A Free Companion eBook for Quilting Arts TV Series

A Free Companion eBook for Quilting Arts TV Series
presents
Tips &
Techniques
A Free Companion eBook for
Quilting Arts TV Series 1800
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
Quilting Arts TV
with SUSAN BRUBAKER KNAPP
Series 1800 Episodes 1-13
Hosted by Susan Brubaker Knapp, “Quilting Arts TV” features many top fiber artists
sharing their artful approaches to surface design, hand stitching, thread painting, and
more. We hope they will inspire you to make time for quilting every day.
Please enjoy this free overview of materials lists, descriptions, and/or tips that are part
of 21 of the segments in Series 1800.
Thank you to our sponsors!
Vivika Hansen DeNegre
Editor
1801-1: Quilting Leather Wholecloth Quilts by Cathy Wiggins
W
ith the right leather and
leather needle, anyone
can be successful working with
leather. Leather is sold by grade
and weight. Look for garment- or
upholstery-grade leather that is
3 oz. or less. Leather can be used
in most any project—just like
cotton—even in your favorite
quilt, bags, or clothing patterns.
Materials
• 3 oz. or lighter weight leather
• Tracing paper
• Saral chalk paper
• Stylus
• Basting spray
• Batting and backing
• Leather dyes
• Paintbrushes
gypsywoodleathers.com
1801-2: Susan Carlson and ‘Stevie’ the Saltwater Crocodile
S
ometimes, a piece of art can stop you in your tracks because of its size.
It happens frequently when crowds gather around the enormous quilt
“Crocodylus Smylus.” Artist Susan Carlson created this quilt, a life-sized
rendition of a saltwater crocodile she calls “Stevie,” and the sheer size—22' x 6',
that’s feet, not inches!—is something to behold. Her work is fascinating from
any distance. It incorporates a multitude of fabrics not often used in quilts, while
creating life-like images of people and animals, all made from commercial cloth.
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1803-1: Tips for Piecing Hexagon Star Flowers by Victoria Findlay Wolfe
Sponsored by Sizzix
H
ere are my tips for making hexagons with painless Y seams:
•Use a die cutter for precision cutting.
•Sew in sections, 1 star point to 1 background small triangle. Make 6 sets. Next,
sew 2 halves made of 3 sets each, and then sew the 2 halves together, pinning the
center points.
•At any Y seam point, stop ¼" from the end of the fabric.
•Press all seams open for ease of construction.
•Once you’ve made your Hex Star, you can either stop there, or use the extra
triangle on the die to make your block a rectangle for easy finishing.
•Die shapes are dog-eared for easy alignment.
vfwquilts.com
1803-2: Adding Value to Your Quilt by Lea McComas
M
ake your own valuefinding tools from items
you can find at office supply and
hardware stores.
Materials
• 5 gray paint chips: very light, medium
light, medium, medium dark, and
very dark
• A set of rainbow-colored thin plastic
notebook dividers
• Color wheel
• Clear packing tape
• Binder ring, 1"–2" in diameter
C reate
a
V alue S cale
1. Obtain a set of paint chips from a
local hardware or paint store. Begin
with a very light gray and end with
black or almost black.
2. If the chips are different sizes, trim
them so they are all uniform.
3. If the chips are not already on one
strip, place them side-by-side and
tape them together using clear
packing tape.
Your new value scale can be accordionfolded for storage and easy transport.
C reate C olor F ilters
1. Obtain a set of colored plastic
notebook dividers from the school
supply section of a variety or office
supply store.
2. Cut a section from each plastic sheet
approximately 3½" x 6". Punch a
hole in each section.
3. Place a binder ring through the hole
in each sheet to keep the collection
together.
Bring these two tools with you when
shopping for fabric!
leamccomas.com
1804-2: From Sketch to Embroidery by Laura Wasilowski
T
his small embroidery begins as
a sketch. The black and white
sketch is enlarged to size and traced
onto fusible interfacing which is then
fused to batting. Machine stitched
lines on a silk foundation create
compartments for embellishment
with embroidery threads. Embroidery
threads also can wrap around and
lace through the machine threads
to create line and pattern. I so enjoy
how the slow art of hand embroidery
transforms a simple sketch into a
piece full of color and texture.
