

Description

Modify memory at location adrs (hex). The system prompts for modifications to memory, starting at the specified address. It prints each address, and the current 16-bit value at that address, in turn. You can respond in one of several ways:

ENTER

: Do not change that address, but continue prompting at the next address.

number: Set the 16-bit contents to number.

.

(dot): Do not change that address, and quit.

f

adrs, nbytes, value Fill

t

adrs1, adrs2, nbytes Copy

s

[ 0 | 1 ] Turn the CPU system controller ON (1) or OFF (0) (only on boards where the system controller can be enabled by software).

Display a synopsis of the last occurring VxWorks exception.

Display BSP and boot ROM version.

Set Ethernet address.

3.4.4 Description of Boot Parameters

Each of the boot parameters is described below, with reference to the example in

3.4.2 Entering New Boot Parameters

, p.44. The letters in parentheses after some

parameters indicate how to specify the parameters in the command line boot procedure described in

3.4.6 Alternate Boot Methods

, p.52.

boot device

The type of device to boot from. This must be one of the drivers included in the boot ROMs (for example, enp for a CMC controller). Due to limited space in the boot ROMs, only a few drivers can be included. A list of included drivers is displayed at the console (type ? or h).

3

47

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

unit number

The unit number of the boot device, starting at zero.

processor number

A unique numerical target identifier for systems with multiple targets on a backplane. The backplane master must have its processor number set to zero.

For boards not connected to a backplane, a value of zero is typically used but is not required.

host name

The name of the host machine to boot from. This is the name by which the host is known to VxWorks; it need not be the name used by the host itself. (The host name is mars in the example of

3.4.2 Entering New Boot Parameters

, p.44.)

file name

The full pathname of the VxWorks image to be booted (c:\temp\vxWorks in the example). This pathname is also reported to the host when you start a target server, so that it can locate the host-resident image of VxWorks. The pathname is limited to a 160 byte string, including the null terminator.

2

inet on ethernet (e)

The Internet Protocol (IP) address of a target system Ethernet interface, as well as the subnet mask used for that interface. The address consists of the IP address, in dot decimal format, followed by a colon, followed by the mask in hex format (here, 90.0.0.50:ffffff00). For more information about working with

IP addresses, see

Establishing the VxWorks Target Name and IP Address

, p.34.

inet on backplane (b)

The Internet address of a target system with a backplane interface (blank in the example).

host inet (h)

The Internet address of the host to boot from (90.0.0.1 in the example).

gateway inet (g)

The Internet address of a gateway node if the host is not on the same network as the target (blank in the example).

user (u)

The user ID that VxWorks uses to access the host for the purpose of boot loading the file specified by the filename boot parameter (fred in the

2. If the same pathname is not suitable for both host and target—for example, if you boot from a disk attached only to the target—you can specify the host path separately to the target server, using the -c filename option in the

Advanced Target Server Options

field of the

New Target Server Connection

dialog.

48

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.4 Booting VxWorks

example); use the user name you created in

Configuring FTP on Windows

, p.34.

That user must have permission to read the VxWorks boot-image file.

On a Windows host, the user must have FTP access to that host. On a UNIX host, the user must have FTP or

rsh

access. The ftp password boot parameter described below controls how the boot loader accesses the host. For rsh, the user must be granted access by adding the user ID to the host's /etc/host.equiv file, or more typically to the user's .rhosts file (~userName/.rhosts).

ftp password (pw)

The user password used by the boot loader to access the host using FTP for the purpose of boot loading the file specified by the filename boot parameter. Use

the password you created in

Configuring FTP on Windows

, p.34.

NOTE:

This field is not required by the boot program, but you must supply it to boot over the network from a Windows host. Without it, the boot ROM attempts to load the run-time system image using a protocol based on the

UNIX rsh utility, which is not available for Windows hosts. So an FTP password is required, but only for host access during boot loading.

flags (f)

Configuration options specified as a numeric value that is the sum of the values of selected option bits defined below. (This field is zero in the example because no special boot options were selected.)

0x01

= Do not enable the system controller, even if the processor number is 0.

(This option is board specific; refer to your target documentation.)

0x02

= Load all VxWorks symbols, instead of just globals.

0x04

= Do not auto-boot.

0x08

= Auto-boot fast (short countdown).

0x20

= Disable login security.

0x40

= Use BOOTP to get boot parameters.

0x80

= Use TFTP to get boot image.

0x100

= Use proxy ARP.

0x200

= Use WDB agent.

0x400

= Set system to debug mode for the error detection and reporting facility

(depending on whether you are working on kernel modules or user applications, for more information see the VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s

Guide: Error Detection and Reporting or the VxWorks Application

Programmer’s Guide: Error Detection and Reporting).

target name (tn)

The name of the target system to be added to the host table (here, phobos).

3

49

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

startup script (s)

If the kernel shell is included in the downloaded image, this parameter allows you to pass to it the path and filename of a startup script to execute after the system boots. A startup script file can contain only the shell’s C interpreter commands. This parameter can also be used to specify process-based applications to run automatically at boot time, if VxWorks has been configured with the appropriate components. See VxWorks Application Programmer’s

Guide: Applications and Processes and Target Tools.

other (o)

This parameter is generally unused and available for applications (blank in the example). It can be used when booting from a local SCSI disk to specify a network interface to be included.

3.4.5 Booting With New Parameters

After entering the boot parameters, initiate booting by typing the @ command:

[VxWorks Boot]: @

50

Figure 3-8

VxWorks Booting Display

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.4 Booting VxWorks

3

Figure 3-8 shows a typical VxWorks boot display. The VxWorks boot program

prints the boot parameters, and the downloading process begins.

The following information is displayed during the boot process:

The boot program first initializes its network interfaces.

After the system is completely loaded, the boot program displays the entry address and transfers control to the loaded VxWorks system.

When VxWorks starts up, it begins just as the boot ROM did, by initializing its network interfaces; the network-initialization messages appear again, sometimes accompanied by other messages about optional VxWorks facilities.

After this point, VxWorks is up and ready to attach to the Wind River

Workbench tools.

51

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

The boot display may be useful for troubleshooting. The following hints refer to

Figure 3-8

. For more troubleshooting ideas, see

26.5 Troubleshooting

VxWorks Configuration Problems

, p.341.

– If Attaching network interface is displayed without the corresponding

done

, verify that the system controller is configured properly and the network interface card is properly jumpered. This error may also indicate a problem with the network driver in the newly loaded VxWorks image.

– If Loading... is displayed for more than 30-45 seconds without the size of the VxWorks image appearing, this may indicate problems with the

Ethernet cable or connection, or an error in the network configuration (for example, a bad host or gateway Internet address).

– If the line Starting at is printed and there is no further indication of activity from VxWorks, this generally indicates there is a problem with the boot image.

3.4.6 Alternate Boot Methods

To boot VxWorks, you can also use the command line, take advantage of non-volatile RAM, or create new boot programs for your target.

Command Line Parameters

Instead of being prompted for each of the boot parameters, you can supply the boot program with all the parameters on a single line at the boot prompt

([VxWorks Boot]:) beginning with a dollar sign character (“$”). For example:

$ln(0,0)mars:c:\temp\vxWorks e=90.0.0.50 h=90.0.0.1 u=fred pw=…

The order of the assigned fields (those containing equal signs) is not important.

Omit any assigned fields that are irrelevant. The codes for the assigned fields correspond to the letter codes shown in parentheses by the p command. For a full description of the format, see the reference entry for bootParseLib.

This method can be useful if your workstation has programmable function keys.

You can program a function key with a command line appropriate to your configuration.

Non-volatile RAM (NV-RAM)

As noted previously, if your target CPU has non-volatile RAM (NV-RAM), all the values you enter in the boot parameters are retained in the NV-RAM. In this case,

52

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.4 Booting VxWorks

you can let the boot program auto-boot without having a terminal program connected to the target system.

Customized Boot Programs

See the VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide for instructions on creating a new boot program for your boot media, with parameters customized for your site. With this method, you no longer need to alter boot parameters before booting.

BSPs Requiring TFTP on the Host

Some Motorola boards that use Bug ROMs and place boot code in flash require the

TFTP protocol on the host in order to burn a new VxWorks image into flash.

Workbench ships with a version of TFTP. See your target system documentation on how to burn flash for these boards.

3.4.7 Rebooting VxWorks

When VxWorks is running, there are several ways you can reboot it. Rebooting by any of these means restarts the attached target server on the host as well:

Entering CTRL+X in the Terminal view (other Windows terminal emulators do not pass CTRL+X to the target, because of its standard Windows meaning.)

Invoking reboot( ) from the host shell.

Pressing the reset button on the target system.

Turning the target’s power off and on.

When you reboot VxWorks in any of these ways, the auto-boot sequence begins again from the countdown.

!

CAUTION:

Be sure to follow ESD precautions (see

Protecting Equipment from

Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)

, p.38) whenever working with integrated circuit

boards, including targets and NICs.

3

53

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

3.5 Configuring Host-Target Communication for Workbench

If you are developing applications, an Ethernet connection is the easiest to set up and use, since most VxWorks targets already use the network (for example, to boot), so no additional target set-up is required. Furthermore, a network interface is typically a board’s fastest physical communication channel.

If you need a JTAG or other emulator connection, see the Wind River ICE for

Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference or the Wind River Probe for Wind River

Workbench Hardware Reference for information about making emulator connections to your target.

The next few sections describe the setup of Ethernet, serial line, and TMD connections within Workbench.

3.5.1 Ethernet Connections

When VxWorks is configured and built with a network interface for the target agent (the default configuration), the target server can connect to the target agent using the default wdbrpc back end.

NOTE:

If you experience problems when using Workbench tools with a hardware platform with a new Ethernet driver/chipset, it is highly recommended that you use the WDB agent over a different communications link (such as serial or the

JTAG Transparent Mode Driver) isolate if the driver is the source of the problem.

The target agent can receive requests over any device for which a VxWorks network interface driver is installed. The typical case is to use the device from which the target was booted; however, any device can be used by specifying its IP address to the target server.

Connecting to the Target Server

You can connect the target server to the agent by following these steps:

1.

Click the Create a new target connection icon in the Target Manager toolbar.

54

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.5 Configuring Host-Target Communication for Workbench

3

The Connection Type dialog appears.

NOTE:

You will see both VxWorks and Linux connection types only if you have licensed both products.

2.

Select Wind River Target Server Connection for VxWorks then click Next.

The Target Server Connection dialog appears.

55

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

3.

Select the wdbrpc back end, and type in the name or IP address of the target

(you may specify a name only if you added it to your hosts file in

Establishing the VxWorks Target Name and IP Address

, p.34).

4.

In the Advanced Target Server Options section, select the Verbose target

server output

.

Your command line should look like this:

tgtsvr -V -R C:/

installDir/workspace -RW ipaddress

5.

Click Next through the next two screens, then click Finish. Your new target server connection definition will appear in the Target Manager connection list, along with the simulator connection definition you created in

2.3.5 Creating a

Connection Definition to the VxWorks simulator

, p.17.

56

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.5 Configuring Host-Target Communication for Workbench

The Immediately connect to target if possible box is selected by default, so if your target booted successfully in

Booting With New Parameters

, p.50, the

Target Manager will attempt to connect to your target.

3

6.

If everything is set up properly, you will see [connected] after the target server

connection. If you have problems connecting, see

Troubleshooting VxWorks

Configuration Problems

, p.341.

3.5.2 Serial-Line Connections

A minimal cross-development configuration is one in which the standalone target is connected to the host development system by a single serial line. For a configuration of this sort, use a combination of a boot mechanism that does not require a network and an alternative Workbench communications back end.

Workbench can operate over a raw serial connection between the host and target systems, and can operate on non-networked systems, but this type of connection is very slow and may not be practical for real-world debugging.

When you connect the host and target exclusively over serial lines, you must:

Configure and build a boot program to download over the serial connection, or build an image that boots directly from on-board Flash/ROM memory.

Reconfigure and rebuild VxWorks with a target agent configuration for a serial connection.

Configure and start a target server for a serial connection.

A raw serial connection has some advantages over an IP connection. The raw serial connection allows you to scale down the VxWorks system (even during development) for memory-constrained applications that do not require networking: you can remove the VxWorks network code from the target system.

57

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

When working over a serial link, use the fastest possible line speed. The

Workbench tools—especially the debugger—make it easy to set up system snapshots that are periodically refreshed. Refreshing such snapshots requires continuing traffic between host and target. On a serial connection, the line speed can be a bottleneck in this situation. If your Workbench tools seem unresponsive over a serial connection, try turning off periodic updates in the browser, or else closing any debugger displays you can spare.

Configuring the Target Agent For Serial Connection

To configure the target agent for a raw serial communication connection, reconfigure and rebuild VxWorks with a serial communication interface for the target agent (see the VxWorks Programmer’s Guide for details).

Configuring the Boot Program for Serial Connection

When you connect the host and target exclusively over serial lines, you must configure and build a boot program for the serial connection because the default boot configuration uses an FTP download from the host.

Testing the Connection

Be sure to use the right kind of cable to connect your host and target. Use a simple

Tx/Rx/GND serial cable because the host serial port is configured not to use handshaking. Many targets require a null-modem cable; consult the target system’s documentation. Configure your host system serial port for a full-duplex

(no local echo), 8-bit connection with one stop bit and no parity bit. The line speed must match whatever is configured into your target agent.

Before trying to attach the target server for the first time, test that the serial connection to the target is good. To help verify the connection, the target agent sends the following message over the serial line when it boots (with

WDB_COMM_SERIAL

):

WDB READY

To test the connection, attach a terminal emulator to the target-agent serial port, then reset the target (see

Connecting a Serial Cable and Configuring the Terminal View

, p.39). If the

WDB READY

message does not appear, or if it is garbled, check the configuration of the serial port you are using on your host.

58

3 Setting Up Your Hardware

3.5 Configuring Host-Target Communication for Workbench

As a further debugging aid, you can also configure the serial-mode target agent to echo all characters it receives over the serial line. This is not the default configuration, because as a side effect it stops the boot process until a target server is attached. If you need this configuration in order to set up your host serial port, edit installDir\vxworks-6.1\target\config\comps\src\wdbSerial.c.

Look for the following lines:

#ifdef INCLUDE_WDB_TTY_TEST

{ int waitChar = 0; if (WDB_TTY_ECHO) waitChar = 0333;

#ifdef INCLUDE_KERNEL

/* test in polled mode if the kernel hasn't started */ if (taskIdCurrent == 0) wdbSioTest (pSioChan, SIO_MODE_POLL, waitChar); else wdbSioTest (pSioChan, SIO_MODE_INT, waitChar);

#else /* INCLUDE_KERNEL */ wdbSioTest (pSioChan, SIO_MODE_POLL, waitChar);

#endif /* INCLUDE_KERNEL */

}

#endif /* INCLUDE_WDB_TTY_TEST */

In each call to wdbSioTest( ), change waitChar to 0300.

With this configuration, attach any terminal emulator on the host to the COM port connected to the target to verify the serial connection. When the serial-line settings are correct, whatever you type to the target is echoed as you type it.

NOTE:

This configuration change also prevents the target from completing its boot process until a target server attaches to it. Thus, it is best to change the

wdbSioTest( )

calls back to the default as soon as you verify that the serial line is set up correctly.

3

Connecting to the Target Server

After successfully testing the serial connection, you can connect the target server

to the agent by following steps similar to those in

Connecting to the Target Server

, p.54:

1.

Close the serial port that you opened for testing (if you do not close the port, it will be busy when the target server tries to use it).

59

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

2.

Click the Create a new target connection icon in the Target Manager toolbar.

The Connection Type dialog appears.

3.

Select Wind River Target Server Connection then click Next. The Target

Server Connection

dialog appears.

4.

Select the wdbserial back end, and type in the name or IP address of the target

(you may specify a name only if you added it to your hosts file in

Establishing the VxWorks Target Name and IP Address

, p.34).

5.

In the Advanced Target Server Options section, select Verbose target

server output

, then specify the communications port with -d, and also specify the line speed to match the speed configured into your target. Your command line should look like this:

tgtsvr -V

-d

comport -bps speed -B wdbserial ipaddress

6.

Click Next through the next two screens, then click Finish. Your new target server connection definition will appear in the Target Manager connection list.

7.

Select the target server definition you just created, then click the Connect icon.

If everything is set up properly, you will see [connected] after the target server connection. If you have problems connecting, see

Troubleshooting VxWorks

Configuration Problems

, p.341.

3.6 Troubleshooting VxWorks Problems

If you encountered problems booting or exercising VxWorks, there are many possible causes. Read

26.5 Troubleshooting VxWorks Configuration Problems

, p.341

before contacting Wind River customer support. Often, you can locate the problem just by rechecking the installation steps and your hardware configuration.

60

PA R T I I

Projects

6

7

4

5

Projects Overview ..............................................

63

VxWorks Image Projects ....................................

75

Boot Loader Project ...........................................

89

ROMFS File System Projects ............................

93

8

9

VxWorks Real-time Process Projects ...............

97

VxWorks Shared Library Projects ..................... 105

10 VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects 113

11 VxWorks User-Defined Projects ........................ 121

12 Native Application Projects ............................... 125

13 Working in the Project Navigator ...................... 131

14 Advanced Project Scenarios ............................. 143

61

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

62

4

Projects Overview

4.1 Introduction 63

4.2 Workspace/Project Location 64

4.3 Creating New Projects 64

4.4 Overview of Preconfigured Project Types 66

4.5 Projects and Project Structures 70

4.1 Introduction

Workbench uses projects as logical containers and as building blocks that can be linked together to create a software system. The Project Navigator lets you, among other things, visually organize projects into structures that reflect their inner dependencies, and therefore the order in which they are compiled and linked.

Pre-configured templates for various project types allow you to create or import projects using simple wizards that need only minimal input.

63

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

The Wind River Workbench cannot know where your source files are located, so it initially suggests a default workspace directory within the installation directory.

However, this is not a requirement, or even necessarily desirable. If you use a workspace directory outside of the Workbench installation tree this ensures that the integrity of your projects is preserved after product upgrades or installation modifications.

Normally, you would set your workspace directory at the root of your existing source code tree and create your Workbench projects there. For multiple, unrelated source code trees, you can use multiple workspaces.

4.3 Creating New Projects

Although you can create projects anywhere, you would generally create them in your workspace directory (see

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64, above). If you

follow this recommendation, there will generally be no need to navigate out of the workspace when you create projects. Note that if you do create projects outside the workspace, you must have write permission at the external location because

Workbench project administration files are written to this location.

To create a new project, select File > New > Project to open the New Project wizard. It will help you create one of the pre-configured project types. You can also select the specific type of project you want to create from File > New > ProjectType.

For more information about these projects, see

Overview of Preconfigured Project

Types

, p.66.

To create one of the demonstration sample projects, select File > New > Example to open the New Example wizard. Each comes with instructions explaining the behavior of the program.

Whichever menu command you choose, a wizard will guide you through the process of creating the specific type of project you select. Note that most settings in the New Project wizard can be inspected and modified at any time after project creation in the Project Properties, see

16.2 Accessing Build Properties

, p.175

64

4 Projects Overview

4.3 Creating New Projects

For step-by-step descriptions of how to create projects of each type, see the chapters:

5. VxWorks Image Projects

6. Boot Loader Project

7. ROMFS File System Projects

8. VxWorks Real-time Process Projects

9. VxWorks Shared Library Projects

10. VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects

11. VxWorks User-Defined Projects

12. Native Application Projects

4.3.1 Subsequent Modification of Project Creation Wizard Settings

All project creation wizard settings can be modified in the Project Properties once the project exists. To access the Project Properties from the Project Navigator, right-click the icon of the project you want to modify and select Properties.

Project structural settings (sub- and superproject context of the project you are creating) can be most easily modified in the Project Navigator by dragging-and-dropping project folders into or outside other folders.

4.3.2 Projects and Application Code

All application code is managed by projects of one type or another. You can import an existing Workbench-compatible project as a whole (see

Importing Projects

, p.132) or you can add new or existing source code files to your projects (see

Importing Application Code

, p.133).

4

65

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

4.4 Overview of Preconfigured Project Types

Different types of projects are used for different purposes. Workbench supports a number of such project types, each of which will be discussed in more detail in later chapters. This section contains a brief overview of the available project types.

In the Project Navigator, you can identify the project type by its icon.

Table 4-1

Project Type Icons

Icon Project Type

VxWorks Image

Board Support Package

Downloadable Kernel Module

Real-time Process

Shared Library

User-Defined

VxWorks File System

Native Application

NOTE:

This manual does not discuss Middleware Component projects, as they are only functional if you have licensed the Wind River Platforms product.

4.4.1 Workbench Sample Projects

A good place to start exploring the sample projects is

2. Wind River Workbench

Tutorials

. The Guide uses sample projects to walk you through many aspects of

Workbench and shows you some of the project types introduced below.

4.4.2 VxWorks Image Project

Use a VxWorks Image project to configure (customize/scale) and build a VxWorks kernel image to boot your target. By adding a VxWorks File System project and

66

4 Projects Overview

4.4 Overview of Preconfigured Project Types

kernel modules, applications, libraries and data files, you can link a complete system into a single image.

A new VxWorks Image project can be based either on an existing project of the

same type, or on a Board Support Package. For more information, please see

5.7 Notes on Board Support Packages (BSPs)

, p.86.

Please refer to

5. VxWorks Image Projects

for more information on working with this type of project.

4.4.3 VxWorks Board Support Package Project

Use a VxWorks Board Support Package project to create a VxWorks boot loader (also referred to as the VxWorks boot ROM) to boot load a target with the VxWorks kernel.

Boot loaders are used in a development environment to load a VxWorks image that is stored on a host system, where VxWorks can be quickly modified and rebuilt. Boot loaders are also used in production systems where both the boot loader and operating system image are stored on a disk.

Boot loaders are not required for standalone VxWorks systems that are stored in

ROM.

4.4.4 VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects

Use Downloadable Kernel Module projects to manage and build modules that will exist in the kernel space. You can separately build the modules, run, and debug them on a target running VxWorks, loading, unloading, and reloading on the fly.

Once your development work is complete, the modules can be statically linked into the kernel, or they can use a file system if one is present (see

4.4.7 VxWorks File

System Projects

, p.69).

Figure 4-1 illustrates a situation without a file system on the

target.

Kernel-mode development is the traditional VxWorks method of development; all the tasks you spawn run in an unprotected environment, and all have full access to the hardware in the system.

A Downloadable Kernel Module that is linked into the kernel is a bootable application that starts when the target is booted.

Please refer to

10. VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects

for more

information on working with this type of project.

4

67

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 4-1

Downloadable Kernel Modules: Overview

Cross-development

HOST TARGET modules

.wrproject

*.c, *.cpp

*.h

*.o.

*.

out

Makefile

Target

Server

Kernel

Final Product

TARGET

Kernel including statically linked modules

4.4.5 Real-time Process Projects

Use Real-time Process projects to manage and build executables that will exist outside the kernel space. You can separately build, run, and debug the executable.

At run-time, the executable file is downloaded to a separate process address space to run as an independent process. A Real-time Process binary can be stored on a

target-side file system such as ROMFS, see

7. ROMFS File System Projects

.

Please refer to

8. VxWorks Real-time Process Projects

,

17.6 Executables that

Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries

, p.207, and

18. RTPs and Shared Libraries from

Host to Target

for more information on working with this type of project.

Figure 4-2

shows how executables, when loaded into a Real-time Process, run as a separate entity from the kernel.

68

4 Projects Overview

4.4 Overview of Preconfigured Project Types

Figure 4-2

Real-time Processes: Overview

Cross-development

HOST TARGET

RTP

.wrproject

*.c, *.cpp

*.h

*.o.

*.vxe

Makefile

Target

Server

Kernel

Final Product

TARGET

File System

RTP

Kernel

[+modules]

4

4.4.6 VxWorks Shared Library Projects

Use VxWorks Shared Library projects for libraries that are dynamically linked to

VxWorks Real-time Process projects at run-time. Such a shared library will need to be stored, like the Real-time Process project, on a target-side file system, which can be created using

4.4.7 VxWorks File System Projects

, p.69. You can also use VxWorks

Shared Library projects to create subprojects that are statically linked into other project types at build time.

Please refer to

9. VxWorks Shared Library Projects

,

17.6 Executables that Dynamically

Link to Shared Libraries

, p.207, and

18. RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

for more information on working with this type of project.

4.4.7 VxWorks File System Projects

Use a VxWorks File System project as a subproject of any other project type that requires target-side file system functionality.

So, for example, you may not need a file system project for Downloadable Kernel

Module projects (which can be linked to the VxWorks kernel directly, see

10. VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects

for details), but you will need to

create one for other project types.

This project type is designed for bundling applications and other files, of any type, with a VxWorks system image in a ROMFS file system. No storage media is required beyond that used for the VxWorks boot image. Therefore, no other file

69

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

system is required to store files; systems can be fully functional without recourse to local or NFS drives, RSH or FTP protocols, and so on. Note that the name

ROMFS has nothing to do with ROM media. It stands for Read Only Memory File

System.

Please refer to

7. ROMFS File System Projects

for more information on working with this type of project.

Figure 4-3

VxWorks File System: Overview

Cross-development

HOST

.wrproject

*.c, *.cpp

*.h

*.o.

*.vxe

Makefile

Target

Server

TARGET

RTP

Kernel

Final Product

TARGET

File System

RTP +

Shared Libs

(*.so) *.*

Kernel

[+modules]

4.4.8 Native Application Projects

Use a Native Application project for C/C++ applications developed for your host environment. Wind River Workbench provides build and static analysis support for native GNU 2.9x, GNU 3.x, and Microsoft development utilities (assembler, compiler, linker, archiver). There is no debugger integration for such projects in

Workbench, so you have to use the appropriate native tools for debugging.

4.5 Projects and Project Structures

All individual projects of whatever type are self-contained units that have no inherent relationship with any other projects. The system as such is initially completely flat and unstructured. You can, however, construct hierarchies of

70

4 Projects Overview

4.5 Projects and Project Structures

project references within Workbench. These hierarchies will reflect inter-project dependencies and therefore also the build order.

When you attempt to create such hierarchies of references, this is validated by

Workbench; that is, if a certain project type does not make sense as a subproject of some other, or even the same, project type, such a reference will not be permitted.

4.5.1 Adding Subprojects to a Project

There are several ways to create a subproject/superproject structure in

Workbench:

In the New Project wizard, use the Project Structure dialog to specify a superproject and subprojects. This method works only when a project is first created and only if a valid existing superproject is selected in the Project

Navigator when the New Project wizard is invoked.

Drag-and-drop nodes in the Project Navigator. This is the easiest way to set up a structure among existing projects. Select the project that you want to make into a subproject and drag it onto its new parent (superproject).

Use the Add as Project Reference dialog. In the Project Navigator, select the project that you want to make into a subproject and choose

Project > Add as Project Reference

(or right-click the project node and choose

Add as Project Reference

). In the dialog, you will see a list of valid superprojects; you can select more than one.

Use the Project References page in the Properties dialog. In the Project

Navigator, select the project that you want to make into a superproject and choose Project > Properties (or right-click the project node and choose

Properties

). Then select Project References. In the dialog, you will see a list of projects; select the ones that you want to make into subprojects.

Subproject nodes appear as a subnodes of their parents (superprojects); see

Figure 4-4 and

Figure 4-5

.

Workbench validates subproject/superproject relationships based on project type and target operating system. It does not allow you to create certain combinations.

For example, a Real-time Process project cannot be a direct subproject of a

VxWorks Image project (but it can be added to a File System project). In general, a user-defined project can be a subproject or superproject of any other project with a compatible target operating system.

For additional information about project structure, see

14.4 Complex Project

Structures

, p.146.

4

71

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Removing Subprojects

To undo a subproject/superproject relationship, use one of these methods:

In the Project Navigator, select the subproject and choose

Project > Remove Project Reference

(or right-click the subproject and choose

Remove Project Reference

).

In the Project Navigator, select the superproject and choose

Project > Properties

(or right-click the superproject and choose Properties).

Then select Project References and uncheck the subprojects that you want to disassociate from their current parent.

4.5.2 Project Structures and Host File System Directory Structure

A tree of directories has only one Workbench project at the top, all subdirectories will automatically be included in this project. Do not attempt to create project hierarchies by creating projects for subdirectories in a tree. This will result in overlapping projects, which is not permissible.

Figure 4-4

illustrates an ideal host file system directory structure. This flat system, on the left, maps to the project structure displayed on the right, which also represents the ideal (recommended) basic project structure (assuming you need all the project types displayed).

The illustrated project structure is achieved as follows:

1.

Create a project for each of the directories on the left.

2.

In the Project Navigator, drag and drop the individual projects into place.

Figure 4-4

Workspace/Directory Structure and Project Structure

Physical Logical

72

4 Projects Overview

4.5 Projects and Project Structures

4.5.3 Project Structures and the Build System

As you can see in Figure 4-4 above, project structures are logical, not physical,

hierarchies. These hierarchies define and reflect the inner dependencies between projects, and therefore also the order in which they have to be built.

NOTE:

All references in this section to build and the build system assume that your projects use Workbench build support. That is, your user-defined projects are not automatically included in these descriptions, though it is possible to integrate custom projects into such a system.

Figure 4-5 illustrates the build order in this project structure. The build starts at the

top of the structure, recursively checks dependencies in each branch, and builds all out of date objects and targets at each leaf, until it finishes at the top of the tree.

Figure 4-5

Build Order in Project Structures

4

Assuming that everything in

Figure 4-5

needs to be built, the build order will be:

1.

DKM _1

2.

SL

3.

RTP_1

4.

(

SL

already built in 2 above.)

5.

RTP_2

6.

FS

7.

VIP_1

73

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

4.5.4 Project Structures and Sharing Subprojects

Project structures can share subprojects. That is, a single physical project can be referenced by (dragged and dropped into) any number of logical project structures.

The products of any update or build of a subproject, or element thereof, will be available to project structures that reference that subproject.

4.5.5 Customizing Build Settings for Shared Subprojects

A single file system folder can be imported into multiple logical project structures, appearing as a subproject of each one. In each case, you can assign a different build specification (known as a build spec) depending on what is required by each project.

A folder can also be assigned several different build specs within the same project.

Later, when you set a particular active build spec for the project as a whole, the sub folder that is assigned the same build spec will be included in the build, while others assigned different build specs will be excluded. See

17.5 Architecture-Specific

Implementation of Functions

, p.206 for an example.

74

5

VxWorks Image Projects

5.1 Introduction 75

5.2 Importing a VxWorks Image Project 76

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project 77

5.4 VxWorks Image Projects in the Project Navigator 80

5.5 Configuring Kernel Components 84

5.6 Adding Application Projects to the VxWorks Image Project 85

5.7 Notes on Board Support Packages (BSPs) 86

5.1 Introduction

Use a VxWorks Image project (VIP) to configure, customize, scale, and build a

VxWorks kernel image to boot your target. A VIP can be a complete application and can also contain projects of other types. For example, you can add

Downloadable Kernel Modules or, through an intermediary ROMFS File System,

Shared Libraries and Real-time Processes to your VIP.

A new VxWorks Image project can be based on an existing VIP (which can be imported into your workspace; see

Importing a VxWorks Image Project

, p.76) or on

a Board Support Package (see

5.7 Notes on Board Support Packages (BSPs)

, p.86).

75

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

5.2 Importing a VxWorks Image Project

One situation where you would want to import a VxWorks Image project is if you are using the vxprj command-line project facility to build a custom board support package (see the VxWorks Command-Line User’s Guide: Working with Projects and

Components and the vxprj API reference entry for more information).

You can then import the custom-built BSP into Workbench as follows:

1.

Right-click the Project Navigator and choose Import.

2.

Select Existing VxWorks Image Project into Workspace, then click Next.

3.

Browse to the location of the custom-built BSP (a *.wpj file), click Finish.

5.2.1 Migrating a VxWorks Image Project

In Workbench 2.2 and 2.3, the .wrmakefile template used to generate the Makefiles for the VIP project contained all functionality on how to build VIP projects.

In Workbench 2.4, the VIP-specific instructions moved to a dedicated

vxWorks.makefile

, which now contains the necessary functionality to build the

VIP. The .wrmakefile now only covers generic managed build process instructions like recursion, etc.

So when migrating existing VIP projects to Workbench 2.4, you must update the makefile template manually.

If you updated your Workbench installation to version 2.4 and want to continue using VxWorks 6.1, copy over the newly installed (version 2.4)

.wrmakefile

and vxWorks.makefile to your existing VIP project to cause the project to work properly with the new build system. The simplest way to get these files is to create a new VIP (using the defaults), copy over the two files, and delete the VIP again.

If you also updated your VxWorks installation to version 6.2, then you must not only copy over the above two files but also run tcMigrate to migrate your

VIP project from VxWorks 6.1 to 6.2.

For more information about migrating to a new version of VxWorks, see the

tcMigrate

help entry (by typing tcMigrate into the help system Search field) and the Wind River Workbench Migration Guide: Workbench Projects.

NOTE:

If you made any manual modifications to your previous .wrmakefile file, you must manually migrate those to the new version of the file.

76

5 VxWorks Image Projects

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project

Before creating the project, please take a look at the general comments on projects and project creation in

4. Projects Overview

.

To create a VxWorks Image project, proceed as follows.

1.

Choose File > New > VxWorks Image Project.

The New VxWorks Image Project wizard appears. If applicable, you are asked to select a target operating system. Select a VxWorks version from the drop-down list and click Next.

2.

You are asked to enter a Project name and Location.

If Create project in workspace is selected, the project is created in the current workspace. If Create project at external location is selected, you can navigate

to a directory outside the workspace. See also

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64.

When you are ready, click Next.

3.

The next page of the wizard asks what the project is based on.

– You are asked whether you would like to base your project on

An existing VxWorks Image project

, or on A board support package

(BSP).

If you have already configured a VxWorks Image project that closely matches your current needs, you can base your project on that. Otherwise you can either select a supplied BSP from the list, or navigate to a third party or other custom BSP (see also

5.7 Notes on Board Support Packages

(BSPs)

, p.86).

The list of known BSPs will depend on the BSPs you have installed

(including the simulator).

Project creation will be faster using an existing VxWorks Image project since the project facility does not have to regenerate configuration information from BSP configuration files. The files are simply copied.

– If you select A board support package, you are asked to select a

Tool chain

. A tool chain is the suite of tools (compiler, linker, and so on) that will be used to build projects. This is part of the build spec that configures how things are built. The available list of tool chains depends on what you have installed.

5

77

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

NOTE:

If you intend to select one of the VxWorks scalability profiles, your toolchain must be based on the Wind River Compiler (diab).

When you are ready, click Next.

4.

You are asked to select networking options for the kernel.

Select Use IPv6 enabled kernel libraries to include IPv6 support.

Select Use System Viewer free kernel libraries to exclude Wind River

System Viewer support. This option builds the project without System

Viewer instrumentation, provided the kernel has previously been compiled with OPT=-fr or OPT=-inet6_fr specified. (Instrumentation-free kernel libraries are not supplied with the product.) For information on building the VxWorks kernel, see the source-code installation and build instructions in your getting started guide. For information about the

System Viewer, see the Wind River System Viewer User’s Guide.

Select Use source mode build to build from source, rather than from libraries, whenever possible. This compiles only those parts of the system that are needed by that specific project configuration, greatly increasing its ability to scale VxWorks down to smaller sizes. Source builds also enable the system to perform better, because only the needed source is compiled.

If the component configuration does not allow a build from source, then the project facility will build from libraries as usual.

NOTE:

In this release, only the following BSPs allow configurations that are buildable from source: Integrator1136jfs, wrSbcPowerQuiccII, wrPpmc74xx,

Bcm1250_cpu0_mips64

, Bcm1250_cpu1_mips64, Bcm1250eCpu0_mips64,

Bcm1250eCpu1_mips64

.

When you are ready, click Next.

5.

You are asked if you want to select a kernel configuration Profile. A Profile is a preconfigured collection of kernel components that attempts to match given needs. Selecting a profile can save you quite a bit of manual configuration, but it is not required.

PROFILE_MINIMAL_KERNEL—Minimal VxWorks Kernel Profile

This profile provides the lowest level at which a VxWorks system can operate. It consists of the micro-kernel, and basic CPU and BSP support.

This profile is meant to provide a very small VxWorks systems that can support multitasking and interrupt management at a very minimum, but semaphores and watchdogs are also supported by default. (See the

78

5 VxWorks Image Projects

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project

!

VxWorks Profiles for a Scaling the Operating System section in VxWorks Kernel

Programmer’s Guide: Kernel.)

PROFILE_BASIC_KERNEL—Basic VxWorks Kernel Profile

This profile builds on the minimal kernel profile, adding support for message queues, task hooks, and memory allocation and deallocation.

Applications based on this profile can be more dynamic and feature rich than the minimal kernel. (See the VxWorks Profiles for a Scaling the

Operating System section in VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide: Kernel.)

PROFILE_BASIC_OS—Basic VxWorks OS Profile

This profile provides a small operating system on which higher level constructs and facilities can be built. It supports an I/O system, file descriptors, and related ANSI routines. It also supports task and environment variables, signals, pipes, coprocessor management, and a

ROMFS file system. (See the VxWorks Profiles for a Scaling the Operating

System section in VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide: Kernel)

PROFILE_COMPATIBLE—VxWorks 5.5 Compatible Profile

This profile provides the minimal configuration that is compatible with

VxWorks 5.5.

PROFILE_DEVELOPMENT—VxWorks Kernel Development Profile

This profile provides a VxWorks kernel that includes development and debugging components.

PROFILE_ENHANCED_NET—Enhanced Network Profile

This profile adds to the default profile certain components appropriate for typical managed network client host devices. The primary components added are the DHCP client and DNS resolver, the Telnet server (shell not included), and several command-line-style configuration utilities.

When you are ready, click Finish. The new VxWorks Image project will appear at the root level in the Project Navigator.

Please refer to the VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide: Kernel and the help page for vxprj::profile for more information about profiles.

CAUTION:

The OS scale profiles (PROFILE_MINIMAL_KERNEL,

PROFILE_BASIC_KERNEL

, and PROFILE_BASIC_OS) are built from source code, so you must install VxWorks source to use them. For this release, the profiles can only be built with the Wind River Compiler. In addition, the profiles are only available for the BSPs listed in the Note on page

78 .

5

79

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

5.4 VxWorks Image Projects in the Project Navigator

After a VxWorks Image project has been created (see

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image

Project

, p.77), a number of nodes appear in the Project Navigator. This section

describes these nodes as they appear immediately after project creation, as well as some that only appear after the projects are built using a specific build specification (referred to here, and in the user interface as build spec).

For general notes about manipulating nodes, for example, moving, copying, filtering, and so forth, please see

13. Working in the Project Navigator

.

5.4.1 Global Project Nodes

ProjectName

The icon at the root of the project tree identifies the type of project; the icon’s label is the name you gave the project when you created it.

Kernel Configuration

Immediately below the project node of a VxWorks Image project, there is the Kernel Configuration node. Double-click the

Kernel Configuration

node to open the Kernel Editor. Please refer to

5.5 Configuring Kernel Components

, p.84, for information on using this

editor.

5.4.2 Project Build Specs and Target Nodes

Each target node is associated with a predefined build spec.

The default VIP target is a RAM-based image. If you want to create an image of another type, select a different target node when you build the project. See

Creating

New Build Targets

, p.81 for more information.

NOTE:

What follows is a typical list of build specs. The build specs initially available for a project are determined by the board support package. The VxWorks

simulator BSP (see

5.7.1 Using the Simulator BSP

, p.86) does not supply ROM build

specs.

80

5 VxWorks Image Projects

5.4 VxWorks Image Projects in the Project Navigator

default

This represents the target built using the default build spec and appears immediately after the project is created. It is a RAM-based image, usually loaded into memory by a VxWorks boot loader. This is the default development image and the only one that is available if you specify a simulator as your target “board”. It is also available in formats such as vxWorks.bin and vxWorks.hex. The .hex options are variants of the main options with Motorola S-Record output. The .bin options are variants of the main options with binary output.

default_rom

This is a ROM-based image that copies itself to RAM before executing.

This image generally has a slower startup time, but a faster execution time than default_romResident. It is also available in .bin and .hex formats.

default_romCompress

A compressed ROM image that copies itself to RAM and decompresses before executing. It takes longer to boot than default_rom but takes up less space than other ROM-based images (nearly half). The run-time execution is the same speed as default_rom. It is also available in .bin and .hex formats.

default_romResident

A ROM-resident image. Only the data segment is copied to RAM on startup. It has the fastest startup time and uses the smallest amount of

RAM. Typically, however, it runs slower than the other ROM images because ROM access is slower. It is also available in .bin and .hex formats.

Creating New Build Targets

To add a build target to a project, select the project and choose

File > New > Build Target

(or right-click on the project and choose

New > Build Target

). Type a name for the new build target and click Finish.

For VxWorks Image projects, build-target names should have the form

vxWorks

[type][format], where type can be empty (the default RAM-based image),

_rom

, _romCompress, or _romResident, and format can be empty (the default ELF image), .bin, or .hex. Examples:

vxWorks vxWorks.hex

5

81

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

vxWorks_rom vxWorks_romResident.hex

vxWorks_romCompress.bin

Each target name corresponds to one of the build specs described above. Target names are case-sensitive and must be spelled correctly to invoke the intended predefined build specs.

5.4.3 Build Output Folders

When you create the project, a node called vxWorks (default) is added to the project tree. It will hold the build output of the default target (created by setting the active build spec to default). Nodes are created for each target as you build them. The names of the nodes match those of the targets and will, once built, hold the corresponding target’s build output.

Other build output folders will be created if you use other build specs. These will

have the same names as the build spec used (see

5.4.2 Project Build Specs and Target

Nodes

, p.80).

5.4.4 Makefile Nodes

Three Makefiles are created in the project folder. One is a template that can also be used for entering custom make rules. The others are dynamically regenerated from build spec data at each build.

.wrmakefile

A template used by Wind River Workbench to generate the project’s

Makefile

. Add user-specific build-targets and make rules in this file.

These will then be automatically dumped into the Makefile.

Makefile.mk

Called from Makefile. Connects the Workbench project to the VxWorks build system. Includes a list of components and build parameters. Do not edit.

Makefile

Do not add custom code to this file. This Makefile is regenerated every time the project is built. The information used to generate the file is taken from the build specification on which the target node is based.

82

5 VxWorks Image Projects

5.4 VxWorks Image Projects in the Project Navigator

5.4.5 Project File Nodes

The project creation facility generates, or includes copies of, a variety of files when a VxWorks Image project is created.

