official rulebook

official rulebook
OFFICIAL RULEBOOK
Deckbuilding
Quick Reference
There are only a few rules you need to follow when building your deck:
Your deck must include at least 60 cards, not counting your starting hero. Your hero starts the game in play, and it isn’t considered a part of your deck.
❂
You can’t include more than four copies of a single card in your deck
unless that card has “unlimited” in its type line. You may include any number of unlimited cards in your deck.
❂
Some ability cards can only be used by a hero who has a certain talent spec. Those cards will have “[Talent Spec] Hero Required” in bold in their text box.
❂
You can include only cards that share one or more trait icons with your hero in your deck. Some neutral cards don’t have any trait icons. You can put those cards into any deck.
❂
Check out the WoW TCG websites: UDE.com/wow, WoWRealms.com, WoWCards.org,
WoW.TCGPlayer.com, WarcraftCCG.com, WoWTCGDB.com
Table
of
Introduction.......................... 1
Contents
Game Overview..................... 1
Object of the Game................ 2
What’s in the Starter Box....... 2
About This Rulebook.............. 2
Traits ............................... 3
Parts of a Card...................... 5 Basic Game Terms................. 6.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Ready and Exhaust
Resources
Costs
Powers
Target
Uniqueness
Game Zones.......................... 9.
Card Types............................ 11
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Hero
Ally
Weapon
Armor
Item
Ability
Quest
Setup ............................... 17
Turn Sequence...................... 18
1.
2. 3. Start Phase
Action Phase
End Phase
Basic Combat........................21
1. 2. 3.
The Combat Step
Combat with a Hero
Protecting in Combat
Keywords..............................22
Deckbuilding.........................24
Advanced Concepts.................25
The Chain and Responding.....25
1. 2. 3. The Chain
Responding
Resolving
Damage................................28
1. 2. 3. 4. Sources and Types of Damage
Healing Damage
Preventing Damage
Armor
Multiplayer Rules..................30
Sealed Pack Formats.............31
Glossary...............................32.
Credits ...............................39
Quick Reference Rules..........44
®
Introduction
Welcome to the World of Warcraft™ trading card game!
In this game, you control a hero in the world of Azeroth. As you play, your hero can invite allies to
join your party, complete quests, find weapons and armor, and play abilities and talents directly
from the World of Warcraft online game.
The World of Warcraft TCG draws from the rich lore of the Warcraft universe. Two factions are
battling for supremacy over Azeroth—the Horde and the Alliance—and each time you play, you
choose a hero from one of these factions to represent you.
This TCG was created by loyal World of Warcraft fans and the best trading card game designers in
the world. We hope you enjoy it!
Game Overview
Trading card games (TCGs) are different from other games in two ways. First, the cards in a TCG
can change or go beyond the game’s basic rules. The card is always right. That means you should
always do what the card says—even if the rules say something different.
Second, you get to choose the cards you want to play in your deck. You decide which hero to play,
what items and abilities you will use, which allies you will invite into your party, and what quests
you will perform. In this game, you have total control over the power of your deck.
1
Object of the Game
In the World of Warcraft TCG, you control a hero. Your hero is the leader of your party who fights
alongside your allies. The cards that you play will allow you to equip your hero with weapons and
armor, use spells and talents, invite allies into your party, and complete quests.
The object of the game is to defeat your opponents before they defeat you. Over the course of
the game, your hero and allies will deal damage to
your opponents’ heroes and allies, and that damage
is permanent unless it is healed. If your hero takes
damage equal to or greater than his or her health, you’re
out of the game.
You’re also out of the game if you run out of cards in
your deck and can’t draw another card, so you must
defeat your opponents before that happens.
Deal 27 damage to this hero, and you win.
What’s in the Starter Box?
Each starter box contains:
❂
A deck of 30 cards, wrapped together with a hero card and two UDE Points cards. The deck has been preconstructed to go with its hero card. You’ll play your first few games with this deck and its hero. There are 9 different starter decks, one for each class.
Two booster packs of additional cards. Feel free to open them up, but don’t mix them with the
preconstructed deck yet.
❂
Three random oversize hero cards. You can use these
cards in games, or just collect them.
❂
About This Rulebook
The rest of this rulebook is divided into three parts: game rules, advanced concepts, and the
glossary. The game rules will tell you everything you need to know to start playing the World of
Warcraft TCG. You can reference the glossary or advanced concepts section whenever you wish.
For comprehensive tournament rules, visit www.ude.com/wow.
2
Traits
What a hero can do in the World of Warcraft TCG is determined by his or her traits. Your hero has
five traits: faction, talent spec, professions, race, and class.
FACTION: The war between the Horde and the Alliance has settled into a tenuous peace. While open warfare may be over, the hostility is not, and skirmishes often break out between the two sides.
❂
The Alliance: The Alliance is made up of four races: the noble humans of Stormwind, the
mysterious night elves of Darnassus, the mighty dwarves of Ironforge, and the gnomes,
refugees of the irradiated city of Gnomeregan. They are bound by ties of loyalty dating
back to the Second War, when they fought side by side to defeat the Horde. In addition, the
draenei will be featured in the TCG’s second set.
The Horde: The races of the new Horde came together under Warchief Thrall in the wake
of the Second War and the flight to Kalimdor. The Horde is made up of the bloodthirsty
orcs, the Darkspear trolls, the noble tauren, and the Forsaken, undead who broke free of
their enslavement to the Lich King. You’ll also find a sneak peek of the blood elves in the
first set.
TALENT SPEC: Each hero specializes in a talent tree. Your hero’s talent spec is located on the hero card as shown here:
❂
Talent Spec
Professions
❂ PROFESSIONS: Each hero has two professions, which will be important in future World of Warcraft TCG expansions. Future sets will include cards like Glimmering Mithril Insignia for Blacksmiths and Smoking Heart of the Mountain for Enchanters.
❂ RACE: In future World of Warcraft TCG expansions, there will be cards that can be used only by members of a certain race. For example, the Undead will have a Cannibalize card.
❂
CLASS: All nine classes are represented in the TCG.
Druid: Keepers of the natural order of the world, druids can shape-shift into different
animal forms. They harness the power of nature to heal their allies and harm their
enemies. Druids have powerful spells to help themselves and their friends, such as
Mark of the Wild and Innervate. In this first TCG set, Druids will have access to bear
form. More forms will be added with each set.
3
Hunter: Hunters are deadly marksmen who share a special bond with the beasts of
Azeroth. Hunters have access to powerful offensive cards like Aimed Shot, Aspect of
the Hawk, Multi-Shot, and Rapid Fire. There are four Hunter Pets in this first TCG set
and many more in upcoming sets.
Mage: Masters of the arcane arts, mages have access to powerful direct damage and
area of effect spells that can disable many enemies at once. Their offense from this
first TCG set includes cards such as Fire Blast, Frostbolt, Flamestrike, and Pyroblast.
Mages can utilize tricks like Blink, Counterspell, Frost Nova, and Polymorph to outlast
their opponents despite their lower starting health.
Paladin: These upholders of the Light are powerful fighters and solid healers.
Their unwavering pursuit of justice makes them stalwart defenders of the Alliance.
Paladins are very powerful as heroes or as allies in your party. Paladins have offensive
capabilities with cards such as Blessing of Might, Hammer of Justice, and Retribution
Aura, and defensive capabilities with cards such as Blessing of Protection, Cleanse,
Devotion Aura, and Divine Shield.
Priest: The priests of Azeroth are spread across many races and faiths, but all share
powerful healing abilities. Those who lean toward shadow have great power to melt
faces, while those who specialize in holy pursuits are incredible healers. In this first
TCG set, Priests have access to a wide range of offensive, defensive, and utility
cards, including Dispel Magic, Flash Heal, Mind Blast, Mind Control, Prayer of Healing,
Psychic Scream, and Shadowform.