Materials
• Background, 12" x 14" (I used hand-
dyed silk but cotton works well, too.)
• Paper-backed fusible web,
12" x 14" (I used Pellon® 805
Wonder-Under®.)
• Fusible interfacing, 12" x 14" (I used
Pellon 911FF Fusible Featherweight.)
• Batting, 12" x 14" (I used Hobbs
Premium Heirloom® 80/20 Cotton
Blend.)
• Black and white sketch, 8" x 11"
• Backing, 12" x 14"
• Binding, fat quarter
• Black fine point permanent marker
• Thread:
• 12wt for machine quilting, used in
the bobbin
• 40wt for the top of the machine
• Perle cotton in sizes 8 and 12, a
variety of colors for hand embroidery
• Hand embroidery needles, sizes 3 or 4
(for the size 8 threads) and sizes 5 or
7 (for the size 12 threads)
artfabrik.com
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1804-3: Machine Quilting Tips: A Balancing Act by Susan Brubaker Knapp
T
o successfully free-motion
machine quilt, you have
to be able to rub your tummy
and pat your head at the same
time—well, not really, but it
takes similar skills. You have to
move your hands (placed on the
quilt top) at a certain speed while
the machine needle is going up
and down at a different speed. It’s
important to find that balance.
When I quilt, the needle goes
up and down pretty fast but my
hands go at a slower but consistent speed.
P repare
for
P ractice
Make a small quilt sandwich with
backing, batting, and a top fabric as a
practice ‘quilt.’ Baste with safety pins or
basting spray. Set your sewing machine
up for free-motion quilting: lower the
feed dogs and load a free-motion or
darning foot. Take 1 stitch and pull the
bobbin thread up, holding it away from
the needle before stitching.
E xercise 1: T oo
fast
With the practice quilt under the
needle, press the foot pedal for power
and move the practice quilt back and
forth quickly, making a lightning bolttype design. Take a look at the stitches.
More than likely, the stitches are too
long and you may see puckers in the
fabric
E xercise 2: T oo
slow
With the same practice quilt still under
the needle, press the foot pedal for
power and move the practice quilt back
and forth, lightning bolt-style again,
very slowly. Look at these stitches. They
are probably too short and very dense.
bluemoonriver.com
E xercise 3: F inding
balance
Remembering what too fast and too
slow felt like, now try finding the right
amount of power from the foot pedal
balanced with the speed of your moving
hands on the quilt. You will notice
that your hands move slower than the
needle does.
Continue practicing to get a feel for
how much you need to press the foot
pedal of your machine (how fast the
needle will go up and down) balanced
with the speed needed to obtain regular
stitches on the practice quilt.
After you’ve practiced the lightning
bolt or other straight stitch—and are
getting the hang of the balance you
need between power and movement—
practice making a curve, like a flower
petal, and try to retain the balance. It’s a
little trickier, isn’t it? Try other shapes,
shooting for consistent stitches.
Once you feel a good balance, make a
mental note. For me, I like to quilt with
my foot pedal at a speed of about a 7 or
8 (on a scale of 1–10) with my hands
at about a 2 or 3. Your ratio might be
different.
Go for the sweet spot! And practice,
practice, practice!
1805-1: Portrait Technique Exercise with Esterita Austin
Materials
O
multi-value
fabric , fat
quarter
• Foundation
fabric, 12" x 12"
• Freezer paper,
8"x 8"
• X-Acto® knife
• Teflon sheet or
silicone-coated
parchment
paper
• Mistyfuse®,
8"x 8"
ne can make virtually any image appear three-dimensional with the
addition of paint. The yin and yang symbol is an effective example with
which to demonstrate my technique for portrait making. Using this symbol,
which has two identical shapes, and juxtaposing them with the lights in one
half touching the darks in the other half, creates a visual distinction in shape
and form.
The trick here is to take the existing lights and darks and exaggerate them with
lighter light and darker dark paints. The medium tones are not painted.
