Mar - American Radio History

Mar - American Radio History
THE AUTHORITATIVE MAGAZINE ABOUT HIGH FIDELITY
MARCH 1975
47425
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Do Record cleaners Really Work?
phase distortion, plus substantially better
stability with four double tuned phase
linear ceramic filters and four monolithic
IC's in the IF section.
6-stage limiters
The IF section includes 6 -stage limiter
circuits. Used in conjunction with
differential amplifiers in monolithic IC's,
noise interference is completely elimin ated with a signal to noise ratio of 75dB.
Exclusive Phase Lock Loop (PLL) IC
circuitry in the TX -9100 multiplex section
Developed and used for the first time by
Pioneer, the Phase Lock Loop (PLL)
circuit is actually an electronic
servomechanism. It maintains continuous
and precise phasing between the pilot
signal and the subcarrier, supplying
optimum channel separation. Completely
drift free, no alignment is ever required.
The PLL cannot be affected by
humidity or temperature since there are no
coils or capacitors to be detuned. This
provides complete stability and reliability.
New pulse noise suppressor in the TX-9100
operates with computer control
This circuit operates automatically when
it is switched on. It effectively blocks
radiated noise from airplane and auto
ignition systems, neon and traffic lights,
etc. It does not interfere with frequency
response and stereo separation. Whether
the signal is weak or strong, this automatic
'brain' decides when the PNS gate circuit
is to operate.
Unique muting control
A 2 -position variable muting control uses
electronic switching as well as reed relay
switching. This eliminates interstation
noise and the popping noise of
tuning and detuning.
Complete command with a wide variety
of controls
Whether it's for AM, FM or headset output
levels, Pioneer provides greater operating
precision with three independently
operated output level controls. A headset
may be used without a following power
amplifier. Precision tuning is achieved
with the aid of signal strength and tuning
meters.
AM section highlights IC's
The entire AM section, following the front
end, is a unitized IC. A monolithic IC
replaces 84 individual components plus a
ceramic filter. By using a differential amp
circuit and a balanced mixing circuit,
there are better spurious characteristics
and special AGC amplification.
Great specs for great performance
FM Sensitivity (IHF)
Selectivity
TX -9100
TX -8100
TX -7100
1.5uV
90dB
1dB
75dB
110dB
40dB
1.8uV
80dB
1dB
70dB
100dB
40dB
1.9uv
60dB
1dB
70dB
85dB
40d B
0.2%
0.4%
100dB
0.2%
0.4%
100dB
Capture Ratio
S/N Ratio
Image Rejection
Stereo Separation
Distortion (THD)
0.2%
Mono
0.3%
Stereo
Spurious Response 110dB
The Amplifiers: SA -9100,
SA -8100, SA -7100
Two separate power supplies utilize
30,000 uF total capacitance
You read it right. The power supply in
the SA -9100 uses a total capacitance of
30,000 uF. 15,000 uF each for the balanced
positive and negative power supplies. This
completely eclipses anything now
available in integrated amplifiers. This
super high capacitance results in an
absolutely pure DC voltage supply. There's
constant DC voltage regulation regardless
of line voltage changes and signal input.
Two 15,000uF power supplies
eclipse anything now available
in integrated amplifiers.
Even at extremely low frequencies,
there's stable power output, excellent
transient response and low total
harmonic distortion
not greater than
0.1% at any power level up to 60 watts
minimum continuous power per channel,
at any frequency from 20Hz to 20,000 Hz,
using 8 ohm loads.
These positive and negative power
supplies provide absolute stability in all
stages, even in the equalizer amp and
proceeding to the control and power
amps. Therefore, the signal lines become
zero potential to completely eliminate the
usual (and annoying) click noise of
operating controls and switches.
Stability is increased even further by
the differential amplifier used in the first
stages of the equalizer and control
amplifiers (also the power amp.) 100% DC
negative feedback supplies excellent
stability and transient response; it also
eliminates distortion.
To further
increase
-
Interior view. SA -9100
Tie Tuners:
TX -9100,
T X-8100, TX -7100
-
an end ineering triumph
FN front end
Th _ height of sophisticaticn, :he TX -910!'3
The time has come to
completely re-evaluate
the standard you now
use to judge high
fidelity performance.
stabilized, drift -free front end replaces
printed circuit boards w.th ccmpletely
metallized construction. The same used In
high precision communications equipment.
Employing three dual gate MOS FET's
arid a buffer circuit in the local oscillator,
there's exceptionally high gain with
extremely low noise. Two to ied FF stages
with a 5 -gang variable tuning o`apacitor
contrioute to the highest selacivit, (90dB)
and astonish ng FM sensitivity
The exclusive use of a heavy gaug a die
cast aluminum housing asscres ("canny
stability.
the epitome of
IF section
-
advanced research
In the oursuit of excellence, aignif cant new
IF section technology was developed. The
result is optimum selectivity wilt T fiirrum
With this new line of tuners and amplifiers,
Pioneer presents many ingenious
innovations in circuitry that are being used
for the first time. However, this
exclusiveness is only secondary. While
each new circuit can be considered
revolutionary by itself, what is even more
important is that their combined
capabilities achieve precision and
performance heretofore unattainable.
Exclusive heavy gauge die cast aluminum
housing assures uncanny stability.
www.americanradiohistory.com
TX -9100 interior view.
Chrome plated shielded front end
housing and multiplex sectiion.
HIGH FIDELITY: "... The
performance of the SA -9100
is so exceptional and the
many extras in the way of
switching options, and so
on, so eminently useful,
that we find it the most
exciting piece of audio
hardware we've yet tested
from this company."
STEREO REVIEW: "... The
TX -9100 unequivocally
outperforms anything we
have tested up to this time."
HI-FI STEREO BUYERS'
GUIDE: "(The SA -9100) is a
powerhouse of sound evel,
performance and features.
Works like something the
chief engineer had built
for his own use."
"The Pioneer TX-9100
AM/FM stereo tuner offers
notably excellent performance and sound quality."
Review
NT
..
_
TEST REPORTS
unequivocally
outperforms anything
we have tested
up to this time."
.:-.
.
- :
rx-eroo devolve
"You can't buy
better audible performance
than is achievable with
pioneer's new TX -9100
(AM -FM stereo tuner) at
any price."
ß UDIO:
Iv«.
Complete reprints available upon request.
www.americanradiohistory.com
STEREO REVIEW: "This
(SA -9100) is an essentially
distortionless, bug -free,
and powerful amplifier with
exceptional flexibility...
A highly complex array of
electronic circuitry has
been packaged into a
consumer product of
relatively modest price
without a trace of `haywire'
or slipshod assembly. It
almost seems a pity to hide
internal workmanship."
stabilization, special electronic regulator
circuits are used. Transient response is
also improved with a superb damping
factor of 70.
The unique equalizer amplifier
To make certain that extraneous signals
do not interfere with the input signal, the
equalizer amp is totally enclosed and
sealed to shield it against leakage.
There's also extra assurance of
precision with special low noise metal
film resistors and styrol capacitors. Both
are manufactured under continuous
computer control to highest laboratory
test equipment tolerances: -±-1% for
resistors; ±2% for capacitors. Until now
such precision has been unheard of in
hi-fi equipment. Deviation from the ideal
RIAA curve is only ±0.2dB.
Since a direct-coupled SEPP
complementary circuit is used in the
equalizer amplifier, virtually any dynamic
phono cartridge can be accommodated
without overloading or distortion. For
example, with 2.5 mV sensitivity, the
overload at 1 KHz is an unbelievable
250mV, and 1200mV at 10KHz!
Twin stepped tone
da
.HOTEOTON,
Main Control Curves
(Sub set at Flat)
The power amplifier
To sustain the ultra sophistication of the
equalizer and control amp sections, the
power amp has a direct-coupled pure
complementary SEPP circuit, double
differential amplifiers and two constant
current loads. The combined effect is the
achievement of wide power frequency
range and excellent transient response.
100% negative DC feedback is
supplemented by 66dB dynamic negative
feedback for minimum distortion and
absolute stability. The pre and power
amps can be used independently with a
separation switch.
Exclusive direct -coupling in all stages
Until now direct-coupling has been used
only with the power amplifier. Pioneer
takes it a dramatic step further in the
SA -9100 and SA -8100. Direct -coupling in
all stages from the equalizer amp to the
control amp to the power amp. More
effective? Absolutely. It achieves the
finest transient response, wider dynamic
range, with no greater than 0.1% total
harmonic distortion. It's an incredible
achievement.
Level set, volume
controls.
and loudness
contour controls
adjust to listening
preference
Three controls
working together
adjust to any degree
of loudness. The
level set control is
the primary volume
control. Its maximum
Sub Control Curves
(Main set at Flat)
loudness setting
is OdB.
The control amplifier: Twin stepped tone
controls custom tailor your listening.
Now you can make the most critical bass
and treble adjustments with supreme ease.
In fact, there are 5,929 tonal combinations
to suit your listening room acoustics and
to compare or compensate for component
frequency response.
On the SA -9100 and SA -8100 four
tone controls (two for bass, two for treble)
make 2dB (2.5dB with SA -8100) step
adjustments for the entire audio spectrum.
Working together with the tone controls is
a buffer amplifier with 100% negative DC
feedback. The main bass control governs
±
10 dB at 100 Hz; the sub -bass, ± 6dB at
50 Hz. The main treble control governs
±10 dB at 10KHz and the sub -treble,
± 6dB at 20 KHz. This, plus the tone
defeat control (described in the next
paragraph) makes the SA -9100 the most
exciting -to -use amplifier that has ever
powered any hi-fi system.
New tone defeat switch
Because of the extremely wide variety
(5,929) of frequency adjustments made
possible by the twin tone controls, the
tone defeat switch adds extra flexibility.
Adjusting the tone controls to your
satisfaction, you can flip the tone defeat
switch. Bass and treble responses
instantly become flat. When it is switched
off you return to the original tone control
settings.
additional convenience. A separate flip
type lever control for instant switching
between the more widely used tuner and
phono 1 and any other single program
source. Incidentally, both switches are
shielded to protect the input against
undesirable extraneous signal pickups.
Two-way tape duplicating and monitoring
There are two separate flip type switches
on the front panel of the SA -9100 for
tape -to-tape duplicating and monitoring.
Two tape decks can be connected for
recording, playback and duplicating in
either direction, with simultaneous
monitoring.
Level controls for phono 2, aux 2
In order to match the level of various
inputs, individual level controls are
provided for phono 2 and aux 2.
Speaker B control
This special control helps in the use of two
pairs of speaker systems of different
efficiencies. There is no sacrifice of
damping or distortion when switching from
orie pair to the other.
Impedance selector for phono 2
An easy -to -use switch allows you to
employ any phono cartridge input
(25K, 50K, 100K ohms).
Two -position high & low filters
The low filter switch on the SA -9100 and
SA -8100 has subsonic (below 8Hz) and
30Hz positions. The high filter switch has
12KHz and 8KHz positions.
Maximum versatility in program sources
SA -9100
SA -8100
SA-7100
Inputs
Successive settings
Tape monitor-S/N 2-90dB 2-90d B 2-90dB
of -15dB and -30dB
2-80dB 2-80dB 2-80dB
Phono-S/N
result in lower gain.
2-90dB 2-90dB 2-90d B
Auxiliary-S/N
Once the desired
2-70dB 2-70dB 1-70d B
volume is obtained,
Microphone-S/N
the volume control
1-90dB 1-90d B 1-90d B
Tuner-S/N
is used for fine
Outputs
adjustments within
2
2
3
Speakers
the given
1
1
1
Headsets
range. While the loudness contour boosts
2
2
2
Tape Rec.
bass and treble, it may also be used
with the level set control. The Consistent power for every requirement
more advanced the position
Continuous power output per channel, both channels driven
of the level set control, the
into 8-ohm loads, at any frequency from 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz.
lower the effective range of
at no more than the total harmonic distortion indicated.
the loudness contour.
Rated Maximum Total Harmonic Distortion
Rated Power
0.1%
The original and positive
SA -9100 60 watts, minimum
0.3%
SA -8100 40 watts, minimum
speaker protector circuit
0.5%
SA -7100 20 watts, minimum
Since the signal is fed
directly to the speakers
This new lineup of Pioneer tuners and
because of direct -coupling, an automatic
amplifiers is unquestionably the most
electronic trigger relay system is
advanced available today. Yet despite
incorporated into the power amplifier.
this overwhelming sophistication, they're
This protects the speakers against
sensibly priced.
damage from DC leakage which can also
See your Pioneer dealer. He'll show
cause distortion. It also prevents short
you how this series of fine instruments
circuits in the power transistors.
can outperform any units in their price
Maximum convenience for program
range. All prices include walnut cabinets.
source selection
SA -9100-$449.95; SA -8100-$349.95;
SA -7100-$249.95
While there is a multiple function rotary
TX -9100-$349.95; TX -8100-$249.95;
switch for microphone, phono 2 and two
TX -7100-$199.95
auxiliaries, Pioneer has included an
While not discussed here, Pioneer is also
introducing the SA -5200 stereo amplifier
and the TX -6200 stereo tuner for high
quality hi-fi on a low budget. Only $139.95
each, with walnut cabinet.
U.S. Pioneer Electronics Corp.,
75 Oxford Drive, Moonachie,
Convenient program source
New Jersey 07074
selection switch 8 control lever.
West: 13300 S. Estrella, Los Angeles
90248 / Midwest: 1500 Greenleaf, Elk
Grove Village, III. 60007 / Canada: S. H.
Parker Co.
better
PIONEER'
when you want something
Check No. 25 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
RESIDUE
PROOF
Every record cleaner claims to remove
dirt. But never mentions what it leaves
behind. Recent independent tests
show that this omission may be more
than just oversight. See for yourself.
500% or Greater Residue
than
dl
400%
March, 1975
300%
20
24
"Succesor to INDIA
Est.
Vol. 59, No.
1917"
Feature Articles
Record Cleaners-Do They Really Work?/B. V.
3
Pisha
Adoption of the Westrex 45/45 System/Ralph W. Wight
The Many Worlds of Sun Ra/Tom Bingham
56
Equipment Profiles
Technics SA -8500X 4 -Channel Receiver
36 Soundcraftsmen PE2217 Equalizer
42 Ferrograph Super Seven Tape Deck
46 Hitachi HS -300 Speaker System
31
49
JSP
.P
Kensonic C-200 ControlAmplifier/P-300 Power Amplifier
Record and Tape Reviews
P
s\
64 The Column/Fred DeVan
Classical Reviews/Edward Tatnall Canby
68
Actual dry weight measurements of best selling record cleaners.
72
The chart is just half our story. Only
discwasher's directional pile brush
(Pat. Pending) lifts fluid and any residue off the record by capillary action.
So things aren't left to air dry.
78
Theater Music/Donald M. Spoto
74 Jazz & Blues
Tape & Turntable/Bert Whyte
Audio in General
Discwasher-the superior record
4
Audioclinic/Joseph Giovanelli
cleaner is at Audio Specialists world
wide.
6
Tape Guide/Herman Burstein
10
14
Behind the Scenes/Bert Whyte
Audio ETC/Edward Tatnall Canby
58 Advertising Index
80
Classified
EDITOR Eugene Pitts Ill
PUBLISHER Jay L. Butler
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Edward Tatnall Canby
MARKETING DIRECTOR Sanford L. Cahn
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Bert Whyte
DESIGN Janet Lee
ASSISTANT EDITOR Charles Graham
CIRCULATION MANAGER Jean Davis
ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Peggy Bicknell
Contributing Editors: Herman Burstein, Martin Clifford, Fred De Van, Leonard Feldman,
Martha Sanders Gilmore, Joseph Giovanelli, Richard C. Heyser, Bascom H. King, C.G.
McProud, B.V. Pisha, Alexander Rosner, Donald M. Spoto, George W. Tillett.
AUDIO (title registerd U.S. Pat. Off.)
Frank Nemeyer, and lay
L.
is published monthly by North American Publishing Co., Irvin J. Borowsky, President;
Butler, Vice Presidents; R. Kenneth Baxter, Vice President/Production: Nate Rosenblatt, Promotion
Director; Mary Claffey, Circulation Director.
RATES-United States only: 1 year for $7.00, 2 years for $12.00, 3 years for $17.00; outside the U.S.: 1 year for $9.00, 2 years for
$16.00, and 3 years for $23.00. Printed in U.S.A. at Columbus, Ohio. All rights reserved. Entire contents copyrighted 1975 by
North American Publishing Co. Second class postage paid at Philadelphia, Pa. and additional mailing office. Back issues, $2.00
each.
REGIONAL SALES OFFICES: Jay
L.
Butler, Publisher and Sanford
L.
Cahn, Marketing Director,
41 East
42nd St., New York, N.Y.
10017, telephone (212) 687-8924.
lay Martin, 2525 West 8th St., Los Angeles, California, 90057, telephone (213) 385-2917.
REPRESENTATIVES: Continental Europe: John Ashcraft, 12 Bear St., Leicester -Square, London W.C.2, telephone 930-0525.
For Benelux and Germany. W.I.M. Saunders, Mgr., Herengracht 365. Amsterdam, Holland, telephone 24.09.08.
Japan: Japan Printing News Co., Ltd., No. 13.2 Chome Ginza Higasi, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, telephone 541-5795.
AUDIO Editorial and Publishing Offices,
134 N. 13th St.,
Philadelphia, Penna. 19107
Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to the above address
Discwasher INc.
909 University, Columbia, Mo. 65201
www.americanradiohistory.com
In the beginning there was
foldedhornbassreflexacoustiC Suspension.
And now 131C VENTURI
For about 40 years, speaker designers
have been juggling the characteristics they
wanted from speakers: Compact size, high
efficiency, high power -handling, and deep
ranging, pure, clean, gut -reaction bass.
They tried folded horns:efficient,
clean, good power -handling, but too
large for most homes, quite expensive. They tried the bass reflex:
Efficient, compact, but limited by
uneven, one -note bass. Ditto the
labyrinth,but far less efficient.
Today's favorite,the acoustic
suspension: Compact, smooth,
deep -ranging bass.. But inefficient (requiring costly,highpowered amplifiers)and limited
dynamic range.
A virtue here,a virtue there
-- but all with corresponding
compromises.
Ironically, the principle
that combines these objectives
into one compact cabinet has been
around for some 180 years: The
VENTURI principle of fluid motion
transformation, reapplied in a form
better suited to acoustics (patents
pend). Our simplified diagram shows
how the scientifically formulated VENTURI
coupled path functions as a step-up transformer. Up to 140 times more bass energy
comes from the duct than comes directly frcm
the woofer. And bass is reinforced broadly
over the low frequency spectrum, not at a
single "tuned" frequency.
The BIC VENTURI coupled path also
operates as a low pass acoustic filter,
cleansing harmonics and distortion components from the bass waves. So, the bass not
only goes down further and is louder, it's
cleaner and more natural. And requires a
fraction of amplifier power of other
speakers of comparable size and performance.
Yet, even though BIC VENTURIS need less
amplifier power, they can handle more.This
new principle eliminates compromises in
cone, suspension and magnetic design to
"match" cabinet characteristics.
Above the woofer, you can see our midrange. To match the exceptional high
efficiency of the bass section, we had to
invent a new horn, combining two different
types of flare, conical and exponential,
BICONEX' (pats pend). It provides wide,
smooth dispersion in both horizontal and
Check No.
9
vertical planes, so placement in the home
won't be critical. BICONEX covers the full
midrange to well beyond 15,000 Hz without
crossover network interruptions, for
distortion -free, smooth response.
Our super tweeter handles just
a half octave from 15,000
to over 23,000 Hz. While
you can't hear single
frequency tones in that
range, thé accuracy of
musical "timbre"
depends upon those frequencies being added in
proper proportion to
the complex tones you
do hear. An important
subtlety.
Because you hear
less bass and treble at
low and moderate levels,
we built a DYNAMIC TONAL
COMPENSATION circuit
(patents pending)
into the speaker. It
adjusts speaker frequency response
pressure output changes,
sound
as
automatically. Amplifier "loudness contour"
controls can't do that. Result: aurally
"flat" musical reproduction always, regardless of volume control settings.
Our Formula 2 is the most efficient
speaker system of its size, yet can be used
with amplifiers rated up to 75 watts per
channel! Formula 4 has deeper bass and can
be used with amplifiers up to 100 watts.
Formula 6, the most efficient, will handle
125 watts. The Formula 1, newest and
smallest model, handles up to 50 watts and
needs only a few watts input for clean,
high level sound. Hear them at franchised
BFC VENTURI dealers. Or write for brochure:
BRITISH INDUSTRIES CO. ,Westbury, N.Y. 11590,
Div.of Avnet,Inc.
B1C VENTURI
on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
000
Audioclinic
Joseph Giovanelli
Muting Prob-
an auditorium with few people in it let
the vocals over -ride the instruments
Q. When the tonearm on my record changer comes down on a rehear a thump in my right
cord,
speaker only. Otherwise the changer
performs well. Could this noise be
caused by a bad ground on my cartridge or improperly grounded changer frame?-William Hernandez,
when similar music played in a crowded auditorium tends to submerge the
vocals under the instruments?-Mel
Burgess, Oakville, Ontario, Canada.
A. When an auditorium is empty,
sound is reflected from one wall to
the other, and from floor to ceiling
(and back) unless appropriate acoustic treatment has been applied. The
sound produced in such an area is
often harsh and unpleasant, with
highs which are too strong. Under
these conditions, singers' voices may
be projected clearly and very up
Record Changer
lem
1
FPO, Spain.
A.
do not believe your thump
problem relates to grounding. When
grounding problems develop, they
usually produce hum and/or lowI
The Cookbook is a free booklet of
simple test procedures for anyone
with a basic technical background.
The audio specialist too will find
the procedures provide new timesaving ways to spec and troubleshoot audio amplifiers. With the
Cookbook procedures and a
moderately -priced 5L4N Spectrum
Analyzer you can spec, troubleshoot,
and produce graphic results like
those shown. We'll be happy to mail
you a free copy of this valuable
booklet. Write Tektronix, Inc., Box
500A, Beaverton, Oregon 97077.
In Europe, write Tektronix Limited,
P.O. Box 36, St. Peter Port,
Guernsey, Channel Islands.
ered signal.
Record changers usually have a
muting system designed to prevent
any sound produced by the cartridge
from being audible during the change
cycle. This muting system should
come into play just before the tone arm lifts from the surface of the disc
and continue until just after the stylus has set down on the next record.
The purpose of the muting is to
eliminate the annoying thumps associated with the lifting and landing of
the stylus. Besides being annoying,
this thump is potentially damaging to
some speakers used with high-powered amplifiers. Because you hear a
thump on just one channel, at the
time of stylus set -down, it's apparent
that the muting contacts are not
working in this particular channel.
This could result from oxidation of
the contacts, or being bent so they just
don't make physical contact. You'll
need to trace this down visually. Often careful examination underneath
the chassis will reveal the trouble and
permit its repair. In some cases you'll
have to get a service manual from the
manufacturer, or take the changer to
a repair dealer.
Changes in Auditorium Acoustics
Q. Why does dance music played in
About The Cover: Spring is just
around the corner, and we
thought that you might like to
see the current crop of phono
cartridges in our garden.
TEKTRONIX
committed to
technical excellence
Check No. 37 on Reader Service Card
front.
When the auditorium is filled, the
people act as sound absorbers. Under these conditions the sound does
not reflect as much as it did when the
room was empty. Because highs are
more readily absorbed than lows, the
crispness of the singer's voice tends to
get lost, placing the voice further
down in the mix.
Repairing Cracked Speaker Cones
Q. I have a 12 -in., high -efficiency
speaker which has a crack in the cone
extending 2 in. from the outer rim
toward the center. Can I repair this
crack without completely ruining the
speaker's performance?-P.G. Ruuth,
North Highland, Calif.
A. If a speaker cone is cracked but
not badly torn, repair is relatively simple, and will not degrade the performance of the speaker greatly.
Cut a piece of onion skin paper just
a bit wider and longer than the crack
in the cone. Place a bit of glue, such as
Elmer's, both on the cone and on the
patching strip. Accurately align the
strip over the crack. Place a finger
under the cone to support it gently
while you smooth the paper down.
When the glue hardens the repair is
complete.
If you have a problem or question on audio, write to
Mr. Joseph Giovanelli, at AUDIO, 134 North
Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. All letters
answered. Please enclose
addressed envelope.
are
a
stamped, self-
AUDIO MARCH,
4
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
Before you buy a manual turntable,
consider what"manual" really means.
"Manual" means more than just "single play"
Every time you play a record, you Must pick up the
tonearm and move it to the record. And at the end of
play, you must stop whatever you're doing, go to the
turntable and return the tonearm to its resting post.
All by hand.
Not only is this inconvenient, it's also risky, because the business end of a
tonearm is virtually weightless. Handling it without
damage to the delicate stylus
and your fragile records
takes a very steady hand.
What about
the automatic's extra
moving parts?
An advantage often
assumed for the manual
turntable is simplicity: few
moving parts. The automatic
turntable does have additional parts, but they serve
only to move the tonearm to
and from the record when
cycling. During play, a fully
automatic Dual turntable.has no more moving parts
than a manual: motor, platter and drive system.
What's more, every manual turntable requires
one additional moving part that no Dual ever
requires: you.
Why many manual turntable owners
switched to Dual.
From warranty cards, we know that many Dual
owners formerly owned manual turntables and
switched to enjoy Dual's quality performance plus
fully -automatic convenience and safety.
For many years, more audio
experts- hifi editors, engineers
and record reviewers-have
owned Duals than any other make of quality
turntable. So have the readers of the leading
music/equipment magazines. Certainly no group is
more concerned about record protection and the
quality of music than these people.
Even the lowest
priced Dual, model 1225, at
$129.95 has more precision
than you are ever likely to
need. As for the highestpriced Dual, the $400
electronic, direct -drive
model 701, test reports have
been extraordinary. Most
independent test labs
acknowledge that its rumble,
wow and flutter are below
the measuring capability of
their test equipment.
A word for those
who still think they
want to play manually.
Despite all the above,
you may still prefer to play
your records manually.
The Dual tonearm gives you
this option, because it is as free-floating during play
as any manual -only tonearm. Thus you can always
place it on the record or lift it off-manually.
However, we predict that you will soon take
full advantage of the convenience and security of
Dual's full automation. Which is what most Dual
owners prefer.
And considering what kind of
people own Duals, that's something
Dual
you really should consider.
The multi -play automatic Dual 1229Q, $259.95; Other multi -play
automatics from $129.95. All less base and dust cover.
Single-play automatics are the Dual 601, $270; and the electronic
direct-drive Dual 701, $400. Both include base and dust cover.
Check No. 38 on Reader Service Card
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United Audio Products
120 So. Columbus Ave.,
Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 10553
Exclusive U.S. Distribution Agency for Dual
Why not get
all the music
you paid for?
You've built your music library with
a critical ear and a good amount
of money.
Have you considered that your
present amplifier might be shortchanging your listening with elements of distortion and hum or
noise?
You're entitled to pure unadulterated music ... the original. Nothing more, nothing less.
And this is the whole idea of the
Crown DC -300 A.
"Like lifting a curtain" was how
one Crown owner described his
experience.
Why not get an amplifier that gives
you all the music in your collection, but no more than that!
Make this simple comparison:
(1)
Listen with a critical ear to
your favorite recording at
home; then
(2) Listen to that same recording
with a DC -300 A at your Crown
dealer.
We rest our case on your ears!
Power output: 155 watts/channel
min. Riv1S into 8 ohms stereo. 300
watts min. RMS into 16 ohms mono,
over a bandwidth of 1-20,000 Hz, at
a rated distortion of 0.05%. Intermodulation distortion less than
0.05%, 0.01 watt to rated output,
into 8 ohms stereo, 16 ohms mono.
Is Crown crazy?
To guarantee parts and
labor, and pay for roundtrip shipping for three full
years. (We'll even send you
a shipping carton if you
didn't save yours.) That
takes nerve ... and faith in
your product!
Tape Guide
Herman Burstein
Tape Deck Options
Q. I have a KLH Model 41 tape deck
which has been modified to use the
Scotch Dynarange series of tapes.
This was done according to factory
specifications by a qualified technician. The deck works perfectly with
Dynarange tape. My question is:
What other tapes will it work equally
well with, if any? I am particularly
interested in your opinion about how
it would perform with the new
BASF low -noise, high -output tape,
TKD-SD tape, and Sony SLH-180.
Do all of these tapes require approximately the same bias setting? Is
it the same setting I now have after
the Modification for DynarangeP I
realize the real test is to try them,
but that can get expensive.-E. W.
Hodges, Newark, Del.
A. Conventional tapes of various
brands require very nearly the same
bias
for optimum performance.
Similarly, low -noise tapes require
nearly the same bias as each other,
although somewhat different bias
than conventional tapes (low -noise
tapes require somewhat more bias).
In order for one manufacturer to compete with others making the same
general kind of tape, he cannot afford
to require substantially different
bias. On the other hand, for fine
adjustment of a tape machine in
order to extract the most out of it in
terms of good performance (flat
frequency response, high signal-tonoise ratio, and low distortion), bias
may have to be adjusted slightly from
one brand of tape to another. In other
words, for a given kind of tape, one
setting should do pretty well for most
brands of tape.
At Crown, reliability is a way
of life. Long life ... with you.
If you have
High Frequency Loss
crown
WHET LISTEnInG BECOMES Rll RRT.
per month over a four-year period,
and have cleaned the heads about
every two months with isopropyl
alcohol. However, I never demagnetized the heads until very recently.
During the past year I have noticed a
loss volume and a loss of high frequencies, usually in one channel,
but sometimes in both. I again
cleaned the unit, which didn't help;
then I checked the circuitry and the
alignment instructions accompanying the recorder, which didn't help
either. Finally I decided that demagnetizing was the factor that I had
overlooked. Furthermore, l read about
"wet demagnetizing"
with tape
head cleaner and decided to try that.
The results were marvelous. But, alas,
these good results were very short
lived. On repetition of cleaning and
demagnetization, I found that the
improved sound quality would last
only about 10 to 30 seconds before
deterioration again set in.-Stephen
R. Snow, Eugene, Or.
A. It may be that you are operating
your machine too soon after cleaning
your heads, so that the still -wet heads
are picking up tape oxide. The resultant slight spacing between the tape
and the heads (specifically the playback head) causes high frequency
loss. More likely, the problem lies
in a worn head, with too wide a gap.
Therefore head replacement is indicated. You should take your machine
to an authorized service, agency,
unless you have the technical competency and necessary test instruments
yourself.
a Uher 24 Special (Model
America, I believe). I have
played it an average of 5 to 10 hours
Q.
I
have
9000 in
a problem or question on tape recording,
write to Mr. Herman Burstein at AUDIO, 134 North
Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. All letters
answered. Please
addressed envelope.
are
enclose
a
stamped,
AUDIO MARCH,
6
Check No. 10 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
self-
1975
stereo deck...
Play pre-recorded tapes,
or make them yourself
taiored to your specific
tastes, your changing
moods.
3
-
a 4 -channel deck...
Enjoy ;he exciting world
cf true 4 -channel sound
four discrete tracks on
tape.
-
Z£,AC
FE
7\\
a
4 -track Simul-sync
recorder...
if you play a musical
instrument, or know
someone who does, take
'all advantage of the
4-234.)'s music making
apublities. With Simulsync, you can record
each part of the tune,
one track at a time,
n synchronization, until
ill of the music is the
besth mnbe.
superb machine for
only 5739.50...
No natter how you use
the A-2340 to learn, to
crea E, to enjoy you can
count on using it for a
Long time. It was made to
withs-,and the paces you'll
put it through. And that's
as it should be.
We ,gladly invite
comparisons, and we'd
like you to hear the
A-2:340, to operate it
yowselL You'll find that
our retailers are well
informed and helpful in
general, rare qualities
so there can't be many of
them You can find the
one nearest you by calling
180(1¡ 447-4700? We'll pay
for the call.
a
- -
T EAC
The leader. Always l -as been.
*In Illinois,
TEAL- Corporation of Ame.rica,7:33te egraph Road, Morc.ebello, California 90640.
www.americanradiohistory.com
cal_ (800) 322-4400.
www.americanradiohistory.com
Our new series is
so advanced,we expect our
irrst customers to be
Audio Research & Grown.
They'll haul it back to their labs.
it.And play with it. And in
general, examine it to pieces to find
out How We Did It.
Sony's Vertical Field Effect
And play
Transistors: What our
competitors are eating their
hearts out about.
It'sa shame the term "state of the
art" has been worn ragged n dozens
of "This is It, this is finally and really
It" stereo ads. Because anyone in the
busi ness wi tell you that V-FET's are
the biggest thing since the invention
of thevacuum tube. V-FET's combine
all of the advantages of both triode
vacuum tubes and conventional
transistors. With none of Their disadvantages.
But nobody else can take advantage of these.advantages yet. Ask
anybody else how their V-=ET's are
coming. The responses will range
from a forthright and candid "we're
working on it," tö an equaly forthright and candid "buzz off:"Sony is
the first company in the world making commercially available equipment with V-FET's. A power-amp.and
integrated amp.
Herewith a partial and oversimplified explanation of just what
in the world we're talking about.
Triode vacuum tubes:
Pros and cons.
To belabor the obvious for a
moment, in amplifiers, the name of
thegame is distortion. And until now
triode vacuum tubes have yielded`
the lowest levels around. That's because of their non -saturating voltage
versus current characteristics. Also,
they do not suffer from carrier storage effect (which is standard equipment with regular transistors, and
causes notch distortion and deterioration in transient response).
So much for the good points of
tubes. They also tend to be inefficient, begin to deteriorate as soon as
you use them, and wear out. Their
high impedance characteristics general ly require an output transformer
to drive the speakers. And there's no
way you can set up a true complementary circuit with vacuum tubes,
so there's no way you can get true
wave form symmetry.
I I
®1975 Sony Corp.of America. Sony, 9
W.
marked tendency toward thermal
runaway (which is a fancy way of
saying they try to self-destruct).
V-FET's: All pros. And that's
no con.
First off, V-FET's are very reliable, very efficient and last almost
forever. They also match the highly
defined tonal cual ity previously provided only by vacuum tubes. V-FET's
don't become satu rated with current.
But at the same time, they protect
themselves as temperatures build
up. So there's no possibility of thermal runaway. Their low impedance
c h a ra cte r i s c s mean no output
transformer (the less gizmos in the
circuit, the better the sound). The
use of V-FET's allows for better control of negative feedback, making
the amp more stable.-V-FET's don't
have carrier storage effect to cause
switching lag. And you can use
V-FET's to build a true complemeni
Harmonic distortion components.
The wave of the
Conventional Transistor
of the past.
Transistor switching lag.
future.
The lack of lag with V-FET's.
One reason nearly everyone will be
switching to V-FET's.
Conventional Bi -polar
transistors: Pros and cons.
The advantages of bi -polar transistors can be dealt within a sen-
tence. They're very reliable, very
efficient and last almost forever.
But there are a number of bugs in
the ointment.
Bi -polar transistors can become
saturated with current. And they all
cause switching lag distortion. To
obtain acceptably low levels of distortion, plus wide frequency response, you need to pump in a lot of
negative feedback. Which can make
the amp unstable.
Plus (at no extra charge), as they
heat up, bi -polar transistors have a
57 St., N.Y., N.Y.10019. SONY is a trademark of Sony Corp.
www.americanradiohistory.com
tary circuit, thus obtaining true
wave form symmetry. And isn't that
what it's really all about?
One more thing. We'd be less than
forthright and candid if we didn't
admit that our new amplifiers are a
bit pricey. As much as $1300 a piece.
At Sony, we've always maintained that, in the end, the best way
to buy equipment is to hear it for
yourself. So we're making what's
probably the best offer you've ever
heard. Haveyour dealer hook up our
new V FET equipment against anything made by anybody. If we sound
sure of ourselves, we are.
And we're sure yourown ears will
tell you we've got the best sound
you've ever heard.
SONY®
Check No. 65 on Reader Service Card
Behind The Scenes
Bert Whyte
MONTH
reported on the
audio press junket arranged by
Philips and AKG, and covered
some of the interesting new developments we were shown at the Philips
facilities in Eindhoven. The second
half of our trip was through the courtesy of the AKG company, and early
on a Sunday morning we flew from
Amsterdam to Vienna where AKG is
headquartered.
Once installed in our hotel, those
who had the stamina were free to explore the historical sights and to soak
up the gemütlicheit of the living
monument that is Vienna. The last
time was in Vienna just happened to
be the day after the Russian occupation of the city ended, and a tearful,
joyful populace was celebrating.
There was still quite a bit of damage
from the bombing and shelling of the
war, but as was apparent to our press
group on the occasion of this visit, a
major proportion of Vienna's historical buildings and landmarks had miraculously escaped destruction.
must say that AKG really went "all
out" in entertaining us. Early Sunday
evening a group of AKG executives
met us at our hotel and invited our
press group to climb into an assembly
of 18 horse-drawn open carriages, and
then this procession was given a tour
through the streets and byways of
Vienna. Of course,
gave my most
gracious "Queen Elizabeth 2nd" hand
waves to the people lining our route,
as we wended our way into the cobblestone courtyard of the Palais
Schwarzenberg. Our group was escorted into a reception room, a great
high-ceilinged place aglitter with
crystal chandeliers, the gleam of parquet floors, hung with rich tapestries
and paintings, and in one corner,
standing fully 8 -ft. tall, one of those
incredible blue and white porcelain
stoves so reminiscent of the Hapsburg era. A bar was at one end of the
room and while we enjoyed our
champagne and orange juice (very
"in" and very European!), we were
formally introduced to our hosts.