Rogue: Masters of stealth and subtlety, rogues are deadly assassins. They
complement their skills in combat with a seemingly endless arsenal of tricks. Rogues
in the TCG have access to Poisons, stealth, Combo cards, and Finishing Moves.
Cards in the first set include Backstab, Cold Blood, Crippling Poison, Expose Armor,
Premeditation, and Sinister Strike.
Shaman: Shamans have an arsenal of weapons at their disposal along with healing
spells and totems that buff the entire party. In this first TCG set, Shamans have cards
such as Chain Lightning, Earthbind Totem, Ghost Wolf, Purge, Windfury Totem, and the
mighty Frost Shock.
Warlock: Warlocks channel demonic energies to destroy their enemies with curses,
DOTs, and the most powerful debuffs in the game. Warlocks have access to four useful
Pets in the first TCG set, with more upcoming in future sets. Some key Warlock spells
from the first set include Life Tap, Rain of Fire, Shadow Bolt, Fear, and Curse of Agony.
Warrior: The masters of melee combat. As tanks or damage dealers, warriors are
most at home in the thick of battle. Warriors have access to the most weapons, armor,
and shields. They are the best tanking class, which is represented by the protector
ability in the TCG. Some Warrior cards in the first set include Battle Shout, Charge,
Demoralizing Shout, Execute, Last Stand, Mortal Strike, Shield Bash, and Sunder Armor.
4
Parts of a Card
World of Warcraft TCG cards have:
❂ A card name
❂ A play cost in the upper left corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust to play the card from your hand.
❂ Trait icons, which are used when you construct your deck. (See the “Traits” and “Deckbuilding” sections for more information.)
❂ A type line between the art and the text box, which tells you what type of card it is. A card’s type line may have one or more tags (such as “Pet” or “Axe”) that other cards may reference.
❂ A text box under the type line, which tells you the card’s powers.
A collector number that tells you the card’s number within the set and what set it’s from. The
color of the collector number also tells you the card’s rarity: white for common, green for
uncommon, blue for rare, purple for epic, and orange for legendary.
❂
Play Cost
Name
Type Line
Trait Icons
Collector Number
5
Card Power
Basic Game Terms
1. Ready and Exhaust
When a card enters play, it starts out in the ready position, as shown here.
Ready
Exhausted
At the start of each of your turns, you ready all of your cards in play.
When you want to use a card in play, you usually exhaust it. To exhaust a card, turn it sideways as
shown. You can only exhaust a card that’s ready.
2. Resources
Resources are like currency in this game. You exhaust resources to pay the costs of various actions,
such as inviting allies into your party or using your hero’s abilities.
On each of your turns, you may choose any card from your hand to place (put into play) as a
resource. To place a resource, put it into play in your resource row. (See the “Game Zones” section
for more information.) Quests can be placed face up; other cards can only be placed face down.
3. Costs
A cost is anything you must pay to play a card, use a power, or perform any other game action.
Resource costs on a card or power are represented by a number within the resource cost
symbol. You pay a resource cost by exhausting that number of resources. For example, a card
that you must exhaust two resources to play will have a 2 in its upper left corner, and a power
that you must exhaust two resources to use will have a 2 as part of its cost.
6
4. Powers
The text in a card’s text box tells you that card’s powers. Read the text and follow the instructions to
use the card’s power. Many powers have costs to use them.
5. Target
If a card tells you to target something, you must choose one target. If a card tells you to target more
than one thing, you must choose that number of targets.
Example: You play an ability that reads, “Exhaust target ally.” You play the card and choose one
ally your opponent controls. Your opponent exhausts that ally.
You must choose the target as you play that card. If there is no legal target (a target in play that fits
the description given on the card), you can’t play that card.
Once you choose a target, you can’t change your mind, even if something happens to the target you
picked.
6. Uniqueness
Some cards have the “unique” keyword on their type line. Any time you control more than one unique
card in play with the same name, you must put all but one of them into their owners’ graveyards.
You choose which one to keep. This happens as soon as more than one copy of the same unique
card are in play on your side.
7
Some cards have a tag on their type line followed by a number in parentheses. That number tells
you how many cards with that tag you can control at the same time. Any time you control more than
that number of cards with that tag, you must immediately put all but that number of them into their
owners’ graveyards. You choose which to keep.
Example: Searing Totem has the Fire Totem (1) tag as shown here. This means
you can have only one Fire Totem in play. Any time you have more than one Fire
Totem in play, you must immediately put all but one of them into their owners’
graveyards. You choose which one to keep.
Only heroes, unique cards, and cards with restricting tags (as shown above) have limits on how many
you can have in play on your side. For example, you can have more than one copy of the ally Grint
Sundershot in play at the same time, because Grint Sundershot does not have the “unique” keyword.
Some cards have the tag “Two-Handed” followed by a weapon type (such as Axe) on their type line.
You can’t have both a Two-Handed weapon and a card with the “Off-Hand” tag (usually an item,
weapon, or armor) in play at the same time. Any time you control a Two-Handed weapon and an
Off-Hand card, you must immediately put one of them into its owner’s graveyard. You choose which
one to keep.
Note that all Two-Handed weapons have the “Melee (1)” tag, so you can’t control both a Two-Handed
weapon and another Melee weapon at the same time. However, you can control both a Melee weapon
and a Ranged weapon at the same time. Dual-wielding will be introduced in upcoming sets.
8
Game Zones
Your cards can be in any one of six game zones. Each player has a deck zone, a hand zone, a
graveyard zone, and a removed from game zone. All players share the chain zone and the play zone.
While you’re playing a game, your zones will look something like this:
9
❂ You shuffle your deck and allow your opponent to cut it before each game starts. During a game, cards in your deck are face down, and you can’t look through any player’s deck.
Your hand is where you hold the cards you draw. Only you get to see the cards in your hand.
❂
Your graveyard is where your “dead” cards go. Cards that have been destroyed or discarded go into your graveyard. Cards in a graveyard are face up, and you can look through any
player’s graveyard.
❂
The chain is where cards and effects go after you play them but before they have an impact on the game. You don’t need to know more about the chain until you get to the advanced concepts section.
❂
The play zone is where most of the game’s action happens. Allies, weapons, armor, items, resources, and ongoing abilities enter play here. Each player has an ally row for allies; a hero row for weapons, armor, items, ongoing abilities, and his or her hero; and a resource row
for resources. To see where the different types of cards belong in the play zone, look at the diagram on the facing page.
❂
❂ The removed from game zone is where players put cards that have been removed from the game. The removed from game zone isn’t the same as the graveyard, so cards in the removed from game zone aren’t accessible by cards like Resurrection, for example.
10
Card Types
1. Hero
Your hero card represents you, the leader of your party.
Each hero has a health value printed in the lower right corner, which tells you how much damage the
hero can take. If your hero takes damage greater than or equal to his or her health (fatal damage),
you’re out of the game.
Your hero can attack and defend against opposing heroes and allies, but to deal damage in combat,
you usually must strike with a weapon. Your hero can also use armor and items to help in combat.
Each hero card has a type line with several traits on it. You can find your hero’s race, talent spec,
and class on the left side of the type line. Your hero’s professions are on the right side of the type
line. Each hero also has a faction trait icon in the upper left corner and a class trait icon in the
upper right corner.
Each hero card is two-sided. You start the game with the side that has the trait icons on it face up.
During the game, you may use your hero’s power, which causes the hero to be flipped over to the side
that has full artwork.
Hero Card Front
Hero Card Back
29
11
Graccus
2. Ally
At the start of the game, your party contains only your hero, but as the game progresses you may
invite allies to join your party. Allies can attack and defend against opposing heroes and allies, and
many of them have powers that you can use during the game.
❂ You can attack with an ally or use its
the start of your turn.
powers only if it has been in your party since When you play an ally, it enters play in your ally row.
Each ally card has:
❂ A play cost in the upper left corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust to play the card from your hand.