Whatever the patterning in the fabric, use it as a road map for the brushstrokes.
The idea is not to cover the patterning but to work with it. By doing this, visual
drama is created.
esteritaaustin.com
• Multi-colored,
• Acrylic textile
paint, white,
the colors of
lightest color in
the fabric, and
the colors of the
darkest color in
the fabric
• Acrylic paint
brushes, ¼" and
½".
• Paint palette or
plate
Optional
• Aloe gel
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1805-2: Technology Meets Art: Make your own pixelated portrait quilts by Vivika Hansen DeNegre
N
ot long after seeing the
pixelated portrait quilt trend
explode on social media and at
quilt shows, I decided on a lark
to try my hand at designing my
own quilt. With a professional
headshot as my starting image,
I used the pixelating service
at youpatch.com and, within
15 minutes, came away with
a design. But that is not all:
YouPatch created a personalized
pattern, yardage requirements,
cutting chart, and detailed
instructions for my quilt, all
emailed to me as a PDF. I was
hooked.
•Within minutes of designing the quilt
on the website, YouPatch sent me a
detailed PDF of the design, including
yardage needed for each color of
Kona® cotton, detailed cutting charts,
and piecing instructions for the entire
quilt.
•Piecing the 64" x 64" quilt took
approximately 40 hours.
•Professional longarm quilting was
done by Angela Walters.
Note: Andi’s design service added an
additional day and minimal expense to
the project.
•The cutting and piecing diagrams
were excellent and contained no
errors.
•I cut the 1,281 individual pieces first
and organized them in plastic bags by
color and size.
quiltingdaily.com
1805-3: Machine Quilting Tips: Adjusting Tension by Susan Brubaker Knapp
G
ood tension in machine
quilting means that the
thread coming from the top
of the machine and the thread
coming from the bobbin
interlock in a balanced way—
your stitches should look
identical on both the front and
back of your quilt.
T roubleshooting
T ips
When thinking about tension,
I often envision a tug of war
going on between the top spool
and the bobbin—if one pulls too
hard, the stitches will be out of
balance.
•If your bobbin case has a little arm
If you’re having trouble with
tension, here are some ideas to
fix it.
•Remove the top thread entirely
and rethread the machine. Check
your machine’s manual if you have
questions on how to thread the
machine. Sometimes, if you miss even
just one element or disc, the stitching
will not be right.
extending up, that arm probably also
has a small hole in it. Try threading the
bobbin thread through that hole before
pulling it up to the top of the machine.
This will increase the bobbin tension
a little bit and may help balance your
stitches.
•On most bobbin cases, there is a tiny
screw that can be adjusted to tighten
or loosen tension. Be careful, though,
when doing this frequently as the
case is not designed for that and may
fail at some point. Take a photo or
make a small mark on the case with a
permanent marker to note where you
started from so that you can adjust it
back later. This increases the bobbin
tension.
•Start with the top tension on the
machine’s default. Practice with a quilt
sandwich that mimics exactly what you
plan to quilt—same weight of fabric,
batting, etc.—so you get an accurate
picture of what the stitching will look
like on your quilt. If you see too much
of the bobbin thread on top, the top
tension is too tight. Try going down
one notch on the top tension dial.
This decreases the top tension. Test
the stitching. If it is still too tight on
top, go down one more notch. Make
subtle adjustments, one at a time,
and test the stitching in between and
before making additional adjustments.
Conversely, adjusting the tension disc
up to a higher number increases the
top tension.
•Use the same weight thread in the top
and in the bobbin or, sometimes, a
little lighter in the bobbin.
bluemoonriver.com
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1806-1: Tips for Piecing Bow Tie Blocks by Victoria Findlay Wolfe
H
ere are my tips for piecing
curves and Bow Tie blocks
Sponsored by Sizzix
•“Floppy Toppy”—my mnemonic
T ips
device for remembering how to place
the pieces for sewing: the concave
curve is always on top.
•Use a die cutter for precision cutting.
Die shapes are dog-eared for easy
alignment.
•Always fold fabric in half to find the
•Play with color placement. The “bow-
middle, place the first pin in the folds.