Feeling that we had somehow be LAST
I
I
I
I
come a part of a typical Viennese
operetta, we made our way into an
opulent dining room, and as we
started on our delicate smoked
sturgeon with whipped cream/horseradish sauce, we heard the Third Man
Theme, played on the zither by none
other than the composer, Anton
Karas. At the conclusion of our superb
dinner, Dr. Gorike, the head of AKG
gave us a welcoming speech and an
outline of our activities in the technical aspects of our visit.
AKG-Akustische and Kino -Gerate
GmbH-was founded some 29 years
ago by Dr. R. Gorike and Herr E. Pless
for the production of film projectors
(that's the Kino in the company
name). In their work a need arose for
a microphone which would record in
one direction while discriminating
against the unwanted background
noise of the projector. Thus in 1953,
they marked the AKG D-12 cardioid
dynamic microphone which quickly
established AKG's reputation as a
manufacturer of high -quality microphones.
From that point on, microphones
became the principal product of AKG.
Mass production methods were
developed to produce high -quality
dynamic microphones at a reasonable price and their types D-11, D-19,
D-24 and D-119 became a familiar
sight in recording studios throughout
the world. Early on, AKG did pioneering work in the manufacture of condenser microphones, one of the most
famous being the C-12, which featured remote control change of pickup patterns. As manufacturers of electro -mechanical transducers, it was
only natural that AKG would undertake the production of headphones,
many high -quality types
emerged, including back in 1959, the
first "open -aire" types, which are now
becoming so popular.
and
In the ensuing years, AKG has become one of the best-known manufacturers of dynamic and condenser
microphones. Their latest dynamic
microphone, the D-200, has created
great interest because of its unusual
is known as a "two-way"
cardioid as it employs separate high frequency and low -frequency diaphragms and a crossover network, as
in many loudspeaker systems. In the
field of condenser microphones the
model C-414 is quite versatile with
design. It
patterns switchable from omnidirectional, carioid, hyper-cardioid,
and figure eight. The C-451 is a whole
system of condenser mikes with the
mike handle containing an FET preamplifier, and accepting seven interchangeable "capsules" of different
pick-up patterns. The same system has
now become available with electret
capsules.
With growth has come diversity,
and AKG is in the fields of digital
delay, artificial reverberation, and ultrasonic transducers. The company
holds over 600 patents in electro acoustics. More than 750 people are
employed by AKG, and they have
expanded to facilities in Munich, London, and Zurich. As mentioned last
month, AKG products are marketed
in the U.S. by North American Philips
Co.
On
a
Monday morning,
a
half-hour
bus ride brought our group to the
AKG factory. There we met a number
of the AKG engineers and scientists,
including Chief Engineer W. Fidi, and
inspected some of the extensive research facilities. Then with the aid of
AKG marketing director Herr H.
Schnabel, Herr Fiki, and several other
engineers, we all sat down to a sort of
AKG products symposium and "interchange of ideas" conference.
With AKG's involvement in electromechanical technology, it wasn't too
surprising when it was announced
that they were entering into the
manufacture of phonograph cartridges. Sometime during 1975, a full
line of magnetic cartridges will be
introduced, including a special model
for the CD -4 quadradisc. A thorough
briefing on the special qualities of
various AKG microphones followed,
in preparation for the next day's inspection of the production facilities.
Following this we were shown the
AUDIO MARCH,
10
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
1974
c
ing prevents
any discernible
record wear.
Every Empire
long-playing cartridge
is fully shielded with 4
poles, 4 coils and 3 magnets
(more than any other brand).
Empire's new
wide response
4000D *series phono
cartridge features our
exclusive "4
Dimensional"
diamond
stylus tip.
This phenomenal
cartridge
TM
will
track any record below 1
gram and trace all the way
For a free
to 50,000 Hz. Guide to Sound
Design write to:
EMPIRE SCIENTIFIC CORP.
Empire's "4
Garden City,
Dimensional"'
diamond has a
N.Y.11530.
MEMBER
UHF
0.1 mil radius of
engagement yet
the very low force
required for track -
INSTITUTE OF
HIGH FIDELITY
8VI'IFE
Mfd. U.S.A.
* Plays any 4 channel system perfectly. Plays stereo even better than before.
Check No. 13 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AKG digital -delay system, which is
somewhat similar to the Blesser and
Eventide units in the U.S. The main
thrust here is in retaining the per-
formance of the device, while making
a most determined effort to reduce
the cost of the unit. There is a very
compelling reason for this, as you will
see a bit later on. After a break for
lunch at the charming medieval -style
inn, not far from the AKG plant, it was
back to our conference.
The afternoon was devoted almost
entirely to a discussion and demonstration of the AKG BX-20 reverberation device, including its use in some
unusual applications. At the risk of
offending some of the AKG microphone people, this BX-20 demonstration was, in my opinion, the highlight
of the AKG visit.
Let me preface this description of
the BX-20 by stating that it is in essence a coil spring reverb device,
even if it is rather euphemistically
called a "torsion transmission line" or
TTL. Such devices have been absolute
anathemas to me, as any have ever
heard have been plagued by the curse
of the characteristic "boinngggg"
coloration of sound they produce.
Needless to say, such spring reverb
units have not found favor with professional recording engineers. However, it turned out that the BX-20 was
a new breed of spring reverb, since in
several hours of listening to it, none of
us could detect even a smidgin of the
"boinnggg" coloration.
The BX-20 is designed to be a portable unit and consists of three main
I
parts... the electro -mechanical
reverb unit proper, the electronic circuits, and the elastic support.
The BX-20 is a two -channel unit
with independent control of decay
time of each channel. Thus, it can be
used for stereo or mono recording.
The length of the spring is 47.2 inches
as calculated for the desired delay
time. To make the spring fit into a
reasonable size enclosure, the spring
has been bent twice. At each end of
the spring are moving coil systems.
Each moving coil consists of two coils
which have a rigid mechanical connection between them and which
vibrate in a strong magnetic field. The
signal to be reverbed is fed into one
half of the coils and picked up by the
other. There are mechanical dampers
inserted at specially calculated intervals along the coil spring. On plug-in
printed circuit boards are an input
amplifier, output amplifier, and two
attenuation amplifiers for each
channel. The two springs with the
magnet systems and various supporting systems are mounted in a rigid
cardboard tube which is filled with
porous foam material. The tube is
mounted on a single -point pendulum
suspension, whose natural resonance
is below 1 Hz. The whole unit is
mounted inside a strong wooden box,
with
additional sound insulating
material.
The "dry" signal to be reverbed is
fed in phase to each moving coil half
on the ends of the spring. The reverberated signal is picked up by the two
remaining coil halves, amplified, and
connected in opposite phase. Motional feedback is used in the attenuation amplifiers permitting the variation of decay continously from 2 to 4.5
seconds in each channel. Because the
amplifiers are controlled by a d.c.
voltage, remote control is possible.
Input and output levels of the amplifiers are plus 6 dB, with an input
impedance of 1 k ohms and an output impedance of 50 ohms.
Okay...so what is different about
these spring reverb units that prevents the "boinnggg" coloration of
the signal?
The secret is in the preparation of
the spring wire itself. By a special
"denting" process, the wire
is
"etched" and thus
has thousands of
along its length. As
discontinuities
much as 20 percent of the wire
material is removed during this process which reduces the mass of the
wire, which is an aid in the propagation of higher frequencies. Below 1
kHz, the individual turns of the spring
are deformed by bending parts of the
coils toward the spring axis. Selection
of the turns that are to be deformed is
done statistically, so that along the
length of the spring some coils are
quite stretched and elongated, while
at other intervals, some coils are considerably compressed. All of this is in
aid of maximum non-homogeniety of
the surface of the wire, which permits a high degree of statistical diffusion in frequency and time
domains. In other words, for the production of as non -coherent a sound as
possible. The system works and not
only is the "boinggg" eliminated but
the reverb itself has an exceptionally
natural character akin to a good
chamber.
Having briefed us on the BX-20, the
AKG engineers took us into an adjoining room, where there was a
typical stereo system set up in front of
several rows of chairs. However, in
addition to the pair of Tannoy
speakers up front, there was another
pair in the rear of the room, facing
forward.
The demonstration began with the
playing of a record of Bruckner's 7th
Symphony, in straight stereo through
the front speakers. Nice enough, but
nothing spectacular. Then the same
recording, plus 30 milliseconds of
delay through the AKG digital delay
unit to the rear speakers. Aha! A very
considerable improvement
in
acoustic perspective. Next, the same
recording, sans digital delay, but with
about 2.5 seconds decay through the
BX-20 unit to the rear speakers. A different perspective, but interesting
and much preferable to straight
stereo. Finally, the same recording,
plus the 30 mS digital delay, plus the
2.5 seconds decay through the BX-20.
WOW!! This was sensational. It is by
now a cliche, but the walls of the
room did indeed seem to "fall away,"
giving a tremendously enhanced
"concert hall" perspective to the
sound. This was pseudoquadraphony
of a very high order, and it was hard to
believe that a stereo recording could
be processed to achieve such a
thrilling and very desirous sound.
Why, this could revitalize even the
oldest of stereo recordings.
Ah, well! A great sound, but the
digital delay unit is expensive (and
now you know why AKG is so anxious
to reduce its cost) the BX-20 is over
$3500, and that makes the whole thing
"blue sky," right? Well, friends, not
entirely. After this demonstration, the
AKG engineers flipped us by handing
around a very junior version of the
reverb spring, and calmly stating that
it was the prototype of a consumer
version, to sell for "around $300." To
be sure, it would have a restricted
decay, on the order of 1.8 to 2.4
seconds, but that would be enough to
do the trick. There already exists a 6X10, with essentially the same performance as the larger unit but simpli-
and with some frills
removed...and at half the price!
fied
expect to have one of these AKG
reverb units before long, which will
combine with my UREI Cooper Time
Cube acoustic delay line (At least
hope it can be used!), and see if can
come up with that great sound heard
in Vienna.
The following day we visited the
I
I
I
I
microphone production facilities at
AKG and were impressed with how
many parts such as diaphragms,
moving coil assemblies, miniature
transformers, etc. are made with such
precision, many on proprietary
machines designed for these fabrications. It was apparent that mass production of high -quality micro -hones
requires very specialized facilities.
That final evening, we were driven
over 80 miles north west of Vienna, to
the medieval town of Durnstein,
where we enjoyed cocktails on a bluff
overlooking the Danube, and then a
superb dinner in the Refktorium,
amid much wine and good fellowship. The people of AKG were great
hosts, who did themselves proud in
the best tradition of Viennese
hospitality. We learned a great deal,
under the most pleasant auspices. O'
AUDIO MARCH,1975
12
www.americanradiohistory.com
co PA
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Name
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A3
Audio ETC
Edward Tatnall Canby
IHAVE been saying for years that the
business of audio is music. In the
home, at least, 95 percent of our
audio is music in spite of a respectable area held down by recorded
speech. The other day, then,
received a recording of music with a
note enclosed from the Editor of a
well-known audio publication saying
"This is a must review Gene." Of
course played it toute de suite. And
in two shakes of a stylus' tail knew
that it merited much more than a
mere mention. Or even a mere reI
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view.
The disc
is entitled, with classical
simplicity, Portsmouth Sinfonietta
Plays Popular Classics, licensed to Columbia by an English outfit called
Transatlantic Records, Ltd. A sober
black jacket with color photo of the
Sinfonietta indicates what you might
expect, a proper classical offering.
Unless you happened to notice, as
did, a dim Columbia K designation-KC 33049-in the upper left
corner. K (in place of M for Masterworks) could mean Special Show
Stuff? A hint that perhaps more than
meets the eye is about to assault the
virgin ear. A closer look at the photo
said even more-but more on that in
a moment.
If I may say so, the British taste in
popular classics is rather more restricted than our own, tending towards such amiable chestnuts as Peer
Gynt (Hall of the Mountain King, etc.),
The Nutcracker, Air for the G String
(early pornography?), the Blue Danube, all of which appear on this disc.
In addition there are some foreshortened arrangements, elements of the
I
Fifth
Symphony,
a
fragment from
Holst's The Planets (astrology to the
fore) and ha! an eye and an ear for
2001-the ominous opening of
Also
Sprach Zarathustra. Not the first disc
to capitalize on that film classic. All in
all, a rather tame repertory for a Sinfonietta. One might have anticipated
at least an early Mozart, a bit of Henry
Purcell and a few of Vivaldi's Seasons.
Let us not beat further about the
bush. Put stylus demurely to this disc,
side 1 band 1 (Peer Gynt), and presently the most appalling noise you
have ever heard sails loudly out of
your loudspeakers, whether by two or
by four. How can I describe? Thirtytwo classical players here, if count
'em rightly, and a representative of
every orchestral element of usual interest-each of them sounding precisely as it might if you sat down to an
oboe, a fiddle or a trombone, trumpet, horn, string bass, sax, viola, cello,
for the very first time, and barged
right in, all unafraid. And mean you,
the audio buff, not one of those
talented pop players who tosses off
solos on any of a dozen instruments
without half rehearsing. You, who
never before had a musical instruments in your hands. Or hardly ever.
There are the fiddles, ear-splitting
squeals, like a hundred alley cats at
two in the morning but much less
melodious. Cats with tails caught in
doors. Cats with sore throats and
hernias. Then, oboes, like a worn-out
automatic auto transmission about to
freeze into a solid lump. Sheer agony.
Oboes like sharp buzz saws. (Ed, the
jacket doesn't mention oboes. -Ed.)
And clarinets as strident as geese (the
analogy is close: a conical bore with
single reed and suppressed odd overtones). Screaming flutes, tromping
trombones, horny horns, trumpets ä
la cub scout. Plastered percussion,
pig -grunt string bass, oink oink. How
can
go on? And the whole of this
hopelessly, tantalizingly out of time
and, oh yes, o my yes, OUT OF TUNE.
So unbelievably out of tune that ran
to get me an onion to peel so I could
cry properly. Of these and other classical sounds, there are no less than an
interminable and unremitting eleven
cuts, two whole sides, in sure -enough
stereo. Enough to last a life time.
The most uncanny sound of all, in
all this cacaphony, is the occasional
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sweetness of
a genuine professional
note or two, right in the midst. suppose that a few legits were taken in to
keep a semblance of order which,
alas, there is, most of the time, more
or less. But the effect of those beauteous distillations of normal music in
such a situation is worse than manic, it
is maniac. How do they do it? And the
more think about it, how do any of
these performers do it? Not a bang
nor a whimper of audible laughter,
from start to finish. Self control, in respect to giggles and break-up, which is
simply beyond understanding. Deadpan seriousness. Not a muscle quivers anywhere. Just look at the picture on the album. No smiles. Not
one. That's precisely the way it
sounds, as though these young players were uncomprehending zombies
going through a sort of subhuman act,
in deadly earnest.
It is you, the listener, of course, who
will fall into pieces in seconds. You
will gasp, then gape, then pull in a
huge breath and dissolve into hysteria. Just try not to. And what is most astonishing is that-as you will see when
you look really closely at the Sinfonietta performers on the cover of the
album-this is a youth orchestra.
couldn't say whether they are still wet
behind the ears, since only two pairs
of ears are completely visible, one of
those a girl's. But the quantity of hair
per head and the paucity of male
bearditude indicates a teenage average. Also the green shoes, the fluorescent red socks, the blue pants, and
the open shirts. These, in a word, are
kids. With aplomb. So much so that
really wonder-are they faking it?
Could they, indeed? doubt it.
Oh yes,
have a few morals to
point.
think the most vital is that
here, astoundingly, is the obverse of
something we take entirely too much
for granted in life, and especially in
record listening-professional technique.
The trouble with so much of our
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AUDIO MARCH,
14
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
Capitol Records CalibratEs EvaluatEs
ApprovEs TEsts REpairs Quality Controls and
REViEWS with the Stanton 681 CartridgE SEriEs
The physical process of making phonograph records
for amateurs. It is a job for craftsmen of the highest
order, craftsmen who know exactly what they are doing.
Naturally, they need the precisely right tools to do the job.
In the case of Capitol Records, the highest quality
tools are employed throughout the process. That is why
Stanton 681 Calibration Standard Series Cartridges are
used, with various styli that are designed specifically for
each critical measuring and listening job.
It has proven to be a great advantage to Capitol
Records to standardize their entire operation with the
681 Series and three basic styli:
for cutting system check-outs.
The D6807A
for the most
The D6800EEE (our famous Triple -E)
is not
-
-
critical listening.
for tough nickel -plated "mothers".
The D6872AMC
The Stanton 681 Calibration Standard Series enjoys
almost universal acceptance throughout the Recording
-
Industry. After all, it was created in order to satisfy the
need for a cartridge of sufficient sophistication to be
used as a primary Calibration Standard in system checkouts for linearity and equalization. Stanton Magnetics
met this need by producing an "absolute" cartridge
standard ... stereo cartridges of such linearity and overall quality as to gain immediate acceptance within the
Recording and Broadcasting Industries.
The fact that Capitol has selected the Stanton 681
Calibration Standard Series for use throughout its operation is a testament to its quality.
All Stanton Calibration Standard Cartridges are guaranteed to meet specifications within exacting limits. Their
warranty comes packed with each unit ... the calibration
test results for that individual cartridge.
Whether your usage involves Recording, Broadcasting
or Home Entertainment, you can enjoy professional audio
quality with Stanton Products.
Write today for further information to Stanton Magnetics, Inc., Terminal Drive, Plainview, N. Y. 11803.
Check No. 24 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
sraNTon
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on your record Invest ment?
Your largest hi-fi investment will probably be in your record collection. Yet it is generally known that the quality of music you hear
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www.americanradiohistory.com
audio music is that it is so polished, so
pro, so utterly expert in performance
right down the (recorded) line, that
nine -tenths of our soft -bellied listeners haven't the slightest idea how
much sheer technique, what incredible skills go into those easy sounds
nor how many thousands and thousands of painstaking hours of practice stand behind each smoothly tailored phrase of music of whatever sort.
And to think that so much of it ends
up as musical wallpaper, elevator (lift)
music, background stuff-measured
by the yard or the minute, reduced to
the nearest approach to nothing
which ingenuity can devise. A crying
shame, always say, and what musician will disagree?
Now, in this recording, we have the
sound of music without technique,
and it is for most of us a revelation.
Who would know, otherwise? How
many of us, for instance, have tried
out an oboe or a clarinet or a trombone or a fiddle in person? Have you
heard a beginner at one of these?
Your own child? Well, at least you
know!
tried an oboe, just once. thought
it might be for me, if could manage.
Squawked like an old crow for a few
moments, and that was that. Also a
clarinet, on which, to my astonishment, produced nothing but a strangled hissing. When 'the thing finally
did speak, it gave such a realistic duck
jumped. And the reed
quack that
tickled my lips until sneezed. Like
many an amateur, ended up with a
recorder, on which could produce
some mildly pleasant sounds if the
music was slow enough. Great little
instrument for the frustrated. Flute?
As far as am concerned, it is merely
get steam
an animated steam pipe.
sounds out of the mouthpiece, nothing more, though go red in the face.
These things one must know and experience, before one can really appreciate what a musician can do when
he does things right. Trumpet? My
trumpet sounds exactly like my farmer neighbor's stud bull, come
spring. A real desperate sound and
very expressive, but not yet BeethI
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oven.
Curiously, this Portsmouth recording falls into an honorable British tradition of great age and popularity,
though in the U.S. it is rare. mean
performing humorously out of tune
and unlikely and unseemly sounds.
Perhaps the recent quintessence of
tfis was in the famed Hoffnung Festival recordings, which Angel took
down from live concerts that were
done up on a monumental scale before immense audiences. Remember
the concerto for vacuum cleaner
I
AUDIO MARCH,
signed up for a recorder ensemble
class and turned up bright one morning to play. Well, there were a dozen
or so ardent ladies with soprano recorders in hand and the instant the
got the giggles.
first piece started
Such an incredible squalling you
never heard (except thanks to Portsmouth). Each lady tuned her own, and
all of them were blissful. Things beat,
each instrument against the next, so
that the composite was a fiercely po-
the great horn player
Dennis Brain (or was it his father,
Aubrey?). You can still get these on
Angel. And then there are those Flanders & Swan things, and their successors of the sort; come to think of it,
the whole British "music hall" tradition comes straight from the same
aura of tunelessness and may be said
to have had a potent effect upon our
own musical comedy heroine, who
sings exactly the same way. Somehow, though, we don't double up
with laughter quite as quickly as the
British do at the hint of the musical
grotesque, the off -tune, off -beat parody. Peter Sellers. Even he. And maybe Ringo Starr, who sings so perfectly
off tune.
Now do call to mind a number of
similarly healthy excursions into atunality, serving to make precisely the
same point as do the inscrutable
youth players of Portsmouth. One
example, and no youth by a long shot,
was the cryptic diva, Florence Foster
Jenkins, who for many years gave
song recitals to piano accompaniment by a man with the unlikely name
of Moon, was it Cosmo Moon? Mr.
Moon played impeccable Schubert,
Brahms, Puccini, what have you, even
Mozart, on a very in -tune piano, a
visible and sonic picture of propriety.
Ms. Jenkins, though, first got herself
up in outlandish costumes, sometimes changed to match each piece,
and at the end of every number she
threw armsful of rosebuds into the
ecstatic audience then retrieved
them so she could toss them again.
But the singing was what mattered.
Such excruciating, incredible, abhose? With
I
tent brrrrr, ear-curdlingly treble. A
synthesizer with a dozen oscillators in
square wave might roughly approximate it. Needless to say, was frowned
upon, and as a matter of fact was
quite helpless because you simply
cannot giggle into a recorder. It
sounds like one of those whistle cutouts they put on mufflers of high
powered cars in the 1920s, ker-TWEET,
I
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TWEET, snort.
I
solutely astounding out-of-tunedness. that in itself it amounted to
sheer genius. Audiences instantly collapsed-but the lady seemed unaware, and sailed along as though
every note were the acme. Did she
know? Was it an act? Was she just
amiably insane? Nobody ever really
could tell, which was the best part. It
was all acutely, deliciously embarassing, and the more so for those who
held off, out of a false propriety, for
fear of offending. Not a chance! The
more they howled, the more she
beamed. And yet it was cruel in a way,
like making fun of a cripple. A final
monster concert was organized, with
every Beautiful Person who could be
dug up for the occasion, and the lady
died within the week, as remember.
Yes, she made a few scratchy 78
records. Some were once issued on an
RCA 10 -inch LP.
That deadpan act is what really gets
me. For, you see, have been in a few
ventures of this sort myself, directly or
indirectly. In the 1950s went to one
of those folk dance and recorder playing summer camps. Having learned a
bit of good music on the recorder,
I
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1975
An even worse occasion happened
found myself involved in a
when
performance of Haydn's Toy Symphony, before an audience. This little
piece is in fact a joke, though most ingenious, and there are even Toy -Symphony kits, furnished with tin horns
and one of those water -filled birds
that you blow into for a realistic gurgly bird song. They had them in the
18th century. When played soberly,
the music is delightful and funny-but
how to play it soberly? (Imagine the
recording sessions which have somehow got it down on LP. See catalogue.) OK when everything is 100
percent pro, on time and in tune. But
then the fun is minimal; it's much
nicer when the sounds are truly rustic, as Haydn so obviously intended.
He was a wise, gentle soul and fond of
humor, much less sadistic than the
younger Mozart, who wrote out horn
parts in wild colors for his horn playing friend and pencilled in unspeakable jokes at crucial points to break
the poor man up in performance.
Anyhow, came bravely on stage
with my performing friends and my
recorder and we started-you may
call it nerves but within three seconds
exploded with one of those loud
TWEET -snorts, and from that moment
on, try though would, could not
produce two notes in a row before
another explosion occurred. was totally undone. And so were the others,
was utmostly. It was a shambles.
terly remorseful, but what could do?
It takes an experienced and imperturbable pro to play an amateur part
of that sort. Maybe like these Portsmouth kids.
So go listen to Portsmouth and
more power to you. And do not ever
again forget (after you have recovered) what it means to play a musical
instrument well. Even for wallpaper
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music.
.O.
17
www.americanradiohistory.com
Introducing one of the
finest collections of stereo receivers
in the world: the MX1580.
Plower* of the Sony 7065. FM Sensitivity* of the Pioneer 338. Szleetivity* of the Sherwood 7900A.
Capture tatio* of the Marantz 2270. THU* of theJVC VR-5660.
Al specs s,ibjea to change wthout notice.
p;
Specs of compeitive reccvers elem from mandacturers own published data heets.
**-2,/lanufactureis suggested reta I
optional with dealer.
www.americanradiohistory.com
tion for output transistors and the
power transformer.
And a special speaker matrix
for surround-sound effects.
Plus lots m -e we were able
to include and, at $479.95**, save
you a few bucks in the bargain.
How? It wasn't easy. But we
had help.
srEPEO
The oldest new company
in the business.
And it almost didn't happen.
Before we designed the
MX 580, we asked ourselves a
simple question: "With so many
excellent AM/FM stereo receivers
around these days. who needs
another?"
The answer: nobody. Sc instead of making just "another"
receiver, we collected the most
significant specs and useful features
of five of the best, and "combined"
them in one: the MX 1580.
Of course, some of these five
receivers have features our one
doesn't have (we think you can
manage without two phono inputs,
for example).
But _hen, ours has features
they don't have: features you
shouldn't do without.
You pay for-and get-
what you really need.
The MX 1580 has exclusive
ASNC, which automatically reduces the noise level on weak
stereo stations without reducing
separation on strong ones.
And special thermal protec-
Although we're a completely
separate engineering group and
manufacturing facility, we were
able to draw on the resources of a
company that's been a leader in
:he industry since 1915. So we could
afford to wait until we had the
\IX 1580 right.
And now it's so right, we
insist that every single one be inspected twice before it's shipped.
(If your MX 1580 isn't right, our
final inspectors don't pass it. Or
ship it.) After all, we have one of
the world's finest stereo collections
to protect.
See and hear MX 2- and
4-channel receivers, speakers and,
automatic turntables at your MX
dealer. For his name, write to:
MX High -Fidelity Components
Ser:es, The Magnavox Company,
1700 Magnavox Way,
Fort Wayne, Ind. 46804.
OCL direct -coupled differential
amplifier for extended frequency
response and wide power
bandwidth.
Automatic Protection Circuit to
protect speakers and amplifiers.
Electronic loudness switch to
provide smooth low- and highfrequency boost at low listening
levels.
Extra -heavy heat sink to keep
output transistors cool at maximum
power.
Full complement of controls with
low noise pre -amp IC circuit.
High/low filter switches for
special high/low frequency attenuation effect.
Auto-cff power switch, when
used with MX automatic turntables, will automatically shut off
the system when the last record
is player.
*Specifications:
FM Tuner Section:
Usable sensitivity (IHF)
Selectivity (IHF)
Capture ratio (IHF)
Features:
Sensitive front-end with three
dual gate MOSFET's and 4 -gang
tuning capacitor.
Two 6-pole linear phase filters for
improved selectivity and phase
response.
High gain IC quadrature FM
detector.
Switchable signal-strength/
center-tuned meter for accurate
tuning.
Phase lock loop IC circuit for FM
stereo multiplex.
Computer designed low pass
audio filters for suppression of
ultrasonic frequencies.
Balanced AM detector for low
distortion AM 1_stening.
TM
We'll beor heard from..
Check No. 18
Reader Service Card
50dB signal to noise mono ..
Stereo separation @ lkHz
1.8uV
75dB
1.5dB
2.5uV
50dB
@ 10kHz
40dB
Harmonic Distortion:
0 2%
Mono
0.3%
Stereo.
97dB
Image rejection
94dB
Spurious rejection
45dB
AM suppression
AM Tuner Section:
Usable sensitivity (IHF) . 250uV/m
31dB
Selectivity (IHF)
Amplifier Section:
Cont_nuous power
Band
Distortion
Load
1M distortion
...
60 watts/Ch
20Hz-20kHz
0.5%THD
8 ohms
0.8%
Frequency response ..20Hz-25kHz
Dimensions
6"Hx 19"Wx15"D
30 lbs.
Weight
Veneer with
Constriction
grained walnut finish.
brushes in the unit when the records
are removed. When the brushes were
separated mechanically before
removing the record, the static charge
was not increased. The static charge
introduced on the records made with
the new RCA compound dissipated
within a minute or two.
Another device, the Staticmaster
500 (from Nuclear Products, P.O. Box
1178-A, El Monte, Calif. 91734), was
also checked for its advertised static reducing ability. Generally sold
through photographic stores, this
device combines a mildly radioactive
polonium element with a retractable
3 -in. wide brush. Ordinary stereo LPs
were used to test this device; they
were left for three days to accumulate dust and a quick check with the
electroscope before treatment
showed that they had a high static
charge. For use, the element should
be about one half inch from the
record and the bristles pointing
counterclockwise or against the mo-
22
tion of the disc on the turntable. After
treatment with the Staticmaster 500,
there was no measurable static charge
on the records and the brush was able
to do a moderately effective job of
removing dust from the surfaces as
seen under the microscope. While
this device was highly effective in
removing the static charges, it should
be noted that it is not a true cleaner as
are the Discwasher or Manual Para stat, and, of course, the disc can easily
pick up a new static charge. Polonium
elements, available from the maker,
will need to be replaced on a one to
two year basis.
Cleaning Tests
To test the cleaning ability of the
various record cleaning devices, a
number of records were left exposed
to the room air for a period of more
than two months, with temperatures
ranging from 68° to 85° F. and the
relative humidity ranging from 35 to
75 percent. When examined with the
unaided eye, the record surfaces were
uniformly quite dusty, a whitish -gray
color. When examined with a wide field stereoscopic microscope, the
surface and the grooves of each
record were truly dirty.
Additional records were treated
with dust removed from a vacuum
cleaner. This was done out-of-doors,
at night, and with the records illuminated with a slanting light beam.
A small quantity of dust was tossed up
in the air about two feet laterally from
the records and allowed to fall freely
with no breeze being present to
scatter the dust. Each record had a
high static charge, and as the dust
descended close to the vertically oriented records, the static charge
would pull dust particles onto the record, the process being observed in
the light beam. The dust settled fairly
evenly on all the records. Another
group of records was subjected to
cigarette ashes sprinkled on them,
which were then blown off, and a
duplicate set had the cigarette ashes
smeared on them by hand. A few
records were also left exposed to the
room dust for a period of about 24
hours, this being about the longest
length of time a record would commonly be left out of its sleeve. Finally,
a set of records was subjected to
varying degrees of naturally oily
finger marks over their entire surface. All of the records were examined under the microscope to ensure a reasonably equal amount of
"dirt" on the surface and in the
grooves. In looking at these artificially produced dirty records, it seemed
very doubtful that anyone would have
records this dirty. Each of the cleaning
devices examined was then used according to the instructions accompanying that device.
All of the cleaning devices did a
good job of removing dust from the
surfaces and grooves of the records
left exposed for 24 hours, as viewed
with the unaided eye. However, when
examined microscopically, some of
the records had a limited amount of
dust remaining in the grooves. To our
surprise, the Vac-O-Rec unit left a
dust streak on the record the width of
the mohair brush. This dust streak was
visible with the unaided eye when the
record surface was illuminated at an
angle. We examined two additional
units with similar results, and concluded that the suction developed by
the unit is probably not sufficient to
remove the accumulated dust from
the mohair bristles. The unit would
probably be more efficient were it
possible to mechanically separate the
opposing walls a little before the
record is removed. We took one unit
AUDIO MARCH,
1975
apart, held it together manually while
a record was being cleaned, then
separated the walls about one-half
inch before removing the record. The
dust streak was absent when the
record was examined under oblique
light and microscopically.
Microscopic examination of the
mohair bristles revealed an accumulation of dust that could easily be
brushed out or vacuumed out with a
household -type vacuum cleaner.
Only the Discwasher and the
Manual Parastat were able to truly
clean the remaining dirty records,
including those with finger marks.
Microscopic examination revealed
only
a
A very important part of record
maintenance is the cleaning of the
cartridge stylus. The stylus should
never be permitted to accumulate dirt
and encrustations which can transfer
to the record groove as well as scratch
the delicate groove walls during play.
A soft, small -bristled, camel hair brush
should be used to gently clean the
stylus. The cleaning motion should be
in the same direction as the record
moves, i.e. from the back forward and
at a 45 -degree angle from left to right
and vice versa, again from the back to
the front. Never use a back -and -forth
motion to clean the stylus since this
can easily bend the very delicate can-
tilever, thus destroying the stylus
assembly. The camel hair brush may
be moistened with any solution
recommended for stylus cleaning.
This will assist in loosening any encrusted deposits on the stylus for
easier removal. A most damaging
practice, sure to harm the cantilever,
is flicking the stylus with your finger.
Remember, as many audio manufacturers have stated, your greatest investment is in the records, not in the
equipment-so keep them clean if
you want to retain the signal origi49+
nally cut on the record.
limited amount of dirt
remaining in the record grooves with
either device after one cleaning. After
cleaning both devices, the records
were cleaned two more times. All the
remaining dirt from the grooves was
totally removed. The Audio-technica
AT -6010 Record Cleaning Kit did a
creditable job but repeated efforts did
not remove all the dirt from the
grooves. All the cleaning devices except the Vac-O-Rec did an excellent
job of removing the naturally oily finger marks; the Vac-O-Rec is not intended for this purpose, as is stated in
their instruction booklet.
To sum up, no ordinary record
cleaning device tested was able to
eliminate the surface static charge to
an acceptable degree. All of the
devices did an excellent job of
removing dust accumulated in a
period of less than 24 hours. Only the
Discwasher and the Watts Manual
Parastat were successful in returning
very dirty records to their original
clean state. Although it is desirable to
remove the static charge with its accompanying noise, we would venture an opinion that it is more important to utilize a device that
thoroughly removes the various
record pollutants that are responsible for long-term cummulative noise.
To preserve records in as near new
condition as possible, a regular maintenance program should be put into
practice. Records should be handled
only by the edges and label area to
avoid oily finger marks on their surface; they should be cleaned before
each playing with a cleaning device
such as those discussed above; when
a disc has finished playing, it should
be cleaned and immediately placed in
its polyethylene -lined sleeve and then
its jacket, and stored in a vertical position to prevent warping. If the record
did not come in a polyethylene
sleeve, such sleeves can be purchased
at most record stores or through
various sources in Audio's classified
section.
AUDIO MARCH,
1975
23
E
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PO. Box 711
312 271-7755
"ISee What You Mean!"
How the Westrex 45/45 System
Was Adopted by the Record Makers
By Ralph W.
N THE Home Furnishings Daily of
Thursday, September 26, 1957, out
of New York under the by-line of
Henry Brief, it was pointed out that
"the future of stereophonic sound,
which has been closely linked with
tape and tape recorders in the past
few years, may now have to share or
perhaps even be dominated by stereo
phonograph records."
The article then described the recently developed stereophonic disc
recording and reproducing system
being shown to the record industry by
Westrex Corp., then a wholly -owned
subsidiary of Western Electric Co.
Subsequent events bear out Mr.
Brief's appraisal of the situation. However, the events leading up to the final
acceptance of the Westrex 45/45 System as the American standard, make a
very interesting story.
Prior to the introduction of the
"StereoDisk," the record industry had
been stumbling along the best way it
Wight
could in the face of competition from
tape in the home entertainment field.
The ready adaptation of tape to stereo
left the record people with practically no place to go and business was
showing the effects. Indeed most record producers were swinging into
the tape field as fast as practical, but
none were happy with the price of the
end product nor were they willing to
give up on records. By March of 1957
the stereo tape business was undergoing a phenomenal boom, and it was
felt that a stereophonic record at
approximately half the price would
greatly broaden the market.
Because of the early success of its
tape program, RCA had decided to
also explore all developmental work
going on associated with the recording and reproducing of stereo on records. Major Westrex disc recording
licensees at that time included RCA,
Decca, Columbia, London -Decca, and
others. All were clamoring for a com-
About The Author
From
1951
to 1958 Ralph W.
Wight was Manager of the Recording Equipment Division of
Westrex Corp. with headquarters
in Hollywood, Calif. In 1958 Westrex Corporation was sold to Litton
Industries under the terms of a
consent decree entered into between the United States Justice
Dept. and AT&T Company. In 1959
Mr. Wight became Vice President
of the Westrex Division of Litton
Industries, and in 1960 was made
Vice President of Litton Systems,
Inc.
From 1962 to 1972 Mr. Wight was
President and Vice President of
Technical Products Engineering
Co., which he formed to engineer, manufacture, and install
radio communications control
center equipment for governmental subdivisions such as police, sheriffs, and fire departments.
In 1972 Mr. Wight formed Ralph
W. Wight Associates, a consulting
organization working in the radio
communication control center
field and associated areas. The firm
currently has offices at 10920 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif.,
90024.
petitive stereophonic record system
and were following any lead, foreign
and domestic, in this direction.
September of 1957 RCA had
become the largest single user of
1/4 -in. tape in the country, recording six million feet a week for
home entertainment use.
For a year prior to the height of the
tape boom, Westrex had been quietly working on a stereo cutter to replace the outmoded monaural Westrex cutter. The new cutter was to be
capable of functioning with the many
Western Electric and Westrex feedback amplifiers then in use.
Development of the new cutter
progressed slowly on a more or less
routine basis in the Westrex Hollywood laboratory until on August 16,
1957, when out of the blue, a call was
received from A.L. McClay, General
Manager of Record Manufacturing
and Engineering at the RCA Victor
Record Division in New York City,
telling us that "if we had anything to
show on stereo for records, we had
better do it and do it now." Otherwise the industry might be forced to
accept a vertical -lateral system being
promoted by Sugden of England and
Telefunken of Germany. This telephone call was based on information
obtained by RCA's Allen Pulley
(Manager of RCA's recording studio
in New York City) on a recent trip to
England and the Continent where he
had listened to a demonstration of the
Sugden vertical -lateral stereophonic
recording system, both the recorder
and reproducer having been designed and built by Sugden. Pulley reported that the reproduced quality
BY
AUDIO MARCH,
24
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
Introducing
the KLH
Research %
Model Sixty
Turntable:
A solid
triumph in
human
engineering.