Application Initialization Stubs

Two of the files that are copied to the project at creation time are stubs for entering calls to your application code:

usrAppInit.c

A stub for adding DKM application initialization routines.

usrRtpAppInit.c

A stub for adding RTP application initialization routines.

Other Project Files

Normally, you need not be concerned with the remaining project files. However, here a brief summary of the remaining VxWorks Image project files displayed in the Project Navigator:

projectName.wpj

Contains information about the project used for generating the project makefile, as well as project source files such as prjConfig.c.

.project

Eclipse platform project file containing builder information and project nature.

.wrproject

Workbench project file containing common project properties such as project type, etc.

linkSyms.c

A dynamically generated configuration file (therefore not to be checked in to your version control system) that includes code from the VxWorks archive by creating references to the appropriate symbols. It contains symbols for components that do not have initialization routines.

5

83

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

prjConfig.c

A dynamically generated configuration file (therefore not to be checked in to your version control system) that contains initialization code for components included in the current configuration of VxWorks.

prjComps.h

A dynamically generated configuration file (therefore not to be checked in) that contains the preprocessor definitions (macros) used to include

VxWorks components.

prjParams.h

A dynamically generated configuration file (therefore not to be checked in) that contains component parameters.

5.5 Configuring Kernel Components

The Wind River Workbench distribution includes VxWorks kernel images located in installDir/vxworks-version/target/config. A kernel image is a binary module that can be booted and run on a target system. The kernel image consists of system object modules linked into a single non-locatable object module with no unresolved external references. In most cases, you will find the supplied kernel image adequate for initial development. However, later in the cycle you may want to create a custom VxWorks kernel image.

The VxWorks kernel is a flexible, scalable operating system with numerous facilities that can be tuned, and included or excluded, depending on the requirements of your application and the stage of the development cycle. For example, various networking and file system components may be required for one application and not another; the Kernel Editor provides a simple means for including or excluding such components. In addition, it may be useful to build

VxWorks with various target tools (such as the target-resident shell) during development, and then exclude them from the production application.

For more information about kernel components, please refer to the VxWorks Kernel

Programmer’s Guide: Kernel.

84

5 VxWorks Image Projects

5.6 Adding Application Projects to the VxWorks Image Project

5.5.1 The Kernel Editor

To configure the kernel of a VxWorks Image project, in the Project Navigator, double-click the Kernel Configuration node immediately under the VxWorks

Image project root node. This opens the Kernel Editor.

The Kernel Editor consists of three tabs (select at the bottom edge of the view).

The Overview tab provides a read-only summary of the configuration that is updated by changes you make on the other two tabs.

The Bundles tab allows you to add or remove entire bundles of components that you can fine-tune to your needs in the Components tab.

The Components tab displays a tree of bundles and, at the leaf nodes of expanded bundles, individual components and their parameters.

For more information about the Kernel Editor, see Wind River Workbench User

Interface Reference: Kernel Editor View.

5

5.6 Adding Application Projects to the VxWorks Image Project

Once you have created application projects, populated these with code, and successfully built them, you will want to add these to the VxWorks Image project.

You may also want to add a ROMFS file system (see

7. ROMFS File System Projects

).

Step 1: Link the application projects to the VxWorks Image project.

Some projects, including downloadable kernel modules and user-defined projects, can be managed as subprojects of a VxWorks Image project. If your application projects are not already set up as subprojects of a VIP, see

4.5.1 Adding Subprojects to a Project

, p.71 for information on how to do this. Building VIPs with application

subprojects helps assure correct linking and dependency-checking.

RTP and shared-library projects cannot be direct subprojects of a VIP, but they can be subprojects of a File System project that is in turn a subproject of a VIP.

Step 2: Add the application initialization routines to the VxWorks Image project.

When VxWorks boots, it initializes all operating system components (as needed), and then passes control to the user’s application for initialization. To add application initialization calls to VxWorks do the following:

85

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

For DKM projects, double-click userAppInit.c to open the file for editing, and add the necessary calls to the usrAppInit( ) function.

For RTP projects, double-click userRtpAppInit.c to open the file for editing, and add the necessary calls to the usrRtpAppInit( ) function.

Step 3: Configure the VxWorks Image project VxWorks kernel.

VxWorks must be configured to support the calls your application makes to it, or you will not be able to link your image. If your BSP provides a “bare-bones”

VxWorks configuration, you may wish to use the Kernel Editor’s Auto Scale facility to detect and add most of the VxWorks functionality you require.

Auto Scale

will compile your code, analyze the symbols in your object modules, map them to components, and offer to include those components. There may be some components that Auto Scale does not detect. If you Auto Scale, build, and still get link errors, you will need to add the additional components from the

Kernel Editor (for more information about auto scale and the kernel editor, see the

Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Kernel Editor View).

5.7 Notes on Board Support Packages (BSPs)

A Board Support Package (BSP) consists primarily of the hardware-specific

VxWorks code for a particular target board. A BSP includes facilities for hardware initialization, interrupt handling and generation, hardware clock and timer management, mapping of local and bus memory space, and so on.

You can base a VxWorks Image project on the VxWorks simulator BSP, a Wind

River BSP supplied with Workbench, or a third-party BSP; or you can create your own custom BSP.

5.7.1 Using the Simulator BSP

You can base your VxWorks Image project on the VxWorks simulator BSP if you want to develop a custom BSP and application code for your product in parallel, or if your target hardware is not yet ready. The simulator BSP contains default

VxWorks functionality sufficient for supporting most applications.

86

5 VxWorks Image Projects

5.7 Notes on Board Support Packages (BSPs)

5.7.2 Using a Wind River or Third-Party BSP

Wind River Workbench BSP

If your BSP was installed with Workbench 2.3, you can create a VxWorks Image project from it directly (see

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project

, p.77).

Tornado 2.x BSP or SNiFF+ 4.1 and Newer BSP

For information on migrating a Tornado 2.x-compliant BSP or a SNiFF+ 4.1 (or newer) BSP to Workbench, see the Wind River Workbench Migration Guide.

5.7.3 Using a Custom BSP for Custom Hardware

Creating a BSP

If you need to create your own BSP, please refer to the VxWorks BSP Developer’s

Guide. If you wish to develop the BSP and the application code in parallel, you may want to begin application development on the VxWorks Simulator. See

5.7.1 Using the Simulator BSP

, p.86.

Using a Pre-Existing BSP with the Wind River Workbench Project Facility

If you already have a custom BSP that is Tornado 2.x compliant, please see the

VxWorks Migration Guide for information on migrating to Workbench.

If you already have a custom, non-compliant BSP, you will need to modify it to conform to the guidelines outlined in the VxWorks BSP Developer’s Guide in order to use it with the Workbench project facility. Once you have modified it, verify that it builds properly before creating a project for it.

NOTE:

If you do not make your BSP Workbench compliant, Workbench will not be able to provide project-based support for customizing, configuring, or building it.

5

87

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Using a BSP Outside the Wind River Workbench

You may still use a non-compliant BSP by managing its configuration manually.

For information on using manual methods, see the Wind River Workbench Command

Line User’s Guide. You can still create downloadable projects to hold your application code and download them to a target booted with a non-compliant BSP.

88

6

Boot Loader Project

6.1 Introduction 89

6.2 Creating a Boot Loader Project 90

6.3 Boot Loader Projects in the Project Navigator 91

6.1 Introduction

Use a

VxWorks Boot Loader

project to create a VxWorks boot loader (also referred to as the VxWorks boot ROM) to boot-load a target with the VxWorks kernel.

Boot loaders are used in a development environment to load a VxWorks image that is stored on a host system, where VxWorks can be quickly modified and rebuilt. Boot loaders are also used in production systems where both the boot loader and operating system image are stored on a disk.

Because Boot Loader projects provide rudimentary board support (boot loading), they can also be used for loading standalone Downloadable Kernel Module

Applications without a full-blown VxWorks kernel.

Boot loaders are not required for standalone VxWorks systems that are stored in

ROM, nor is it possible to create a boot loader for an image meant to be run on the

VxWorks simulator.

Please refer to the VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide: Kernel for more information on boot loaders.

89

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

6.2 Creating a Boot Loader Project

Before creating the project, please take a look at the general comments on projects

and project creation in

4. Projects Overview

.

To create a Boot Loader project, proceed as follows.

1.

Choose File > New > VxWorks Boot Loader Project.

The New VxWorks Boot Loader Project wizard appears. If applicable, you are asked to select a target operating system. Select a VxWorks version from the drop-down list and click Next.

2.

You are asked to enter a Project name and Location.

If Create project in workspace is selected, the project is created in the current workspace. If Create project at external location is selected, you can navigate to a directory outside the workspace. See also

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64.

When you are ready, click Next.

3.

The next page of the wizard asks you to set:

– The Board support package for which you want to create a boot loader.

– The Boot loader image Style and Format.

Boot loader images come in the following styles: Compressed,

Uncompressed

, ROM-Resident, and ROM-Resident At High Address.

These are functionally the same but have different memory requirements and execution times. After the project has been created, you can change the Style by right-clicking the project and selecting Set Active Build Spec.

The VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide: Kernel chapter provides detailed information on Style and Format. BSP documentation specifies which types are available for a specific target.

When you are ready, click Finish. The new Boot Loader project will appear at the root level in the Project Navigator.

90

6 Boot Loader Project

6.3 Boot Loader Projects in the Project Navigator

6.3 Boot Loader Projects in the Project Navigator

After a Boot Loader has been created, a number of nodes appear in the Project

Navigator. This section describes these nodes as they appear immediately after project creation.

For general notes about manipulating nodes, for example, moving, copying, filtering, etc., please see

13. Working in the Project Navigator

.

6.3.1 Global Project Nodes

ProjectName

The icon at the root of the project tree identifies the type of project; the icon’s label is the name you gave the project when you created it.

6.3.2 Project Build Specs and Target Nodes

Each Boot Loader project has a single IDE-managed build target whose name has the form bsp (buildSpec)—for example, simpc (bootloader_res). To switch build specs, right-click and choose Set Active Build Spec.

Build-spec names have the form bootloader[style][format], where style can be empty (the default compressed image), _uncmp (uncompressed), _res

(ROM-resident), or _res_high (ROM-resident at high address), and format can be empty (the default ELF image), .bin (binary output), or .hex (Motorola S-Record).

Examples:

bootloader bootloader.bin

bootloader_res_high bootloader_uncmp.hex

You can create new build targets with user-defined make rules by choosing

File > New > Build Target

or right-clicking on the project and choosing

New > Build Target

.

6

91

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

6.3.3 Makefile Nodes

Makefile

Do not add custom code to this file. This Makefile is regenerated every time the project is built. The information used to generate the file is taken from the build specification on which the target node is based.

6.3.4 Other Project Files

Normally, you need not be concerned with the remaining project files. However, here a brief summary of the remaining VxWorks Boot Loader project files displayed in the Project Navigator:

.project

Eclipse platform project file containing builder information and project nature.

.wrproject

Workbench project file containing common project properties such as project type, etc.

92

7

ROMFS File System Projects

7.1 Introduction 93

7.2 Creating a ROMFS File System Project 94

7.3 ROMFS File System Projects in the Project Navigator 95

7.1 Introduction

Use a ROMFS File System project as a subproject of a VxWorks Image project that requires ROMFS. The ROMFS file system provides a means for bundling RTP applications and shared libraries with the VxWorks system image. At runtime, these files can be accessed in the VxWorks /romfs directory (and any subdirectories you create).

To use other file systems—such as dosFs—in your applications, configure

VxWorks with the appropriate components.

For more information about ROMFS and other file systems, see the VxWorks Kernel

Programmer’s Guide: Local File Systems or the VxWorks Application Programmer’s

Guide: Local File Systems; and the VxWorks Application Programmer’s Guide:

Applications and Processes.

93

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

7.2 Creating a ROMFS File System Project

Before creating the project, please take a look at the general comments on projects

and project creation in

4. Projects Overview

.

To create a VxWorks File System project, proceed as follows.

1.

Choose File > New > VxWorks FileSystem Project.

The New VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project wizard appears.

If applicable, you are asked to select a target operating system. Select a

VxWorks version from the drop-down list and click Next.

2.

You are asked to enter a Project name and Location.

If Create project in workspace is selected, the project is created in the current workspace. If Create project at external location is selected, you can navigate to a directory outside the workspace. See also

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64.

When you are ready, click Next.

3.

You are asked to define the project structure (the superproject and subproject context) for the project you are creating. This is an optional step; it is not necessary to select a superproject or subprojects.

The Superproject check box refers to VxWorks Image project (VIP) that is currently highlighted in the Project Navigator. If you do not see this check box, or if the check box is grayed, no valid project is highlighted in the Project

Navigator. If you select the check box, the project you are creating will be a subproject of the indicated VIP.

The check boxes below list the remaining projects in the workspace that can be added to the current project as subprojects.

When you are ready, click Finish. The VxWorks File System is created and appears in the Project Navigator, either at the root level or linked under a

VxWorks Image project, depending on your selection above.

94

7 ROMFS File System Projects

7.3 ROMFS File System Projects in the Project Navigator

7.3 ROMFS File System Projects in the Project Navigator

After a ROMFS file system project has been created (see

7.2 Creating a ROMFS File

System Project

, p.94) a number of nodes appear in the Project Navigator. This

section describes these nodes as they appear immediately after project creation.

For general notes about manipulating nodes, for example, moving, copying, filtering, etc., please see

13. Working in the Project Navigator

.

7.3.1 Global Project Nodes

ProjectName

The icon at the root of the VxWorks File System project tree identifies the type of project; the icon’s label is the name you gave the project when you created it.

VxWorks File System Contents

Immediately below the project node, there is the

VxWorks File System Contents

node. Double-click the

VxWorks File System Contents

to open the File System Contents

Editor. Please refer to

7.3.3 Configuring the ROMFS File System

, p.96, for

information on using this editor.

7.3.2 Project File Nodes

The project creation facility generates, or includes copies of, a variety of files when a VxWorks File System project is created. Normally, you need not be concerned with these files. However, here is a brief summary of the VxWorks File System project files displayed in the Project Navigator:

.project

Eclipse platform project file containing builder information and project nature.

.wrproject

Workbench project file containing common project properties such as project type, etc.

7

95

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

7.3.3 Configuring the ROMFS File System

To add files or create subdirectories, in the Project Navigator, double-click the

VxWorks File System Contents

node immediately under the VxWorks File

System root node of the project. This opens the File System Contents Editor.

Two panels, one for the host and one for the target, allow you to add and remove files. You can also create or delete subdirectories in the Target Contents panel.

The panel at the bottom of the view displays a summary of properties for the selected element in the Target Contents (right) panel.

Make sure that you add the correct binary or data files. Click the file names in the

Target Contents

pane and verify the path in the Host path field in the bottom panel. This can be useful, for example, to check that:

You have used the correct version of a versioned shared library.

You have taken files from the correct build-spec output folder.

96

8

VxWorks Real-time Process

Projects

8.1 Introduction 97

8.2 Creating a VxWorks Real-time Process Project 98

8.3 VxWorks Real-time Processes in the Project Navigator 100

8.4 Application Code for a VxWorks Real-time Process Project 103

8.5 Linking to VxWorks and Using Shared Libraries 103

8.1 Introduction

Using VxWorks Real-time Process (RTP) projects to manage and build modules that will exist outside of the kernel space, you can separately build, run, and debug the

VxWorks Real-time Process executable.

At run-time, the executable file is downloaded to a separate address space to run as an independent process. The binary produced from a VxWorks Real-time

Process project will need to be stored on a target-side file system, see

7. ROMFS File

System Projects

.

VxWorks Real-time Process projects provide a protected, process-based, user-mode environment for developing applications. In this mode, applications are developed as VxWorks executables. An application has a well-defined start address. When the executable is loaded, memory is allocated by the system for the executable, execution begins at the known start address, and all tasks in the

97

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

process run within the same memory-protected address space. When the application terminates, all the resources associated with it are freed back to the system.

8.2 Creating a VxWorks Real-time Process Project

Before creating the project, please take a look at the general comments on projects

and project creation in

4. Projects Overview

.

To create a VxWorks Real-time Process project proceed as follows.

1.

Choose File > New > VxWorks Real Time Process Project.

The New VxWorks Real Time Process Project wizard appears. If you have multiple versions of VxWorks installed, you are asked to select a target operating system. If applicable; that is, if you see this wizard page at all, select a VxWorks version from the drop-down list and click Next.

2.

You are asked to enter a Project name and Location.

If you choose Create project in workspace (default) the project will be created under the current workspace directory. If you choose to

Create project at external location

, you can navigate to a location outside the workspace (see also

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64 and

4.3 Creating New

Projects

, p.64).

After project creation, the project name will appear in the Project Navigator

(see

8.3 VxWorks Real-time Processes in the Project Navigator

, p.100). To see the

project location, right-click on the project and select Properties, then select the

Info

node of the Properties dialog.

When you are ready, click Next.

3.

You are asked to define the project structure (the super- and subproject context) for the project you are creating.

The text beside the Link to superproject check box refers to whatever project is currently highlighted in the Project Navigator (if you do not see this check box, no valid project is highlighted). If you select the check box, this will be the superproject of the project you are currently creating.

98

8 VxWorks Real-time Process Projects

8.2 Creating a VxWorks Real-time Process Project

The check boxes in the Referenced subprojects list represent the remaining projects in the workspace that can be validly referenced as subprojects by the project you are currently creating.

After project creation, you can change the project structure in the Project

Navigator using drag-and-drop.

When you are ready, click Next.

4.

You are asked to specify the Build Defaults source either from an existing template or an existing project. If you select Use Default, preconfigured default templates are used.

You can inspect and, if necessary modify, the default settings for new projects of each project type from Window > Preferences > Build Properties (see

16.2.1 Project Build Properties and Preferences Build Properties

, p.175).

When you are ready, click Next.

NOTE:

All settings in the following wizard pages are build related. You can therefore verify/modify them after project creation in the Build Properties node of the project’s Properties, see

16. Build Properties and the Build Console

.

5.

A VxWorks Real-time Process project is a predefined project type that uses

Workbench Build support, so you can only select either this, or no build support at all. If you are creating a project because you want to browse symbol information only and you are not interested in building it, you could also disable build support.

The Build command specifies the make tool command line.

Build output passing

: If the project is a subproject in a tree, its own objects

(implicit targets) as well as the explicit targets of its subprojects, can be passed on to be linked into the build targets of projects that are further up in the hierarchy.

When you are ready, click Next.

6.

Build Specs

: The list of available build specs will always be available. By checkmarking individual specs, you enable them for the current project, which means that you will, in normal day to day work, only see relevant (enabled) specs in the user interface, rather than the whole list. Additional specs can be enabled/disabled at any time after the project has been created.

The Debug Mode checkbox specifies wether or not the build output includes debug information or not.

8

99

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

7.

Build Target

: The Build target name is the same as the project name by default. If you delete the contents of the field no target will be created.

Build tool

: For a VxWorks Real-time Process project you can select:

Linker

: This is the default selection. The linker produces a a

BuildTargetName.vxe file. This single, partially linked and munched

(integrated with code to call C++ static constructors and destructors) object is intended for downloading.

The Linker output product cannot be passed up to superprojects, although the current project’s own, unlinked object files can, as can any output products received from projects further down in the hierarchy (see step

5.

above).

Librarian

: This is the default selection if you specified that the project is to be linked into a project structure as a subproject. The Librarian produces an archive TargetName.a file.

The Librarian output product can be passed up to superprojects, as can the current project’s own, unlinked object files, as well as any output

products received from projects further down in the hierarchy (see step 5.

above).

8.

When you are ready, you can review your settings using the Back button or click Finish.

The VxWorks Real-time Process project is created and appears in the Project

Navigator, either at the root level, or linked into a project tree, depending on your selection in step

3.

above.

8.3 VxWorks Real-time Processes in the Project Navigator

After a VxWorks Real-time Process has been created, a number of nodes appear in the Project Navigator. This section describes these nodes as they appear immediately after project creation. For general notes about manipulating nodes, for example, moving, copying, filtering, etc., please see

13. Working in the Project

Navigator

.

100

8 VxWorks Real-time Process Projects

8.3 VxWorks Real-time Processes in the Project Navigator

8.3.1 Global Project Nodes

ProjectName

The icon at the root of the project tree identifies the type of project; the icon’s label is the name you gave the project when you created it.

8.3.2 Project Build Specs and Target Nodes

Each target node is associated with a predefined build specification.

The RTP build targets depend on the options you selected during project creation.

Specifically, you will not have both an archive (TargetName.a) target and a

TargetName.out target immediately after project creation. Which of these will be visible depends on the build tool you selected. Also, the presence or absence of the green upward arrow on the target icon (to indicate whether the target is passed up the hierarchy) will be determined by your project settings.

TargetName.vxe (BuildSpecName[_DEBUG])

This single, partially linked and munched (integrated with code to call

C++ static constructors and destructors) object, produced by the Linker build tool is intended for downloading.

TargetName.a (BuildSpecName[_DEBUG])

An archive produced by the Librarian build tool that has to be statically linked into an executable.

8.3.3 Makefile Nodes

At project generation time two Makefiles are copied to the project. One is a template that can also be used for entering custom make rules. The other is dynamically regenerated from build spec data at each build.

.wrmakefile

A template used by Workbench to generate the project’s Makefile. Add user-specific build-targets and make-rules in this file. These will then be automatically dumped into the Makefile.

8

101

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Makefile

Do not add custom code to this file. This Makefile is regenerated every time the project is built. The information used to generate the file is taken from the build specification that on which the target node is based.

8.3.4 Project File Nodes

The project creation facility generates, or includes copies of, a variety of files when a project is created. Normally, you need not be concerned with these files.

However, here a brief summary of the DKM project files displayed in the Project

Navigator:

.project

Eclipse platform project file containing builder information and project nature.

.wrproject

Workbench project file containing common project properties such as project type, etc.

102

8 VxWorks Real-time Process Projects

8.4 Application Code for a VxWorks Real-time Process Project

8.4 Application Code for a VxWorks Real-time Process Project

After project creation you have the infrastructure for a VxWorks Real-time Process project, but often no actual application code. If you are writing code from the beginning, you can add new files to a project. If you already have source code files, you will want to import these to the project. For more information please refer to

13.3.1 Importing Resources

, p.132, and

13.3.2 Adding New Files to Projects

, p.133.

8.5 Linking to VxWorks and Using Shared Libraries

In order to have your VxWorks Real-time Process project binary initialized once the kernel has booted, you will need to:

Create a VxWorks Image project, see

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project

, p.77.

Configure the VxWorks Image project as described under

5.6 Adding

Application Projects to the VxWorks Image Project

, p.85 and

5.5 Configuring Kernel

Components

, p.84.

Create a target file system before the target is disconnected from the host system, see

7.2 Creating a ROMFS File System Project

, p.94.

If you want to dynamically link to shared libraries, the VxWorks Real-time

Process project needs to be appropriately configured, see

17.6 Executables that

Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries

, p.207, and

18. RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

.

8

103

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

104

9

VxWorks Shared Library

Projects

9.1 Introduction 105

9.2 Creating a VxWorks Shared Library Project 106

9.3 Shared Libraries in the Project Navigator 108

9.4 Source Code for the Shared Library 109

9.5 Making Shared Libraries Available to Applications 110

9.1 Introduction

Use VxWorks Shared Library projects for libraries that are dynamically linked to

VxWorks Real-time Process projects at run-time. Such a shared library will need to be stored, like the Real-time Process project, on a target-side file system (see

7. ROMFS File System Projects

). You can also use VxWorks Shared Library projects to create subprojects that are statically linked into other project types at build time.

Please refer to

9. VxWorks Shared Library Projects

,

17.6 Executables that Dynamically

Link to Shared Libraries

, p.207, and

18. RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

for more information on working with this type of project.

105

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

9.2 Creating a VxWorks Shared Library Project

Before creating the project, please take a look at the general comments on projects

and project creation in

4. Projects Overview

.

To create a VxWorks Shared Library project, proceed as follows.

1.

Choose File > New > VxWorks Shared Library Project.

The New VxWorks Shared Library Project wizard appears. If you have multiple versions of VxWorks installed, you are asked to select a target operating system. If applicable; that is, if you see this wizard page at all, select a VxWorks version from the drop-down list and click Next.

2.

You are asked to enter a Project name and Location.

If you choose Create project in workspace (default) the project will be created under the current workspace directory. If you choose to

Create project at external location

, you can navigate to a location outside the workspace (see also

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64 and

4.3 Creating New

Projects

, p.64).

After project creation, the project name will appear in the Project Navigator

(see

9.3 Shared Libraries in the Project Navigator

, p.108). To see the project

location, right-click on the project and select Properties, then select the Info node of the Properties dialog.

When you are ready, click Next.

3.

You are asked to define the project structure (the super- and subproject context) for the project you are creating.

The text beside the Superproject check box refers to whatever project is currently highlighted in the Project Navigator (if you do not see this check box, no valid project is highlighted). If you select the check box, the new VxWorks

Shared Library project will be created as a subproject of the highlighted project, and will be built as part of it.

The check boxes in the Referenced subprojects list represent the remaining projects in the workspace that can be validly referenced as subprojects by the project you are currently creating.

After project creation, you can change the project structure in the Project

Navigator using drag-and-drop.

When you are ready, click Next.

106

9 VxWorks Shared Library Projects

9.2 Creating a VxWorks Shared Library Project

4.

You are asked to specify the Build Defaults source either from an existing template or an existing project. If you select Use Default, preconfigured default templates are used.

You can inspect and, if necessary modify, the default settings for new projects of each project type from Window > Preferences > Build Properties (see

16.2.1 Project Build Properties and Preferences Build Properties

, p.175).

When you are ready, click Next.

NOTE:

All settings in the following wizard pages are build related. You can therefore verify/modify them after project creation in the Build Properties node of the project’s Properties, see

16. Build Properties and the Build Console

.

5.

A VxWorks Shared Library project is a predefined project type that uses

Workbench Build support, so you can only select either this, or no build support at all. If you are creating a project because you want to browse symbol information only and you are not interested in building it, you could also disable build support.

Build command

: specifies the make tool command line.

Build output passing

: if the project is a subproject in a tree, its own unlinked objects, as well as the explicit targets of its subprojects, can be passed on to be linked into the build targets of projects that are further up in the hierarchy.

When you are ready, click Next.

6.

Build Specs

: the list of available build specs is always accessible in the Project

Properties. By selecting individual specs, you enable them for the current project, which means that you will only see relevant specs rather than a whole long list. Additional specs can be enabled/disabled at any time after the project has been created.

The Debug Mode checkbox specifies wether or not the build output includes debug information or not.

7.

Build Target

: Build target name is the same as the project name by default. If you delete the contents of the field no target will be created.

The Build tool can be the Shared Library Linker or a custom user-defined tool.

The Shared Library Linker produces a BuildTargetName.so target that is dynamically linked to at run-time.

9

107

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

The output product of the Shared Library Linker will normally be passed up to superprojects. If you do not pass the library target up to its superprojects, references in the superprojects’ application code cannot be resolved at compile time. If you specified that the VxWorks Shared Library project you are currently creating links to a superproject (see step

3

above), the check box will be selected by default.

8.

When you are ready, you can review your settings using the Back button or click Finish.

The VxWorks Shared Library project is created and appears in the Project

Navigator, either at the root level, or linked into a project tree, depending on your selection in step

3.

above.

9.3 Shared Libraries in the Project Navigator

After a VxWorks Shared Library project has been created, a number of nodes appear in the Project Navigator. This section describes these nodes as they appear immediately after project creation. For general notes about manipulating nodes,

for example, moving, copying, filtering, and so on, please see

13. Working in the

Project Navigator

.

9.3.1 Global Project Nodes

ProjectName

The icon at the root of the project tree identifies the type of project; the icon’s label is the name you gave the project when you created it.

9.3.2 Target Node

TargetName.so (BuildSpecName[_DEBUG])

A VxWorks Shared Library produced by the Shared Library Linker that is dynamically linked at run-time.

108

9 VxWorks Shared Library Projects

9.4 Source Code for the Shared Library

9.3.3 Makefile Nodes

At project generation time a template that can also be used for entering custom make rules is copied to the project.

.wrmakefile

A template used by Workbench to generate the project’s Makefile. Add user-specific build-targets and make-rules in this file.

9.3.4 Project File Nodes

The project creation facility generates, or includes copies of, a variety of files when a project is created. Normally, you need not be concerned with these files.

However, here a brief summary of the Shared Library project files displayed in the

Project Navigator:

.project

Eclipse platform project file containing builder information and project nature.

.wrproject

Workbench project file containing common project properties such as project type, etc.

9

9.4 Source Code for the Shared Library

After project creation you have the infrastructure for a Shared Library project, but often no actual library source code. If you are writing code from the beginning, you can add new files to a project. If you already have source code files, you will want to import these to the project. For more information refer to

13.3.1 Importing

Resources

, p.132, and

13.3.2 Adding New Files to Projects

, p.133.

109

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

9.5 Making Shared Libraries Available to Applications

To make shared libraries accessible to your applications at run-time, you have to make sure of a few configuration details, both on the library side and on the application side. You also need a file system project to store the library on the

target (see

7. ROMFS File System Projects

).

9.5.1 Configuring the Shared Library Project

Make sure the shared library is a subproject of all applications that need to access it. If the library is used by many applications, create projects for each

application and make the library a subproject of each (see

13. Working in the

Project Navigator

for information on how to do this).

Make sure the library target is passed to superprojects. You can do this during

project creation (see step 7 under

9.2 Creating a VxWorks Shared Library Project

, p.106), or subsequently in the Project Properties as follows:

– In the Project Navigator, highlight the shared library project folder you are interested in and right-click Project Properties.

(If the project folder is a subnode under several different superprojects, it does not matter which you choose because these nodes are only logical representations of one and the same project.)

– In Project Properties, select Build Properties node, then the Build Tools tab. On the Build Tools tab, be sure the

Generated build target can be passed

check box is selected.

If the output of the library build is not passed up to superprojects, references from the superproject to the library subproject cannot be resolved at build-time.

Click OK to close the Project Properties.

9.5.2 Configuring the Application Projects

Most shared library projects are created as subprojects of one or more application projects. Although a superproject knows the location of its subprojects, it does not know that a particular subproject is a shared library, so the application project’s linker has to be configured to accommodate dynamic access to shared libraries. For

110

9 VxWorks Shared Library Projects

9.5 Making Shared Libraries Available to Applications

more information, please see

17.6 Executables that Dynamically Link to Shared

Libraries

, p.207, and

18. RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

.

9

111

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

112

10

VxWorks Downloadable Kernel

Module Projects

10.1 Introduction 113

10.2 Creating a VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project 114

10.3 Downloadable Kernel Modules in the Project Navigator 116

10.4 Application Code for a VxWorks DKM Project 118

10.1 Introduction

Use VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module (DKM) projects to manage and build modules that will exist in the kernel space. You can separately build the modules, then run and debug them on a target running VxWorks, loading, unloading, and reloading on the fly.

Once your development work is complete, the modules can be statically linked into the kernel or use a file system if one is present.

Kernel-mode development is the traditional VxWorks method of development. All the tasks you spawn run in an unprotected environment and all have full access to the hardware in the system.

113

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

10.2 Creating a VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project

To create a VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module project, proceed as follows.

1.

Choose File > New > VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project.

The New VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project wizard appears.

If applicable, you are asked to select a target operating system. Select a

VxWorks version from the drop-down list and click Next.

2.

You are asked to enter a Project name and Location.

If you choose Create project in workspace (default) the project will be created under the current workspace root directory. If you choose to

Create project at external location

, you can navigate to a location outside the workspace (see also

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64 and

4.3 Creating New

Projects

, p.64).

After project creation, the project name will appear in the Project Navigator

(see

10.3 Downloadable Kernel Modules in the Project Navigator

, p.116). To see the

project location, right-click on the project and select Properties, then select the

Info

node of the Properties dialog.

When you are ready, click Next.

3.

You are asked to define the project structure (the superproject and subproject context) for the project you are creating.

The text beside the Link to superproject check box refers to whatever project is currently highlighted in the Project Navigator (if you do not see this check box, no valid project is highlighted). If you select the check box, this will be the superproject of the project you are currently creating.

The check boxes in the Referenced subprojects list represent the remaining projects in the workspace that can be validly referenced as subprojects by the project you are currently creating.

After project creation, you can change the project structure in the Project

Navigator using drag-and-drop.

When you are ready, click Next.

4.

You are asked to specify the Build Defaults source either from an existing template or an existing project. If you select Use Default, preconfigured default templates are used.

114

10 VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects

10.2 Creating a VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project

You can inspect and, if necessary modify, the default settings for new projects of each project type from Window > Preferences > Build Properties (see

16.2.1 Project Build Properties and Preferences Build Properties

, p.175).

When you are ready, click Next.

NOTE:

All settings in the following wizard pages are build related. These can therefore all be verified or modified after project creation in the Build Properties node of the project’s Properties, see

16. Build Properties and the Build Console

.

5.

Build Support

options: A VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module project is a predefined project type that uses Workbench build support, so in most cases you will want to select Managed build to use makefiles generated by the IDE.

If you are creating a project because you want to browse symbol information only and you are not interested in building it, you could also disable build support by selecting Disabled (and enable it later, if needed). The

User-defined build

option is not available for VxWorks Downloadable Kernel

Module projects.

The Build command specifies the make tool command line.

Build output passing

: If the project is a subproject in a tree, its own objects

(implicit targets) as well as well as the explicit targets of its subprojects can be passed on to be linked into the build targets of projects that are further up in the hierarchy.

When you are ready, click Next.

6.

Build Specs

: The list of available build specs will always be available. By checkmarking individual specs, you enable them for the current project, which means that you will, in normal day to day work, only see relevant (enabled) specs in the user interface, rather than the whole list. Additional specs can be enabled/disabled at any time after the project has been created.

When you are ready, click Next.

7.

Build Target

: The Build target name is the same as the project name by default. If you delete the contents of the field no target will be created.

However, a default target named PartialImage.pl will always be built and passed to the superproject.

Build tool

: For a VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module project you can select:

Linker

: This is the default selection if you did not specify that the project is to be linked into a project structure as a subproject. The linker produces

10

115

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

a BuildTargetName.out file. This single, partially linked and munched

(integrated with code to call C++ static constructors and destructors) object is intended for downloading.

The Linker output product cannot be passed up to superprojects, although the current project’s own, unlinked object files can, as can any output products received from projects further down in the hierarchy (see step

5.

above).

Librarian

: This is the default selection if you specified that the project is to be linked into a project structure as a subproject. The Librarian produces an archive TargetName.a file.

The Librarian output product can be passed up to superprojects, as can the current project’s own, unlinked object files, as well as any output

products received from projects further down in the hierarchy (see step 5.

above).

Partial Image Linker

: The Partial Image Linker produces a TargetName.pl file. This single, partially linked, but not munched (not integrated with code to call C++ static constructors and destructors) object is for subproject support only; it is not intended for download.

The Partial Image Linker output product can be passed up to superprojects, as can current project’s own, unlinked object files, as well as any output products received from projects further down in the hierarchy

(see step 5.

above).

8.

When you are ready, you can review your settings using the Back button, or click Finish.

The VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module is created and appears in the

Project Navigator, either at the root level or linked into a project tree,

depending on you selection in step 3.

above.

10.3 Downloadable Kernel Modules in the Project Navigator

After a VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module has been created, a number of nodes appear in the Project Navigator. This section describes these nodes as they appear immediately after project creation. For general notes about manipulating

116

10 VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects

10.3 Downloadable Kernel Modules in the Project Navigator

nodes, for example, moving, copying, filtering, and so forth. Please see

13. Working in the Project Navigator

.

10.3.1 Global Project Nodes

ProjectName

The icon at the root of the project tree identifies the type of project; the icon’s label is the name you gave the project when you created it.

10.3.2 Project Build Specs and Target Nodes

Each target node is associated with a predefined build specification.

The VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module project software targets depend on the options you selected during project creation. Specifically, you will not have both an archive (TargetName.a) target and a TargetName.out target immediately after project creating. Which, if any, of these will be visible depends on the build tool you selected. Also, the presence or absence of the green upward arrow on the target icon (to indicate whether the target is passed up the hierarchy) will be determined by your creation settings.

PartialImage.pl

This default target is always built for VxWorks Downloadable Kernel

Module project. This single, partially linked, but not munched object is for subproject support only; it is not intended for download. By default, the build target is passed to the next level (hence the green upward arrow on the icon).

TargetName.out (BuildSpecName[_DEBUG])

This single, partially linked and munched object, produced by the

Linker

build tool is intended for downloading.

TargetName.a (BuildSpecName[_DEBUG])

An archive produced by the Librarian build tool that has to be statically linked into an executable.

10

117

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

10.3.3 Makefile Nodes

At project generation time two Makefiles are copied to the project. One is a template that can also be used for entering custom make rules. The other is dynamically regenerated from build spec data at each build.

.wrmakefile

A template used by Workbench to generate the project’s Makefile. Add user-specific build-targets and make-rules in this file. These will then be automatically dumped into the Makefile.

Makefile

Do not add custom code to this file. This Makefile is regenerated every time the project is built. The information used to generate the file is taken from the build specification on which the target node is based.

10.3.4 Project File Nodes

The project creation facility generates, or includes copies of, a variety of files when a project is created. Normally, you need not be concerned with these files.

However, here a brief summary of the VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module project files displayed in the Project Navigator:

.project

Eclipse platform project file containing builder information and project nature.

.wrproject

Workbench project file containing common project properties such as project type, and so on.

10.4 Application Code for a VxWorks DKM Project

After project creation, you have the infrastructure for a VxWorks Downloadable

Kernel Module project, but often no actual application code. If you are writing code from the beginning, you can add new files to a project. If you already have source code files, you will want to import these to the project. For more

118

10 VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Projects

10.4 Application Code for a VxWorks DKM Project

information please refer to

13.3.1 Importing Resources

, p.132, and

13.3.2 Adding New

Files to Projects

, p.133.

You can link your VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module with the operating system and have it start automatically at boot time. To do this:

1.

Create a VxWorks Image project. See

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project

, p.77.

2.

Configure the VxWorks Image project as described under

5.6 Adding

Application Projects to the VxWorks Image Project

, p.85 and

5.5 Configuring Kernel

Components

, p.84.

10

119

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

120

11

VxWorks User-Defined

Projects

11.1 Introduction 121

11.2 Creating a User-Defined Project 122

11.3 Creating an Application for VxWorks 124

11.1 Introduction

VxWorks User-Defined Projects assume that you are responsible for setting up and maintaining your own build system, file system population, and so on. The user interface provides support for the following:

You can configure the build command used to launch your build utility; this allows you to start builds from the Workbench GUI. You can also configure different rules for building, rebuilding and cleaning the project.

You can create build targets in the Project Navigator that reflect rules in your makefiles; this allows you to select and build any of your make rules directly from the Project Navigator.

Build output is captured to the Build Console.

121

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

11.2 Creating a User-Defined Project

Before creating the project, please take a look at the general comments on projects

and project creation in

4. Projects Overview

.

When you create a User-Defined project, Workbench checks the root location of the project’s resources for the existence of a file named Makefile (or, if you specified a different filename in the New Project wizard’s Build Command field using the

-f

make option, which can include a relative or absolute path to a subdirectory,

Workbench checks for the file you specified). If it does not exist, Workbench creates a skeleton Makefile with a default all rule and a clean. This allows you to use the Build Project, Rebuild Project, and Clean Project menu commands, as well as preventing the generation of build errors. You are responsible for maintaining this Makefile, and you can write any other rules into this file at any time.

If you base your User-Defined project on an existing project, the Makefile (or whatever filename specified in the build command) of that project will be taken and copied to the new project. If you change the name of the makefile used by the build command in the New Project wizard’s Build Command field using the -f make option, the file will be renamed accordingly. In this case the file, if it already exists in the new project’s location, will be overwritten.

NOTE:

If you specify an absolute path for a makefile in the New Project wizard’s

Build Command

field using the -f make option, no Makefile will be generated at any time.

11.2.1 Linking to External Files

If you have a large source tree of existing files that you do not want to copy into your workspace, a User-Defined project allows you to link to the directory where the sources are located.

1.

Create a User-Defined project by selecting File > New > VxWorks

User-Defined Project

. The New User-Defined Project wizard appears.

2.

Select your target operating system, then click Next.

3.

Type a name for your project.

4.

Decide where to create your project, then click Next.

Leave Create project in workspace selected if you want the project to be created under the current workspace directory (typical for projects created

122

11 VxWorks User-Defined Projects

11.2 Creating a User-Defined Project

■ from scratch with no existing sources, or for projects where existing

sources will be imported into them later on—see

Adding Application Code to Projects

, p.132—or for projects where you do not have write permission

to the location of your source files

1

).

Select Create project at external location, click Browse, then navigate to a different location if you want the project to be created outside the workspace (typical for projects being set up for already existing sources— removing the need to import or link to them later on—or for projects being version-controlled, where sources are located outside the workspace).

5.

On the next few screens, adjust the settings if necessary, then click Finish. Your project appears in the Project Navigator.

If you created your project in the directory where your source files are located, you can use your project immediately.

If you created your project in your workspace, then you need to create a link to your source files.

1.

Right-click on the project, then select New > Folder. The New Folder dialog appears.

2.

Choose the parent folder (your project) then type a name for the new folder.

3.

Click the Advanced button at the bottom of the dialog, then click Link to

folder in the file system

. Browse to the directory containing your sources, then click OK.

Your project now contains a folder that links to your source files in their original location. You may repeat this process to create links to as many source directories as you need.

NOTE:

This process is different from importing sources into your project. When you import files, they are copied into the project’s directory in your workspace.

When you link to files, you see them in the Project Navigator but they remain in their original location.

11

1. If you do not have write permission to the file system location where you want to create any project of any type, you either need to get it temporarily to be able to add the project files to that directory, or you have to import the sources into your project if you want a managed build, or you could create a folder in a User-Defined project and link it to your sources.

123

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

11.3 Creating an Application for VxWorks

In order to have your application initialized once the kernel has booted, you will need to:

Create a VxWorks Image project, see

5.3 Creating a VxWorks Image Project

, p.77.

Configure the VxWorks Image project as described under

5.6 Adding

Application Projects to the VxWorks Image Project

, p.85 and

5.5 Configuring Kernel

Components

, p.84.

Before the target is disconnected from the host system, create a target-side file system, see

7.2 Creating a ROMFS File System Project

, p.94.

124

12

Native Application Projects

12.1 Introduction 125

12.2 Creating a Native Application Project 126

12.3 Native Applications in the Project Navigator 128

12.4 Application Code for a Native Application Project 130

12.1 Introduction

Use a Native Application project for C/C++ applications developed for your host environment. Workbench provides build and static analysis support for native

GNU 2.9x, GNU 3.x, and Microsoft development utilities (assembler, compiler, linker, archiver) though these utilities are not distributed with Workbench. There is no debugger integration for native application projects in Workbench, so you have to use the appropriate native tools for debugging as well.