•Pin the ends in place.
•Allow the feed dogs to take the fabric
through the machine, do not pull the
fabric.
tie” is in 2 parts and this provides
more options for design. The quarter
circle can be solid or pieced with
wedges included on the die.
vfwquilts.com
1806-2: Working with Leather Scraps by Cathy Wiggins
W
ith the right leather and
leather needle, anyone
can be successful working with
leather. Leather is sold by grade
and weight. Look for garment- or
upholstery-grade leather that is
3 oz. or less. Leather can be used
in most any project—just like
cotton—even in your favorite
quilt, bags, or clothing patterns.
Materials
• 3 oz. or lighter weight leather
• Tracing paper
• Saral chalk paper
• Stylus
• Basting spray
• Batting and backing
• Leather dyes
• Paintbrushes
gypsywoodleathers.com
1806-3: Sheers to You by Esterita Austin
I
n looking for a technique that
would allow for creating a
watercolor effect in fabric, sheer
organza and lace seemed to be a
natural choice. Although organza
can be slippery, that problem is
solved by pre-fusing all the fabric
squares before proceeding and
in doing so a palette of colors is
ready to use. Instead of pinning
the fabrics together a small iron is
used to lightly tack them, one to the
other. When the sheers are cut a bit
oversized and overlapped, the excess
creates new shapes and colors. This
gives the effect of watercolor, but a
watercolor that can be quilted.
Materials
• Finished size 8" x 10"
• Assorted colored lace and
translucent or transparent organza,
10–12 pieces, 5" x 5" each or large
scraps
• White transparent organza,
10" x 12"
• Mistyfuse®, 1 yd.
• Silicone-coated parchment paper
• Outline pattern, an original drawing
or image from a copyright-free
source such as a coloring book
Optional
• Tweezers
esteritaaustin.com
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1807-2: Spiral Collage by Susan Carlson
A
simple shape becomes a
vibrant design using scraps
of fabric, strong value change,
and a collage technique that uses
glue. Artist Susan Carlson shows
how the spiral shape, when
executed with strong color or
value changes, actually creates
two spirals. Play with color,
value, and your fabric scraps and
learn this fun technique.
Materials
• Large square of muslin
• Fabric scraps in a variety
of colors and values
• White craft glue
• Tulle
• Batting
• Backing fabric
susancarlson.com
1808-3: Printing with UV-Reactive Dye by Jane Dávila
I
love harnessing the sun to
create art. Lately, I’ve had fun
creating sun printed fabric using
masks and photo imagery. But be
warned—it is fun AND addictive!
• A photograph scanned into your
Materials
• Fabric (I use solid white cotton.)
• Plastic sheet
• Jacquard® SolarFast™ dyes
• Small foam brushes
• Jacquard SolarFast Wash
• Items to use as masks—such as
computer
• Jacquard SolarFast Film
• Inkjet printer
• Abundant sunshine
Optional
• Large sheet of glass or acrylic
janedavila.com
leaves, washers, keys, flowers, lace—
items must be flat and opaque
1809-2: Binding a Quilt on a Longarm Machine by Renae Haddadin
A
dding binding to a quilt
is fast and simple with a
longarm machine. This method
adds binding to a finished quilt
while it is still on the quilting
frame.
Sponsored by Innova
Materials
• Straight edge ruler or template for
guiding longarm machine
• Pre-sewn binding strip
• Glue stick
• Circle template for rounded corners
• Unbound quilt (My sample is
35" x 35"
quiltsonthecorner.com
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1810-2: Designing Patterns by Frieda Anderson
I
have been making small
art quilt patterns for over
16 years. I have sold them
wholesale as well as retail from
my website and at Quilt Market.
Over the course of time and
with experience, the directions
and the quality of my patterns
have greatly improved. From
simple hand-drawn reproduced
line drawings with separate
directions, my patterns have
evolved into professional, mass-
produced, computer-drawn line
renderings with directions either
on the same page or printed
separately.