There are more manual turntables
to choose from these days than ever
before. And most of the better models
share many of the samefine features
and specifications.
So why make a turntable? (And we
not just slapping our
are making
name on someone else's product. Every
part is hand assembled in our plant in
Cambridge, Mass.)
The answer is in the product itself.
The Model Sixty is a two speed, belt driven, transcription quality turntable
that combines all of the most wanted
features with exceptional performance
and a maximum of something we call
"human engineering':
What is human engineering?
It's designing an electro -optical
system that automatically shuts off the
turntable at the end of the record and
gently lifts off the tonearm. This is achieved
through the use of a light detector resistor
it-
(shown here) rather than a mechanical
device which would have to be tripped by
the side force of the tonearm. Since our
system requires no side force, it virtually
eliminates all potential distortion and
side thrust problems.
Human engineering isdesigning a
special low massaluminum tonearm and
unique low friction pivot block and post
assembly to such exacting standards that
usage deterioration and performance
deviation is all but eliminated.
Human engineering isdesigning all
of the electronic controls into an upright
module for incredibly simple and
convenient operation. It's also making
the controls feelas good as they look.
(Just one touch and you know there's
something substantial here.)
In short, human engineering is
finding out what people want and. need
in a product and putting it there. That's
why the Model Sixty also features pushbutton electronic cue ing, anti-skating
control, a discrete suspension system that
minimizes rumble, acoustic feedback and
vibrations, one piece dynamically
balanced platter, 24 -pole synchronous
motor and every other important feature
you could want in a precision turntable.
All for $150.
Now that's human engineering.
The Model Sixty. Another superb
new product from KLH ResearchX- a
new era in audio.
Check No.16 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
For more information,
visit your KLH
dealer or write to
KLH Research &
Development Corp.,
30 Cross St.,
Cambridge, Mass. 02139.
Specifications
Rumble: -58 dB (CBS-RRLL), exceeds DIN
requirements.
Wow& Flutter: .09%, lower than one half of DIN
requirements.
Tracking Force: Continuously adjustable from 0.5
to 4.0 grams, with precision calibrated scale.
Average Absolute Tracking Error: 0.59
less than 0.01 radian.
Arm Structure: Low inertia, precision ground,
high strength aircraft aluminum alloy.
Suspension: Tripoint seismic suspension of arm
and turntable on single precision casting, damped
to minimize influence of external vibrations
causing high order resonances.
300 RPM Motor: Precision polyphase synchronous
low speed motor for minimal vibrations and
optimum instantaneous speed accuracy and
freedom from counter -rotation.
Timing Accuracy: Better than 5 seconds per
average LP side; twice as good as DIN
requirements.
Speeds: 331/3 & 45 RPM
Record Sizes: 7',' 10',' 12"
Operates on: 105-125 volts, 60Hz only, pilot light
indicates power "ON"
Dimensions: 17" (W) 136" (D) 61%" (H) with
dust cover.
OOIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIllhIIIIIIII"
KLH Research 8 Development Corp.
30 Cross St., Cambridge, Moss. 02139
would be quite acceptable commercially and that Sugden was then working on some 10 recorders which were
about 15 to 20 percent complete
when he visited the plant. Design
problems were being experienced
with the reproducer but it was
thought that reproducers would be
available in limited quantities by the
first of 1958.
Pulley next visited London -Decca
where their Dr. Haddy was experimenting with vertical -lateral recordings made on a Telefunken recorder
and played back on a reproducer
developed by Dr. Haddy. Pulley reported that the quality of reproduction there was also quite acceptable,
and he had been advised Telefunken
was in a position to go into manufacture on their vertical -lateral recorders at once. Because of the progress
reported from two different sources
in Europe, McClay was very anxious to
find out what progress Westrex was
making. He felt it was imperative that
the Westrex position be made known
not only to RCA but to the other
licensees at the earliest possible moment, since it was felt that, from the
progress reported from Europe, the
market might be flooded with European vertical -lateral stereo recordings within the next six months.
Even though Westrex had only two
hand -made models of the new StereoDisk cutter, it was decided that the
system should be unveiled immediately. It was also decided that the first
exposure should be at the engineering level and that it should be done in
Hollywood. Arrangements were made
at once for such a demonstration.
Appropriate listening facilities were
set up in the Hollywood laboratory of
Westrex and engineering representatives of all interested organizations
were invited to attend a single session so that there could be no possible complaints of favoritism. The
demonstration was held on August 26,
1957.
Dr. Haddy of London -Decca came
and brought with him a trunkful of
equipment plus vertical -lateral recordings he had made on the Telefunken recorder. He also brought his
own hand -made reproducer, and displayed some excellent test material.
Westrex had not advanced very far
in the development of a reproducer,
but had one in the design stage. The
first Westrex test reproducer consisted of two ESL cartridges taped together. The reproducer built by Dr.
Haddy was a superior device which
appeared to function equally well on
either vertical -lateral or 45/45.
Dr. Haddy's demonstration material had been developed over a consi-
derable period of time and was excellent. The Westrex 45/45 material
was also excellent, particularly when
played back via the London -Decca
reproducer.
An interesting facet of the demonstration was the reaction of the audience, many of whom had never heard
stereo from a phonograph record and
did not know quite what to expect. A
representative of one of the major
companies, whose responsibility had
been that of furniture and packaging
of home entertainment systems, expressed the opinion that he had been
through similar demonstrations many
times and had yet to hear any new de-
velopment involving an improvement sufficiently outstanding for the
average customer to detect. The listening room where the demonstration was held happened to be an almost optimum size and shape and had
been treated acoustically to provide
the correct reverberation time for this
type of use. Two Altec professional
corner -type two-way speaker system
were used and placed for the most
pleasing effect.
Capitol Records, although not a
Westrex licensee, was located close to
the Westrex laboratory and furnished
invaluable cooperation and assistance in providing test material. The
material initially used for the demonstration was obtained by re-recording Capitol's tape "Introduction to
Stereo" (with which most everyone is
familiar) to the Westrex StereoDisk
system. Facilities were provided in the
laboratory so that the original tape
and the re-recorded StereoDisk version could be played back in the listening area.
Switching facilities were provided
to permit instantaneous comparisons
between both types of material. Colored lights indicated the material to
which the audience was listening.
At no time did the demonstration
take on the appearance of a contest
between vertical -lateral and the Westrex 45/45. This was easily accomplished since neither London -Decca
or Dr. Haddy were equipment suppliers. They were simply concerned
with doing what they could to come
up with a better product to help bail
the industry out of an insecure business situation.
Various tests and counter tests were
made, listening to Westrex recordings on Westrex equipment and London -Decca recordings on Westrex
equipment, the process then being
reversed to play the same material in
all possible combinations. We were
careful to seat the obvious skeptics in
the preferred location. After only
three or four revolutions of the turn-
28
table, our firmest skeptic stood up
and said "I see what you mean."
After a full day of listening it was
the consensus that, while both systems exhibited excellent reproducing characteristics, it appeared the
Westrex 45/45 system was the more
practical since it recorded two separate recordings of identical sound
quality and therefore did not require
different electrical equalization characteristics for each track, as would be
required with vertical -lateral.
Another governing factor was that a
vertical recording/reproducing system was more susceptible to turntable rumble than a lateral system.
Thus, if rumble was present on the
vertical -lateral, it would be more pronounced in one channel than the
other. While the Westrex 45/45 system appeared to have more susceptibility to turntable rumble than a conventional lateral system, at least the
rumble was the same in both
channels.
While it was by no means the prerogative or responsibility of those attending this Hollywood demonstration to set the standard for the industry, the reaction of those present actually accomplished exactly that. The
Westrex 45/45 system was formally
adopted as the American standard by
the Record Industry Association of
America (RIAA) on December 27,
1957.
Immediately after to the initial demonstration, tremendous pressure
was put on Westrex to supply cutters
to its licensees. As a stopgap measure, it was agreed that a sufficient
number of units would be hand -made
to provide one cutter to each licensee at the earliest possible moment,
after which Westrex would go into
production on a substantial quantity
of cutters on a routine basis.
Additional demonstrations were
made on October 11, 1957, before the
9th Annual Convention of the Audio
Engineering Society held in New York
City. The following week further
demonstrations were made at the
Park Sheraton Hotel in New York City
for record and phonograph company
representatives.
IN looking through various old records recently,
I
cording, Heifitz-BSO-Beeth. Conc."
Also scratched in the surface was the
name "C.C. Davis 7-12-57." This record is the original first full-length cut
on the experimental model of the
Westrex 45/45 feedback cutter. Although there are a few ticks and pops,
the record exhibits excellent sound
quality and an amazing dynamic
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
came upon one
entitled "Westrex StereoDisk Re-
MARCH, 1975
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range. The material looks like an early
vinyl -type base.
Charlie Davis, more than anyone
else, was the moving spirit in development of the Westrex 45/45 cutter.
His contributions to this form of entertainment have gone largely unrecognized although many of his basic
equipment developments and operating techniques are still being practiced. Davis, however, cannot be
given credit for the "invention" of the
45/45 system since the Bell Telephone Laboratories had anticipated
the possibility of this type of recording in patents issued to them covering certain elements of the early "hill
and dale" vertical recording method
as well as those covering the Western
Electric lateral feedback monaural recorder.
During his lifetime, Charlie Davis
made three significant contributions
to sound recording and reproducing.
His first contribution was the development of the "Davis Drive," used in
film recording machines by profes-
motion picture agencies
throughout the world. The Davis
Drive involved the first "Tight Loop"
mechanical filtering system resulting
sional
dbx 120 series noise reduction
For
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The new dbx 120 tape noise reduction system provides about 40 dB
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live recordings, tape hiss and background noise are completely eliminated. For taping off -the -air or dubbing from records or tapes, no
noise is added beyond the noise content of the material being copied.
(We do not attempt to remove noise present in the original input signal,
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dbx 120 units also decode the newly released dbx encoded "noiseless" discs which offer over 100 dB dynamic range with no audible
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Model 122 is a two -channel tape noise reduction system, switchable
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Words cannot adequately describe the experience of listening to
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www.americanradiohistory.com
in a uniformity of film motion which
set new worldwide standards. The
basic principles of this system are still
in use by most manufacturers of film
recording and reproducing equip-
ment.
Davis applied the same design
philosophy he used in high-speed
film -pulling mechanisms to low speed disc drives and came up with
the same accurate mechanical motion. Low -frequency flutter and wow
has not been much of a problem for
many years in the disc recording and
reproducing field because of his pioneering work. Uniform motion is no
longer a problem even in reasonably
inexpensive drive mechanisms.
Charlie Davis was very ably directed in his efforts by Dr. John G. Frane,
Engineering Manager of Westrex for a
long period of time. Dr. Frane is well
known and highly respected for his
contributions to the technology of
professional motion picture recording, as well as the disc recording and
reproducing field.
Others who played
a
prominent
part in making the 45/45 system the
American standard and bringing it to
its present state of perfection include
Bill Miltenberg and Bob Moyer of
RCA; Dr. G.F. Dutton of the Record
Division of EMI, Hayes, Middlesex
England; Ed Uecke, Chief Engineer of
Capitol Records; Dick Crane, Bob
Davis, and Ed Dickinson of the Westrex Hollywood laboratory, and many
others. Enjoy their efforts!
,a,
30
AUDIO MARCH,
1975
Equipment Profiles
coding, however, takes a back seat to CD -4 demodulation,
with two simple matrix positions available, but with no logic
circuitry added. One of the two matrix positions corresponds to RM (Regular Matrix, as standardized in Japan), the
other comes close to SQ parameters (though Technics
neither says so nor labels the position that way).
The front panel of the SA -8500X is one of the most impressive we have seen since the dawn of four -channel
sound in home equipment. The upper, blacked -out area
(illuminated when power is applied) has four level meters at
the left, one for each channel. In addition to assisting you in
balancing all four channels, must confess that psychologically always feel better when tinkering with four -channel
program sources when am able to SEE (as well as hear)
different things happening in each channel. A 10 -dB pushbutton switch has been wisely added, so that meter sensitivity can be increased by that amount and meters be read
easily even when sound levels are fairly low. The well calibrated AM and FM dial scales are surmounted by channel indicator lights which spell out mode of operation (4 -CH
DISCRETE, 4 -CH. MATRIX, STEREO, etc.), while below the
scale are more illuminated words which identify pushbuttons such as the three available tape monitor buttons, FM
MUTING switch, and the aforementioned meter sensitivity
switch. Lights also tell you program source chosen while at
the extreme right is a signal -strength tuning meter active in
both FM and AM modes. A separate power ON/OFF switch
is located center -left on the panel.
The lower section of the panel contains a pair of headphone jacks (for four -channel phones), bass and treble
controls, a large master -volume control surrounded by four
individual channel -level controls, mode selector, program selector switch, and a large tuning knob. Secondary controls in this area include low- and high -filter switches, loudness control, and audio -muting switch (not to be confused
with FM muting) which lowers overall volume level by a
fixed 20 dB when answering the phone, doorbell, etc.
Finally, there is a CD -4 "High Blend" switch intended for
use when CD -4 records are unduly noisy. With the switch in
use, noise is reduced with some minimal sacrifice in high frequency channel separation-much like the familiar
"MPX filter" popular on some stereo tuners and receivers
for accomplishing the same objective when listening to
weak or noisy stereo FM signals. The now almost -standard
"radar light" blinks on whenever a CD -4 record is played,
appearing in the upper dial -scale area along with the other
previously noted lights.
I
I
I
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
FM Tuner Section
IHF Sensitivity: 1.9 µV. S/N: 65 dB. Selectivity: 65 dB. Capture Ratio: 1.5 dB. THD: Mono, 0.3%; Stereo, 0.4%. AM
Suppression: 50 dB. Image Rejection: 55 dB. I.F. Rejection:
60 dB. Spurious Response Rejection: 60 dB. Stereo Separation: 40 dB, 1 kHz. Frequency Response: 20 Hz to 13 kHz +1
dB. Carrier Suppression: 50 dB.
AM Tuner Section
IHF Sensitivity: 20 µV. Selectivity: 25 dB. Image Rejection: 40
Rejection: 40 dB.
Amplifier Sections
Power Output Per Channel, Minimum Continuous (RMS),
All Channels Driven, 8 -ohm Loads at Maximum Total Harmonic Distortion of 0.5%: 26 watts, 4 -channel mode; 80
watts, 2 -channel mode. Damping Factor: 20, 8 ohms. Input
dB. I.F.
Sensitivity: Phono, 2.0 mV; AUX, Tape, 180 mV. Hum and
Noise: Phono, 70 dB; AUX, 90 dB; residual, 1.5 mV. Frequency Response: Phono, RIAA +1 dB; AUX, 7 Hz to 70
kHz, +0,-3 dB. Tone Control Range: Bass, +11 dB @ 50 Hz;
treble: +10 dB @ 10 kHz. Low Filter Cut -Off: 200 Hz @ 6
dB/octave. High Filter Cut -Off: 7 kHz @ 6 dB/octave.
General Specifications
Maximum Power Sumption: 360 watts, at 120 V, 60 Hz.
Weight: 37.3 Lbs. Dimensions: 21-3/8 in. W x 6-1/8 in. H x
15-1/2 in. D. Retail Price: $739.95.
For many, the chief objection to earliest all -in -one four channel receivers was their low power output per channel
in return for quadraphonic flexibility, and the apparent aim
of the new SA -8500X is to counter these objectúons, which it
does most successfully. Here is a receiver that supplies more
than 25 watts per channel into 8 -ohm loads at all audio frequencies, in accordance with the strict power output disclosures required by the new FTC power rule. Switch it to
what Technics calls the BTL mode (more familiarly known as
"strapped" two -channel operation) and you have at your
command up to 80 watts of power for each of the two channels then available.
Having gained experience with the CD -4 quadraphonic
disc format (Technics by Panasonic was one of the first companies to champion quadradiscs in this country), they have
refined that circuitry in this latest receiver, making it much
easier (and less critical) than in earlier products. Matrix de-
Fig.
1-Rear panel of the SA -8500X
AUDIO MARCH, 1975
31
www.americanradiohistory.com
The rear panel of the SA -8500X, shown in Fig. 1, may set a
new record for number of input and output jacks and terminals. Three full tape -monitoring facilities (in four -channel)
means no less than 24 jacks, in addition to a full four -channel AUX input arrangement, enough speaker terminals for
two four -channel speaker setups, 300 -ohm, 75 -ohm, and
AM antenna terminals, switched and unswitched a.c. convenience outlets, and a four -channel FM detector output
jack for future use with a four -channel FM decoder. Each
speaker line is fused, with transparent covers over each pair.
Two types of phono inputs are provided. Conventional ones
for magnetic cartridges require no further explanation. The
other pair, intended for semiconductor cartridges (one of
which is manufactured by Technics by Panasonic), deliver a
bias voltage required by this type of phono pickup, so that
no separate power supply is required when they are used
with this receiver. A two -position switch near the phono inputs selects either pair of terminals (they cannot both be
used simultaneously), while three -position slide switch,
identified as a 30 -kHz compensator switch, is intended to
help adjust frequency response of the CD -4 input circuitry
to compensate for less than perfect CD -4 cartridge that have
dips or peaks at the high end of the response. With reasonably good cartridges, this switch position should be left in
the NORMAL position.
Circuitry Highlights
An internal view of this massive chassis is pictured in Fig.
Power amplifier circuits, seen standing vertically, each include a first -stage differential amplifier, followed by direct coupled circuitry out to output-capacitorless power stages.
Operation in the strapped mode (in which pairs of
amplifiers are effectively parallelled for greater power output) is selected on the front panel by the speaker -selector
switch. A direct -coupled I.C. circuit is used for the phono
equalizer section of the receiver. Perhaps the most outstanding new feature of the CD -4 portion of the receiver is
that fact that separation and carrier level adjustments are no
longer required (they were with all earlier receivers whenever you changed or installed a new cartridge).
The FM front-end uses a four -pole MOSFET and the variable capacitor is designed so that dial calibration is linear.
The i.f. section employs five stages, three of which are
differential amplifiers, and there are three two -element
ceramic filters for achieving desired band-pass characteristics. The AM section also employs a ceramic filter. The
stereo FM decoder circuit includes a monolithic IC which
incorporates two differential switching or demodulation circuits.
2.
FM Performance Measurements
We measured an IHF sensitivity of exactly 1.8 µV for the
SA -8500X receiver, but in terms of quieting, 50 dB of S/N was
reached under signal input conditions of only 2.0 µV, as
shown in Fig. 3. Ultimate quieting in mono was 71 dB, considerably better than the nominal 65 dB claimed by the
manufacturer. THD in mono was also excellent, at 0.2% for
mid -frequencies. In stereo, the same test resulted in 0.32%
THD, still very good, and the best signal-to-noise ratio obtained was 65 dB. Selectivity was closer to 70 dB than to the
65 dB claimed, while capture ratio measured 1.3 dB, image
rejection was 60 dB, and AM suppression was 53 dB.
Stereo -FM separation, plotted in Fig. 4, was 42 dB at mid
frequencies, remaining as high as 40 dB all the way down to
50 Hz, and decreasing to 30 dB at 10 kHz. Figure 4 also shows
that THD is maintained at low levels for all audible frequencies. At 7 kHz, THD measured 0.5% in mono, 1.0% in stereo.
AM sensitivity was measured as 25µV, via the external antenna terminal input, while selectivity actually proved to be
a bit better than claimed, measuring 27 dB on our sample.
New Measurements For Amplifiers
In keeping with the editorial policy of AUDIO magazine,
we have begun testing power amplifiers and the power
amplifier sections of receivers in accordance with the new
Federal Trade Commission Rule which went into effect last
November. While we do not agree with all the provisions
and requirements of this rule, it does serve a useful purpose in partially clarifying power output claims and, until it
is modified or something more meaningful (and even less
ambiguous) comes along, we shall continue to report our
findings a la the FTC rule.
First, it should be noted that the literature supplied with
our unit (including the owner's manual) was printed before
the rule went into effect, and so we had to search through
several kinds of power ratings before arriving at the fact that
Technics by Panasonic claims 26 watts per channel from 20
Hz to 20 kHz, with 8 -ohm loads, all channels driven, at no
o
10
STEREO THD =0.32 %
20
MONO THD
30
30
7
10
3
40
50
60
70
STE R
80
EOS/N-65d8
S/N
MONO
1111
0
1
1.0
100
10
INPUT -MICROVOLTS ACROSS
Fig.
I
I
71dB
1111111
IK
10K
300 OHMS
3-FM quieting and distortion characteristics.
0
10
20
3.0
30
40
2.0
50
1.5
THD STEREO
1.0
THD MONO
10
100
IK
FREQUENCY
Fig.
2-Internal view.
Fig.
4-FM separation
32
IIf
10K
0.5
0
100K
- Hz
and distortion versus frequency.
AUDIO MARCH, 1975
www.americanradiohistory.com
No other component in your high
fidelity system will influence your
enjoyment of music as much as your
choice of speakers. Every speaker
design has its own individualcharacter-ter
istics, and actually imposes s ow
personality on any music vol... play.
What kind of a sound dc you prefer? The tight
sound of an acoustic suspension speaker? The ope`
sound and flexibility of an orrni-radial speaker? Or the
presence and realism of a multi -directional speaker?
No matter which you crcose. Sansui makes a speaker o
match your taste. And they c -e al super or in performance, deliver n
sharp definition, and a snocth, but crystal clear dynamic attack
over a wide range.
e seven
Yes, speakers are a matter of taste. Only you can decide which one o
Sansui speakers is really the best speaker you ever heard. So stop in at your nearest Sc r:eui dealer... and listen.
i
`
Check No. 31 on Reader Service Card',
SANSUI ELECTRIC CO LTD
.
I ELECTRONICS CORP.
Woodside, New York 1"377 Garder. Californio 9C2L7
Tokyo. Japan SANSUI AUDIO EUROPE SA Antwerp. BeI um
www.americanradiohistory.com
more than 0.5% THD. (We shall continue to use the abbreviation THD even though the FTC says it is an unfamiliar
term and must not be used by manufacturers who are required to spell out "Total Harmonic Distortion" each time.
If any reader still has doubts about the meaning of THD at
this point, please forgive our attempt at brevity).
On that basis, we ran the receiver, with all channels
driven to a power output of 8.7 watts into 8-ohm loads for
one hour continuously. This is the so-called preconditioning test about which there has been so much debate within
the industry. The SA -8500X heat sinks warmed up considerably (as would be expected) but no fuses popped, no circuits failed, and we were able to go on with full -power
measurements. Not only were we able to produce 26 watts
per channel in the four -channel mode at 20 Hz and 20 kHz
following this preconditioning test, but the THD observed at
these two frequency extremes was 0.1% at 20 Hz and 0.13%
at the high end-both well below the 0.5% maximum
claimed by the maker. Breathing a sigh of relief, we went on
to find that at mid -frequencies (where, FTC notwithstanding, there is still much music to be heard), each channel produced just over 35 watts into 8-ohm loads, as plotted in Fig.
5. IM distortion (up to now ignored by the FTC) measured
0.5% at an output of 32.7 watts per channel, also plotted in
Fig. 5.
In the "strapped mode," we only made one measurewas at mid -frequencies, where we observed an output of 87 watts per channel, with both channels driving 8 -ohm loads. Those technically familiar with the
"strapping" circuit will appreciate that using ordinary bench
test equipment it is difficult to make complex measurements because of "common ground" problems. When receivers are used in this mode in home applications, however, no problem is encountered since each speaker has its
own twin -wire cable leading back to the receiver and there
are no "common ground" points. It should be noted that
Technics by Panasonic claims 80 watts per channel in the
strapped mode, into 8 -ohm loads, from 20 Hz to 20 kHz and,
based on the reserve measured at mid -frequencies, we have
ment-and that
no doubt but what they "make it."
0.9
ALL CHANNELS DRIVEN
8 -OHM LOAD
0.8
--INPUT:
0.7
I
KHz
THD
IM
0.6
32.7W fr35W
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
Not content with just end -frequency measurements, we
plotted full -power output (26 watts per channel, etc. etc.
etc.) at all frequencies against THD and the results are
shown in Fig. 6.
Figure 7 shows tone -control range, filter action, and loud-
compensation referenced at -30 dB from full volume.
The low filter, though sloped at only 6 dB per octave, is more
effective than a bass control in reducing audible rumble
with minimum loss of lows, whereas the high -cut filter does
little more than the treble control rotated to nearly its most
ness
counterclockwise position.
Phono and high-level input sensitivities corresponded
closely with published claims, while phono overload capability was measured as 60 millivolts RMS. Hum, in phono was
70 dB exactly as claimed. Hum referred to high-level inputs
was in excess of 80 dB. Frequency response from high-level
inputs to output, with tone controls set for mechanically flat
position was within 1 dB of "flat" all the way from 3 Hz to 30
kHz.
Listening and Use Tests
Most of our listening tests were confined to CD -4 records, since it is in this area of circuitry that Technics by
Panasonic seems to have made greatest strides in this new
receiver. We purposely substituted a few of the earlier CD -4
cartridges we have in our possession just to see if they would
produce any better results with the new CD -4 circuitry than
they did when tested a year or two ago with "earlier"
demodulators. They did! This new CD -4 circuit certainly
makes up for deficiencies elsewhere in the CD -4 chain,
whether it be in less than perfect records or cartridges. But
to really appreciate how good some CD -4 records can
sound, you should equip your tonearm with a late model
CD -4 cartridge of known reputation, set a recent CD -4 release to spinning, and feed those complex signals through
that new demodulator circuitry. It may change your mind (if
you've been negative) about the future of CD -4. In this reviewer's opinion, it's here to stay-so long as we can find
equipment like the SA -8500X through which to play it!
There's not much we can say about the matrix circuitry incorporated in the SA -8500X, other than to point out that it
does about what you would expect from circuitry without
"logic" augmentation. With all those tape -monitoring facilities, you'll probably have room for an add-on matrix decoder if you want better matrix separation than is obtainable
from either the MATRIX 1 or MATRIX 2 switch settings on
the SA -8500X. Of course, you can always decide about that
later on. No doubt many music lovers will be content with
the simple matrix system already built in.
While we were impressed with the 80+ watts capability of
the receiver in the strapped mode, our listening tests were
J
o
0.1
1.0
10
1000
100
POWER OUTPUT /CHANNEL -WATTS
LOUDNESS AT
v
30dß
+15
1
Ia
2.5
26W/CHANNEL,
8 OHM LOADS
2.0
+5
0
w
LO FILTER
>
1-2
J
1.5
+10
1+1
1.0
5
`
7
,_
HI FILTER
10
15
0.5
10
0
10
100
Ix
10K
100
I
IOK
K
FREQUENCY
IOOK
IOOK
- Hz
FREQUENCY- Hz
Fig.
Fig.
6-Distortion
versus frequency.
7-Tone-control range, and filter and loudness circuit
characteristics.
AUDIO MARCH,
34
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
The BASF
90 in -nute
sale.
Buy one BASF 90 -minute cassette or 8 -track
cartridge at the regular
price, and get a second
one at half price.
That amounts to 45 minutes
of free music. And not just
free, but fabulous because
BASF cassettes and tapes
are the best in the world.
Every 90 -minute cassette
and 8 -track cartridge BASF
makes is included in this
half-price sale:
BASF LH Super Cassette.
Quite simply, the best high density ferric oxide tape
your money can buy. It
gives you less noise, more
pure sound. It also provides
50% more playback
volume at the same record
level-the very ultimate in
sound reproduction on
any equipment.
brilliance of LP discs or open reel tape to equipment
designed for chromium
dioxide cassettes.
BASF SK / LH Cassette.
The tape used by many professional studios. It's a low noise, high output cassette
that reproduces the best
sound with great clarity and
distortion -free fidelity, and
at a very attractive price.
Like all BASF cassettes,
it has our patented Special
Mechanism that makes it
guaranteed jamproof.
BASF LH 8 -Track
Cartridge. A low-noise
tape with a remarkably high
BASF Chromdioxid: the
Ideal for music,
world's finest cassette. For output. its dynamic range
because
the most demanding music
is far superior to that of
selections. It brings the
other ferric oxide tapes.
Check No. 4 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
BASF LN 8 -Track
Cartridge, a low-noise
tape combining BASF
quality with unmatched
low -noise performance at
an economical price.
The BASF 90 -minute half
price sale is on right now.
So hurry down to your
BASF dealer, stock up and
save money on the BASF
tape you like the best. For
more information, call or
write BASF Systems,
Crosby Drive, Bedford,
Massachusetts 01730.
Telephone:
(617) 271-4000.
Available at participating
dealers only while supply
lasts.
confined to four -speaker applications, but we found that
the SA -8500X offered plenty of drive power for our moderately low efficiency test speakers. Since the SA -8500X is, first
and foremost, a receiver, we devoted the remainder of our
listening time to FM and were happy to note that the low
stereo -switching threshold (about 4µV) plus the excellent
quieting -slope characteristics of the tuner section enabled
us to enjoy all the mono and stereo stations received in our
area with relative freedom from noise and audible distortion. If only a single tuning meter was economically feasi-
Soundcraftsmen
ble, we would have preferred a center -of -channel type (and
been willing to forego meter action in AM), but it's a relatively minor quibble. Even stereo broadcasts are more fun
when "dematrixed" into synthesized quadraphonics we
find, and that's the way we listened to them (as well as to the
few four -channel matrix broadcasts we encountered) and
will continue to listen to them until the FCC gives us something to plug into that FOUR -CHANNEL DETECTOR jack at
the back of this excellent receiver.
Leonard Feldman
Check No. 60 on Reader Service Card
Preamp-Equalizer
PE 2217
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
Frequency Response: + 1/4 dB 20 Hz to 100 kHz. Harmonic
Distortion: Less than 0.05% at 1.0 volt. Intermodulation Distortion: Less than 0.05% at 1.0 volt. Signal-to-noise Ratio:
Phono, 84 dB below 10 mV input; Equalizer Section, 90 dB
below 1 volt input. Input Impedance: Phono, 47 K; High
Level, 50 K. Maximum Output: 5 volts into high impedance; 2.5 volts into 600 ohms. Dimensions: 20 in. W x 111/4
in. D x 71/2 in. H. Price: $499.50. Simulated walnut case
supplied. Walnut wood case optional, $50.
No doubt about it, an equalizer is a most useful piece of
equipment to have, particularly for tape enthusiasts or those
who have poor listening rooms (I refer to the acoustics, not
the decor-I once saw a magnificent room furnished in
good taste with heavy plush carpeting which extended right
up the walls! As you might expect, it was hopeless as a listening room. Even the Steinway piano sounded muffled. No
equalizer could have corrected sufficiently.)
The only possible disadvantage in using a graphic equalizer is the extra shelf space and cable connections required.
If you also have a preamplifier, an FM tuner, and a quadra-
phonic decoder, connecting an equalizer could complicate
matters if you also wish to hook up a tape recorder. Partly to
simplify things, Soundcraftsmen has now combined a graphic equalizer with a state-of-the-art preamplifier. In so doing
they've made it possible to save space and simplify cabling,
at the same time reducing the cost of the total setup.
The equalizer section is very similar to the Model 20-12
which we reviewed in AUDIO in December 1971. It has 10
slide controls for each channel, each handling about one
octave, and providing maximum boost or cut up to around
14 dB. An added feature is a set of four visual indicators
called Test Lites which permit balancing the signals going
into and coming out of the equalizer section.
Watching these Test Lites one can readily control the
overall gain of the equalizer section to keep it at (or near)
zero. This is necessary because it is possible to adjust several of the octave tone equalizers for maximum gain, thus sup-
plying too much signal to the amplifier following the pre amp -equalizer. To set the controls properly one has only to
set them so that the two Test Lites for the input signals and
those for the output signals have roughly the same brilliance. The adjustment is not at all critical.
A separate pushbutton controls the use of the Test Lites; if
that button is in the off position the upper two lights will
monitor the output of the equalizer.
Looking at the controls, at the bottom left we find a bank
of four buttons for Test -Lites, Reverse, Mono -left, and
Mono -right. After the Volume Control comes a group of six
pushbuttons. These switch the equalizer in or out of the
main amplifier signal path, or the tape recording signal path.
They also select tape 1 or tape 2, and permit dubbing from
either of two tape decks onto the other one. Next comes the
channel balance control, and a last group of four buttons for
phono 1, phono 2, tuner, and AUX. Jacks for stereo headphones (two sets) and 1 for Tape In and Tape Out are at the
right hand end.
The power on -off switch is at the extreme left, while directly in the center of the unit, between the banks of equalizer sliders are the four Test Lites and the two gain controls.
s7ter
le-c±.
Fig.
ProomP- Equaño
Model PE2217
:
e«
-ßß
--i-®,.
1-Rear panel of the Soundcraftsmen
Equalizer.
VIII
Fig.
MI MI Mt
Mid IMP Mil 111Nrillill
2-Internal view of the
36
chassis.
AUDIO
www.americanradiohistory.com
PE2217 Preamp-
MARCH, 1975
Introducing
Super.
BASF/LH
A
technical breakthrough
in sound reproduction.
ventional recording
tape as a cobblestone
road, with large,
unevenly shaped magnetic particles as the
rough cobblestones. In
this arrangement, a
great deal of sound "slips through the cracks"
and never gets recorded.
LH Super is more like a brick road. The magnetic particles are smaller. And they're all the same
shape. This allows us to arrange them close together
in even rows. Which gives LH Super a smoother,
quieter surface and reduces the size of the "cracks"
be increased.
between magnetic particles, so less sound "slips
If you record LH Super on a late -model, high through."
quality deck at l'/s ips, the dynamic range and
The result is a reel-to-reel tape that gives you
frequency response will exceed hi-fi standards.
You'll get twice the playing time for the same money. more pure sound and less noise than any other
ferric oxide tape.
On the other hand, if you prefer to record at 7'/2 or
For more information, call or write
3 3/4, the sound may even exceed your
BASF Systems, Crosby Drive,
standards.
Bedford, Massachusetts 01730.
Technically, it's easy to understand
Telephone: (617) 271-4000.
what we've done if you can imagine con-
Our LH Super
tape isn't just a new
tape on your dealer's
shelf. It's a technical
breakthrough in sound
reproduction. We've
actually redesigned
the surface of ferric oxide recording tape.
When you listen to a playback on LH Super,
you'll know you're listening to something new. The
volume will be up 50 per cent at the same record
level. Noise will be down, perceptibly. Highs will
be strong and clean. All this, yet distortion will not
-
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
On the rear panel are the numerous input and output
jacks, along with no less than six a.c. power outlet sockets-two unswitched by the front panel power button, and
four switched. There are two sets of magnetic phono inputs, and enough inputs and outputs for two complete
stereo tape decks, with provision for dubbing from either
one to the other. These are in addition to the jacks on the
front panel which permit connection of yet a third tape
machine.
Finally, note that the equalizer section may be switched
into either the tape inputs, or so that it comes after the tape
outputs.
Circuit Description
The circuit can be divided into five sections: phono
preamp, equalizer, Test Lite drivers, line amplifier, and
power supply. Figure 3 shows the basic circuit of the phono
preamp. It is a fairly conventional NPN-PNP arrangement of
Q1 and Q2. Equalization is provided by the frequency -selective feedback loop consisting of Cl, C2, R1 and R3. The output of the preamplifier section feeds Q3, and emitter follower, which in turn feeds the equalizer section and the Test
Lite drivers. The basic circuit of the equalizer is seen in Fig.
4. Only one control network is shown, the other nine being
identical except for their component values. All 10 networks are connected in parallel to points Y and Z. The output at point Z also goes to four one -transistor amplifiers,
which drive the Test Lites, and a two -stage line amplifier,
which terminates at the line outputs on the rear panel. The
line amplifiers use a single transistor with an emitter follower and, like the equalizer section, employ heavy current
feedback. Gain is very low but the distortion is insignificant.
+VOLTAGE FROM
POWER SUPPLY
Five transistors are used in each Test Lite circuit, and
another two in the regulated power supply, making a total
of 32 in the entire circuit of the 2217. A muting relay prevents transient surges during turn -on from being applied to
the power amplifier, thus preventing undesirable "thumps."
Measurements
Figure 5 shows the response with each of the controls set
at maximum, and at minimum. Figure 6 shows a typical response curve tailored to correct certain poor room acoustics
and compensating for some loudspeaker deficiencies. Note
that the low frequency boost under 100 Hz is attenuated
below 45 Hz. This is something you just can't do with ordinary tone controls. Although we cannot hear most of these
low frequencies, they can cause severe intermodulation distortion in loudspeaker systems.
The boost in the 2,000 to 8,000 Hz range will improve the
overall sound when used with loudspeakers like the Dy naco A-25 or the Hegeman 1, especially if the room is heavily damped (lots of rugs, drapes, and so on). On the other
hand, speakers with "presence" peaks (the so-called "West
Coast" sound) can be made tolerable by lowering the midrange response.
Output level is plotted against both types of distortion in
Fig. 7. It shows that distortion is almost unmeasurable below
a volt or so. At three volts output, both the IM and the THD
were below 0.03%, and at 4.0 volts it was still less than 0.1%.
Switching in the equalizer made no significant difference,
regardless of where the controls were set.
Frequency response was within 1.0 dB from 4.0 Hz to near
200 kHz, and square wave tests showed no signs of ringing
or instability. The phono sensitivity was 1.2 mV for one volt
output. High level input sensitivity was a mere 43 mV. The
phono input overload point was 105 mV, quite comfortable, but this fell to 31 mV when the equalizer was switched
into the circuit-lower than I would have liked.