125

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

12.2 Creating a Native Application Project

Before creating the project, please take a look at the general comments on projects

and project creation in

4. Projects Overview

.

To create a Native Application project, proceed as follows.

1.

Choose File > New > Native Application Project.

The New Native Application Project wizard appears. If you have multiple versions of VxWorks installed, you are asked to select a target operating system. If you see this field, select a VxWorks version from the drop-down list and click Next.

2.

Enter a Project name and Location.

If you choose Create project in workspace (default) the project will be created under the current workspace directory. If you choose to

Create project at external location

, you can navigate to a location outside the workspace (see also

4.2 Workspace/Project Location

, p.64 and

4.3 Creating New

Projects

, p.64).

The project appears in the Project Navigator (see

12.3 Native Applications in the

Project Navigator

, p.128). To see the project location, right-click on the project

and select Properties, then select the Info node of the Properties dialog.

When you are ready, click Next.

3.

If you have created other projects, you are asked to define the project structure

(the super- and subproject context) for the project you are creating.

The text beside the Link to superproject check box refers to whatever project is currently highlighted in the Project Navigator (if you do not see this check box, no valid project is highlighted). If you select the check box, this will be the superproject of the project you are currently creating.

The check boxes in the Referenced subprojects list represent the remaining projects in the workspace that can be validly referenced as subprojects by the project you are currently creating.

After project creation, you can change the project structure in the Project

Navigator using drag-and-drop.

When you are ready, click Next.

126

12 Native Application Projects

12.2 Creating a Native Application Project

NOTE:

All settings in the following wizard pages are build related. You can therefore verify/modify them after project creation in the Build Properties node of the project’s Properties, see

16. Build Properties and the Build Console

.

4.

A Native Application project is a predefined project type that uses Workbench

Build support

, so you can only select either this, or no build support at all. If you are creating a project because you want to browse symbol information only and you are not interested in building it, you could also disable build support.

The Build command specifies the make tool command line.

Build output passing

: If the project is a subproject in a tree, its own objects

(implicit targets) as well as the explicit targets of its subprojects, can be passed on to be linked into the build targets of projects that are further up in the hierarchy.

When you are ready, click Next.

5.

Build Specs

: The list of available build specs will always be available. By checkmarking individual specs, you enable them for the current project, which means that you will, in normal day to day work, only see relevant (enabled) specs in the user interface, rather than the whole list.

If you are working on a Windows application, you would normally enable the

msvc_native

build spec, and disable the gnu-native build specs. If you are working on a Linux or Solaris native application, you would normally enable the GNU tool version you are using, and disable all others.

The Debug Mode checkbox specifies wether or not the build output includes debug information.

When you are ready, click Next.

6.

Build Target

: The Build target name is the same as the project name by default. You can change the name if necessary, but if you delete the contents of the field, no target will be created.

Build tool

: For a Native Application project you can select:

Linker

: This is the default selection. The linker produces a a

BuildTargetName(.exe for Windows native projects) executable file.

The Linker output product cannot be passed up to superprojects, although the current project’s own, unlinked object files can, as can any output products received from projects further down in the hierarchy (see

step 4.

above).

12

127

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Librarian

: This is the default selection if you specified that the project is to be linked into a project structure as a subproject. The Librarian produces a

TargetName.a (or .lib for Windows native projects) archive file.

The Librarian output product can be passed up to superprojects, as can the current project’s own, unlinked object files, as well as any output

products received from projects further down in the hierarchy (see step 4.

above).

7.

When you are ready, you can review your settings using the Back button or click Finish.

The Native Application project is created and appears in the Project Navigator, either at the root level, or linked into a project tree, depending on your

selection in step 3.

above.

12.3 Native Applications in the Project Navigator

After a Native Application project has been created, a number of nodes appear in the Project Navigator. This section describes these nodes as they appear immediately after project creation. For general notes about manipulating nodes, for example, moving, copying, filtering, etc., please see

13. Working in the Project

Navigator

.

12.3.1 Global Project Nodes

ProjectName

The icon at the root of the project tree identifies the type of project; the icon’s label is the name you gave the project when you created it.

12.3.2 Project Build Specs and Target Nodes

Each target node is associated with a predefined build specification.

The build target depends on the options you selected during project creation.

Specifically, you will not have both an archive (TargetName.a for a gnu build spec, or TargetName.lib for a msvc build spec) target and a TargetName(.exe for a msvc

128

12 Native Application Projects

12.3 Native Applications in the Project Navigator

build spec) target immediately after project creation. Which of these will be visible depends on the build tool you selected. Also, the presence or absence of the green upward arrow on the target icon (to indicate whether the target is passed up the hierarchy) will be determined by your project settings.

TargetName[.exe] (BuildSpecName[_DEBUG])

An executable.

TargetName.a|.lib (BuildSpecName[_DEBUG])

An archive produced by the Librarian build tool.

12.3.3 Makefile Nodes

At project generation time two Makefiles are copied to the project. One is a template that can also be used for entering custom make rules. The other is dynamically regenerated from build spec data at each build.

.wrmakefile

A template used by Workbench to generate the project’s Makefile. Add user-specific build-targets and make-rules in this file. These will then be automatically dumped into the Makefile.

Makefile

Do not add custom code to this file. This Makefile is regenerated every time the project is built. The information used to generate the file is taken from the build specification that on which the target node is based.

12

129

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

12.3.4 Project File Nodes

The project creation facility generates, or includes copies of, a variety of files when a project is created. Normally, you need not be concerned with these files.

However, here a brief summary of the DKM project files displayed in the Project

Navigator:

.project

Eclipse platform project file containing builder information and project nature.

.wrproject

Workbench project file containing common project properties such as project type, etc.

12.4 Application Code for a Native Application Project

After project creation you have the infrastructure for a Native Application project, but often no actual application code. If you are writing code from the beginning, you can add new files to a project. If you already have source code files, you will want to import these to the project. For more information please refer to

13.3.1 Importing Resources

, p.132, and

13.3.2 Adding New Files to Projects

, p.133.

130

13

Working in the Project

Navigator

13.1 Introduction 131

13.2 Creating Projects 132

13.3 Adding Application Code to Projects 132

13.4 Opening and Closing Projects 134

13.5 Scoping and Navigation 135

13.6 Moving, Copying, and Deleting Resources and Nodes 136

13.7 Project Navigator Quick Reference 140

13.1 Introduction

The Project Navigator is your main graphical interface for working with projects.

You use the Project Navigator to create, open, close, modify, and build projects.

You also use it to add or import application code, to import, or customize build specifications, and to access your version control system.

Various filters, sorting mechanisms, and viewing options help to make project management and navigation more efficient. Use the arrow at the top-right of the

Project Navigator to open a drop-down menu of these options.

131

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

13.2 Creating Projects

Creating projects is discussed in general under

4.3 Creating New Projects

, p.64.

Specific descriptions for creating individual project types are provided in the other chapters in

Part II. Projects

.

13.3 Adding Application Code to Projects

After creating a project, you have the infrastructure for a given project type, but no actual application code. If you already have source code files, you will want to import these to the project.

13.3.1 Importing Resources

You can import various types of existing resources to (newly created) projects by choosing File > Import.

Importing Projects

To import entire projects, choose File > Import. In the Import dialog, you can, among other things:

Import an Existing VxWorks 6.0 Image Project into Workspace.

You would use this to import a VxWorks image (a *.wpj file) created using the

vxprj

command line utility (see the VxWorks Command-Line User’s Guide and the VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide for more information.)

This creates references to the selected *.wpj file in the current workspace. No files are copied.

Import Existing Project from another Workbench Workspace.

This creates references to the selected project in the current workspace. No files are copied.

Checkout Projects from CVS

.

This copies the selected project files from a CVS repository to your Workspace.

132

13 Working in the Project Navigator

13.3 Adding Application Code to Projects

Import an Existing SNiFF+ Project (as of 4.1) to the current Workspace. Files are optionally copied (recommended) or referenced. The SNiFF+ project has to be mapped to a Workbench project type. For more information, please refer to the Workbench Migration Guide.

Import an Existing Tornado 2.x Project to the current Workspace. Files are copied to the current workspace. The Tornado project has to be mapped to a

Workbench project type. For more information, please refer to the Workbench

Migration Guide.

Import an Existing Wind Power IDE 1.0 Project to the current workspace.

Files are copied to the current workspace. The Wind Power IDE 1.0 project has to be mapped to a Workbench project type. For more information, please refer to the Workbench Migration Guide.

Import a Team Project Set that was previously defined and exported.

A team project set is a list of project names and locations that have been exported (choose File > Export) to a project set file (*.psf). Projects are recreated in the current workspace according to this list and project content is copied to the current workspace.

Importing Application Code

To import application code (or any other type of file) into a project, highlight it and select File > Import > File system.

In the Import dialog, you can import files or directories from anywhere on your file system, filtering by subdirectory and file type.

Importing Build Settings

To import build settings, choose File > Import > Build Settings.

Import build settings either from an existing project or from the default for the selected type of project.

13.3.2 Adding New Files to Projects

To add a new file to a project, choose File > New > File.

You are asked to Enter or select the parent folder, and to supply Filename.

13

133

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

For a description of the Advanced button, and what it reveals, press F1 and select

New file wizard

.

13.4 Opening and Closing Projects

You can open or close a project by selecting it in the tree and choosing

Project > Open

(if it is currently closed), or Project > Close (if it is currently open).

You can also use the corresponding commands on the Project Navigator’s right-click context menu.

13.4.1 Closing a Project

The icon changes to its closed state (by default grayed) and the tree collapses.

All project member files that are open in the editor are closed.

All subprojects that are linked exclusively to the closed project are closed as well. However, subprojects that are shared among multiple projects remain open as long as a parent project is still open, but can be closed explicitly at any time.

In general, closed projects are excluded from all actions such as symbol information queries, and from workspace or project structure builds (that is, if a parent project of a closed subproject gets built).

It is not possible to manipulate closed projects. You cannot add, delete, move, or rename resources, nor can you modify properties. The only possible modification is to delete the project itself.

Closed projects require less memory.

134

13 Working in the Project Navigator

13.5 Scoping and Navigation

13.5 Scoping and Navigation

There are a number of strategies and Workbench features that can help you manage the projects in your workspace, whether you are working with multiple projects related to a single software system, or multiple unrelated software systems.

Close projects

If you expect to be working in a different context (under a different root project) for a while, you can select the root project you are leaving, and right-click Close Project.

If you close your root projects when you stop working on them, you will see just the symbols and resources for the project on which you are currently working (see also

13.4.1 Closing a Project

, p.134).

Go into a project

If you want to see, for example, the contents of only one software system in the

Project Navigator, select its root project node and right-click Go Into. You can then use the navigation arrows at the top of the Project Navigator to go back out of the project you are in, or to navigate history views.

Open a project in a new window

If you expect to be switching back and forth between software systems (or other contexts) at short intervals, and you do not want to change your current configuration of open editors and layout of other views, you can open the other software system’s root project in a new window (right-click

Open in New Window

). This essentially does the same as Go Into (see

Go Into a Project

), except that a new window is opened, thereby leaving your current Workbench layout intact.

Open a new window

You can open a new window by choosing Window > New Window. This opens a new window to the same workspace, leaving your current Workbench window layout intact while you work on some other context in the new window.

Use Working Sets

Using working sets lets you set the scope for all sorts of queries. You can, for example, create working sets for each of your different software systems, or any constellation of projects, and then scope the displayed Project Navigator

13

135

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

■ content (and other query requests) using the pull-down at the top-right of the

Project Navigator.

To create a Working Set, from the drop-down menu, choose

Select Working Set

. In the dialog that appears, click New, then, in the next dialog, specify the Resource type.

In the next dialog select, for example, a software-system root project and give the working set a name. When you click Finish, your new working set will appear in the Select Working Set dialog’s list of available working sets.

After the first time you select a working set in the Select Working Set dialog, the working set is inserted into the Project Navigator’s drop-down menu, so that you can directly access it from there.

Use the Navigate Menu

For day-to-day work, there is generally no absolute need to see the contents of your software systems as presented in the Project Navigator.

Using the Navigate > Open Resource (to navigate files) and

Navigate > Open Symbol

(to jump straight to a symbol definition) may often prove to be the most convenient and efficient way to navigate within, or among, systems.

13.6 Moving, Copying, and Deleting Resources and Nodes

The resources you see in the Project Navigator are normally displayed in their

logical, as opposed to physical, configuration (see

4.5 Projects and Project Structures

, p.70). Depending on the type of resource (file, project folder) or purely logical

element (target node) you are manipulating, different things will happen. The following section briefly summarizes what is meant by resource types and logical nodes.

13.6.1 Resources and Logical Nodes

Resources is a collective term for the projects, folders, and files that exist in

Workbench.

There are three basic types of resources:

136

13 Working in the Project Navigator

13.6 Moving, Copying, and Deleting Resources and Nodes

Files

Equivalent to files as you see them in the file system.

Folders

Equivalent to directories on a file system. In Workbench, folders are contained in projects or other folders. Folders can contain files and other folders.

Projects

Contain folders and files. Projects are used for builds, version management, sharing, and resource organization. Like folders, projects map to directories in the file system. When you create a project, you specify a location for it in the file system.

When a project is open, the structure of the project can be changed and you will see the contents. A discussion of closed projects is provided under

13.4.1 Closing a Project

, p.134.

Logical nodes is a collective term for nodes in the Project Navigator that provide structural information or access points for project-specific tools.

Subprojects

A project is a resource in the root position. A project that references a superproject is, however, a logical entity; it is a reference only, not necessarily

(or even normally) a physical subdirectory of the superproject’s directory in the file system.

Build Target Nodes

These are purely logical nodes to associate the project’s build output with the project.

Tool Access Nodes

These allow access to project-specific configuration tools. VxWorks File

System Projects have a node that opens a tool for mapping host-side project contents to target file system contents. VxWorks Image Projects have a node that opens the Kernel Editor for configuring the VxWorks kernel.

13.6.2 Manipulating Files

Individual files, for example source code files, can be copied, moved, or deleted.

These are physical manipulations. For example, if you hold down CTRL while you

13

137

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

drag-and-drop a source file from one project to another, you will create a physical copy, and editing one copy will have no effect on the other.

13.6.3 Manipulating Project Nodes

Although copying, moving, or deleting project nodes are undertaken with the same commands you would use for normal files, the results are somewhat different because a project folder is a semi-logical entity. That is, a project is a normal resource in the root position. A project that is referenced as a subnode is, however, a logical entity; it is a reference only, not a physical instance.

If you copy/paste (or hold down CTRL while you drag-and-drop) a project folder node to a new location in the project editor (for example, under some other project node to be used as a subproject there) all that happens is that a reference to one and the same project is inserted. This means that if you modify the properties of one instance of the subproject node, all other instances (which are really only references) are also modified. One such property would be, for example, the project name. If you rename the project node in one context, it will also be renamed in all other contexts.

Moving and (Un-)Referencing Project Nodes

If you drag-and-drop a project folder, you are making a logical, structural change.

However, if you select a project folder node and right-click Move, you will be asked to enter (browse for) a new file system location. All the files associated with the current project will then be physically moved to the location you select, without any visible change in the Project Navigator (you can verify the new location in the Project Properties).

When you drag-and-drop a project node, you are actually performing the equivalent of right-click Add as Reference or, if you have selected a subproject, also right-click Remove Reference. These commands open a dialog allowing you to either have the currently selected project reference other projects as a subproject, or, in the Remove Reference dialog, to remove the currently selected project from its structural (logical) context as a subproject, in which case it will be moved to the root level as a standalone project in the Project Navigator.

138

13 Working in the Project Navigator

13.6 Moving, Copying, and Deleting Resources and Nodes

Deleting Project Nodes

Note that you cannot delete subprojects. To delete a subproject, which might potentially be linked into any number of other project structures, you first have to either unlink (right-click Unlink) all instances of the subproject, or get a flat view of your workspace. To do this, open the drop-down list at the top-right of the

Project Navigator’s toolbar and choose Hide > Project Structure. This hides the logical project organization and provides a flat view with a single instance of the

(sub)project that you can then delete.

When you delete a project you are asked whether or not you want to delete the contents. If you choose not to delete the contents, the only thing that happens is that the project (and all its files) are no longer visible in the workspace; there are no file system changes.

13.6.4 Manipulating Target Nodes

Target nodes cannot be copied or moved. These are purely logical nodes that make no sense anywhere except in the projects for which they were created. If you copy or move entire projects, however, the target nodes and generated build-targets beneath them are also copied.

Deleting Target Nodes

Deleting a target node also removes the convenience node that represents the generated, physically existing build-target. However, the physically existing build-target (if built) is not deleted from the disk.

The convenience node referred to above, lets you see at a glance whether the target has been built or not, even if you have uncluttered your view in the Project

Navigator by hiding build resources (in the drop-down menu at the top-right choose Hide > Build Resources) and/or collapsing the actual target node. If you have collapsed the node, the + sign will indicate that the build-target exists).

13

139

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

13.7 Project Navigator Quick Reference

Icons In the Project Navigator

Icon

Description

VxWorks Image project

VxWorks Board Support Package project

Downloadable Kernel Module project

Real-time Process project

Shared Library project

User-Defined project

(User-Defined) subproject. Arrow indicates that this is a reference in a logical tree, not a physical subdirectory.

Open Kernel Configuration Editor

Open File System Editor

Build target (logical)

Passed build target (logical)

ADA file

Assembly language file

C or C++ file

Makefile

Makefile rule (build-target) for a user-defined build

wpj

project file (VxWorks image)

140

13 Working in the Project Navigator

13.7 Project Navigator Quick Reference

Icons in the Project Build Properties View

This view, accessible from the Project Navigator’s local drop-down menu, shows a summary of the build properties of the selected project.

Build support enabled

Build support disabled

Build target is passed

Build target is not passed

13

141

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

142

14

Advanced Project Scenarios

14.1 Introduction 143

14.2 Resource Locations 144

14.3 Multiple, Unrelated Software Systems 145

14.4 Complex Project Structures 146

14.1 Introduction

The scenarios developed in this chapter suggest how you could use the Wind River

Workbench to manage various constellations of projects and project types. Because

Workbench provides a variety of possibilities for achieving different ends, the scenarios are neither prescriptive, nor comprehensive. All we can do here is offer some suggestions.

The scenarios do not look at the edit/compile/debug cycle; the emphasis is on project organization and handling. The discussion looks at:

■ resource locations strategies for working with multiple, unrelated software systems complexities within a single software system, including project structure design, development, and finalization steps

143

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

14.2 Resource Locations

One complexity that you might be faced with, especially in team development situations, is that you might have to use file system resources (files and directories) that are outside your workspace.

As long as file system resources are located in the default location (your own workspace), for example because you have checked them out from your version control system, there is nothing to discuss.

When you create projects in Workbench, project-specific administrative files are stored at the file system location of the resources used by the project. This means that, if these resources are outside your workspace, you may not have write permission there and that the necessary files therefore cannot be created.

This may be an issue, for example, also with respect to centrally maintained header files and third party libraries. In such cases you have the following options:

Have your administrator, who does have write permission, create the project

(see

Creating Projects for External Headers

, p.157) and import the project as

follows:

– In the Project Navigator, right-click Import.

– In the Import wizard, select Existing Project into Workspace and click

Next

.

Browse

to the directory where the project was created and click OK, then

Finish

.

This is the recommended way to proceed in cases where not everyone is allowed to write to resource directories. This way all team members always access both the same, most up to date source files and the same project, thereby ensuring consistency across the entire team without any synchronization overhead. Note that, if you have multiple workspaces, you would have to import the project to each workspace.

Furthermore, if the external resources are not just header files; that is, if they are buildable, build support must be either disabled for the imported project

(if existing build-output is externally available), or build output of the imported projects must be redirected somewhere that users have write

permission (see

16.8 Build Paths

, p.190). Write permission will also be required

for the .wrproject file in the project directory and the .wrfolder files in each folder, for modifications (added/removed resources) and for maintaining changes in build properties.

144

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.3 Multiple, Unrelated Software Systems

The other option is to copy the resources to somewhere that you do have write permission.

This option is not recommended because of the synchronizations problems that are bound to arise sooner or later. Consider this a last resort.

14.3 Multiple, Unrelated Software Systems

The assumption is that you work on multiple, unrelated software systems in parallel. Each of these systems will normally (but not necessarily) consist of any number of subprojects organized into project structures; that is, each system will normally be arranged as a tree under a single superproject. However, ignoring the internal organization of your software systems for the moment (this is discussed under

Complex Project Structures

, p.146), first look at the software systems as a

whole.

During the course of any working day you might spend time working in different software systems that have nothing to do with each other (other than the fact that you happen to be working in them). You will presumably want to be able to focus as fully as possible, with as little distraction as possible, on the software system you are working on at any given time. If you have to switch from one system to the other fairly frequently, the switch should be easy and rapid.

14.3.1 Using Different Workspaces for Different Systems

Using different workspaces for unrelated software systems lets you keep these systems completely separate, without seeing any sign of the currently non-relevant context anywhere.

However, when you switch from one workspace to another (choose

File > Switch Workspace

), you are actually closing your current Workbench instance and reopening a new instance that uses the selected new workspace. This takes time, but offers the advantage that the new workspace opens exactly as you left it when you last closed it.

This option, because of the time overhead involved in switching, is probably most feasible if you have only a few separate software systems, and if you spend extended periods of time in one or other context without interruption.

14

145

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

However, if you have, a system that you work on most of the time, and several other systems where you have to frequently do relatively minor maintenance work, you might find it more convenient to use a single workspace for all, or many of, your projects.

Naturally, there is no reason why you should not have both multiple workspaces as outlined here, and, within one or more of these, also maintain multiple, unrelated software systems in the same workspace as discussed below.

14.3.2 Using the Same Workspace for Different Software Systems

Using the same workspace for any number of unrelated software systems does not stop you from keeping these systems completely separate. The only sign of each currently non-relevant system can be a single icon (or not even that if you Go Into

a project - see

13.5 Scoping and Navigation

, p.135). This means that all software

systems are immediately visible and accessible, without being unduly obtrusive.

Furthermore, switching from one software system to another is much faster than using different workspaces as described above. On the other hand, if you are working on multiple, very large software systems, general performance might become an issue that would suggest using separate workspaces.

Some of the ways that will help you handle multiple software systems in the same workspace are introduced under

13.5 Scoping and Navigation

, p.135

14.4 Complex Project Structures

This section develops a simple infrastructure as a possible approach to a high-level, internal organization of an individual software system.

146

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

14.4.1 Project Assumptions

The following discussion attempts to align how Workbench project structures and project types can support a software system that includes the following requirements.

There is a kernel

In the design phase, you need not think too much about the kernel. It is sufficient to know that there will be one at some point.

Use a simulator for initial development and testing.

The output product must be a single flashable image

This image will contain the kernel as well as all the run-time components

(binaries from Real-time Process Projects, libraries, data files, and so on). A target-side file system is therefore required; this will be implemented using

Wind River ROMFS technology by setting up a File System project.

However, in the design phase, you do not need not worry about this; it is sufficient to know that there will be a File System project at some point.

The software system will have to be ported to different boards

Although the kernel as such is not initially of primary importance, the assumption that you will have to port the system at some stage may be a design consideration. If you are developing and testing on a simulator (see above), there will be porting to do anyway.

There is middleware

One or more modules are needed as abstraction layers that wrap around the kernel

Use Downloadable Kernel Module Projects for these.

There are application modules

These have to be process-based and they have to run in their own memory-protected address space.

Use Real-time Process Projects for these.

There are shared libraries

These are potentially used by any or all of the application modules.

Use Shared Library Projects for these.

14

147

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

There is legacy code

Use User-Defined Projects and/or Real-time Process Projects and/or

Downloadable Kernel Module Projects.

User-Defined Projects are appropriate in situations where you would rather not tamper with how the application is built. In other situations, you can wrap your legacy projects in one of the standard project types supported by

Workbench.

There are external headers

These are centrally maintained and are potentially used by any or all of the software system’s modules.

Use a User-Defined project (without build support) for these.

Building a complete product image must be simple

14.4.2 Infrastructure Design

, p.148, tries to meet all the above requirements and

provide a push-button build of the full product image, including all its components, for multiple architectures.

14.4.2 Infrastructure Design

Based on the

Project Assumptions

, p.147, the following describes how you could go

about building an infrastructure for such a software system.

NOTE:

The screenshots in the following have been filtered in various ways to hide everything that is not related to project structure. If you follow the procedures described, you will see this same structure, as well as a number of additional files, folders, target nodes, and so on.

The infrastructure described here is not a requirement for project management in

Workbench. It can however be convenient to create such an infrastructure to facilitate porting a software system to other boards, as well as to allow building an entire product image, even for multiple boards, all at once. Furthermore, such an infrastructure does not need to be in place from the start; it can be folded over a project system at any stage of development.

148

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

Create Container Projects

This infrastructure uses empty container projects at the superproject level as well as at subproject levels. The type of container used in each case will depend on the type of content the container will later accommodate.

In the current context, the term container project is therefore used to denote a project of any type that does not, however, itself contain any source code files; all application source files will be in subprojects referenced by the empty container project.

Step 1: Create a container project.

Creating a container project as the topmost superproject the software system is an organizational artifact to provide a convenient way of keeping everything together, and thereby also cleanly separating the software system from other software systems you might work on in the same workspace.

The only other real functionality the superproject container project needs to provide is that it has to be buildable. Although the project itself contains no source code files, you will want to able to start the build at the top of your future project tree to recursively build the whole structure.

The default User-Defined project provided by Workbench is exactly what you need for a topmost container project.

To create a new User-Defined project, in the Project Navigator, right-click

New > User-Defined Project

.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter: playpen_sim (this is an arbitrary name for a fictitious software system; the suffix _sim reflects that this system will be built for the simulator) and click Finish. (You can ignore the Next button and the other Wizard pages because the defaults are fine.)

This creates a default User-Defined project; that is, one that supports a user-defined build based on existing makefiles. Since this is a just a container project without any (user-defined) makefiles, Workbench will create a Makefile with a default all rule and a clean. This allows you to use the Build Project,

Rebuild Project

, and Clean Project menu commands, as well as preventing the generation of irritating build errors. If you want, you can write any other rules into this file at any time. See also

11. VxWorks User-Defined Projects

.

14

149

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Step 2: Create container projects for each project type and for external headers.

Recall that

Project Assumptions

, p.147, stated requirements for Downloadable

Kernel Modules, Real-time Process Projects, Shared Library Projects, and

User-Defined projects.

Creating empty projects for each of these project types facilitates porting from the simulator to a board, and from one board to another. This is because, in a tree of projects of the same type, all subprojects are built using the same build spec as that used by the topmost project. This applies to all project types except User-Defined projects (there is no way to predict how these are built).

So, for example, by creating an empty Real-time Process project type container project and later populating this container with real Real-time Process project type subprojects, then you only need to use a different build spec for the container when it comes to porting the system to a different board (more about this later).

Note that Real-time Process projects and Shared Library projects actually use the same build specs, so, technically speaking, you could lump these two project types together under one container and save yourself a couple of steps. However, the orderly separation of project types appears a little cleaner and is therefore adopted here.

The naming convention used for these containers indicates the project type that will be stored within (actually only reference) these containers, plus a suffix that indicates the software system they belong to and the board they will be built for

(_playpen_sim).

To create the empty container project types, proceed as follows:

NOTE:

You can ignore the Next button and click Finish on the first page in each of the wizards because the defaults are fine for the moment.

NOTE:

Project references can only be created if the projects are based on the same

Platform. Platform here refers to the settings in Window > Preferences > General

> Target Operating Systems

.

To create a new container Downloadable Kernel Module project, in the Project

Navigator, right-click New > Downloadable Kernel Module Project.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

DKMs_playpen_sim

and click Finish.

To create a new container Real-time Process project, in the Project Navigator, right-click New > Real Time Process Project.

150

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

RTPs_playpen_sim

and click Finish.

To create a new container Shared Library project, in the Project Navigator, right-click New > Shared Library Project.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

LIBs_playpen_sim

and click Finish.

To create a new container User-Defined project, in the Project Navigator, right-click New > User Defined Project.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

UDPs_playpen_sim

and click Finish.

To create a new container User-Defined project (without build support) to accommodate the external, centrally maintained header files mentioned in

Project Assumptions

, p.147, in the Project Navigator, right-click

New > User-Defined Project

.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter: headers_playpen

(notice that we have not appended the suffix _sim; this is because this project does not use a build spec, see below) and keep clicking Next until you get to the wizard’s Build Support page.

14

151

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 14-1

Disable Build Support for Header Projects

In the wizard’s Build Support page, select the Disabled option and click

Finish

.

In the Project Navigator you should now see the flat list of container projects

(collapsed) shown in Figure 14-2 .

Figure 14-2

Container Projects

152

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

Step 3: Drop all container projects onto the topmost container project.

The topmost container project must be referenced by all other container projects; in other words, all other container projects must by subprojects of playpen_sim.

In the Project Navigator, select all projects except playpen_sim and drag-and-drop them into playpen_sim.

Figure 14-3

illustrates the infrastructure created in the above steps. Notice the referencing arrows at the left of the subproject icons.

Figure 14-3

Container Projects Referenced by the Topmost Container

14.4.3 Development

Once you have set up the infrastructure for your first board (or simulator), you will populate the container projects with real projects, ones that actually contain source files.

14

153

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

In order to later facilitate porting the software system to other boards you would, organize these, at least initially, so that:

All Real-time Process projects are subprojects of RTPs_playpen_sim.

All Downloadable Kernel Module projects are subprojects of

DKMs_playpen_sim

.

All Shared Library projects are subprojects of LIBs_playpen_sim.

All projects for external headers are in headers_playpen.

All User-Defined projects (except the ones in headers_playpen, where build support is disabled) are subprojects of UDPs_playpen_sim.

Referencing Containers

There are a number of ways you can associate projects with other projects as subprojects. Above, during the creation of the container project infrastructure, drag-and-drop, was used. Another method is to right-click Add Reference. You can also create the reference during project creation as demonstrated in the example below.

Example 14-1

Creating and a Project and Referencing its Container

Assumption: you are creating a Real-time Process project. This, according to the conventions outlined above, will be a subproject of RTPs_playpen_sim. The quickest way to achieve this is:

1.

In the Project Navigator, select RTPs_playpen_sim.

This is the Real-time Process project you are currently creating should reference as a subproject.

2.

Right-click New > Real Time Process Project.

3.

In the wizard, enter a Project name (we shall use rtp_1 in this example) and click Next.

4.

In the wizard’s Project Structure page there is a Superproject check box labelled Link to project RTPs_playpen_sim. This check box appears because you selected the RTPs_playpen_sim project in step

1

, above.

5.

Select Reference RTPs_playpen_sim and continue to create the project as needed.

154

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

Figure 14-4

Linking as Subproject during Project Creation

Shared Libraries

The recommended convention, above that “

All Shared Library projects are subprojects of LIBs_playpen_sim.

” might seem strange. Shared libraries are

normally subprojects of the projects that use them, so why put shared libraries in this seemingly disconnected location (LIBs_playpen_sim)?

The libraries are actually even more disconnected than they appear. Remember that, physically speaking, all the projects in any project structure, no matter how deep, are topographically flat as shown in

Figure 14-5 . This figure shows exactly

the same system as

Figure 14-6 , which displays the logical view you normally see

(you can switch from one representation to the other using the drop-down menu at the top-right of the Project Navigator Hide > Project Structure).

14

155

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 14-5

Physical View of the System

While it is true that you will normally only have libraries as subprojects of applications that use them (even if you are developing a library you will probably have a test application project above the library), it does not matter how often a library node occurs in a given tree, or even in the entire workspace, it is physically

only one library and will therefore only be built once (see Figure 14-5 ). In this

sense, it does not matter that the libraries will appear in one extra place,

LIBs_playpen_sim

.

Figure 14-6 shows exactly the same system as Figure 14-5

. Notice that the Shared

Library project, lib_1, occurs three times: once each under rtp_1 and rtp_2, and once, seemingly unnecessarily, under LIBs_playpen_sim.

Figure 14-6

Logical View of the System

156

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

If you adhere to the convention recommended above, that “ All Shared Library projects are subprojects of LIBs_playpen_sim.

”, you will have to copy” (for

example, using hold down CTRL while you drag-and-drop) library nodes to subproject locations under applications that use them. Note again that when you do this, you are not really copying anything; you are creating references—if anything, you are copying links (again note the reference arrows on subproject icons). However, on the upside, whenever you need to add your library projects to applications, you will know exactly where to find them because they are neatly collected in their container project, in our example, LIBs_playpen_sim.

The other advantage of adhering to this convention will, as already mentioned, become apparent when it is time to port the software system to different boards.

External Headers and Projects that Use Them

This section starts by describing how to create projects for external headers on the assumption that you follow the convention of having projects of the same type referencing their respective container projects, in our example, headers_playpen.

The discussion continues with an outline of the steps you need to apply to the projects that use these header projects.

Creating Projects for External Headers

Headers, or any other resources that are external to your workspace, might be a problem if you do not have write permission. If you do not have write permission,

proceed as described under

14.2 Resource Locations

, p.144.

If you have write permission, and it is up to you to create projects for external headers, you would create User-Defined projects for these. These projects, like their container project, headers_playpen, will have build support disabled.

To create projects for the external headers:

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click headers_playpen and select

New > User-Defined Project

.

2.

On the first wizard page, give the project a name (headers_1 in the example), clear the Default check box and browse to the root directory that contains the files you need. Click Next.

On the Project Structure page, select Link to project headers_playpen. If you do not see a check box, or if the label is different, you did not select

headers_playpen

in step

1

, above. In this case you can manually move the project when you are finished. Click Next twice.

14

157

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

3.

In the wizard’s Build Support page, select Disabled, click Finish.

Generating Include Search Paths for Projects

Once you have created the header project(s), others can import them (see

14.2 Resource Locations

, p.144). Whether you create the header projects yourself, or

whether you import them, the include paths of the projects that use the headers have to be updated. If you are able to import the header projects, the chances are that you will also be able to import (or use your version control system to synchronize) the projects that use the headers.

On the other hand, if you are the one who creates the headers project(s), you will probably also be the one who updates the projects that use them and then makes these available to others. In this case, or if you create a new project that uses the headers project from the start, you will generally proceed as follows.

Once your workspace knows the headers (because there is a project for them), include search paths can be generated.

For each topmost project that uses the headers proceed as follows:

In the Project Navigator, select the project that uses the headers and choose

Project > Generate Include Search Paths

.

In the wizard that appears you can configure and generate include search paths for the project, its subprojects and folders, as well as for multiple build specs.

Note that in the Project Properties dialog, Build Properties node, Build Paths tab, and the Generate button (for include paths) invoke a similar wizard. This wizard, only lets you configure include paths for one build spec at a time.

Testing and Debugging

A simulator connection should be sufficient for initial testing and debugging of

your applications. Please refer to

21. New VxWorks Simulator Connections

for

information about simulator connections, and to

25. Debugging Projects

for information on debugging.

14.4.4 Finalization

Once things are working on the simulator, and your board and hardware connections are up and running, it is time to port the software system from the simulator to the board(s).

158

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

The steps below, especially step

2 , where you create four new container (sub)

projects might initially seem tedious. However, you cannot just copy the existing ones because as you remember, no physical copies are created, only references

(that look like copies) are created.

Creating four empty container projects per architecture does not take long, and you only do it once. After that, the advantages include:

Your projects are clearly and systematically organized.

You never need to worry about changing build specs for individual projects.

You can build your whole workspace (all the boards you support) at one time, again without manipulating the build specs.

Any resource modifications, adding, removing, editing, at source project level will be reflected in all the project structures (=boards) simultaneously, regardless of where you make the modification since these are references, not copies.

Repeat the following steps for each board you will be supporting.

Step 1: Create VxWorks Image project and File System projects.

1.

First, create a VxWorks Image project using the BSP appropriate to your board, see

5. VxWorks Image Projects

.

This will be a top-level project. If you follow the naming conventions used in this chapter, the project might be named something like playpen_ppc.

2.

Then, if you are using Real-time Process projects and/or Shared Library

projects, you will also need to create a File System project, see

7. ROMFS File

System Projects

.

This will be a subproject of the VxWorks Image project (playpen_ppc). The file system will be linked with the VxWorks system image created from the

VxWorks Image project, and will hold the binary and data files of the system’s

run-time components. These are associated with the file system in Step 3

below.

When you build the VxWorks Image project, the File System subproject and the other associated subprojects will be compiled to binaries and linked to the kernel. If you update files in the file system, rebuilding it creates a new file system image, which is then re-linked to the kernel.

14

159

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Step 2: Create container subprojects for each project type (except headers).

Essentially, you repeat the procedure outlined under

Step 2:Create container projects for each project type and for external headers.

, p.150, except that:

You do not need to create another project for the headers as they do not use a build spec.

Instead of appending the suffix _sim to the project names, you would, in our example, append _ppc.

You have to set the build spec for each container (except the one for

User-Defined projects, which cannot have pre-defined build specs) because the wizard default (simulator) will no longer apply.

Step-by-step, the procedure is as follows:

1.

To create a new container Downloadable Kernel Module project: a.

Right-click in the Project Navigator and select

New > VxWorks Downloadable Kernel Module Project

.

b. In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

DKMs_playpen_ppc

and click Next until you reach the wizard’s

Build Specs

page.

c.

In the Build Specs page, select Deselect All, then select the check box next to the appropriate build spec (only one) from the list, for example,

PPC32diab

and click Finish.

160

Figure 14-7

Select the Build Spec

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

2.

To create a new container Real-time Process project, right-click in the Project

Navigator and select New > VxWorks Real Time Process Project.

a.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

RTPs_playpen_ppc

and click Next until you reach the wizard’s

Build Specs

page.

b. In the Build Specs page, select Deselect All, then select the check box next to the appropriate build spec (only one) from the list, for example,

PPC32diab_RTP

and click Finish.

3.

To create a new container Shared Library project, right-click in the Project

Navigator and select New > VxWorks Shared Library Project.

a.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

LIBs_playpen_ppc

and click Next until you reach the wizard’s

Build Specs

page.

b. In the Build Specs page, select Deselect All, then select the check box next to the appropriate build spec (only one) from the list, for example,

PPCdiab and

click Finish.

161

14

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

4.

To create a new container User-Defined project, right-click in the Project

Navigator and select New > User Defined Project.

a.

In the wizard that appears, in the Project name field, enter:

UDPs_playpen_ppc

and click Finish.

By definition, there can be no predefined build specs for User-Defined projects. Workbench does not manage the build; it is up to you to know what needs to be done with them to complete the porting.

Step 3: Drop all new container projects onto the File System project.

The File System project is a subproject of the VxWorks Image project (see

Step 1

).

The new containers you have just created, as well as the headers_playpen project, should, in turn, be subprojects of this VxWorks File System project.

Select all the container projects you have just created and drop them onto the

FileSystem_playpen_ppc

project you created under Step 1

.

Select the headers_playpen subproject under playpen_sim and while holding down CTRL, drag-and-drop it onto the FileSystem_playpen_ppc project. It should now appear under both playpen_sim and FileSystem_playpen_ppc.

The infrastructure for the new board is now complete (see Figure 14-8

).

Next, you have to create references to the source code projects.

Figure 14-8

Project Organization for Two Boards

162

14 Advanced Project Scenarios

14.4 Complex Project Structures

Step 4: Referencing source code subprojects.

Insert references from the source code subprojects from each per-type container subproject under playpen_sim to the corresponding container under

playpen_ppc

.

That is, while holding down CTRL, drag-and-drop it to create the references from all source code subprojects under:

DKMs_playpen_sim

to DKMs_playpen_ppc

LIBs_playpen_sim

to LIBs_playpen_ppc

RTPs_playpen_sim

to RTPs_playpen_ppc

UDPs_playpen_sim

to UDPs_playpen_ppc

Step 5: Configure the VxWorks Image project and File System projects.

You will need to configure the VxWorks Image project (add initialization routines and configure components) and the VxWorks File System project.

For more information on this subject, see

5. VxWorks Image Projects

,

7. ROMFS File

System Projects

, and the VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide.

14

163

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

164

PA R T I I I

Development

15 Navigating and Editing ....................................... 167

16 Build Properties and the Build Console ........... 173

17 Building: Use Cases ........................................... 199

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target 219

165

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

166

15

Navigating and Editing

15.1 Introduction 167

15.2 Wind River Workbench Context Navigation 168

15.3 The Editor 171

15.4 Search and Replace: The Retriever 171

15.5 Static Analysis 172

15.1 Introduction

Workbench navigation views allow seamless cross-file navigation based on symbol information. For example, if you know the name of a function, you can navigate to that function without worrying about which file it is in. You can do this

either from an editing context, or starting from the

The Symbol Browser

, p.168. On

the other hand, if you prefer navigating within and between files, you can use the

The File Navigator

, p.169.

Static analysis is the parsing and analysis of source code symbol information. This information is used to provide code editing assistance features such as multi-language syntax highlighting, code completion, parameter hints, definition/declaration navigation for files within your projects.

Apart from the things you see directly in the Editor, static analysis also provides the data for code comprehension and navigation features such as include

167

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

browsing, call trees, as well as resolving includes to provide the compiler with include search paths.

NOTE:

Syntax highlighting is provided for filesystem files that you open in the

Editor, but no other static analysis features are available for files that are outside your projects.

15.2 Wind River Workbench Context Navigation

Various filters are available on each tool’s local toolbar. Hover the mouse over the buttons to see a tooltip describing what these buttons do. At the top-right, a pull-down menu provides additional filters, including working sets (if you have defined any). An active working set is marked by a bullet next to its name in the pull-down menu.

Generally, you will want to navigate to symbols, or analyze symbol-related information from an Editor context. The entry points are:

The right-click context menu on a symbol

Keyboard shortcuts:

F3 —

Jump between associated code, for example, between definition/declaration or function definition/call (though there is no navigation from workspace files to external files, i.e. files outside your projects).

F4 —

Open Type Hierarchy (see

15.2.4 Type Hierarchy View

, p.170).

CTRL+ALT+H

— Open Call Tree (see Wind River Workbench User Interface

Reference: Call Tree View).

CTRL+I

— Open Include Browser (see

15.2.5 Include Browser

, p.170).

15.2.1 The Symbol Browser

By default, the Symbol Browser is a tab in the left pane of the main window, together with the Project Navigator.