❂ An attack value (or ATK) in the lower left corner, which tells you how much damage the ally deals in combat. There’s also a symbol around the ATK that tells you what kind of combat damage the ally deals. While the kind of combat damage dealt has no impact on the game, other cards may refer to it.
These are the eight damage symbols:
Arcane
Fire
Frost
Holy
Melee
Nature
Ranged
Shadow
❂ A health value in the lower right corner, which tells you how much damage the ally can take. An ally that takes fatal damage (damage equal to or greater than its health) is destroyed and goes to its owner’s graveyard.
Cost
Name
Type Line
Restriction
ATK
Health
12
3. Weapon
Weapon cards can only be used by your hero and only if your hero’s class matches one of the class
icons on the weapon card. Weapons and other equipment in the TCG use the “common sense”
method of class restriction. Therefore, Warriors won’t be able to use equipment intended for casters,
and vice versa. For example, in the TCG Warriors can’t equip a Mooncloth Robe or an Inventor’s
Focal Sword. Likewise, a Mage can’t equip a Krol Blade or Heartseeker.
Your hero starts the game with no ATK, but while your hero is in combat, you may strike with a
weapon to increase your hero’s ATK for the combat. You can only strike with one weapon during a
combat, but you can strike with that weapon multiple times if you can find a way to ready it. If you
strike with a weapon multiple times in the same combat, you add its ATK to your hero’s each time
you strike.
Your hero doesn’t have to be attacking to strike with a weapon. You can also strike with a weapon if
your hero is defending. If you have two weapons (one Melee and one Ranged, for example), you can
strike with one while your hero is attacking. Then, when your hero is attacked, you can strike with
the other weapon.
Even if your hero is exhausted, you can still strike with a weapon.
If your weapon leaves play after you’ve struck with it, your hero gets to keep the ATK bonus for the
duration of the combat.
When you play a weapon card, it enters play in your hero row. To strike with a weapon in play, pay its
strike cost and exhaust it. You can strike with a weapon on the same turn that you play it. You can
use a weapon’s
powers on the same turn that it enters play.
Play Cost
ATK
13
Strike Cost
Each weapon card has:
❂ A play cost in the upper left corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust to play the card from your hand.
❂ A strike cost in the lower right corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust to strike with the weapon.
❂ An ATK in the lower left corner, which tells you how much ATK the weapon gives your hero for the combat when you strike with it. There’s also a symbol around the ATK that tells you what kind of damage a hero deals when he or she strikes with the weapon.
4. Armor
Armor cards can only be used by your hero and only if your hero’s class matches one of the class
icons on the armor card.
Armor can be used to prevent damage that would be dealt to your hero. When you play an armor
card, it enters play in your hero row. To use an armor in play, you exhaust it.
You can use an armor’s
powers on the same turn that it enters play.
Each armor card has:
A play cost in the upper left corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust to play the card from your hand.
❂
A defense value (or DEF) in the lower right corner. Any time damage would be dealt to your hero, you may exhaust an armor to prevent damage equal to its DEF.
❂
To learn more about using armor, see “Armor” in the “Damage”
section.
DEF
14
5. Item
Item cards can only be used by your hero and
only if your hero’s class matches one of the
class icons on the item card.
Items are the gear your hero can have in
addition to weapons and armor. Rings, Trinkets,
and Potions are examples of items.
When you play an item card, it enters play in
your hero row.
You can use an item’s
turn that it enters play.
powers on the same
Each item card has:
❂ A play cost in the upper left corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust to play the card from your hand.
A power in its text box.
❂
6. Ability
Abilities are cards that represent your hero’s special skills and magical spells.
Each ability card has a play cost in the upper left
corner, which tells you how many resources you must
exhaust to play the card from your hand.
Most abilities go to your graveyard when you play them,
but abilities with the “ongoing” keyword in their text
box enter play. The text after the word “ongoing” tells
you what the ability’s powers are while it’s in play.
Ongoing Power
15
Ability cards can only be played during the action phase on your turn unless they have the “instant”
tag on their type line. Instant abilities can be played any time, including during your opponent’s turn.
If an ongoing ability tells you to attach it to
a card in play, you put the ability underneath
that card as the ability enters play. When a
card leaves play, each ability attached to that
card goes to its owner’s graveyard.
Attached
More than one ongoing ability can be attached to the same card—even abilities with the same name.
❂
7. Quest
Quests enter play only as resources. When you choose a quest card to place as a resource, you can
put it into play face up. While a quest is face up in your resource row, you can pay costs with it like
you would with a face-down resource (by exhausting it), and you can also use its powers.
Example: You have a quest face up in your resource row that reads, “Pay 3 to
complete this quest. Reward: Draw a card.” If you exhaust three resources and
flip this quest face down, you draw a card. (Note that you can exhaust the quest
itself to pay part of the resource cost.) Once flipped, a quest stays face down in
your resource row. You can still use it as a resource to pay costs, but you can’t use
its power again because it’s no longer face up.
Quest Power
Once you complete a quest, you must flip the card face down to show that it’s been completed.
Quests have an exclamation point instead of a play cost in the upper left corner.
16
Setup
You should play your first few games with the hero and preconstructed deck that came in the
starter box. Remember, don’t mix the cards in your booster packs with the preconstructed deck yet.
The only other things you need to play are counters to represent damage and other card effects. You
can track counters on a card with dice, beads, or other small items. Use counters to keep track of
how much damage your hero and each of your allies has taken. Remember that damage on a hero or
ally is permanent unless the damage is healed or the ally leaves play.
Each player starts by putting his or her hero into play. Then, flip a coin to decide who goes first.
After shuffling, each player draws an opening hand of seven cards.
Starting with the first player, each player who doesn’t like his or her opening hand can mulligan. To
mulligan, shuffle your opening hand of cards into your deck and then draw a new opening hand of
seven cards. Each player can mulligan only once each game, and only at the start of the game.
Example: Your opening hand contains seven ability cards, each with cost 5 or
greater. You know that if you keep that opening hand, you probably won’t be able
to do anything for the first few turns of the game, so you decide to mulligan.
After each player has settled on an opening hand, the first player’s turn starts.
17
Turn Sequence
Players take turns, going clockwise from the first player. Each player’s turn is divided into three
phases, and some phases are divided into steps.
1. Start Phase
Your start phase is when you get ready for a new turn. It’s divided into two steps: the ready step
and the draw step.
Ready Step
At the beginning of your ready step, you ready (turn upright) all your cards in play.
Draw Step
At the beginning of your draw step, you draw a card.
On the first player’s first turn, he or she doesn’t draw a card.
18
2. Action Phase
During your action phase, you may perform any of four actions in any order: play a card, use a
payment power, place a resource, and propose a combat.
You may place only one resource a turn, but you may perform each of the other actions as many
times as you’d like.
a. Play a Card
To play a card, take it from your hand, pay its play cost (the number in the upper left corner) by exhausting that number of your resources, and follow the instructions in its text box.
Once you’ve done that:
❂
If the card is a weapon, armor, or item, it enters play beside your hero.
❂
If it’s an ally, it enters play in your ally row.
❂
If it’s an ability that attaches to a card, it enters play underneath that card.
If it’s an ongoing ability that doesn’t attach to a card, it enters play in your
hero row.
❂
If it’s a non-ongoing ability (an ability that doesn’t have the “ongoing” keyword), it goes to your graveyard.
❂
b. Use a Payment Power
A payment power is any power on a card that has an arrow symbol ( ) in its text. The text before the
is the cost to use the payment power, and the text after the
is what happens when you do. To use a payment power, pay its cost and then do whatever the text after the
says to do.
Unless the card says otherwise, you can use a payment power as many times as you’d like, as long as you can afford to pay the cost each time.