2
3
4
50
100
200
5
6
7
IK
2K
9
s
10
TO EQUALIZER,
2
RI
C2
TEST LITE
DRIVERS, LINE
R3
AMPLIFIER
10
15
Fig.
20
3-Basic circuit of phono preamplifier.
500
5K
10K
20K
50K
FREQUENCY- Hz
Fig.
F-Z
x
FROM
PHONO
PREAMP
+12
O
-
r
+15
+10
+5
SLIDER
-12
5-Response curves, controls at min. and at max.
1.11
:
I
w
0
5
-10
15
10
100
Fig.
4-Basic equalizer circuit.
Fig.
10K
1K
FREQUENCY
IOOK
- Hz
6-Typical equalized response curve.
38
AUDIO MARCH,
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
The Un -common Cartridges
from
ADC
The patented low -mass design
assures lower distortion and
greater tracing accuracy.
The cartridge is the least expensive but one
of the most critical components in a hi-fi
system. Its stylus is the only contact with
the complicated modulation of the record
groove. To extract every note without
distortion, especially at the high frequencies
of the audible spectrum, is the problem.
XLM MK.II
Lower mass = higher accuracy.
Since the magnet itself in a moving magnet
cartridge contributes significantly to its
mass, ADC created and patented an
"induced magnet" cartridge that reduces
the mass in the moving system. This allows
the stylus to track with a lower force
resulting in superior tracing accuracy and
low distortion.
Super
XLMMK lI
CD -4 with
Shibata type
stylus
You can actually hear the difference.
Ask your hi-fi dealer to demonstrate the
comparison between an ADC cartridge and
any other brand. There is an audible
différence that can easily be distinguished.
A modestly priced ADC cartridge may be all
you need to upgrade the sound of your
entire hi-fi system-and there's a model
compatible with every brand of manual
turntable or record. changer.
Send for a free detailed brochure of the
complete line of ADC cartridges.
AUDIO DYNAMICS CORPORATION
A BSR Company
New Milford, Conn. oh
www.americanradiohistory.com
VLM MK JI
Listening Test
permanently installed there. Thus, it was easy to substitute the 2217 and duplicate the control settings previously
set up on the 20-12. Balancing the input-output signals with
the Test-Lites was simple. The instruction manual suggests
that FM interstation noise can be used for precise adjustment, but this was not found necessary. The equalizer controls would normally be set once and left but the tape recording enthusiast would probably use them much more
often and a number of chart forms are provided for what
Soundcraftsmen call "Instant Programming."
All 20 controls are reproduced on the forms just as they
appear on the actual panel and all you have to do is to mark
each special equalization curve accordingly. Because of the
tape dubbing facilities and the provision for three recorders, the 2217 is specially recommended to the tape enthusiast but it will also appeal to those who want a top quality
preamp with equalization controls.
It has become fashionable in some circles to describe
sound quality as grainy, sweet,"dry, or even "a gray
color but hesitate to use such terms. After all, one man's
"dry sound" might be "sweet sound" to someone else! In
this case, extended listening tests with first-rate program
material confirmed the impression that the 2217 is completely neutral-it neither added coloration nor distorted
signals audibly.
The excellent signal-to-noise ratio of this unit places it
alongside the two or three other top preamplifiers, and at its
price, it's a bargain. Incidentally, the simulated walnut
cabinet supplied is really intended just to protect the unit in
shipping. The real wood cabinet ($50 extra) is much more
attractive.
George W. Tillett
12 is
The 2217 was paired with
a
Phase Linear 400 amplifier and
Nakamichi 500 super cassette
other equipment included a
recorder, a Sony TC 755 open -reel machine and a Dynaco
AF -6 tuner. No equalization is needed in the listening room
but the lab itself is another story and a Soundcraftsmen 20I.0
INTERMODULATION/
HARMONIC
0.1
I
0.01
2
3
4
OUTPUT
Fig.
7-Output
5
-
6
7
VOLTS
level vs distortion 10 K load.
Check No. 61 on Reader Service Card
Ferrograph Super Seven Model 7504-AHW
4 -Track
General Specifications
Dimensions: 201/4 in. W x 171/2 in. H x 10 in. D. Weight: 55
lbs. Price: $1025, plus $125 for Dolby B, $50 for amps and
speakers.
Ferrograph is highly respected not only in England, its
country of origin, but it is known all over the world for solid,
well -engineered products (what we used to call "built like a
battleship"). The original makers of the Ferrograph tape recorder, Wright and Weaire, were established back in the
1920s and I remember buying tuning coils from them in the
late 30s. Huge copper can monsters they were, wound with
Litz multistrand wire on glass formers, and boasting a fantastic Q -factor.
Their tape recorders were among the first made in England and the machines' reliability soon made them a first
choice for many airports and shipping lines. The Super
Seven, then, comes with an impeccable pedigree based on
more than 20 years experience. At first glance it looks much
like any other semi-professional recorder but there are significant differences, some innovations and, let's face it,
Tape Deck
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
Speeds: 15, 71, and 33/4 ips. Wow and Flutter: Less than
0.08% at 15 ips: 0.10% at 71/2 ips; and 0.15% at 33/4 ios. Frequency Response: 30 - 20,000 Hz ± 2dB at 15 ips; 30-17,000
Hz ± 2dB at 71/2 ips, and 40-14,000 Hz ± dB at 33/4 ips. Signal -to -Noise Ratio: Better than 60 dB referred to 0.2% THD,
unweighted. Input Levels: Line, 50 mV to 10 V; Microphone, 300µV to 15 mV. Output Levels: 2.0 V at 600 ohms;
300 mV at 10,000 ohms.
Fig.
1-Socket panel.
AUDIO MARCH,
40
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
The Speaker.
Rather than starting with an existing
speaker, Yamaha began with a
speaker idea.
A speaker system with the lowest
distortion and coloration, and the
best possible transient response.
Instead of merely modifying one,
Yamaha has re -invented it. And in
doing so, has improved every aspect
of speaker design.
We call it.the NS -1000 M Monitor.
Transparency and The
Dome. Existing technology has
largely solved a major problem of
speaker design through the use of
the acoustic suspension driver:
a midrange driver. It
extends the linear portion of its
response curve.
The midrange driver's frequency
response is so wide that we can
select only the choice flat section of
its frequency response, thereby
eliminating the peaks and valleys
most competitors are forced to use.
possible for
to direction changes in amplitude
and frequency of the input signal.
Dome Tweeter Comparison
SDOMEr
THICKNESS
WEIGHT
YAMAHA
NS -1000 M
(BERYLLIUM
3cm
0.03 mm 0.03 g
3cm
0.3 mm
0.1 g
2.5 cm
0.45mm
1.038
DOME)
TYPICAL
SOFT
DOME
CONVENTIONAL
DRIVER
This is called transparency. It can
be noticed best in complex musical
passages and can be best described
The Beryllium Dome creates
simply the flattest response; least
colored, most natural sounding
midrange of any speaker around.
Carefully designed acoustic
equalizers flatten the frequency
extended frequency response.
By Our Own Skilled
Today, what's missing from most
sound in most people's living rooms
Hands. Yamaha's philosophy is
one of self-reliance.
That's why, for example, we build
the critical speaker components
(like cone materials and speaker
baskets) rather than purchase them.
That includes the speaker
enclosure made from material
designed for anti -resonance
characteristics. (Our piano making
experience was essential here.)
There are enough speaker system
modifications and copies around,
already.
This is something original.
something a touch more subtle.
It's called transparency.
The hemispheric dome tweeter
allows a wider dispersion of high
frequencies.
But the dome's own material
weight causes it to lag behind the
input signal. It simply doesn't
respond fast enough,.creating an
opaque, masked sound that lacks
fine detail and definition.
The ideal dome material for midrange and high frequency drivers
would be extremely rigid and, most
is
Proudly Presenting the
NS -1000 M. It's not
importantly, virtually weightless.
Introducing the
Beryllium Dome. Why did
inexpensive or easy to find.
The NS -1000 M is sold as right
and left-hand units, and by the pair
it take so long?
After all, beryllium is the lightest,
and most rigid metal known, and
has a sound propagation velocity
twice that of commonly used
aluminum.
Beryllium is lighter and stronger and
propagates sound better than other metals.
RIGIDITY
ATOMIC
WEIGHT
BERYLLIUM
(Be)
MAGNESIUM
(Mg)
ALUMINUM
(AI)
TITANIUM
(Ti)
IRON
(Fe)
(ELASTIC
MODULUS(
SOUND
PROPAGATION
ellocity
le/rum'Iseo
28000
12600
24.32
4500
5770
26.98
7400
6420
47.90
11000
5990
55.85
19700
5950
9.013
But because of beryllium's inherent
characteristics, it resisted attempts
by any manufacturer to form it into
a diaphragm, let alone a dome.
Until now.
The New Yamaha Beryllium Dome,
formed by Yamaha's unique
vacuum deposition process, is lighter
than any other speaker diaphragm
found today. So it's more responsive
system that holds the beryllium
dome to the speaker frame with less
contact allowing it to move more
freely. It's called the Tangential
Edge. (You may not hear the
difference at first, but you will.)
The crossover system was
specially designed to have a very
low DC resistance, increasing the
system efficiency.
Most highly accurate systems
need a large amp to drive them
properly. The NS -1000 M Monitor
requires only 15 watts RMS to fill an
average room with loud music, yet
can handle RMS power outputs
exceeding 100 watts.
only.
as highly defined and finely detailed.
Only Yamaha has it.
Midrange: The Voice of
Your Speaker. Its no secret
that between 500 hz and 6 Khz is
where most audible differences in
speakers occur.
Its where we hear the human
voice, and it is the hardest part of
the frequency spectrum to
reproduce accurately.
Once again, beryllium solves the
problem of uneven response. Since
't's so lightweight, the dome can be
made larger and lighter than before
The Beryllium home uses more of the flat section
et the 'sermon y curse Than
aamens' dome.
CONVENTIONAL SOFT DOME
YAMAHA BERYLLIUM DOME
RESONANCE
FREQUENCY
OPERATING RANGE
USED
PEAK OUTPUT
RESPONSE
NSE WI H
ACOUSTIC EQUALIZER
s
ETICY
Re -thinking the Woofer.
Some respected speaker
manufacturers buy their low
frequency drivers wholesale.
Yamaha doesn't buy them. We
make them.
Even the very cone material itself
was researched and developed and
manufactured specially by Yamaha.
(It's made much more dense than
most cones. That means a tighter,
cleaner sound.) And the frame is
cast in our own foundry so we can
control quality.
A plucked string of a bass sounds
like a plucked string bass note.
Instead of a dull thud.
The Tangential Edge and
Other Extras. Yamaha
BERYLLIUM
R
response curve even further.
The NS -1000 M Monitor is so
accurate that you may even hear
enhanced detail in a recording you
once thought already perfect.
DISPLACEMENT
designed
a
special suspension
YAMAHA
INTERNATIONAL CORP., P.O. BOX 6600, BUENA PARK, CALIF. 90620
Check No.
39
on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
They cost $960.00 the pair, when
you can get them.
Yamaha is making them as fast as
we can, but you may have to wait a
short while until your Yamaha
Audio Dealer has a pair for you to
audition. (He also features Yamaha
speakers based on the same
technology and quality at less
money.)
Patience, please.
Part of the Yamaha
System. The NS -1000 M Monitor
the ultimate air suspension
speaker system.
That is a strong claim to make.
In the future, Yamaha will present
the ultimate power amplifier, tuner,
preamplifier, and turntable.
Actually advancing the state-ofthe-art of the major components
of a music reproduction system.
In short, the ultimate system.
We're convinced that no matter
what you think is the best today,
we'll make you dissatisfied with it.
Don't say we didn't warn you.
is
some idiosyncrasies. The unit tested has built-in Dolby B and
the three speeds are 33/4, 71/2 and 15 ips. It's also available
without the Dolby, or with 17/i3, 33/4, and 71/2 ips speeds.
Another option is a pair of built-in 10 -watt amplifiers with
small loudspeakers mounted on the sides behind grilles.
Styling is neat and workmanlike with the charcoal black
center section housing the head assembly contrasting nicely
with the satin aluminium panel and controls. Looking at the
left, there are two dual -concentric controls, one for Microphone and Line input for channel 1 and the other for Equalization. Then come the two VU meters and in between is a
mode switch for selecting upper track, lower track or stereo.
To the right of the second VU meter are two more dual controls, the first a level control (marked Volume), the second is
the Microphone and Line input control for channel 2.
At the bottom are Bass and Treble controls for each channel, tape monitor switches, and in the middle are two pushbuttons marked U>L and L>U (more about these later), a Bias
switch, a Dolby switch and one for MPX filter. Under the VU
meters are preset controls for adjusting the bias which is indicated on the meters by using the bias switch. A nice
idea-and it works! That's one of the innovations...
At the left, beside the head assembly, is the tape motion
control lever with the functions indicated by Fast, Stop (reset), Pause, and Run. A small locking catch is just above that,
and on the right side is a Fast Wind knob and another for
reel size, 10 inch and Others. In the center is a large red
Record bar switch, a digital counter, and a Reset light. At the
top is the three -speed control, and at the very top is a tiny
On -Off switch.
The head assembly is exposed by lifting a lid and inside is
a retractable lever to facilitate tape loading. Microphone input sockets are in recessed positions at the left and right on
the bottom panel, and all the other inputs are located on a
recessed panel at the top. (That is, if you operate the machine in the vertical position, otherwise you could say the
socket panel is at the rear!) There are three output sockets
for each channel, a high impedance at 300 mV, another bypassing the level control, and a 600 -ohm output from an
emitter follower connected to a point prior to the tone and
level controls. Also located on this panel are a.c. power line
fuses, d.c. fuses, and a socket for a remote control unit.
Now for some explanations: that Reset light comes on
whenever an incorrect setting is made, as for example, if the
equalization or speed change knobs are turned when the
tape is running. It also operates when the automatic stop is
.
activated. The procedure is to return the tape motion lever
to Stop, as the machine will not function when the light is
on. Having done that, you then put the controls in the correct positions.
The two push -buttons inscribed U>L and L>U are for track
transferring. In other words, the recorded signal from one
track can be transferred to a second track. This signal can in
turn be transferred to the third or fourth tracks to produce a
kind of multiplay recording. As there has to be a small delay
between the record and replay signals, it is possible to obtain some echo effects too.
The Fast Wind arrangement is a little unusual as there are
two controls. The function lever is turned to Fast and then
the Fast Wind knob is rotated left or right to give direction
and speed.
An MPX switch cuts the frequency response above 18 kHz
so that the 19 kHz FM carrier will not interfere with the
Dolby operation. The equalization switch is marked High,
Medium and Low, referring to the tape speeds. These are
selected by a knob at the top which rotates an indicator disc
located behind a window just below. And if you select the
wrong equalization for a particular speed, you know what
happens!
The rest of the controls are conventional enough, although tone controls are rarely found on tape recorders this
side of the Atlantic. If you prefer to use the amplifier tone
controls, you can disregard those on the recorder or you
can use the 600 -ohm output sockets. On the other hand, if
you play non-standard tapes, the instruction manual gives
the correct tone control settings to compensate. By nonstandard,
mean tapes made to other standards such as
CCIR and IEC (European).
I
o
-10
20
10
FREQUENCY
Fig.
100K
10K
100
3-Record/Play response,
15 ips,
- Hz
Maxell UD -35 tape.
o
10
20
-\
10
Fig.2-Interior view.
Fig.
100
4-Record/Play response,
10K
IK
71/2
ips.
AUDIO MARCH,
42
www.americanradiohistory.com
IOOK
1975
Our U"and you.
Every Shure phono cartridge comes equipped with its own "U" Factor. The
tough quality
"U" stands for uniformity in rigid production standards
and satisfying listening pleasure. By maintaining these high
control
standards in every phase of engineering, production, and inspection, Shure
over, and over, and over. And, with routine
provides a better cartridge
will continue to perform at the published
cartridge
Shure
your
maintenance,
specifications. You may not see the U Factor, but you'll always hear it.
...
...
...
Shure Brothers Inc.
222 Hartrey Ave., Evanston, IL 60204
In
e
Canada: A. C. Simmonds & Sons Limited
Manufacturers of high fidelity components, microphones, sound systems and related circuitry.
Check No.
33
on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
Three motors are used, one for the capstan drive and two
capacitor-start types for the reels. When the switch is set to
Fast, these two are connected in series but with the Fast
Wind control in parallel so its resistance can be divided between them to produce a rotation in either direction. The
capstan motor is a split -phase induction type so its speed is
controlled, within certain limits, by the power supply frequency.
Measurements
Before taking any measurements, the bias was checked by
pressing the switch so its value appeared on the VU meters.
According to the instruction manual a setting of 0 VU is
suitable for Scotch 203, BASF LGS 35, and similar low -noise
tapes and this was found to be the optimum value for the
tapes used. Figure 3 shows the Record/Play response with
Maxell UD -35 tape at 15 ips and Fig. 4 shows the response at
71/2 ips. Results with Scotch Classic tape were very similar.
At 15 ips the 3dB point was 23.5 kHz and at 71/2 ips response is down the same at 21 kHz. Tape saturation was
slightly less at 15 ips but the effect of saturation can be clearly seen in Fig. 5 which shows the response at 33/4 ips. The 3
point was
Distortion for various recording
kHz is shown in Fig. 6. Note that the 3%
distortion level is not reached until + 7 dB, indicating ample
recording headroom. Distortion versus frequency can be
seen in Fig. 7, and playback response with a standard (Ampex) 71/2 ips tape is shown in Fig. 8.
Input required at the line input for 0 record level was 19
mV and 250 µV for microphone. Output levels were measured to be 360 mV at the high impedance output jacks and
1.9 volts at the 600 -ohm outputs. Signal-to-noise ratio was 56
dB (ASA weighted) referred to 0 VU, or 63 dB referred to the
3 percent distortion level. Using the Dolby system added
another 10 dB, as expected. Wow and flutter measured 0.07
percent at 15 ips, 0.09 percent at 71/2 ips, and 0.15 percent at
33/4 ips, very satisfactory indeed.
Fast rewind time was 72 seconds for a 1200 -ft. reel. Finally, the Dolby system was checked and found to be well
within specification, but more about this later.
dB
levels at
71/2
15.5 kHz.
ips,
1
Listening Tests
For most of the listening tests the Super Seven was
teamed up with a Soundcraftsmen PE 2217 preamp and a
Phase Linear 400. must confess it took a little while to get
used to some of the controls, specifically the two separate
ones for speed change and the two controls for fast rewind
(or forward). But imagine it's like changing from a Detroit
Automatic 8 to a Mercedes or Porsche: there's a lot more
flexibility. There's that forward -to-reverse rewind facility
and the bias adjustment and multitrack switching. All these
will score heavily with the serious recording enthusiast. And
that reset warning system is really foolproof. At one point in
the tests had set all the controls correctly but the red light
still said "no." So looked again and found that had not
put the tape around one of the tape guides!
One question many will ask is this: is the Dolby system
really necessary with a machine having such a high standard of performance? Well, there is no doubt whatsoever
that the Dolby system is relatively more effective with cassette recorders but even so, the extra 10 dB of noise reduction is worth having. You can use it to get that much more
I
3
I
2
I
0
+1
+2
+g
+4
+5
+7
+6
I
RECORDING LEVEL
5-Record/Play response,
Fig.
31/4
- Vu
ips.
25
I
2.0
1.5
+ IO
10
+5
0.5
0
10
100
IK
IOOK
10K
100
IO
FREQUENCY -Hz
Fig.
6-Distortion
IK
versus recording level
(1
kHz,
71/2
ips).
-Hz
8-Playback response with standard test tape,
Fig.
100K
10K
FREQUENCY
71/2
ips.
+15
o
+10
+5
10
dB
0
z
5
20
10
15
10
100
10K
IK
100K
10
FREQUENCY
Fig.
7-Distortion
versus frequency,
-
Hz
71/2
100
10K
IK
FREQUENCY
ips, OVU.
Fig.
-
100K
Hz
9-Tone control characteristics.
AUDIO MARCH,
44
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
We're one of two major
companies seriously and
exclusively into the manufacture
of high performance tape
recorders. The smaller one.
too. But you're buying
recorder, not an ad.
a
tape
When you work with a tape
recorder the only thing that
counts is how well it works with
you, not the size of the
company that made it.
They have a sophisticated
assembly line and so do we.
Theirs is just longer. They have a
big quality control department
and ours is smaller. But only one
man can check one machine at a
time and it's the commitment to
quality that matters.
For sure they sell more tape
recorders than we do. But you're
only interested in the one you buy.
They spend more on advertising,
They're continually working on
new products...we are, too. And
good ideas have nothing to do
with sze.
TEAC 2340
DOKORDER 7140
you compare specs, features
and functions you'll find yourself
comparing two excellent tape
recorders. One of them, however,
takes significartl y fewer dollars to
buy. Ours. And that's the difference.
So
i
You won't always find TEAC and
DOKORDER at the same store;
we're too much alike. Naturally
they have more dealers, so you
may have to look around
Motors
3
Motors
3
Heads
4 -Channel Record
and Playback
3
3
Built-in S-O-S/Echo
Overdub
Frequency Response
No
Yes
Heads
4 -Channel Record
and Playback
Built-in S-O-S/Echo
at7%ips
±3 dB,
40-18,000 Hz
S/N
Wow and Flutter
55dB
0.08%
Manufacturer's
suggested retail price
$739.50
Yes
Overdub
Frequency Response
at 71/2 ips
S/N
Wow and Flutter
Yes
Yes
Yes
-±3 dB,
30-23,000 Hz
58 dB
0.08%
at 7'/2 ips
at7%ips
Manufacturer's
suggested retail price
$629.95
Features and specifications as published by respective manufacturers in currently available literature.
7140
DOKORDER
5430 Rosecrans Avenue, Lawndale, California 90260
Check No.
12
on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
a
little.
But that's the only price you'll have
to pay for paying a lower price.
headroom or dynamic range. So the answer is, no, it's not
necessary but it does give you more latitude when making
recordings. This was confirmed by some recordings made
with high quality microphones using the 33/4 speed.
Summing up then, the Ferrograph Super Seven is a well engineered machine with most impressive specifications, all
of which were met or exceeded by a comfortable margin. It
must certainly be included in that exclusive list of the top
four or five recorders made for the exacting home user as
well as the professional. Are there any criticisms? Yes, must
say didn't like the tiny on -off switch, much prefer a nice
large lever type. But of course this is a minor point and
don't suppose everyone would agree!
George W. Tillett
Hitachi HS -300 Speaker System
viewed from the front. One's first impression is that this
rigid -looking fold shouldn't work, but a slight finger pressure on the cone quickly shows that it not only moves, but
moves a great distance very freely. Great care has obviously
been taken in the design of the woofer itself, and it uses an
aluminum voice -coil bobbin, both aluminum and copper
shorting rings in the magnet circuitry, and a coating on the
back side of the cone to prevent breakup.
The cone tweeter is mounted behind what Hitachi refers
to as an acoustic lens, which to this reviewer more nearly resembles a diffraction grating. Whatever you call it, the lens
does provide good horizontal dispersion of the very high
frequencies.
The enclosure is a vented system of 30 -liter volume (1830
cu.in.) which has a suitable amount of absorbing material included to provide a high degree of internal damping.
Designed as a floor -standing system, the enclosure is finished on the sides and top with natural wood. Connection is
made to well -marked, quick -access terminals in a recessed
cavity on the rear of the enclosure. The front grille cover is
removable, but in the absence of controls it is unlikely that
the user need concern himself with this feature.
A very thorough set of measured curves accompanies
each speaker, which is really "putting it on the line" for any
manufacturer. This, coupled with a well -written instruction
manual, is a real help to the user in obtaining the best performance in his (or her) listening situation.
A three-year warranty is extended to the original purchaser against defects in materials and workmanship.
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
System Type: Two-way, vented, floor type. Drivers: Woofer,
8 -in. (20 -cm.) gathered -edge suspension; tweeter, 21/2 -in.
(61/2 -cm.) cone type. Frequency Response: 55 to 16,000 Hz,
-8 dB; 45 to 19,000 Hz, -15 dB. Crossover Frequency: 3.8
kHz. Nominal Impedance: 8 ohms. Maximum Input Power:
50 W (music). Dimensions: 111/2 in. W x 27 in. H x 10-5/8 in.
D. Weight: 28.6 lbs. Price: $189.95.
The Hitachi HS -300 is a two-way, vented -box speaker system. In place of the more traditional outer edge surround,
the Hitachi woofer uses a gathered -edge type of suspension which looks like the bellows of an accordion when
I
I
I
I
Check No. 62 on Reader Service Card
Technical Measurements
The measured impedance as a function of frequency is
shown in Fig. 1. The Hitachi HS -300 is a vented enclosure,
but is suitably packed with absorbing material to make it a
highly damped system. As a result, this system has a single
resonance peak, rather than the two peaks generally found
in the more conventional vented systems. The sharp -pointed, low -frequency peak and the flat slope of the low -frequency impedance are hallmarks of this class of design. This
speaker can be safely considered to be an 8 -ohm system
from the standpoint of amplifier requirements.
Figure 2 shows the one -meter axial sound pressure level
(SPL) for one -watt drive under anechoic conditions. The
100
16
14
-?
90
12
SPL e0
dB
10
OHMS
8
6
70
4
60
2
0
10
100
1
FREQUENCY
10K
-
IOOK
10
Fig.
Fig.
1-Impedance.
100
I
K
10K
IOOK
at one
meter with
FREQUENCY-Hz
Hz
2-Anechoic amplitude response
one -watt input.
AUDIO MARCH,
46
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
general response throughout the major frequency range is
quite uniform and shows no structural acoustic difficulties.
The low -frequency performance is commendable down to
about 70 Hz, then falling off in a well-mannered fashion.
The peak followed by a dip at around 4 kHz is attributable to
diffractive scatter from the removable front grille frame, and
the precise nature of the grille diffraction depends substantially on microphone position. The response is smoother in
the 2 to 5 kHz region when the grille is removed, however,
without the grille, the system is not as attractive as with the
grille in place, and this could be an invitation to probing
toddler fingers. Therefore, leaving the grille in place is
recommended.
Figure 3 is the one -meter phase response corresponding
to Fig. 2. The woofer and tweeter are in phase throughout
the audible spectrum. The response has no discernable non minimum phase characteristics, and the only detractions
from an otherwise excellent transient response will be due
to the rapid amplitude and phase transitions at 4 kHz and 10
kHz.
The response to be expected in a room is shown in Fig. 4.
The HS -300 was placed on a carpeted floor and flat against a
wall. The frequency spectrum of the first 13 milliseconds of
"early sound" is plotted for an on -axis and for a left -channel stereo position, which are displaced 10 dB for clarity.
The rather wide dispersion of the speakers maintains the
general frequency characteristic over the angular spread required for good stereo, however, floor placement takes a
toll in middle -frequency response due to scatter. Depending on room layout, it might be advisable to experiment
with an off -floor placement for greater accuracy of sound.
One interesting point with this test is that high -frequency
response is better than middle -frequency response, where
with the anechoic test, the reverse was true.
The horizontal polar energy response is shown in Fig. 5,
and good stereo imagery is indicated by this polar plot. The
l
+90°
left -channel spieaker of a stereo installation will be a little
"hotter" than the right channel for average speaker placement, and will require a slight increase in level to the right
speaker for optimum energy balance. The HS -300 has a wide
dispersion of sound, and large objects, such as lamps, bookcases, and the like, should not be placed adjacent to the
speaker if substantial reflection of sound is to be avoided.
Figure 6 is a plot of the vertical energy response. The sound
is launched in a slightly vertical direction, as it should be for
a floor -mounted system, but ceiling and floor reflections
FRONT
Fig.
5-Horizontal polar energy.
w
tN
-90.
10
100
1K
IOOK
1OK
FREQUENCY- Hz
Fig.
3-One-meter phase response.
r
10dB
mr-A\
10
ON AXIS
rv\
100
30°LEFT
CHANNEL
POSITION
10K
IOOK
FRONTAL AXIS
FREQUENCY - Hz
Fig.
4-Three-meter room test.
AUDIO MARCH,
Fig.
6-Vertical polar energy.
47
1975
www.americanradiohistory.com
100
E2= 2nd
82= 3rd
EI
10
A3
c
-2nd 42
44
A3 =2nd
E4=3rd 42
E6 .3rd A4
i
i
0.I
0.01
01
100
10
r
70
80
SPL
90
l
l
1
80
90
100
I
i
80
90
100
WATTS
1
E1
=41.2Hz
SPL A2=110 Hz
110
,1
110
SPL
A4=440Hz
7-Harmonic distortion for the musical tones
Fig.
A2 (110
Hz), and
A4 (440
E, (41
Hz),
Hz).
6
5
4
IM
3
2
o
00
10
POWER
8-Intermodulation of
Fig.
- WATTS
A4 (44 Hz) by E, (41 Hz)
mixed
one to one.
o
I
Listening Test
-10
dB
-30
40
L.
5o
275
30
325
3.5
375
4.0
4.25
TIME, MILLISECONDS
Fig.
should be expected from a floor -mounted configuration, as
this plot verifies.
Harmonic distortion for the musical tones E, (41 Hz), A2
(110 Hz), and A4 (440 Hz) is shown in Fig. 7. Except for the
lowest bass, the distortion remains quite low up to about 75
watts. The speaker shows a sudden distortion overload
above about 80 watts average. The droop in the curve for E2
(82 Hz), the second harmonic of E, (41 Hz), is due to non-linearities associated with the damping in the vent. Above 10
watts there is sufficient motion of air in the front -located
vent that the damping material and the mesh grille on the
inner side of the vent come into contact causing a "buzzing" sound. This sound was not discerned in the earlier listening test on musical material but can be heard on high
level sine-wave test signals. While it is unlikely that a listener would play "flat" musical material at such a high level,
this measurement does indicate that severe bass boost
should not be applied to the HS -300.
Figure 8 shows intermodulation of A4 (440 Hz) by E, (41
Hz). The IM is quite low all the way up to the maximum test
level of 100 watts and is almost purely amplitude modulation.
The musical tones of middle C (262 Hz) and A4 (440 Hz)
were used to check crescendo -handling ability. The acoustic transfer function decreases very slightly with increase in
drive. A random crescendo 20 dB louder than a middle C
inner voice will not noticeably reduce the level of the inner
voice even up to a peak level over 300 watts. The HS -300 can
thus handle hand claps and cymbal crashes without causing
a muddying of a middle C tone. The tone of A4, however, is
more affected and is reduced by almost one dB for peak
crescendos of about 80 watts.
Figure 9 is the plot of received energy for a perfect transient pulse. This curve is the true envelope of the impulse
response and shows an excellent initial transient, followed
by diffraction signals. Almost the whole of the arrival from
3.6 to 3.8 milliseconds is due to scatter from the removable
grille housing, as is the central peak at around 3.4 milliseconds. With these exceptions, the remainder of the
energy -time plot indicates excellent transient response. The
initial peak of energy at 3.05 milliseconds is due to the frequency components below 10 kHz while the smaller peak at
3.15 milliseconds is due to the spectrum above 10 kHz.
Because this is a vented system, the woofer was checked
for its susceptibility to subsonic record -warp frequencies.
The woofer is clearly a long throw driver, but at very high
levels it can be run out of its linear range by a warped
record, producing a very unpleasant program modulation.
recommend that the preamplifier rumble filter be used for
this system to prevent low -frequency cone excursions.
9-Energy-time plot.
45
475
50
The listening test was performed under the conditions
outlined by Hitachi in their excellent instruction manual.
The speakers were placed against a hard wall in a configuration such that the opposite wall, facing the speakers, was
covered with drapery providing some sound absorption.
The floor was carpeted, which Hitachi recommends to provide de -emphasis of the bass level to some extent.
The overall impression of tonal balance, to this reviewer,
was that the extreme low bass was absent, low and mid bass
up to the octave below middle C was slightly prominent, the
middle frequencies were somewhat irregular, and the extreme top was down in level. A modest touchup with conventional treble control is able to restore the balance on the
high frequencies. Tone control equalization of the bass frequencies could not reduce the small amount of heaviness
without dropping out too much low bass. A better cure,
under the listening conditions for this review, was made by
pulling the HS -300's slightly away from the wall. Some
AUDIO
48
www.americanradiohistory.com
MARCH, 1975
placed in angular location but the sound appears compressed in depth somewhat like a motion picture screen.
This subjective impression was most evident for choral
reproduction. This is, of course, a matter of taste and personal opinion and may not represent the way others perceive stereo presence on the HS -300.
This speaker system can run out of 50 watts of amplifier
rather easily. A great deal of this is because the low distortion of the speaker lets you "hang out" a bit more of the
program before it begins to sound "loud." While not specifically pointed out by Hitachi, I would recommend the use
of a two -ampere, fast -blow fuse to protect the speaker from
damage if you like your music loud.
In summary, the Hitachi HS -300 gives a good acoustic
account of itself and makes an attractive addition to any lisRichard C. Heyser
tening room.
experimentation, however, may be necessary to suit individual preference for tonal balance.
The characteristic most apparent with extended listening
is that the HS -300 is unobtrusive. It does not project any extreme coloration into reproduction which can cause listening fatigue. It has a polite sound which does not intrude
upon enjoyment of good musical material. The lack of stridency gives a reasonably accurate presentation of piano and
human voice.
The HS -300 has good transient response for percussion instruments. A good stereo stage presence exists for lateralization, and it isn't necessary to sit on a chalk mark to get
good sound. A better stereo image was obtained, in this reviewer's opinion, by providing relatively wide speaker
placement and angling the speakers toward the center of
the listening area.
The stereo image tends toward a two-dimensional presentation. That is, instruments and voices are accurately
Check No. 66 on Reader Service Card
Kensonic Accuphase
C-200 Control Amplifier
P-300 Power
Amplifier
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
C-200 Control
Amplifier
Frequency Response: 20 to 20,000 Hz +0 -0.5 dB. Distortion: 0.05% at rated output level, 20 to 20,000 Hz. Hum and
Noise: Tuner, AUX, and Tape, 90 dB below rated output;
Disc and Mike, 64 dB below rated input, 78 below 10 mV
input. Output Level and Impedance: Main, 2.0 v, 200 ohms;
Headphones, 0.75 v into 8 -ohm load, and Tape Rec., 200 mV,
Maximum Output: 10 V at 0.05% THD. Input
200 ohms
Sensitivity: Disc 1 & 2, 2 to 6 mV, changeable; Mike, 2 mV;
Tuner, 200 mV; AUX, 200 mV, and Tape Play, 200 mV.
.
C-200 Control Amplifier
New bookshelf series!
RTR delivers the
thinking maris system
...for less thanyou may think.
... sophisticated
bookshelf speaker systems for the audiophile who
takes his music seriously. That means true high
fidelity. Free of coloration. Full of transparent audio
reproduction.
RTR's new EXP-8 and EXP-12
other words, the new EXP series is pure RTR.
Engineered and built from the voice coils up to reflect
the most critical standards in the world of speakers.
The wide -band tweeter exhibits the best transient
performance from 1,000 to 15,000 Hz of any dynamic
tweeter. And the woofers deliver hair -line delineation,
natural boom -free bass. All this at a bookshelf
system price.
In
Think about it. Then listen to the new EXP series
at your nearest franchised RTR dealer. For a dealer list
and complete information, write: RTR INDUSTRIES,
Dept. BG, 8116 Deering Ave., Canoga Park, CA 91304.
Check No. 28 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
Dimensions: 171/2 in. W
Price: $600.00.
P-300 Power
x 6
in. H
x 14
in. D. Weight: 30.8 lbs.
Amplifier
Power Output: 200 watts continuous rms watts per channel
into 4 ohms with less than 0.1% total harmonic distortion
with both channels operating simultaneously at any fre-
,,rlmank*..t
P-300 Power
Fig.
Amplifier
1-Rear panel of control/preamplifier.
quency from 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz; 150 watts continuous rms
watts per channel into 8 ohms with less than 0.1% total harmonic distortion with both channels operating simultaneously at any frequency from 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz. Inter modulation Distortion: Less than 0.1% at rated output for
any combination of frequencies between 20 and 20,000 Hz.
Frequency Response: 20 to 20,000 Hz +0 -0.2 dB at rated
output. Input Impedance: 100k ohms. Input Sensitivity: 0.5
V for rated output at maximum level control. Damping Factor: 40 at 4 ohms, 20 at 8 ohms for any frequency from 20 to
20,000 Hz. Dimensions: 171/2 in. W x 6 in. H x 14 in. W.
Weight: 55 lbs. Price: $750.00.
The Kensonic Accuphase C-200 control amplifier is a
quite attractive, well-built, and very flexible preamplifier
which has quite a few very nice features. The construction
uses a subplate, about an inch off the bottom, on which are
mounted a row of plug-in PC boards, the transformer, filter
capacitors, and regulator power transistor heat sinks. There
is extensive internal shielding, which was removed for Fig. 1.
The unit appears nicely made, with good quality components. Kensonic claims a 1 dB tracking error between channels in the volume control at any level, and measurement
confirmed this, so this is an especially good volume control.
The P-300 power amp is a solidly built unit, weighing
about 55 lbs. It also has a sub -chassis like the preamp, on
which are mounted the nicely made power transformer,
filter capacitors, and four PC boards. Two boards are power
amp driver assemblies, containing all the transistors save the
output devices; the other two are the protection circuit and
the power supply regulator. The side -mounted heat sinks,
essentially the height of the unit, are fairly large and have
plenty of free -flow ventilation.