168

15 Navigating and Editing

15.2 Wind River Workbench Context Navigation

Use the Symbol Browser for global navigation. Because the Symbol Browser presents a flat list of all the symbols in all the open projects in your workspace, you might want to constrain the list by using Working Sets. You can configure and select working sets using the Project Navigator’s local pull-down menu.

Text Filtering

The Name Filter field at the top of the view provides match-as-you-type filtering.

The field also supports wild cards: type a question mark (?) to match any single letter; type an asterisk (*) to match any number of arbitrary letters. Selecting

Hide Matching

next to the Name Filter field inverts the filter you entered in the field, so you see only those entries that do not match your search criteria.

For a guide to the icons in the Symbol Browser, see Wind River Workbench User

Interface Reference: Symbol Browser View.

15.2.2 The Outline View

The Outline view is to the right of the currently active Editor, and shows symbols in the currently active file.

Use the Outline view to sort, filter, and navigate the symbols in the context of the file in the currently active Editor, as well as to navigate out of the current file context by following call and reference relationships.

For a guide to the icons in the Outline view, see Wind River Workbench User Interface

Reference: Outline View.

15.2.3 The File Navigator

If you have never used the File Navigator, you can open it by choosing

Window > Show View > Other

. In the dialog that opens, select

Wind River Workbench > File Navigator

and click OK. After the first time you open the File Navigator, a shortcut appears directly under the

Window > Show View

menu. By default, the File Navigator appears as a tab at the left of the Wind River Workbench window, along with the Project Navigator and the Symbol Browser.

The File Navigator presents a flat list of all the files in the open projects in your workspace, so you can constrain the list by using Working Sets. You can configure and select working sets using the File Navigator’s local pull-down menu.

15

169

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

The left column of the File Navigator shows the file name, and is active; double-clicking on a file name opens the file in the Editor, and right-clicking on a file allows you to compile the file and build the project, among other tasks. The right column displays the project path location of the file.

The File Filter field at the top of the view works in the same way as the Name

Filter

field in the Symbol Browser, see

15.2.1 The Symbol Browser

, p.168.

15.2.4 Type Hierarchy View

Use the Type Hierarchy view to see hierarchical typedef and type-member information.

To open the Type Hierarchy view:

Right-click a symbol in the Editor, Outline, or Symbol Browser view and select

Type Hierarchy view

.

Click the toolbar button on the main toolbar.

Select Navigate > Open Type Hierarchy.

For more information, see the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Type

Hierarchy View.

15.2.5 Include Browser

By default, the Include Browser appears as a tab at the bottom-right.

To open the Include Browser:

Right-click a symbol in the Editor, Outline, or Symbol Browser view and select

Open Include Browser

.

Right-click a file in the File Navigator or the Project Navigator and select

Include Browser

.

Select Navigate > Open Include Browser.

Use the Include Browser to see which file includes, or is included by, the file you are examining. Use the buttons on the Include Browser’s local toolbar to toggle between showing include and included-by relationships. Double-click on an included file in the Include Browser to open the file in the Editor at the include statement.

170

15 Navigating and Editing

15.3 The Editor

15.3 The Editor

The Editor is your primary view for editing and debugging source code. The

Editor is language-aware, and can parse C, C++, Ada, and Assembler files. Many

Editor features are configurable in the Preferences (see Wind River Workbench User

Interface Reference: Editor).

15.4 Search and Replace: The Retriever

The Retriever is a fast, index-based global text search/replace tool. The scope of a search can be anything from a single file to all open projects in the workspace. You can query for normal text strings, or regular expressions. Matches can be filtered according to location context (for example, show only matches occurring in comments). Text can be globally or individually replaced, and restored if necessary. You can create working sets from matched files, and you can save and reload existing queries.

15.4.1 Intiating Text Retrieval

Text retrieval is context sensitive to text selected in the Editor. If no text is selected in the Editor, an empty instance of the Retriever opens. If text is selected in the

Editor, the retrieval is immediately initiated according to the criteria currently defined in the Retriever’s Find tab.

To open the Retriever, or to initiate a context sensitive search, use:

■ the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F2

■ right-click in the Editor and choose Retrieve in Files from the global menu, choose Search > Retrieve in Files

Click the Retriever tab in the lower panel of the Workbench window, where the Retriever appears by default.

For more information, see the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference:

Retriever.

15

171

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

15.5 Static Analysis

Editing, navigating, and code comprehension rely on static analysis, so it is important to understand the static analysis settings you can configure in the

Preferences.

For information about global and project-specific preferences, see the Wind River

Workbench User Interface Reference: Static Analysis Preferences.

172

16

Build Properties and the Build

Console

16.1 Introduction 174

16.2 Accessing Build Properties 175

16.3 Build Support 177

16.4 Build Targets 178

16.5 Build Specs 181

16.6 Build Tools 184

16.7 Build Macros 188

16.8 Build Paths 190

16.9 Build Properties for VxWorks Image Projects 193

16.10 Folder, File, and Build-Target Properties 194

16.11 Makefiles 194

16.12 Build Console View 197

173

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

16.1 Introduction

Workbench build support allows three types of build management at project, target, folder, and file level.

1.

Fully managed build

– Full build management is available for all project types except the

User-Defined project type.

– Makefiles are generated automatically based on the data you enter at project creation time or subsequently in the project/folder/file Properties dialog, Build Properties node.

– Build order is determined by the project and folder hierarchies as displayed in the Project Navigator.

– Include search paths can be generated for header files that are visible in the workspace.

– Build output is captured to the Build Console.

2.

User-defined build

In the User-Defined project type, it is assumed that you are responsible for setting up and maintaining your own build system. The user interface nevertheless provides support for the following:

– You can configure the build command used to launch your build utility; allowing you to start builds from the Workbench GUI.

– You can create build targets in the Project Navigator that reflect rules in your makefiles; allowing you to select and build any of your make rules directly from the Project Navigator.

– Build output is captured to the Build Console.

3.

Disabled build

You can disable build support for projects or folders; you would do this in projects or folders that contain only header files. Disabling the build for such folders or projects improves performance both during makefile generation as well as during the build run itself.

174

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.2 Accessing Build Properties

16.2 Accessing Build Properties

To access the build properties from the Project Navigator, right-click a project, folder, or file and select Properties.

In the Properties dialog, select the Build Properties node.

Depending on the type of node, including the type of project, you selected in the

Project Navigator, the properties will naturally differ.

Figure 16-1 shows the

Build Properties

node of a project as it appears when first opened for an RTP project.

NOTE:

Build properties for VxWorks Image Projects (VIPs) differ substantially from the general properties discussed below, although some of the differences are pointed out along the way; see

Build Properties for VxWorks Image Projects

, p.193.

Consult the VxWorks Kernel Programmer’s Guide for more information about VIPs.

16.2.1 Project Build Properties and Preferences Build Properties

The Preferences (Window > Preferences) also include a Build Properties node.

This node allows you to globally set defaults for all general build properties per project type. The Preferences Build Properties node has tabs that are practically identical to the ones in the project-specific Build Properties. The difference is that

Preferences store defaults for creating new projects, whereas the project

Build Properties

are applied to an existing project (the one currently selected in the Project Navigator).

The defaults that can be set in Preferences are used in the project-specific

Build Properties

tabs described in the context of the Project Properties (the functionality is the same, except that, in the Preferences, you have to additionally select the project type from a list at the top of each tab):

16.3 Build Support

, p.177,

16.5 Build Specs

, p.181.

16.6 Build Tools

, p.184.

16.7 Build Macros

, p.188.

16.8 Build Paths

, p.190.

16

175

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Multiple Target Operating Systems and Versions

If you installed Workbench for multiple target operating systems and/or versions, you can set a default target operating system (version) for new projects in the

Preferences, Build Properties. In the Project Properties, Target Operating System node, you can verify the target operating system (version) of existing projects.

NOTE:

In most cases, it will not be possible to successfully migrate a project from one target operating system (version) to another simply by switching the selected

Target Operating System and Version

.

In the Project Navigator (and elsewhere), the target operating system and version are displayed next to the project name by default. You can toggle the display of this information in the Preferences, Workbench > Label Decorations node, using the

Target Operating Systems

check box.

If you have multiple versions of the same operating system installed, the New

Project Wizard allows you to select which version you want to create a project for.

176

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.3 Build Support

16.3 Build Support

The settings on this tab of the Build Properties node are common to all architecture-specific build specs; these are introduced under

Build Specs

, p.181.

Figure 16-1

Build Support

The Build Support options are described under

16.1 Introduction, p.174 .

The Build Command is the command line call to your make utility. This, and only this build-property, is also available for User-Defined projects, where you are responsible for the build setup and maintenance.

Once you have built a project from the Project Navigator and the makefiles have been generated, you can rebuild the project from the command line

(assuming there are no structural changes, such as added/removed resources) using this command.

Build output passing

These check boxes apply if the current project is used as a subproject in a hierarchical project structure.

– Pass objects to next level

The object files generated by compiling individual source files that belong to the project are passed up to be linked into executable or library targets further up in the project hierarchy.

16

177

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

– Pass received targets to next level

Executable or library targets that were built further down in the project hierarchy and have been passed up, are passed up the hierarchy for further processing.

16.4 Build Targets

The Build Targets tab, as well as the Build Tools (see

Build Tools

, p.184) and

Build Macros

(see

Build Macros

, p.188) tabs are also available for target nodes you

select in the Project Navigator. This tab also appears in the New Build Target wizard.

The settings on this tab of the Build Properties node are common to all

architecture-specific build specs; these are introduced under

Build Specs

, p.181.

178

Figure 16-2

Build Targets—A Library

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.4 Build Targets

Build target

Projects can have multiple targets. You might, for example, want to Copy an existing project target and then select a different Build tool and/or modify the

Contents and link order

(see below).

You can also create New build targets directly from the Project Navigator’s context menu (select a project node). Whether you create a new target here (in the Project Properties dialog), or by selecting New > Target from the Project

Navigator’s context menu, you will want to define a Build tool (see below).

16

179

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

You can also Rename or Delete build targets directly from the Project

Navigator’s context menu (select a target node).

– Renaming a target does no more than apply a new label by changing text in one of the Workbench maintained project administration files

(.wrproject).

– Deleting a target does no more than remove text relating to the target from one of the Workbench maintained project administration files

(.wrproject).

Build tool

Select the build tool to use for building the target selected in the Build target drop-down. The list of available tools will depend on the project type. Please

refer to

16.6 Build Tools

, p.184 for more information.

Build output passing

Whether this is enabled depends on the selection in the Build tool drop-down.

For example, if the Build tool is set to Linker for the target selected in the

Build target

drop-down, there will be no next level to pass the current project’s build-target (an executable) to.

Contents and link order

You can specify the contents to include, and the order in which it is linked, when building the target selected in the Build target drop-down with the tool specified in the Build tool drop-down.

If the Use default contents and link order check box is selected, all files in the project tree and all subtargets are used to build the project’s build-target (or the currently selected build-target, depending on what you selected before opening the Properties dialog). Any files that are subsequently added to the project will also be automatically added to the project’s default target if this check box is selected.

If the Use default contents and link order check box is not selected, you can customize the current target contents by including or excluding files and subtargets from anywhere in the project tree. For example, you might want to selectively pull certain files scattered around your project tree into a library target.

180

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.5 Build Specs

16.5 Build Specs

A build spec is a group of build-related settings that lets you build the same project for different target architectures and/or different tool chains by simply switching from one build spec to another. Note that the architecture/tool chain associations are preconfigured examples; you can also create your own build specs (usually from copies of existing ones, using the Copy button) for any constellation of the many configurable properties that make up a spec (see also

17.8 A Build Spec for

New Compilers and Other Tools

, p.211).

It is important to remember is that the build spec used when you build must match the target board; that is, it must match the VxWorks Image project that the application project will be associated with.

Figure 16-3

Build Specs

16

Use the Build Specs tab to manage the build specs for your project.

You can create a new build spec by clicking New.

You can copy an existing build spec by clicking Copy, and then modify it to suit your needs.

181

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

You can enable/disable build specs.

You enable a build spec by selecting the check box next to it in the

Available and enabled build specs

list; you disable it by clearing the check box. Convenience buttons to Enable All and Disable All are also provided.

For most project types, the list of available build specs will depend on the BSPs and tools, for example the Wind River compiler, you have installed. The naming convention is therefore of the form BOARDNAMEtoolchain.

For VxWorks Image Projects (VIPs), the list of build specs is predefined (see

5.4 VxWorks Image Projects in the Project Navigator

, p.80) and depends on

whether a simulator or a real-board BSP is used to create the VIP.

Being able to enable/disable build specs offers the following advantages.

– You can do this at subproject and folder level. That is, you can enable/disable different build specs for different folders within the same project structure.

17.5 Architecture-Specific Implementation of Functions

, p.206 illustrates possible benefits of being able to do this.

– The other advantage of disabling build specs is that you will not see them in contexts where they are not needed. You can, of course, re-enable them at any time.

NOTE:

If you have build specs that you never use, you can globally disable them in the Preferences, Build Properties node.

Default build spec

A default build spec for the current project can be set and stored here. Note that when you create a project, the wizard suggests an Active Build Spec (see below). This suggestion is taken from the Preferences, Build Properties node, and is used only for new projects. The Default build spec you set here, in the project-specific Build Properties, applies only to the current project, and is used as described below.

– If you import a project, for example by checking it out from your version control system, the active build spec is set to this default.

If you start a build from the command line (see

16.3 Build Support

, p.177)

and you do not specify a build spec parameter, this default spec is used.

– You can refer back to this if you change the active build spec to something other than the one you want to use by default in the situations described above.

182

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.5 Build Specs

Active Build Spec

The Active build spec is the one that is used when you build the project.

Whatever you set here is also propagated to the following tabs:

Build Tools

, p.184

Build Macros

, p.188

Build Paths

, p.190

Whenever you switch active build specs (see, for example,

17.3 Building

Applications for Different Boards

, p.202) in the Project Navigator before you

build a project, you are therefore automatically switching all the settings defined in the Build spec specific settings on the above tabs.

Debug mode

Each of the preconfigured build specs has a release and a debug mode (with and without debug information). You can set the default and active build specs to either of these modes using the Debug mode check box.

16

183

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

16.6 Build Tools

Figure 16-4

Build Tools

A Workbench build tool is a configuration of a tool and its attributes used to build a software target.

Build Tool

Build tools can be configured at project, folder and file level. At file level the available build tools include, using the names as they appear in the GUI, the

C-Compiler

, the C++-Compiler, or the Assembler. At higher (folder or project) levels, tools can additionally include, for example, the Linker, the

Librarian

(generally used by default for subproject targets that are passed up to higher-level projects), and the Shared Library Linker.

184

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.6 Build Tools

Buttons are provided for New, Rename, Copy, and Delete.

If you want to create new build tools, these will probably often match one of the preconfigured build tools fairly closely, so the road to creating your own build tools will more often start by using the Copy button, rather than the New button to create a completely empty tool.

Suffixes

The build tool used for compiling individual files is determined by the input file’s suffix. A suffix does not need to be the same as the filename’s .extension, although it usually is. The entries in the Suffixes field can be any trailing string in the filename that determines which build tool is used to compile files with the given suffixes. If the field is empty, the tool can be assigned to projects, as opposed to individual files.

The input format is *.extension; multiple entries are separated by a semi-colon (;).

Build output generation

Build tools distinguish between the implicit target (object) of an individual file; that is, where there is a one-to-one mapping between a source file and an output file, and software targets, which are collections of objects and perhaps other files, such as subtargets that have been passed up from lower levels in the build hierarchy. You can also specify whether the

Generated build output can be passed to next level

.

Build spec specific settings

As the title of this group of settings implies, the settings are specific to each individual build spec; they apply to the spec that is set in the Active build spec drop-down. These settings, like the others on the Build Tools tab, are all specific to the tool currently set in the Build tool drop-down list.

The build product file’s Derived suffix also has to be specified so that

Workbench can evaluate the resulting file.

The Command is the configurable command that is used to generate the necessary make rule for building each target. The command is executed in the order specified in this field.

The Command references various macros using the syntax $(MacroName).

These macros are defined in 16.7 Build Macros, p.188 . To make build-target

specification easier, the Command also references a number of pre-defined macros using the syntax %MacroName% that are expanded to the appropriate make syntax.

16

185

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

%DebugModeFlags%

Expanded to the value specified in the Debug mode field when debug mode is on, and to the value specified in the Non Debug mode field when debug mode is off. The debug mode is set in the

Active Build Spec

, p.183,

using the

Debug mode

, p.183 checkbox. (In the Project Navigator you can

tell whether you are building with/without debug information by the presence/absence of the _DEBUG suffix on the target node label.)

%ToolFlags%

Expanded to the value specified in the Tool Flags field. Note that options in the Tool Flags field are used in both debug and non-debug mode building. Depending on the current Build tool, options will be set either in the Debug mode field, the Non Debug mode field, or in the Tool Flags field. For example Linker flags will normally be the same regardless of whether you are doing a debug or a release build, so any options you want to pass the linker will usually be set in the Tool Flags field.

Note that GUI support is provided for some tool options. These are available for all three fields from the buttons next to the fields. The dialog evoked by these buttons also allows switching between the debug, non-debug, and common tool flags. The GUI support provided for flags depends on the current Build tool, the compilers, for example, have many more pre-configured options than the linker. Please refer to the compiler documentation for details.

%Includes%

Expanded to the values in the list of Include Directories (see

16.8 Build

Paths

, p.190).

%InFile%

Expanded to $<.

%OutFile%

Expanded to [email protected].

%Objects%

Expanded to $(OBJECTS) $(SUB_OBJECTS) or to the list of objects

derived from the selected contents of the current target (see

16.4 Build

Targets

, p.178).

%Libraries%

Expanded to $(SUB_TARGETS_PASSED) or to a relevant list of targets that were passed up to build the current target.

186

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.6 Build Tools

The Tool Flags button and the adjacent field are used to fill the %ToolFlags%

macro used by the Command (see

%ToolFlags%

, p.186). You can either directly

enter options for the selected Build Tool (for example, compiler flags) in the field, or you can click the button to open a dialog that provides assistance for setting these options (for example, if you are unfamiliar with the command line syntax used by the selected Build Tool). Note that these options are used both in debug

and non-debug mode. See

17.2 Adding Compiler Flags

, p.200 for an example of how

this field is used.

The Debug mode and Non Debug mode buttons and the adjacent fields are used to fill the %DebugModeFlags% macro used by the Command (see

%DebugModeFlags%

, p.186). You can either directly enter options for the selected

Build Tool

(for example, compiler flags) in the field, or you can click the button to open a dialog that provides assistance for setting these options (for example, if you are unfamiliar with the command line syntax used by the selected Build Tool).

Which of these fields the %DebugModeFlags% macro expands to depends on whether the

Active Build Spec

, p.183, is set to debug mode or not, see

Debug mode

, p.183.

16

187

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

16.7 Build Macros

Figure 16-5

Build Macros

In addition to the options specified for build tools (see

16.6 Build Tools

, p.184), you

can also freely define build macros, both globally, in the Build macro definitions list, or per build spec. Note that you must enter these macros in the build tool command in the order they are to be executed (see

16.6 Build Tools

, p.184). The

macros are referenced using the syntax $(MacroName). Multiple entries are separated by blanks.

To set additional, architecture-specific compiler flags, use the CC_ARCH_SPEC build macro to add the required flags to each appropriate build spec in the

Active Build spec

list.

188

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.7 Build Macros

Setting the TOOL_PATH Macro

When specifying the path to a different compiler than the default one for your project, it is critical to specify the final slash ( / ) in the TOOL_PATH field of the

Build spec specific settings

table.

Specifying a New Compiler Version for a Single Project

If you have projects that were created for VxWorks 6.1, the default Wind River compiler version recognized by these projects is 5.2.3.0. In this release, VxWorks

6.2 ships with Wind River compiler version 5.3.1.

So if you want to use the new compiler with a project that originally recognized the old version, you must specify the path to the compiler root directory: not:

$(WIND_HOME)/diab/5.3.1/bsp/bin/

$(WIND_HOME)/diab/5.3.1/bsp/bin

In the Workbench build system, and in a development shell if you have set up an appropriate build environment

1

, $(WIND_HOME) defaults to your Workbench installation directory.

This is the same directory represented by installDir elsewhere in the Workbench documentation, but in that case it is a convenient way to represent your installation path, whereas in the build system and on the command line,

$(WIND_HOME) is an actual variable.

If you installed your compilers in a different location, substitute the appropriate path for $(WIND_HOME).

NOTE:

The path to the compiler root directory must be make-compliant, so even on Windows, you must use forward slashes throughout. Backslashes will be misinterpreted by make.

Specifying a New Compiler Version for All Projects

If you want all your projects to use the new compiler version, it is easier to change the specified compiler version in the installDir/install.properties file.

In the install.properties file for VxWorks 6.1, you will see a line that represents your default toolchain-platform version association:

1. For information about setting up a build environment, see the VxWorks Command-Line User’s

Guide: Creating a Development Shell with wrenv.

16

189

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

vxworks61.eval.04=require diab-5.2.3.0,gnu-3.3.2-vxworks61

Now, if you want to use the new compiler for all your projects, including those formerly associated with VxWorks 6.1, you must change that line to: vxworks61.eval.04=require diab-5.3.1.0,gnu-3.3.2-vxworks61

16.8 Build Paths

Figure 16-6

Build Tools

Build output is usually directed to a subdirectory at your workspace root location.

However, you can also redirect it anywhere on your file system by specifying a location in the Redirection root directory field. The Redirection directory is a

190

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.8 Build Paths

subdirectory of the Redirection root directory. By Default this directory has the same name as the Active build spec.

If the build-generated files should not be generated within the source code tree, and absolute redirection root directory can be used. In a team setting this may be problematic, as the value of this directory is stored within the .wrproject file, so it may potentially not be shareable if team members have different hardware setups, for instance. One user could specify a redirection path that does not exist on other team member’s machines. To avoid this problem, define environment variables that every team member can use. For example, you can define a variable called

REDIRECTION_ROOTDIR

and specify the absolute redirection root in the project properties as $REDIRECTION_ROOTDIR. Every team members can now set the environment variable to fit their needs, while the information stored in the

.wrproject

file becomes user/machine independent.

Supported environment variables are:

– The environment in which Workbench was started (specified outside of

Workbench)

– The environment variables defined in the Workbench package

(WIND_HOME, WIND_TOOLS, etc.)

– The environment variables of the target platform of the project (for instance WIND_BASE for vxworks-6.2)

The environment variables must be specified in UNIX or make notation:

$ENV/

additional-path or $(ENV)/additional path

NOTE:

Make macros that are defined within the project are not supported.

The list of Include paths used by the compiler can be correctly generated for directories that are visible (that is, they are in projects) and are unambiguous in the current workspace using the Generate button.

There are different contexts in which include search paths can be manually added:

Clicking Generate calls a wizard (see

16.8.1 The Generate Include Search-Paths

Wizard

, p.192) that allows you to manually add include search paths that will

be seen in the context of the current Active build spec and the current project.

The Add button lets you add include search paths that will be seen in the context of the current Active build spec and the current project.

16

191

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

The Add to all button lets you add include search paths that will be seen in the context of enabled build specs (these are visible in the Active build spec drop-down; see also

16.5 Build Specs

, p.181) and the current project.

You can use the Up and Down arrows to change the order in which the directories are searched to fix ambiguities. The list is processed from top to bottom, and the first find wins.

16.8.1 The Generate Include Search-Paths Wizard

You can call up the Generate Include Search-Paths wizard from a number of places:

■ the Generate button in the Properties dialog of projects, folders, and files the context menu in the Project Navigator

■ the dialog that appears the first time you build an application or library

The Generate Include Search Paths wizard always sets the include search path in the context of the current folder, whereby there is no distinction between folder types (project or normal folders).

The first page of the wizard tells you the current Folder context for which the include search paths can set.

You can also select whether or not to Ignore non-active includes (code that is not compiled because of preprocessor directives), and whether or not to

Ignore system includes

.

The list under Substitute paths (or path segments) with selected build macros allows you to select strings that are segments of absolute paths found on your local machine, to be replaced by macros. This facilitates sharing across different environments in team development. The list is pulled together from a number of sources in your current environment, namely:

■ from user and system environment variables from environment variables that are set when you start up the Wind River

Workbench from build macros

If a Path Segment is checked, the corresponding Build Macro will be used in the include search path, rather than the absolute reference.

192

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.9 Build Properties for VxWorks Image Projects

Click Resolve on the second page of the wizard to resolve include directives that were found in files in the current project or folder and add the corresponding

Include Search Paths

. Includes can be resolved if they are in open projects in the workspace. If there are unresolved directives, this is reported in the upper list and you can Add Folders manually. You can also change the order of the search paths to fix possible ambiguities.

The third page of the wizard (only available if called before the first build of a project or from the Project Navigator context menu), allows you to specify the scope of application, both in terms of folder/project and build specs.

16.9 Build Properties for VxWorks Image Projects

In general, the Build Properties tabs offer fewer options for VxWorks Image projects than for other project types. The Build Support and Build Target tabs do not appear at all for VIPs, while a separate tab allows you to specify link order for object files.

16.9.1 Build Specs for VIPs

Build specs for a VxWorks Image project are determined by the board support package (BSP) used to create the project. (Simulator BSPs usually offer only one build spec.) Use the Build Specs tab to enable and disable build specs or set the active build spec. Disabled (unselected) build specs are still in the project file, but they don’t appear the Workbench UI. See

16.5 Build Specs

, p.181 for more

information.

16.9.2 Build Tools for VIPs

See

16.6 Build Tools

, p.184 for more information.

16.9.3 Build Macros for VIPs

Build macros for VxWorks Image projects are set on a per-build-spec basis, not globally. See

16.7 Build Macros

, p.188 for more information.

16

193

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

16.9.4 Build Paths for VIPs

Use this tab to add, delete, or reorder the directories searched by the build tools.

See

16.8 Build Paths

, p.190 for more information.

16.9.5 Link Order for VIPs

Specify the order in which object files are linked to create the VxWorks image.

16.10 Folder, File, and Build-Target Properties

Folders, files, and build-targets inherit (reference) project build properties where these are appropriate and applicable. However, these properties can be overwritten at the folder/file level. Inherited properties are displayed in blue typeface, overwritten properties are displayed in black typeface.

Overwritten settings are maintained in the .wrproject and .wrfolder files. These files should therefore also be version controlled. Note that you can revert to the inherited settings by clicking the eraser icon next to a field.

16.11 Makefiles

The build system uses the build property settings to generate a self-contained makefile named Makefile in each project and folder at each build run. This allows you to build individual folders, projects, and subtrees in a project structure. By default makefiles are stored in project directories; if an absolute

Redirection Root Directory

(see

16.8 Build Paths

, p.190) has been specified, they

are stored there, in subdirectories that match the project directory names.

The generated makefile is based on a template makefile named .wrmakefile that is copied over at project creation time. If you want to use custom make rules, enter these in .wrmakefile, not in Makefile because this is regenerated for each build.

The template makefile, .wrmakefile, references the generated macros in the

194

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.11 Makefiles

placeholder %IDE_GENERATED%, so you can add custom rules either before or after this placeholder. However, there are also other ways of setting custom rules, see

17.7 User-Defined Build-Targets in the Project Navigator

, p.210.

16.11.1 Derived File Build Support

The Yacc Example

Workbench provides a sample project, yacc_example, that includes a makefile extension showing how you can implement derived file build support. It is based on yacc (Yet Another Compiler Compiler) which is not contained in the

Workbench or VxWorks installation. To actually do a build of the example you need to have yacc or a compatible tool (like GNU’s bison) installed on your system, and you should have extensive knowledge about make.

The makefile, yacc.makefile, demonstrates how a yacc compiler can be integrated with the managed build and contains information on how this works.

1.

Create the example project by selecting New > Project > Example > Native

Sample Project > Yacc Demonstration Program

.

2.

Right-click the yacc_example project folder, then select New > Build Target.

The New Build Target dialog appears.

3.

In the Build target name field, type pre_build.

4.

From the Build tool drop-down list, select (User-defined), then click Finish to create the build target.

5.

In the Project Navigator, right-click pre_build and select Build Target. This will use the makefile extension yacc.makefile to compile the yacc source file to the corresponding C and header files. The build output appears in the Build

Console.

NOTE:

It is necessary to execute this build step prior to the project build, because the files generated by yacc will not be used by the managed build otherwise. This is due to the fact that the managed build generates the corresponding makefile before the build is started and all files that are part of the project at this time are taken into account.

6.

When the build is finished, right-click the yacc_example folder and select

Build Project

.

16

195

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Additional information on how you can extend the managed build is located in

yacc.makefile

. It makes use of the extensions provided in the makefile template

.wrmakefile, which can also be adapted to specific needs.

General Approach

To implement derived file support for your own project, create a project-specific makefile called name_of_your_choice.makefile. This file will automatically be used by the managed build and its make-rules will be executed on builds.

It is possible to include multiple *.makefile files in the project, but they are included in alphabetical order. So if multiple build steps must be done in a specific order, it is suggested that you use one *.makefile and specify the order of the tools to be called using appropriate make rules.

For example:

1.

Execute a lex compiler.

2.

Execute a yacc compiler (depending on lex output).

3.

Execute a SQL C tool (depending on the yacc output).

Solution: (using the generate_sources make rule) generate_sources :: do_lex do_yacc do_sql do_lex:

@...

do_yacc:

@...

do_sql:

@...

or generate_sources :: $(LEX_GENERATED_SOURCES) $(YACC_GENERATED_SOURCES)

$(SQL_GENERATED_SOURCES)

Add appropriate rules like those shown in the file yacc.makefile.

196

16 Build Properties and the Build Console

16.12 Build Console View

16.12 Build Console View

When you launch a build, the Build Console view comes to the foreground to display each step of the build (you can toggle this by selecting or unselecting

Activate Build Console on building

from the Build Console toolbar). The information displayed in the Build Console includes the full command line, when the build started and finished, as well as any errors.

If a particular line of output interests you and you do not want it to scroll out of view, click the Scroll Lock icon. The Build Console continues to accumulate information, but the display does not refresh until you click Scroll Lock again to release it.

Double-click an error to navigate to the offending line in the source file.

16.12.1 Saving Build Output

To save your build output to a Build.log file, click the Save icon. Log files are saved to installDir/host/platform/bin/Build.log by default, but you can save them anywhere you like.

16.12.2 Build Console Preference Settings

To display the output of each build separately, select

Clear Build Console before new Build Run

. This is useful if you save build output to log files. To display build results sequentially, clear this check box.

Specify the color, text style, and regular expression you want to display for each type of result in the Build Console view.

To pass all build output through the error parsers before displaying it in the Build

Console view, select Use Diab Error Parser or Use Gnu Error Parser. This will create links in the Tasks view between any build errors and the line in your source code containing the errors.

If you do not use the parsers, the errors will still appear in the Tasks view, but you will not be able to double-click them to navigate to the corresponding line of source code. You will have to navigate to the errors manually.

16

197

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

198

17

Building: Use Cases

17.1 Introduction 199

17.2 Adding Compiler Flags 200

17.3 Building Applications for Different Boards 202

17.4 Creating Library Build-Targets for Testing and Release 203

17.5 Architecture-Specific Implementation of Functions 206

17.6 Executables that Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries 207

17.7 User-Defined Build-Targets in the Project Navigator 210

17.8 A Build Spec for New Compilers and Other Tools 211

17.9 Developing on Remote Hosts 213

17.1 Introduction

This chapter suggests some of the ways you can go about completing various build-specific tasks in Wind River Workbench.

199

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

17.2 Adding Compiler Flags

Let us assume:

1.

You are working on a Real-time Process project (referred to in the following as

MyRTP

), and you are using the build spec, SIMPENTIUMgnu_RTP.

2.

You want to suppress compiler warnings, and you are familiar with the GNU compiler (used by the given build spec) command line.

3.

You later have to change the build spec to SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP; that is you have to use the Wind River Compiler tools, with which you are not familiar, but you still want to suppress compiler warnings.

17.2.1 Add a Compiler Flag by Hand

According to assumption 2 , above, you are familiar with the GNU compiler

command line, so you just want to know where to enter the -w option.

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click on the MyRTP project and select

Properties

.

2.

In the Properties dialog, select the Build Properties node.

3.

In the Build Properties node, select the Build Tools tab.

4.

In the Build Tools tab:

– Set the Build tool to C-compiler

The Active build spec will, according to assumption 1 , above, already be

set to SIMPENTIUMgnu_RTP.

– In the field next to the Tool Flags button, append a space and -w

The contents of this, the Tool Flags field you have just modified, is expanded to the %ToolFlags% macro you see in the Command field above it. Because you entered the -w in the Tool Flags field, rather than the

Debug

or Non Debug mode fields, warnings will always be suppressed, rather than only in either Debug or Non Debug mode.

200

17 Building: Use Cases

17.2 Adding Compiler Flags

17.2.2 Add a Compiler Flag with GUI Assistance

According to assumption

3

, above, you have to change to the Wind River Compiler tool chain used by the SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP build spec, and you are not familiar with the new command line tool options.

Step 1: Change the Active Build Spec

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click on the MyRTP project, and select

Set Active Build Spec

.

If the SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP build spec is enabled, you will see it listed in the dialog that appears. In this case, all you would have to do is select

SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP

from the list and click OK.

However, we shall assume SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP is not enabled, and therefore not available in the list.

2.

In the Project Navigator, right-click on the MyRTP project, and select

Properties

.

3.

In the Properties dialog, select the Build Specs node.

4.

In the Build Specs node, select the SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP build spec and set both the Default build spec and the Active build spec to

SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP

.

Leave the Properties dialog open to complete Step 2

, below.

Step 2: Use the GUI to Add a Compiler Flag

1.

Select the Build Tools tab.

2.

In the Build Tools tab:

– Set the Build tool to C-compiler

– The Active build spec will already be set to SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP

(see

4

above).

– We assumed you are unfamiliar with the Wind River compiler options so, to open the Wind River Compiler Options dialog, click the Tool Flags button.

17

201

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

– In the Wind River Compiler Options dialog, click your way down the navigation tree at the left of the dialog and take a look at the available options.

When you get to the Compilation > Diagnostics node, select the check box labelled Suppress all compiler warnings.

Notice that -Xsuppress-warnings now appears in the list of command line options at the right of the dialog.

Click OK.

3.

Back in the Build Tools node of the Properties dialog, you will see that the option you selected now appears in the field next to the Tool Flags button.

The contents of this, the Tool Flags field, is expanded to the %ToolFlags% macro you see in the Command field above it.

17.3 Building Applications for Different Boards

Generally, but not necessarily, you would have a VxWorks Image project (VIP) for each architecture you support. If, however, you are developing applications and/or libraries only, you might not have VIPs.

If you do have VIPs, you will probably only set the build spec once for the application subprojects to match the VIP they are under. On the other hand, if you do not have VIPs, you might switch the build spec to build projects for different architectures.

The target nodes under projects in the Project Navigator display, in blue, the name of the currently active build spec.

If, for example, you want to build an application for testing on a simulator, and then build the same project to run on a real board, you would simply switch build specs as follows:

1.

Right-click the project or the target node and, from the context menu, select

Set Active Build Spec

.

202

17 Building: Use Cases

17.4 Creating Library Build-Targets for Testing and Release

2.

In the dialog that appears, select the build spec you want to change to and specify whether or not you want debug information.

When you close the dialog, you will notice that the label of the target node has changed. If you selected debug mode in the dialog, the build spec name is suffixed with

_DEBUG

.

3.

Build the project for the new architecture.

17.4 Creating Library Build-Targets for Testing and Release

Assume you have a library that consists of the files source1.c, source2.c, and test.c.

The file test.c implements a main( ) function and is required exclusively for testing, and is not to be included in the release version of the library.

One way to handle this is to use different targets that are built with different tools as described below.

1.

Create a Real-time Process project to hold all the files mentioned above. Use this project type, because you will need to use both the Linker and the

Librarian

build tools later.

In the first page of the project creation wizard, name the project, for example,

LIB

and click Finish. You will need to do some tweaking in the Project’s

Properties

dialog anyway, so you might as well do everything there.

2.

Right-click the newly created LIB project, and select Properties. In the

Properties

dialog, select the Build Properties node, then the Build Targets tab.

First create a build-target for the release version of your library.

– Change the Build tool to Librarian.

– Select Pass build target to next level.

– Clear the Use default contents and link order check box.

– Clear the check box next to test.c.

– Click Apply.

Figure 17-1

shows the results.

17

203

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 17-1

Release Version of the Library

3.

Next, create a target for the test version of the library.

– Click New then enter, for example, LIB_test in the dialog that appears.

Notice that the Build Tool is set to Linker, this is because the Linker is the default tool for Real-time Process Projects, and that the LIB (your previous build-target) has been added to the Contents and link order list.

– Clear the Use default contents and link order check box.

– In the Contents and link order list, select only the check boxes next to LIB and test.c; clear all other check boxes.

Figure 17-2 shows the results.

204

17 Building: Use Cases

17.4 Creating Library Build-Targets for Testing and Release

Figure 17-2

Test Version of the Library

After you close the Properties dialog, there will be two new build-target nodes in the LIB project. If you build LIB_test, then LIB will automatically also be built if it is out of date.

17

205

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

17.5 Architecture-Specific Implementation of Functions

You can enable/disable build specs at the project as well as at the folder level. This allows architecture-specific implementation of functions within same project.

Figure 17-3 shows a simplified project tree with two subprojects, arch 1 and arch2,

that each use code that is specific to different target architectures. This is how projects could be set up to build a software target that requires the implementation of a function that is specific to different target boards, where only the active build spec in the topmost project has to be changed. The inner build spec relationships

are outlined in Table 17-1 .

Figure 17-3

Simple Project Structure for Architecture-Specific Functions

Table 17-1

Project Content and Build Spec Configuration of the Structure in

Figure 17-3

Directories/Folders

/project

/project/arch1

/project/arch2

Files

main.c, arch.h

arch1.c

arch2.c

Enabled Build Specs

PENTIUMdiab_RTP

and

PPC32diab_RTP

PENTIUMdiab_RTP

only

PPC32diab_RTP

only

The function int arch_specific (void) is declared in arch.h and the file arch1.c implements int arch_specific (void) for PENTIUM (the only build spec enabled for the arch1 project), while the file arch2.c implements int arch_specific (void) for

PPC32

(the only build spec enabled for the arch2 project).

If the active build spec for project is set to PENTIUMdiab_RTP, the subproject

arch1

will be built, and its objects will be passed up to be linked into the project

206

17 Building: Use Cases

17.6 Executables that Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries

build-target. The arch2 subproject will not be built, and its objects will not be passed up to be linked into the project build target because the

PENTIUMdiab_RTP

build spec is not enabled for arch2.

The same applies if the PPC32diab_RTP is the active build spec for project: the

arch2

subproject will be built, but the arch1 subproject will not.

17.6 Executables that Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries

Only executables produced from RTP projects can dynamically link to shared libraries. Note that you will need a VxWorks File System project for a ROMFS file system to hold the library binary on the target. The compiled library must be located in the host and target side directories you specify as described below.

Step 1: Modify the Real-time Process build-target build properties.

1.

Right-click the RTP’s target node and select Properties.

2.

In the Properties dialog, select the Build Properties node.

Step 2: Set up the Linker Build Tool for a dynamic executable and target-side run path.

1.

Select the Build Tools tab.

2.

In the field next to the Tool Flags button, enter the run path (-rpath) to the directory that will hold the shared library on your target, for example,

-rpath /romfs/lib

(romfs is the default root directory of the ROMFS created by

File System projects).

3.

Click Tool Flags.

17

207

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 17-4

Build Options for Dynamic Executables

4.

In the Linker Options dialog that appears, select

Create a dynamic executable

.

You will notice that the option, as used on the command line, appears in the

Selected Options

list on the right. After you click OK to close the

Linker Options

dialog, you will see the option again in the field next to the

Tool Flags

button.

208

17 Building: Use Cases

17.6 Executables that Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries

Step 3: Define Build Macros for the host-side location and library binary.

1.

Select the Build Macros tab.

2.

In the list of Build spec specific settings, select the

LIBS

macro and click Edit.

In the dialog that appears, add a space after the existing value (-lstlstd), followed by the basename of the shared library binary you want to link to, for example, MyLibrary:

-l:MyLibrary.so

When you close the dialog you should see:

LIBATH -lstlstd -l:MyLibrary.so

3.

In the list of Build spec specific settings, select for the LIBPATH macro and click Edit.

In the dialog that appears, enter the host-side directory location of the library binary you want to dynamically link to, for example:

-L../MyLibrary/$(OBJ_DIR)

Note that

$(OBJ_DIR)

expands to wherever the build output for MyLibrary is generated to. Using

$(OBJ_DIR)

is generic and therefore offers the advantage of not having to change the

LIBPATH

macro if you change build specs.

Note further that the relative reference assumes the Shared Library project is located in the same workspace as the Real-time Process project.

Click OK to close the project’s build-target Properties dialog.

The next time you build the project structure, a dynamic executable capable of run-time linking to the shared library with the file basename and the directories (host and target side) you specified above will be produced.

NOTE:

If your application is not built as described in this section (

17.6

Executables that Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries

, p.207), you must set the

LD_LIBRARY_PATH

environment variable.

Click Edit beside the Environment field, then click Add in the Edit

Environment

dialog, then type

LD_LIBRARY_PATH

in the Name field and the full path to your shared library file (using forward slashes and excluding the filename itself) in the Value field. The path must be defined in terms of the file system as seen on the target.

Click OK. The Edit Environment dialog should contain the new environment variable; click OK.

17

209

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

17.7 User-Defined Build-Targets in the Project Navigator

In the Project Navigator you can create custom build-targets that reflect rules in makefiles. This is especially useful if you have User-Defined projects, which are projects where the build is not managed by Workbench. However, you might also find this feature useful in other projects as well.

17.7.1 Custom Build-Targets in User-Defined Projects

Assuming you have two rules in a makefile, clean and all, you can define a custom build-target for either or both of these rules. To do so:

1.

Right-click a project or folder and select New > Build Target.

2.

In the dialog that appears, enter the rule(s) you want to create a target for. If you want to execute multiple rules, separate each one with a space.

In our example, enter clean all to have both these rules, which must exist in your makefile(s), executed when you build your new user-defined target.

Click Finish. The new build-target node appears under the project or folder you selected. The node icon has a superimposed M to identify it as a user-defined make rule.

To execute the rule(s), right-click the new target node and select Build Target.

17.7.2 Custom Build-Targets in Workbench Managed Projects

First write the make rules you need into the .wrmakefile file in the project directory.

1.

Right-click a project or folder and select New > Build Target.

2.

In the dialog that appears, enter the rule name(s) you created in .wrmakefile.