When you are writing directions
for patterns, you must be very
clear and precise. Write the
directions like you would write a
recipe for cooking. Write it as if
the audience doesn’t know how
to sew. For instance, don’t write
in your supply list ‘2 fat quarters
of green,’ write ‘two
18" x 22" pieces of green fabric
(fat quarters).’ This is very
important because there are
many first-time sewists and
quilters interested in learning a
new skill who need good, clear
directions to succeed.
Include in the supply list all the
elements that will be needed
for the pattern as well as all the
tools.
friestyle.com
1810-3: Blocking a Quilt by Vivika Hansen DeNegre
H
ere’s how I block my quilts
to guarantee they lie flat,
hang straight, and have square
corners.
Note: Quilts can be blocked
either before or after binding.
1. Pin the quilted quilt onto a design
wall, spacing the pins every 2"–3".
Use sturdy pins with large glass
heads or T-pins. My design wall
is made of thick insulation foam
boards and covered with a gridded
interfacing. Push the pins in all the
way, making sure the quilt is straight
and square. If you don’t have a
design wall appropriate for this step,
you can also block on a carpeted
floor.
2. As you are pinning, use a ruler or
acrylic square to make sure the
corners are straight. Ease the quilt
into the correct shape until it is flat
on the wall.
3. Using a spray bottle, spray water
evenly over the surface of the quilt.
The quilt should not be dripping
wet, but soaked through all three
layers. My large quilt drank in more
than a quart of water.
4. Adjust the pins, if necessary.
5. Allow the quilt to dry, untouched.
The length of time depends on
the humidity and amount of water
sprayed on the quilt. My quilt took
more than 48 hours to dry.
Voila—straight and square! Now it is
ready to photograph and enter into a
quilt show!
quiltingdaily.com
1811-1: Creating With Texture Magic by Wendy Butler Berns
I
love creating lots of texture in my quilts. I discovered a product
several years ago that is great fun to play with to add texture to
your work. Texture Magic looks like a piece of polyester but it is so
much more! It is excellent in appliqué projects where a small textured
feature might add just the right touch to a quilt.
Texture Magic will shrink by about a third—and so will your fabric—
so refer to the conversion chart in the package to determine the size
fabric to start with for your project.
Materials
• Texture Magic™ by Superior® Threads
• Fabric to texturize
• Iron with good steam
wendybutlerberns.com
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1812-1: Leather Panels by Cathy Wiggins
W
ith the right leather and
leather needle, anyone
can be successful working with
leather. Leather is sold by grade
and weight. Look for garment- or
upholstery-grade leather that is
3 oz. or less. Leather can be used
in most any project—just like
cotton—even in your favorite
quilt, bags, or clothing patterns.
Materials
• 3 oz. or lighter weight leather
• Tracing paper
• Saral chalk paper
• Stylus
• Spray baste
• Batting and backing
• Leather dyes
• Paintbrushes
gypsywoodleathers.com
1812-2: Make Fiber Bowls on a Longarm Machine by Nancy Wick
I
love to explore surface design,
and ways to create texture
interest me whether it’s dyeing,
painting, or embellishing. It
delighted me to discover I could
create a base transformable into
a sculpted fabric bowl on my
longarm quilting machine. I view
thread as my artist palette and
enjoy working with the wide
variety of threads and colors
available to today’s quilter.
Materials
• Finished bowl 10" diameter
• Flower fabric, 2 pieces 121/2" x 121/2"
(These can be the same or different
fabrics.)
• Backing, 15" x 15"
• Double-stick fusible web, 1 piece 121/2"
x 121/2" and 1 piece 2" x 2" (I used Lite
Steam-A-Seam 2®.)
• Batting, 2 pieces 15" x 15"
• Accent fabric for flower center, large
scrap or 2" square
• Thread, 4–12 contrasting and
coordinating colors
• Flower drawing
Optional
• Angelina® fibers for flower center,
bonded
Sponsored by Innova
• Lightweight fusible web
• Press sheet or parchment paper
• Fabric paint (I used Jacquard® Lumiere®
in color 564 Super Copper.)