The front panel has two VU meters without power scales,
however, pushbutton switches change the meter sensitivity
from 0 to -10, or -20, zero being for 150 watts at 8 ohms, -10
15 watts, and -20 1.5 watts. This stepping of sensitivity is
nice, as it's easy to remember that if you push -10, your
scale is a factor of 10 different than the one above. The
front panel also has a selector switch which selects Main,
Remote 1, Remote 2, Front Panel, or Main and Remote 1.
There are two level control pots, and a power switch which
limits the amp to 50% or 25% of full output. On the bottom
of the front panel is a nice hinged panel with a magnetic
catch. Behind it are phone output and input jacks, a pair of
front speaker output banana plugs, a filter switch which
limits the bandwidth of the amp, and a switch between front
and rear inputs.
r,r
811
III
III
Y'
Fig.
2-Inside view of control/preamplifier.
Fig.
3-Rear panel of power amplifier.
III
If!
Fig.
4-Inside view of power amplifier.
AUDIO MARCH 1975
50
www.americanradiohistory.com
On the rear panel is a set of high quality, barrier terminstrips for connection of three speaker sets, a pair of input
jacks, a device to select 100, 117, 120, 220 or 240 V a.c., and
an
unswitched a.c. outlet, and the main a.c. fuse.
The tape monitor facility has a tape -copy switch, separate
from the monitor switch, which allows recording from one
deck to another, independent of the signal to the speakers.
This is a good feature, rather unusual, and works well.
The headphone amp is connected to the output of the
main preamp output and in attenuated to about one -fifth of
the main preamp's output voltage. It is a complete power
amplifier that can drive 4, 8 or 16 ohm 'phones to about 200
mW. It has a low output impedance so that dynamic phones
can get damping. This is unusual as most headphone amp
circuits, which come in power amps, drop the feed to the
'phones through a large series resistor, so there is virtually
no damping.
Figure 6 is a simplified schematic of the phono preamp,
the most elaborate circuit used in the C-200; both the high
level and headphone circuits are simplified versions. What is
unusual about this phono preamp, aside from fully complementary design, is the high voltage used in the output stage
of the preamp,E60 V, which to my knowledge is the highest supply voltage for any present day solid-state preamp
output stage. The high supply voltage, combined with the
ability to lower the circuit gain from 40 to 30 dB at 1 kHz by
means of back channel pots, makes it virtually impossible to
overload this phono preamp with any magnetic pickup.
Such unusually high signal acceptance is very good.
Q1 through Q4 form a complementary -differential input
amplifier which drives complementary inverting transistors
Q5 and Q6. The collectors of Q5 and Q6 have signal currents in phase, but even -order harmonic distortion products are out of phase, and thus cancel-if the devices are
completely and perfectly complementary.
Q7 through Q10 constitute a complementary compound
al
Preamplfier Circuitry
The C-200 design
is
unusual in several respects. First, it
fully complementary circuitry and may have been the
first on the market to do so. The block diagram, shown in
Fig. 5, discloses six amp blocks per channel, phono
preamp,
high level amp also used for tone control action, low- and
high -cut active filters, output buffer amp, and headphone
amp. In normal use, when you're playing records and don't
have the filters in, you go through the phono preamp,
the
high level amp, and the output buffer amp, making a total of
three, with the C-200 driving a following power amp.
When the tone controls are switched in, a flat feedback
network in the high level amp is replaced by switched RC
networks. There is, therefore, little difference in performance when the tone controls are "in circuit," which is not
the case with other designs that typically use another inverting gain -of -one amplifier. The high level amp is always in
use, and when you use the tone controls you aren't adding
any extra electronics. The high and low filters are, however,
bypass switchable.
The C -200's design is also unusual in that the balance control comes after the high level amp, which follows the volume control; usually the balance and volume controls are
together in a circuit. There is also a muting relay between
the output of the high level amplifier and the balance control, which is connected to a time -delay circuit and prevents turn -on thumps.
uses
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AUDIO MARCH
1975
is
shown at bottom.
51
(loll vs. fxUwc! alla. F,a.aiR......
AUDIO MARCH
1975
55
Tweaves
memo
er
St)l A
Tom Bingham
AY BACK in the 1930s, pianist Herman Blount came
north from Alabama with the
Whatley band. He worked in Chicago through the 40s, including a stint
with Fletcher Henderson.
However, during the 50s, Blount
underwent a strange metamorphosis.
He changed his name to Sun Ra,
formed his own band, began preaching a rather esoteric philosophy
somewhat akin to what you might
hear in a Grade -C space movie, and
became housefather to a sizeable
communal entourage of musicians,
Fess
dancers, artists, and assorted "believers." After a couple conventional
mid -50s big band albums, he formed
his own record company, El Saturn
Research, and began releasing albums at a surprisingly rapid clip.
As Sun Ra's philosophies became
more arcane, his music became correspondingly more avant-garde, and
his stage presentation (with costumed bandsmen, dancers, light displays, and the like) more outlandish.
Throughout the 60s, word began to
spread from Chicago to New York to
Europe about this bizarre visitor from
another world (or so he claimed).
With equal justification, he was considered as little more than a crackpot
by the musical establishment, while
receiving high praise as the greatest of
all genius/innovators by a very tiny
minority.
Until very recently, Sun Ra and his
Arkestra (using such descriptions as
Myth -Science, Solar, Astro -Infinity,
Intergalactic Research, Intergalactic
Infinity, and Intergalactic Discipline in
front of the constant term "Arkestra") could only be heard on 30 to 35
albums released by El Saturn, ESP Disk, Transition, Delmark, and Savoy.
However, these labels have been so
poorly distributed as to be near -nonexistent as far as the average record
buyer is concerned. In the last 11/2
AUDIO MARCH,
years, though, there has been a mild
avalanche of Sun Ra recordings on
nationally distributed labels. It is this
new rash of albums (some new, some
imports, some repackages of Saturn
material) that is of concern here.
Over half of the recent Sun Ra releases are on ABC's Impulse label, one
new set and four re -issues. The earliest of the Impulse albums is Angels
And Demons At Play, recorded between 1955 and 1957. Side two of the
album is straight 50s big band bebop,
revealing Ra's musical origins in Dizzy
Gillespie, Duke Ellington, and Charles Mingus. It's quite good for the era,
though sounding rather dated now.
However, it is on side one where Sun
Ra demonstrates his unique approach
to 50s jazz. Tiny Pyramids is mysterioso Arabic -influenced flute music
over an exotic camel -caravan rhythm.
Music From The World Tomorrow is,
appropriately enough, the strangest
track, with dissonant strings, demented percussion, and Ra's crazed
organ. The whole side is filled with
odd voicings, off -beat spacey melodies, unusual structures, and floating
rhythms, all in a 50s base. The album is
only 23 minutes long, though Impulse seems to be issuing the Saturn
albums intact.
Space Is The Place on Blue Thumb
and Astro Black on Impulse are, as of
this writing, the two most recently released new Sun Ra recordings.
Though the subject matter is still outer space, these two albums find Ra not
too far removed from 1970's possessive Black America. This is partly a case
of the world catching up to Sun Ra in
some small degree. However, it
should be noted that Ra, always ready
to utilize the gains of others if they fit
his aesthetic, has reincorporated
selective soul and jazz influences into
his music.
Space Is The Place is the more commercial album, with contemporary
1975
big band tunes, a madcap updating of
his old Rocket Number Nine, and an
exciting unison -soloing piece called
Sea Of Sounds. The side -long title
song features baritone saxman Danny
Thompson on a repetitive riff, while
the Space Ethnic Voices weave the
title in and around some bristling reed
solos. It is either hypnotic or boring,
depending on your mood and receptivity. The entire album is a brief respite from the subtle complexities of
earlier albums.
Astro Black is a more objectively
creative record. The album abounds
with all the usual modern Sun Ra elements-spurting moog and organ,
June Tyson's cool singing, African rhythms, minor -key exotica, ingenious
arrangements, excellent soloing by
Allen and Davis, and highly intelligent compositions. Particularly fine is
an
ambitious, glowing three-part
piece, The Cosmo -Fire, which ranks
with the very best of his work.
Indeed, Astro Black proves that at
the age of 60, at the peak of his popularity, Sun Ra has not forsaken his
creative principles. At an age where
he would be forgiven if he were
merely to sit back and receive the
accolades that have been so long in
coming, Sun Ra continues to extend
his search for new means of self-expression continually further. Even so,
the music of Herman Blount-intense, personal, and innovative-is
truly unlike anything anyone else has
ever accomplished.
The Nubians Of Plutonia, recorded 1959 at Sun Ra's own El Saturn
Studios, is more consistently strange.
It finds him moving out of the big
band framework, with many more
avant-garde elements. Indeed, the
straight and the bizarre clash almost
ludicrously at times, with typically
(Continued on page
63)
57
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ADVERTISER
ATV Research
TV Camera Kit
83
Write Direct to Advertiser
Acoustical Mfg. Co.
Amplifiers
Write Direct to Advertiser
Ahuja Radios
1
75
68
Audio Dynamics
High Fidelity Components
Write Direct to Advertiser
39
Avid
Loudspeakers
Check No. 3 on Reader Service Card
63
BGW Systems
72
on Reader Service Card
I
16, 70
High Fidelity Components
Write Direct to Advertiser
British Industries Co.
Venturi Speakers
Check No. 9 on Reader Service Card
3
Crown International
High Fidelity Components
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6
dbx, Inc.
on Reader Service Card
27
Receivers
Check No. 15 on Reader Service Card
29
Model 60 X Turntable
Check No. 16 on Reader Service Card
81
18,
Magnavox
High Fidelity Components
Check No. 18 on Reader Service Card
Magnepan
Magneplanar Speakers
Check No. 19 on Reader Service Card
19
71
Marantz Co.
Cover
Electrostatic Headphones
Check No. 43 on Reader Service Card
Maxell
3
Phase Linear Corp
on Reader Service Card
2
76
SAE
71
High Fidelity Components
Check No. 30 on Reader Service Card
Sansui Electronics
Saxitone Tape Sales
Blank Recording Tape
Write Direct to Advertiser
80
Schwann Record & Tape Guide
Current Listings
79
Back Cover
Sherwood Electronic Labs
High Fidelity Components
Check No. 32 on Reader Service Card
43
Shure Bros
Cartridges
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8
Stanton Magnetics
Cartridges
Check No. 24 on Reader Service Card
TEAC
Tape Decks
1
77
Quintessence
High Fidelity Components
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Dynaco
PAT=4
13
RTR Industries
15
49
7
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4
Tektronix
High Fidelity Components
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Teletronics
84
Subscription Information
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United Audio
5
Dual Turntables
Check No. 38 on Reader Service Card
Yamaha
Loudspeakers
Check No. 39 on Reader Service Card
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www.americanradiohistory.com
73
78
76
Polk Audio
Loudspeakers
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58
33
High Fidelity Components
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73
47
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82
Teledaptor
Write Direct to Advertiser
Ruxton Electronics
Speaker and Amplifier Kits
Check No. 29 on Reader Service Card
Amplifiers
Check No.65 on Reader Service Card
Sound Technology Research
P12 Loudspeaker
Check No. 35 on Reader Service Card
Pioneer
Cover 2,
Tuners and Amplifiers
Check No. 24 on Reader Service Card
Loudspeakers
Check No. 28 on Reader Service Card
Rhoades & Co.
Sony
Dokorder
High Fidelity Components
Check No. 12 on Reader Service Card
65
69
Blank Recording Tape
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McIntosh Lab.
Free Catalog
Check No. 21 on Reader Service Card
Revox Corp.
Tape Decks
Write Direct to Advertiser
High Fidelity Components
Check No. 23 on Reader Service Card
Audio Accessories
Discwasher Inc
Record Cleaning Materials
Write Direct to Advertiser
Logic Newsletter
Sample Copy
PAIA Electronics
70
Synthesizer Kits
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30
11
65
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23
BML Electronics
Tracer
Check No. 8 on Reader Service Card
Check No.
14
PAGE
ADVERTISER
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Kirsch
76
Stereo Shelving
Check No. 17 on Reader Service Card
35, 37
Bose Corp.
11
KLH
Blank Recording Tape
Check No. 4 on Reader Service Card
6
Amplifiers
Check No.
JVC
Audioanalyst
Loudspeaker Systems
Check No. 2 on Reader Service Card
Amplifiers
Check No.
Empire Scientific
Cartridges
Check No. 13 on Reader Service Card
Great American Sound Co.
on Reader Service Card
BASF
PAGE
66
PA Systems
Check No.
ADVERTISER
41
MARCH, 1975
(Continued from page 57)
unique dissonances, pervasive percussion timbres, exotic rhythms, and
discomforting horn voicings in abundance. Among the highlights are
James Spaulding's first alto solo on
The Golden Lady, the humming harmony vocal and Marshall Allen's
melancholy flute on Africa, and the
over-all weirdness of Aiethopia. Also
included is an early version of Wat usa, an Egyptian march, which is as
close as Sun Ra comes to having a
"theme song." The engineering is im balanced and obscurant, but this only
adds to the mysteriousness of the
murky -textured music.
Two other Saturn/Impulse re -issues, The Magic City and Atlantis,
were unavailable fqr review. Both,
however, are considered Sun Ra masterpieces, dating from 'ardund 1960.
Other Sun Ra recordings of the' 60s,
during which he abandoned established forms to develop his own
"black classical music" (improvised
music using jazz instruments, but
methods and concepts similar to postwar academic music), are still pretty
much unobtainable.
The exception is Pictures Of Infinity, on Audio Fidelity's Black Lion
label. Unfortunately, this is a straight
big -band jazz album, albeit quite a
good one. Dating from 1968 (released in the U.S. in late 1973), it has
several forceful examples of Ra's most
important contribution of the early
the controlled "free" ensemble.
On the opening Somewhere There (of
which 10 of the 15 minutes are devoted to drumming) and the flippant
band vocal, Outer Spaceways Incorporated, each member of the 10 -man
horn section appears to simultaneously blow a different, seemingly
random, atonal improvisation. However, these unison passages are rather
tightly masterminded by Ra, with the
freedom given strict boundaries.
Nonetheless, these wild, screaming,
squealing ensembles are extremely
exciting and spontaneous -sounding.
These ensembles reached their fullest development on It's After The End
Of The World. By any standards, this
1970 German live album is an enthralling creative experience. Sun Ra's
expansive compositions are brilliant
launching pads for the swirling, visionary soloing. The album is filled
with expressive woodwind textures
(flutes, oboes, saxophones, and the
angry sound of a bassoon fitted with a
trumpet mouthpiece), with such longtime Sun Ra sidemen as Marshall
Allen, Danny Davis, and Pat Patrick at
the summit of their inventiveness. Sun
Ra himself plays some of his most
majestically powerful keyboard solos
on record. There are also couple samples of Ra sermonizing his philosophies. The excellence of the music
and its presentation make this the
very best available introduction to the
strange world of Sun Ra.
ttem
60s,
Sun Ra Discography
.4,x.0.
.0%.9-0-03
Angels and Demons at Play
Impulse AS -9245, mono, $5.98.
Sound: B- Performance: B
Fate in a Pleasant Mood
Impulse AS -9270, stereo, $5.98
The Nubians of Plutonia
Impulse AS -9242, mono, $5.98
Super-Sonic Sounds
Impulse AS -9271, stereo, $5.98
Sound: B- Performance: C
Sound:
C-
Performance: B+
Pictures of Infinity
Black Lion BL -106, stereo, $5.98
It's After the End of the World
BASF 20748, stereo, $5.98
Sound: B+ Performance: A
Space is the Place
Blue Thumb BTS -41, quadraphonic,
$5.98
Sound:
A-
Performance:
A-
Astro Black
Impulse AS -9255, quadraphonic, $5.98
Sound: A Performance: A
Sound:
B- Performance: A-
Heliocentric Worlds of Sun
ESP -Disk
Sound:
ESP -Disk
Sound:
Avid 102.
Ra,
Vol.
Ra,
Vol. II
"Utter smoothness and
freedom from undue emphasis
or coloration..." Julian Hirsch,
Stereo Review-April, 1974/
Avid 103.
"One of the more sensational high-fidelity buys of our
time..." Modem Hi-Fi & Stereo
Performance: A+
Nothing
Is
ESP -Disk
1045, stereo, $5.98
Sound:
"Extremely smooth and
1017, stereo, $5.98
A-
Guide-November, 1974/
Avid 60.
But it's not what we think,
or even what the critics think,
that's important. It's what you
think. See for yourself at your
nearest Avid dealer.
B- Performance: B+
The Magic City
Saturn LPB-711, stereo, $5.98
Sound:
B
Performance:
A++
There are several other Sun Ra
albums available through El Saturn
Research, P.O. Box 7124, Chicago, Ill.
CORPORATION
10 Tripps Lane/East Providence, RI. 02914
60607.
AUDIO MARCH,
The most acclaimed new
line of speaker systems on the
market today didn't get there
by accident.
At Avid, we're totally
dedicated to just one thing and
one thing only: the design and
construction of the cleanest sounding, most accurate
speakers in their price range.
Each and every one.
And that's not just so much
advertisingese. It's for real.
And we're not the only ones
who think so.
"A best in its class..."
High Fidelity- August, 1974/
neutral..." Len Feldman, FM
Guide-December, 1974/
Performance: A
Heliocentric Worlds of Sun
A committment.
Avid 100.
1014, stereo, $5.98
A-
Before we
started making
speakers,
we made
something else.
63
1975
www.americanradiohistory.com
Check No.
3
on Reader Service Card
The Column
Fred
Illusions on a Double Dimple: Triumvirat.
Harvest ST 11311, stereo, $4.95.
Three-man rock groups are becoming as rare as hen's teeth, but as
typified by this German trio, those still
around are worth listening to. This
group is new to me and, I believe,
new to these shores. The name of the
album is as inexplicable as the name
of the band, which might well itself
cause confusion since it recalls an album (a disaster) which was titled
Triumvirate (Dr. John's only recorded mistake, which he made with Mike
Bloomfield and John Paul Hammond.
Don't confuse this group with that album.)
Illusions on a Double Dimple is a
well-done album from Germany
which should not be overlooked.
When you see the white rat coming
out of an egg shell on the cover, don't
feel stupid. had no idea what that
was all about either. The record inside is a totally different story. It is excellent. Much of the music the other
musicians make is overwhelmed by
the superb keyboard work of Jurgen
I
J
DeVan
Fritz. His synthesizer and organ work
is strikingly well conceived. Percussionist Hans Bathelt does much more
than go chunka-chunka. He plays
with precision and speed, embellishing every line and riff. Helmut Kollen
would be totally submerged by the
strengths of the other two were his
bass, guitar, and vocal work less
strong and solid.
Side One has a flow of ideas gath-
ered under the title of the album,
while Side Two is entitled Mister Ten
Per Cent. Helmut Kollen delivers
vocals and instrumentals in styles that
normally turn me off, but not only do
they grab me here; they are fully in
keeping with the statement being
made. His brash violent delivery of
words and the dissonant bass line
make a really interesting and exciting
flow which segues into a number of
broad, strong, statements. Hats off to
this band!
It seems that today's musicians are
out to make firm, often personal
statements on the conditions of a
musician's life. To name two: Janis
Ian's Stars, a softly, sensitively -delivered, nine -minute condemnation
of what the music -biz had done to her
and many others, and Rick Derringer's The Airport Giveth. There are
many, many others. Mister Ten Per
Cent does it with rawness and clout
initially, and goes on with logical, uplifting smoothness into expressions
that are mostly non-verbal, but easy to
identify with. I suppose that is what
makes a good concept album. A really
well-done job of making music.
This German recording is on a par
with the best of the classical and jazz
discs coming out of that country. With
ECM and DGG issuing their fine recordings, everybody else is kept busy
trying to keep up. EMI Electrola
GMBH (German Capitol) has pulled
out all the stops.
Put this "stereo" record through an
SQ decoder and you may be a bit confused as to what's happening. This
disc, like many others, released as
"stereo"
has quadraphonic virtues
which are inexplicably a well -kept
secret. You just have to experience it
to know what mean.
I
Sound: A
Performance: A
AUDIO
64
www.americanradiohistory.com
MARCH, 1975
Good Old Boys: Randy Newman
Reprise M5 2193, stereo, $6.98.
It appears to me that Randy Newman intends his Good Old Boys album to be more than poking provocative humor and music at a (I hope
dying) moral chink in our society.
Good Old Boys can be treated as
commentary on today's realities
couched in an image of the Summer
of '42 and southern political structure
before the new south (i.e. a communal and profitable reform of social/economic spread and vitality)
burst into life.
Randy Newman throws musical and
lyrical darts at things the USIA and its
mus -biz Doppelganger, the mass total
of program directors and music directors hold dear. What their sins reflect is the mentality that provides interesting news. The good old boys of
City Hall or the Chamber of Commerce tell them how to look and what
to say. The rednecks of the world, of
our time, of our nation are everywhere. From the White House to your
gas tank and a.c. socket, it's the good
old boys and the rednecks who ruin
things of substance and who exploit
things and people of value.
You will not hear most of Randy
Newman's Good Old Boys on the
came across it
radio. Indeed,
through a friend who insisted that
listen to it. did and he left without it.
had to borrow it from him right then
and there. It is one of the most brilliantly conceived and executed records have heard. Aside from the social commentary on past and present
(its point of view is in the Thirties with
many aspects of today interwoven), it
is also a personal impression of what
he saw and felt on a recent return to
his ancestral home in Louisiana.
His words vary from bitingly cruel
attacks on everything he can cram
into four minutes to wry twisted
humor that is so pervasive and intelligent, it forces one to look beyond the
poetry of it all and peer into oneself.
His songs travel a course so broad that
one cannot take all the information in
without repeated listenings. There are
straight-out controversial and cleverly reflective songs like Rednecks
and Kingfish; political satire on Every
Man A King and Mr. President (have
pity on the working man); and there
are even a love song, a drinking song,
a touch of Steven Foster, a dash of
warm tenderness, plus a twisting tribute to Birmingham, Alabama, to cap
things off.
Randy Newman has given us a
documentary portrait of a sentimental, compassionate romantic, along
with the genius of wit and metaphor
he holds the patent on. He has not al -
The PreAmp is Coming!
PreAmp is Coming!
;>~;:;r..
.
THAEDRA
,4;
I
pi
di
IF
THE GREAT AMERICAN SOUND COMPANY, INC.
8780 Shoreham Drive, W. Hollywood, CA 90069 - (213) 659-2486
I
Check No. 14 on Reader Service Card
I
I
I
I
AUDIO
MARCH, 1975
The best by far...
because Revox delivers what
all the rest only promise.
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es
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www.americanradiohistory.com
a
p.s
aad o
Òe
\e`S
ways applied it in the past, but he
is
without doubt one of the most important composer/writers around.
Popular music may not be important enough to lump him with Solzhenitsyn, Nabokov, or Schlessinger.
But as an art it has generated social
changes more than once. think we
take its material far too lightly. We fail
to acknowledge the forces embodied
in vinyl waffles. As circumspect as
some of our singer/writers' wisdom is
today, so was Mark Twain in his time.
The little essays that are the songs of
today are too available to be precious
in our time, too transitory to have sustained relevance. Yet, happily, this
will be .art of some nostalgia kick in
I
the future and a lot of things we dismissed or ignored in this decade will
find rebirth in the future.
Fortunately, you don't have to wait,
you can truck down to your local record store and have this utterly perfect recording right nowt don't say
this lightly-it is just that every intended goal has been realized. The music
is brilliant, the execution is flawless,
the sound is impeccable. It is one of
those stereo records which sounds
good in quad using either a QS or an
SQ decoder to extract ambience information for the rear (side) channels. Any form of enhancement
works, but it also sounds great in ordinary two -speaker stereo.
I
Again and Again
and Again
Given the time, the patience,
and the money, one can connect*
fifty 303 amplifiers nose to
tail so that the programme goes
through one after the other
gradually deteriorating along
the way.
Deteriorating? The fact is
that apart from a very slight
backround hiss akin to a
good tape recording the
programme will sound exactly
the same at the end as when it
started.
*Of course one must fit an
attenuator to reduce the signal
back to its original level
between each amplifier.
Send postcard for illustrated
leaflet to Dept.(A U)
Acoustical Manufacturing
Co. Ltd., Huntingdon PE18 7DB.
Telephone (0480) 52561.
- -
QUAD
Products of
the Acoustical Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
for the closest anoroach to the original sound.
QUAD is a Registered Trade Mark
The instrumentation and musical
structure were conceived along with
the words and are part of the total
work as opposed to being words set to
music, or vice versa. If could find any
fault with this recording of any kind
would mention it.
can't. It is a
unique record. No review can do it
justice.
I
I
I
Sound: A
It's Only Rock 'N Roll: The Rolling
Stones
Rolling Stone 79101, stereo, $6.98.
I'm amazed to find myself writing
this, but the Rolling Stones have a
very pleasant record album. So much
of what they've done in the past is totally unappealing, yet somehow they
have always generated something that
grabs me. I think beyond the hype
and the image to the good music they
have occasionally made.
When Jagger and company are
doing their kind of rock and roll, they
always manage to produce a pure
gem-one or two per album. The
music of The Rolling Stones that you
hear most is (to me) ugly. I can rarely
listen through a whole Rolling Stones
album. Some of their newer things are
really hard to deal with and are meant
to be twisted and rough. The Rolling
Stones are that way.
Now The Stones present us with a
total admission of guilt. Guilty of subordinating music for perpetuation of
their image. Guilty of trashing Rock
and Roll for the sake of producing
acoustic hysteria. The full title of this
album and cut three, side one is: It's
Only Rock 'N Roll (But I Like It). They
build a basis for this statement on the
first two cuts which are standard
grossed -out Rock and Roll Stones, at
best tolerable. The rest of the record
is uphill; it keeps getting better.
Time Waits For No One is a long
rocker with one of Keith Richards'
best solos and a lot of really nice
piano by Nicky Hopkins.
As usual the sound is loud, usually
with the density of granite. As usual,
that very density is at odds with what
good musical qualities they possess.
Again, they have culled some excellent musicians from elsewhere to add
color where ever it can shine through.
They picked up the whole Blue Magic
group to do background vocals on If
You Really Want To Be My Friend.
Among others they gathered in Billy
Preston and Ian Stewart on piano, and
Ray Cooper on percussion.
The quieter parts of the pressing I
have are noisy by today's standards.
Sound:
66
www.americanradiohistory.com
Performance: A
B
Performance:
AUDIO MARCH,
B
1975
(Continued from page 55)
citive load to the Tape Out jacks. An IHF load (1000 pF in
parallel with 100K) causes a high frequency rolloff at 30 kHz.
While the 1000 pF is rather extreme, if you do have some
rather long Tape Out leads, you might get some audible
high frequency rolloff. Output amplifier scope photos are
shown in Fig. 11, and the amount of droop in the 20 kHz
square wave about doubles when going from an IHF to a
10K load. When the filters are switched in, there is no increase in noise, as with some circuitry-a good feature.
Another good feature is that the balance control, due to
its position past the high level amplifier, doesn't increase
noise when it is rotated away from center.
Crosstalk between channels of the phono preamp at 20
Hz was about -68 dB, increasing to -61 dB at 1 kHz, and to
-56 between 5 and 20 kHz. All measurements here are
good. High level crosstalk, using AUX 1 with the tone controls out, was -55 dB at 20 Hz, -72 at 1 kHz, and -49 dB at
20 kHz. With the tone controls in, the crosstalk is even better at high frequencies, about -62 dB at 20 kHz.
The maximum power output of the headphone amp is
about 250 mW into 4 ohms, 245 mW into 8 ohms, and 202
mW into 16 ohms. The IM distortion here is mostly 2nd and
3rd harmonic, varying between 0.05% and a few tenths of a
percent as voltage ranges from 1/2 V to 11/2 V, depending on
load impedance. The output resistance is about 0.16 ohms,
which might make dynamic phones sound better at low frequencies because of better damping.
The power amplifier had a voltage gain with the pots wide
open of 43 to 1, or 34.6 dB, which is higher than the 34 to 1
specified. This amp passed the new FTC one hour burn -in at
1/3 full power test with no apparent problems. THD and IM
are shown in Fig. 12, with one -watt frequency response and
THD versus frequency and power in Fig. 13. Note that the 1
watt distortion versus frequency curve begins at 1 kHz, since
at this point the distortion began to climb above the noise,
indicating a small amount of high frequency crossover dis-
23 at 20 kHz, decreasing smoothly
above 500 Hz.
Power at clipping was 301 watts into 4 ohms. At 8 ohms, it
was about 185 to 190 watts, and at 16 ohms about 110 watts.
Next measured was the output noise, with input shorted,
for two bandwidths. From 20 to 20,000 Hz, the output noise
is 160 mV in the left channel and 183 in the right, mostly random noise. With a 400 Hz to 20 kHz bandwidth, output noise
was 83µV for the left channel and 87 for the right. All these
are very good measurements, since for example, the 183 µV
right channel is 105.5 dB below rated power of 150 watts.
Bascom H. King
low frequencies to about
Check No. 64 on Reader Service Card
Table 3-Preamplifier noise vs. volume control position
(Aux 1 input shorted).
Bandwidth
Control
Right Out
Noise (uV)
Pos.
(Hz)
20-20K
400 - 20 K
20 - 20 K
400 - 20 K
20 - 20 K
400 - 20 K
CCW
CCW
Worst case
Worst case
CW
CW
Left Out
Noise (uV)
15
14
11
11
97
82
76
25
22
81
28
22
tortion.
Overall this amplifier measures very well, though it does
a tiny bit of odd harmonic distortion, about 0.01%
which is not likely to be heard. Introduction of the bandpass filters raised distortion slightly at high power levels-from 0.01% to 0.016% at 100 watts, 1 kHz. Scope photos
of various waveforms through the amplifier are shown in
Figs. 14 through 17.
This amplifier has excellent high frequency power capability, as shown by the 80 V peak -to -peak, 20 kHz square
wave and the 80 V p -p 10 kHz square wave with a two uF
load. Damping factor versus frequency varied from 100 at
have
AUDIO MARCH
Fig. 17 -10 -kHz square waves
about 160 VA, bottom about
into 2µF resistive loads; top
3
is
VA.
67
1975
www.americanradiohistory.com
Classical Reviews
J
Edward Tatnall Canby
Francois Couperin: Les Nations.
Quadro Amsterdam. Telefunken TK
11550/1-2 (2 discs), stereo, $13.96.
This is the ultimate French music of
the Louis XIV and XV period, the very
essence of Frenchness-and isn't it
curious that, as with the Italians, outsiders like these Dutch seem to do a
much better job of playing it than the
French ever do.
There are four of the special
Couperin -type suites in this published collection, spaced out over
much of his composing life, the latest
from 1726. Each has a name, a country
personified-La
Francoise,
L'Imperiale, L'Espagnole,
Walt Ostrander, Aúdioonalyst,
As Seen Through Th
es
Of His A-100X Spear
x::,.
His tortures drive drivers to drink.
This perfectionist believes
results justify the individual
bench testing of every single
assembly. "Unusually flat
toward the top of its price
range" says High Fidelity
of ourA-100X bookshelf
speaker. We say, a Six Year
Warranty on every speaker in the Audioanalyst
line, $94 to $249.
Everyone boasts clean highs, low
bass, a better driver.
best drivers are pretty much
alike. It's what our Audio
Fact.Thet-r
analysts do with them that's different. Is there
a percentage in this kind of obsession? A sound
one to be sure.To test our speakers, simply
write to us. All we ask is that you give them what
we give them. The works.
Mideastern distributor:
Argo Hellas, Intl. Hollstein Hotel in Taunus,
6382 Friedrichsdorf/Bad Hamburg, West
Germany.
Distributed
in
Canada by
Supe'ior Electronics Inc.
European
and
-
:Audioanalyst
PO. Box 262, Brookfield, Conn. 06804
Monstrous About Perfection
toise-but
La
Piemon-
these are wholly fanciful
and have nothing to do with the
music itself, which, some of it, had
earlier names quite different. PR stuff.
Each has an Italian -based Baroque
sonata at the beginning, six movements slow and fast, and then a suite
of dances including a variation -like
chaconne, 14 or 15 short movements
altogether. No strain-it all goes forward smoothly and easily. The Dutch
players, notably Frans Brüggen, young
genius of flute and recorder, and Gustav Leonhardt on the harpsichord,
have so perfectly caught the French
ambience that one almost expects
them to Frenchify their names-Francois de Bruges? Gustave Coeur de
Lion?
Carlo Gesualdo: The Complete Five part Madrigals. Quintetto Vocale Italiano, Ephrikian. Telefunken SIA
25086-117 (7 discs), stereo, $48.88.
Small choral groups, and a very few
professional solo groups, occasionally tackle the strange, chromatic
music of Don Carlo Gesualdo, an Italian nobleman and dilletante of the
early 17th century. My own Canby
Singers have sung a dozen or so of
these works. Stravinsky and others in
his league have been fascinated-Gesualdo Monumentum, a
Stravinsky ballet score made out of
three Gesualdo madrigals. We sang
the three originals. But all of them?
There are six Books, published over
many years, with from 15 to 20 works
in each, many of them in two parts,
double length. This was the age when
the content of a later symphonic
movement was crammed into a few
minutes. Each of these takes long
study and repetition-by singers or by
listeners-if the meat and sense is to
get through. Not that they are
dull-far from
Check No.
2
on Reader Service Card
it. Just concentrated,
one idea right on top of another.
OK-so here are six books, the
68
www.americanradiohistory.com
AUDIO* MARCH, 1975
works, and it must have taken these
really excellent solo singers years to
do the recording job. Indeed it did;
the dates of recording are given.
Curiously, their sense of the music
and how to project it with musical
force grows, as they move forward
from book to book, session to session. But so also did G. himself grow!
So his best late works are sung the
best; the earlier madrigals are given
appropriately less intense treatment.
Complete texts and lots of annotations and a life time of listening for
anyone who dares.
THE PROIAM
TAPE
Leopold Stokowski, The Philadelphia
Orchestra. De Falla: El Amor Brujo.
Wagner -Stokowski: Love Music from
Tristan. With Shirley Verrett, mezzo.
Odyssey Y 32368, stereo, $3.49.
Now here is the sort of "reissue"-quotes are deliberate-which
timeless bargain, even at a new
low price of $3.49. (Odyssey was once
$2.50.) "The Great Columbia Stereo
Recordings" looks good as a highflying ad phrase but it also happens to be
moderately accurate. This one is indeed timeless in stereo sound and
might have been done yesterday, unless you are one of those engineers
who say, ah yes, those old Neumann
mikes they used to use, and an RCA in
the middle-don't you hear it? Not
me. Good stereo is good, if in various
styles according to period and circumstance, and this one definitely is
good. Clean, and wide, and large in
the bass.
It must have been an exciting day
when old Stoky, who first took over
think in 1912, came
this orchestra
back to make stereo recordings such
as these, before RCA took the orchestra away from Columbia. Undeniably, the orchestra's great days were
is a
I
under the durable old maestro,
though it has always been potentially
a
superb instrument. Virtually the
entire early output of 78 electrical
albums in America came from Philadelphia and Stokowski, via Victor, of
course, in its first proprietorship. This
is in that sense a rerun. But the old fire
is there and every man in the orchestra knew it. Imagine it-this old man
still waving his hands after 60 years!
A vividly Spanish De Falla,
sparkling, brooding-does Stoky
know how to bring out this sort of
drama! Busty, gutsy Spanish singing
by Verrett. And on side 2 one of the
famous "symphonic synthesis" works,
in which Stokowski seamlessly joined
bits of opera together for people who
didn't like singers but wanted Tristan.
They got it, and plenty else. All in all, a
fine "reissue."
AUDIO MARCH,
1975
Introducing Maxell UI ra Dynamic
backcoated/open reel tape.
A professional studio engineer
doesn't have time for dropouts, wow, flutter, tape noise, static, poor winding,
edge damage or erratic tape traction.
Maxell Ultra Dynamic tape has the
backcoating that eliminates tnese recording obstacles.
That's why the professionals use it.
And why you should too.
While your Maxell UD tape is running (and the backcoating is protecting
your music) you can concentrate on mike
placement, sound levels and the more
creative side of audio...like shushing the
kids in the next room.
Maxel Corporation of America,
Moonachie, New Jersey 07074. Also available in Canada.
I
maxell.
For professional recordings
at home.
,nt
Check No. 20 on Reader Service Card
69
www.americanradiohistory.com
The Haydn Organs in Eisenstadt. Concertos by J. and M. Haydn, Albrechts-
was already composer in residence at
this great princely center for the Esterhazy clan. The music is as above, by
"the" Haydn (Josef) and his brother
berger. Daniel Chorzempa; German
Bach Soloists. Philips 6700 052 (2 discs),
stereo, $15.90.
A rather special organ disc, this
one, both as to place and as to the
musical style. After the great Baroque
period of organ building and elegant
stuff called "galant," all frills and
furbelows. The organ! It really didn't
suit that magnificent and somewhat
(Michael) and by one Albrechts-
formal instrument, but our composers, nothing daunted, went right
ahead, since most of their music was
played where the organs were a normal accompaniment.
berger; it all sounds much alike, pleasant, ornamental, lovely in the orchestral parts and doing nothing
much in the organ department, just
spinning frilly melodies. Almost exactly as it must have sounded on the
same instruments 200 -plus years ago,
which apparently was very satisfactory to all concerned. Three different
organs, and Philips curiously makes it
difficult to find which of them plays
which music, though there are excel-
This is music of the very early
Haydn period, the low 1760s, when
Mozart was a child and young Haydn
lent pictures of the instruments.
Doesn't matter much-in recording,
they sound pretty much alike to the
ri
THE GNOME FILLS A VARIETY OF NEEDS!
TO THE SEASONED
PERFORMER
It's the
...
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INTRODUCES
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extra voice that completes
a composition while leaving
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TO THE BEGINNER ... It's a
low cost introduction to synthesizers that won't be obsolete
when more expensive instruments are purchased.