If you want to execute multiple rules, separate each one with a space.

Set the Build tool to User-defined, click Finish.

The new build target node appears under the project or folder you selected.

The node icon has a superimposed M to identify it as a user-defined rule.

To execute the rule(s), right-click the new target node and select Build Target.

210

17 Building: Use Cases

17.8 A Build Spec for New Compilers and Other Tools

17.7.3 User Build Arguments

You can use the User Build Arguments view to execute any existing make rule, or overwrite any macro, or anything else that is understood by make, at every build, regardless of what is being built. The view is toggled by choosing User Build

Arguments view from the drop-down menu at the top right of the Project

Navigator, or by clicking the button in the Project Navigator’s toolbar.

If the User Build Arguments check box is selected, the rule, or rules separated by a space, or macro re-definitions, and so on will override the makefile entries on the fly at every build, regardless of context.

17.8 A Build Spec for New Compilers and Other Tools

The easiest way to define a build spec for a new compiler and other associated tools (known as a tool chain) is to copy one of the pre-configured build specs of an existing tool chain and architecture, and modify the copy.

Step 1: Copy an Existing Build Spec.

1.

Open an application project’s, for example an RTP, build properties as described under

16.2 Accessing Build Properties

, p.175.

Using an application project has the advantage that these have a fuller range of generic build tools (Assembler, language-specific Compiler, Librarian, and

Linker

).

2.

Select the Build Specs tab and look at the existing specs. The pre-configured build spec names follow an ArchitectureToolChain_ProjectType convention, for example, PENTIUMgnu_RTP. This spec is configured for a Pentium target board, using GNU tools to create an Real-time Process (RTP).

In the Build Specs tab, select the build spec that comes closest to your needs, at least in terms of target architecture, or a tool chain that you are familiar with, and click Copy.

You will be warned that build properties need to be saved before proceeding.

Click OK, then enter a name for the copy you are creating in the next dialog and click OK again.

17

211

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

3.

Still in the Build Specs tab, set the Active build spec to your newly created copy (this is initially right at the bottom of the list of

Available and enabled build specs

. Whatever you set here is also propagated to the following tabs (described in more detail in

16. Build Properties and the

Build Console

):

Build Tools

, p.184

Build Macros

, p.188

Build Paths

, p.190

Each of these tabs has a generic section at the top with

Build spec specific settings

below. The generic section will normally be correct, which is one advantage of copying an existing spec, rather than creating a new spec from the beginning.

Step 2: Configure the Build Tool.

The build system uses generic build tools, for example, a C-Compiler. So if you are adding a new, unsupported C compiler, you will have to configure a build spec that understands this specific instance of the generic C-Compiler build tool. Using the compiler as an example, proceed as follows:

1.

Select the Build Tools tab and set the Build tool drop-down list to

C-Compiler

.

The generic settings regarding Suffixes and Build output generation should be correct, if not modify accordingly. (If you were adding a compiler for a new language, foolanguage, you could first create a Copy of a generic C-Compiler

Build tool

and name that, for example, Foo-Compiler, and then configure the generic settings as required.)

2.

In the Build spec specific settings you would configure the options that are specific to your particular compiler.

– The Active build spec should already be set to your newly created build spec.

– The Derived suffix refers to the file suffix of the compiler’s output.

– The Command is the command line call to your compiler with all the options you want to pass.

In theory, you could simply type a hard command in this field. However, using the predefined macros of the form %MacroName% and macros (your own and/or pre-defined) that are defined on the Macros tab and referenced using $(MacroName) generally makes more sense, as does

212

17 Building: Use Cases

17.9 Developing on Remote Hosts

separating common Tool Flags and Debug mode and Non Debug mode flags. For more detailed information please refer to

16.6 Build Tools

, p.184.

3.

If you are using your own and/or pre-defined using macros in the Command field, set these in the Build Macros tab.

For more detailed information please refer to

16.7 Build Macros

, p.188.

4.

In the Build Paths tab, configure the redirection directories for build output and set the include search paths (if applicable; that is, if you are configuring a build spec for a C/C++ compiler) using the Generate and Add buttons.

For more detailed information please refer to

16.8 Build Paths

, p.190.

After you have configured the build spec for the first tool in the chain, for example, the compiler, go back to the Build Tools tab (see

Step 2 , above) to configure any

additional tools, such as the Linker or Librarian.

17.9 Developing on Remote Hosts

The Workbench remote build feature allows you to develop, build and run your applications on a local host running Workbench, using a workspace that is located on a remote host as if it were on a local disk.

17

In the case of a managed build, Workbench generates the makefiles on the local machine running Workbench using a path mapping of the workspace root

213

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

location, so that the generated makefiles will be correctly dumped for a build that is executed on the remote machine. When launching the build, a network connection (rlogin) is established to the build host, and the actual build command is executed there by using an intermediate script to allow you to set up the needed environment for the build process.

17.9.1 General Requirements

The workspace root directory has to be accessible from both machines.

Only Eclipse projects located underneath the workspace root can be remotely built.

A rlogin remote connection to the build machine must be possible.

17.9.2 Remote Build Scenarios

Local Windows, Remote UNIX:

The workspace root directory should be located on the remote UNIX host and mapped to a specific network drive on Windows. It may also be possible to locate the root directory on the Windows machine, but then there is the need to mount the Windows disk on the build host. This may lead to problems regarding permissions and performance, so a mapping of the workspace root-directory is definitely needed.

Local UNIX, Remote UNIX:

As it is possible to access the workspace root directory on both machines with the equivalent path (automount) it may be possible to skip the path mapping.

Local UNIX, Remote Windows:

This scenario is not supported, as you would need to execute the build command on Windows from a UNIX host.

214

17 Building: Use Cases

17.9 Developing on Remote Hosts

17.9.3 Setting Up a Remote Environment

To set up your environment on the remote machine prior to a build or run, use the

Edit remote command script

button to include additional commands. It will open the file workspaceDir/.metadata/.plugins/com.windriver.ide.core/remote_cmd.sh.

For example, to extend the path before a build, add the highlighted lines to the default file:

#!/bin/sh

WORKSPACE_ROOT="%WorkspaceRoot%" export WORKSPACE_ROOT

DISPLAY=%Display% export DISPLAY

PATH=/MyTools/gmake_special/bin:$PATH export PATH

cd $WORKSPACE_ROOT cd "$1" shift 1 exec "[email protected]"

You can add any commands you need, but all commands must be in sh shell style.

17.9.4 Building Projects Remotely

1.

Switch to a workspace that contains existing projects by selecting File >

Switch Workspace

. Type the path to the appropriate workspace, or click

Browse

and navigate to it.

2.

In the Project Navigator, right-click a project and select Build > Remote

Connection

. The Remote Connections dialog appears.

3.

Click Add and type a descriptive name for this remote connection. Click OK.

4.

In the Connection Settings fields, add the following information to create a remote connection:

Hostname

The name of the build host (can also be an IP address).

Username

The username used to establish the connection (the remote user may differ from the local user).

17

215

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Remote Workspace Location

The root directory of the workspace as seen on the remote host.

Display (XServer)

IP address of the machine where the output should be displayed.

By clicking the Advanced button you can also access these fields:

Password request string

A string that will be recognized as a password request to prompt you for the password.

Remember Password during Workbench sessions

A switch to specify whether the password entered should be remembered during the current session. This is useful during a lengthy build/run session.

5.

Click Connect to connect immediately. Remote connection settings are stored, and are specific to this workspace. They are not accessible from any other workspace.

6.

The build is executed on the remote host, with the build output listed in the standard Workbench Build Console. The XServer (IP address listed in the

Display field) is used whenever any type of X application is started, either during builds or runs.

7.

To return to local development, select Local Host from the list of connections, then click Connect.

17.9.5 Running Applications Remotely

This section provides information about running native applications only, as running VxWorks projects remotely is handled differently.

Running native applications remotely is quite similar to running applications locally: a Native Application launch configuration must be created that defines the executable to be run, as well as remote execution settings for the launch. On the

Remote settings

tab are:

Remote Program

Enter the command that is used to launch the application. This may be useful for command-line applications that could then be launched within an xterm, for instance.

216

17 Building: Use Cases

17.9 Developing on Remote Hosts

Remote Working Directory

This setting is optional, but if a remote working directory is given, it overrides the entry in the Working Directory field of the Arguments tab.

For remote runs, a new connection similar to the active connection will be established to allow control of Eclipse process handling, as the new remote process will be shown in the Debug view. The Remember password during Workbench sessions feature is very useful here.

Command-line application’s output and input is redirected to the standard Eclipse console unless the application is started within an external process that creates a new window (such as xterm). The default for remote execution is a remote command like xterm -e %Application%, therefore a local XServer (like Exceed or

Cygwin X) must be set up and running.

For more information about creating launch configurations, see

23. Launching

Programs

.

17.9.6 Rlogin Connection Description

The rlogin connection used in the Workbench remote build makes use of the standard rlogin protocol and ports. It establishes a connection on port 513 on the remote host, and the local port used must be in the range of 512 to 1023 per rlogin protocol convention.

On Windows the rlogin connection is implemented directly from within

Workbench, so you do not need an existing rlogin client. The UNIX implementation is different, because for security reasons the local port (range: 512 to 1023) is restricted to root access, which cannot be granted from within

Workbench. Therefore an external rlogin process is spawned using the command-line: rlogin -l

username hostname

rlogin

on UNIX platforms makes use of setUID root to ensure that the needed root privileges are available.

The standard rlogin protocol doesn't support access to stderr of the remote connection, to all output is treated as stdout. Coloring in the Build Console of

Workbench for stderr is therefore not available.

17

217

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

NOTE:

On Linux the rlogin client and server daemon can be switched off per default. So if the machine is used as a Workbench (remote build client) host, the

rlogin

executable must be enabled (or built) and if the machine is acting as build server (remote build host) the rlogin daemon must be enabled. Details may be found in the system documentation of the host.

218

18

RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.1 Introduction 219

18.2 A VxWorks Real-time Process from Host to Target 220

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target 225

18.1 Introduction

This chapter uses hands-on examples to illustrate one of the ways you might set up, build, and run VxWorks Real-time Processes and VxWorks Shared Libraries from host to target. The target used will be a VxWorks Simulator.

The Shared Library hands-on (

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

, p.225) follows from the Real-time Process hands-on, and therefore

assumes that you have completed the steps outlined under

18.2 A VxWorks

Real-time Process from Host to Target

, p.220.

219

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

18.2 A VxWorks Real-time Process from Host to Target

This section describes how to go about setting up a VxWorks Real-time Process.

Although the section is self-contained, you will also need to set up a VxWorks

Real-time Process with the infrastructure described here if you want to use a

VxWorks Shared Library.

18.2.1 Set Up the Project Structure for Real-time Processes

You will need a VxWorks Image project, a VxWorks File System project, and a

VxWorks Real-time Process project to start with. When this is done, you will need to add some code and to create a target connection to test the system.

Step 1: Set up a VxWorks image project.

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click and select

New > VxWorks Image Project

.

2.

In the first wizard page, under Project name: type VxWorksSim and click

Next

.

3.

In the next wizard page, set A board support package to simpc and click

Finish

.

Step 2: Set up a VxWorks File System project.

1.

In the Project Navigator, be sure the project you have just created,

VxWorksSim

, is selected so that the new VxWorks File System project you are about to create will automatically become a subproject of

VxWorksSim

.

2.

In the first wizard page, under Project name: type VxWorksSimFS, click

Finish

.

3.

In the Project Navigator, expand the VxWorks Image project VxWorksSim project folder you created earlier. You will see the VxWorksSimFS project you have just created is a subproject of VxWorksSim.

Step 3: Set up a VxWorks Real-time Process project.

1.

Right-click in the Project Navigator and select

New > VxWorks Real Time Process Project

.

2.

In the first wizard page, under Project name: type MyRTP, click Finish.

220

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.2 A VxWorks Real-time Process from Host to Target

By default, the build spec

SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP_DEBUG

will be activated for the project, which is fine because this will match the board support package you set for the VxWorks Image project in

Step 1 , above.

Step 4: Add the Real-time Process to the File System project.

In the Project Navigator, drag-and-drop the MyRTP project onto the

VxWorksSimFS

project (the VxWorksSim project must be expanded).

Figure 18-1

shows the project setup so far (note that .* files have been filtered out).

Step 5: Set up the target file system.

Figure 18-1

Project Hierarchy for a VxWorks Real-time Process

18.2.2 Add Code to the Real-time Process Project

You need some code that will let you verify that everything works.

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click MyRTP, select

New > File from Template

, and under File Name: type MyRTP.c.

Click Finish; the file MyRTP.c opens in the Editor view.

221

18

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

2.

In MyRTP.c change the following lines (the results are also shown in

Figure 18-2 ):

Change:

#include “MyRTP.h” to read:

#include <stdio.h>

Change the function: void MyRTP()

{

} to read: int main()

{ printf("MyRTP called!\n”); return 0;

}

Figure 18-2 shows the modified source file, MyRTP.c.

Figure 18-2

The MyRTP.c Source

Leave the file open; you will need it again if you intend to go through

18.3 A

VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

, p.225.

222

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.2 A VxWorks Real-time Process from Host to Target

18.2.3 Add the Real-time Process to the Target File System

Although you do not have a Real-time Process binary yet, you can make provision for the binary to be on the target file system once the system is built.

1.

In the Project Manager, under the VxWorksSimFS File System project you created earlier, double-click the VxWorks File System Contents node to open the File System Contents Editor.

2.

In the File System Contents Editor, click New Folder and under Name type

bin

.

The bin folder appears in the Target Contents panel.

3.

In the Target Contents panel select the bin node, then in the Host Contents panel, expand the project nodes until you can see the target node that represents the (future) Real-time Process binary, namely:

MyRTP.vxe (SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP_DEBUG)

.

Select this node and click Add. The MyRTP.vxe binary (which does not yet exist) appears in the Target Contents panel under the bin folder.

Figure 18-3

shows the results.

Figure 18-3

The Executable on the Target File System

18

Leave the File System Contents Editor open; you will need it again if you intend to go through

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

, p.225.

223

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

18.2.4 Build the System

In the Project Navigator, right-click the VxWorks Image project, VxWorksSim, and select Build Project.

The structure is recursively built, starting in MyRTP, as you can see in the Build

Console. Next the File System project, VxWorksSimFs, is built. The build finishes at the top, in VxWorksSim.

In the next step (

Set up the Target Connection

, p.224) you will need to know the

location of the VxWorks kernel you have just built. You can see the path to this in the second to last line of the build console; copy this location for later pasting.

18.2.5 Set up the Target Connection

To test the system you have just built, you need to create a connection to the target.

1.

In the Target Manager, right-click the default(localhost) registry icon and select New > Connection.

2.

On the first wizard page, select Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection and click Next.

3.

On the next wizard page, select Custom Simulator and, if you copied the path to the VxWorks Kernel Image you have just built (under

Build the System,

p.224

, above) paste this in the field and then either Browse to VxWorks, or enter /VxWorks.

In general terms, the location of the image is:

WorkspaceDirectory/ProjectName/BuildSpecName/VxWorks whereby

BuildSpecName in this case example would be default.

You have to select Custom Simulator because your image, unlike the

Standard Simulator

, has a VxWorks File System (FSROM) that holds a

Real-time Process binary linked to it.

4.

Continue to click Next until you reach the last wizard page (when the Finish button is enabled). At Connection name: type VxWorksSim. Leave the

Immediately connect to target if possible

check box selected. Click Finish.

The connection is immediately established and the Kernel Shell opens.

224

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

18.2.6 Run the Real-time Process on the Simulator

At the Kernel Shell prompt, type:

cd "/romfs/bin"

Press ENTER and type:

rtpSpawn "MyRTP.vxe"

Press ENTER again.

The output MyRTP called! should appear. Close the Kernel Shell.

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

Much of the initial work required for using a VxWorks Shared Library project is done under

18.2 A VxWorks Real-time Process from Host to Target

, p.220. It is

assumed you have completed all the steps in that section, and the procedures outlined below will follow on from there.

18.3.1 Set Up the VxWorks Shared Library Project

First, create a new VxWorks Shared Library project to add to the existing project structure you have already created under

18.2 A VxWorks Real-time Process from

Host to Target

, p.220.

1.

Right-click in the Project Navigator and select

New > VxWorks Shared Library Project

and click Finish.

2.

On the first wizard page, at Project name: type MyLibrary and click Finish.

Note that you have not set a build spec. The build spec for a Shared Library must match that used for the Real-time Process that will link to it. However, the default build spec for the Real-time Process you implicitly accepted above

(see

Step 4:Add the Real-time Process to the File System project.

, p.221) matches the

default for Shared Libraries, namely

SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP_DEBUG

.

18

225

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

18.3.2 Add Code to the Shared Library Project

You need some code that will let you verify that everything works.

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click MyLibrary, select

New > File from Template

, and under File Name type MyLibrary.h. Click

Finish

; the file MyLibrary.h opens in the Editor view.

2.

In the Project Navigator, right-click MyLibrary, select

New > File from Template

, and under File Name type MyLibrary.c. Click

Finish

; the file MyLibrary.c opens in the Editor view.

3.

In MyLibrary.c add the following line:

#include <stdio.h>

4.

Insert the following line into the MyLibrary function:

printf("MyLibrary called!\n");

Figure 18-4 shows the modified source file, MyLibrary.c.

Figure 18-4

The MyLibrary.c Source

5.

Save MyLibrary.c.

226

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

18.3.3 Add the Shared Library to the Run-Time Process

The Shared Library must be built before the Real-time Process, so it is added as a subproject. Furthermore, the library binary must be located in the host and target side directories you specify as described below.

Step 1: Add the library as a subproject.

In the Project Navigator, drag-and-drop the MyLibrary project onto the MyRTP project.

Step 2: Modify the Real-time Process build-target build properties.

1.

Right-click the MyRTP project’s build target node (MyRTP.vxe) and select

Properties

.

2.

In the project’s Properties dialog, select the Build Properties node.

Step 3: Set up the Linker Build Tool for a dynamic executable and target-side run path.

1.

Select the Build Tools tab.

2.

In the field next to the Tool Flags button, type the run path (-rpath) in the directory that will hold the shared library on your target, for example,

-rpath /romfs/lib

(romfs is the default root directory of the ROMFS created by the File System project you set up earlier).

3.

Click the Tool Flags button. In the Linker Options dialog that appears, select

Create a dynamic executable

.

18

227

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 18-5

Tool Flags for Dynamic Executables

You will notice that the option, as used on the command line, appears in the

Selected Options

list on the right.

4.

Click OK to close the Linker Options dialog. You will see the option again in the field next to the Tool Flags button.

Step 4: Define Build Macros for the host-side location and library binary.

1.

Select the Build Macros tab.

2.

In the list of Build spec specific settings, select the LIBS macro and click Edit.

228

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

3.

In the dialog that appears, add a space after the existing value (-lstlstd), followed by the basename of the shared library binary you want to link to, namely MyLibrary:

-l:MyLibrary.so

When you close the dialog you should see:

LIBATH -lstlstd -l:MyLibrary.so

4.

In the list of Build spec specific settings, select the LIBPATH macro and click

Edit

.

5.

In the dialog that appears, enter the host-side directory location of the library binary you want to dynamically link to, namely:

-L../MyLibrary/$(OBJ_DIR)

Note that $(OBJ_DIR) expands to wherever the build output for MyLibrary is generated. In this example, this will be a subdirectory named

SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP_DEBUG

. Using $(OBJ_DIR) is generic and therefore offers the advantage of not having to change the LIBPATH macro if you change build specs.

Note that the relative reference assumes that the Shared Library project is located in the same workspace as the Real-time Process project.

6.

Click OK to close the project’s build-target Properties dialog.

The next time you build the project structure, a dynamic executable capable of run-time linking to the shared library with the file basename and the directories (host and target side) you specified above will be produced.

However, you still need to do a few more things.

18

229

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

18.3.4 Modify the Code in the Real-time Process Project

You need some code that will let you verify that everything works.

1.

Open MyRTP.c in the editor, if it is not already open.

2.

In MyRTP.c, insert the line:

#include "MyLibrary.h"

3.

Modify main( ) as follows: int main()

{ printf("MyRTP calling MyLibrary!

MyLibrary(); return 0;

}

Figure 18-6 shows the modified source file, MyRTP.c.

Figure 18-6

The Modified MyRTP.c Source

4.

Save MyRTP.c.

230

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

18.3.5 Generate Include Search Paths

The file you included, MyLibrary.h, in MyTP.c is not in the same project

(directory). The include therefore needs to be resolved for successful compilation.

1.

In the Project Navigator, right-click the MyRTP project and select

Generate Include Search Paths

.

2.

In the dialog that appears, click Next, and on the next page click Resolve All.

Notice that the entry %Proj-MyLibrary% appears in the lower,

Include Search Paths

, panel. Click Next, then Finish.

18.3.6 Add the Shared Library to the Target File System

Although you do not have a Shared Library binary yet, you can make provision for the binary to be on the target file system once the system is built.

1.

The File System Contents Editor should still be open. If not, in the

Project Manager

, under the VxWorksSimFS File System project you created earlier, double-click the VxWorks File System Contents node to open it.

2.

In the File System Contents Editor, click New Folder and at Name: type lib.

The lib folder appears in the Target Contents panel.

3.

In the Target Contents panel select the lib node, and in the Host Contents panel, expand the project nodes until you can see the target node that represents the (future) Shared Library binary, namely:

MyLibrary.so (SIMPENTIUMdiab_RTP_DEBUG)

.

4.

Select this node and click Add. The MyLibrary.so binary (which does not yet exist) appears in the Target Contents panel under the lib folder.

Figure 18-3

shows the results. Notice that the information panel at the bottom displays the settings you entered earlier in the Build Properties.

18

231

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 18-7

The Library Binary on the Target File System

18.3.7 Build the System Again

In the Project Navigator, right-click the VxWorks Image project, VxWorksSim, and select Build Project.

The structure is recursively built, starting, as you can see in the Build Console, in

MyLibrary

, followed by MyRTP, followed by the File System project,

VxWorksSimFs

, and finishing at the top in VxWorksSim.

232

18 RTPs and Shared Libraries from Host to Target

18.3 A VxWorks Shared Library from Real-time Process to Target

18.3.8 Run the RTP with the Shared Library on the Simulator

1.

In the Target Manager, right-click VxWorksSim, the connection you created under

18.2.5 Set up the Target Connection

, p.224, and select Connect.

Once the connection has been established, the Kernel Shell will appear.

2.

At the Kernel Shell prompt, enter:

cd "/romfs/bin"

3.

Press ENTER and type:

rtpSpawn "MyRTP.vxe"

4.

Press ENTER again.

The following output should appear:

MyRTP calling MyLibrary!

MyLibrary called!

5.

Close the Kernel Shell.

18

233

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

234

PA R T I V

Target Management

19 Connecting to Targets .................................. 237

20 New Target Server Connections ................. 245

21 New VxWorks Simulator Connections ........ 257

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections ...... 261

235

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

236

19

Connecting to Targets

19.1 Introduction 237

19.2 The Target Manager View 238

19.3 Defining a New Connection 238

19.4 The Registry 239

19.5 Establishing a Connection 242

19.6 Connect to the Target 242

19.1 Introduction

A target connection manages communication between the Workbench host tools and the target system. A connection must be configured and established before host tools can interact with the target.

All host-side connection configuration work and connection-related activity is done in the Target Manager view. Connections are registered and made accessible to users by the Wind River Registry.

This chapter describes ways to configure, start, and manage target connections in the Target Manager view. For detailed information Target Server and Registry, see the tgtsvr and wtxregd API reference entries (see

Help > Help Contents > Wind River Documentation > References > Host API and Command References > Wind River Host Tools API Reference

).

237

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

19.2 The Target Manager View

A connection to a Target Server, a VxWorks Simulator, an Instruction Set

Simulator (ISS), or an on-chip debugging device (OCD) such as Wind River ICE and Wind River Probe must be defined and established before tools can communicate with a target system.

All host-side connection configuration work and connection-related activity is done in the Target Manager view. The target side (required for Target Server and

VxWorks Simulator connections) is configured in the Kernel Editor (see

5.5.1 The

Kernel Editor

, p.85).

By default, the Target Manager view is on a tab at the bottom-left of Workbench.

It is available in the Application Development perspective and in the Device

Debug perspective. If the view is not visible, choose Window > Show View >

Target Manager

(or, if it is not listed there, Window > Show View > Other).

The most import tasks in the Target Manager view are:

■ defining new connections connecting to targets disconnecting from targets

Once you have connected to a target, more commands are enabled on the right-click context menu (see also

23. Launching Programs

).

19.3 Defining a New Connection

All connections types are defined from the Target Manager view (see

19.2 The

Target Manager View

, p.238).

To open the New Connection wizard, use the appropriate toolbar icon or right-click in the Target Manager and select New > Connection.

The first thing the New Connection wizard asks you to do is to select one of the following connection types:

Wind River ICE

See

22.1 Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection

, p.261.

Wind River ISS

238

19 Connecting to Targets

19.4 The Registry

See

22.2 Defining a New Wind River ISS Connection

, p.271.

Wind River Probe

See

22.3 Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection

, p.275

Wind River Target Server Connection

Separate options are presented for Linux and VxWorks. For VxWorks connections, see

20.2 Defining a New Target Server Connection

, p.245.

Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection

See

21.2 Defining a New Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection

, p.257.

Properties you set using the New Connection wizard can be modified later by right-clicking the connection in the Target Manager and choosing Properties. In most cases, you will have to disconnect and reconnect for the changes to take effect.

19.4 The Registry

The Wind River Registry is a database of target servers, boards, ports, and other items used by Workbench to communicate with targets. For details about the registry, see the wtxregd and wtxreg reference entries.

If Workbench finds an installed VxWorks platform on start-up, it creates a default

VxWorks Simulator connection. Before any target connections have been defined, the default registry—which runs on the local host—appears as a single node in the

Target Manager. (Under Linux, the default registry is a target-server connection for Linux user mode.) Additional registries can be established on remote hosts.

Registries serve a number of purposes:

The registry stores target connection configuration data. Once you have defined a connection, this information is persistently stored across sessions and is accessible from other computers.

You can also share connection configuration data that is stored in the registry.

This allows easy access to targets that have already been defined by other team members.

19

239

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

NOTE:

Having connection configuration data does not yet mean that the target is actually connected.

The registry keeps track of the currently running target servers and administrates access to them.

Workbench needs the registry to detect and launch target servers.

If Workbench does not detect a running default registry at start-up, it launches one. After quitting, the registry is kept running in case it is needed by other tools. You do not ever need to terminate the registry. If you do terminate the registry, it stores its internal data in a file that has to be writable on relaunching

Workbench. Please refer to

19.4.2 Registry Data Storage, p.241

,

for information on the location of this file.

19.4.1 Remote Registries

If you have multiple target boards being used by multiple users, it makes sense to maintain connection data in a central place (the remote registry) that is accessible to everybody on the team. This saves everyone from having to remember communications parameters such as IP addresses, etc. for every board that they might need to use.

Creating a Remote Registry

You might want to create a new master registry on a networked remote host that is accessible to everybody. To do so:

1.

Workbench needs to be installed and the registry needs to be running on the remote host. The easiest way to launch the registry is to start and quit

Workbench. However, you can also launch the wtxregd program from the command line. (For more information about wtxregd, see

Help > Help Contents > Wind River Documentation > References > Host

API and Command References > Wind River Host Tools API Reference

.)

2.

Right-click in the Target Manager, (see

19.2 The Target Manager View

, p.238),

then select New > Registry from the context menu.

3.

In the dialog that appears, enter either the host name or the IP address of the remote host.

240

19 Connecting to Targets

19.4 The Registry

Workbench immediately attempts to connect to the remote registry. If the host is invalid, or if no registry is identified on the remote host, this information is displayed in the Target Manager.

19.4.2 Registry Data Storage

If you shut down the registry, its internal data is written to the file

installDir/.wind/wtxregd.hostname. If this file is not writable on launch, the registry attempts to write to /var/tmp/wtxregd.hostname instead. If this file is also not writable, the registry cannot start and an error message appears.

19.4.3 The Registry and Product Updates

Because other tools use the registry, it is not automatically shut down when you quit Workbench. Before updating or uninstalling Workbench (or other products that use the registry), it is advisable to shut down the registry so that the new one starts with a fresh database. To shut down the registry:

On Windows, right-click the registry icon in the system tray, and choose

Shutdown

.

On Linux and UNIX, execute wtxregd stop, or manually kill the wtxregd process.

If you want to migrate your existing registry database and all of your existing connection configurations to the new version, make a backup of the registry data

file (see 19.4.2 Registry Data Storage, p.241 ) and copy it to the corresponding new

product installation location.

19.4.4 Changing the Default Registry

Normally, the default registry runs on the local computer. You can change this if you want to force a default remote registry (see

19.4.1 Remote Registries

, p.240). To

do this on Linux and UNIX, modify the

WIND_REGISTRY

environment variable.

To do this on Windows, under the Windows Registry

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE

node, modify the field Software\Wind River Systems\Wtx\N.N\WIND

_REGISTRY

.

19

241

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

19.5 Establishing a Connection

Once you have created your application projects and defined connections, you will want to run, test, and debug the projects on your target or simulator. To do this, you first need to connect to the target.

19.5.1 Assumptions

You are using a simulator (VxWorks Simulator or the on-chip debugging simulator, ISS), or you are using a target board and your hardware connections are set up and running.

If you are using a target board (not a simulator), you have correctly configured your FTP service as described in

3. Setting Up Your Hardware

and in the Wind

River ICE for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference and Wind River Probe for

Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference.

You have defined one or more host-target connections as described in

20. New

Target Server Connections

,

21. New VxWorks Simulator Connections

, and

22. New

On-Chip Debugging Connections

.

19.6 Connect to the Target

The first step in running an application on the target is to establish a connection to that target.

Connect to and disconnect from targets in the Target Manager (see

19.2 The Target

Manager View

, p.238) by selecting a connection node and then using the

appropriate toolbar icon, or by right-clicking and selecting Connect.

Once the connection has been established:

If the connection is to a simulator, the Kernel Shell appears (see

19.6.1 The

Kernel Shell

, p.243, for more information).

On Windows, a registry icon appears (if it is not there already) in the Windows system tray (the area at the right of the Windows taskbar) to indicate the

registry is running (see also

19.4 The Registry

, p.239).

In the Target Manager:

242

19 Connecting to Targets

19.6 Connect to the Target

– A blue check mark is superimposed on the top-left corner of the connection node, the node is labeled ConnectionName [connected], and new nodes appear under the connection node.

– A subnode appears under the connection node. This node’s label identifies the connection type and the kernel. The node’s right-click context menu offers a subset of the connection node’s context menu (restricted to the most commonly used commands) as well as the Kernel Objects command. The Kernel Objects command populates and opens the Kernel

Objects

tab (by default located behind the Target Manager).

– A number of additional subnodes appear. These are described in

Table 19-1 . Please refer to the Wind River Workbench User Interface

Reference: Target Manager View for a full list of the icons that you might see in the Target Manager.

Table 19-1

VxWorks Connections

Node Description

Real Time Processes

When you run RTPs, they will appear as subnodes under this node.

Kernel Tasks

When the connection is initially established, you see the VxWorks tasks. When you download and run

DKMs, they will appear as additional subnodes under this node.

VxWorks

location The kernel node and its host location. A superimposed red S at the top-right of the icon indicates that symbol information has been downloaded.

19

19.6.1 The Kernel Shell

The Kernel Shell

1

that appears when you establish a connection displays output generated by applications running on the kernel.

If you are using a VxWorks Simulator connection, shell components are included in the kernel by default and the Kernel Shell also provides a prompt and accepts

1. In versions of VxWorks prior to 6.0, the Kernel Shell was called the Target Shell.

The new name reflects the fact that the target-resident shell runs in the kernel and not in a process.

243

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

input like the Host Shell (see the VxWorks Command-Line User’s Guide). If you are using a real board connection, the kernel shell does not provide an input prompt by default; you can, however, include the necessary components in the VxWorks kernel (see

5.5 Configuring Kernel Components

, p.84 as well as the VxWorks Kernel

Programmer’s Guide and the VxWorks Application Programmer’s Guide).

For the most part, the Kernel Shell works the same as the Host Shell. For detailed information about the Host Shell see the VxWorks Command-Line User’s Guide. For information about the differences between the Host and Kernel shells, see the

VxWorks API Reference entries for dbgLib, shellLib, and usrLib.

244

20

New Target Server

Connections

20.1 Introduction 245

20.2 Defining a New Target Server Connection 245

20.3 Kernel Configuration 255

20.1 Introduction

Target Server connections are defined in the Target Manager view (see

19. Connecting to Targets

).

20.2 Defining a New Target Server Connection

To open the New Connection wizard, right-click in the Target Manager, then select New > Connection.

245

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

20.2.1 Wind River Target Server

On the initial page of the New Connection wizard, select Wind River Target

Server Connection for VxWorks

and click Next.

20.2.2 Target Server Connection Page

Back End Settings

Back end

The Back end settings specify how a target server will communicate with a target.

Table 20-1

provides descriptions of the available options in the

Back end

drop-down list.

Table 20-1

Communications Back Ends for Target Server

Back End

wdbrpc wdbpipe wdbserial wdbproxy loopback

Description

WDB RPC. This is the default. It supports any kind of IP connection

(for example, Ethernet). Polled-mode Ethernet drivers are available for most BSPs to support system-mode debugging for this type of connection.

WDB Pipe. The back end for VxWorks target simulators.

WDB Serial. For serial hardware connections; does not require

SLIP

on the host system. If you select this option, also choose a

Host serial device

(port) and Serial device speed (bits per second).

WDB Proxy. The backend for UDP, TCP, and TIPC connections.

Used to run the target server during testing. Not for connecting to targets.

!

CAUTION:

The target server must be configured with the same communication back end as the one built into the kernel image and used by the target agent. The

standard back end options are described in Table 20-1 ; the compatible kernel

components are listed in

Table 20-4

.

246

20 New Target Server Connections

20.2 Defining a New Target Server Connection

!

CAUTION:

Do not choose the TIPC WDB Proxy connection type unless you have included the TIPC network stack (INCLUDE_TIPC_ONLY) component in your

VxWorks Image Project.

For more information about finding components to include in your VxWorks

Image Project, see Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Kernel Editor View.

For more information about TIPC, see Wind River TIPC for VxWorks 6 Programmer’s

Guide: Building VxWorks to Include Wind River TIPC.

CPU

Workbench can correctly identify the target CPU. In rare cases, a close variant might be misidentified, so you can manually set the CPU here.

Name/IP address

The Name/IP Address field specifies the network name or the IP address of the target hardware for networked targets. If you are using a serial port, enter either

COM1

or

COM2

.

Kernel Image and Symbols

The Kernel Image and Symbols properties relate to a copy of the target kernel that resides on the host.

File path from target

(if available)

Select this option to search for an image of the software running on the target using the target path.

File

If the run-time image file is not in the same location on the host that is configured into the target (or if host and target have different views of the file system), select this option and use the adjacent text box to specify the host location of the kernel image.

For example, if you are using a target programmed with a vxWorks_rom.hex,

vxWorks_romCompressed.hex

, or any other on-board VxWorks image, you must use this option to identify the kernel file location; otherwise the target server will not be able to identify the target symbols.

20

247

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Advanced Target Server Options

Please see the tgtsvr reference entry in the online API reference and the VxWorks

Programmer’s Guide for more detailed information about target server options in the Target Manager, as well as on additional available options.

Options

These options are passed to the tgtsvr program on the command line. Enter these options manually, or use the Edit button for GUI-assisted editing.

Advanced Target Server Options Dialog

The properties in the Advanced Target Server Options dialog that you open with

Edit

on the main wizard page are subdivided into three tabbed groups: Common,

Memory

, and Logging.

The Common Tab

Target Server File System

The Target Server File System (TSFS) is a full-featured VxWorks file system that provides target access to files located on the host system. It is used by the

Wind River System Viewer. It also provides the most convenient way to boot a target over a serial connection. Although somewhat slow, it is simple and easy to use.

A target can access files on the host it is booted from, if booted via FTP or rsh.

However, if the target is booted from a remote host, you can use the TSFS as a simple method to access files on the local host.

The TSFS is also the default method used by the System Viewer for uploading event data from the target. The TSFS should therefore be enabled and writable

(default) when using the System Viewer.

!

CAUTION:

To use the TSFS, you must include the

WDB target server file system

component when you build the kernel image.

See

20.3 Kernel Configuration

, p.255, below, and the VxWorks Kernel Application

Programmer’s Guide for more details.

Root

If the Enable File System check box is selected, you have to identify the root of the host file system that will be made visible to target processes using the

TSFS. By default, this is the Workspace root directory. If you use the TSFS for

248

20 New Target Server Connections

20.2 Defining a New Target Server Connection

booting a target, it is recommended that you use the default root directory. If you do not use TSFS, you must use the Kernel Image and Symbols configuration options to specify the location of the kernel image (see

Kernel

Image and Symbols

, p.247).

Make Target Server File System writable

To use the Wind River System Viewer, you must select this check box to allow uploading of event data from the target. Because this also allows other users to access your host file system, you may wish to set the TSFS option for your target server to read-only when you are not using the System Viewer.

Timeout Options

Specify allowable spawn time (in seconds) for kernel tasks and RTPs, time (in seconds) to wait for a response from the agent running on the target system, how often to retry, and at what intervals.

The Memory Tab

Memory Cache Size

To avoid excessive data-transfer transactions with the target, the target server maintains a cache on the host system. By default, this cache can grow up to a size of 1 MB.

A larger maximum cache size may be desirable if the memory pool used by host tools on the target is large, because transactions on memory outside the cache are far slower.

The Logging Tab

Options on the Logging tab are used mainly for troubleshooting by Customer

Support.

A maximum size can be specified for each enabled log file. Files are rewritten from the beginning when the maximum size is reached. If a file exists, it is deleted when the target server restarts (for example, after a reboot).

For the WTX (Wind River Tool Exchange) log file, you can specify a filter, a regular expression that limits the type of information logged. In the absence of a filter, the log captures all WTX communication between host and target. Use this option in consultation with Customer Support.

20

249

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

20.2.3 Object Path Mappings Page

Object Path Mappings have two functions:

To allow the debugger to find symbol files for processes created on the target by creating a correspondence between a path on the target and the appropriate path on the host.

To calculate target paths for processes that you want to launch by browsing to them with a host file-system browser.

By default, the debug server attempts to load all of a module’s symbols each time a module is loaded. In the rare cases where you want to download a module or start a process without loading the symbol file, uncheck Load module symbols to

debug server automatically if possible

.

The simplest way to create Object Path Mappings for a module that does not have symbols yet is to download the output file (or run the executable) manually. In the

Target Manager, right-click the file or executable and select Load Symbols to

Debug Server

. From the Load Symbols dialog, select create path mappings based

on selection

and click OK. Object path mappings are created automatically, so that after the next disconnect/reconnect sequence the symbols will be found.

Pathname Prefix Mappings

This maps target path prefixes to host paths. Always use full host paths, not relative paths.

For example, mapping /tgtsvr/ to C:\workspace\ tells the debugger that files accessible under /tgtsvr/ on the target can be found under C:\workspace\ on the host.

If you launch the process host:/usr/hello.vxe on your target, Workbench needs to know what host:/ corresponds to; in other words, where it can find the hello.vxe

ELF file in the host file system. With an object path mapping of host:/ to

C:\WindRiver\

, Workbench knows that the host path to the file is

C:\WindRiver\usr\hello.vxe

.

In most cases Workbench provides correct defaults. If necessary, click Add to add new mappings, or select existing mappings and click Edit to modify existing mappings. The supplied default mappings are not editable.

250

20 New Target Server Connections

20.2 Defining a New Target Server Connection

Reverse Mapping

Sometimes host paths must be mapped to target paths. For example, if you want to browse to the process C:\WindRiver\usr\hello.vxe and launch it on the target,

Workbench needs to know that the correct target path for this process is

host:/usr/hello.vxe

.

Path Mappings for Working with Remote Hosts

You may need to edit object path mappings if your target boots from a remote host or if your target server runs on a remote host.

Running the target server on a remote host (using a remote registry; see

19.4.1 Remote Registries

, p.240 for details) allows you to:

Access targets using a serial line wdb connection even if the targets are physically connected to a remote host.

Have different IP subnets for the targets in a lab and the client running

Workbench, with the target server being the intermediary to translate between the separate subnets.

In this discussion, the target is the VxWorks target, the host is the remote registry host that the target server is running on, and the client is the system on which

Workbench is running.

Prerequisites

To allow Workbench to access targets attached to a remote host, two prerequisites must be met:

1.

The VxWorks image must be visible to the target (for booting), the host (for the target server), and the client (for the debugger and the host shell).

2.

A file system must be shared between the target and client for running RTPs.

Example: Adding New Path Mappings

When the target server is running on a host that can see the same (networked) file system that the client can, you do not need to adjust your object path mappings.

The remote target server connections can be used exactly like local connections.

However, when the remote host and the client see different file systems, you need to create new path mappings to tell the debugger where it can find the files seen by the target server. In this case, the path to the kernel image is entered as seen on the remote host; path mappings must be added to tell the debugger where these paths are on the client.

20

251

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

When there are multiple clients with different file systems, you must add path mappings for each client. The debugger tries them in the order in which they appear.

For example, consider a scenario with two clients (one on Windows, one on UNIX) accessing a common target server host.

Table 20-2 shows how each client is set up;

this is the information you would have to work with when figuring out the object path mappings for this scenario.

Table 20-2

Clients Connected to a Common Target Server Host

Station Setup Description

target t100 Booted using rsh from moon:/export1/images/t100/vxWorks

TSFS enabled host moon Kernel path from target, on /export1/images/t100/vxWorks

TSFS enabled, with rootdir /Net/shares/tsfs/t100

Tgtsvr

command line: tgtsvr -R /Net/shares/tsfs/t100 -RW t100 client c-unix File system shared with host moon

Kernel seen on /Net/moon/export1/images/t100/vxWorks

TSFS path same as on moon client c-win Kernel seen on \\moon\export1\images\t100\vxWorks

TSFS seen on L:\tsfs\t100

Based on this information, the host and target path mappings you would enter into the Pathname Prefix Mappings fields are shown in

Table 20-3

.

Table 20-3

Host and Target Paths Converted to Object Path Mappings

Target Path

Host Path

Comment

moon:/export1 /Net/moon/export1

Access to the boot file system for UNIX clients. Allows

Workbench to reverse-map for running RTPs, so when running the RTP /Net/moon/export1/myrtp.vxe, the target path will be computed as moon:/export1/myrtp.vxe

moon:/export1 \\moon\export1

/export1 /Net/moon/export1

/export1 \\moon\export1

Now the same for Windows clients.