) as part of their cost. To pay that cost, Some payment powers have an activate symbol (
exhaust the card that the power is on. These powers are called activated powers. Remember, you can use an ally’s activated power only if that ally has been in your party since the start of your turn. You can use an armor, item, or weapon’s activated power on the same turn that it
enters play.
c. Place a Resource
You may place one resource on each of your turns. To place a resource, take any card from your hand and put it face down into your resource row. If the card is a quest, you may choose to put it into your resource row face up. If you do, you can use its powers once it’s in play.
d. Propose a Combat
Your hero and allies can attack your opponents’ heroes and allies. You’ll learn about how combat works in the “Basic Combat” section.
19
3. End Phase
After you’re done playing cards, using payment powers, placing a resource, and proposing combats, you move into your end phase.
During your end phase:
You can no longer place a resource, propose combats, or play cards other than instants.
Any player may play instants or use powers.
❂
❂
Once all players have performed the actions they want to do, you move into your wrap-up step.
During your wrap-up step, if you have more cards in hand than the maximum hand size (seven
cards), you must discard until you have only the maximum hand size.
After a player’s wrap-up step is over, the next player begins his or her start phase.
20
Basic Combat
1. The Combat Step
In a basic combat, five things happen in order:
1. Propose: You choose a ready hero or ally in your party to be the proposed attacker and an
opposing hero or ally to be the proposed defender.
2. Attack: Your proposed attacker exhausts (turns sideways) and attacks.
3. Defend: The proposed defender starts defending.
4. Damage: The attacker and defender deal combat damage to each other equal to their ATKs. This
is the only damage that counts as combat damage.
5. Conclude: The combat step ends.
There are other things that can happen in a combat if the attacker or defender is a hero or if the
defending player controls a hero or ally that can protect, but for now, let’s look at an example of a
combat between two allies.
Example: You propose an ally in your party to attack one of your opponent’s
allies. Your proposed attacker has 2 ATK and 3 health, and the proposed defender
has 1 ATK and 2 health. You exhaust your attacker. When the combat concludes,
your attacker deals 2 combat damage to the defender, and the defender deals 1
combat damage to your attacker. The defender is destroyed because it has taken
fatal damage. Your attacker gets a damage counter to show that it has taken 1
damage, but it is not destroyed, because it has 3 health.
2. Combat with a Hero
If your hero is the attacker or defender, there are two things you can do in addition to the steps
listed above:
Strike with a weapon: After the defender starts defending, you can strike with a weapon to add its ATK to your hero’s ATK for the rest of the combat. To strike with a weapon, pay its strike cost and exhaust it. You can only strike with a weapon before combat damage is dealt. You may only strike with one weapon per combat, but you can strike with it multiple times if you find a way to ready it.
❂
Example: You propose your hero to attack one of your opponent’s allies. Your
hero exhausts. The defender has 1 ATK and 2 health. Your hero has 25 health and
6 damage counters on it. Your hero has a ready weapon with 2 ATK, so you pay
that weapon’s strike cost and exhaust it to give your hero +2 ATK for the combat.
When the combat concludes, your hero deals 2 damage to the defender, and the
defender deals 1 damage to your hero. The defender is destroyed because it has
taken fatal damage. You add 1 damage counter to your hero, for a total of 7.
Use armor: When your hero is going to take combat damage, you can exhaust your armor to prevent damage to your hero equal to the armor’s DEF.
❂
21
3. Protecting in Combat
If your opponent attacks your hero or one of your allies, and you have a ready hero or ally that can
protect (which usually means it has the “protector” keyword in its text box), you can choose to have
that hero or ally step in for the proposed defender. This represents the ability for classes to “tank.”
Many Warriors have this ability, as well as some Shamans, Paladins, and Druids (while in bear form).
When the proposed defender would start defending, you may exhaust the hero or ally with protector,
and it becomes the defender for the combat instead of the proposed defender.
Example: Your opponent proposes Kor Cindervein as an attacker, a basic
Paladin ally with no special powers. Your opponent proposes your frail Druid
ally, Voss Treebender, as the defender. Since you want to keep Voss Treebender
alive, you exhaust Guardian Steelhorn, a Warrior with the protector ability.
Guardian Steelhorn becomes the new defender, keeping your Druid alive to fight
another day.
Keywords
Some words have special meaning in the World of Warcraft TCG. These keywords often appear
on cards in bold text. Some cards with keywords also have reminder text in italics, mainly for the
benefit of newer players.
Bear Form: Some Druid abilities give your hero bear form. While in bear form, your hero has protector. When you play a non-Feral ability or strike with a weapon, you must destroy any ability cards in play that give your hero bear form.
❂
Example: You play Bash, an ability that puts your hero into bear form. You keep
the Bash card in play to remind you that you are in bear form. Later, you strike
with your Twig of the World Tree, a weapon. As soon as you strike with the weapon,
you must put the Bash card into your graveyard, since you’ve shifted out of
bear form.
Elusive: An elusive hero or ally can’t be attacked. However, it can still attack as usual. It can also be targeted by abilities as usual.
❂
Ferocity: An ally with ferocity can attack on the same turn that it joins a party. However, even an ally with ferocity can’t use activated powers unless it has been in your party since the start of your turn. An ally with ferocity can still use regular payment powers that don’t require an activation.
❂ Instant: You can play a card with the “instant” keyword any time—even during your opponent’s turn. Many abilities and a few allies have this keyword.
❂
22
Long-Range: Some weapons give your hero long-range. While a hero with long-range is attacking, defenders deal no combat damage to it.
❂
Ongoing: An ongoing ability enters play instead of going to the graveyard. The text after the word “ongoing” tells you what the ability’s powers are while it’s in play.
❂
Protector: A hero or ally with protector can defend in place of a proposed defender in combat. (See “Basic Combat.”)
❂
Stealth: Some Rogue abilities give your hero stealth. While a stealthed hero is attacking, opposing heroes and allies can’t protect. As soon as your hero deals damage, you lose stealth and must destroy any card that gives you stealth.
❂
Totem: A Totem is a special kind of Shaman ongoing ability. A Totem has a health value in its
lower right corner. Totems can be attacked in combat or targeted by anything that would normally target an ally. For example, a card can target a Totem to exhaust it or return it to its owner’s hand.
❂
However, Totems are never considered to be allies or heroes. If a Totem ever has an attachment, the attachment is immediately destroyed. Totems can’t gain ATK or health.
Unique: Any time you have more than one unique card in play with the same name, you must immediately put all but one of them into their owners’ graveyards. You choose which one to keep. You are allowed to have four copies of each unique card in your deck.
❂
❂ Unlimited: When a card has the “unlimited” keyword, you can put any number of them into your deck. For example, you could have 60 Orgrimmar Grunts cards in your deck instead of the normal maximum of 4.
23
Deckbuilding
With a TCG, you get to decide what cards you want to have in your deck. Once you’ve played some
games with the preconstructed deck, you can get more cards to build a deck of your own.
There are only a few rules you need to follow when building your deck:
❂ Your deck must include at least 60 cards, not counting your starting hero. Your hero starts the game in play, and it isn’t considered a part of your deck.
❂ You can’t include more than four copies of a single card in your deck unless that card has “unlimited” in its type line. You may include any number of unlimited cards in your deck.
❂ Some ability cards can only be used by a hero who has a certain talent spec. Those cards will have “[Talent Spec] Hero Required” in bold in their text box.
❂ You can include only cards that share one or more trait icons with your hero in your deck. Some neutral cards don’t have any trait icons. You can put those cards into any deck.
You can put any number
of Ironforge Guards in
your deck since it has the
“unlimited” keyword.
Landro Longshot is a neutral
ally and may be used by Horde
or Alliance heroes.
Mooncloth Robe can be used by
Warlocks, Priests, and Mages.
Some tournament formats may allow players to bring a ten-card side deck. If a side deck is used, it may contain any card that is normally allowed in your main deck. You can switch out cards from your side deck on a one-for-one basis after the first game of a match. In future sets and raid decks, interesting mechanics will be added that interact with your side deck.