TO THOSE IN BETWEEN... the
GNOME's portability and ease of
operation make It great for "toy
boxes," sound effects or Just
for fun.
PAIA's FREE CATALOG
features the GNOME and
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listen
If your business is providing or operating
quality sound systems for musical performances...
Listen to the sound of live music with a
conventional reinforcement system and
then with the unconventional BOSE 800
system.
Only BOSE lets through the clear, natural
sound of the live musical performance...
without traditional sound system coloration. Prove it to yourself. Just listen.
$4.98.
Well, here we go, and this will have
to stand for umpteen Olympic releases in the "Classical Collection"
that are mono oldies (some stereo)
fashioned into QS simulated quadraphonic. Might say doubly simulated.
As so often in the Everest family, it is a
splendid musical performance, well
worth bringing back on musical
grounds. And as so often, too, the
sound is so scratchy that I can't
believe the original (was it Westminster, Urania?) wasn't a lot better, if
mono. Typically, the opening chord
(a) has a loud pre -echo and (b) slides
up to pitch. Sloppy lathe work or
machine work, and we can't waste a
whole lacquer just for one little
chord...
is one of the greatest flutof the century and unusual in that,
unlike the earlier French flute genii
he specializes and is best at 17th and
18th century works, of the sort we
have here. Rene Leibowitz, a top
French serial composer and theorist,
did a notable series of fine recordings soon after WW II was over and
France got back into the act. That's
what we have here. A surprisingly
jaunty and elegant ("galant") concerto by Gluck, the opera man, and
the familiar Telemann Suite, here
played-so far back-with the correct rhythms and tempi, a thing that
many an orchestra still doesn't do
(Marlboro, for instance). Good stuff
and you quickly forget the edgy
sound if you are music minded. Just
open up the filter.
Rampal
ists
Mozart: Piano Concertos No. 14, K.
22, K.482. Paul Badura-Skoda;
Vienna Symphony, Sterberg. Olympic
8104, sim. stereo, $4.95.
Please send information on the BOSE 800 to:
Name
I
Jean-Pierre Rampal: The German
Rococo Flute. (Gluck: Concerto in G
Major; Telemann: Suite in A Minor.)
Paris Philharmonic, Leibowitz. Olympic 8112 (Everest), QS quadromonic,
449,
._1174117,SF
l
non -expert ear. The playing is light
and expert, right in the style of the
music.
If you know the little Mozart organ
concerti, or the London organ works
of Christian Bach (the youngest Bach
son), you'll find this music the same,
and just as elegant.
Address
City/State/Zip
BOSE The Mountain, Framingham, MA 01701 Dept. AP
It had to happen,
knew, as
ploughed my way through the piles of
these many Everest -family reissues, in
all sorts of quadramonic, stereo, simulated stereo, and maybe just mono.
This one, turned over, displayed two
I
70
www.americanradiohistory.com
I
AUDIO MARCH,1975
big columns of annotation-signed in
large letters EDWARD TATNALL
CANBY. So long ago, I did not even
recognize a word of it! Don't think I
was asked. The liner rights evidently
go with the tapes which, maybe were
Westminster? I'm not even sure. So
too am being reissued, along with the
floods of old records revived. I feel
like a fossil, or maybe a leprechaun.
Excellent music, as usual. Execrable
sound. You can't tell me that any
taped original, even c. 1954 maybe,
could sound as scratchy and fuzzy as
this. And painfully overloaded, as
soon as the first loud tutti passage is
reached. Awful. Too much. I expect
have the original of this one-I'll let
you know if I can find it somewhere in
the files. (Fat chance.)
And yet-Badura-Skoda emerged
about that time as one of the finest
Mozart players (Schubert too, any
Viennese music) for recording. Like
Gould he is better on discs than in the
flesh, apparently. Jonathan Sternberg
was one of the postwar reconstrucI
I
tion conductors, doing a job for the
early Haydn Society recordings and
then (I think here) for Westminster.
Good musical history on these
records-it was the pioneer period for
the LP via tape. But such a reconstruction as this scratchy disc? Well, it
could be my stylus. (But why do the
new Philips discs sound so good, same
stylus?) Search through the rest of the
Olympics on your own, and maybe
put on ear flaps to contour the sound.
Baroque Organ Masters-Buxtehude,
Boehm, Walther. Kenneth Gilbert,
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AUDIO MARCH,
1975
71
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P.O
Casavant organs, Sts. Jean & Joliette,
Quebec. Orion OR574155,stereo,$6.98.
Unusual among organ discs in that
these modern Baroque -style organs
are French Canadian, with (for my
ear) a hint of the French Baroque in
them, as of Louis XIV and XV. They are
two relatively modest Quebec
churches and the sound is on the
chaste side as here recorded, Joliette
and Jean both. Partly due to modestly
live acoustics, microphoned without
any vast reverb. But the organs
themselves, clearly out of the same
builder's thinking, are almost aristocratically highbrow in sound though it
is a lovely sound just the same. Kenneth Gilbert is a careful and accurate
player who contributes his own relatively quiet expressiveness to the
record. All this, in comparison to some
of the showier recordings of the big old
North German organs-which can be
positively flamboyant when somebody (E. Power Biggs?) wants them
to be! A good little recording of wellchosen music.
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THESE AMPS
SOUND BEST!
Theater Music
Donald M. Spoto
MODEL 250
Trouble in Tahiti: Leonard Bernstein
Singers: Nancy Williams, Julian Patrick: Leonard Bernstein, conductor,
with the Columbia Wind Ensemble.
Columbia EM 32597, stereo, $6.98.
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The original mono recording of
Bernstein's Trouble in Tahiti commands fancy scalpers' prices these
days. Thus, this recent recording
should command the interest of nostalgia -maniacs as well as Bernstein
fans. It should also save members of
these groups from paying inflated
prices for the earlier discs, whose
quality would be at least dubious.
Bernstein called Trouble in Tahiti "a
lightweight piece. The whole thing is
popular song -inspired and the roots
are in musical comedy, or, even better, the American musical theater."
He has wisely chosen to conduct this
new release with the light touch it deserves, since the opera-a satire on
the suburban good life, with dark
undertones of disarray and discord-probably called "searingly
honest" in 1952, has lost some of its
oomph today. Two decades ago, suburban living was taken for granted as
an ideal, so to demonstrate its insufficiency was at that time considered
bold. (Middle-class values were religious ideals during the Eisenhower
years, remember?) But the whole
thing is a trifle naive after Stephen
Sondheim's Company. The confrontations here between Sam and Dinah,
the bored and estranged couple, lack
subtlety. Bernstein is better off with
someone else as his lyricist: Comden
and Green did well for him in Wonderful Town. So did Sondheim in
West Side Story and Richard Wilbur in
Candide.
Still, the bittersweet finale is at least
psychologically honest, with the couple failing to resolve their difficulties
and going out to a movie, one of
those examples of escapist Technicolor twaddle, Trouble in Tahiti.
The campy trio lilting in and out of
the action like a Greek chorus has the
best music Bernstein wrote for this
bonbon, although
admire Nancy
Williams and Julian Patrick for their
solid voices and utter credibility as
Dinah and Sam. Where Bernstein's
I
music for them unimaginatively recalls early Menotti (and Sam's fifth scene aria is surely patterned on the
famous soliloquy in Carousel), there
are flashes of the sort of freshness he
later brought to Wonderful Town in
1953 and his masterpiece. Candide, in
1956.
To Columbia's credit, the disc is
free of warble or static; the musical
preparation has obviously been careful, and the engineering serves the
music well. Stereo separation is direct and reasonable, and there are no
arbitrary pyrotechnics or sudden
shifts.
Trouble in Tahiti is more than a curiosity but less than a masterpiece.
Classify it as the work of a composer
in progress, as Bernstein was then
and, in his effort to do something on
the grand scale, still
is
now.
Performance:
Sound: B+
DYBBUK (Complete Ballet): Leonard
Bernstein
New York City Ballet Orchestra, Composer Conducting; David Johnson,
Baritone; John Ostendorf, Bass.
Columbia M33082, stereo, $6.98.
New York's wunderkind has certainly come a long way since Trouble
in Tahiti. His ballet music for Jerome
Robbins' Dybbuk, which premiered
May 16, 1974, is one of the most interesting compositions for dance in
several years.
Dybbuk is the lost, restless spirit
that enters the body of a living person to possess it. This certainly seems
to be the age of the bizarre, and even
the arts are not immune from trying to
cash in. Bernstein has used a 12 -tone
system which employs (perhaps too
relentlessly, at times) the complexities of the kabbalah, the traditional
Hebrew system of numerology.
This may seem precious to the average listener, and doubt there will be
many music students anxious to decode it all, but the total effect of the
music is strangely moving. In sections
called Witnesses of Birth, Possession,
I
AUDIO MARCH,
72
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B
1975
THE STR P12 IS ONE OF THE BEST SPEAKERS
and Exorcism, the music has an eerie
quality-Bernstein avoids easy cliches
to which Robbins' choreography must
be entirely apposite.
Numerology and dodecaphony
notwithstanding, there are measures
of almost unbearable tenderness (The
Children and Leah invite reflection),
suggesting that Dybbuk is not all head
and no heart. And there are favorite
chords from his earlier symphonies
and from Chichester Psalms, too. The
kind has certainly excited wunder this
time, and I shouldn't be surprised if
he supervised the stereo processing,
too, which is happily free of muddy
brassiness and excesses.
David Johnson and John Ostendorf
try valiantly for a dozen phrases of indistinguishable Hebrew chant in the
opening and closing sections. This will
not appreciably further their singing
careers.
Sound: A
Performance:
B
Singers: Caballe, Domingo, Milnes,
Biegen: Conductor, Solti.
RCA ARD2-0371, CD -4, two records,
$13.98
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The talents of Caballe,
Domingo and Solti ... and an abso-
35
on Reader Service Card
is.
lutely beautiful quadraphonic effort
from RCA. There are entire sections
of this sweetly rapturous score that
shine out like restored pictures; the
third act opening, for example, and
the brief interludes in the last scene.
The usual muddiness that accompanies the second act crowd scenes has
vanished.
To praise Caballe's pianissimo now
is to state the obvious, but what may
not be so evident is the real sensuous
feeling with which she modifies the
usually tepid renderings of the tubercular Mimi. Domingo's voice blends
superbly with hers, and Maestro Solti
modulates everything with a reverence that this opera does not ordinarily receive.
Judith Blegen's Musetta isn't quite
as brash as it should be, but it is an
appealing portrait. The entire recording, in fact, is a fine example of a
cast and crew that you could never
have on the stage (rather like the
Sutherland-Pavarotti-Caballe Turandot under Mehta) without weeping
with laughter, but the tears in the
living room betray another emotion.
This new Boheme would make an old
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Sound: A
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AUDIO MARCH,1975
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73
www.americanradiohistory.com
Jazz
Duke Ellington: The World of Duke
Ellington: Columbia KG 32564, two
discs, stereo, $6.98.
The Duke Is On The Air: Aircheck #4,
mono, $5.98.
The Second Sacred Concert; Prestige
24045, two discs, stereo, $6.98.
Duke Ellington, The Pianist; Fantasy F9462, stereo, $5.98.
While the death of Duke Ellington
triggered the avaand reissues one
might have anticipated, the Ellington
discography continues to grow at a
steady pace, and Ellington collectors
will surely require all four of these relast May has not
lanche of issues
leases. Indeed, jazz buffs in general
will find much that is valuable in all of
them.
The Columbia double set is vintage, 1947-a perplexing year for
Sic
Blues
Ellington, and a very bad one for his
fellow leaders on the then -declining
big band scene. Nevertheless, while
other bands were folding, Ellington
persevered, returning to Columbia
after a seven-vear absence, where he
cut these sessions for the label between August and December 1947. (In
1948 the American Federation of
Musicians imposed a second recording ban, which kept bands from entering recording studios for the entire year. In retrospect, the AFM's
short-sighted policy resulted in pop
singers become increasingly important at the expense of instrumentalists.).
The material in The World of Duke
Ellington is uneven; there are a number of trite pop tunes like It's a Mad,
Mad, World; Kitty, and You've Gotta
Crawl Before You Walk. They were re-
corded, suggests Stanley Dance, who
wrote the album notes, "perhaps with
an eye to a jukebox hit." Whatever
the reason, none of this dross posed
any threat to such jukebox heavyweights of the period as Frankie Laine
or Jo Stafford. Far more productive
musically are the many fine jazz instrumentals. Hi Ya Sue, which kicks off
the first side is a vigorous, earthy,
medium tempo blues with a flashing,
high-stepping solo by altoist Johnny
Hodges, and splendid followup
choruses by trombonist Tyree Glenn
and tenor -man Jimmy Hamilton. Lady
of the Lavender Mist, which follows, is
a vivid showcase for the sonorous, im-
pressionistic Ellington ensemble
sound. The flip side includes Maybe
1
Should Change My Ways, a tune from
the Ellington -Latouche score of Beggars' Holiday; it's crisply and smoothly played by a very mellow sax section and spots expressive solos by
trombonist Lawrence Brown and violinist Ray Nance. Sultry Serenade is
another fine track in the robust dance
band tradition of the 40s.
The high point of The World of
Duke Ellington is a showcase for all
the band's power and solo strength;
Three Cent Stomp. The Progressive
Gavotte is an example of Ellington
whimsey-titled at a time when to be
"progressive" in jazz was to be au
courant. Progressive Gavotte is actually a good ballroom piece taken at a
relaxed tempo from which Johnny
Hodges emerges with an outstanding
chorus-his lush, mellow tone, flowing phrases and swinging beat are joy
to the ears. Hodges also buoys up the
nonchalant Take Love Easy, another
good tune from Beggars' Holiday,
which features a low key vocal by Dolores Parker. I Can't Believe That
You're In Love With Me is played with
joyful elan in an informal jam session
setting with rocking solos from practically everyone in the band. How
High the Moon, another sizzler, is
one of the best big -band interpretations of the jazz classic ever made.
Side Four offer a straightforward and
vigorous Singin' In the Rain, Al Hibbler on the now -standard, Do Nothing
'Til You Hear From Me, and the exquisite On a Turquoise Cloud, with a
shimmering, worldless vocal by Kay
AUDIO
74
www.americanradiohistory.com
MARCH, 1975
Davis. The arrangement is a marvel of
sensual impressionism.
While The World of Duke Ellington
is not the apex of Ellingtonia, it does
display enough expressive writing and
playing and the casually supreme caliber of Ellington's sidemen to make it
important addition to the Ellington discography. The sound transfer
job, both from the original 78s and
from an early 10 -in. microgroove LP, is
excellent. Kudos to Columbia engineer Tom Geelan.
an
Sound:
A-
Performance: A
The sonics of the release called
Duke on the Air would certainly win
no awards from the IHF, but considering it's a 1952 aircheck of a big
band remote from Chicago's late,
lamented jazz club, the Blue Note, the
sound is adequate. This recorded rarity contains broadcast versions of
Ellington standards like Flamingo,
Rockin' in Rhythm, Tulip or Turnip,
Bakiff and Sophisticated Lady, and
makes for interesting comparison
with the studio recordings.
In 1952, the year the Ellington band
got out of the doldrums that were a
holdover from the late Forties (in 1950
Down Beat magazine gave Ellington a
scroll commemorating the fact that
his was the only leading band from
the magazine's 1949 poll still in existence!). Drummer Louis Bellson was
the band's inspiration as it emerged
from this difficult period, and he
sparks the ensemble on driving performances of The Hawk Talks, Jam
With Sam, and Flying Home. The
Ellington orchestra, which now
boasted the tremendous trumpet section of Clark Terry, Ray Nance, Willie
Cook, and Cat Anderson, plays with a
raw, urgenn sound, and with fire in its
belly.
Sound: C
Performance:
A-
Two decades later the sense of urgency had gone, and many devoted
followers of Duke felt he was coasting through his final years and were
dubious about his forays in religious
music. Indeed, the First Sacred Concert, recorded in 1965, was not well
received. But the Second Sacred Concert, just -eissued by Prestige, performed and recorded at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in 1968, is a
rich, exultant work that may eventually be regarded as an important piece
of American music.
The Second Concert is many faceted, with elements of sensuality, reverence, spirituality, and drama. The
Ellingtonian orchestral effects are always in evidence-the idiomatic
cross -harmonies, polyrhythmic effects, unusual modulations and dissonances have been welded to passionate vocal declamatory passages.
The outstanding Heaven section,
which features Ellington's nimble,
striding piano, a stunning recitative by
the Swedish soprano Alice Babs, and
an exquisitely phrased, flowing
chorus by Johnny Hodges, is memorable and moving. Another highlight is
an evocative solo by Duke called
Meditations.
Sound: A+
Performance: A
The
dependable
public address
equipment
Duke Ellington the pianist was always overshadowed by Ellington the
Yet
leader/composer/orchestrator.
one of the special treats for the Ellington connoisseur was to occasionally
savour Duke at the keyboard as soloist or accompanied by rhythm. Fantasy's Duke Ellington, the Pianist is
taken from some casual sessions taped
in New York City and Las Vegas. The
New York performances are disappointing and do not compare with the
superb Ellington trio recordings made
in Hollywood for Capitol in 1963. The
New York tracks cover Side One and
part of Side Two, they are pleasant but
superficial.
The chordal explorations and sinuous lines, incorporating the melodic
curve of the blues that one comes to
expect from this marvelous piano
player are not present until we get to
the 1970 Vegas sides, which are the
last three selections on the LP. Duck
Amok, is a rocking exercise in which
Duke growls and stomps his way
through a cluster of earthy chords;
Never Stop Remembering Bill, dedicated to the late Billy Strayhorn is evocative Ellington at its best, tender and
singing, the pianist embellishing the
theme with magnificent arpeggios. Fat
Mess, the final cut, swings urgently
and ]s played percussively by Duke,
drummer Rufus Jones and bassist John
Lamb. Remixed at the Berkeley Fantasy studios by Skip Shimmin and
Orrin Keepnews, Duke Ellington, the
Pianist offers splendid stereo sound.
John Lissner
Sound: A+
Performance:
A-
6)
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Keep Your Lamp Trimmed and Burning: Fred McDowell.
Musicians: McDowell, vocal and guitar: Johnny Woods, harmonica: Mike
Russo, guitar: John Kahn, bass: The
Hunter's Chapel Singers.
Songs: I Heard Somebody Calling,
Amazing Grace, Where Could I Go
AUDIO MARCH, 1975
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Issued by: Engineering Export Promotion Council,
Calcutta (India).
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But To the Lord, Keep Your Lamp
Trimmed and Burning, Bye and Bye,
Dig My Grave With a Silver Spade,
Don't Look For Me on a Sunday,
Good Morning Little Schoolgirl, Little
Girl, Little Girl, Levee Camp Blues.
Arhoolie 1068, $5.98.
Death came to Fred McDowell on
July 3, 1972-an untimely tragedy that
took him away from us at the height
of his career. But Fred McDowell's
music lives on after him. He has left a
legacy of pure, unadorned blues for
people the world over to enjoy and
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bottleneck sound comes right
through in I Heard Somebody Calling, his guitar emulating his expressive voice which has a skywide range.
One can hear his foot tapping alongside his guitar as he set up a cadence,
varying the resonance of his instrument from a dull thud to a bright
76
MEN Mlle
Check No. 29 on Reader Service Card
tap their toes to.
"Mississippi" Fred McDowell, as he
was affectionately called, lived in
Como, Mississippi where he plowed
behind a mule and drove a tractor.
Fred McDowell was a natural musician, and a very natural man.
In Como, Mississippi Fred would
often play his guitar behind the choir
of Hunter's Chapel or just sit around
the house playing for his own satisfaction. Such a perfectionist was he
that he'd stop even in the middle of a
performance to tune his guitar.
As he began to travel around the
countryside (and later the world) his
career mushroomed, his reputation
blossomed. During his lifetime Mississippi Fred made many appearances
at the Berkeley Folk Festival and other
places on the West Coast including
Phil Elwood's class at Sonoma State
College. McDowell played for Pete
Feldman in Santa Barbara, at the Ash grove in Los Angeles, for the Cate
School in Carpinteria as well as in
Portland, Oregon and Seattle, Washington. He played concerts and clubs
in the East, appeared at the Newport
Folk Festival and went abroad with
John Lee Hooker, Doctor Ross, Buddy
Guy, Big Mama Thornton, Eddie
Boyd, and Big Walter Horton, among
others.
By 1971 Fred began to get more
bookings than he could handle, due
in part to the Rolling Stones' recording of his composition You've Got To
Move on their LP Sticky Fingers.
This recording has Mississippi Fred
picking and singing in his highpitched, haunting voice, a cross-section of good of country blues, all
composed and arranged by the superb rural musician himself. Fred
McDowell is not at his best here but
neither is he at his worst. His eerie
Check No. 26 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
AUDIO MARCH,
1975
glow. This part of the recording was
recorded live and features Fred talking right through it.
The most jazzed -up version of
Amazing Grace I've ever heard follows as Fred plays now soft, now loud.
Where Could I Go But To the Lord
features Fred accompanying the Hunter's Chapel Singgers at a lilting
bounce. Unfortunately, the seemingly free form singers sound a bit
sloppy and unsynchronized.
Mississippi Fred delivers a pungent, spicy sound in Bye and Bye.
Faster and faster he goes, his guitar
playing extraordinary! The best sound
on the recording is Dig My Grave
With a Silver Spade, with Mike Russo
on guitar and John Kahn on bass. It is
a clear demonstration of the richness
and fullness of McDowell's style. Fred
implies or insinuates as much as he
actually plays, thus leaving a great
deal to the listener's imagination.
Don't Look For Me On a Sunday is
taken at a very slow, sauntering pace,
Fred seeming to drag his finger up a
string while Good Morning Little
Schoolgirl is the extreme opposite,
with a sunny quality, moving along at
a fast clip.
Fred makes a beautifully subtle entrance in Little Girl, Little Girl and it all
comes to an end with Levee Camp
Blues with his favorite harmonica
player, Johnny Woods, joining him.
They really wail together, and at one
point play a truly amazing unison passage:
Sound quality throughout is variable, a mite muddy, but we must remember part of this was recorded in
concert.
Whether you are a Mississippi Fred
McDowell fan, or you've never heard
him, come share with him, as he so
generously did with us.
Martha Sanders Gilmore
Sound: B-
Performance:
B
Lookout Farm: Dave Liebman
Musicians: Liebman, soprano and
tenor sax, flute; Richard Beirach, electric and acoustic piano, Frank Tusa,
electric and acoustic bass; Jeff Williams, drums; John Abercrombie,
acoustic and electric guitar; Armen
Halburien, percussion; Don Alias,
congos, bongos; Badal Roy, tablas;
Steve Sattan, tambourine, cowbell;
Eleana Sternberg, voice.
ECM 1039 ST, stereo, $6.98.
A couple of years ago went to hear
the Elvin Jones Quartet at the Village
I
Vanguard during the Newport Jazz
Festival. Following a day of seemingly
endless trekking around New York
from one concert to the next, we
arrived at the Vanguard pooped.
AUDIO MARCH,
Well, snoozing in a corner of the
bandstand was a young man, soprano
sax in hand. Little did we know it was
Dave Liebman.
As the group began playing, suddenly the soprano man arose from his
deep sleep, swung up front with his
axe, and began blowing! He conjured up a flowing solo with impeccable taste, dazzling variety and technique, with a rich, full-bodied tone.
Many exciting choruses later he sat
back down as abruptly as he'd arisen,
and went back to sleep!
Well, here he is leading his own talented group. Dave's own solos are
like what we heard at the Vanguard,
just performed with a different band.
Though most of these musicians may
be unknown to you, don't despair.
The group is tight; it cooks. And one
listen to the album will make you
eager for more. You will immediately
want to remember these musicians'
names. Their performances certainly
show them to be talents deserving of
wider recognition.
On sessions such as this one, which
include both acoustic and electric instruments, all too often the acoustic
instruments are used too little, e.g.
only on the last chord of a tune or for
the opening chord of another, with
the rest of the number sounding like
an expOosion at Con Ed's main power
plant. had feared that might be the
case here too, but not so. was pleasantly surprised.
Richard Beirach does a tremendous job on acoustic piano on Lookout Farm. Following a very free first
half, there is a complete turnaround
into an up -tempo jazz four -beat. He
takes another refreshing outing on
HO'S WATCHING YOUR SPEAKERS?
You and your ears, most certainly, but so
is your amplifier. It watches through feedback, electrically sersing what your speaker is do ng. Specifically, it watches the
"back power" from the driver; power that
is the product of voltage and current.
Feedback to your bain comes from your
senses. Can you see 3-D with only one eye?
Can you hear 3-D with only one ear? No,
3-D is the result of dual observation.
Power Amplifiers have two stages-a voltage or driver amplifier and an output or
current amplifier, yet they only look at
one part of the feedback from the speakerthe voltage. Not very 3-D if we want the
speakers controlled as well as driven.
CURRENT X VOLTAGE
=
POWER
VOLTAGE IEEOBACK
-CURRENT
A
EEDBACK
I
I
Pablo's Story, an airy samba. Jeff Williams is consistently fresh and he employs a whole gamut of dynamics that
many other drummers do not know.
Don Alias is brilliant on congas as
usual. Both play magnificently
whether underlining rhythms in the
ensemble or soloing. And Liebman's
horn work should satisfy any musical
appetite. His funky soprano work on
Sam's Float and his brilliant quote
from the diametrically -opposed Andalucia Suite by Ernesto Lecuona
show off his rich and varied grab bag
of tricks.
Those who are familiar with ECM's
top recording techniques, as well as
the quality of the music they package
will expect nothing but their best
from Dave Liebman's Lookout Farm.
To those who are unfamiliar with
say, take a
ECM s albums
chance-you'll be glad you did.
Eric Henry
I
Sound: B+
Performance: A
77
1975
www.americanradiohistory.com
VOLTA(, A,VL:E:EH
CURRENT AMPLIFIER
"Block Diagram of
The Quintessence Group Ltd.
Power Amplifier II"
The Quintessence Amplifier has two feedback paths: one for voltage and one for
current; the result is controlled power. The
electrical signal going to the power amplifier is a model of the sound we wish to
produce-a controlled speaker reproduces
this sound exactly, an uncontrolled speak-
interprets it-interpretation should be
left to the artist!
This dual feedback control dynamically reduces THD (total harmonic distortion),
IM lintermodulation distortion), and TIM
(transient intermodulation distortion) and
assures stability and drive into any load.
er
Conservatively rated at150 watts per channel into 8 ohms (FTCI.The forced air cooled Quintessence Amp will drive over 500
watts into 2 ohms dvith no danger of overload.
In the Quintessence tradition of simplicity,
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In
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How else would you describe a
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A Peak Unlimiter that restores
dynamics lost in recording to
closely approximate the original.
A Downward Expander that reads
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dynamics down to precisely the
intended level.
An AutoCorrelator that makes
record/tape hiss and FM broadcast
noise virtually vanish without
affecting musical content.
Plus an Active Equalizer that gives
you flat energy distribution over
the full audio spectrum, Joystick
Balance and Step Tone Controls
that allow precise music tailoring
to your listening environment and
SQ* and Phase Linear differential
logic for Quad Sound.
Bert Whyte
SOME MONTHS ago there was a
change of command at Ampex
Stereo Tapes, and as a consequence all of their open -reel tape
production virtually stopped. Since
then several polls conducted by AST
has shown that there is a large and
sustained interest in open reel tapes,
and fortunately for us, a new series of
monthly tape releases has been initiated. Some tapes are now beginning to reach us, as witness this fine
example:
Symphony #
4 (The Inextinguishable), Neilsen: Zubin Mehta, the Los
Angeles Philharmonic.
Ampex/London L46848, open reel,
71/2 ips, Dolby B, stereo, $9.95.
Nielsen is enjoying a vogue at present, and this is reflected in the fact
that most of his symphonic output has
now been recorded. This 4th sym-
The 4000 is an advanced stereo
preamp that actually puts back in
what recording studios take out ...
lets your music (at last) reach life-like
levels without distortion ... lets you
(for the first time) hear your music
from a silent background. It is, in a
word, incredible. Ask your dealer
for an audition.
Warranty: 3 years, parts & labor.
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phony is a broadly contrasting work,
with long cantabile passages punctuated by violent orchestral outbursts
and even some flirtation with atonality. The four movements are meant to
be played without a break, and the
finale has become something of a
sonic showpiece (and a natural for
stereo) wherein there is a tympanist at
each side of the orchestra. The one at
the left of the orchestra "battles" the
one on the right with some thunderously loud and wonderfully intricate
figures in this final passage.
Mehta is thoroughly at home with
this kind of music and his taunt, compelling performance would be hard to
top. There are some incredibly difficult unison string passages in this
work and the L.A. Philharmonic traverses them with ease. The sound is
broadly spacious, but with good orchestral detail in the London/Decca
manner. Overall sound is slightly on
the bright side, all elements very
clean, inner balances good, and frequency and dynamic ranges very
wide. The tympani "duel" is exciting,
but would have liked a little sharper
focus, a less resonant sound from the
tympani. The Dolby B processed tape
is virtually free of tape hiss and print I
through.
Hugo
in Wonderland:
RCA APD1-0413, CD -4, $6.95.
This is another outstanding exam-
ple of four -channel sound from that
master of the medium, Hugo Montenegro. Here he explores the music
of Stevie Wonder in a group of his
well-known ballads, including a super
arrangement of You Are The Sunshine Of My Life. Once again the
superbly clean and beautifully balanced recording is engineered by my
former RCA colleague Mickey Crofford, aided by Brian Christian.
Hugo artfully employs all the quadraphonic trickery ... front -to -back
switching, criss-cross, and pan -pot
"swirl around the channels." The pinpoint localization of various instruments sets a new standard for CD -4
quality. The overall sound is certainly
wide in frequency response, and
would seem to refute the contention
of some that CD -4 sound is restricted
in bandwidth. Another plus is the excellent surface, a result of the new
RCA record compound announced
some months ago. All in all, one of the
best CD -4 recordings on the market.
Organ Music From Westminster: Edward D. Berryman, organist.
Ark Records 10251-S, $6.95.
For audiophiles in the know, this is
a famous recording, being an outstanding demonstration record, especially for low frequency reproduction. Ark Records is a small company
based in Minneapolis. recently had
the pleasure of meeting the owner
(and recording engineer) of Ark, Bob
I
AUDIO
78
www.americanradiohistory.com
Hugo
Montenegro and his Orchestra.
MARCH, 1975
Fulton. Bob is a gifted person who
runs a unique operation in Minneapolis, a combination of record producing company, speaker manufacturer, and audio research laboratory.
One of the reasons for the super
wide -range response of this recording is a special condenser microphone designed and built by Bob (for
$6000) and special recording electronics for his tape machine. Bob's
Fulton Sound Company builds custom loudspeakers based on the
modular principle ... separate
woofer enclosure, dynamic mid-
range, and electrostatic top end. The
speakers come in several sizes and
prices.
Because the woofer is in its own enclosure, it is frequently sold as a sub -
Who knows?
What is new in recorded music.
What favorites have been re -issued.
Whether tapes are available.
What can be obtained in quadraphonic.
Schwann knows.
Schwann is that world-famous, ever -so useful compendium of record and tape
information. Issued in two volumes-lists
60,000 currently available records and
tapes in many different categories to suit
every taste and every need. Schwann
knows plenty and tells all!
woofer for use in other bi -amplified
systems. This unit operates from 155
Hz down, with response stated to be
only 2 dB down at 19 Hz! heard the
organ recording through this woofer
as part of Bob's Model j speaker sysI
tem and must say have rarely heard
the gut -shaking thunder of the 32 -ft.
contra bourdon pedal reproduced
with such low distortion and impressive sonority.
The organ in this recording is a Kimball revoiced by the M.P. Moller Organ Co. which reposes in a splendid
acoustic environment in the Westminster Presbyterian Church in
Minneapolis. The reverberation time
of the church is long enough to lend
spaciousness and grandeur to the
sound, but not so long as to obscure
detail.
Dr. Berryman is a fine, if somewhat
conservative organist with impressive
credentials as instructor at several colleges and the University of MinneI
sota.
The program chosen by Dr. Berryman is quite varied, including pieces
by Sweelinck and Mozart, LS. Bach,
Mendelssohn, Vierne, and Widor.
But the showpiece of this album and
the one most used for demonstration
is Dr. Berryman's transcription of Sibelius' Finlandia. It runs the gamut in
frequency response and dynamic
range from quiet reflective passages
to a massive outpouring of sound
from the full organ.
It is a thrilling recording, and if you
want to probe the low frequency
capabilities of your system, you will
find this disc most demanding. The recording is one of a series which includes orchestral works, made by Bob
will be reporting on
Fulton, and
them in due course. This organ disc
can be ordered through Fulton Electronics (Ark Records) at 4128 Zane
Ave. North, Minneapolis, Minn.
Schwann -1 Monthly.
Special new listing section has
latest releases: records, 8 -track cartridge and cassette
tapes. Nearly 45,000 total listings on 773 labels in
classical, recent popular, rock, jazz, musical shows,
country, opera, ballet, electronic, quadrasonic, etc.
95¢ at your dealer's.
Schwann -2
Semi-annual catalog for specialized categories: pop more than two years old, classic jazz, older
and re-released mono and reprocessed stereo classical
recordings, classical on lesser -known labels, international pop & folk on domestic labels, spoken, educational, religious, etc. 85¢ at your dealer's.
Get more pleasure.
There's more joy in recorded music when you get exactly what you want.
Keep Schwann at hand, and always refer to it before you buy.
SPECIAL PRICE SAMPLE OFFER
If your favorite store doesn't carry Schwann, order samples by mail, but please
try your dealer first. Prices include postage and handling.
E
$1.50
$1.25
Latest Schwann -1 (monthly)
Latest Schwann -2 (semi-annual)
Combination Offer: latest Schwann -1 (monthly) and
latest Schwann -2 (semi-annual)
$2.50
Newly revised Basic Record Library booklet.
Lists 1,000 suggestions in classical music by musical periods for your enjoyment.
Send 25¢ for cost of handling, also 10¢ stamped self-addressed long envelope.
I
enclose
for the items checked above.
$
Name
Address
State
City
Zip
I
55422,
for $5.95.
AUDIO MARCH,
Dealer's Name & Address
Schwann Record &Tape Guide
137 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass. 02116
1975
79
www.americanradiohistory.com
AU
Classified
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
CASSETTE LABELS
Norela cleaners. paper mailer boxes hold
Noralco type plastic box. famous brand assettes. "Ube new" 10-1/2"
metal reels. Send for open reel and cassette discount catalog.
Plain white cassette labels.
1-910-99 1001000 10M
Cassette Labels (Multiples of 10)
Norelco Cassette Cleaner
Cassette Paper Mailer boxes
'Scotch Cassette SC9OHE
10-1/2" Metal, NAB Hole, Used
'Buy 10, SC9OHE, get 5 free
Plus Postage by Weight and Zone
.65
.02 .015
.01
007
.60
.50
.45
.55
.03 .025 .022 .02 .018
2.72 2.55 2.44 2.39 2.34
1.00 1.00 .90 .80 .75
Minimum Order. 55.00
OPEN REEL STEREO TAPE BUYERS!
At last! An open reel catalog, including titles, songs, etc. of 95
long play, 2-3 hour albums, by American Airlines or Ampex 4
trock stereo 4pa. Send
ons te and e uil also
you a 140 -page H
Harrisonris stereo tape guide
so you'll get both for $1.00
and this $1.00 is
refundable on your first $10.00 purchase of open
reel stereo tapes at our 30% discount.
-
-
SAXITONE TAPE SALES 1776 COLUMBIA ROAD,
N.W.,
WASHINGTON,
D.C. 20009
RECORDING TAPE CLOSEOUT: Dozen reels
2400', $12.00. Dozen 1200', $8.00. 24 reels
900', $6.00. 24 600', $5.00. Postpaid' Guaranteed. Mitchell, Box 132, Flushing, N Y 11367.
CROWN D1200 & M2000 on demo in our
showroom. The cleanest amp ever made, driving
RTR STUDIO MASTERS. Cyberacoustic Laboratory, 503 Haverford Ave.. Narberth, Pa. 19022.
215-667-3048.
YOUR CUSTOM IMF DEALER in N. CALIFORNIA offers you:
IMF "MONITOR -ORIENTED" LOUDSPEAKERS -STUDIOS. ALS40's, and
amazing SUPER COMPACTS. Monitor Ill's
available on special order!
IMF SUB -WOOFER KIT!! Dual transmission line system flat to 6 Hz -$180!
IMF "CUSTOM -KIT" SPEAKERS -Incorporating plastic cone technology and "line
tunnel" damping. Kit 'Q'-$80.00. Kit
'R'-$175.00, uses new version of KEF flat
woofer!
Custom demonstrations under ideal listening
conditions. For information and/or listening appointment, write or call Russ Goddard,
CUSTOM IMF DEALER, 1171 W. Latimer,
Campbell, Ca. 95008. (408) 374-4697.
OPERA TAPES. Historical performances of past
40 years. Unbelievable treasures and rarities.
ALSO LP RECORDS. Free catalog. Ed Rosen,
66-33 Saunders St.. Rego Park, N.Y. 11374.
NEW AND
AMAZING,..
The sound sensation that's sweeping the nation.
Rolen Star with unusual characteristics changes
walls, floors and ceilings into speakers. Act Now!
Send for free literature. James A. White, 5302
Pine St., Phila., Pa. 19143.
CONNECTICUT: Yamaha, Celestion, IMF, Infinity, Braun, Revox, Stellavox, Thorens, ESS,
Mark Levinson. Supex, BGW. Will ship prepaid.