Allows Workbench to find the kernel path: sent by the target server as /export1/..., this can be forward-mapped to the common UNIX file system for clients.

a

Now the same for Windows clients.

252

20 New Target Server Connections

20.2 Defining a New Target Server Connection

Table 20-3 Host and Target Paths Converted to Object Path Mappings (cont’d)

/tgtsvr /Net/shares/tsfs/t100

Allow reverse-mapping of the tgtsvr file system for UNIX hosts.

/tgtsvr L:\tsfs\t100

Now the same for Windows hosts.

a. This mapping may be used only for forward-mapping the kernel image, so it must be listed after the previous mappings, which are used for reverse-mapping as well.

If you do not run RTPs, only the mappings for the kernel image are required

(shown in the third and fourth rows of

Table 20-3 ). None of the other mappings are

necessary, since a file system is not needed for debugging kernel modules.

Basename Mappings

Use square brackets to enclose each mapping of target file basenames (left element) to host file basenames (right element), separated by a semi-colon (;). Mapping pairs

(in square brackets) are separated by commas. You can use an asterisk (*) as a wildcard.

For example, if debug versions of files are identified by the extension *.unstripped, the mapping [*;*.unstripped] will ensure that the debugger loads

yourApp.vxe.unstripped when yourApp.vxe is launched on the target.

20.2.4 Target State Refresh Page

Since retrieving status information from the target leads to considerable target traffic, this page allows you to configure how often and under what conditions the information displayed in the Target Manager is refreshed.

These settings can be changed later by right-clicking the target connection and selecting Refresh Properties.

Available CPU(s) on Target Board

Workbench can correctly identify the target CPU. In rare cases, a close variant might be misidentified, so you can manually set the CPU here.

20

253

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Initial Target State Query and Settings

Specify whether Workbench should query the target on connect, on stopped events, and/or on running events. You can select all options if you like.

Target State Refresh Settings

Specify whether Workbench should refresh the target state only when you manually choose to do so, or if (and how often) the display should be refreshed automatically.

Listen to execution context life-cycle events

Specify whether Workbench should listen for life-cycle events or not.

20.2.5 Connection Summary Page

This page proposes a unique Connection name, which you can modify, and displays a Summary of name and path mappings for review. To modify these mappings, click Back.

Shared

This option, which is available only for certain connection types, serves a dual purpose:

When you define a target connection configuration, this connection is normally visible only for your user ID. If you define it as Shared, other users can also see the configuration in your registry, provided that they connect to your registry (by adding it as a remote registry on their computer; see

19.4.1 Remote Registries

, p.240).

Normally, when you terminate a target connection, the target server (and simulator) are killed because they are no longer needed. In a connection that is flagged as Shared, however, they are left running so that other users can connect to them. In other words, you can flag a connection as shared if you want to keep the target server (and simulator) running after you disconnect or exit Workbench.

Immediately connect to target if possible

If you do not want to connect to the target immediately, you can connect to the target later using one of the ways described in

25. Debugging Projects

. If you

254

20 New Target Server Connections

20.3 Kernel Configuration

have applications ready to run using the connection(s) you just created, please see

23. Launching Programs

.

20.3 Kernel Configuration

Once you have defined a Target Server (or VxWorks Simulator) connection, you may have to configure the kernel communication. The default configuration, however, will normally work fine for getting started.

The target server and the simulator communicate with the target system through the target agent. To communicate with the target agent, the target server uses a communication back end that has to be configured for the same communication protocol and transport layer as the target agent on the kernel.

When you create Target Server or VxWorks Simulator connections, you define host back end communication in the Kernel Editor. For more information about

this topic, see

5.5.1 The Kernel Editor

, p.85.

Table 20-4 shows an overview of target server back ends and the kernel

components that provide the required target-agent communication interface.

Table 20-4

Communications Back Ends for Target Server and Compatible Kernel Components

Back End

wdbrpc wdbpipe wdbserial

Compatible Kernel Component

WDB END driver connection

or WDB network connection

WDB simulator pipe connection

WDB serial connection wdbproxy WDB network connection

(for UDP/TCP) or

TIPC network stack

(for TIPC)

loopback

Not

see .

Figure 20-1

shows where to find these kernel components in the Kernel Editor.

20

255

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 20-1

Kernel Editor Showing WDB Connection Components

These and other communication-related kernel components are described in detail in the VxWorks Programmer’s Guide: Kernel Images, Components, and Configuration.

256

21

New VxWorks Simulator

Connections

21.1 Introduction 257

21.2 Defining a New Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection 257

21.1 Introduction

The Wind River VxWorks Simulator allows you to simulate a connection to a standard or customized version of a VxWorks 6 kernel.

21.2 Defining a New Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection

For VxWorks Simulator-specific information going beyond this description, please see the Wind River VxWorks Simulator User’s Guide.

Target Server connections are defined in the Target Manager view (see

19.2 The

Target Manager View

, p.238).

To open the New Connection wizard, right-click in the Target Manager and choose

New > Connection

.

257

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

On the initial page of the New Connection wizard, select

Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection

and click Next.

21.2.1 VxWorks Boot Parameters Page

Standard Simulator (Default)

Select this option to create a simulated connection to a standard VxWorks kernel.

Custom Simulator

Select this option if you are using a customized VxWorks kernel.

VxWorks Kernel Image

This field is enabled only if you select Custom Simulator. Navigate to the location of your customized kernel image.

Processor Number

Your system is automatically configured to run multiple simulators.

Workbench assigns each simulator a unique positive number, known as the

Processor number

.

Advanced Boot Parameters

Please see the Wind River VxWorks Simulator User’s Guide for information on the vxsim command-line options that can be set in this dialog.

21.2.2 VxSim Memory Options Page

These options allow you to manage your memory resources. Please see the Wind

River VxWorks Simulator User’s Guide for details.

21.2.3 VxWorks Simulator Miscellaneous Options Page

This page offers file-system location options (see the Wind River VxWorks Simulator

User’s Guide for details) and a field for entering additional command-line options that are passed as-is to vxsim.

258

21 New VxWorks Simulator Connections

21.2 Defining a New Wind River VxWorks Simulator Connection

21.2.4 Target Server Options Page

WDB back end type

This corresponds to the Back end, as described for the Target Server

connection; see

Back End Settings

, p.246. The VxWorks Simulator uses the

wdbpipe

back end by default.

Name/IP Address

Available only if the wdbrpc back end is selected. Specifies the network name or IP address of the target. If you are using a serial port, enter either

COM1

or

COM2

.

The remaining options in the wizard are the same as those outlined for the Target

Server connection settings. These are described starting from

Advanced Target

Server Options Dialog

, p.248.

If you have created a connection for a standard simulator, the default settings should work. However, if you have defined a custom simulator connection, you

may have to configure the kernel-side communication, see

20.3 Kernel

Configuration

, p.255.

If you have applications ready to run using the connection(s) you have just created,

please see

23. Launching Programs

.

21

259

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

260

22

New On-Chip

Debugging

Connections

22.1 Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection 261

22.2 Defining a New Wind River ISS Connection 271

22.3 Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection 275

22.1 Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection

Wind River ICE SX connections are defined in the Target Manager view (see

19.2 The Target Manager View

, p.238).

To open a new Wind River ICE SX connection, use the following steps:

1.

Right-click in the Target Manager view and select New > Connection. The

New Connection

Wizard appears, as shown in Figure 22-1

.

261

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 22-1

New Connection Wizard—ICE

2.

Choose Wind River ICE from the list of options and click Next.

The Communication Settings dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-2

.

Figure 22-2

Communication Settings—ICE

262

To configure communication settings manually, see

Configuring

Communication Settings Manually, p.263

.

To configure communication settings

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.1 Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection

through a serial port, see

Configuring Communication Settings Through a Serial

Port

, p.265.

Configuring Communication Settings Manually

NOTE:

If you choose this option you will need to know either the network name of the emulator or its IP address. For information on assigning these values, see the

Wind River ICE SX for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference: Configuring the

Wind River ICE SX for Network Operation.

3.

Check the Configure Communication Settings Manually box and click Next.

The Settings dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-3

.

4.

In the Designators area, click Select to choose from a list of available target processors.

If you are using multiple processors, or if you have multiple devices (such as field-programmable gate arrays or application-specific integrated circuits) on your JTAG scan chain, specify a board file in the Board File field. If you are only connecting a single processor, you do not need a board file, and you can ignore the Board File field.

Either choice will populate the field below the Board File field with a summary description of your board.

5.

In the Communications area, fill in the IP Address field with the IP address you have assigned to your ICE unit.

Figure 22-3

shows the Settings dialog with values for a PPC750FX board.

22

263

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 22-3

Settings Dialog

6.

When you have entered the correct processor or board file and IP address, click Next.

264

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.1 Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection

The Target Operating System Settings dialog appears. Proceed to Step 7.

Configuring Communication Settings Through a Serial Port

If you choose to make your connection using the serial port, make sure that a serial cable is connected between Wind River ICE SX and your host computer.

NOTE:

A direct serial cable is required to create your connection this way. If you do not have a direct serial connection between your host and emulator, you must configure your ICE settings manually.

a.

Check the Configure Communication Settings Through a Serial Port box

and click Next. The Settings dialog appears, as shown in Figure 22-4

.

Figure 22-4

Serial Settings

b. Use this dialog to select the serial port you want to connect to, and set a timeout value in seconds. Communication settings such as the ICE’s dynamically assigned IP address and other settings will be retrieved and displayed automatically, as shown in

Figure 22-5 .

265

22

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 22-5

Serial Settings Summary

266

The retrieved settings can also be modified; that is, you can reconfigure the

Wind River ICE SX communication settings using a serial connection. To do this, check the Modify checkbox.

If you have downloaded a TOS (Target Operating System) to the board, click into the TOS plugin column, select the operating system from the dropdown, and enter any required parameters in the next column.

c.

Click Next.

The Target Operating System Settings dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-6 .

Figure 22-6

Target OS Settings

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.1 Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection

7.

In the Booted Target OS on selected CPU field, select the operating system that is running on your target processor. The default is None.

8.

Next to the Kernel Image field, click Browse to navigate to the kernel image you wish to specify. If you selected None in the previous step, you do not need to specify a kernel image.

9.

If you are using a Linux plug-in, specify the pass-through options in the Target

OS Pass-Through Options

field. If you are not using a Linux plug-in, skip this step.

Options are passed as pairs in the format name=’value’. Separate options with a comma. The following options are available:

notasklist=’1’

: Never fetch process list.

noautomodules=’1’

: Do not plant internal breakpoints to do automatic kernel module load/unload detection. When this option is specified, you must manually refresh to see an updated module list.

22

267

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

noloadcheckuntilhit=’1’

: Do not issue gophers until a hardware breakpoint is used to detect kernel load triggers. This option is for

“sensitive” boards that do not accept access until the kernel loads and sets up memory mapping.

loaddetectloc=’

symbol or address: Set the hardware breakpoint used to detect kernel load at symbol (for example, loaddetectloc=start_kernel) or

address (for example, loaddetectloc=0x1000). If you do not specify a symbol or address, Workbench uses a default. For most architectures the default is start_kernel; for PowerPC targets, the default is 0x0.

10.

Click Next.

The Object Path Mappings dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-7 .

Figure 22-7

Object Path Mappings

Use the Object Path Mappings dialog to specify how files in the target file system are visible in the host file system.

11.

To add a host or target path, click Add... and type the path in the dialog that appears.

268

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.1 Defining a New Wind River ICE SX Connection

12.

Click Next.

The Target State Refresh dialog appears, as shown in Figure 22-8 .

Figure 22-8

Target State Refresh

Use the Target State Refresh dialog to configure the target state query and target state refresh settings on your target processor.

13.

Click Next.

The Connection Summary dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-9 . Inspect the

displayed values to make sure they are correct.

22

269

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 22-9

Connection Summary—ICE

14.

If you want to connect to your target now, select Immediately connect to

target if possible

.

If you do not want to connect to the target immediately, you can connect to the target later using the Target Manager view to select the connection you have just defined, or you can create a Launch Configuration from the Run >

Debug...

menu. Launch Configurations allow you to combine applications with connection definitions, and to set various configuration parameters that are then persistently stored (see

23.2 Launching a Kernel Task or a Process

, p.286

and

23.5 Relaunching Recently Run Programs

, p.294). Also see the

Wind River ICE SX for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference: Establishing

Communications.

15.

If you want to share your target connection, select Shared checkbox.

This option serves a dual purpose:

When you define a target connection configuration, this connection is normally only visible for your user-id. If you define it as Shared, other users can also see the configuration in your registry, provided that they connect to your registry (by adding it as a remote registry on their computer, see

19.4.1 Remote Registries

, p.240).

270

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.2 Defining a New Wind River ISS Connection

Normally, when you disconnect a target connection, the target server (and simulator) are killed because they are no longer needed. In a connection that is flagged as Shared, however, they are left running so that other users can connect to them. In other words, you can flag a connection as shared if you want to keep the target server (and simulator) running after you disconnect or exit Workbench.

16.

Click Finish.

Your connection is now visible in the Target Manager view.

NOTE:

For Wind River ICE SX-specific information going beyond this chapter, including troubleshooting information, see the Wind River ICE SX for Wind River

Workbench Hardware Reference and the Wind River Workbench On-Chip Debugging

Guide.

22.2 Defining a New Wind River ISS Connection

For more information on the Wind River Instruction Set Simulator (ISS), please see the Wind River Workbench On-Chip Debugging Guide: Using the Instruction Set

Simulator and the Wind River Workbench Compiler manuals.

ISS connections are defined in the Target Manager view (see

19.2 The Target

Manager View

, p.238).

To define a Wind River ISS connection, use the following steps:

1.

Right-click in the Target Manager view and select New > Connection.

The New Connection Wizard appears, as shown in

Figure 22-10

.

22

271

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 22-10

New Connection Wizard—ISS

2.

Select Wind River ISS and click Next.

The Settings dialog appears, as shown in Figure 22-11

.

272

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.2 Defining a New Wind River ISS Connection

Figure 22-11

Instruction Set Simulator Settings

3.

Select a Processor (to simulate single-core debugging) or a Board file (to simulate multi-core debugging.)

This populates the list below the Board file field with a summary description of the board.

If you are simulating a board with multiple cores, the list will display a row for each. You can choose which cores you want to debug by selecting the checkbox in the first column of each row.

The second column displays the unique designator used to identify each core.

NOTE:

The TOS (Target Operating System) plugin and TOS parameters are not supported for the Instruction Set Simulator.

4.

Click Next.

The wizard next passes through three screens (Target Operating System

Settings

, Object Path Mappings, and Target State Refresh) that specify parameters on the target processor. Since this is a simulated connection and

22

273

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

there is no real target processor, you can ignore these screens. Click Next until the Connection Summary dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-12 .

Figure 22-12

Connection Summary—ISS

5.

Check the displayed values to make sure they are correct.

6.

If you want to connect to your simulation now, select Immediately connect to

target if possible

.

If you do not want to connect to the simulation immediately, you can connect later using the Target Manager view to select the connection you just defined.

7.

Click Finish.

Your connection is now visible in the Target Manager view.

274

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.3 Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection

22.3 Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection

To open a new Wind River Probe connection, use the following steps:

1.

Right-click in the Target Manager view and choose New > Connection.

The New Connection Wizard appears, as shown in

Figure 22-13

.

Figure 22-13

New Connection—Probe

2.

Select Wind River Probe and click Next.

The Settings dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-14

.

22

275

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 22-14

Settings—Probe

3.

Click Select to choose from a list of available target processors.

4.

If a board file is necessary for your target board, check the Board File field and click Browse to specify the board file.

NOTE:

Multicore debugging is not supported for the Wind River Probe. Unless your target board has more than just the processor on the JTAG scan chain, you do not need to select a board file. (For example, the Wind River SBC405GP board has some FPGAs on the scan chain, so it does require a board file.)

This populates the list below the Board file field with a summary description of the board.

5.

Inspect the Device Name field.

The Device Name field shows the serial number of your Wind River Probe unit. Since Wind River Probe uses a USB connection, there may be several units attached to your host computer at the same time. Make sure the Device

Name

field shows the serial number of the Wind River Probe you want to use.

276

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.3 Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection

6.

Click Next.

The Target Operating System Settings dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-15 .

Figure 22-15

Target OS Settings

7.

In the Booted Target OS on selected CPU field, select the operating system that is running on your target processor. The default is None.

8.

Next to the Kernel Image field, click Browse to navigate to the kernel image you wish to specify. If you selected None in the previous step, you do not need to specify a kernel image.

9.

If you are using a Linux plug-in, specify the pass-through options in the Target

OS Pass-Through Options

field. If you are not using a Linux plug-in, skip this step.

Options are passed as pairs in the format name=’value’. Separate options with a comma. The following options are available:

22

277

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

notasklist=’1’

: Never fetch process list.

noautomodules=’1’

: Do not plant internal breakpoints to do automatic kernel module load/unload detection. When this option is specified, you must manually refresh to see an updated module list.

noloadcheckuntilhit=’1’

: Do not issue gophers until a hardware breakpoint is used to detect kernel load triggers. This option is for

“sensitive” boards that do not accept access until the kernel loads and sets up memory mapping.

loaddetectloc=’

symbol or address: Set the hardware breakpoint used to detect kernel load at symbol (for example, loaddetectloc=start_kernel) or

address (for example, loaddetectloc=0x1000). If you do not specify a symbol or address, Workbench uses a default. For most architectures the default is start_kernel; for PowerPC targets, the default is 0x0.

10.

Click Next.

The Object Path Mappings dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-16

.

Figure 22-16

Object Path Mappings

278

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.3 Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection

Use the Object Path Mappings dialog to specify how files in the target file system are visible in the host file system.

11.

To add a host or target path, click Add... and type the path in the dialog that appears.

12.

Click Next.

The Target State Refresh dialog appears, as shown in Figure 22-17

.

Figure 22-17

Target State Refresh

Use the Target State Refresh dialog to configure the target state query and target state refresh settings on your target processor.

13.

Click Next.

The Connection Summary dialog appears, as shown in

Figure 22-18

. Inspect the displayed values to make sure they are correct.

22

279

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Figure 22-18

Connection Summary—Probe

14.

If you want to connect to your target now, select Immediately Connect To

Target If Possible

.

If you do not want to connect to the target immediately, you can connect to the target later using the Target Manager view to select the connection you have just defined, or you can create a Launch Configuration from the Run >

Debug...

menu.

Launch Configurations allow you to combine applications with connection definitions, and to set various configuration parameters that are then persistently stored (see

23.2 Launching a Kernel Task or a Process

, p.286 and

23.5 Relaunching Recently Run Programs

, p.294). Also see the Wind River Probe

for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference: Establishing Communications.

The Shared option is not available for the Wind River Probe. When you define a target connection configuration for the Wind River Probe, this connection is only visible for your user-id.

15.

Click Finish.

Your connection is now visible in the Target Manager view.

280

22 New On-Chip Debugging Connections

22.3 Defining a New Wind River Probe Connection

NOTE:

For Wind River Probe-specific information going beyond this description, including troubleshooting information, see the Wind River Probe for Wind River

Workbench Hardware Reference and the Wind River Workbench On-Chip Debugging

Guide.

281

22

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

282

PA R T V

Debugging

23 Launching Programs .......................................... 285

24 Managing Breakpoints ....................................... 299

25 Debugging Projects ............................................ 307

26 Troubleshooting ................................................. 323

283

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

284

23

Launching Programs

23.1 Introduction 285

23.2 Launching a Kernel Task or a Process 286

23.3 Reset & Download: Hardware Debugging Launches 291

23.4 Launching a Native Application 292

23.5 Relaunching Recently Run Programs 294

23.6 Using Attach-to-Target Launches 295

23.7 Suggested Workflow 298

23.1 Introduction

A launch configuration is like a named script that captures the whole process of building, connecting a target, downloading, running, and possibly attaching a debugger. Whenever you run a process, task, or program from the Project

Navigator or the Target Manager, a Launch Configuration is automatically created for you. Launch configurations are stored persistently, so you can rerun your previous launches by clicking a single button, and you can share them with your team.

The same launch configuration can be executed in Run-mode and Debug-mode:

Run-mode connects to your target, then launches a task or process.

285

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Debug-mode is like run-mode, but in addition to connecting to your target and launching your process, it also attaches the debugger.

This chapter explains how to create, edit, and fine-tune your launch configurations to provide a tight edit-compile-debug cycle, as well as how to manually attach the debugger to tasks and processes.

For descriptions of these dialogs as well as a guide to the icons you will see in the launch configuration wizard, see the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference:

Launch Configuration Dialog.

23.2 Launching a Kernel Task or a Process

Launch configurations that run kernel tasks, RTPs, and Linux processes are very similar. Only a few options and settings differ between them.

To create a new launch configuration, select a build target in the Project Navigator then select Run > Run or Run > Debug

1

. The Create, manage, and run

configurations

dialog appears.

1.

From the Configurations list, select the type of launch you want to create, then click New.

2.

The Name field will display a default name based on the type of configuration you selected.

A new kernel task launch configuration is called noEntryPoint -

moduleName - connectionName

2

. As soon as you select an entry point for the configuration, the name changes to entryPoint - moduleName -

connectionName. If you prefer, you can type a completely new name in the

Name

field.

A new process or RTP configuration is called noExecPath -

connectionName. As soon as you select an Exec Path for the configuration

(when you specify the executable to run), the name changes to executable -

connectionName. Or, if you prefer, you can type a completely new name in the Name field.

1. You can also create a launch configuration by right-clicking on the build target in the Project

Navigator and selecting the appropriate Run or Debug command from the context menu.

2. If no target is connected, the default name is noEntryPoint - moduleName - noDownload.

286

23 Launching Programs

23.2 Launching a Kernel Task or a Process

23.2.1 Defining the Target Connection

The default Connection to use is the target that is currently connected. If you have more than one connection defined in the Target Manager, you can select a different one from the drop-down list.

1.

To change the properties of the target connection, including target server options and object path mappings, click Properties.

2.

To create a new connection definition, click Add.

3.

To retrieve the connection-specific properties from the target, and adjust them if necessary, click Connect.

For more information about target connections, see

20. New Target Server

Connections

and the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Target Manager

View.

23.2.2 Defining the Kernel Task or Process to Run

The settings in this section can be changed only when you are connected to a target.

Once your target is connected, you can select the Entry Point of your program from the drop-down list, click Browse next to the Exec Path on Target field and navigate to the executable to run

3

(if it does not already appear), or change any of the other settings in this section.

NOTE:

If your application is not built as described in

17.6 Executables that

Dynamically Link to Shared Libraries

, p.207, you must set the

LD_LIBRARY_PATH

environment variable. See that section for details.

For more information on the fields on the Main tab, see the Wind River Workbench

User Interface Reference: Launch Configuration Dialog.

23

3. Workbench automatically maps the pathname from your host file system into a pathname that is valid on the target file system. To change the mappings, click Properties, scroll right to the Object Path Mappings tab, highlight the mapping you want to change, click Edit, then update and save your new settings.

287

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

23.2.3 Specifying a Build Target to Download

If you want Workbench to download a particular build target each time this launch is used, specify it on the Downloads tab (this is necessary only for kernel task launches). If you highlighted a build target in the Project Navigator before opening the launch dialog, the file appears in the Downloads list automatically.

1.

To modify any of the settings of the output file that appears, click Edit.

To add a file or to specify additional files to be downloaded, click Add.

In both cases, the Download dialog appears. For details about the fields in this dialog, see Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Launch Configuration

Dialog.

2.

When you are finished adjusting the settings, click OK. The new information appears in the Downloads list.

NOTE:

You can also create launches for kernel tasks that are already downloaded, or are resident in Flash or are part of the kernel image. Those tasks do not require an entry in the Downloads list since they do not need to be downloaded each time the configuration is run.

23.2.4 Specifying The Projects to Build

If you want Workbench to build a particular project or projects prior to launching this configuration, specify them on the Projects to Build tab. If you selected a build target in the Project Navigator, its project appears in the Projects to Build list automatically.

1.

To add another project to the list, click Add Project, select one or more projects, then click OK.

2.

To rearrange the build order in the list, select a project then click Up or Down.

3.

If you do not want Workbench to build for this particular launch configuration, such as when you are working with very large projects, select all projects and select Remove to clear the list

4

.

4. To prevent Workbench from building prior to launching any of your programs, unselect

Window > Preferences > Run/Debug > Launching > Build (if required) before launching

.

288

23 Launching Programs

23.2 Launching a Kernel Task or a Process

NOTE:

Workbench is aware of relationships between projects and subprojects.

So if myLib is a subproject of myProj and you choose to add myProj to the list, you cannot add myLib to the list as well because it will be built automatically when you build myProj. Adding myLib as well would be redundant and so is disabled.

When you change the list of downloaded files for kernel task launches (see

Specifying a Build Target to Download

, p.288) the projects containing those files

are automatically added to the Projects to Build list. You should always review this list when you change the list of downloaded files.

23.2.5 Defining Debug Behavior

Break on Entry

When creating debug-mode launches, Break on entry is selected by default.

Uncheck it if you want this program to run to the first breakpoint you set, rather than breaking immediately after startup.

If Break on entry is selected when the launch is run, four things happen:

Workbench automatically switches to the Device Debug perspective (if it is not already open).

5

The task or process is displayed in the Debug view.

A temporary breakpoint is planted and appears in the Breakpoints view.

The program executes up to Entry Point and breaks.

Automatically Attach Spawned Kernel Tasks

For kernel task launches, select this option if you want Workbench to automatically attach spawned kernel tasks.

23

5. From the View Management Preferences screen (

Window > Preferences > Run/Debug

> View Management

) you can control under what circumstances Workbench switches views based on your selection.

289

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

23.2.6 Specifying Where Workbench Should Look for Source Files

If your build target was compiled on the same host where you want to debug it, you do not need to change anything on the Source tab.

However, if the build target was compiled on a different host, and Workbench needs to find source files during debugging, it searches the locations listed on this tab in the specified order.

NOTE:

If you do not specify a source lookup path, the debugger will ask for the correct source path as soon as it encounters a source it cannot find. So if you prefer, you can configure the source lookup manually as you go, rather than configuring it when creating the launch.

1.

On the Sources tab, click Add to configure the source lookup path.

2.

Select the type of source to add, then click OK.

3.

Most choices require that you select a specific project, folder, or path. Make your selection, then click OK.

4.

Click Up or Down to adjust the search order.

5.

Check Search for duplicate source files on the path to have Workbench search the entire source lookup path and offer you a choice of all the files it finds that have the same filename, rather than automatically using the first file of that name it encounters.

For more information about the source locator, see

25.6 Understanding Source

Lookup Path Settings

, p.317 and Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Source

Lookup Path Dialog.

23.2.7 Configuring Access Methods

Use the Common tab to specify whether this launch is local or shared, to add the launch to the Workbench toolbar favorites menus, and to indicate whether the program should be launched in the background or not.

1.

By default this launch configuration is a local file available only to you. If you want to share it with others on your team, click Shared, then type or browse to the directory where you want to save the shared file.

2.

If you want to be able to launch this program from the Run or Debug favorites menus (the drop-down menus on the Workbench toolbar), select Run or

Debug

in the Display in favorites menu box.

290

23 Launching Programs

23.3 Reset & Download: Hardware Debugging Launches

23.2.8 Using Your Launch Configuration

When you are finished configuring the launch configuration for your program, click Apply to save your settings but leave the dialog open, click Close to save your launch configuration for later use, or click Run or Debug to launch it now.

Running Your Program

If you select Run to launch your program, the output file or executable is loaded into target memory and its name and host location appear below your target connection in the Target Manager (RTPs appear under Real-time Processes). A red

S

over the output file icon indicates that symbol information has been downloaded to the debugger.

NOTE:

If no symbol information was found, right-click the module and select Load

Symbols

to load the symbols for your module from an alternate location.

You can also match module paths with symbol information by selecting the Create

path mappings based on selection

checkbox in the Load Symbols dialog.

Debugging Your Program

If you select Debug to launch your program, in addition to loading the output file or executable into target memory and downloading symbol information, the debugger attaches to the task or process that then appears in the Debug view. For

more information about debugging your programs, see

25. Debugging Projects

and the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Debug View.

23.3 Reset & Download: Hardware Debugging Launches

For information about creating a Reset and Download launch configuration, see

Wind River ICE SX for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference: Establishing

Communications or Wind River Probe for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference:

Establishing Communications, depending on whether you are using a Wind River

ICE SX or Wind River Probe for your OCD connection.

23

291

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

23.4 Launching a Native Application

1.

To create a new launch configuration that will run a native application on your local host or remote host, select your application’s executable in the Project

Navigator then select Run > Run. The Create, manage, and run

configurations

dialog appears.

2.

From the Configurations list, select Native Application, then click New.

3.

The default name of the new configuration is New_configuration. Type a descriptive name in the Name field.

23.4.1 Specifying the Location and Arguments for Your Application

1.

To specify the location of your application’s executable file, click Browse

Workspace

near the Location field. The Select an application dialog opens.

2.

Select the executable and click OK. The executable appears in the Location field.

3.

To specify the working directory for your application, click Browse

Workspace

to open the Select a working directory dialog, or Browse File

System

to open the Browse for Folder dialog.

4.

Select a working directory, then click OK. The directory appears in the

Working Directory

field.

5.

Type the arguments your application requires into the Arguments field, or click Variables to open the Select Variable dialog. Double-click the variable you want to use, or select it and click OK to add it to the Arguments field.

23.4.2 Specifying Remote Settings

These settings are optional, and are required only if you are running your application on a remote host. For more information about working with remote

hosts, see

17.9.5 Running Applications Remotely

, p.216.

Command-line application’s output and input will be redirected to the standard

Eclipse console unless the application is started within an external process that creates a new window, such as xterm.

1.

If your application requires an interactive shell, type the program and arguments in the Remote Program field. The default for remote execution is a

292

23 Launching Programs

23.4 Launching a Native Application

remote command like xterm -e %Application%, so a local X-server like Exceed or Cygwin X must be running.

2.

If you want to use a different working directory than the one specified on the

Arguments tab, type the path to the desired directory (as seen on the remote host).

23.4.3 Setting Environment Variables

These settings define the environment variable values to use when running a Java application. By default, the environment is inherited from the Eclipse run time.

You may override or append to the inherited environment.

NOTE:

These settings apply to applications that run locally, not to remote applications.

1.

To set a new environment variable, or to change or extend variables from the existing environment, click New. The New Environment Variable dialog opens.

2.

Type a descriptive name for the variable.

3.

Type the value for the variable, or click Variables and select the desired variable, add any required arguments, then click OK.

4.

To include an existing environment variable, click Select. The Select

Environment Variables dialog opens.

5.

Select the checkbox next to the desired variable, then click OK.

6.

For each variable, choose whether to append it to the native environment or substitute it for the native environment.

23.4.4 Configuring Access Methods

Use the Common tab to specify whether this launch is local or shared, to add the launch to the Workbench toolbar favorites menus, and to indicate whether the program should be launched in the background or not.

1.

By default this launch configuration is a local file available only to you. If you want to share it with others on your team, click Shared, then type or browse to the directory where you want to save the shared file.

23

293

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

2.

If you want to be able to launch this program from the Run favorites menu (the drop-down menu on the Workbench toolbar), select Run in the Display in

favorites menu

box.

23.4.5 Running Your Native Application

When you are finished configuring the launch configuration for your application, click Apply to save your settings but leave the dialog open, click Close to save your launch configuration for later use, or click Run to launch it now.

23.5 Relaunching Recently Run Programs

In a typical development scenario, you will run the same application many times in a single debugging session. After creating a launch configuration, you can click the Run or Debug icon or use a keyboard shortcut to run a process and attach the debugger in a few seconds.

To relaunch a recently run program:

Press CTRL+F11 to launch the last run-mode configuration you used, or F11 to launch the last debug-mode configuration you used.

Click the drop-down arrow next to the Run or Debug icon and select the configuration from the list. If you ran the configuration recently, it will appear on the menu. If you selected Run or Debug from the

Display in favorites menu

list (see

Configuring Access Methods

, p.290) it will

always appear on the list, whether you have run it recently or not.

294

23 Launching Programs

23.6 Using Attach-to-Target Launches

To run a configuration not listed on the favorites menu, click Run > Run or

Run > Debug

, then choose the configuration from the Configurations list and click Run or Debug.

23.5.1 Increasing the Size of the Launch History List

Workbench stores a history of previously launched configurations. The default length of the launch history is 10, but you can increase the history length by selecting Window > Preferences > Run/Debug > Launching and increasing the number in the Size of recently launched applications list field.

23.6 Using Attach-to-Target Launches

Workbench automatically creates Attach to Target launch configurations when you attach to an individual process or kernel task from the Target Manager. They do not actually run an application, they just connect to your target and attach the debugger to the specified task or process that already exists. These configurations are visible only in Debug mode.

Once Attach to Target launches are created, you can:

Review them and delete those that you no longer need.

Change which target connection should be used to run the process.

Rename your launch configurations, and if you think they are valuable, put them into your Favorites menu using the Common tab.

Change the mapping between source paths compiled into your objects and source paths in your workspace by editing the Source Locator information in the Sources tab.

Change the Projects to Build settings for the launch. This is particularly valuable for Attach to Kernel launches on the VxWorks simulator: you can disconnect your simulator, rebuild your kernel as part of the launch, and then let the launch automatically restart and reconnect the simulator.

Automatically rebuilding shared libraries is another use of Build before

launching

.

23

295

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

NOTE:

When you attach to a process or task with the same name using the same connection, Workbench automatically reuses all the settings from the previous launch.

However, Workbench creates a new launch (requiring you to reconfigure the settings) when it detects that the properties of the connection have changed: for example, if the connection was renamed, a different kernel image was used, or the target server arguments or other connection properties were changed.

One way to avoid accumulating many similar launches is to make your configuration changes in the launch itself, rather than right-clicking a process in the Target Manager and selecting Attach. That way Workbench will always have the correct settings for the process you want to run.

23.6.1 Attaching the Debugger to a Running Task or Process

To attach the debugger to a task or RTP that is already running, right-click it in the

Target Manager and select:

Attach to Real-time Process

to attach to a Real-time Process on VxWorks.

Attach to Kernel Task

to attach to a kernel task on VxWorks.

Attach to Process

to attach to a process on Linux.

Whenever you manually attach an individual process or task, Workbench automatically switches to the Device Debug perspective (if it is not already open) and displays the task or process in the Debug view, the debugger attaches without stopping the program, and Workbench automatically creates a corresponding

Attach-to-Target

launch configuration with those properties. For more

information about how to use Attach-to-Target configurations, see

23.6 Using

Attach-to-Target Launches

, p.295.

Comparing Definitions: Running, Suspended, and Stopped Tasks

VxWorks and the Workbench Debug view both make a distinction between running, suspended, or stopped tasks, but their definitions are not identical.

VxWorks

Running

Suspended

Workbench Debug View Definition

Running

Running

Task is active, and has focus.

Task is waiting while another task runs.

296

23 Launching Programs

23.6 Using Attach-to-Target Launches

Stopped Suspended Task stopped at a breakpoint or other event, or was stopped by user.

23.6.2 Attaching the Debugger to the Kernel

The debugger functions differently depending on whether you attach to the kernel in task mode or system mode.

23.6.3 Attaching the Kernel in Task Mode

To attach to the kernel in Task Mode

6

(VxWorks), right-click the Kernel Tasks node in the Target Manager and select Attach All Kernel Tasks.

The debugger will automatically track added and removed kernel tasks so that you can always debug the entire system. You can also stop (suspend) individual kernel tasks, unless they have the VX_UNBREAKABLE option set. When you stop a kernel task, the rest of the system will continue to run.

23.6.4 Attaching the Kernel in System Mode

To attach the kernel in System Mode (VxWorks and Linux dual-mode agent), right-click the CPU icon below the Connection icon and select Attach-to-Kernel.

This will create an Attach-to-Target launch configuration that automatically switches your target into System Mode before attaching the debugger. The

Debugger will show a single node labelled System Context that represents the code that the CPU is currently executing. When you stop (suspend) the System

Context, your entire System is stopped, including all the tasks, processes, and interrupt service routines. You can now also set breakpoints that will suspend the entire system when they are hit.

In addition to the single System Context node in the debugger, you can also attach to individual kernel tasks. This will create separate debug sessions. You can also set breakpoints that are specific to the task that is currently executing by selecting

restrict breakpoint scope to task

on the Scope tab of the breakpoint dialogs (for more information, see the line, expression, and hardware breakpoint dialog entries in the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference).

6. Task mode is also known as user mode.

23

297

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4

Note that System Mode breakpoints (breakpoints that are planted while a System

Mode attach is active) will only be active when your target is in System Mode. You can switch your target between System Mode and User Mode by choosing the gear-wheel icon in the Target Manager, or by ticking the Debug Mode menu items in the Debugger. For more information about Debug Mode functionality, see

25.5 Using Debug Modes

, p.313.

23.7 Suggested Workflow

Launch Configurations allow for a very tight Edit-Compile-Debug cycle when you need to repeatedly change your code, build and run it. You can use the F11 (Debug

Last Launched) key to build the projects you have specified, connect your target

(unless it is already connected), download, and run your most important program over and over again.

The only thing to keep in mind is that it may not be possible to rebuild your program or kernel while it is still being debugged (or its debug info is still loaded into the debugger). Workbench will warn you with a dialog and suggest proper actions in case a problem of such simultaneous usage is detected. Depending on the size of the modules you run and debug, it can be the case that the debug server cannot load all the symbolic information for your modules into memory. By default, the size limit is set to 60MB (this can be changed by selecting Preferences

> Target Manager > Debug Server Settings > Symbol File Handling Settings

.)

If a module is bigger than this limit, it will be locked against overwriting as long as the debugger has symbols loaded. This means that when you try to rebuild this module, you will see a dialog asking you to unload the module’s symbol information from the debugger before you continue building. You can usually unload symbolic information without problems, provided that you do not have a debug session open in the affected module. If you have a module open, you should terminate your debug session before continuing the new build and launch process.

298

24

Managing Breakpoints

24.1 Introduction 299

24.2 Types of Breakpoints 299

24.3 Manipulating Breakpoints 303

24.1 Introduction

Breakpoints allow you to stop a running program at particular places in the code or when specific conditions exist. This chapter shows how you can use the

Breakpoints view to keep track of all breakpoints, along with any conditions.

You can create breakpoints in different ways: by double-clicking or right-clicking in the Editor’s left overview ruler (also known as the gutter), by opening the various breakpoint dialogs from the pull-down menu in the Breakpoints view itself, or by selecting one of the breakpoint options from the Run menu.

24.2 Types of Breakpoints

Figure 24-1

shows the Breakpoints view with various types of breakpoints set.

299

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Figure 24-1

Breakpoints View

See the sections below for when and how to use each type of breakpoint. For a guide to the icons you will see in the Breakpoints view, see Wind River Workbench

User Interface Reference: Breakpoints View.

24.2.1 Line Breakpoints

Set a line breakpoint to stop your program at a particular line of source code.

Creating Line Breakpoints

To set a line breakpoint with an unrestricted scope (that will be hit by any process or task running on your target), double-click in the left gutter next to the line on which you want to set the breakpoint. A solid dot appears in the gutter, and the

Breakpoints view displays the file and the line number of the breakpoint. You can also right-click in the gutter and select Add Global Line Breakpoint.

To set a line breakpoint that is restricted to just one task or process, right-click in the Editor gutter and select Add Breakpoint for selected thread. If the selected thread has a color in the Debug view, a dot with the same color will appear in the

Editor gutter, with the number of the thread inscribed inside it.

Right-clicking in the Editor’s gutter and selecting Add Line Breakpoint, or selecting Add Line Breakpoint from the Breakpoints view’s pull-down menu will open the Line Breakpoint dialog, where you can create and adjust the properties of the breakpoint.

300

24 Managing Breakpoints

24.2 Types of Breakpoints

For more information about the settings in this dialog, see Wind River Workbench

User Interface Reference: Line Breakpoint Dialog.

24.2.2 Expression Breakpoints

Set an expression breakpoint using any C expression that will evaluate to a memory address. This could be a function name, a function name plus a constant, a global variable, a line of assembly code, or just a memory address. Expression breakpoints appear in the Editor’s gutter only when you are connected to a task.

Breakpoint conditions are evaluated after a breakpoint is triggered, in the context of the stopped task or process. Functions in the condition string are evaluated as addresses and are not executed. Other restrictions are similar to the C/C++ restrictions for calculating the address of a breakpoint using the Expression

Breakpoint dialog.

Select Add Expression Breakpoint from the Breakpoints view’s pull-down menu to open the Expression Breakpoint dialog, where you can create and adjust the properties for the breakpoint.

For more information about the settings in this dialog, see the Wind River

Workbench User Interface Reference: Expression Breakpoint Dialog.

24.2.3 Hardware Breakpoints

Some processors provide specialized registers, called debug registers, which can be used to specify an area of memory to be monitored. For instance, IA-32 processors have four debug address registers, which can be used to set data breakpoints or control breakpoints.

Hardware breakpoints are particularly useful if you want to stop a process when a specific variable is written or read. For example, with hardware data breakpoints, a hardware trap is generated when a write or read occurs in a monitored area of memory. Hardware breakpoints are fast, but their availability is machine-dependent. On most CPUs that do support them, only four debug registers are provided, so only a maximum of four memory locations can be watched in this way.

There are two types of hardware breakpoints:

A hardware data breakpoint occurs when a specific variable is read or written.

24

301

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

A hardware instruction breakpoint or code breakpoint occurs when a specific instruction is read for execution.

Once a hardware breakpoint is trapped—either an instruction breakpoint or a data breakpoint—the debugger will behave in the same way as for a standard breakpoint and stop for user interaction.

Adding Hardware Instruction Breakpoints

There two ways to add a new hardware instruction breakpoint:

In the gutter (grey column) on the left of the source file, right-click and select

Add Hardware Code Breakpoint

. Or, double-click in the gutter to add a standard breakpoint and then, in the Breakpoints view, right-click the breakpoint you've just added and select Properties. In the last pane (Hardware) of the Properties dialog select Enable Hardware Breakpoint.

Adding Hardware Data Breakpoints

Set a hardware data breakpoint when:

The debugger should break when an event (such as a read or write of a specific memory address) or a situation (such as data at one address matching data at another address) occurs.

Threads are interfering with each other, or memory is being accessed improperly, or whenever the sequence or timing of runtime events is critical

(hardware breakpoints are faster than software breakpoints).