❂
In future World of Warcraft TCG expansions, your hero’s race and professions will determine additional cards that you can add to your deck.
❂
24
Advanced Concepts: Introduction
Now that you’ve played the World of Warcraft TCG, you’re ready to learn more about some advanced
concepts in the game. These are in-depth explanations of certain rules that experienced players
may find interesting and helpful.
The Chain and Responding
There are often times when you want to do something after your opponent plays a card but before
that card affects the game. The chain allows you to do that.
The chain is the zone where cards and effects go after they are played but before they have an
impact on the game. While a card or effect is waiting on the chain, you can do things that will
impact the game before that card or effect does.
1. The Chain
Most actions you take in this game don’t happen right away. First, they put a card or effect on the
chain, where it waits to resolve. Only when that card or effect resolves does something happen. The
chain keeps track of the order in which things happen in the game.
Cards and effects resolve off the chain in reverse order. This means that if you put something on the chain after your opponent does, your card or effect will have an impact on the
game first.
❂
If the chain is empty and two players want to do something at the same time, the turn player (the
person whose turn it is) gets to act first. In a multiplayer game, the person to the turn player’s left
gets to act next, and so on.
If the chain has a card or effect on it and two players want to do something at the same time, the
player who added the last thing to the chain gets to act first, then the person to that player’s left,
and so on.
2. Responding
Whenever a card or effect goes on the chain, players get a chance to respond to it with payment
powers or instants of their own. If no one wants to respond, the card or effect resolves and has its
impact on the game right away. If someone does respond, the chain determines the order in which
things happen.
25
The player who put the last card or effect on the chain gets to respond first with as many actions as
he or she wants. Once that player is done, the other player (or, in a multiplayer game, the person to
his or her left) gets a chance to respond.
When there are no more responses to the last card or effect on the chain, it resolves and has its
impact on the game. Then the next-to-last card or effect on the chain moves up and is ready to
resolve. Players can respond to it with the same process, and so on for the entire chain. Once the
chain is empty, if no one adds to it, the game moves on.
Example: It’s the action phase of your turn. You play
Shield Bash, an ability that reads, “Your hero deals
1 damage to target ally.” The ally you target has 3
health and 2 damage counters on it already, so the
1 damage your hero will deal as the ability resolves
will be enough to destroy the ally. Your ability card
goes on the chain, and you tell your opponent that
you’re done adding to the chain for now.
Your opponent responds by targeting the same ally
with Primal Mending, an instant ability that reads,
“Your hero heals 2 damage from target ally.” That
ability goes on the chain on top of yours, and then
your opponent gives you the chance to respond.
You choose not to respond, so the last thing added to
the chain (your opponent’s healing ability) resolves
first, removing the 2 damage counters.
You both get another chance to respond to your first
ability, but neither one of you chooses to respond.
Your ability resolves, and your hero deals 1 damage
to the ally. When everything is done resolving, the
ally has 1 damage counter on it.
26
3. Resolving and Interrupting
When a card or effect resolves, it does what its text says it does (or as much as it can) and then
leaves the chain. The only exception is when that card or effect has one or more targets and none of
those targets is legal when it tries to resolve. When that happens, the card or effect is interrupted.
A card or effect that’s interrupted is simply stopped, with no other impact on the game. An
interrupted card is put into its owner’s graveyard.
Example: You play an ability that says, “Your hero deals 2 damage to target ally.
Draw a card,” targeting one of your opponent’s allies. In response, your opponent
uses an ability that destroys the ally you targeted. When your ability tries to
resolve, none of its targets is legal, so the ability is interrupted, which means you
don’t draw a card and the ability goes into your graveyard.
27
Damage
1. Sources and Types of Damage
The source of damage is whatever dealt it. Heroes and allies are the source of combat damage they
deal, and other cards or effects that deal damage will tell you what the source of that damage is.
Damage can also have one or more tags that tell you what kind of damage it is. Most cards and
effects that deal damage will tell you what kind of damage they deal. The symbol around an ally’s
ATK tells you what kind of combat damage that ally deals, and the symbol around a weapon’s ATK
tells you what kind of combat damage a hero deals with that weapon. While the kind of combat
damage dealt has no impact on the game, other cards may refer to it.
Some cards or powers cause your hero to deal damage directly. This is not the same as
combat damage.
Some cards or effects say, “Put 1 damage on a hero or ally.” Putting damage on a card this way isn’t
the same as “dealing” damage to it, but it does count toward a hero or ally taking fatal damage.
2. Healing Damage
Damage on a hero or ally is permanent unless it is healed or the ally leaves play. If damage is
healed from a hero or ally, simply remove that many damage counters from it.
You can’t heal damage that hasn’t been dealt, and once a hero or ally has taken fatal damage, it’s
too late to heal it.
Example: An ally in your party has 2 health and no damage on it. Your opponent
plays a card that reads, “Your hero deals 2 damage to target ally,” and you have
a card in your hand that reads, “Your hero heals 1 damage from target ally.”
However, playing that card in response won’t do anything, because your ally has
no damage on it. As your opponent’s card resolves, 2 damage counters are added
to your ally, which destroys it immediately. You don’t have a chance to heal fatal
damage once it has been dealt.
3. Preventing Damage
Some cards and effects prevent damage from being dealt to a hero or ally. When one of these
resolves, the damage that would be dealt is prevented until the card or effect has prevented its
described amount of damage or its duration ends (whichever comes first).
28
Cards or effects that prevent damage are always applied after anything that replaces damage with
a new amount.
Example: Your opponent controls an ability that reads, “If your hero would deal
damage, it deals that amount of damage plus 1 instead.” That opponent attacks
your hero with his hero, striking with a weapon with 2 ATK. You use a power that
reads, “Prevent the next 2 damage that would be dealt to your hero this turn.”
During the damage step, the damage is first increased to 3, and then 2 of that
damage is prevented. Your opponent’s hero deals 1 combat damage to your hero.
If the damage that would be dealt is greater than the amount that the card or effect prevents, the
hero or ally takes damage equal to the difference.
Example: Your opponent plays a card that reads, “Your hero deals 1 damage to
target hero or ally” and targets your hero. In response, you use a power that reads,
“Prevent the next 2 damage that would be dealt to your hero this turn.” Your effect
resolves first and prevents the damage. Later that turn, your hero is attacked by
an ally with 2 ATK. As that combat concludes, 1 damage is prevented by your
effect, and the ally deals 1 combat damage to your hero.
If a card or effect says, “Put X damage on a hero or ally,” you can’t use damage prevention to
keep it from happening, because “putting” damage on a card that way is different from “dealing”
damage to it.
4. Armor
Using armor is a special way to prevent damage to your hero. Any time damage would be dealt to
your hero—both inside and outside of combat—you can exhaust an armor card to prevent damage
equal to its DEF. Armor can prevent all types of damage, including damage from abilities.
Unlike other cards and effects that prevent damage:
Using armor is optional. You exhaust an armor only if you want to use it.
If an armor prevents damage that’s less than its DEF, the leftover DEF is wasted.
❂
❂
Example: Your hero would be dealt 2 damage, and you control a ready armor with
3 DEF. If you exhaust the armor, it prevents the 2 damage, and the remaining 1
DEF is wasted. That armor won’t prevent any additional damage later in the turn
unless you ready it and use it again.
Keep in mind that you can only exhaust armor for DEF while you’re taking damage. You can’t exhaust
armor in response to an opponent playing an ability that destroys it, for example.
29
Multiplayer Rules
You can play the WoW TCG with more than two players. Once you know the rules for a two-player
game, you can start playing multiplayer. Just keep the following things in mind:
❂ When a player is eliminated, all of his or her cards are removed from the game. This includes abilities that are attached to other players’ cards.
❂ Players take turns, going clockwise from the first player. Only the first player skips drawing a card on his or her first turn.
❂ Characters in your party can attack any opposing hero or ally. Opposing characters are controlled by players who aren’t on your team.