AUDIOCOM, 177 Sound Beach Avenue, Old
Greenwich, Conn. 06870. (203) 637-3621.
WANT TO GO
B1 -AMP?
DeCoursey Electronic Dividing Networks are
available from $89.10 (Monaural bi-amp) to
$205 (Stereo tri -amp). Price includes plug-in
Butterworth filters: 6, 12, or 18 db. per octave at
any desired cutoff frequency. Write for brochure.
DeCoursey Engineering Laboratory, 11828 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, California 90230.
ARE YOU READY TO UPGRADE YOUR
PRESENT SYSTEM??? You can incorporate the
latest technological advances into your sound
system by consulting with the staff of
The DKL LABORATORY, INC.
We offer expert advice and the experience of
testing hundreds of "state-of-the-art" components to find those units that offer vast sonic
improvements at the most reasonable prices.
For a personal consultation:
Write: The DKL LABORATORY, INC.
P.O Box 683
Severna Park, Maryland 21146
or Call: (301) 647-8918, during our
convenient evening hours,
8-11 PM Eastern time.
LOWEST DISCOUNT PRICES ANYWHERE
on audio equipment. All major brands discounted. Write for quotes, K&L Sound Services.
75 N. Beacon St., Watertown, Mass. 02172.
DIAMOND NEEDLES and Stereo Cartridges at
Discount prices for Shure, Pickering, Stanton,
Empire, Grado and ADC. Send for free catalog.
LYLE CARTRIDGES. Dept. A, P.O. Box 69 Kensington Station, Brooklyn, New York 11218.
SPEAKER SPECIALIST. TOBY Corporation of
America, 4620 Camp Bowie, Fort Worth, Texas
76107.
THE MONEY SAVER! Write STEREO SPECTRUM, Box 1818, Miami Beach, FL 33139.
ARP SYNTHESIZERS!
$1150, String Ensemble $1380, #2600 $2310. Dickstein Distributing, 1120 Quincy Avenue, Scranton, Pennsylvania 18510.
Pro -Soloist $920, Odyssey
PIEZO-ELECTRIC TWEETERS. Write for
specifications & prices. The EAR DRUM, 5146
W. Imperial Hwy.. Los Angeles, Calif. 90045.
CERWIN-VEGA PRODUCTS (312) 581-7436.
QUOTES ON 60 POPULAR BRANDS.
Specializing in "high end" and hard to find equip-
ment-Ace Audio, Cizek, Fulton, Phase Linear,
Phillips -much, much more. Sound Center, 219
E. 17th, Bloomington, Indiana. (812) 332-4252.
FOR SALE
OPERA TAPES -RECORDS "live" broadcasts.
Complete Met broadcast cast list. $1.00, deductible from first order. Hathaway. 49A Merbrook.
Merion. Pa. 19066.
NORTHWEST'S FINEST AUDIO
DEALER -Audio Research, Dayton Wright,
IMF, Fulton, Hartley, Mark Levinson, Dahlquist,
Infinity, Radford, Crown, BGW, Quad. Decca,
Supex, Phase Linear, Braun, Tandberg, Linn
Sondek, and Many More. HARTLEY ELECTRONICS, 1502 Butternut, Richland, WA 99352
1509) 947-5026 after 5:00 PM weekdays, all
day weekends.
TUNED ROCK P.A.'s. Customized high intensity touring/permanent installation sound systems, including narrow band (5'hz!) feedback sup-
pression, detailed regenerative response,
Acousta-Voicing/environmental equalization
(±Idb at your ears), room design/measurement/treatment, <15% articulation loss of consonants. 1000's of customized professional
products including
fiberglass horns, consoles, comp/rms/peak limiters. 18db continuously variable electronic crossovers, digital/acoustic
delays, omnipressors, phasors, reverb, echo,
doubling/tripling effects. P.A. noise reduction,
piezo transducers, frequency shifters from ...
J.B.L./Altec Pro., Tascam, U. R. E.I., Eventide,
Gately, Schoeps, Beyer, Crown, Community
Light/Sound, Mom's Audio, McIntosh, Bozak, Allen Heath, Gauss, Cetec, Langerin, Electrodyne,
etc., etc. All shipped prepaid/Insured. Music &
.
Sound Ltd. 111/2 Old York Rd.. Willow Grove, Pa.
19090 1215) 659-9251.
FLORIDA AUDIOPHILES! Phase Linear, IMF,
Linn Sondek, Klipsch, RTR, B&O, Revox, Quad,
Thorens, Sony, Marantz, Barzilay cabinets. Sales
& repairs. INTERIORS PLUS SOUND, 3038 N.
Federal Highway, Ft. Lauderdale. Fla. 33306.
(3051 566-3511.
AUDIO RESEARCH MAGNEPLANARS and
Electronics, ESS, Infinity, Ohm, Dahlquist, EPI,
Audionics, Radford, Crown, Citation, BGW, Transcriptor, Linn-Sondek, Keith Monks, ERA, Connoisseur, SME, Supex, Decca. Grace, Sony.
Spectrum Scanning Tuner. Epicure Amplifier,
Marantz 500, DBX, ADC, Nakamichi. B&O,
Tandberg, Celestion, Marc Levinson, Stax, Dayton -Wright, others. THE GRAMOPHONE LTD.,
757 Asp St., Norman, Okla. 73069. 405-364-
9477.
-
FIREWORKS NEWS MAGAZINE -Covering
Commercial
Display Fireworks, Sources, Construction, Black Powder, Fuse, Literature. Firecrackers To Bombshells! Interesting Catalog -25e. With Sample -$1.00 Pyro Press, Box
12010-P, Lexington, Kentucky 40511.
SONY TC-134SD Cassette Deck w/Dolby
Used 5 hrs. $180. Doug Rein, R.R.I., Winthrop
Minn. 55396.
Rates: 35E per word per insertion for noncommercial advertisements; 60E per word for commercial advertisements. Frequency dis-
counts as follows: 3 times, less 10%; 6 times, less 15%; 12 times, less 20%. Closing date is the FIRST of the second month preceding the
date of issue. Payment must accompany all orders. Use the handy self-addressed, postage paid card at the back of this issue. When replying to AUDIO box number ads, send letters c/o AUDIO, 34 North 13th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. For more information about classified advertising, circle Reader Service Card #135.
AUDIO
80
www.americanradiohistory.com
MARCH, 1975
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
LOGIC MICRO/MINILOW NOISE RESISTORS -'ßW, 5%, carbon
film from 10-3.3 Meg. for 31/2é each. Fifty of one
value for $1.25. (10% discount over $50.) 75e
postage/handling. COMPONENTS CENTER -A,
Box 134. New York, NY 10038.
ADVENT, CROWN INTERNATIONAL, McINTOSH, REVOX, THORENS, SME, IMF. JBL, EPI,
CITATION, BEYER. FULL SERVICE ON ALL
EQUIPMENT!!!
STEREO SOUND
320 Route 10,
East Hanover, New Jersey 07936.
(201) 386-0050
ORTOFON
-
SUPEX CARTRIDGE
OWNERS; our Micro-Preamp outperforms any
transformer. Free literature. Huntington Electronics, Box 2009-A, Huntington, Conn. 06484.
SCA ADAPTOR KIT $15.00. Send $1.00 for
diagram and information to: Arnold McGall 9
Clarkes-Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450.
ELECTRONIC CROSSOVERS-ALL TYPES.'
Definitive booklet describes applications; how to
improve speaker systems; $5.00. credited to first
purchase. Huntington Electronics, Box 2009.
Huntington, Conn. 06484.
AUDIO EXCELLENCE from Advent. Audio Research, BGW, B&O, Fulton. Grace, Dahlquist,
Levinson, Infinity, Quintessence, Phase Linear,
SAE, STAX. Supex. RTR, Revox 700, Na kamichi, Tandberg, Technics, Magneplanar. "'Certified Audio Consultant." STEREO SHOP, 107
Third Ave. SE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401. 319-
365-1324.
THE SS -3 PORTABLE MIXING CONSOLE
provides unmatched performance in remote recording applications. Available in 2, 4. 8, 16 and
24 track configurations. Write for specs. Reply
Box No. A47-1.
AR,
KLH,
DYNACO,
ADVENT,
RECTILINEAR, ADC OWNERS -Our electronic equalizer gives your speakers a
of new bass, plus three broadband
trols. Three reviews, literature, from
LABORATORIES, 2278 Industrial
Norman, Oklahoma 73069.
full octave
tone conNORMAN
Boulevard,
KLIPSCHORN-KLIPSCHORN-KLIPSCHORN
Only the finest in Audio. Superior Sound Stereo
Center, 2780 Erie Blvd. E. Syracuse. N.Y.
13224.
ATTENTION
WESTERN NEW YORK AUDIOPHILES -Personalized friendly service, and quality equipment have made our new store a success. In addition to the incomparable Audio Research line, we carry the complete RTR speaker
line, Hegeman (1a, II), SAE, Quintessence.
Thorens, Connoisseur, Phillips, Dokorder, Infinity. Transcriptors. Levinson. Supex. Ortofon, B&O,
Cerwin Vega. Sherwood, Linn Sondek. KMAL,
Dahlquist, ADC, Soundcraftsmen, Technics, Fulton Music, Onkyo. Rabco, IMF, Phase Linear,
more. The Stereo Emporium, 3407 Delaware
Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 14217. 716-874-3372.
NEW 3" CENTER PRECISION 10-1/2" reels
loaded with new Ampex tape less than half price.
mil -$8.00.
1/4"x1-1/2 mil -$7.00;
1
1/2"x1-1/2 mil -$9.75;
1
mil -$10.75. S.I.C..
POB 338, Dunwoody, Ga. 30338.
AUDIO RESEARCH Magneplanar Tympani Ill,
$900. (901) 323-7702.
ONE STOP for all your professional audio requirements. Bottom line oriented. F.T.C. Brewer
Company, P.O. Box 8057. Pensacola, Florida
32505.
SHOTGLASS. AS SEEN IN ESQUIRE. Glass cone Column Speaker. $129.50 each. F.O.B.
Moneyback Guarantee. TACHYON'", Box 1012.
Roselle, Illinois 60172.
COMPUTER NEWS
BUILD YOUR OWN SPEAKERS AND SAVE
UP TO 50%. You can assemble your own high
quality. multi -element stereo speakers in a few
hours and save up to half the cost of comparable
speakers Send for our free 32 -page catalog of
speaker kits, raw speakers and accessories.
SPEAKERLAB. Dept. A2, 5500-35th N.E.,
Seattle, WA 98105.
CANADIANS
-
TREMENDOUS
DYNACO COMPONENTS AT
DISCOUNTS. Write
En -Jay
Sales. Hornepayne. Ontario.
CYBERACOUSTIC LABORATORY: only one
of its kind! Featuring Crown, IMF. AKG, UREI,
RTR, DBX, Infinity, Rabco, Decca, Transduction,
more. Crown warranty service. Featuring Crown
tape recorders: Audiomodtronics by our engineers. Barclay -503 Haverford Ave., Narberth,
Pa.
19072; 215-667-3048.
SHURE V15 -III -$50 plus your old cartridge.
Shipped prepaid. STEREO SHOP, 107 Third Ave.
SE, Cedar Rapids. Iowa 52401.
WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY
AUDIOPHILES TAKE NOTE! THE AUDIOPHILE, 231 BEDFORD STREET, STAMFORD, CONN. specializes in equipment for the
connoisseur. Audio Research, ADC. Citation,
Crown, Hegeman, IMF, Infinity. Janszen, Philips,
SAE, SME, TEAC, Technics, Thorens and many
more. (203) 348-3551 (Closed Mondays).
NEW CATALOG of raw speakers, network kits
& network parts, audio test equipment, fabric &
foam speaker grids, speaker systems, electronic
crossovers & active filters. Distributors wanted
for our line of network kits and parts. MIKE
LEWIS/TSR, Inc., 3673 West 113th St., Inglewood, Calif., 90303, 213/678-1979.
AVAILABLE
NOW
.
FAMOUS
REFLECTING SYSTEM'S 41" REPLACEMENT DRIVERS. $7.98 POSTPAID. BIG
QUANTITY DISCOUNTS. FREE SPECIFICATIONS. AURATONE, BOX 580-17A, DEL
MAR, CALIFORNIA 92014.
SCOTCH MAGNETIC TAPE, discount Box
167A Orwigsburg, Pa.
AUDIO DEALERS ATTENTION!!! Let
us de-
sign your "house brand" speaker systems. Our
engineers can put some quality into this
neglected item. We design systems to suit your
needs, supply parts and source list, cabinet plans,
schematics & diagrams & cost figures. You
arrange for local enclosure construction & system assembly and/or sell kits. Write for complete details on your letterhead TSR Engineer ing, 3673 West 113th St., Inglewood. Ca.
90303,213/678-1979.
NEUMANN MICS & ACCESSORIES. DBX
Gately Pro kits and mixers. Most models in stock.
Immediate prepaid shipment. Mastercharge.
Write or call Dick McGrew Recording Service,
902 N Industrial Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75207.
214-691-5107.
THE AUDIO RESEARCH ROOM. The complete range of Audio Research equipment on display under ideal listening conditions. By appointment C.M. Santmire. AUDIO SYSTEMS & DESIGN, 5421 South 84th St., Lincoln. Nebraska
68516 (402) 489-9888.
AMPEX TAPE -NEW 1800' on 7" reel 12 for
$18 POSTPAID; 1200' 12 for $13 POSTPAID -free list -WIDE RESPONSE, 6114A
SANTA MONICA
BLVD., HOLLYWOOD, CA.
90038.
CANADIAN WARRANTIES! Write for our
needs.
Browne's, 541 Danforth, Sudbury, Ontario.
quotes on
your stereo component
ELECTROENCEPHALOPHONE: brainwave
monitor. Professional biofeedback instruments.
J&J 8102-A, Bainbridge, WA. 98110.
AUDIO MARCH, 1975
LOGIC
NEWSLETTER
SAMPLE COPY $1.00
LOGIC NEWSLETTER
POB 252
WALDWICK, N.J. 07463
CROWN DC -300-5475; Crown IC
150-$245: Harman Kardon Citation
11-$225: Dynaco PAT -4A (factory
assembled( -$75; Dynaco Stereo 120A (factory assembled) -$95; Pair of Rectilinear III
Lowboys -$375; Pair of Onkyo 25A's-$345:
Empire 598 III -$265; Concord MK -IV tape
deck -$145; Shure V15-III -$40; Sony SQ1000L logic decoder -$65; All as new lin
original factory pack). S. Parazale, 34 Stevenson
St.. Lynbrook, N.Y. 11563: call (516) 599-7311.
AUDIOPHILES! Quality Sounds of Maryland
has come to your rescue. Write to me for system
quotes you won't believe! Send requests for
equipment prices to Quality Sounds of Maryland, Gerard White, Sales Manager, P.O. Box 63.
College Park, Maryland 20742.
AR TURNTABLE OWNERS. Add cueing. Precision machined. Silicon damped. American made.
$16.00, postpaid. Lyrelift, 582 Franklin Street.
Cambridge, Mass. 02139.
COLLECTORS ITEM: Two Fisher Lincoln Automatic Turn -over Turntables Model 70. Both are
new and in perfect working condition. $299.95
plus shipping. Palmer Electronics, 3560 N. High
St., Columbus, Ohio 43214.
MARANTZ TUBE 10B, 7 & 88 with tube grille.
1953 Hark mahogany klipschorn. Extremely good
condition. Also one shorthorn. 4430 Wheeler,
Houston, Texas 77004. 713-747-4682 - call
anytime!
JAPANESE TRANSISTORS, Kit $23.44 contains 24 most widely used transistors, including
14 power transistors. Over 500 types available.
Free catalog WEST PACIFIC ELECTRONICS,
Box 25837. W. Los Angeles, Calif. 90025.
BAY
AREA
AUDIOPHILES: AUDIO
RESEARCH, AUDIONICS, BRAUN, CONNOIS-
SEUR, CROWN, DAHLQUIST, DECCA,
DYNACO, FERROGRAPH, F.M.I., GRACE,
KMAL, LINN SONDEK. MAGNEPAN. MARK
LEVINSON, NAKAMICHI, PANASONIC (SP -10).
QUINTESSENCE, RADFORD. R.T.R., SE QUERRA, SHURE, SUPEX, TANDBERG, WIN
LABS. McINTOSH (USED). Compare any of our
products through our switching device using 1/1
Mark Levinson master tapes at GARLAND
AUDIO, 2960 Stevens Creek Blvd.. Suite D. San
Jose, Calif. 95128 (408) 244-6724.
CUSTOM
LOADED
NAME BRAND
POPULAR RECORDING TAPE; REELS. CASSETTES. CARTRIDGES. SAVE OVER
50% -HIGH ENERGY CASSETTES 10 for
$17.00 PD. MJS, 1126 Cobb St.. San Mateo,
Calif. 94401.
AKAI GX-4000 - hardly used. N. Lilien. 37
Hickory Place, Livingston. N.J. 07039. 201-3512846 days. 201-994-3913 after 7 PM.
DENVER'S SPECIALISTS in High Definition
Sound Systems offer Audio Research, B&0.
Crown, ESS. IMF, Lipsch, Phase Linear, Quad.
Radford. Transcriptor, Yamaha and more. Visit
ListenUp, 685 South Pearl. Denver, Colorado
80209. 303-778-0780.
MARK LEVINSON-PHASE LINEAR -Win
JBL
Braun
Nakamichi
Dahlquist
tosh
B&0
Tandberg
Linn Sondek
Supex
-- - - -
- - --
Quatre -Technics. Hear the Supex cartridge
with the Levinson cartridge preamp at Stereo
One, 1229 Post Rd., Fairfield, Conn. 06430.
Phone:
203-255-5939.
81
www.americanradiohistory.com
TELEVISION
RTR EXCLUSIVE PHILA.
IN STEREO
The TE -200 TELEDAPTER
EASILY CONNECTS TO ANY TV Si
STEREO SYSTEM. Using our coupling and matrix circuit, teledapter takes
Irons the television and delivers two HIGH
a low impedance output
IMPEDANCE CHANNELS OF SIMULATED STEREO, to dove any
amplifier. Frequency response is maintained so you can hear the tinkle of
hells or booming bass sounds as it happens on TV. With service warranty
and hookup instructions 516.95 ppd. Guaranteed to make your TV 100%
more enjoyable.
OUR NEW TE300 VHF -UHF HI-FI TUNER IS NOW AVAILABLE. A
complete and self contained 110 volt tuner. VHF -UHF antenna connec.
Recording and amp output jacks. Five year service warranty
tions
$149.95 ppd. From our factory.
-300
SEND: [ICHECK CI MASTER CHARGE NO. for
-200
or I' $5.00 for C.O.D.
TO: RHOADES NATIONAL CO. DEPT AD
TE
TE
P.O. BOX 817
HENDERSONVILLE, TENNESSEE 37075
NAME
ADDRESS
ZIP
CITY
FOR SALE
10'2'" RECORDER SPECIALISTS: Fresh new
Scotch LIN 3600 ft. on new '/4" NAB center
metal reels five for $34.00 or 10 Ampex 2500 ft.
new Acetate tape on new metal reels same price.
Add $.65,, for a new box. Reconditioned metal
New metal
101/2" reels NAB centers $2.75
reels $4.80,... Edital splicing tabs for '/4" tape
300 $2.00. Soundd Investment, POB 88338,
Dunwoody. Ga. 30338.
YORK
NEW
HI -Fl
ENTHUSIASTS -Britain's finest loudspeakers
CENTRAL
on
demonstration -THE
ALS40-as well
IMF STUDIO
AND
as Marantz,
Pioneer, Revox,
Beyer, Epicure (3 lines). Thorens. Ortofon, XLM.
Discwasher ... THE SOUND SHOP, 96 Seneca
Street, Geneva, N.Y. 14456 1315) 781-0215.
RECORDING TAPES, Rock bottom prices. McCord Electronics, Box 276A, Sylvania, Ohio
43560.
YOUR ROOM IS THE MISSING LINK
A state of the art system is usually junk in the
typical poor listening environment, and therefore a rip-off. Our acoustical consulting division
will have a calibrated "reverberation curve vs.
frequency" measurement performed in your
room, and our engineering dept.'s plan of correction, loudspeaker placement, and room equalization, all at no cost with your purchase or upgrade. Music & Sound Ltd., 111/2 Old York Rd.,
Willow Grove, Pa. 19090. 1215) 659-9251.
CONSIDER YOUR SOURCE FOR SOUND
Credentials
College instructors in audio/acoustics. Inventors/graduate electrical engineers, Recording & disc mastering engineers;
I.
Members: United Inventors & Engineers
Acoustical Society of America
Institute of Electronic
Engineers
II.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
Listen to
Facilities
Anechoic Chamber
$50.000 research laboratory
Factory authorized "A" warranty stations
Ill. Our Distinguished Suppliers
Audio Research, Sequerra, Transcriptors,
F.M.I./R. T. R., Linn Sondek, Nakamichi, Dayton Wright, Dahlquist, Crown, Infinity.
I.M.F., London Decca, Quad, Rogers, Spendor, Stax, B&O. Grace, Supex, Micro
Acoustics, Custom Rabco, Braun, Revox A700, Ortofon, Damped S.M.E., Scully. dbx,
Mark Levinson,
t
1000's of PROFESSIONAL products (see
Tuned Rock P.A. ad).
Music & Sound Ltd., 111/2 Old York Rd., Willow
Grove, Pa. 19090. 1215) 659-9251.
Whom Would You Trust?
THOUSANDS OF LIKE NEW LP's and prerecorded tapes. Catalogue $1.00. House of
Records, Hillburn, New York 10931.
SHOWROOM All
RTR Speakers on demo including the new 400E
HPR12 Super Magnum and 88D, Don't buy any
speaker until you've heard RTR, call for an
appointment 215-667-3048 or write 503
Haverford Ave., Narberth, Pa. 19072.
AUDIO
RESEARCH, AUDIONICS TRANSMISSION LINE SPEAKERS. BANG & OLUFSEN, BOZAK, BRAUN, CROWN, DBX, KLIPSCH,
KMAL, LINN SONDEK, NAKAMICHI, PHASE
LINEAR. RADFORD, REVOX, TANDBERG,
BEYER & SENNHEISER MICS, and other fine instruments for the reproduction of music. Custom
design and construction, component analysis,
consultations. demonstration by appointment.
Send for list of top grade used equipment.
AUDIO SYSTEMS AND DESIGN, 5421 South
84th St., Lincoln, Nebraska 68516 1402) 4899888 and 4408 Capital Ave., Omaha, Nebraska
68131, 1402) 556-7559.
SCOTCH RECORDING TAPE, lowest prices
TAPE CENTER Box 4305B, Washington, D.C.
20012.
BROADCAST QUALITY MIXER for creative
D.J. audiophiles with facilities for simultaneous
mixing of two stereo phonographs, a tape
microphone. Precue for all inputs
with built in monitor headphone amplifier. Discoteques, small radio stations, background music
systems. Send for literature. $325.00. GLI, Box
2076, Dept. A, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11202. 1212)
machine and
a
875-6992.
PORTLAND'S OWN HAWTHORNE STEREO
offers the sophistication and expertise of the East
with the friendliness of the West. Featured lines:
AKG, Advent, Audio Research, Beyer, Braun,
Citation,
Dahlquist,
Infinity,
Linn-Sondek,
Magneplanar, Marantz, McIntosh, Nakamichi,
Phase Linear, Philips, RTR, Rabco, SAE, Senn heiser, Sony Corp., Soundcraftsman, SpectroAcoustic shipped from stock to your door -fully
pretested and insured. Write for information and
price quotations: Hawthorne Stereo, 3580 S.E.
Hawthorne Blvd., Portland, Oregon 97214.
COMPONENTS FOR THE CONNOISSEUR
LOUDSPEAKERS: Audio Research T -3A, 18,
Braun LV 1020, Dahlquist DQ10, Dayton -Wright
XG-8 MK11B, ESS, Fulton J Modular System.
Hartley Concert Master, Hegeman 1A, & 2, IMF
Monitor,
Studio. ALS 40, Magneplanar
MG2167-F, RTR 280 DR, ESR 6, 15. COMPONENTS: Audio Research, BGW, Burwen, Connoisseur, Dayton -Wright, Hervic. Linn-Sondek,
M&K super woofers and crossovers for T-3ATM,
18, etc., Mark Levinson Products, Ortofon, Panasonic SP 10, Quad, Quintessence, Radford, SAE,
Shure, SME, Supex, Thorens Transcriptor and
SEQUERRA. Brochures available.
PAUL HEATH ADUlO
354 STATE STREET
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 14608
17161232-2828
HONG KONG, TAIWAN, JAPAN, Asia Directory. World products information. Mail -orders,
bulk -orders. Listings. Directory and Information
$1.00 today. World Trade Inquiries. Box 6224.
Spokane, Wash. 99207.
PANASONIC, GARRARD, DYNACO, Ken wood. Marantz, Pioneer, McIntosh, Sony,
Ampex, AR, Advent, KLH, Rectilinear. Sound craftsman, Audio Technica, any and all brands, at
up to 60% off. That's right -60%! Write for free
price quote on any Hi-Fi equipment. If we don't
have it, we'll get it. All equipment in excellent
condition in factory sealed boxes. Hurry! Sortie
supplies limited. Write H. Simon Sales Co. Ltd.,
4048 Bernice Rd., Seaford, N.Y. 11783.
HIGH PERFORMANCE HIGH FIDELITY
WITHOUT THE "HYPE". Suffolk Audio takes a
rational, no nonsense viewpoint on high performance audio equipment. Our advice and opinions are based in objective fact, not mythology
and folklore. All equipment is pre -tested for
maximum performance. Our distinguished suppliers include: Allison Acoustics, Bowers and
Wilkins, Quad, Linn Sondek, Decca, Mark Levinson, Revox (incl. A-700 series). KMAL, Ortofon,
BGW Systems, Radford, Beyer, Connoiseur, and
much, much more. Call or write for information.
SUFFOLK AUDIO, INC.
1105 Mass. Avenue
Cambridge, Mass. 02138
Ph. 1617) 868-1080.
THE EAR DRUM IS GOING STRONG
with plenty of crossover parts plus raw frame
speakers from ALTEC, JBL. BOZAK, CELES-
TION,
PEERLESS,
Ca.
www.americanradiohistory.com
SENN -
90045.213/641-1930.
PROTECT YOUR LPs. Poly sleeves for jackets
8c round bottom inner sleeves 6c Poly lined
paper sleeves 15c White jackets 30c Postage
$1.00. House of Records, Hillburn, New York
10931.
ORGAN RECORDS. Prize-winning Michael
Murray records at Grace Cathedral. San Francisco, and St. Meinrad Archabbey. Superb low -end
response, DBX-ed masters, European -quiet
pressings. French Romantic composers. $6.98
each, or both for $9.98. BACH on a Beckerath
tracker organ, sold separately, $6.98. Advent Records, Inc., 23366 Commerce Park Road,
Cleveland, OH 44122.
HIGHEST QUALITY USED EQUIPMENT:
IMF Studio II, $275 ea.; Marantz 500. $860;
Marantz 33, $270; Marantz 20B. $500. McIntosh MC -2300, $950; McIntosh MR -77,
$500; McIntosh MAC -1900. $650; McIntosh
ML -2C. $425 ea.; Sony 2000F & case, $380.
Crown CX-822 & many access., $1700; Hadley
Basic, $250; Heath AJ-15, $150; Teac 450.
$325; Advent FBC, $150; AR-LST, $425 ea.;
Bose 901. $370 pair; Infinity 2000A. $140 ea.:
JBL 001, $295 ea.; Thorens 125/Shure SME,
$300; Braun P9-600, $150; JBL SE -401, $200.
All guaranteed 90 days parts and labor. Audio
Consultants, 517 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois
60201. 1312) 864-9565.
C/M LABORATORIES professional preamplifier. $360. Levinson-Supex cartridge combination. IMF Monitor loudspeakers. Transcriptors
turntables. Marantz - Futterman - McIntosh
tubed equipment bought and sold. English Leak
stereo preamp. mint $85. English Beam -Echo
tubed amplifier, new $195.00. Almost all audio
equipment quoted. Trades accepted. WANTED:
Marantz - Futterman - McIntosh tubed equipment. Audiocraft. South Rockwood. Michigan
48179. 1313) 379-9945.
TRUSONIC FREE CONE SPEAKERS.
Recognized 25 years as finest high efficient
speakers made. Full ranges, woofers. midranges, drivers, crossovers, co-axials. Discount
prices. Ship anywhere U.S. and Canada. Dimension Hi-Fi, 2109 Bancroft Way. Berkeley, Calif.
94704. (415)-548-1218.
ABSOLUTELY THE LOWEST PRICES on
name brand stereo components. Send for our
free catalog to BOSTON AUDIO EXCHANGE,
1589 Commonwealth Avenue. Brighton, Massachusetts 02135.
AUDIO
82
NORELCO,
HEISER. ELECTRO -VOICE, GAUSS, HEPPNER, CTS, UTAH, TRUSONIC, UNIVERSITY AND PIEZO-ELECTRIC TWEETERS. ELECTRONIC X-OVERS, TOO! Plenty of technical information available. If you want to do it yourself,
and do it right, the EAR DRUM is the only place
to go. Open 11 til 7 (or later) 7 days. THE EAR
DRUM. 5146 W. Imperial Hwy., Los Angeles,
MARCH, 1975
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
LEVIN SON-SUP EX ultimate cartridge combination. C/M Laboratories 400 -watt professional
amplifier, $700. IMF Monitor Loudspeakers.
Hartley Speaker Sentry. Dahlquist loudspeakers.
Fane automobile speakers. Transcriptors turntables. British "LEAK" tubed equipment. Tubed
equipment bought and sold. Trades accepted.
WANTED: Marantz - Futterman - McIntosh
tubed equipment. Audiocraft, South Rockwood,
Michigan 48179. (313) 379-9945.
RACK MOUNT MARANTZ EQUIPMENT:
S725;
10-B Tuner
$395 ea..
(21 9 Amplifier
$325.
7-C Preamp
INFINITY SERVO -STATIC
$1200. Jim, 215-744-8651.
I,
walnut.
Mint.
-WORLD'S FIRST HIGH OUTPUT'
MOVING -COIL CARTRIDGE WITH
Standard Chassis Models.
10-B
$695;
7-C
$275.
McIntosh MC240 Amps $115 ea.
Ampex A9 500-2 ',o tk. Port. $995.
Music Box, Incorporated, 58 Central Street,
Wellesley. Mass. 02181.
7" MAGNETIC TAPE SPECIALISTS, Low dis-
CHECK AUDIO CABLES THE EASY WAY.
New cable fault indicator checks 2 or 3 circuit
phone, RCA, Cannon XLR 3 or 4 pin cables. Led
display indicates shorts, opens, crosswiring. Advanced I.C. design $89.95 (net) plus postage.
Crossroads Audio. Box 19671, Dallas, Texas
75219. Dealer inquiries invited.
FLASH
BUILD A 'SPACE -ACE"' TV CAMERA!!
RE-
PLACEABLE STYLUS is now in stock! The
revolutionary new SATIN M -15L series easily
surpasses ALL other cartridges in clarity, separation. and ultra -low distortion. Has rock -solid
bass definition, and the realism heard from solo
or massed violins is incredible. $225., with
choice of conical, elliptical, or Shibata-type
stylus; cartridge with all three (interchangeable)
styli purchased together, $375. Sister models
with similar qualities. $145. and $195. At better
dealers, or direct from exclusive U.S. distributor,
AUDIOPHILE IMPORTS, 8 East Erie, Chicago,
IL 60611.
BUY! SWAP! SELL! Your personal ad placed
count prices on Scotch and others. Send for free
price list now. and save $1.00 on first order.
N.A.B. Audio, Box #7, Ottawa, III. 61350.
"ULTRA -DEFINITION"
THE DKL LABORATORY, INCORPORATED
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES THEIR EXPANDED
LINE OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES:
DKL 1 - "ULTRA -DEFINITION" Amplifier
designed specifically for electrostatic tweeters and headphones.
DKL 2 - The famous "SUPER-RABCO" modification for Rabco SL8 (E).
DKL 3 - Our exclusive "Hand -Tuning service
for Decca Mk V and "Export".
DKL 4 - Individually engineered "Ultra -Definition" crossover'networks for bi- and tri -ampli-
fication.
DKL
5
-
Unique
modifications
to
Infinity
2000A.
DKL 6 - An inexpensive "Ultra -Definition" pre amp.
DKL
7
-
The larger amplifier designed for
elec-
trostatic transducers.
AUDIOMART, the audiophile's classified
newsletter. SUBSCRIBE! $4/yearly. AUDIO MART, Box 821, Stratford, Conn. 06497.
BIG DISCOUNTS ON L,P,'s, cartridges,
cassettes, "singles." Stereo and Quad, all labels'
all artists. No fees, no gimmicks. Same -day
service, postpaid. Send stamp for free details and
Schwann Basic Record Library pamphlet listing
1000 pieces of classical music arranged by musical period and composer, Or. send $1.00 each
(refundable) for Schwann Record and Tape
Guide: Harrison Tape Catalogue; or "Golden
Oldie" singles catalogue (listing over 5000 45
RPM's). DISCO -TAPE UNLIMITED, Mail Order
Dept. AO, Box 817, LaPlace, La. 70068.
DKL 8 - Resonance dampening modifications for
SHURE, SME, and other fine tonearms.
DKL 9 - The "AMAZING $720. WONDER
SPEAKERS" with flat response from 28-
ALTEC ACOUSTA-VOICETTE $600. Matching
H/P Sound Level Meter $600. Wanted: Crown
electronics. Cecil Erdly, 22 S. 4th St., Clearfield.
Pa. 16830.
CROWN D-60 AMP $125.00: 2 W.E. 7288
W.E. 754C speaker
speakers $45.00 each;
$55.00. Phone: (404) 964-6213.
ARP 2600, LIKE NEW, with keyboard.
$2400 00. Call 1513) 274-7715.
PHONO PRE -AMP KIT using LM381, $32.00.
PC board and plans $20.00. Schematic $5.00.
Gold Electronics. 7207 Stanford, University City,
Missouri 63130.
FREE in
WE HAVE A FEW competitively priced used
Revox A77 decks available. These have been
completely reconditioned by Revox, are virtually
indistinguishable from new and have the standard Revox 90 day warranty for rebuilt machines.
Satisfaction guaranteed. One example is an A77
Dolby for $675 plus shipping. Please write
stating your requirements to ESSI. Box 854,
Hicksville, N.Y. 11801 (212-895-9257).
CANADIANS: Shure M91ED $24.88; Dynaco
A25 $68.00; Pioneer SX424 $179.95; Dual
1216 $119.00; Leak Delta 75 $289.00: Garrard
Mini changer $13.99. Free Hi-Fi discount catalog. Etco (Au), Box 741, Montreal H3C 2V2.
SHURE
M3D-$9.95... M91 E-$27.50... KOSS
KO/727B-$29.95 TUBES, ACCESSORIES ...
LIST -10c. F & M ELECTRONIC DIST., BOX 236.
DEPT
H.
MASPETH, N.Y. 11378.
SAE MKIII amp, MKVI tuner; MARANTZ 7T &
QUAD 33 preamps; 2 JBL 001 systems in C38
walnut enclosures; SONY TTS3000 turntable:
TECHNICS RS263US Dolby cassette deck;
SOUTHWEST TECHNICAL amp; DECCA
MKV (new); KEITH MONKS MKII mercury arm.
Seeking 2 JBL 150-4C woofers. Jeff Horen, 364
Mission Ct.. St. Louis, MO 63130 (314) 863-
6037.
22,000 Hz.
DKL 10 - The DKL Client Information File - a
service that will give "Ultra -Definition" to any
sound system.
FOR MORE INFORMATION WRITE:
The DKL Laboratory, Incorporated
P. O. Box 683
Severna Park, Maryland 21146
OR CALL:
(301) 647-8918
during our convenient evening hours
8-11 PM Eastern time.
1
TANDIBERG 3000X
QUAD 33 PREAMP,
-
$364. (301) 757-2357.
year, $135. Tom Groom,
Box 766, Murfreesboro, Tennessee 37130. 6151
893-4418.
AUDIO RESEARCH D51G - $750; Heil ESS
AMT3 with cards - $800 pr.: Teac 3300-10 $450; DBX 119 - $150; Pioneer CS99A - $350
Braun PS6000 with Grado F3Et - $175. Excellent condition. Hayden, McMahon, General
Delivery, Columbia, Mo. 65201, (314) 443-
2026.
CROWN IC -150 - $200.00; Crown DC -300A $500.00; Crown DC -300 - $390.00; Revox A77
- $200: Revox A76 FM tuner - $275.00: Base
901 - $250.00; JVC VLB turntable & 4 channel
cartridge - $200.00; Lafayette 4 channel decoder $50.00: Sony Dolby cassette - $165.00:
Uher 4000 report - L mono portable recorder
with complete accessories - $225.00. Lamberto
S. Lopez,
M.D.. Station 'A', Wingdale, New York
12594.
AUDIO MARCH, 1975
Only. known solid-state cameo a,alebe on Lit lam
or
racla, assembled. Idea sa experimenters,
eauealio`Conne
e to
cnontentie'd
Nii Wale
-
nyy..L,TV sel
Pe4amanc backed
" Fuully Gun'
baieeatlon
y years of lab and field Rslm8
step-by-step
nteea
Eas'
model MT -Id, Series 99
assembly manual
plea
with
denser,
Optimal
PHONE
Box 4s,.ANI
meon Nbe only
anywhere
In
W,
SUAVE.
o, WRITE for CATALOG... DIAL 402 -08>J))1
ATV
Postpaid
ana memo..
528.95.