• Small flathead paintbrush
Note: These Innova longarm machine
accessories are useful with this project,
depending on your thread selection and the
amount of dense filler work you plan to do:
• Horizontal spool holder (for use with
spools of horizontally stacked thread)
• Micro-handles (for use with dense filler
work and micro-stippling; allows more
controlled stitching)
• Spool stands, 2 (allows for feeding 2 top
threads through the needle eye)
imapiecemaker.com
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
1813-3: Choose the Right Paint by Susan Brubaker Knapp
I
love to paint on fabric but
I know some people are
confused about what to use.
There are lots of different brands
and types of paint—it can seem
overwhelming. Here are some
tips to choosing the right paint
for your quilt.
•Regular acrylic paints can be used
on fabric with the addition of fabric
medium.
•Fabric acrylic paints or textile paints
have ingredients in them that allow
them to become permanent on
fabric. After heat setting (follow the
manufacturer’s instructions) most are
even washable.
•Extender (also called base extender)
is what paint is made of before
pigment is added to it. Extender can
be mixed with paint to obtain a more
sheer and lighter value of it. If I want
a lighter or pastel shade of a paint
color but want it to retain its opaque
quality, I’ll add white paint instead of
extender.
•There are opaque paints and there
are transparent paints. The difference
between them is kind of like the
difference between tights and
pantyhose. One offers more coverage
than the other.
•I like to use transparent paint for
realism—like a natural subject. The
color looks more realistic to me.
•Metallic or pearlescent paints have
mica chips and other ingredients that
give them sparkle and shine. These
paints are usually opaque.
•To darker a color, add in a dot of its
color compliment. For example, if
you want a darker red, add a little
green to it. This usually works better
than adding black. Try it!
bluemoonriver.com
© 2016 F+W, a Content + eCommerce Company. All rights reserved. Any or all pages in this document may be copied for personal use. • quiltingartstv.com • interweavestore.com
Susan Brubaker Knapp
and Melissa Averinos
Previous seasons now
available for streaming
at QNNtv.com!
Tune in to Quilting Arts TV
New episodes of Series 1800 of “Quilting Arts TV” are now airing
nationally on PBS. Check your local listings for program times. Visit
quiltingartstv.com for more information.
Once again hosted by well-known quilt artist, teacher, and author Susan
Brubaker Knapp, “Quilting Arts TV Series 1800” features cutting-edge
surface design techniques, machine quilting motifs, art quilts, and
more. Susan’s guests cover creating unique fabric, quilting the finished
masterpiece, and everything in between!
Tune in for techniques that inspire the artist in every quilter.
This season features innovative appliqué techniques, hand and machine
stitching, thread painting, lessons on value, portrait quilts, large-scale
designs, and so much more.
Featured artists include:
JoanneQuilting
Sharpe
Arts TV
Susan Carlson
Cathy Wiggins
Victoria Findlay Wolfe
Lea McComas
Jane Dávila
Series 1800
Series 1800
Series 1800 Episodes 1-13
Join Susan as you make time for quilting every day!