❂ For team games, all heroes on the same team must be from the same faction (Horde
or Alliance).
❂ For team games, players should alternate their seating. For example, a three-on-three game between Team A and Team B should have the seating go A, B, A, B, A, B. In other words, you will be seated with players from the opposing team on either side of you.
❂ When a card refers to “your party,” it’s talking about characters only you control. The term “friendly” refers to heroes and allies on your team. A hero or ally with protector can protect any friendly hero or ally.
❂
30
Sealed Pack Formats
Whether you’re seeing some of the cards for the first time or looking for that last rare to complete
your deck, one of the most fun things about any TCG is cracking open new packs of cards. In the
WoW TCG, there are two Sealed Pack formats: Sealed Deck and Booster Draft. These formats
combine the fun of tearing into new packs with the challenge of deckbuilding and playing with your
new cards. When you play Sealed Deck or Draft, you get to play with all of your new cards, not just
the ones that you’re going to put into your Constructed decks.
You can play Sealed Deck with any number of your friends. To play, each person will need six
boosters. Open your six boosters, look through the cards that you got, and decide what hero you
want to be. You can be any hero in the game. Once you’ve chosen your hero and built a deck of
at least 30 cards to go with it, you’re ready to play. The cards that don’t make your sealed deck
will become your side deck if you choose to play with one or if side decks are allowed at your
tournament.
When you build your deck, make sure you have a good mix of quests and other cards. Also keep in
mind that the fewer cards you have in your deck, the more likely you are to draw your best ones, so
you should stick as close to the 30-card minimum as you can.
To do a Booster Draft, you’ll need between four and eight people, and each person will need four
packs. Everyone sits down around a table, and then each player opens one booster, picks a card
from it to go into his or her deck, and passes the rest of the cards to the player on the left. You
repeat this process for each booster that’s passed to you, taking one card to add to your deck and
passing the rest on. Once all the cards from the first set of packs have been drafted, the process
is repeated for the second set of packs, then the third, and then the fourth. Alternate the direction
that you pass cards for each set. Once all the cards have been drafted, you choose your hero—like
in Sealed Deck, it can be any hero in the game—and build a 30-card (minimum) deck from the
cards you drafted. The cards that don’t make your draft deck will become your side deck.
While you’re drafting, in addition to following the guidelines for building a sealed deck, make sure
you decide early on which hero you’re going to be. You don’t just want to take the best card out of
every pack; you want to take the card that’s going to be the best in your deck, so it’s important to
know what traits you’ll be able to play. You also want to get a healthy mix of card types and card
costs, because regardless of how good each of your cards is on its own, you probably won’t win if
your deck is made up of eighteen armor cards and only four allies, or if everything in your deck costs
5 or more.
Playing Sealed Deck or Draft is a great way to familiarize yourself with all the cards in a set.
Because you’ve got a limited number of cards to work with, you’ll find yourself playing with (and
playing against) a lot of cards that you might not have considered including in a Constructed deck.
This increases your chances of knowing what tricks your opponents might have put into their decks,
and it also lets you find new cards and combos to put into Constructed decks of your own.
31
Glossary
ACTIVATE: This is a cost of some payment powers. To activate a card, you exhaust it (turn
it sideways). Allies can’t use powers that have the activate symbol on the same
turn that they enter play. You must have controlled the ally from the start of the
turn in order to use its activated powers. You can use an armor, item, or weapon’s
activated power the turn that it enters play.
Ally Token: Some abilities or quests will tell you to put an ally token into play. You can use anything
to represent a token, because it isn’t considered to be a card. An ally token is just like a regular
ally while it’s in play. A token has cost 0 and can exist only in the play zone—if it moves to
another zone, it ceases to exist.
ATK: This is the attack value of a card. A card’s ATK is the number in its lower left corner.
An ally’s ATK is how much combat damage it deals, and the symbol around the ATK
tells you what kind of damage it is. If you strike with a weapon, its ATK is added
to your hero’s ATK. The symbol around the weapon’s ATK tells you what kind of
combat damage your hero deals when you strike with the weapon. Most weapons
deal melee or ranged damage.
Attach: If an ongoing ability tells you to attach it to a card, you put the ability underneath it when
the ability enters play. If a card leaves play, each ability that is attached to it goes to its owner’s
graveyard. More than one ongoing ability may be attached to the same card—even abilities
with the same name. For example, several copies of Mark of the Wild could be attached to the
same ally.
Attacker: An attacker is a hero or ally that’s attacking. A hero or ally becomes an attacker as it
exhausts to attack, and it stops being an attacker if it is removed from combat or the combat ends.
Bear Form: Bear form is a keyword that a Druid hero can have. While a Druid is in bear form, it can
protect. Ability cards will tell you when your hero is in bear form. Those ability cards stay in play
and provide powers until you strike with a weapon or play any ability other than a Feral one.
Chain: The chain is the zone where cards and effects go before they resolve. The chain keeps track
of the order in which things are added to it. The order that things resolve off the chain is “last
on, first off.”
CHARACTER: A character is a hero or ally.
Combat: During your action phase, you can propose a combat with a ready hero or ally in your party. A
hero or ally can attack any opposing hero or ally, unless the opposing hero or ally is elusive.
32
Combat Damage: Combat damage is damage that’s dealt by an attacker or defender during the
conclusion of a combat. Any other damage is not combat damage, even if it is dealt during a
combat step. For example, striking with your Arcanite Reaper causes combat damage; attacking
with your Hunter Pet causes combat damage; and attacking with an ally causes combat damage.
Damage dealt from a Fire Blast ability is never combat damage, even if you play the card during
the combat step.
Control: You control your hero and all allies, items, weapons, armor, abilities, and resources in play
on your side. You also control effects and cards that you put on the chain and any abilities that
you attach to a card in play, even if the attached card is controlled by another player.
Counter: A card or effect may tell you to put one or more counters on a card in play. It will also
tell you what those counters do. You should also use counters to keep track of damage on your
allies. You can track counters on a card with dice, beads, or other small items, but you should be
careful not to get different kinds of counters confused with each other.
Damage: Damage is dealt to heroes and allies through combat, abilities, and powers. Damage that
is dealt to a hero or ally stays on it until the damage is healed or that hero or ally leaves play.
You should track the amount of damage on each of your allies with counters. When an ally has
fatal damage on it, it is put into its owner’s graveyard. When a hero has fatal damage on it, its
controller is out of the game.
DEF: This is the defense value of an armor card. An armor’s DEF is the number in its lower right corner.
The DEF tells you how much damage the armor prevents when you exhaust it.
Defender: A defender is a hero or ally that’s defending. A hero or ally defends when it enters combat
with an attacker, and it stops being a defender if it is removed from combat or the combat ends.
Destroy: When a card in play is destroyed, it is put into its owner’s graveyard.
Effect: An effect is simply a placeholder on the chain—it isn’t a physical object. When an effect
resolves, it makes something happen in the game.
Elusive: Elusive is a keyword that a hero or ally can have. If a hero or ally is elusive, it can’t
be attacked.
Empty Chain: The chain is empty if there are no cards or effects waiting to resolve.
Enter Play: When an ally, item, weapon, armor, or ongoing ability resolves off the chain, it
“enters play.”
EQUIPMENT: An equipment card is an armor, item, or weapon.
33
Exhaust: To exhaust a card in play, turn it sideways; once that’s been done, the card is referred to
as “exhausted.” You can’t exhaust a card that’s already exhausted to pay a cost. The opposite
of exhausted is “ready.”
Fatal Damage: Fatal damage is damage on a hero or ally that’s greater than or equal to its health.
Ferocity: Ferocity is a keyword that an ally can have. If an ally has ferocity, it can attack on the
same turn that it enters play.
FRIENDLY: All the heroes and allies controlled by you and the players on your “team” are friendly. This
can be very important for multiplayer games when several people are on the same team.