Canada
and. subcrna also wadable,
Research
DAKOTA CITY,
NEBR.
6873I
FOR SALE
TWO WALNUT AR -3s, excellent - asking
$280.00. H. Lorenz, 2584 Traymore, Cleveland,
Ohio 44118.
AR3-A's - $380 pr. EV 12" speakers in cabinets
- $220 pr. (201) 991-6904.
1 OLD SHAW MIKE - want to sell - $50.00: 1
Kustom P.A. 2 column 48" JBL;s in each
column. 150 watt head 4 channel with masters Kustom bass amp, 2 - 15" JBL;s,
$350.00;
Fender strat. good
100 watt head - $200.00;
condition - $200.00. Will make deal for all.
Thomas Murpy, 669 - 59 Street, Brooklyn. New
York 11220.
1
1
ALTEC M -II CONDENSER MIC SYSTEM,
$130. 21-B capsule, cable, power supply (XLR-3
out). Jerry Immel, 1493A Druid Valley Dr. NE.
Atlanta. Ga. 30329. (404) 634-0988. 8921611.
REVOX A77 WITH DOLBY. Excellent condition. $850 including case. Alan Jacobsen, 2507
W. Phoenix, Grand Island, NE 68801
PREAMPLIFIER. Mint cond.
Complete specs available. $250.00. Ted Jensen.
118 Hobart. New Haven, Conn. 06511
HADLEY 621
ESS AMT -1 OWNERS: Dissatisfied with bass!
Our modification greatly improves performance,
leaves warranty intact. Only $69.95 plus tax and
shipping. Free brochure. TRANS -BASS
SYSTEMS. P.O. Box 2763, Laguna Hills, Calif.,
92653.
WESTCHESTER HEADQUARTERS
for the
great sounds in the world. Quad, Ohm, Cambridge, Dahlquist, Bose ESS, Braun, SAE, EPI,
Crown, Phase Linear, Tandberg, Thorens,
Yamaha, Nakamichi, Technic, BGW, Dual, Revox,
Kenwood, Pioneer. The Listening Room, Inc. 590
Central Ave.. Scarsdale, N.Y. 10583. 1914) 471-
4558.
HEATH KIT AA -2010 4 -channel amp w/cabinet
$325; Fulton FMI 100A speakers $195/pair;
Thorens TD125B Mkll turntable, SME 3009/S2
arm, ADC XLM cartridge, deluxe cover. All in
mint condition. Alan Nerenberg, 885 Covington,
Detroit, Michigan 48203. (313) 861-6925.
LOOKING
FOR
HIGH
QUALITY
"PRE-
OWNED" MERCHANDISE/
VIOUSLY
Referral/resale service for industrial and professional audio equipment. All merchandise
guaranteed to meet manufacturer's specification for 12 months (parts, labor. and round trip
shipping included). Call or write OHRWERKE.
876 McVeagh Road, Westbrook, Conn. 06498,
(203) 399-7367.
CUSTOM PREAMPLIFIERS, ELECTRONIC
X-OVERS, MIXERS, etc. Engineered to meet
most stringent performance parameters. Call or
write for additional information: OHRWERKE.
876 McVeagh Road. Westbrook. Conn. 06498,
(203) 399-7367.
LED POWER LEVEL DISPLAYS; Stereo Display, 6 LED/Ch, $75.00. Deluxe $100.00, Professional 4 Channel $225.00; Stereo overload
Indicator,
LED/Ch, $25.00. Free information,
1
Orion Audio.
Box
145, Springfield,
Virginia
22150.
AUDIO RESEARCH Dual 75A converted to
Dual 76,
$600. Dual 75 converted to 75A.
919/449-4132, days.
FULL AUDIO RESEARCH Tympani 3A with
bass screens - new 919-449-4132.
$500
83
www.americanradiohistory.com
EVERYTHING YOU'VE ALWAYS WANTED TO
KNOW ABOUT YOUR
Telephone
BUT DIDN'T KNOW WHO TO ASK
A UNIQUE REFERENCE GUIDE
TO THE INSIDE STORY
FROM THE HOBBIEST TO THE TECHNICIAN
Current News Items
Plans
Illustrations
Stories
History
Comics Facts
Games
Code Numbers
Projects
And Many More
'LEARN THE SECRETS OF YOUR TELEPHONE
1
FACTS NEVER PUBLISHED FOR THE PUBLIC
One year subscription only S 3.00
[O
rY
OrnmoiLiEFI
T
Gúúio.w,a..am.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA
ADC, Advent, AKG, AR-LST, Audio -Research,
BGW, Citation. Crown, Dahlquist, DBX, Dynaco,
FMI, Janszen, Linn Sondek, Magneplanar,
Marantz, Micro -Acoustics, Ohm, Phase Linear.
Philips, Quintessence. Rabco Revox, RTR, Senn -
ARE YOUR TAPES IN DANGER
Playback
on magnetized equipment can ruin them. Now
you can measure and eliminate danaging
magnetic residuals. Standard Audiophile Han -D Kit $29.75. Delux Han -D -Kit $51.00, delivered
in USA on prepaid orders. Free data on request.
Annisco. 1 103 N. Delaware, Indianapolis. Indiana 46202.
heiser, SME. Stax, Supex, Tandberg, Yamaha.
Sound Company
4701 College Ave.. (714) 582-4148
3675 Sports Arena Blvd., (714) 224-2844
CAN YOU IMAGINE a magazine that recommends components in four categories from no holds -barred to best -for -the -money? The
Stereophile does it. For info write Box 49A,
Elwyn. Pa. 19063.
THE FIRST (1962) UNDERGROUND audio
publication of them all, the Stereophile is the
subscriber -supported perfectionist's magazine
the others are trying to imitate. Free dope sheet
explains why. Box 49A. Elwyn, Pa. 19063.
AUDIO EQUIPMENT, you can't
afford not to read the Stereophile. Write Box
IF YOU BUY
49A, Elwyn,
ALLISON
FOR SALE
AKAI GX-2800-SS, in original carton. Never
used. $675 FOB. Larry Riley, 4A Couch Street.
Plattsburgh, New York 12901. 518-561-8333.
SOUTH
FLORIDA'S ONLY AUDIO
RESEARCH DEALER. Full Audio Research
Systems on display: SP3-A/Dual 76/Dual
51/Magneplanar Tympani 1-B/Tympani 111A.
Plus Advent. B&O, ESS, Harman-Kardon, McIntosh. Marantz, Phase Linear, SAE. Supex, Stax.
SME. Sennheiser, Tandberg, TEAC, Thorens,
Technics. Nakamichi, Mark Levinson. Complete
audio counselling and custom installations.
Sound and Sight, 20 N. Federal Highway, Boca
Raton. 33432, (305) 391-1843: 141 Lakeview
Avenue. West Palm Beach 33401, (305) 655-
2236.
FACT: One of the largest and oldest exotic audio
stores is now open at their brand new location.
No other store combines the display facilities, the
equipment and the service quite like TRANSCENDENTAL AUDIO LTD. in all of the United
States.
A. ROOMS -three perfect sound rooms with
complete working demonstration -generally live
tape.
B.
EQUIPMENT -Dayton Wright XG8Mk11B
speakers and SPS preamps. Cambridge Audio TL
200 transmission line speakers and P140X,
P7OX amplifiers. J.E. Sudgen "Class A" amps.
ERA 48 pole belt -driven turntables. Radford.
Quad, Revox, Audionics, AKG, B&O, B&W Ltd.,
Crown. BGW. Celestion. DBX. Epicure, Technics, SAE,. Infinity. Sequerra, Phase Linear,
Supex, Levinson. Grace, Transcriptors. ESS,
Braun, Magneplanar, Yamaha. Stax, Marantz,
Harman-Kardon, Wizard Phono., Ortofon, GAS.
C. SERVICE-Anechoic Chamber, test equipment from Hewlett Packard, Crown, B&K Sound
Technology, etc.
D. USED EQUIPMENT -Ton! Dahlquist
DQ10, Audio Research D51, D76, SP3A &
speakers, RTR 28DR, Phase Linear 4000,
Quintessence. Infinity Monitors. preamp, IMF
speakers and amp, much, much, more.
TRANSCENDENTAL AUDIO, LTD., 773
NIAGARA FALLS BLVD., BUFFALO, NEW
YORK 14226. 834-3100 & 834-3101.
TRANSIENT OUTPUT MONITOR for audio
amplifiers. L.E.D. readout indicates /4 to 1000
watts average and transient power output. Hand
assembled, calibrated, tested, $100. Free literature. Analogic Design, P.O. Box 7753, Phila., Pa.
19101.
Pa.
19063 for free blurb sheet.
ACOUSTICS
LOUDSPEAKERS
have stabilized Radiation Loading. Years of intensive research by Roy Allison (formerly of
Acoustic Research, Inc.) on the interaction
between loudspeakers and room boundaries has
yielded a new high standard of uniform bass performance. New Convex Diaphragm Mid -Range
and High Frequency drivers achieve phenomenal
wide dispersion 1-3db 90 degrees off axis at
20kHz!) Literature and price information available upon request.
SUFFOLK AUDIO, INC.
1105 Mass. Avenue
Cambridge, Mass. 02138
Ph. (617) 868-1080
BALTIMORE -WASHINGTON AREA AUDIOPHILES REJOICE! At last a store for you. Come
to Myriad Sound and hear the finest in state of
the art audio equipment. Featuring the complete
Audio Research line, Polk Audio Model Nines.
ESS Heils, Janszen, S.A.E., Altec, Citation,
R.T.R., B&O. Thorens, S.M.E. etc. all accompanied by Fred Huggins himself. Main store at 9619
Reisterstown Rd., Garrison, Md. 21055 (2 miles
North of Balt. Beltway exit 20) (301) 363-1733.
WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY
AUDIOPHILES TAKE NOTE! THE AUDIOPHILE, 231 BEDFORD STREET, STAMFORD, CONN. specializes in equipment for the
connoisseur. Audio Research, ADC. Citation.
Crown, Hegeman, IMF, Infinity, Janszen, Philips.
SAE, SME, TEAC, Technics, Thorens and many
more. 1203) 348-3551 (Closed Mondays).
INFRA WOOFER TM world's largest, deepest,
most powerful sub -woofer system can be had
only at Music and Sound. Ltd. 50 dB per octave
crossover. bandpass 16 hz ... $1295.
F.M.I. & I.M.F. SUB -WOOFERS, for the
closest approximation to dipole definition -$180-$350! Also, the rave five -way Fulton/R.T.R. super speakers. Shipped prepaid/insured. Music and Sound, Ltd., 111/2 Old York
Road, Willow Grove, Pa. 19090 (215) 659-
9251.
AKG, ALTEC, AUDIO RESEARCH, Beyer,
CROWN, DAHLQUIST, DECCA, INFINITY, KLH
9s. Koss, Mark Levinson, Ortofon. PHASE
LINEAR, PML, REVOX, SAE, Sennheiser, Se querra, Sony. Stanton, Supex, Tandberg, TAS CAM. Thorens, etc....
HI-FI HAVEN
28 Easton Ave.
New Brunswick, N.J. 08901
201-249-5130
DON'T PAY THE HIGH
MAIL ORDER
PRICES THIEVES WAREHOUSE OF TAMPA,
1531 SOUTH DALE MABRY, TAMPA. FLORIDA
33609.
TEXAS AUDIOPHILES! On demonstration:
Dahlquist, Nakamichi. Transcriptors. Linn-Sondek. Infinity, Braun, Advent, Crown, Phase Linear, Ortofon, Levinson, Supex, Quad. Klipsch,
IMF, Keith -Monks, ESS. Decca. B&O, Radford,
Stax, Audionics, Philips. Revox, Citation and
many others. Audio Concepts. 2021 Guadaloupe, Austin, Texas. Phone 512-478-7421.
NEW, IMPROVED SME TONE ARMS correctly mounted in AR turntables. Audio Consultants.
517 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 (312)
864-9565.
HI-FI ENTHUSIASTS WANTED!! Earn more
than just spare money in your spare time. We
need campus representatives to sell name brand
stereo components at discount prices in your
area. High commission, no investment required.
Serious inquiries only, please. Contact: Mike
Santillo K&L Sound Services Co. 75 N. Beacon
St., Watertown. Mass. 02172.
ROGERS B.B.C. MONITOR, IMF. B&W Ltd..
Celestion. Radford, Decca. ERA. Connoisseur,
Audionics TL -90, Goldring. Revox, Beyer. Lamb
and more. Custom design and modifications.
SUFFOLK AUDIO, INC. 1105 Mass. Ave.. Cambridge. Mass. 02138. 1617) 868-1080.
WISCONSIN'S
NEWEST
AUDIO
RESEARCH dealer, now stocking Magneplanar
Tympani 1B & 1 1 speakers, SP3A, D76, EC -2
& EC -4 electronics. Also -Crown, Quintessence. ESS, Dahlquist. Transcriptors. Epicure.
Phase Linear. RTR, SAE. Infinity, Citation, Bozak,
FMI, Nakamichi, Revox, AR-LST, Tandberg, 50
other brands. WACK SALES CO., 5722 W. North
Ave.,, Milwaukee, Wis. 53208.
1
PROPRIETARY CUSTOMIZED MODS reduce tone arm friction, damp spurious resonances. minimize torsional forces. improve track-
ing, and reduce record wear. For
S.M.E.'s-$30.00.
For
Rabco SL -
8(E) -$100.00. For Transcriptors-free
with purchase).
NOW
LISTEN to our calibrated Ortofon/Supex moving
coils. B&0/Grace/Micro-Acoustics. From the
laboratories of Music & Sound Ltd.. 111/2 Old
York Rd.. Willow Grove, Pa. 19090. 1215) 6599251.
+ Levinson Cartridge Preamp
(
t
IMF,
B&W,
DAHLQUIST, Nakamichi, Se querra, Quad. Braun. B&O. McIntosh, Tandberg,
Crown, Revox, Advent. Stax. Ortofon, Beyer,
Phase Linear and many others. Also wide
selection of first-class used equipment. Expert
advice. No sale final until you are satisfied.
AUDIO CONSULTANTS. 517 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201. (312) 864-9565.
AUDIO COMPONENTS-lowest prices on all
major brands. Write for quotes: Audio, Suite 47947A Dyer Avenue. Cranston, Rhode Island
02920.
OREGON AUDIOPHILES: Hear some uncommonly good things -Radford, Crown, Quintessence, Mark Levinson, BGW. Yamaha. Integral
Systems, Magneplanar, Dayton -Wright, Ohm,
Quad, Janszen, Audionics, Decca, Supex, Stax.
SME, Thorens, Transcriptors, Vestige', Linn-Sondek, Braun, Ferrograph, Grace, Sony Pro -Mikes
and Mixers, Super Woofer Systems. Passive
Crossovers. Transmission -Line Speaker Kits.
Basic Drivers. AUDIO -Uncommon Inc., 8600
N.E. Sandy Blvd.. Portland, Oregon 97220. 503254-6202.
AUDIO MARCH,
84
www.americanradiohistory.com
1975
FOR SALE
EQUIPMENT WANTED
USED EQUIPMENT: Gately Prokits SM -6, EQ-
DYNACO, MARANTZ, Fisher, Radford tube pre
$600; Revox A-700 71/2 ips, Half Track Recorder - $500; (2) AKG D 224E Mikes - $100 each. George Swanson,
2006 E. First St.. Duluth, Minn. 55812. (218)
728-2695.
and power amplifier. Sherwood Scott tube tuner.
Citation 12. State condition and price. Pierre
Royer, 10781 St. Julien #3, Montreal H1H 3Y1,
Canada.
FOR SALE
ATTENTION!
ATTENTION!
The DKL LABORATORY, INCORPORATED
proudly announces the opening of their new
"STATE-OF-THE-ART" SHOWROOM
called
The DKL Sound Lab
located at
943 BONIFANT STREET
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 20910
Hours: Monday. Wednesday. Thursday, Saturday - 12-8 PM
or by appointment
EXCLUSIVE AREA DEALERS FOR: Audio
Research, DBX, DECCA, Fulton, IMF, LINNSONDEK, RTR, and lots more!!!
for further information:
call (301) 647-8918
SPEAKERS,
DAYTON-WRIGHT
Preamp-
equalizer. 519-945-8486.
TASCAM
Model 10 mixing console. Lou
Sauer, 1700 Market St., Philadelphia. Pa. (215)
864-7772.
MARK IV CM power amps, $415 each;
SAE Mark IX preamp w/case, $325; 4 ESS
AMTS, $145 each; 4 RTR 400E, $215 each;
SONY SQD-2020 full logic decoder. $160;
Technics SL -1 100A direct drive turntable, $250;
Toshiba SR -50 turntable w/photoelectric cartridge, $325: JVC demodulator w/Audio Technica AT -14S cartridge, $115. (516) 799-7251.
2 SAE
6, EK-6 mixing group
-
TARZAC CASSETTES: C-1
thru
C-90.
CUSTOM CASSETTE LABELS. Free samples.
638 Muskogee Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia 23509.
CONSTRUCTION
Louis Sonier. 139 Dawes Road. Toronto, Ont.
M4L 501.
Call Limiter. Conference Bridge, Central Dial Ex-
SONY 770-2. J. Perkins, 189 Lexington Ave.,
Cambridge, Mass. 02138. 617-864-6359.
COMPLETE
PLANS -TELEPHONE: Answering Device,
Automatic Dialer, "Black Boxes", Call Diverter,
change, Melodic Ringing Generator, RecorderActuator. Remote Control, Schematics, Speakerphone, Telelink Burglar Alarm, Voice Scrambler,
$3.00 each. ELECTRONIC -Biofeedback Conditioner. Horticulture Stimulator, Multifrequency
Encoder Network (Speeds telephone calling
500%!). $5.00 each. ONE YEAR SUBSCRIPTION: Telephone Electronics Line (TEL) $3.00.
Super Illustrated CATALOG of plans, many more.
50 cents. ALL OF THE CONSTRUCTION
PLANS ABOVE PLUS A YEARS SUBSCRIPTION TO TEL AND A CATALOG, $24.95.
TELETRONICS COMPANY OF AMERICA. P.O.
DRAWER 3450, HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA,
90028.
QUAD ELECTROSTATIC LOUDSPEAKERS.
6 months old. Best offer over $400. 203-2884544.
MARANTZ 1013 TUNER in case, mint condition. $775.00 firm. R. Shannon, P.O. Box 277,
Tipton, Calif. 93272. 209-752-4420.
STANTON 681EE cartridge $36; new boxed
681EE stylus $18; Orthofon RS 212 tonearm
SQ DECODER AMPLIFIER,
never used, $140.00. REALISTIC SCT -7, Auto
Reverse Cassette Deck, used one month, perfect
condition, $250.00. Either postpaid, money
orders only. James Tunall, 502 S. Juniata. Lewistown, Pennsylvania 17044
MKV - $95 POSTPAID! KEITH
MdNKS MKII (IMPROVED) MERCURY ARM
$125 POSTPAID! The Sound Affair, 364
150W PA AMP -MIXER -$395.00
$22.(212)376-4842.
DECCA
Mission Ct., St. Louis, MO 63130. (314)863-
6037.
DQ-10, RTR, INFINITY, BOSE,
DAHLQUIST
ESS. KLIPSCH. SAE, CROWN, PHASE LINEAR.
CITATION,
HERVIC.
YAMAHA,
QUINTESSENCE, BURWEN, BEOGRAM 4002,
THORENS,
LINN
SONDEK, TECHNICS,
TRANSCRIPTORS, PHILLIPS. CONNOISEUR,
A&D, SME, REVOX, SONY. ADC, ORTOFON,
SHURE, MUCH MORE.
STEREO CENTER.
2539 VESTAL PKWY. EAST.
VESTAL, NEW YORK 13850.
(607) 729-6191
devoted to
STEREOPUS
thorough subjective equipment review and comment. First issue features reviews of Infinity
Monitors, RTR ESR-6, Crown DC300a, Phase
Linear 400. Citation 12. Grace cartridge, and
more. Available January. $9.00 year ($11.50
foreign). SteroOpus. P.O. Box 269 Fort Walton
-
A new quarterly
Beach. Florida 32548.
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA
Quad
Braun
Fulton
Klipsch
Dahlquist
Yamaha
Quatre
Dbx
Revox
Grace
Supex
Technics
Keith Monks
Linn-Sondek
Transcriptors
Audionics
Magneplanar
Mark Levinson
Quintessence
Citation
Radford
STEREO WORKSHOP
2985 College Avenue
Berkeley, California 94705
open 2-8 TWThf; 12-6 Sat
(415) 843-5836
HIGH MAIL ORDER
THIEVES WAREHOUSE OF
BETHESDA. P. 0. BOX 34251, WEST
DON'T
PAY THE
PRICES.
BETHESDA, MD. 20034.
AUDIO MARCH,
WANTED - Pioneer SX-1010 & SA -9100; ESSAMT series; Garrard Zero 100 SB or 100C; Sony
& Tascam tape equipment; cartridges new or top
condition only. Send specs, lists & prices to:
- Best offer under $350 pr.
Ravine, Tenafly, N.J, 07670 (201)
567-2684, evenings.
INFINITY 2000A
Boschen,
7
PIONEER OR MARANTZ electronic crossovers. Maranta 5-s, 9's, 8B's. Collins, 915 East
6th, Sedalia, Missouri 65301.
WANTED: Xerox Copy of owners' manual for
Marantz 108 Tuner. Will Pay. G. Coumanis, P.O.
Box 6701, Mobile, Ala. 36606
WANTED: ACOUSTIC RESEARCH amplifier
in excellent condition with cabinet. State price.
Noel Lavallee. Tuslog Det. 8. Box G. APO New
York 09294.
SERVICES
SONY 2030,
ANTIQUE PHONOGRAPHS REPAIRED
AND RESTORED by specialists. Edison, Columbia, Victor, etc. Incomplete phonographs purchased. Evan Blum, 21 Brook Lane, Great Neck,
N.Y. U.S.A. 11023 (516) 482-0371.
6 MIC CHANNEL, Hl -LO Z, FULL CONTROLS.
NASHVILLE RECORD PRODUCTIONS WILL
150W RMS, FULLY GUARANTEED.
SPECIAL PURCHASE OF A MAJOR U.S.
MANUFACTURER'S OVER RUN. LIMITED
QUANTITY. WRITE FOR FULL SPECS.
Whitfield Loudspeakers. Inc..
P O. Box 352,
Lansdowne. Pennsylvania 19050.
MASTERING. 1819 BROADWAY, NASHVILLE.
TENNESSEE 37203.
EQUIPMENT WANTED
WANTED: TEAC RA40s Recording Amplifier
for TEAC 4000 tape deck, Send asking price to:
Lete Connelly, 536 Dolphin St., Ft. Walton
Beach, Fla. 32548.
WANTED: MARANTZ 7, 10B; JBL. SG -520,
SE -400S; McINTOSH C-22. MC -275. Kazuo
Takishima, 33-7-1421, Takashima-Daira, 2 Cho me, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, 175 Japan.
WE MUST HAVE YOUR USED
COMPONENTS
Premium Trade or Cash for:
McIntosh tube (pre) amps & tuners, Marantz
tube (pre) amps 7 tuners, Marantz 7(T), 15, 16
(B). Futterman H-3, J.B.L. 400. 500. 600 series
electronics, J.B.L. Hartsfield. L-101, Metrogon,
Minigon. Music & Sound Ltd., 111/2 Old York Rd.,
Willow Grove, Pa. 19090. (215) 659-9251.
CASH FOR YOUR unwanted reel to reel tapes.
Record House, Kilburn, New York 10931.
MARANTZ 7C AND 8B. State condition and
price. J. Fong. 1238 Green, San Francisco, Calif.
94109.
KLIPSCHORN. Give details, firm price. Tom
Groom, Box 766, Murfreesboro, Tn 37130. 615893-4418.
WANTED: Marantz 7,8-B,9,10.SLT-12 McIntosh C-22, MR -71. MC -275 KLIPSCHORNS..
D.L.Hughes; 312 International Trd. Cent.;
Mobile, Ala. 36602 -phone 205-433-5882.
- NAKAMICHI 700 or 1000: state
condition and price. Mr. W. Hurt, Box 712,
Morristown, N.J. 07960.
WANTED
1975
PRESS HIGH QUALITY PURE VINYL RECORDS
FROM YOUR TAPES. SEND FOR SAMPLE RECORD AND PRICE LIST. ALSO FINEST DISC
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED
AMPRITE SPEAKERS SERVICE
655 Sixth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10010
212-CH3-4812
TAPE RECORDER HEADS brciught back to
spec. Wear removed. Brilliant finish. $10.00
each. One day service.
Orinda, Calif. 94563.
E.
Maher, 5 Evans Place,
DON'T PAY the high mail order prices. Thieves
Warehouse is coming to your area. Franchises
available. Thieves Warehouse, P.O. Box 8057.
Pensacola, Florida 32505.
CUSTOM PRINTED CASSETTE LABELS: 50
to 1,000+. Finest quality. Complimentary
samples. TARZAC, 638 Muskogee Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia 23509.
FINEST MASTER
LACQUERS AND
ACETATE DEMOS. Precision cut using the
Scully -Westrex computerized cutting system.
Also short run record production-LP's/45's.
Trutone Records, Dept. A. 428 Briarwood Lane,
Northvale. New Jersey 07647. (201) 768-9212.
CUSTOM RECORDING SERVICE Tape and
Disc. Stereo and mono. Live and copies. Editing.
Masters and pressings. High quality at reasonable rates. Joseph Giovanelli, Audio Tech
Laboratories. 2819 Newkirk Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y.
IN9-7134.
THE AUDIO WORKSHOP
Comprehensive practical training in SOUND
AND REINRECORDING, PRODUCTION,
FORCEMENT TECHNIQUES. 24 -TRACK FACILITIES for student projects. No prerequisites; accommodations available. 50 Union Park. Boston, MA 02118. (617) 266-7561.
85
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
RECORDS
SHOW ALBUMS -Rare. Out of Print LP's. 52
page list 502. Broadway/hollywood Recordings
Georgetown. Conn. 06829.
OLDIES -45 RPM Original hits. Catalog 50e
C&S Record Sales. Box 197, Wampsville, N.Y.
13163.
"THE RECORD LIBRARIAN"
Computer Printed Record Index Mailed to you
Monthly. Give us your record numbers, we give
you library listing cross referenced by Artist and
Composition etc. Full Details from Box 220, Englishtown, N. J. 07726
MAKE THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS buying
and selling old phono records by mail order. Free
details. Aversa-Sweet Publications, Box 888A,
Burbank, CA. 91503.
DISContinued
SEARCHING? WRITE:
RE-
216 North Rose, Burbank, California
CORDS,
91505.
MONAURAL. Classical LP's Bought -Sold. Box
352, Huntington, N.Y. 11743.
FILM -STAGE SOUNDTRACKS. Large free list.
A. Lutsky, Box 557342, Miami. Fla. 33155.
CATALOGS. Broadcasts, soundtracks. Personalities of Thirties, Forties. Box 225, New York.
N.Y. 10028.
-
SOLD @ AUCTION -JAZZ -Soundtracks
Personalities O.C. Indicate List: Ray Macknic,
P.O. Box 7511, Van Nuys, Calif. 91409 U.S.A.
SOUNDTRACK RECORD ALBUMS -Mail
Free List-Whalon, 2321A
Hill -Redondo Beach, Calif. 90278.
Auction.
CATALOG. 1,400 New
Recordings. Renaissance, Baroque,
Classical, Romantic, Modern Music. Not sold in
stores. Not listed in Schwann's. Highest quality!
Budget label prices! Available only by mail.
MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY, Box 932 AU,
New York, N.Y. 10023.
FREE
200 -PAGE
Stereo
OCCULT MUSIC
RECORDS! Meditational-Psychic-Witchcraft. Free Brochures!
Burchette Brothers, Box 1363-A, Spring Valley,
California 92077 (Dealers also needed).
QUADRAPHONIC
RECORDS
AND
TAPES -ALL labels, over 800 titles -at discount prices! For your free illustrated copy of the
world's most complete quad catalog, write:
SOUND CONCEPTS, 2713 West Radan, Dept.
C3. Peoria. Illinois 61604.
-
RARE RECORDINGS
Soundtracks. Shows.
Personalities. Reasonable Prices. Large New
Catalog. Free. Hiott, Box 440471, Miami, Fla.
33144.
-
SOUNDTRACKS/OC, JAZZ/PERSONALITY
FREE NEWSLETTER! RTSA, 3700 S. Plaza
Drive, Bldg. F/211, Santa Ana, California 92704.
RECORDS, TAPES, OLDIES at tremendous
savings. Catalog $1.00. Beat, Dept. D. P.O. Box
68, Hartsdale, N.Y. 10530.
PERFECTLY CLEAR TM ultra hi-fi record Bur wen Laboratories BL -2. The East Bay City Jazz
Band -Big Bear Stomp. Oriental Strut. Louis -i an -i -a Blues My Naughty Sweeties Gives to Me.
Dans Le rue d'Antibes, etc. $10.50 each postpaid $70.00 postpaid in lots of 10. Send check
or money order Massachusetts residents add 3%
sales tax Dealers wanted. Burwen Laboratories
Inc. 209 Middlesex Turnpike, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803 617-273-1488.
FOR DISCOUNTS on records and tapes, send
25e for catalog to K.D. Flenrich, P.O. Box 123,
Hayes Center, Neb. 69032
KNOW THE BEST -PERFORMED, best -sounding recordings of 50 favorite classical compositions. All currently available recordings covered 841 discs rated. Ratings based on over 2100 reviews appearing in leading publications, 19581975. 80 pages of ratings and comments.
$3.95. RATINGS. Dept. H, 5245 W. Running
Brook. Columbia, Md. 21044.
TAPE RECORDINGS
RENT CASSETTE or Open Reel Prerecorded
tape. All Labels. Catalog 75e. Tape & Time, P.O.
Box 740, Hopkins, Minn. 55343.
EVERYTHING ON OPEN REEL! Prerecorded
classical/popular tapes. Latest releases. Dolby.
Quad. 96 -page catalogue $1. Barclay -Crocker,
Room 857A, 11 Broadway. NYC 10004.
RADIO PROGRAMS
1930-1962 RADIO PROGRAMS, Reels, $1.00
Cassettes, $2.00 hour! Catalog. $1.25.
AM TREASURES, Box 192M. Babylon, N.Y.
hour!
11702.
OLD RADIO PROGRAMS on tape and cassette. Catalogues 50e. 30 minute sample tape
with catalogue $1.25. Satellite Broadcasting,
Box 512, Miami, Florida 33165.
OLD RADIO
PROGRAMS ON TAPE.
Thousands available. Low prices, finest quality,
immediate service. Catalogue 50e. Nostalgic
Radio, Box 29K. Peoria, III. 61601.
HIGH FIDELITY
LIVE
OPERA TAPES. Professional reel,
cassette copies. Extensive sound coded
DYNAKITS, lowest prices. Underground HI -Fl
Sales, Rt. 1, Box 177, Arnold, Md. 21012.
catalogue. Quality guaranteed. Also records. A
Fischer, Box 83 Fordham Station, Bronx, N.Y.
10458.
NOW AVAILABLE ... FAMOUS REFLECTING SYSTEM'S 41/2" REPLACEMENT
OPEN REEL TAPES. All types music, old radio,
comedy, accessories from personal collection.
Stamp for list. Chuck, 2333 Old Hickory,
Davison, Michigan 48423.
QUANTITY DISCOUNTS. FREE SPECIFICATIONS. AURATONE, BOX 580-17, DEL
MAR, CALIFORNIA 92014.
AMBIPHON'S
QUADRAPHONIC TAPES.
Highest quality available anywhere. Stereo compatible. Format: 1/4", 7-1/2 ips, 4 -track discrete reel-to-reel on highest quality mastering
tape. Includes precision test segment. Send
stamped envelope to: Ambiphon Records, Dept.
A, P.O. Box 341, Kingsbridge Station, Bronx,
N.Y.
10463
TAPE &
TAPE RECORDERS
CAPITOL STACK -PACKS. Scotch cassettes,
cartridges, reels. Discount prices. Lawson's, Box
510, Livermore, Ca. 94550.
LIVE OPERA TAPE Giveaway! Catalog: Newby, 36 Ballad Lane, Hicksville, New York 11801.
1/zINCH VIDEO TAPE, $7.25 PER HOUR on
7" reel. Low headwear. 0-9 mil polyester. Free
literature. OREGON MAGNETICS Box 13374.
Portland. Oregon 97213
DRIVERS.
$7.98 POSTPAID. BIG
SHORTWAVE
HEAR POLICE FIRE Dispatchers. Catalogs
show receivers: exclusive directories of "confidential" channels. Send 10e stamp. Communications. Box 56AU Commack. New York
11725.
SPEAKERS
MUSICAL SPEAKERS REPAIRED
ALTEC WARRANTY STATION
Hughes Electronics Service
45 Dunn St., Asheville, N.C. 28806
INSTRUCTION &
EDUCATION
DIGITAL ELECTRONICS! Design and understand Digital Circuits. Increase technical competence. Complete and guaranteed course is
highly effective. $10.00. Free literature. DYNASIGN. Box 60AM. Wayland, Mass. 01778.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
REPRESENTATIVE FOR SPEAKER SYSTEM
KITS in your area. Huge, never ending, untouched market. High energy, young, together,
sound & business oriented individual will do best
with this investment or commission opportunity.
Requires very little attention after establishment
in your protected territory. We must eventually
meet for contractual arrangements. Send detailed resume to: Robb Favier/TSR Engineering,
3673 W. 113th St., Inglewood, Calif. 90303.
HOTTEST MAIL ORDER PLANI Distributors
make big profits selling revolutionary new memory improvement cassette line. Free Details.
General, Dept. AM -124. Box 137, Northridge,
CA.
91324.
EARNINGS to $10,000 yearly working 6 hour
weekends. Tape recorder needed. Details
$10.00. Reel Productions, 3021 Comanche Trail,
Lafayette, IN 47905.
BREAK INTO RADIO, D. J. tells how. Explains
jobs, salaries, etc. $2.00. General. Box 467 -AC,
Landing, N.J. 07850.
BOOKS
BOOKS. Send 50e for Catalog. Refundable with
Order. Also Egyptian Dream Book 35e. Books,
P.O. Box 11965. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
19145.
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOTO BUTTONS made from your photograph or any slogan, advertising, picture, etc.
Only $2.00 postpaid. Arcan Products, Rt. 1, Box
278. Waldorf, Md. 20601.
MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
UP TO 60% DISCOUNT. Name brand instruments. Catalog. Freeport Music, 455R Route
110, Melville. N.Y. 11746.
GOVT. SURPLUS
MANUALS FOR GOV'T. SURPLUS Radios.
Test Sets. Scopes. List 50é. Books. 7218
Roanne Drive, Washington. DC 20021.
MONEY
HISTORIC PAPER MONEY OFFER!! 10,000
(ten thousand!) German Marks yours to treasure
for just $5. Terrific collectors' items. Immediate
delivery. Send to: Finkelstein, 2056 Cropsey
Avenue. Brooklyn. New York 11214.
AUDIO
86
www.americanradiohistory.com
MARCH, 1975
Marantz Stereo Electrostatic
Headphones you may never
want to take
them off.
Marantz Stereo Electrostatic Headphones are powered
The benefits of Marantz Electrostatic Headphones are
combination that makes the
by the EE -1 Energizer
as crystal clear as the sound you get. The Marantz SE -1S
SE -1S the ultimate audio experience.
performs virtually free from distortion not just at 1kHz
The EE -1 needs
or 1OkHz, but conFrequency Response of Marantz Model SE-1S Stereo Electrostatic Headphones'.
only .3 watt for a
sistently throughout
100dB sound presthe listening range.
o
sure level, so it's
The result: Sound
at home with any
quality as close to
amplifier. If severely
perfect as techno'saner I..0..Wba Na
Dfstodlon a 100 dB (Spy.
overdriven, a prologically possible.
tection circuit autoAn unsurpassed frematically shuts the
quency response
.
energizer off-withfrom 2OHz to 20kHz,
out an irritating pop.
full dynamic range
and the ability to ach'eve high sound pressure levels with
Its step-up transformers feature special cores devellow distortion even at low frequencies.
oped by Marantz to provide excellent linearity and low
The SE -15 owes its superiority to an electrostatic
distortion.
transducer diaphragm that's unequalled in its ability to
It accepts two SE-1 headphones so you can share the
track the audio signals from your amplifier. The diaphragm
pleasure of private listening. And headphone/speaker
is six times thinner than the human eardrum and so low
switching is built-in.
in mass that inertia is all but eliminated. The less inertia
The Marantz SE -15 Stereo Electrostatic Headphone
a diaphragm has, the more accurately and instantaneSystem costs $129.95. It's the top of the Marantz line
ously it can track audio signals. And the better its trackthat also includes Marantz Dynamic Headphone Systems
ing ability, the lower its transient distortion. That means
from $39.95. Get our informative headphone brochure
you can listen longer without suffering listening fatigue.
at your Marantz dealer. And try on a pair.
And the lightweight design incorporating soft ear cushions
and accoustical seals lets you wear them comfortably
for hours.
We sound better.
-a
-
DI
+10
-10
20
100
FREQUENCY
IN
CYCLES PER SECOND
1000
10000
20000
10000
20000
2ND ..
1
0
20
100
FREQUENCY
IN
CYCLES PER SECOND
1000
weria
©1974 Marantz Co., Inc., a subsidiary of Superscope, Inc., P.O. Box 99A, Sun Valley, Calif 91352. In Europe: Superscope Europe, S.A., Brussels, Belgium. Available in Canada. Prices and models
subject to change without notice. Consult the Yellow Pages for your nearest Maranta dealer. Send for free catalog.
Check No. 43 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
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