Select Add Data Breakpoint from the Breakpoints view’s pulldown menu to open the Hardware Data Breakpoint dialog, where you can create and adjust the properties for the breakpoint.

For more information about the settings in this dialog, see the Wind River

Workbench User Interface Reference: Hardware Data Breakpoints Dialog.

Converting Line or Expression Breakpoints Into Hardware Code Breakpoints

To cause the debugger to request that a line or expression breakpoint be a hardware code breakpoint, select the Hardware check box on the Hardware tab of the Line Breakpoint or Expression Breakpoint dialogs.

302

24 Managing Breakpoints

24.3 Manipulating Breakpoints

This request does not guarantee that the hardware code breakpoint will be planted; that depends on whether the target supports hardware breakpoints, and if so, whether or not the total number supported by the target have already been planted. If the target does not support hardware code breakpoints, an error message will appear when the debugger tries to plant the breakpoint.

NOTE:

Workbench will set only the number of code breakpoints, with the specific capabilities, supported by your hardware.

NOTE:

If you create a breakpoint on a line that does not have any corresponding code, the debugger will plant the breakpoint on the next line that does have code.

The breakpoint will appear on the new line in the Editor gutter.

In the Breakpoints view, the original line number will appear, with the new line

number in square brackets [ ] after it. See the third breakpoint in Figure 24-1

.

Comparing Software and Hardware Breakpoints

Software breakpoints work by replacing the destination instruction with a software interrupt. Therefore it is impossible to debug code in ROM using software breakpoints.

Hardware breakpoints work by comparing the break condition against the execution stream. Therefore they work in RAM, ROM or flash.

Complex breakpoints involve conditions. An example might be, “Break if the program writes value to variable if and only if function_name was called first.”

24.3 Manipulating Breakpoints

Now that you have an understanding of the different types of breakpoints, this section will show you how to work with them.

24.3.1 Importing Breakpoints

To import breakpoint properties from a file:

303

24

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

1.

Select File > Import > Import Breakpoints, then click Next. The Import

Breakpoints dialog appears.

2.

Select the breakpoint file you want to import, then click Next. The Select

Breakpoints dialog appears.

3.

Select one or more breakpoints to import, then click Finish. The breakpoint information will appear in the Breakpoints view, and the next time the context for that breakpoint is active in the Debug view, the breakpoint will be planted.

24.3.2 Exporting Breakpoints

To export breakpoint properties to a file:

1.

Select File > Export > Export Breakpoints, then click Next. The Export

Breakpoints dialog appears.

2.

Select the breakpoint whose properties you want to export, and type in a file name for the exported file. Click Finish.

24.3.3 Refreshing Breakpoints

Right-clicking a breakpoint in the Breakpoints view and selecting

Refresh Breakpoint

causes the breakpoint to be removed and reinserted on the target. This is useful if something has changed on the target (for example, a new module was downloaded) and the breakpoint is not automatically updated.

To refresh all breakpoints in this way, select Refresh All Breakpoints from the

Breakpoints view toolbar drop-down menu.

24.3.4 Disabling Breakpoints

To disable a breakpoint, clear its check box in the Breakpoints view. This retains all breakpoint properties, but ensures that it will not stop the running process. To re-enable the breakpoint, select the box again.

24.3.5 Removing Breakpoints

There are several ways to remove a breakpoint:

■ right-click it in the Editor gutter and select Remove Breakpoint

304

24 Managing Breakpoints

24.3 Manipulating Breakpoints

■ select it in the Breakpoints view and click the Remove icon right-click it in the Breakpoints view and select Remove

For more information about the Breakpoints view or any of the breakpoint dialogs, see the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference.

305

24

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

306

25

Debugging Projects

25.1 Introduction 307

25.2 Using the Debug View 308

25.3 Coloring Views 312

25.4 Stepping Through a Program 313

25.5 Using Debug Modes 313

25.6 Understanding Source Lookup Path Settings 317

25.7 Using the Disassembly View 318

25.8 Using the Kernel Objects View 319

25.9 Run/Debug Preferences 322

25.1 Introduction

Like other debuggers you may have used, the Wind River Workbench debugger allows you to download object modules, launch new processes, and take control of processes already running on the target.

Unlike other debuggers, it allows you to attach to multiple processes simultaneously, without affecting the state of the items you are attaching to or requiring you to disconnect from one process in order to attach to another.

307

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

This chapter shows you how to use the Debug, Disassembly, and Kernel Objects views to debug your programs. For a guide to the dialogs and icons you will see while using them, see the Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference entries for those views.

NOTE:

You must compile your programs using debugging symbols (the -g compiler option) to use many debugger features. The compiler settings used by the

Wind River Workbench project facility’s Managed Builds include debugging symbols.

However, the Workbench debugger does not support code compiled with -02 optimization.

25.2 Using the Debug View

Use the Debug view to monitor, control, and manipulate the processes and tasks that you are actively debugging. Unlike the Target Manager, which shows all the processes that exist on the target, the Debug view shows only the ones that are currently under debugger control.

To put a process or task under the control of the debugger and thus see it in the

Debug view:

1.

Connect to your target in the Target Manager view (see

Connect to the Target

, p.242).

2.

Launch one or more processes:

Using a launch configuration as described in

Relaunching Recently Run

Programs

, p.294.

By attaching to an already running process, as described in

Attaching the

Debugger to a Running Task or Process

, p.296

3.

Once the debugger has attached to your process, it will appear in the Debug view as shown in

Figure 25-1 .

308

25 Debugging Projects

25.2 Using the Debug View

Figure 25-1

Debug View

Additionally, the Debug view shows processes that were launched on the target using Workbench, but which were not attached by the debugger. These launches have a special entry in the Debug view, as shown in

Figure 25-2

, and are only available to help you locate and terminate the process.

Figure 25-2

Debug View Showing Process Not Under Debugger Control

25.2.1 Understanding the Debug View Display

When using the Debug view, it is crucial that you understand what is represented by each level in the hierarchical tree of the process you are debugging. This is because the level of the current selection in the Debug view affects the activities that you can perform on it and controls the information displayed in other views.

Below are examples from the kernel task in Figure 25-1

for what might appear at each level of the tree, with a general description of each level.

main -ball.out - vxsim0 [Kernel task]

= launch level

launch name [launch type]

SIMNT: vxWorks 6.2 (Task Mode)

= debug target level

core name:OS name OS version (debug mode), can also be process name

tMain (Stopped - Breakpoint Hit)

= thread level

thread name (state - reason for state change)

25

309

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

main( ) - main.c:59

= stack frame level

function(args) - file : line #, can also be address

In Workbench 2.4, stack arguments and argument values are not displayed in the

Debug view by default. This default setting was implemented to improve debugging performance.

To activate stack-level arguments in the Debug view, select Window > Preferences

> Run/Debug > Performance

, then select the Retrieve stack arguments for stack

frames in Debug View

and Retrieve stack argument values for stack frames in

Debug View

checkboxes. Click OK.

NOTE:

The stack arguments reflect the current value of the stack argument variables, not the initial value of the stack arguments immediately after entering the function call.

How the Selection in the Debug View Affects Activities

Choosing a specific level of your debug target controls what you can do with it.

Selected Level Action Allowed

launch

Terminate or disconnect from all processes/cores for the launch debug target.

debug target

Terminate or disconnect from the debug target.

Perform run control that applies to the whole process: suspend/resume all threads.

Assign color to the debug target and all its threads/tasks.

thread stack frame

Terminate or disconnect; terminates individual tasks/threads, if supported by process/core.

Run control for thread: resume/suspend/step.

Assign color to thread.

Select of the stack frame causes the editor to display instruction pointer and source for stack frame.

Perform same run control as on the thread.

Assign color to thread.

Assign corresponding color for parent thread.

310

25 Debugging Projects

25.2 Using the Debug View

Monitoring Multiple Processes

When you start processes under debugger control, or attach the debugger to running processes, they appear in the Debug view labeled with unique colors and numbers. Likewise, breakpoints that are restricted to a particular process display that process’s color/number context in the Breakpoints and Editor views.

For example, in

Figure 25-3

:

The first breakpoint in main.c (a blue circle containing a 0) is restricted to ball, the blue process numbered 0 in the Debug view.

The second breakpoint (a solid blue-green circle) is unrestricted.

The breakpoint in cobble.c (a red circle containing a 1) is restricted to cobble, the red process numbered 1 in the Debug view.

The color assigned to a process or thread can be changed by right-clicking the process or thread and selecting Color > specific color.

Figure 25-3

Debug View with Breakpoint and Editor Views

The context pointer (the arrow in the left gutter in main.c) indicates the statement that will execute when the process resumes.

311

25

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

25.3 Coloring Views

The color context you assign to a process also carries through to other views whose scope is determined by the contents of the Debug view.

The data views that appear in the Device Debug perspective (such as the Threads or Stack Trace view) usually update to reflect whatever is currently selected in the

Debug view. If you prefer, you can start colored views that are associated with a process of a particular color and update only when that process changes.

To open a view of a particular color, select

Window > Show View > Other > Device Debug -

color > view.

For more information about data views in the Device Debug perspective, see the

Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference entries for those views.

312

25 Debugging Projects

25.4 Stepping Through a Program

25.4 Stepping Through a Program

Once a process has stopped under debugger control (most often, at a breakpoint), you can single-step through the code, jump over subroutine calls, or resume execution. What you can do depends on what you selected in the Debug view.

When the program is stopped, you can resume operation by clicking Resume on the toolbar of the Debug view. If there are no more remaining breakpoints, interrupts, or signals, the program will run to completion (unless you click

Suspend

).

To step through the code one line at a time, in the Debug view, click Step Into. If you have other data views open, such as the Registers or Local Variables views, they will update with current values as you step through the code.

The effect of Step Into is somewhat different if you click

Toggle Disassembly/Instruction Step Mode

in the Debug view, or when the current routine has no debugging information. When this mode is set, the step buttons cause instruction-level steps to be executed instead of source-level steps.

Also, the Disassembly view will appear instead of the Editor view.

To single-step without going into other subroutines, click Step Over instead of

Step Into

.

While stepping through a program, you may conclude that the problem you are interested in lies in the current subroutine’s caller, rather than at the stack level where your process is suspended. In this situation, if you click Step Return in

Debug

, execution continues until the current subroutine completes, then the debugger regains control in the calling statement.

These run control options, as well as others, are available from the Run menu as well as from the Debug view toolbar. For more information, see the Wind River

Workbench User Interface Reference: Debug View.

25.5 Using Debug Modes

Depending on the type of connection you created between the debugger and the target, you may be able to operate the debugger in different modes. Different debug modes have different capabilities and limitations, which are mostly related to how the debugger interacts with the target and the processes that are being

25

313

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

debugged. You can also create multiple debug connections to the same target, allowing you to debug in multiple modes simultaneously.

Target

Connection Type Supported Modes

WDB agent on

VxWorks

System Mode

Supports debugging the entire system using a single execution context.

Supports limited debugging of individual kernel tasks. The debugger can retrieve stack traces for individual tasks, but if any of the tasks is resumed and suspended, even when stepping, the entire system is resumed and suspended.

Task Mode

Supports debugging of kernel tasks. It allows suspending, resuming, and stepping kernel tasks individually, without affecting other kernel tasks.

Supports debugging of RTPs.

kgdb on Linux Kernel Mode

Only supports debugging the kernel using a single execution context. When the system context is suspended, the kernel, kernel threads, and user processes are suspended also.

ptrace agent on

Linux

User Mode

Supports debugging user processes. Processes and threads within processes are suspended and resumed independently of each other.

Dual Mode on

Linux

In dual mode, you must toggle between user and kernel mode depending on your debugging needs.

Kernel Mode (also called System Mode)

Only supports debugging the kernel using a single execution context. When the system context is suspended, the kernel, kernel threads, and user processes are suspended also.

314

25 Debugging Projects

25.5 Using Debug Modes

OCD

OCD with OS

Awareness for

VxWorks

OCD with OS

Awareness for

Linux

User Mode

Supports debugging user processes. Processes and threads within processes are suspended and resumed independently of each other.

System Mode

Supports debugging the entire system using a single execution context.

System Mode

Supports debugging entire system using a single execution context, including retrieving the full stack trace when the system is suspended.

Supports limited debugging of individual kernel tasks. The debugger can retrieve stack traces for individual tasks, but if any of the tasks is resumed and suspended, even when stepping, the entire system is resumed and suspended.

Supports viewing of individual RTPs, but does not provide run control unless the target has been configured for one-to-one MMU virtual page mapping.

System Mode

Only supports debugging the kernel and kernel modules using a single execution context.

Supports viewing of processes, but the debugger cannot be attached to them.

Kernel objects are not available.

As a general rule, when you are debugging the target in user mode or task mode, the debugger interacts only with the process or processes being debugged. If you suspend this process, other processes keep running. This mode is less intrusive, as it allows you to control the selected process or thread while the rest of the system can continue to operate normally.

When you are debugging in system mode, the debugger interacts with the entire system at once, so if you suspend one task, all processes and kernel tasks running on the system are suspended as well. This gives you increased control and visibility into what is happening on the system, but it is also very disruptive.

25

315

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

For example, if the system maintains network connections with other systems, suspending it will cause the others to lose their network connections with the debugged system.

25.5.1 Setting and Recognizing the Debug Mode of a Connection

Right-clicking on a connection in the Target Manager or the Debug view and selecting Target Mode allows you to specify a debug mode for the connection. The currently active mode is indicated by a checkmark.

When you create a new debug connection through a launch, the connection debug mode (either system mode or task mode) is saved as a property of the launch. This mode is listed in parentheses at the end of the label of the target node in the Debug view.

Switching Debug Modes

For target connections that support switching between modes, if you switch the debug mode while a debug connection is active, this debug connection will

become unavailable in the Debug view, as shown in Figure 25-4

. When a debug connection is unavailable, no operations can be performed on it, except for disconnecting the debug connection.

Figure 25-4

Debug View Showing Unavailable Connections

316

25 Debugging Projects

25.6 Understanding Source Lookup Path Settings

In the Target Manager, if you switch the target to system mode, every node in the tree will have a system mode icon painted on top. If the system mode icon does not appear, then the node and processes are in task or user mode.

25.5.2 Debugging Multiple Target Connections

You can debug processes on the same target using multiple target connections simultaneously. An example of this setup is a Linux target that has a user mode

ptrace

agent installed for debugging processes, and an OCD connection for halting the system and debugging the kernel.

In this situation, if the system is halted using the OCD (system mode) target connection, the user mode ptrace agent will also be halted, and the user mode target connection will be lost. When the system is resumed, the user mode target connection will be re-established.

The Target Manager and the Debug view (if a debug session is active) both provide feedback in this scenario. The Target Manager hides all the process information that was visible for the target, and displays a label back-end connection lost next to the target node. The Debug view does not end the active debug session, but it shows it as being unavailable, in the same manner as if the debug mode was switched.

25.5.3 Disconnecting and Terminating Processes

Disconnecting from a process or core detaches the debugger, but leaves the process or core in its current state.

Terminating a process actually kills the process on the target.

NOTE:

If the selected target supports terminating individual threads, you can select a thread and terminate only that thread.

25.6 Understanding Source Lookup Path Settings

Source Lookup Path settings allow you to map source file paths that the debugger retrieves from an executable's symbol data (also known as the debugger path) to

317

25

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

the correct location of the source files on the host file system and in your workspace.

The compiler generated these paths when the executable was built, but if you are debugging the executable on a different machine, then the paths to those files are no longer valid.

For information about how to set Source Lookup Path settings, see the Wind River

Workbench User Interface Reference: Source Lookup Path Dialog.

25.7 Using the Disassembly View

Use the Disassembly view:

To examine a program when you do not have full source code for it (such as when your code calls external libraries).

To examine a program that was compiled without debug information.

When you suspect that your compiler is generating bad code (the view displays exactly what the compiler generated for each block of code).

25.7.1 Opening the Disassembly View

Unlike other Wind River Workbench views, you cannot access the Disassembly view from the Window > Show View menu—it appears automatically if the

Debug view cannot display the appropriate source code file in the Editor (it appears as a tab in the Editor, labeled with the target connection being debugged).

You can open the Disassembly view manually by clicking the Debug view’s

Toggle Assembly Stepping Mode

toolbar icon, and by right-clicking in the Stack

Trace view, then selecting Go To Code.

25.7.2 Understanding the Disassembly View Display

The Disassembly view shows source code from your file (when available), interspersed with instructions generated by the compiler. As you step through your code, the Disassembly view keeps track of the last four instructions where the

318

25 Debugging Projects

25.8 Using the Kernel Objects View

process was suspended. The current instruction is highlighted in the strongest color, with each previous step fading in color intensity.

Figure 25-5

Disassembly View

If the Disassembly view displays a color band at the top and bottom (here, the band is blue), then it is associated with the process with that color context in the Debug view; if no color band is displayed, then the view will update as you select different processes in the Debug view.

For more information, see Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference:

Disassembly View.

25.8 Using the Kernel Objects View

Use the Kernel Objects view to monitor and manipulate data structures such as kernel tasks, message queues, semaphores, and other operating system resources.

25

319

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

During multi-process debugging, you can use the Kernel Objects view to monitor a semaphore used to control a device that two processes are using. Or you can set an RTP that uses a system resource to watch that resource during Step Over system calls.

To examine a resource in the Kernel Objects view:

1.

Connect to your target in the Target Manager view (see

19.6 Connect to the

Target

, p.242).

2.

Click the Kernel Objects tab to bring it to the foreground, then click the pull-down arrow and select your target connection.

The Kernel Objects view appears.

320

Figure 25-6

Kernel Objects View

25 Debugging Projects

25.8 Using the Kernel Objects View

25.8.1 Understanding the Kernel Objects View Display

System resources are displayed in a hierarchical tree. To see specific instances of each type of resource, click the plus sign to expand the tree.

Information about specific kernel objects is displayed in the Properties view.

25

321

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

For a guide to the icons in the Kernel Objects view, see Wind River Workbench User

Interface Reference: Kernel Objects View.

25.9 Run/Debug Preferences

For information about how to set debug and run control preferences, see

Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Debug View.

322

26

Troubleshooting

26.1 Introduction 323

26.2 Startup Problems 324

26.3 General Problems 327

26.4 Error Messages 329

26.5 Troubleshooting VxWorks Configuration Problems 341

26.6 Error Log View 344

26.7 Error Logs Generated by Workbench 344

26.8 Technical Support 351

26.1 Introduction

This chapter displays some of the errors or problems that may occur at different points in the development process, and what steps you can take to correct them. It also provides information about the log files that Workbench can collect, and how you can create a ZIP file of those logs to send to Wind River support.

323

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

26.2 Startup Problems

This section discusses some of the problems that might cause Workbench to have trouble starting.

Workspace Metadata is Corrupted

If Workbench crashes, some of your settings could get corrupted, preventing

Workbench from restarting properly.

1.

To test if your workspace is the source of the problem, start Workbench, specifying a different workspace name.

On Windows

Select Start > Programs > Wind River > Wind River Workbench 2.4 > Wind

River

Workbench 2.4, then when Workbench asks you to choose a workspace, enter a new name (workspace2 or whatever you prefer).

Or, if the Workbench startup process does not get all the way to the Workspace

Launcher dialog, or does not start at all, start it from a terminal window:

>

installDir\workbench-2.3\wrwb\2.3\x86-win32\bin\wrwb.exe -data newWorkspace

On Linux or Solaris

Start Workbench from a terminal window, specifying a new workspace name:

> ./startWorkbench.sh -data

newWorkspace

2.

If Workbench starts successfully with a new workspace, exit Workbench, then delete the .metadata directory in your original Workbench installation

(installDir/workspace/.metadata).

3.

Restart Workbench using your original workspace. The .metadata directory will be recreated and should work correctly.

4.

Because the .metadata directory contains project information, that information will be lost when you delete the directory.

To recreate your project settings, reimport your projects into Workbench

(File > Import > Existing Project into Workspace). For more information about importing projects, see

Importing Projects

, p.132.

324

26 Troubleshooting

26.2 Startup Problems

.workbench-2.4 Directory is Corrupted

1.

To test if your %USERPROFILE%/.workbench-2.4 directory is the source of the problem, rename it to a different name, then restart Workbench.

NOTE:

Make sure you rename the %USERPROFILE%/.workbench-2.4 directory (for example, on Windows XP it could be C:\Documents and

Settings\

username\.workbench-2.4).

Do not rename the installDir/workbench-2.4 directory.

2.

If Workbench starts successfully, exit Workbench, then delete the old version of your %USERPROFILE%/.workbench-2.4 directory (the one you renamed).

3.

Restart Workbench. The %USERPROFILE%/.workbench-2.4 will be recreated and should work correctly.

4.

Because the .workbench-2.4 directory contains Eclipse configuration information, any information about manually configured Eclipse extensions or plug-ins will be lost when you delete the directory.

To make them available again within Workbench, you must re-register them

(Help > Software Updates > Manage Configuration). For more information

about registering plug-ins, see

Adding Plug-in Functionality to Workbench

, p.359.

Registry Unreachable (Windows)

When Workbench starts and it does not detect a default Wind River registry, it launches one. After you quit Workbench, the registry is kept running since it is needed by all Wind River tools. You do not need to ever kill the registry.

If you do stop it, however, it stores its internal database in the file

installDir/.wind/wtxregd.hostname.

If this file later becomes unwritable, the registry cannot start, and Workbench will display an error.

26

325

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

This error may also occur if you install Workbench to a directory to which you do not have write access, such as installing Workbench as an administrator and then trying to run it as yourself.

Workspace Cannot be Locked (Linux and Solaris)

If you start Workbench and select a workspace, you may see a Workspace Cannot

be Locked

error.

There are three possible causes for this error:

1.

Another user has opened the same workspace. A workspace can only be used by one user at a time.

2.

You installed Workbench on a file system that does not support locking.

Use the following command at a terminal prompt to start Workbench so that it creates your workspace on a file system which does allow locking, such as a directory on a local disk:

./startWorkbench.sh -configuration

directory that allows locking

For example:

326

26 Troubleshooting

26.3 General Problems

./startWorkbench.sh -configuration /usr/local/

yourName

3.

On some window managers (e.g. gnome) you can close the window without closing the program itself and deleting all running processes. This results in running processes maintaining a lock on special files in the workspace that mark a workspace as open.

To solve the problem, kill all Workbench and Java processes that have open file handles in your workspace directory.

26.2.1 Pango Error on Linux

If the file pango.modules is not world readable for some reason, Workbench will not start and you may see an error in a terminal window similar to

** (<unknown>:21465): WARNING **: No builtin or dynamically loaded modules were found. Pango will not work correctly. This probably means there was an error in the creation of:

'/etc/pango/pango.modules'

You may be able to recreate this file by running pango-querymodules.

Changing the file’s permissions to 644 will cause Workbench to launch properly.

26.3 General Problems

This section describes problems that are not associated with any particular

Workbench component.

26.3.1 Java Development Tools (JDT) Dependency

Some third party plug-ins are dependent on JDT. If a plug-in you are interested in requires JDT, you should download it from the official Eclipse Website:

http://download.eclipse.org/eclipse/downloads/drops/R-3.0.1-200409161125/ecli pse-JDT-3.0.1.zip

A list of official mirror sites is here:

http://www.eclipse.org/downloads

26

327

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

26.3.2 Help System Does Not Display on Solaris or Linux

Eclipse comes preconfigured to use Mozilla on Solaris and Linux, and it expects it to be in your path. If Mozilla is not installed, or is not in your path, you must set the correct path to the browser or Workbench will not display help or other documentation.

To manually set the browser path in Workbench:

1.

Select Window > Preferences > Help.

2.

Click Custom Browser (user defined program), then in the

Custom Browser command field

type or browse to your browser launch program. Click OK.

On Solaris, a sample Netscape browser launch command is

"/usr/dt/bin/netscape" %1

, though you should enter the command line that is appropriate for your browser.

On Linux, sample Mozilla browser launch commands are

“/usr/bin/mozilla” %1

and kfmclient openURL %1, though you should enter the command line that is appropriate for your browser.

26.3.3 Help System Does Not Display on Windows

The help system can sometimes fail to display help or other documentation due to a problem in McAfee VirusScan 8.0.0i (and possibly other virus scanners as well).

For McAfee VirusScan 8.0.0i, the problem is known to be resolved with patch10 which can be obtained from Network Associates. As a workaround, the problem can be avoided by making sure that McAfee on-access-scan is turned on and allowed to scan the TEMP directory as well as *.jar files.

More details regarding this issue have been collected by Eclipse Bugzilla #87371 at

https://bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=87371

.

26.3.4 Removing Unwanted Target Connections

If you have trouble deleting a target connection session for any reason, use wtxtcl.

1.

Start wtxtcl from a terminal window.

% wtxtcl

328

26 Troubleshooting

26.4 Error Messages

2.

List all entries in the registry.

wtxtcl> wtxInfo

3.

Unregister the offending entry or entries (the full entry name must be used).

wtxtcl> wtxUnregister [email protected]

26.4 Error Messages

Some errors display an error dialog directly on the screen, while others that occurred during background processing only display this icon in the lower right corner of Workbench window.

Hovering your mouse over the icon displays a pop-up with a synopsis of the error.

Later, if you closed the error dialog but want to see the entire error message again,

double-click the icon to display the error dialog or look in the

Eclipse Log

, p.345.

This section explains error messages that appear in each Workbench component.

26.4.1 Project System Errors

For general information about the Project System, see

4. Projects Overview

.

Project Already Exists

If you deleted a project from the Project Navigator but chose not to delete the project contents from your workspace, then you try to create a new project with the same name as the old project, you will see this error:

26

329

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

If you click Yes, your old project contents will be overwritten with the new project.

If you want to recreate the old project in Wind River Workbench, click No, then right-click in the Project Navigator, select Import, then select

Existing Project into Workspace

.

Type the name of your old project or browse to the old project directory in your workspace, click OK, then click Finish. Your old project will appear in the Project

Navigator.

Cannot Create Project Files in Read-only Location

When Workbench creates a project, it creates a .wrproject file and other metadata files it needs to track settings, preferences, and other project-specific information.

So if your source files are in a read-only location, Workbench cannot create your project there.

To work around this problem, you must create a new project in your workspace, then create a folder that links to the location of your source files.

1.

Create a User-defined Project in your workspace by selecting

File > New > User-Defined Project

. The Target Operating System dialog appears.

2.

Select a target operating system from the drop-down list, then click Next. The

Project dialog appears.

3.

Type in a name for your project, select Create project in workspace, then click

Next

.

4.

Click Next to accept the default settings in the next dialogs, then click Finish to create your project.

330

26 Troubleshooting

26.4 Error Messages

5.

In the Project Navigator, right-click your new project and select New > Folder.

The Folder dialog appears.

6.

Type in a name for your folder, then click Advanced and select the

Link to folder in the file system

checkbox.

7.

Type the path or click Browse and navigate to your source root directory, then click OK to create the new folder.

8.

Click the plus next to the folder to open it, and you will see the source files from your read-only source directory. Eclipse calls items incorporated into projects in this way linked resources.

NOTE:

This mechanism cannot be used for managed-build projects, only for user-defined projects.

26.4.2 Build System Errors

For general information about the Build System, see

16. Build Properties and the

Build Console

.

Building Projects While Connected to a Target

If you try to build a project while you have a target connection active in the Target

Manager, you may see an error. This happens when any of the files that need to be built contain symbol information, and therefore have been locked by the debugger.

You can continue your build by clicking OK, but be advised that you will need to disconnect your target and restart the build if you see an Build Console error message similar to dld: Can’t create file XXX: Permission denied.

To avoid this problem, Workbench loads files up to a certain size completely into memory so no file lock is needed. To specify the largest symbol file that can be loaded into memory, select Window > Preferences > Target Manager > Debug

Server Settings > Symbol File Handling Settings

and specify a file size up to 60M.

Workflow for Cases Where You Need to Continually Rebuild Objects in Use by Your Target

1.

Create a launch configuration for your debugging task. When you need to disconnect your target in order to free your images for the build process, the launch configuration allows you to automatically connect, build, download, and run your process with a single click.

26

331

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

You can even specify that your project should be rebuilt before it is launched by selecting Window > Preferences > Run/Debug > Launching, and then selecting Build (if necessary) before launching. For more information about launch configurations, see

23. Launching Programs

.

When you work with processes or RTPs, make sure that your process is terminated before you rebuild or relaunch. You can then safely ignore the warning (and check the Do not show this dialog again box).

When you work with Downloadable Kernel Modules or user-built kernel images, just let the build proceed. If the Link error message appears, either disconnect your target or unload all modules, then rebuild or relaunch.

Workflow for Using On-Chip Debugging to Debug Standalone Modules Loaded on Your Target

1.

Create a Reset & Download-type launch configuration for your application, and enable the Build before launch option (by selecting Window >

Preferences > Run/Debug > Launching > Build (if required) before launching

).

2.

Run the launch configuration to debug your code. Make any changes to the source files and save them. Note that saving before unloading the symbols allows the debugger to track your breakpoints.

3.

Before relaunching or rebuilding, unload the modules from the target by selecting them in the Target Manager and pressing the Delete key (you can multi-select if there are multiple modules).

4.

Press the Debug button to relaunch your application. It will automatically rebuild, redownload, reset, and attach the debugger.

Problems Building Workbench 2.x Projects Imported Into Workbench 2.4

If you have trouble building projects that you imported from a previous version of

Workbench, check if the .wrproject file contains an entry for platform. If not, the project is not compatible and has to be patched to work with the newest version of

Workbench.

To patch the .wrproject file:

1.

Open the file with the Workbench text editor by right-clicking the file in the

Project Navigator, then selecting Open With > Text Editor.

332

26 Troubleshooting

26.4 Error Messages

If the .wrproject file is not visible in the Project Navigator, click the downward arrow on the right side of the Project Navigator toolbar and select Filters to open the Project Navigator Filters dialog.

Select the checkbox next to .wr*, then click OK. The .wrproject file should now appear in the Project Navigator.

2.

Locate the line at the beginning of the file similar to:

<properties root="1" type="RealTimeProcessProject"/>

3.

Add platform="projectplatform" to the end of the line, with projectplatform replaced by one of VxWorks, Linux, or Standalone, depending on the platform to which the project type belongs.

4.

The result should appear similar to the following:

26

333

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

5.

Save and close the .wrproject file. Your project should now build properly.

Build All Command Builds Projects Whose Resources have not Changed

Workbench may enter a state where selecting Project > Build All builds projects whose resources have not changed since the last build.

This happens only if Auto-Build (Project > Build Automatically) was previously enabled. If you switch this feature off, you must do a manual clean for all projects

(Project > Clean) in order to re-enable building for previously built projects.

26.4.3 Target Manager Errors

For general information about the Target Manager, see

19. Connecting to Targets

.

Troubleshooting Connecting to a Target

If you see the following error:

334

26 Troubleshooting

26.4 Error Messages

Or if you have other trouble connecting to your target, try these steps:

1.

Check that the target is switched on and the network connection is active. In a terminal window on the host, type:

ping

n.n.n.n

where n.n.n.n is the IP address of your target.

2.

Verify the target Name/IP address in the Edit the Target Connection dialog

(right-click the target connection in the Target Manager then select

Properties

.)

3.

Choose the actual target CPU type from the drop-down list if the CPU type in the Edit the Target Connection dialog is set to default from target.

4.

Verify that a target server is running. If it is not: a.

Open the Error Log view, then find and copy the message containing the command line used to launch the target server.

b. Paste the target server command line into a terminal window, then hit

ENTER

.

c.

Check to see if the target server is now running. If not, check the Error Log view for any error messages.

5.

Check if the dfwserver is running (on Linux and Solaris, use the ps command from a terminal window; on Windows, check the Windows Task Manager). If multiple dfwservers are running, kill them all, then try to reconnect.

6.

When starting the VxWorks simulator on Solaris, the path environment variable must include /usr/openwin/bin so that it can find xterm. If xterm is not in the path, the simulator connection will fail.

7.

Check that the WDB connection to the target is fully operational by right-clicking a target in the Target Manager and selecting

Target Tools > Run WTX Connection Test

. This tool will verify that the

26

335

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

communication link is correct. If there are errors, you can use the WTX and

WDB logs to better track down what is wrong with the target.

Exception on Attach Errors

If you try to run a task or launch an RTP and the Target Manager is unable to comply, it will display an Exception on Attach error containing useful information.

Build errors can lead to a problem launching your task or process; if one of the following suggestions does not solve the problem, try launching one of the pre-built example projects delivered with Workbench.

If the host shell was running when you tried to launch your task or process, try closing the host shell and launching again.

Error Launching a VxWorks Real-time Process on Linux

If you get an error when launching a VxWorks RTP from a Red Hat Workstation, update 3 host system, try these steps:

1.

Delete boothost: from the beginning of the Exec Path on Target field of the

Run Real-time Process

dialog.

2.

Add a new object path mapping to the target server connection properties that does not have boothost: in the host path.

Error When Running a Task Without Downloading First

You will see the following error if you try to run a kernel task without first downloading it to your target:

336

26 Troubleshooting

26.4 Error Messages

Processes can be run directly from the Project Navigator, but kernel tasks must be downloaded before running. Right-click the output file, select Download, fill in the Download dialog, then click OK.

If you see this error and you did download the file, open a host shell for your connection, and try to run the task from the host shell. Type:

lkup entrypoint

to see if your entry point is there.

Downloading an Output File Built with the Wrong Build Spec

If you built a project with a build spec for one target, then try to download the output file to a different target (for example, you build the project for the simulator, but now you want to run it on a hardware target), you will see this error:

To select the correct build spec, right-click the output file in the Project Navigator, select Set Active Build Spec, select the appropriate build spec from the dialog, then rebuild your project.

Your project should now download properly.

Error if Exec Path on Target is Incorrect

If the Exec Path on Target field of the Run Real-time Processes dialog does not contain the correct target-side path to the executable file (if, for example, it contains the equivalent host-side path instead) you will see this error:

26

337

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

1.

If the target-side path looks correct but you still get this error, check the following: a.

Recheck the path you gave.

Even if you used the Browse button to locate the file, it will be located in the host file system. The Object Path Mapping that is defined for your target connection will translate it to a path in the target file system, which is then visible in the Exec Path edit field. If your Object Path Mapping is wrong, the Exec Path will be wrong, so it is important to check.

Troubleshooting Running a Process

If you have trouble running your process from the Run Process or

Run Real-time Process

dialog, try these steps:

1.

If the error Cannot create context appears, verify that the Exec Path on Target is a path that is actually visible on the target (and doesn’t contain the equivalent host-side path instead). a.

Right-click the process executable in the Project Navigator or right-click

Processes

or Real-time Processes in the Target Manager and select

Run Real-time Process.

b. Copy the exec path and paste it into the Output View > Target

Console Tab

(at the bottom of the view). Verify that the program runs directly on the target.

2.

If the program runs but symbols are not found, manually load the symbols by right-clicking the process and selecting Load Symbols.

338

26 Troubleshooting

26.4 Error Messages

3.

Check your Object Path Mappings to be sure that target paths are mapped to the correct host paths. See

20.2.3 Object Path Mappings Page

, p.250 for details on

setting up your Object Path Mappings.

a.

Open a host shell and type:

ls execpath

If you have a target shell, type the same command.

b. In the host shell, type:

devs

to see if the prefix of the Exec Path (for example, host:) is correct.

4.

If the Exec Path is correct, try increasing the back-end timeout value of your target server connection (see

Advanced Target Server Options

, p.248 for details).

5.

From a target shell or Linux console, try to launch the RTP or process.

6.

Verify that the vxWorks node in the Target Manager view has a small S added to the icon, indicating that symbols have been loaded for the Kernel. a.

If not, verify that the last line of your Object Path Mappings table displays a target path of <any> corresponding to a host path of

<leave path unchanged>

.

.

26.4.4 Launch Configuration Errors

If a launch configuration is not working properly, delete it by clicking Delete below the Debug dialog Configurations list.

If you cannot delete the launch configuration using the Delete button, navigate to

installDir/workspace/.metadata/.plugins/org.eclipse.debug.core/.launches and delete the .launch file with the exact name of the problematic launch configuration

!

WARNING:

Do not delete any of the com.windriver.ide.*.launch files.

Troubleshooting Launch Configurations

If you click the Debug icon (or click the Debug button from the

Launch Configuration

dialog) and get a “Cannot create context” error, check the

Exec Path

on the Main tab of the Debug dialog to be sure it is correct. Also check your Object Path Mappings (see

20.2.3 Object Path Mappings Page

, p.250 for

information about Object Path Mappings).

26

339

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

If you still get the error, check to be sure that the process you are trying to run is a

Real-time Process, and not a Downloadable Kernel Module or some other type of executable.

For general information about launch configurations, see

23. Launching Programs

.

26.4.5 Debugger Errors

Shared Library Problems

If you are having trouble working with shared libraries, try these steps:

1.

If you are trying to run an executable and shared libraries located on your host machine's disk, make sure you can see the host machine's disk and the location of the shared libraries from the target.

Use a target shell, or the @ls command from a host shell, to check this.

2.

Set

SHAREDLIB_VERSION

to 1 in order to generate the proper versioned shared object.

3.

Make sure that a copy of libc.so.1 is located in a place where the RTP has access to it. By default it should be located with the executable files, but you may locate it elsewhere as long as you use the compiler's -rpath option or the environment variable

LD_LIBRARY_PATH

.

26.4.6 Static Analysis Errors

If at any point Workbench is unable to open the cross reference database, you will see this error:

There are many reasons the cross reference database may be inaccessible, including:

340

26 Troubleshooting

26.5 Troubleshooting VxWorks Configuration Problems

The database was not closed properly at the end of the last Workbench session running within the same workspace. This happens if the process running

Workbench crashed or was killed.

Various problems with the file system, including wrong permissions, a network drive that is unavailable, or a disk that is full.

You have several choices for how to respond to this error dialog:

Retry

—the same operation is performed again, possibly with the same failure again.

Recover

—the database is opened and a repair operation is attempted. This may take some time but you may recover your cross reference data.

Clear Database

—the database is deleted and a new one is created. All your cross reference data is lost and your workspace will be reparsed the next time you open the call tree.

Close

—the database is closed. No cross reference data is available, nor will it be generated. At the beginning of the next Workbench session, an attempt to open the database will be made again.

26.5 Troubleshooting VxWorks Configuration Problems

If you encountered problems booting or exercising VxWorks, there are many possible causes. This section discusses the most common sources of error. Please

read

26.5.1 What to Check

, p.341 before contacting Wind River customer support.

Often, you can locate the problem just by re-checking the installation steps, your hardware configuration, and so forth.

26.5.1 What to Check

Most often, a problem with running VxWorks can be traced to configuration errors in hardware or software. Consult the following checklist to locate a problem.

26

341

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Hardware Configuration

If you are using an emulator . . .

See the Wind River ICE for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference or the Wind

River Probe for Wind River Workbench Hardware Reference for information on troubleshooting those connections.

Limit the number of variables

Start with a minimal configuration of a single target.

Check that the RS-232 cables are correctly constructed

In most cases, the documentation accompanying your target system describes its cabling requirements. A common problem—make sure your serial cable is a NULL modem cable, if that is what your target requires.

NOTE:

If you need to use a gender converter to connect your serial cable, it is most likely not the right kind of cable. NULL modem cables tend to have same gender connectors on each end, such as both female or both male. Straight through cables tend to have one male and one female connector. Changing the gender of a cable rarely has the desired results.

Check the boot ROM(s) for correct insertion

If the target seems completely dead when applying power (some have front panel LEDs) or shows some error condition (for example, red lights), the boot

ROMs may be inserted incorrectly.

Press the RESET button if required

Some system controller boards do not reset completely on power-on; you must reset them manually. Consult the target documentation if necessary.

Make sure all boards are jumpered properly

Refer to the target information reference for your BSP and the target documentation to determine the correct dip switch and jumper settings for your target and Ethernet boards.

342

26 Troubleshooting

26.5 Troubleshooting VxWorks Configuration Problems

Booting Problems

Check the Ethernet transceiver site

For example, connect a known working system to the Ethernet cable and check whether the network functions.

Verify IP addresses

An IP address consists of a network number and a host number. There are several different classes of Internet addresses that assign different parts of the

32-bit Internet address to these two parts, but in all cases, the network number is given in the most significant bits and the host number is given in the least

significant bits. The simple configuration described in

3.4 Booting VxWorks

, p.43 assumes that the host and target are on the same network—they have the

same network number. If the target Internet address is not on the same network as the host, the VxWorks boot program displays the following message:

Error loading file: errno = 0x33.

See the errnoLib reference entry for a discussion of VxWorks error status values.

Verify FTP server permissions

Check the FTP server configuration. See

Configuring FTP on Windows

, p.34 for

more information on configuring the FTP server if you are using WFTPD

(shipped by Wind River). Otherwise, consult your system documentation on the FTP Server shipped with it.

Helpful troubleshooting tools

When tracking down configuration problems, ping, arp -a, and netstat -r are useful tools. For more information, see

B. Glossary

.

Target Server Problems

Check back end serial port

If you use a WDB Serial connection to the target, make sure you have connected the serial cable to a port on the target system that matches your target-agent configuration. The agent uses serial channel 1 by default, which is different from the channel used by VxWorks as a default console (channel 0).

Your target’s ports may be numbered starting at one; in that situation,

VxWorks channel one corresponds to the port labeled “serial 2.”

26

343

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Verify path to VxWorks image

The target server requires a host-resident image of the VxWorks run-time system. By default, it obtains a path for this image from the target agent (as recorded in the target boot parameters). In some cases (for example, if the target boots from a local device), this default is not useful.

In that situation, create a new Target Server Connection definition in the

Target Manager, and use the -c filename option in the Advanced Target Server

Options

field to specify the path to a host-resident copy of the VxWorks image.

Check the WFTPD Server Log

The WFTPD server log displays very helpful plain text messages. For information about how to enable logging FTP activities, see

Configuring FTP on Windows

, p.34.

26.6 Error Log View

Some errors direct you to the Error Log view, which displays internal errors thrown by the platform or your code. For more information about the Error Log, see Wind River Workbench User Interface Reference: Error Log View.

26.7 Error Logs Generated by Workbench

Workbench has the ability to generate a variety of useful log files. Some

Workbench logs are always enabled, some can be enabled using options within

Workbench, and some must be enabled by adding options to the executable command when you start Workbench.

This section describes the logs, tells you how to enable them (if necessary), and how to collect them into a ZIP file you can send to Wind River support representatives.

344

26 Troubleshooting

26.7 Error Logs Generated by Workbench

26.7.1 Creating a ZIP file of Logs

Once all the logs you are interested in have been enabled, Workbench automatically collects the information as you work.

To create a ZIP file to send to a Wind River support representative:

1.