Heal: When something heals damage from a hero or ally, it removes the described amount of damage
from that hero or ally. You can only heal damage that has already been dealt. You can’t use
healing to raise a hero or ally’s health above the value printed on its card. You can target an ally
with a healing ability even if it is fully healed. Damage can only be healed if it’s not fatal. For
example, if an ally with 4 health has 4 or more damage on it, it can’t be healed.
Health: The number in the lower right corner of a hero, ally, or Totem card is its health. Any time
an ally has fatal damage on it, it is destroyed and put into its owner’s graveyard.
When a hero takes fatal damage, its controller is out of the game.
In Combat: A hero or ally is “in combat” while it is attacking or defending.
IN PLAY: Any card in the play zone is considered to be “in play.” This includes heroes, allies, items,
weapons, armor, resources, and ongoing abilities.
In Response: See “Respond.”
Instant: An instant card has the “instant” keyword in its type line. Any type of card can have the
instant keyword. You can play an instant card in response to a card or effect on the chain, even
during your opponent’s turn.
Interrupt: A card or effect on the chain can be interrupted. An interrupted card or effect is
removed from the chain and does nothing. If a card is interrupted, it is put into its owner’s
graveyard. Counterspell is an example of a card that interrupts. Leave Play: A card leaves play when it moves from the play zone to any other zone. A card leaves
play when it’s destroyed, removed from the game, returned to its owner’s hand, or put into
the graveyard.
Legal Target: A legal target is any card that can be targeted and meets the description of what a
card or effect can target. For example, if a card says “target hero or ally,” any hero or ally is a
legal target, but if a card says “target ally,” only an ally is a legal target.
34
Long-Range: Long-range is a keyword that heroes and allies can have. If a hero or ally with
long-range attacks, it doesn’t take combat damage from the defender.
Maximum Hand Size: The maximum number of cards you can have in your hand when your turn is
over. At the start of the wrap-up step, if you have more cards in your hand than your maximum
hand size, you must discard until you have only that many cards. The starting maximum hand
size is seven cards, but it can be changed by cards that you play.
Mulligan: At the start of each game and only once per game, you can decide to mulligan your
starting hand of cards by shuffling those cards into your deck and then drawing a new hand of
seven cards.
Neutral: A neutral card is neither Horde nor Alliance, so it can go into a deck of either type.
Ongoing: Ongoing is a keyword that some abilities have. As an ongoing ability resolves, instead of
putting it into your graveyard, you put it into play in your hero row or attached to another card.
Opposing: Cards in play that your opponents control are referred to as “opposing.”
Out of the Game: You’re out of the game if your hero takes fatal damage, or if you need to draw a
card and you have no cards left in your deck.
Owner: You are the owner of your hero and any card that started the game in your deck. If a card
would be put into a hand or graveyard, it is put into its owner’s hand or graveyard.
Party: Your party is made up of your hero and the allies in your ally row. Your party is not limited to
five characters.
Pay: Cards and effects have costs that you must pay to play them. You can’t pay only part of a cost,
and you can’t pay more of something than you have.
PAYMENT POWER: Some cards have payment powers. A payment power is identifiable by the arrow
symbol in its text ( ). The text before the
is the cost that you must pay to use the power,
and the text after the
tells you what happens when it resolves.
Place: Once on each of your turns, you may place a resource. To place a resource, choose a card from
your hand and put it into your resource row. Quests can be placed face up in the resource row;
other cards can only be placed face down.
Play: When you play a card, you put it on the chain, choose any targets it describes, and pay its
costs.
Play Cost: The number in the upper left corner of each card is its play cost, which tells you the
number of resources you must exhaust to play the card.
35
Power: When a card has text in its text box that has an impact on the game, that text is a power.
Prevent: Some cards and effects can prevent damage that would be dealt to a hero or ally. Damage
that is prevented is treated as though it were never dealt.
Propose: To propose a combat, choose a ready hero or ally you control to attack with and an
opposing hero or ally to defend.
Protect: Some heroes and allies can protect other members of their party. To protect, the hero or
ally exhausts and becomes the defender in place of the proposed defender in a combat.
Protector: Protector is a keyword that some heroes and allies have. If a hero or ally is a protector,
it can be exhausted to step in front of an attack that’s been proposed against another character
in its party. If it does, the protector becomes the defender for that combat. An ally can protect
even on the same turn that it joins your party.
Ready: A card in play is ready when it isn’t exhausted (which means it hasn’t been turned sideways).
All cards enter play ready. Only ready cards can be exhausted to attack or pay costs. When you
ready a card, you change it from the exhausted position to the ready (upright) position.
Remove from Combat: If an attacker or defender is removed from combat, it is no longer
considered an attacker or defender. The combat will conclude as normal, but no combat damage
will be dealt. If the defender is removed from combat, the attacker remains exhausted. If a hero
or ally exhausts to protect and then the attacker is removed from combat, the hero or ally that
protected remains exhausted.
Remove from the Game: To remove something from the game, take it from whatever zone it’s
currently in (hand, deck, play, etc.) and move it to the removed from game zone. This is different
than putting something into your graveyard. The removed from game zone is normally an area
on the table that’s clearly separate from the play area. Cards that have been removed from the
game are face up unless otherwise noted.
Resolve: When there are no responses to the last card or effect on the chain, it resolves and has its
impact on the game, which is described by its text. An ability goes to its owner’s graveyard after
it resolves, unless it’s an ongoing ability. An ongoing ability, ally, weapon, armor, or item that
resolves will enter play in the play zone.
Resource: You exhaust resources to pay the costs to play items, weapons, armor, allies, and
abilities; use payment powers; and strike with weapons. You get to put one resource into play
on each of your turns. Any type of card can be placed face down as a resource, but only quests
can be placed face up.
Resource Cost: Resource costs on a card or power are represented by a number
36
within the resource cost symbol. To pay a resource cost, you exhaust that number
of resources. For example, a card that you must exhaust two resources to play
will have a 2 in its upper left corner, and a power that you must exhaust two
resources to use will have a 2 as part of its cost.
RESPOND: When a card or effect is on the chain, players can respond to it with cards or
effects of their own. If a player responds, that response will have an impact on the game before
the original card or effect. If a player says that he or she is doing something “in response,” that
player is acting before the most recent card or effect on the chain resolves.
Reveal: If something tells you to reveal a card, you must turn that card face up so that all players
can see it. Revealing a card doesn’t move it out of the zone that it’s in. Once a card is revealed,
you put it back into its previous (hidden) position.
Search: If something tells you to search your deck for a certain kind of card, you look through your
deck for a card of that kind and then shuffle your deck afterward.
SIDE DECK: A side deck consists of additional cards outside a player’s main deck. Players can swap
cards between their side and main decks between games in a match. In Constructed play, a side
deck is exactly ten cards. In Sealed Pack or Draft, a player’s side deck is all cards that player
received that didn’t make his or her main deck. Stealth: Stealth is a keyword that a Rogue hero can have. If a hero is stealthed, other heroes and
allies can’t protect against its attacks. In future sets, Druids will be able to shift into cat form
and use stealth.
Strike: While a hero is in combat, its controller may strike with a ready weapon by paying its strike
cost and exhausting it. This adds the weapon’s ATK to the ATK of the hero for the rest of the
combat.
Strike Cost: The strike cost of a weapon is the number in its lower right corner.
Tag: On a card’s type line, along with its type, some cards have one or more tag words,
like “Pet” or “Axe,” that may be referenced by other cards. Some cards have a tag on their type
line followed by a number in parentheses. That number is how many cards with that tag you can
control at the same time.
Talent: Each hero has a talent specialization along with its faction and class. “Talent” is also
a tag that some abilities have. If an ability with a talent spec tag
has “Fire Hero Required” (for example) in its text, that means only
a hero with the Fire talent specialization can have that card in
its deck.