1706: Curves and Cuts Frieda Anderson
shows how to use freezer paper and glue to
achieve perfectly curved leaves • Lisa Chin
creates custom-cut stencils using a computer
and electronic cutter
1702: Paint and Stitch Stories from long
ago inspire Desiree Habicht to paint and quilt
fabric to resemble vintage tiles • With a little
thread play, Andrea Brokenshire adds realism to
a lily on painted silk
1707: Focus on Stitching Quilt storyteller
Lorie Hancock McCown uses fabrics, lace, and
thread to stitch her stories • Lea McComas
brings life to compelling images using stitched
lines for maximum impact
1703: You Can’t Resist This Enid Gjelten
Weichselbaum designs colorful motifs using
glue as a dye resist • Julie B. Booth paints with
dishwashing liquid to create galaxies of colorful
designs on a variety of fabrics
1708: Creative Collage Frieda Anderson
and Laura Wasilowski join creative forces to
make stunning leaf collages • Janelle Girod
and Kristin Rodriguez mix photo transfers with
hand-quilting, embroidery, and embellishment
to create a treasured keepsake
1704: Making Your Mark Lynn Krawczyk
goes beyond the quilt to create a high-impact
graffiti floor mat • Cyndi Souder prints on
fabric with hand-carved woodblocks • Susan
Brubaker Knapp makes marks with stitches for
endless creative options
1709: Free-Motion Stitching Longarm
quilter Nancy McNally explores free-motion
stitching on a longarm machine • Cyndi Souder
writes on her quilts to add depth and meaning
• Susan Edmonson reaches below the surface
to paint and dye batting for special effects
Susan Brubaker Knapp and Cyndi Souder
1711: Print and Paint Lisa Chin shows
basic techniques for sun printing with various
patterns • Julie B. Booth celebrates repeating
patterns as she prints her own fabric • Susan
Brubaker Knapp paints on stitched surfaces to
create unique effects
1712: Beautiful Backgrounds Quilter
Andrea Brokenshire uses fabric confetti to
create lush backgrounds • Susan Purney Mark
screen prints color block fabric designs • Susan
Edmonson stitches free-motion embroidery that
adds charm and personality to her designs
Order your copy today at
shop.quiltingdaily.com
1705: Appliqué With a contemporary twist,
art quilter Susan Purney Mark uses a variety
of media to add imagery and impact to fabric
• Nancy McNally uses strip sets and die-cut
shapes to create innovative and colorful designs
in appliqué
1710: Let’s Talk Texture Fiber artist
Cecile Whatman creates dimension and depth
with sheers, velvet, and non-traditional
materials • Kristin Rodriguez and Janelle Girod
embroider on burlap • Susan Brubaker Knapp
shares her own favorite techniques
1713: Let’s Just Improvise Improvisational quilter Pat Pauly shares techniques that
allow fabric, color, and design to guide the
creative process • Lorie Hancock McCown uses
garment fabrics, trims, and embellishments to
tell a compelling quilt story featuring dresses
4-disc DVD • Approximately 6 hours
16QM06
$39.99
Also available as a video download
Cover art by (clockwise from top left): Lorie Hancock McCown, Enid Gjelten Weichselbaum, Pat Pauly, Desiree Habicht, and Susan Purney Mark
Series 1800 Episodes 1-13
1701: Stitching, Two Ways Lea
McComas uses stitches like paint to tell a
compelling story • Art quilter Laura Wasilowski
enhances quilts with free-stitched embroideries
to create a narrative of joy
Quilting Arts TV
Hosted by Susan Brubaker Knapp, “Quilting Arts TV” features many of your favorite
art quilters and fiber artists as they challenge and inspire viewers to find their own
artistic voice. Through hand stitching, surface design, and free-motion quilting, they
tell compelling stories with cloth.
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Quilting Arts TV
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Series 1700
quiltingdaily.com
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quiltingdaily.com
quiltingartstv.com
quiltingdaily.com
Series 1800
Episodes 1–3
Series 1700
1–3
quiltingartstv.com
quiltingdaily.com
DVD 1 Episodes
quiltingartstv.com
quiltingdaily.com
Episodes
1–3
Run Time: approximately
6
hours
Run Time:
Series
1700
Episodes
1–3
This DVD is for your
private
DVD
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This DVD is for your private
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only.
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©2015 F+W Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
©2016 F+W Media,
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Art by Enid Gjelten Weischselbaum
All rights reserved.
DVD 1 Episodes 1–3
DVD 1
Art by Lisa Chin
quiltingartstv.com quiltingdaily.com
15QM22
4-DVD Set. Total run time is approximately 6 hours.
This DVD Set is for your private home viewing only. It is not authorized for any other use.
©2015 F+W Media, Inc. All rights reserved.
US $39.99
(CAN $49.99)
ISBN-13: 978-1-63250-468-5
ISBN-10: 1-63250-468-5
UPC
01
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03 0080
EAN
53999
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12787 02323
9
Visit interweavestore.com for great books, DVDs, magazines, patterns, and more.
Artwork top to bottom: Cathy Wiggins, Susan Edmonson, Wendy Butler Berns,
Esterita Austin, Frieda Anderson
Thanks to our “Quilting Arts TV” Series 1800 sponsors:
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