Select Help > Collect Log Files. The dialog opens.

2.

Type the full path and filename of the ZIP file you want to create (or browse to a location and enter a filename) then click Finish. The ZIP file is created in the specified location, and contains all information collected to that point.

3.

To discontinue logging (for those logs that are not always enabled) uncheck the boxes on the Target Server Options tab, or restart Workbench without the additional options.

26.7.2 Eclipse Log

The information displayed in the Error Log view is a subset of this log’s contents.

How to Enable Log

This log is always enabled.

26

345

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

What is Logged

All uncaught exceptions thrown by Eclipse java code.

Most errors and warnings that display an error dialog in Workbench.

Additional warnings and informational messages.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Unexpected error popups.

Bugs in Workbench java code.

Bugs involving intercomponent communication.

26.7.3 DFW GDB/MI and Debug Tracing Logs

The DFW logs are a record of all communication and state changes between the debugger back end (the “debugger framework”, or DFW) and other views within

Workbench, including the Target Manager, debugger views, and OCD views.

How to Enable Log

These logs are always enabled.

To change the maximum debug server log file size, select Window > Preferences

> Target Manager > Debug Server Settings

. In the Maximum Debug Server Log

File Size

field, change the default size to the size you prefer (or to the size requested by a Wind River support representative).

Changing this field to 0 disables the collecting of dfwserver.log information.

What is Logged

Internal exceptions in the debugger back end, as well as all commands sent between Workbench and the debugger back end.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Debugger, Target Manager, and debugger back end-related bugs.

346

26 Troubleshooting

26.7 Error Logs Generated by Workbench

26.7.4 Debugger Views GDB/MI Log

This log shows the same information as reported in the

DFW GDB/MI and Debug

Tracing Logs

, p.346.

How to Enable Log

You must enable this log before you start Workbench. Do this by adding these parameters to the Workbench executable command:

-vmargs -DDFE.Debug=true

What is Logged

Same as

DFW GDB/MI and Debug Tracing Logs

, p.346, except with Workbench

time-stamps.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Debugger and Target Manager-related bugs.

26.7.5 Debugger Views Internal Errors Log

How to Enable Log

You must enable this log before you start Workbench. Do this by adding these parameters to the Workbench executable command:

-vmargs -DDFE.Debug=true

What is Logged

Exceptions caught by the Debugger views messaging framework.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Debugger views bugs.

26.7.6 Debugger Views Broadcast Message Debug Tracing Log

How to Enable Log

You must enable this log before you start Workbench. Do this by adding these parameters to the Workbench executable command:

26

347

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

-vmargs -DDFE.Debug=true

What is Logged

Debugger views internal broadcast messages.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Debugger views bugs.

26.7.7 Target Server Output Log

This log contains the messages printed by the target server while running. These messages typically indicate errors during various requests sent to it, such as load operations. Upon startup, if a fatal error occurs (such as a corefile checksum mismatch) then this error will be printed before the target server exits.

How to Enable Log

Enable this log from the Target Manager by right-clicking the target connection, selecting Properties, selecting the Target Server Options tab, then clicking Edit.

Select the Logging tab, then check the box next to Enable output logging and provide a filename and maximum file size for the log. Click OK.

Enable this log from the command line using the -l path/filename and -lm

maximumFileSize options to the target server executable. For more information about target server commands, see Wind

River Documentation > References > Host API and Command References

> Wind River Host Tools API Reference > tgtsvr

.

What is Logged

Fatal errors on startup, such as library mismatches and errors during exchange with the registry.

Standard errors, such as load failure and RPC timeout.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Debugger back end

Target Server

Target Agent

348

26 Troubleshooting

26.7 Error Logs Generated by Workbench

26.7.8 Target Server Back End Log

This log records all requests sent to the WDB agent.

How to Enable Log

Enable this log from the Target Manager by right-clicking the target connection, selecting Properties, selecting the Target Server Options tab, then clicking Edit.

Select the Logging tab, then check the box next to Enable backend logging and provide a filename and maximum file size for the log. Click OK.

Enable this log from the command line using the -Bd path/filename and -Bm

maximumFileSize options to the target server executable. For more information about target server commands, see Wind

River Documentation > References > Host API and Command References

> Wind River Host Tools API Reference > tgtsvr

.

What is Logged

Each WDB request sent to the agent. For more information about WDB services, see Wind

River Documentation > References > Host API and Command References > Wi nd River WDB Protocol API Reference

.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Debugger back end

Target Server

Target Agent

26.7.9 Target Server WTX Log

This log records all requests sent to the target server.

How to Enable Log

Enable this log from the Target Manager by right-clicking the target connection, selecting Properties, selecting the Target Server Options tab, then clicking Edit.

26

349

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Select the Logging tab, then check the box next to Enable WTX logging and provide a filename and maximum file size for the log. Click OK.

Enable this log from the command line using the -Wd path/filename and -Wm

maximumFileSize options to the target server executable. For more information about target server commands, see Wind

River Documentation > References > Host API and Command References

> Wind River Host Tools API Reference > tgtsvr

.

What is Logged

Each WTX request sent to the target server. For more information about WTX services, see Wind River Documentation > References > Host API and Command

References > WTX C Library Reference > wtxMsg.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Debugger back end

Target Server

Target Agent

26.7.10 Target Manager Debug Tracing Log

This log prints useful information about creation and modification of Target

Manager internal structures, as well as inconsistencies or warning conditions in the subsystems the Target Manager interoperates with.

How to Enable Log

You must enable this log before you start Workbench. Do this by adding these parameters to the Workbench executable command:

-debug -vmargs -Dcom.windriver.ide.target.DEBUG=1.

What is Logged

Target Manager internal debug errors.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Inconsistencies in the debugger back end.

350

26 Troubleshooting

26.8 Technical Support

26.7.11 Static Analysis Parser Logs

These logs contain information that can help a Wind River technical support representative to resolve problems with the source code parsers.

How to Enable Logs

Enable these logs by right-clicking a resource or resources in the Project Navigator or the Editor and selecting Static Analysis > Generate Parser Logs. From the list of logs that appears, select the logs that were requested by a technical support representative (the jobs log and the performance log are selected by default). Click

OK

.

What is Logged

The jobs log describes what the parsers were instructed to do.

The performance log lists the source files the parsers spent the most time with.

The PI4 interface and symbols logs contains the result of parsing.

The debug log shows how the cpp-parser uses internal caching strategies.

The tokens log lists every token processed by the cpp-parser.

What it Can Help Troubleshoot

Problems related to excessive parsing time. The performance log can help pinpoint if there are single files that require more parsing time, or if there are simply many resources to parse.

In a case where results of the analysis are different from what you expect but Wind

River support cannot reproduce the problem, the PI4 and symbol logs are crucial in helping support representatives see the raw data the parsers are generating.

The debug and tokens logs are needed very seldom, but are useful to Wind River developers working on the parsers themselves.

26.8 Technical Support

If you have questions or problems with Workbench or with VxWorks after completing the above troubleshooting section, or if you think you have found an

26

351

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

error in the software, please see the Wind River Workbench Release Notes for your platform for any additional information. Contact information for the Wind River

Technical Support organization is also listed in the release notes. Your comments and suggestions are welcome.

352

PA R T V I

Updating

27 Integrating Plug-ins ............................................ 355

353

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

354

27

Integrating Plug-ins

27.1 Introduction 355

27.2 Finding New Plug-ins 356

27.3 Incorporating New Plug-ins into Workbench 356

27.4 Using Workbench with ClearCase Views 360

27.5 Downloading and Installing Java Development Tools (JDT) 361

27.6 Managing Multiple Plug-in Configurations 362

27.7 Using Workbench in an Eclipse Environment 363

27.1 Introduction

Because Wind River Workbench is based on Eclipse, you can incorporate new modules into Workbench without having to recompile or reinstall it. These new modules are called plug-ins, and they can deliver new functionality and tools to your copy of Wind River Workbench.

Many developers enjoy creating new plug-ins and sharing their creations with other Eclipse users, so you will find many Web sites with interesting tools and programs available for you to download and incorporate into your Workbench installation.

355

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

Some plug-ins are dependent on Java Development Tools (JDT). This chapter will show you how to download and install it.

27.2 Finding New Plug-ins

In addition to the Eclipse Web site,

http://www.eclipse.org

, many other Web sites offer a wide variety of Eclipse plug-ins. Here are a few:

http://www.eclipse-plugins.info/eclipse/plugins.jsp

http://www.eclipseplugincentral.com/ http://eclipse-plugins.2y.net/eclipse/ http://www.sourceforge.net/

27.3 Incorporating New Plug-ins into Workbench

Many developers who download plug-ins prefer to create a new directory for each one, rather than unzipping the files directly into their Workbench installation directory. There are many advantages to this approach:

The default Workbench installation does not change.

You do not lose any of your plug-ins if you update or reinstall Workbench.

Plug-ins do not overwrite each other’s files.

You know which files to replace when an update to the plug-in is available.

27.3.1 Creating a Plug-in Directory Structure

To make your plug-ins easier to manage, create a directory structure for them outside your Workbench installation directory.

1.

Create a directory to hold your plug-ins. It can have any descriptive name you want, for example, eclipseplugins.

356

27 Integrating Plug-ins

27.3 Incorporating New Plug-ins into Workbench

2.

Inside this directory, create a directory for each plug-in you want to install.

These directories can also have any descriptive name you want.

3.

Inside each plug-in directory, create a directory named eclipse. This directory

must be named eclipse, and a separate eclipse directory is required inside each plug-in directory.

NOTE:

Some plug-ins assume they need to create the eclipse directory for you.

So after extracting your plug-in, you may discover that your eclipse directory contains another eclipse directory, and below that are the plug-in files. If that is the case, move the plug-in files up one level and delete the extra eclipse directory.

4.

Inside each eclipse directory, create an empty file named .eclipseextension.

This file must be named .eclipseextension (with no .txt or any other file extension), and a separate .eclipseextension file is required inside each eclipse directory.

5.

When you extract your plug-in, two directories, called features and plugins, appear in the eclipse directory alongside the .eclipseextension file.

NOTE:

For any plug-in to work properly, its features and plug-ins directories as well as an empty file called .eclipseextension must be located inside a directory called eclipse.

27.3.2 Installing a ClearCase Plug-in

Once you have created a plug-in directory structure and have found a plug-in you want to use with Workbench, download and install it according to the instructions provided by the plug-in’s developer (almost every plug-in comes with release notes containing installation instructions).

This section will show you how to download and install a plug-in on Windows.

Downloading the IBM Rational ClearCase Plug-in

If you are running Workbench on Windows or Linux, you should use the IBM

Rational ClearCase plug-in.

1.

Follow the instructions in

27.3.1 Creating a Plug-in Directory Structure

, p.356.

27

357

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

For the purposes of this example, name the top-level directory eclipseplugins, and name the plug-in directory clearcaseIBM.

NOTE:

Extracting the IBM ClearCase ZIP file creates the eclipse directory and the .eclipseextension file for you, so you do not need to create them yourself.

2.

Navigate to

http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/1376.html

and click the Plug-ins link under ClearCase. The Rational ClearCase Plug-ins page opens.

3.

Click the Download link to the right of the appropriate version of the package file. For this example, select IBM Rational ClearCase SCM adapter for Eclipse

3.0.x: Windows

.

4.

Extract the ZIP file to your /eclipseplugins/clearcaseIBM directory. The

eclipse

directory is created for you, and inside are two directories, called

features

and plugins, alongside the .eclipseextension file.

Downloading the Source Forge ClearCase Plug-in

If you are running Workbench on Solaris, you should use the Source Forge

ClearCase plug-in.

1.

Follow the instructions in

27.3.1 Creating a Plug-in Directory Structure

, p.356.

For the purposes of this example, name the top-level directory eclipseplugins, and name the plug-in directory clearcaseSF.

2.

Navigate to

http://sourceforge.net/projects/eclipse-ccase

.

3.

Click Download to the right of the appropriate version of the package file, for example eclipse-ccase:Eclipse 3.1.

4.

From the File List page, click the appropriate package to download (with or without source). A page of download mirror sites appears; click the Download icon next to the site closest to you.

5.

Extract the file you downloaded to your /eclipseplugins/clearcaseSF/eclipse directory. Two directories, called features and plugins, appear in the eclipse directory alongside the .eclipseextension file.

358

27 Integrating Plug-ins

27.3 Incorporating New Plug-ins into Workbench

Adding Plug-in Functionality to Workbench

1.

If Workbench is not already running, start it.

2.

Select Help > Software Updates > Manage Configuration. The

Product Configuration

dialog appears.

3.

Select Add an Extension Location in the Wind River Workbench pane.

4.

Navigate to your eclipseplugins/plug-in/eclipse directory. Click OK.

5.

Workbench will ask if you want to restart. To properly incorporate ClearCase functionality, click Yes.

Incorporating the IBM Rational Plug-in

1.

When Workbench restarts, select Window > Customize Perspective.

2.

In the Customize Perspective dialog, switch to the Commands tab.

3.

Select the ClearCase option in the Available command groups column, then click OK. A new ClearCase menu and icons appear on the main Workbench toolbar.

4.

From the ClearCase menu, select Connect to Rational ClearCase to activate

ClearCase functionality.

To configure the ClearCase plug-in, select Window > Preferences > Team >

ClearCase SCM Adapter

.

For more information about using the ClearCase plug-in, see Help > Help

Contents > Rational ClearCase SCM Adapter

.

Incorporating the Source Forge Plug-in

1.

When Workbench restarts, a new Clearcase menu appears on the main

Workbench toolbar.

2.

From the Clearcase menu, select Activate plugin to activate ClearCase functionality.

3.

To Associate a Workbench project with Source Forge ClearCase:

Select your project in the Project Navigator and then select

Clearcase > Associate project

, or

Right-click your project in the Project Navigator, then select

Team > Associate with clearcase

.

27

359

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

For more information about ClearCase functionality, refer to your ClearCase product documentation.

27.4 Using Workbench with ClearCase Views

When using Workbench with ClearCase dynamic views, create your workspace on your local file system for best performance. For recommendations about setting up your workspaces and views, see Help > Help Contents > Rational ClearCase

SCM Adapter > Concepts > Managing workspaces

.

Wind River does not recommend that you place the Eclipse workspace directory in a view-private directory. If you create projects in the default location under the workspace directory, ClearCase prompts you to add the project to source control.

This process requires all parent directories to be under source control, including the workspace directory.

Instead, create workspace directories outside of a ClearCase view. If you want to create projects under source control, you should unselect the Create project in

workspace

checkbox in the project creation dialog and then navigate to a path in a

VOB.

In addition, you should also redirect all build output files to the local file system by changing the Redirection root directory in the Build Properties > Build Paths tab of your product. All build output files such as object files and generated

Makefiles will be redirected.

For more information about the redirecting build output and the redirection root

directory, see

16.8 Build Paths

, p.190.

27.4.1 Adding Workbench Project Files to Version Control

To add Workbench project files to version control without putting your workspace into a ClearCase view, check-in the following automatically generated files along with your source files:

.project

.wrproject

.wrmakefile

.wrfolder

(in subfolders of your projects)

360

27 Integrating Plug-ins

27.5 Downloading and Installing Java Development Tools (JDT)

For more information about IBM Rational ClearCase, see

http://www-130.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/products/clearcase

.

27.5 Downloading and Installing Java Development Tools (JDT)

If you find that one of your plug-ins has a dependency on JDT, this section will show you how to download and install it.

27.5.1 Creating a JDT Directory Structure

1.

Follow steps 1 and

2

in

27.3.1 Creating a Plug-in Directory Structure

, p.356.

In this example, the directory to hold your plug-ins is called eclipseplugins, and the plug-in directory is called JDT.

NOTE:

JDT creates the eclipse directory for you, so you do not need to create it manually.

27.5.2 Downloading the JDT SDK

1.

Navigate to

http://download.eclipse.org/eclipse/downloads

, then select the appropriate Eclipse release (for example, under Latest Releases, select 3.1).

The Release Build page appears.

2.

Scroll down until you see the JDT SDK section of the page, then select the drop for your platform. A page of mirror sites appears.

3.

Select the mirror site closest to you to start the download.

4.

When the file is finished downloading, extract it to your JDT directory.

27.5.3 Making JDT Available to Workbench

1.

In your /eclipseplugins/JDT/eclipse directory, create a file named

.eclipseextension

(with no .txt or any other file extension).

2.

In this file, type the following information:

27

361

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

name=Eclipse Java Development Tools

Id=com.eclipse.jdt

Version=

version you downloaded, such as 3.1

3.

In Workbench, select Help > Software Updates > Manage Configuration. The

Product Configuration window appears.

4.

Click the Add an Extension Location link in the Wind River Workbench pane.

5.

The Browse for Folder dialog prompts you to choose an extension location.

Navigate to your /eclipseplugins/JDT/eclipse directory, then click OK.

6.

The Install/Update dialog prompts you to restart Workbench. Click Yes.

JDT should now be available to any plug-in that requires it.

27.6 Managing Multiple Plug-in Configurations

If you have many plug-ins installed, you may find it useful to create different configurations that include or exclude specific plug-ins.

When you make a plug-in available to Workbench using the process shown in section

27.5.3

, its extension location is stored in the Eclipse configuration area.

When starting Workbench, you can specify which configuration you want to start by using the -configuration path option, where path represents your Eclipse configuration directory.

On Windows:

From a shell, type:

% cd

installdir\workbench-2.4\wrwb\2.4\x86-win32\bin

% .\wrwb.exe -configuration

path

On Linux and Solaris:

Use the option as a parameter to the startWorkbench.sh script:

./startWorkbench.sh -configuration

path &

For more information about using -configuration and other Eclipse startup parameters, see Help > Help Contents > Wind River Partners Documentation >

Eclipse Workbench User Guide > Tasks > Running Eclipse

.

362

27 Integrating Plug-ins

27.7 Using Workbench in an Eclipse Environment

27.7 Using Workbench in an Eclipse Environment

It is possible to install Workbench in a standard Eclipse environment, though some fixes and improvements that Wind River has made to Workbench will be lost.

27.7.1 Recommended Software Versions and Limitations

Java Runtime Version

Wind River tests, supports, and recommends using the JRE 1.4.2_08 for

Workbench plug-ins.

Wind River adds a package to that JRE version, and not having that package will make the Terminal view inoperable.

Eclipse Version

Wind River Workbench 2.4 is based on Eclipse 3.1. Wind River patches Eclipse 3.1 to fix some Eclipse debugger bugs. These fixes will be lost when using a standard

Eclipse environment.

See the getting started for your platform for supported and recommended host requirements for Workbench 2.4.

Defaults and Branding

Eclipse uses different default preferences from those set by Workbench.

In a standard Eclipse environment, the Eclipse branding (splash screen, welcome screen, etc.) is used instead of the Wind River branding.

27.7.2 Setting Up Workbench

This setup requires a complete Eclipse and Workbench installation. Follow the respective installation instructions for each product.

Substitute the correct installation locations for these values in the rest of the steps in this section:

27

363

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

ECLIPSE_INST denotes the Eclipse installation directory.

WORKBENCH_INST denotes the Workbench installation directory.

Creating a Workbench Plug-in for Eclipse

To register Workbench plug-ins and features with Eclipse they must be located in a directory called eclipse, with the subdirectories plugins and features.

Essentially, to create an Eclipse-recognizable extension location, you must create a

similar structure to what you created in

27.3.1 Creating a Plug-in Directory Structure

, p.356.

1.

Change directory into WORKBENCH_INST/workbench-2.4/wrwb/2.4.

2.

Create a directory called eclipse.

3.

Inside the eclipse directory, create the subdirectories plugins and features.

4.

From the original Workbench plugins and features subdirectories

(WORKBENCH_INST/workbench-2.4/wrwb/2.4), copy the following files and directories into the newly created plugins and features directories (in

WORKBENCH_INST/workbench-2.4/wrwb/2.4/eclipse):

features/com.windriver* features/org.eclipse.gef* features/org.eclipse.emf* plugins/com.windriver* plugins/org.eclipse.gef* plugins/org.eclipse.emf* plugins/org.eclipse.cdt*

Adding Workbench Extension Locations to Eclipse

To add the location of the plug-ins as an extension location:

1.

Create a directory ECLIPSE_INST/links.

2.

Create all Eclipse extension locations currently registered with Workbench: a.

Copy all contents of WORKBENCH_INST/workbench-2.4/wrwb/2.4/links into ECLIPSE_INST/links. b. Edit the copied files and replace the Workbench relative paths with absolute paths. For example:

364

27 Integrating Plug-ins

27.7 Using Workbench in an Eclipse Environment

Original: path=components/extensions

Replacement: path=WORKBENCH_INST/components/extensions

UNIX example: /windriver/components/extensions

Windows example: C:\windriver\components\extensions

3.

Add the path to the Workbench plug-ins directory: a.

In ECLIPSE_INST/links, create a file wb.link.

b. Edit wb.link to add the path to the Workbench plug-ins as an absolute path.

Example: path=C:\windriver\workbench-2.4\wrwb\2.4.

Changing Eclipse Default Preferences to Workbench Defaults

Standard Eclipse uses different default preferences from Workbench.

The default setting for auto-build is one example where Workbench defaults and

Eclipse defaults differ, causing behavior changes. Wind River chooses to disable auto-build, because it does not make much sense for C/C++ development, whereas Eclipse enables auto-build by default.

In order to have the Wind River defaults in the Eclipse environment, you must copy the contents of the Workbench plugin_customization.ini file into the Eclipse installation.

1.

Change directory into ECLIPSE_INST/plugins/org.eclipse.platform_3.1.0.

2.

Rename plugin_customization.ini to plugin_customization.ini.orig.

3.

Extract the default preferences from a Workbench plug-in to the current location: unzip -q

WORKBENCH_INST/workbench-2.4/wrwb/2.4/plugins/com.windriver.ide_2.4.0.ja

r plugin_customization.ini

4.

Repeat the above steps for the directory

ECLIPSE_INST/plugins/org.eclipse.sdk_3.1.0.

Launching Eclipse with Workbench

No special steps are necessary to launch Eclipse.

27

365

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

366

PA R T V I I

Reference

A

B

Updating Workspaces on the Command-line .. 369

Glossary .............................................................. 373

367

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

368

A

Updating Workspaces on the

Command-line

A.1 Overview 369

A.2 wrws_update Reference 370

A.1 Overview

The Workbench installation includes a wrws_update script that allows you to update workspaces from the command-line. This can be used, for example, to update workspaces in a nightly build script. The following section provides a reference page for the command.

369

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (Linux Version)

A.2 wrws_update Reference

A script for updating an existing workspace is available in the Workbench installation and is named:

wrws_update.bat

(Windows only)

wrws_update.sh

(Windows, Linux, and Solaris)

This script launches a GUI-less Eclipse application that can be used to update makefiles, symbols (static analysis), and the retriever index.

Execution

Specify the location of the wrws_update script or add it to your path and execute it with optional parameters, for example:

$ wrws_update.sh -data

workspace_dir

The workspace must be closed for the command to execute. If you do not specify any options to the command, all update operations are performed (-refresh,

-all projects

, -generate makefiles, --update symbols, -update index).

Options

-data

workspace_dir

The script uses the default workspace (if known), but it can also update other workspaces by specifying the -data workspace_dir option, just as Workbench does. (The script accepts the same command-line options as Workbench. For example, to increase virtual memory specify -vmargs -Xmxmem_size.)

-refresh

Refresh workspace (this option should always be specified to ensure correct information is generated).

--all-projects

Update all projects in the workspace. Closed projects will be opened before any operation and closed afterwards to restore the initial state of the workspace.

--generate-makefiles

Trigger a regeneration of all makefiles that use IDE-managed build (including kernel makefiles).

--update-symbols

Trigger an update of static analysis data (symbols and cross references).

370

A Updating Workspaces on the Command-line

A.2 wrws_update Reference

--update-index

Trigger an update of the retriever index (text search).

Output

Any errors that might occur during the updates are printed out to stderr. Other information (for example, status, what has been done, and so on) are printed out to stdout.

Build Information

Note that no actual builds are executed within this script and the launched application, only the needed makefiles will be generated when specifying the

--generate-makefiles

option.

NOTE:

No configuration management-specific actions or commands are executed within this script and the launched application. Configuration management specific synchronizations or updates relevant to the workspace (for example,

cvs-update

, ClearCase view synchronization, and so on) have to be done before this script is started.

371

A

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (Linux Version)

372

B

Glossary

This glossary contains terms used in Wind River Workbench.

If the term you want is not listed here, you can search for it throughout all online documentation.

1.

At the top of the Help > Help Contents window, type your term into the

Search

field.

2.

Click Go. Topics containing the term will appear in the Search Results list.

3.

To open a topic in the list, click it.

For more information about online help, see Help > Help Contents > Wind

River Partner Documentation > Eclipse Workbench User Guide > Tasks > Usin g the help system

.

arp -a

This command displays the address resolution protocol tables that map IP addresses to physical media access control (or MAC) addresses. Your target machine is listed if at least one packet was transferred from your target to your host.

The following example shows both the IP address (91.0.10.1) and physical address

(08-00-20-1b-66-e9) of the target venus:

C:\> arp -a

Interface: 91.0.10.26

Internet Address Physical Address Type

91.0.10.1 08-00-20-1b-66-e9 dynamic

91.0.10.20 00-20-af-52-1e-72 dynamic

91.0.10.254 00-00-ef-01-f1-a0 dynamic

373

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

active view

The view that is currently selected, as shown by its highlighted title bar. Many menus change based on which is the active view, and the active view is the focus of keyboard and mouse input.

back end

Functionality configured into a target server which allows it to communicate with various target agents, based on the mode of communication that you establish between the host and the target (network, serial, and so on).

The target server must be configured with a back end that matches the target agent interface with which VxWorks has been configured and built.

board support package (BSP)

A Board Support Package (BSP) consists primarily of the hardware-specific VxWorks code for a particular target board. A BSP includes facilities for hardware initialization, interrupt handling and generation, hardware clock and timer management, mapping of local and bus memory space, and so on.

build spec

A particular set of build settings appropriate for a specific target board.

color context

The color assigned to a particular process in the Debug view; this color carries over to breakpoints in the Editor and to other views that derive their context from the

Debug view.

cross-development

The process of writing code on one system, known as the host, that will run on another system, known as the target.

editor

An Editor is a visual component within Wind River Workbench. It is typically used to edit or browse a file or other resource.

Modifications made in an Editor follow an open-save-close life cycle model.

Multiple instances of an editor type may exist within a Workbench window.

374

B Glossary

kernel module

A piece of code, such as a device driver, that can be loaded and unloaded without the need to rebuild and reboot the kernel.

launch configuration

A run-mode launch configuration is a set of instructions that instructs the IDE to connect to your target and launch a process or application. A debug-mode launch configuration completes these actions and then attaches the debugger.

netstat

This command displays network status reports. The -r option displays the network routing tables. This is useful when gateways are used to access the target.

C:\> netstat -r

Route Table

Network Address Netmask Gateway Address Interface Metric

0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 91.0.10.254 91.0.10.26 1

127.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 1

91.0.10.0 255.255.255.0 91.0.10.26 91.0.10.26 1

91.0.10.26 255.255.255.255 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 1

91.11.255.255 255.255.255.255 91.0.10.26 91.0.10.26 1

224.0.0.0 224.0.0.0 91.0.10.26 91.0.10.26 1

255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255 91.0.10.26 91.0.10.26 1

Active Connections

Proto Local Address Foreign Address State

TCP mercury:1025 saturn.wrs.com:nbsession ESTABLISHED

TCP mercury:1177 earth.wrs.com:nntp ESTABLISHED

TCP mercury:1259 oak.oakland.edu:ftp ESTABLISHED

overview ruler

The vertical borders on each side of the Editor view. Breakpoints, bookmarks, and other indicators appear in the overview ruler.

perspective

A perspective is a group of views and editors in the Workbench window. One or more perspectives can exist in a single Workbench window. Each perspective contains one or more views and editors. Within a window, each perspective may have a different set of views, but all perspectives share the same set of editors.

B

375

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

ping

IP address

This utility determines whether a specific IP address is accessible by sending a packet to the specified address and waiting for a reply.

The following exchange indicates this host is successfully sending packets to the target venus:

C:\> ping venus

Pinging venus.wrs.com [91.0.10.1] with 32 bytes data:

Reply from 91.0.10.1: bytes=32 time=10ms TTL=255

Reply from 91.0.10.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=255

Reply from 91.0.10.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=255

Reply from 91.0.10.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=255

If a machine’s name and IP address are listed in your hosts file (for details, see

Establishing the VxWorks Target Name and IP Address

, p.34) you may substitute the

machine name for the IP address in the ping command.

plug-in program counter

The address of the current instruction when a process is suspended.

project

An independent module, available from Wind River, the Eclipse Foundation, or from many Internet Web sites, that delivers new functionality to Workbench without the need to recompile or reinstall it.

A collection of source code files, build settings, and binaries that are used to create a downloadable application or bootable system image.

real-time process (RTP)

An application that runs in a protected memory space. If an RTP crashes, it will not crash the kernel.

registry

The registry associates a target server’s name with the network address needed to connect to that target server, thereby allowing you to select a target server by a convenient name.

376

B Glossary

system mode

When in system mode, the debugger is focused on kernel processes and threads.

When a process is suspended, all processes stop. Compare with user mode.

target agent

The target agent runs on the target, and is the interface between VxWorks and all other Wind River Workbench tools running on the host or target.

target server

The target server runs on the host, and connects Wind River Workbench tools to the target agent. There is one server for each target; all host tools access the target through this server.

user mode

When in user mode, the debugger is focused on user applications and processes.

When a process is suspended, other processes continue to run. Compare with system mode.

view

A view is a visual component within Workbench. It is typically used to navigate a hierarchy of information (like the resources in your Workbench), open an editor, or display properties for the active editor.

Modifications made in a view are saved immediately. Only one instance of a particular view type may exist within a Workbench window.

working set

A working set is a group of resources you select because you want to view them or perform an operation on them as a group. For example, creating a working set allows you to speed up a search by restricting its scope. A working set can also help you focus by reducing the number of projects visible in the Project Navigator, the number of symbols displayed in the Outline view, and so on.

workspace

The directory where your projects are created.

B

377

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

378

Index

A

accessing build properties

175

active build spec

183

adding application code to projects

132

application initialization routines to VIPs

85

applications to VIPs

85

new files to projects

133

subprojects

71

applications adding to VIPs

85

creating, for VxWorks

124

initialization stubs

83

projects, configuring

110

architecture specific compiler flags

188

Attach to Target launches

295

B

back end, target server

246

ball sample program

15

basename mappings

253

board support package

86

creating

87

customizing manually

88

migrating

87

simulator

86

Wind River Workbench

87

Bookmarks view

26

boot loader project

67

build specs

91

creating

90

makefile

92

project nodes

91

target nodes

91

mechanism, setting up

41

programs creating new

53

serial connection, configuring for

58

ROMs emulators, substituting ROM

42

boot loader project

89

booting command line parameters

52

parameters displaying current, at boot time

44

nonvolatile RAM, effect of

52

setting

44

VxWorks

50

rebooting VxWorks

53

TFTP, requiring

53

troubleshooting

343

VxWorks commands

46

breakpoints conditional

301

379

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

converting to hardware

302

data

301

disabling

304

exporting

304

expression

301

hardware

301

importing

303

line

300

refreshing

304

removing

304

restricted

300

unrestricted

300

Breakpoints view

299

BSP

See board support package

build

173

applications for different boards

202

architecture-specific functions

206

command

177

command line

177

complete product image

148

console

197

preferences

197

disabled build support

174

executables to dynamically link to shared libraries

207

failure due to locked files

331

library for test and release

203

make rule in Project Navigator

210

managed

174

management

174

output folders

82

saving

197

properties

173

accessing

175

dialog

175

redirection root directory

190

remote

215

remote connection

215

remote, setting up environment

215

spec

181

active

183

creating

211

customizing

74

380

for new compilers, other tools

211

support

174

disabled

174

target properties

194

troubleshooting imported projects

332

user-defined

174

C

cables, connecting

39

ClearCase installing plug-ins

357

using with Workbench

360

colored views

312

command line build

177

parameters

52

registry

237

update workspaces (wrws_update)

369

communication settings

262

configuring manually

263

configuring through a serial port

265

compiler flags, add

200

flags, architecture specific

188

new build spec

211

specifying a different default for a single project

189

complex project structures

146

conditional breakpoints

301

configuring application projects

110

file system project

163

jumpers

38

kernel components

84

shared library projects

110

target file system

96

target hardware

39

VxWorks image project

86

, 163

console build

197

container project

Index

creating

149

per project type and external headers

150

subprojects

160

context pointer

311

customize build specs, shared subprojects

74

D

data breakpoints

301

debug modes

313

Debug view

308

debugger disconnecting and terminating processes

317

single-stepping through code

313

deleting project nodes

139

target nodes

139

development

153

disabled build support

174

Disassembly view

318

opening automatically

318

opening manually

318

Domain Name Service (DNS)

34

downloadable kernel module application code

118

in Project Navigator

116

project build specs

117

creating

114

files

118

nodes

117

target nodes

117

dual mode

32

context pointer

311

Kernel

85

environment variables

LD_LIBRARY_PATH

209

,

287

redirection root directory

190

Error Log view

344

Exec Path on Target troubleshooting

Linux

336

RTPs

337

expression breakpoints

301

external files linking to

122

external headers

157

F

file properties

194

system configuring the target

96

project files

95

project nodes

95

project, VxWorks

69

File Navigator view

169

File Transfer Protocol

See FTP server

files manipulating

137

find and replace

171

folder properties

194

folders, build output

82

FTP server configuring

34

WFTPD

34

E

Eclipse basic concepts

7

log

345

using Workbench in

363

Editor

171

G

generating include search-paths wizard

192

go into project

135

381

Index

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

H

hardware breakpoints

301

headers, external

157

help system accessing

12

display problems

Linux

328

Solaris

328

Windows

328

host, setting up

37

I

importing application code

133

build settings

133

projects

132

resources

132

VxWorks image project

76

Include Browser view

170

include search-paths, generating

192

initialization stubs, application

83

J

jumpers

38

K

kernel configuration

80 ,

95

back ends

255

editor

85

image and symbols

247

shell

243

Kernel Editor

85

Kernel Objects view

319

multi-process debugging

320

L

launch configurations creating

286

native applications

292

LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable

209 ,

287

library, shared project structure

155

project, configuring

110

line breakpoints

300

linking project nodes, moving and

138

linking to external sources

123

location, resource

144

logical nodes

136

logs creating a ZIP of

345

debugger back end debug tracing

346

GDB/MI

346

debugger views broadcast message debug tracing

347

GDB/MI

347

internal errors

347

Eclipse

345

static analysis parser

351

target manager debug tracing

350

target server back end

349

output

348

WTX

349

M

make rule in Project Navigator

210

makefile boot loader project

92

build properties

194

nodes downloadable kernel modules

118

native application

129

RTP

101

shared libraries

109

VIP

82

382

Index

managed build

174

memory cache size, target server

249

menu, Navigate

136

multiple processes, monitoring

311

software systems

145

target operating systems or versions

176

multi-process debugging

Kernel Objects view

320

N

native application project application code

130

build specs

128

creating

126

files

130

nodes

128

target nodes

128

native applications launching

292

project

125

Navigate menu

136

navigation

135

New Connection wizard

238

nodes moving and (un-)linking project

138

resources and logical

136

O

object path mappings creating automatically

250

examples

251

for remote hosts

251

why they are required

250

opening new window

135

project in new window

135

properties dialog, build

175

operating systems, multiple

176

output folders, build

82

P

pango error

327

pathname prefix mappings

250

plug-ins activating

359

adding an extension location

359

creating a directory structure

356

creating a Workbench plug-in for Eclipse

363

installing ClearCase

357

web sites

356

polled mode

32

preconfigured project types, overview

66

preferences build console

197

processes

Attach to Target launches

295

disconnecting debugger

317

RTPs, running

291

profiles

78

VxWorks 5.5 compatible

79

VxWorks scalability levels

78

project application code

65

boot loader

67 ,

89

creating

90

bsp, getting a functioning

87

build macros

188

paths

190

properties

173

accessing

175

build support

177

remote

215

specs

181

system

73

targets

178

tools

184

closing

134 ,

135

compiler

Index

383

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

specifying a different default for a single project

189

configuring application

110

creating

132

for read-only sources

330

creating new

64

creating, boot loader

90

customizing VxWorks image

80

go into

135

headers

150

infrastructure design

148

linking application projects to VxWorks image

85

linking to external sources

123

native application

125

nodes manipulating

138

moving and (un-)linking

138

opening

134

preconfigured, overview

66

project structures

70

real-time process

68

sample

66

scoping

135

shared library

69 ,

110

sharing subprojects

74

structure and build system

73

and host directory structure

72

structures, complex

146

troubleshooting imported

332

user-defined

174

linking to external files

122

VxWorks file system

69

image

66

kernel configuration profiles

78

scalable

78

Project Navigator boot loader projects

91

DOSFS file system projects

95

move, copy, delete

136

moving and (un-)linking project nodes

138

native application projects

128

real-time process projects

100

shared libraries

108

target nodes, manipulating

139

user-defined build-targets

210

VxWorks image projects

80

properties build-target

194

file

194

folder

194

project build

173

R

read-only sources creating projects for

330

real-time process and shared library

219

project

68

application code

103

build specs

101

creating

98

files

102

nodes

101

target nodes

101

See also RTPs

rebooting VxWorks

53

redirection root directory

190

with ClearCase

360

registry

239

changing default

241

command line

237

data storage

241

error, unreachable

325

remote, creating

240

shutting down

241

Wind River

37

wtxregd

240

remote build

215

setting up environment

215

remote connection

215

removing breakpoints

304

replace

171

resource locations

144

resources and logical nodes

136

Retriever

171

384

Index

RTPs and shared library

219

attaching to running

296

running

291

S

sample ball program

15

projects

66

search

171

serial lines target server back end connection, as

57

testing

58

set, working

135

setting breakpoints restricted

300

unrestricted

300

settings build console

197

shared library

155

and real-time process

219

LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable

209

,

287

project configuring

110

creating

106

nodes

108

project file

109

troubleshooting problems

340

simulator establishing a new connection

257

VxWorks

86

software systems, multiple

145

source lookup path adding sources

290

editing

317

source mode build

78

spec build

181

active

183

static analysis description

167

structures, complex project

146

stubs, application initialization

83

subprojects

163

adding

71

container

160

Symbol Browser view

168

symbol file specifying maximum size

331

symbol table target server, configuring

247

symbolic links to files, creating

122

symbols and kernel image

247

system mode

32

compared with task mode

313

T

target agent communication modes

32

introduction

30

board configuring

39

establishing a connection

242

jumpers, setting

38

serial port

39

Terminal view

39

file system

96

name (tn) (boot parameter)

49

operating systems, multiple versions

176

server back end settings

246

connecting ethernet

54

serial

59

connections establishing new

245

network

54

serial line

57

core file

247

file system (TSFS)

248

making writable

249

introduction

30

kernel configuration

385

Index

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

back ends

255

memory cache size

249

symbol table

247

timeout options

249

troubleshooting

343

WDB Pipe back end

246

WDB Proxy back end

246

WDB Serial back end

246

Target Manager view

238

basename mappings

253

defining a new Wind River Probe connection

275

defining a VxWorks Simulator connection

257

New Connection wizard

238

object path mappings

250

examples

251

for remote hosts

251

pathname prefix mappings

250

shared connection configuration

254

Wind River ICE tasks connection configuration, shared

270

Wind River Probe connection configuration, shared

280

attaching to running

296

state

296

Terminal view

39

text search

171

tgtsvr options

248

TIPC target server backend

246

TOOL_PATH macro setting

189

troubleshooting booting problems

343

building imported projects

332

creating a ZIP of log files

345

downloading

337

exception on attach

336

Exec Path on Target

337

hardware configuration

342

help system display problems

Linux

328

Solaris

328

Windows

328

Java Development Tools (JDT) dependency

327

launch configurations

339

logs debugger back end

346

debugger views broadcast message debug tracing

347

GDB/MI

347

internal errors

347

Eclipse

345

Error Log

344

generated by Workbench

344

static analysis parser

351

target manager debug tracing

350

target server back end

349

output

348

WTX

349

pango error

327

registry unreachable

325

removing unwanted target connections

328

running a process

338

shared library problems

340

startup errors

324

target connection

334

target server problems

343

VxWorks

341

workspace cannot be locked

326

TSFS

See target server, file system

248

tutorial ball sample program

15

Type Hierarchy view

170

U

user mode

32

user-defined build

174

projects creating

122

linking to external files

122

usrappinit.c

83

usrrtpappinit.c

83

386

Index

V

views

See Workbench views

VIP

See VxWorks image project

vxprj

132

VxWorks boot loader project

67

booting

43

file system project

69

creating

94

image customizing

80

default location

45

source mode build

78

image project

66

build specs

80

creating

77

files

83

in Project Navigator

80

linking application projects to

85

project nodes

80

source mode build

78

target nodes

80

image projects kernel configuration profiles

78

rebooting

53

shared library project

69

simulator

86

defining a new connection

257

W

WDB back end

Pipe

246

Proxy

246

Serial

246

WFTPD FTP server

34

Wind River

ICE shared connection configuration

270

Probe defining a new connection

275

shared connection configuration

280

registry

37

System Viewer support libraries, excluding

78

writable target server file system

249

Workbench

Application Development perspective

15

bookmarks creating

25

viewing

26

breakpoints modifying

21

running to

20

setting

20

building a project build errors

22

connection definition, creating

17

creating a project

15

Editor bracket matching

25

code completion

23

Eclipse functionality

11

parameter hints

24

help system accessing

12

display problems

Linux

328

Solaris

328

Windows

328

moving and sizing views

11

perspectives

8

project source bookmarks creating

25

viewing

26

bracket matching

25

breakpoints modifying

21

running to

20

setting

20

code completion

23

parameter hints

24

running sample program from build output

18

with Device Debug perspective

18

Index

387

Wind River Workbench

User’s Guide, 2.4 (VxWorks Version)

starting

14

Target Manager connection definition

17

target, connecting to connection definition

17

using in an Eclipse environment

363

using with ClearCase

360

views

10

Breakpoints

299

colored

312

Debug

308

Disassembly

318

Editor

171

Error Log

344

File Navigator

169

Include Browser

170

Kernel Objects

319

Symbol Browser

168

Type Hierarchy

170

working sets

168

using

135

workspace project location

64

starting Workbench with a new

324

switching to a different

145

using one for multiple projects

146

wrws_update reference page

370

script

369

wtxregd how to find API

237

using a remote registry

240

388

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement

Table of contents