Target: If a card or effect tells you to target something, you must choose the target as you play the
37
card or effect. If there is no legal target, you can’t play that card or effect. Once you choose a
target, you can’t change your mind, even if something happens to the target you picked. If a
card or effect resolves and none of its targets is legal, it is interrupted. If at least one target is
legal, it is not interrupted.
Totem: Totems are ongoing abilities that have the word “Totem” in their type line. Totems can be
attacked in combat or targeted by anything that would normally target an ally. However, they are
not actually allies, and they can’t gain ATK or health.
Trait Icon: Your hero and many other cards have trait icons on them. If a card has a trait icon, you
can include it in your deck only if it shares at least one trait icon with your hero. If a card has
a trait icon next to a power in its text box, the card has that power only if your hero has that
trait icon.
Different abilities based on
the faction of your hero.
Indicates a Horde
only quest.
Turn Player: The turn player is the player whose turn it is.
Unique: Some cards have the word “unique” in their type line. Any time you control more than one
unique card with the same name, you must immediately put all but one of them into their
owners’ graveyards. You choose which one to keep.
UNLIMITED: Some cards (mostly allies) have the word “unlimited” in their type line. You can put any
number of an unlimited card into your deck. For example, you can have 60 copies of Orgrimmar
Grunts in your deck instead of the normal maximum of 4.
X: Sometimes, a cost will include an “X” amount. When you exhaust resources to
pay that cost, you can exhaust any number. “X” is then equal to the number of
resources you exhausted this way.
38
Upper Deck Entertainment TCG Credits
World of Warcraft TCG Engine Design: Mike Hummel, Brian Kibler, Danny Mandel
Additional Engine Design: Eric Bess, Ben Brode, Shawn Carnes, Ben Cichoski, Jeff Donais,
Dave Hewitt, Ken Ho, Cory Jones, Paul Ross, Kate Sullivan, Morgan Whitmont
Heroes of Azeroth Design Lead: Danny Mandel
Heroes of Azeroth Development Lead: Brian Kibler
Heroes of Azeroth Design and Development Team: Eric Bess, Ben Cichoski, Mike Hummel,
Ken Ho, Morgan Whitmont
Additional Design and Development (UDE): David Baumgartner, Morgan Bonar, Javier Casillas,
Antonino DeRosa, Sean Dillon, Jeff Donais, Scott Elliott, William Estela, Justin Gary, Dave Hewitt,
Dave Humpherys, Matt Hyra, Cory Hudson Jones, Adam Key, Anand Khare, Brandon Male, Cate
Muscat, Russ Pippin, Justin Reilly, Paul Ross, Ben Rubin, Ben Seck, David Smith, Dan Scheidegger,
Eric Schumann, Jess Stinnett, Kate Sullivan, Patrick Sullivan, Patrick Swift, Andrew Yip
Brand Management: Dave Hewitt (lead), Eric Schumann
Graphic Design: Brian Bateman (lead), Michele Mejia, Scott Reyes
Flavor Text: Brandon Male (lead), Michelle Aten, Jake Bales, Jeff Donais, Jeff Grubb, Mike Hummel,
Brian Kibler, Regan Norris, Marc Schmalz, Geordie Tait, Eric Tice, Drew Walker Editing: Cate Muscat (lead), Darla Kennerud
Rulebook: Paul Ross, Kate Sullivan, Cate Muscat
Art Direction: Mark Irwin, Jeremy Cranford
Production: Louise Bateman, Rudy Diaz, Mike Eggleston, Kim Forral, Angel Sanchez, Anita
Spangler, Gordon Tucker, Wendy Wagner, Armando Villalobos
Project Management: Sean Dillon
Chairman and CEO, Upper Deck Company: Richard McWilliam
President and COO, Upper Deck Company: Bob Andrews
Director, Game Development Group: Jeff Donais
Director, Brand Management Team: Cory Jones
UDE Special Thanks: Farmer Brode, Captain Volume, Tony “Idea Man” Hsu, Dark Talisman, Lost
Anarchy, Shock, The Girl Scouts, Ragnrok the Heavy, Euri’s Gerbils, Stan!, Monkey
39
Blizzard Entertainment TCG Credits
Lead Developer: Shawn Carnes Art Direction: Glenn Rane, Samwise Didier
Producer: Ben Brode
Additional Development: Sean Wang, Tony Hsu, Shane Cargilo
Additional Flavor Text: Ben Brode, Brandan Vanderpool, Tony Hsu, Ryan Pearson, Tim Daniels,
Shawn Carnes, Evelyn Fredericksen
Playtesters: John Schwartz; Michele Arko; Nathan Brown; Samuel Schrimsher; Tim Daniels;
Arec Nevers; David Sanchez; Bob Richardson; Kevin Jordan; Edward Hanes; John Mikros;
Shane Cargilo; Matt Gotcher; Sam Lantinga; Eric Dodds; Tyler Hunter; Tony Hsu; Brian Smith;
Brandan Vanderpool; Josh Hilborn; Justin Klinchuch; Shawn Carnes; Ben Brode; Thomas Blue;
Victor Gonzalez, Jr.; Peiji Guo; Andrew Hsu; Andrew Matthews; Darian Vorlick; Jimmy Truong;
Kris Zierhut; Lee Sparks; Richard Khoo; Serban Oprescu; Shane Dabiri; Ahmed Domyaty; Beni
Elgueta; Don Grey; Joel Clift; Nathan Erickson; Paul Sardis; Sean Wang; Ryan Pearson; Joanna
Cleland; Bob Fitch
Blizzard Special Thanks: Chris Metzen, Gloria Soto, Joanna Cleland, Lisa Pearce, Brian Hsieh,
J. Allen Brack
40
47
Quick Reference Rules
For Experienced TCG Players
• Start game by putting your hero card into play. Bottom right number is your health total.
• Object of the game is to use your hero, allies, and abilities to kill enemy heroes.
• Opening hand is 7 cards. Draw 1 card per turn. First player doesn't draw.
• You may place any card face down as a resource. Place 1 resource per turn.
• You may place a quest card face up as a resource. When you complete a quest, flip it face down.
• Play ally, armor, weapon, item, and ability cards during your turn.
• Play armor, weapon, and item cards on your hero only, not on ally cards.
• You can attack with ally cards or with your hero. You may attack enemy allies or enemy
heroes directly.
• Exhaust (turn sideways) your hero when it attacks.
• While your hero is attacking or defending, exhaust one of its weapons to strike with it.
• Exhaust (turn sideways) a piece of armor to prevent that much damage.
• Resolve each attack separately as a separate combat. You choose the defender.
• Characters with protector can step in front of attacks.
• Damage is permanent. Put damage counters on ally cards (dice, coins, etc.).
• Damage on allies and heroes can be removed by healing spells or effects.
• Decks are 60 cards. Maximum 4 copies per card, except for ones tagged as "unlimited."
• Alliance heroes can only use Alliance allies. Horde heroes can only use Horde allies. Either side
can use neutral allies. Some quests are also limited to the Alliance or Horde faction.
• Heroes are restricted to using armor, weapons, items, and abilities with their class symbol on
the card.
• Multiplayer works just like single player. Heroes and allies can attack or protect anyone.
44
Ready
Step
Draw
Step
• Play Cards
• Use Powers
• Place a Resource
• Make Attacks
Combat
Step(s)
Wrap-Up
Step
Druid
Hunter
Mage
Paladin
Priest
Rogue
Shaman
Warlock
Warrior
©2006 The Upper Deck Company All rights reserved. The Upper Deck Company 985 Trade Drive, N. Las Vegas,
NV 89030 USA. Upper Deck Europe BV, Flevolaan 15, 1382 JX Weesp, The Netherlands. All rights reserved.
© 2006 Blizzard Entertainment, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Warcraft, World of Warcraft and Blizzard Entertainment
are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Blizzard Entertainment, Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries. All
other trademarks referenced herein are the properties of their respective owners.
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement