Generalmusic Equinox
IMPORTANT
Read Before Using Keyboard!
Congratulations on your purchase of the new Equinox Synthesizer Workstation from
Generalmusic. This instrument is equipped with cutting edge Flash ROM memory, so that your
new keyboard can be permanently updated by disk with the latest operational advantages and
new features. It is important that you follow the procedure below before using your instrument
for the first time to ensure that the instrument functions properly. Check with your authorised
Generalmusic dealer for exciting new features to load in your Flash ROM in the future.
STEP 1
With the instrument turned OFF, insert the Generalmusic Equinox
Operating System Disk included in your materials packet into the disk
drive. After you have inserted the disk, turn the instrument ON.
STEP 2
You will see a message in the instrument display screen that says:
Loading OS-DISK clears ALL MEMORY!! <Enter to Load/Escape to
abort>
Press ENTER and wait about 3 minutes for the new Operating System
to load. When the new system has finished loading, you will see the
following message in the instrument display screen:
Loading Successful!! <Enter to continue>
At this time, Press ENTER again and the instrument will proceed
through the normal operating display screens. You can now Turn
OFF the instrument in preparation for the final step listed below.
IMPORTANT: REMOVE THE OPERATING SYSTEM DISK BEFORE PROCEEDING TO THE FINAL STEP!
FINAL STEP
As you turn the instrument ON, KEEP ROTATING THE DIAL until
the following message appears in your display screen:
!!WARNING!! Dial on Power-Up Requests Memory Clear!!
<Enter to clear/Escape to abort>
Press ENTER. You have now completed the
update process, and your Generalmusic Equinox
has been permanently upgraded.
Note: There may be a Battery Warning message when you initially turn on the instrument.
This message will not appear after the instrument has been plugged in and turned ON for a
few hours. During this time, the internal battery that holds new information in memory
will recharge. For now, just press ENTER or ESCAPE to continue on if the message appears
when you power-up the instrument.
271221
Owner’s manual
Cod. 271221 English
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol, within an
equilateral triangle, is intended to alert the user to the
presence of uninsulated “dangerous voltage” within the
product’s enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude
to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC
SHOCK, DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR BACK). NO
USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER
SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL.
The exclamation mark within an equilateral triangle is
intended to alert the user to the presence of important
operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions in the
literature accompanying the product.
CAUTION
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
INSTRUCTIONS PERTAINING TO A RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRIC SHOCK OR INJURY TO PERSONS
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Read all the instructions (Safety, Installation and FCC if applicable) before using the product.
Do not use this product near water (example, near a swimming pool, spa, tub, sink or wet basement) and do not expose to
rain.
This product should be used only with a cart or stand that is recommended by the manufacturer, or should be used with the
components supplied. If this product requires assembly before being played, take special care to follow the assembly
instructions found at the back of the manual.
This product, whether alone or in combination with an amplifier and headphones or speakers, may be capable of producing
sound levels that could cause permanent hearing loss. Do not operate for long periods of time at a high volume level or at a
level that is uncomfortable. If you experience any hearing loss or ringing in the ears, you should consult an audiologist.
WARNING: Do not place this product or any other objects on the power cord, or place it in a position where one could walk
on, trip over or roll anything over power or connecting cords of any kind.
This product should be located so that its location does not interfere with its proper ventilation.
This product should be located away from heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, or other products that produce heat.
This product should be connected to a power supply only of the type described in the operating instructions or as marked on
the product.
This product may be equipped with a polarised line plug (one blade wider than the other). This is a safety feature. If you are
unable to insert the plug into the wall outlet, contact an electrician to replace your obsolete outlet. Do not defeat the safety
purpose of the plug.
The power supply cord of the product should be unplugged from the outlet when left unused for long periods of time.
Care should be taken so that objects do not fall and liquids are not spilled into the enclosure through openings.
This product should be serviced by qualified service personnel when:
a) the power supply cord or the plug has been damaged; or
b) objects have fallen, or liquid has been spilled into the product; or
c) the product has been exposed to rain; or
d) the product does not appear to operate normally or exhibits marked changes in performance; or
e) the product has been dropped, or the enclosure damaged.
Do not attempt to service the product beyond that described in the user-maintenance instructions. All servicing should be
referred to qualified service personnel.
Some products may have benches and/or accessory mounting fixtures that are either supplied as part of the product or as
optional accessories. Please ensure that benches are correctly assembled and stable and any optional fixtures (where
applicable) are well secured before use.
Electromagnetic Interference (RFI) This electronic product utilises digital sample wave processing technology (S.W.P.) that
may adversely affect radio/TV reception. Read the FCC note on the inside back cover of the owner’s manual for additional
information.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
The information in this publication has been carefully prepared and checked. The manufacturers however decline all liability for
eventual errors. All rights are reserved. This publication may not be copied, photocopied or reproduced in part or in whole without prior
written consent from Generalmusic S.p.A. Generalmusic reserves the right to apply any aesthetic, design or function modifications
it considers necessary to any of its products without prior notice. Generalmusic declines all liability for damage to property or persons
resulting from improper use of the instrument.
Make sure that all internal electronic options are installed by an authorized Generalmusic service technician. Check with an authorized
Generalmusic dealer for information on the closest service center.
Copyright Generalmusic © 1998. All rights reserved.
Products and brand names that are referred to in this publication (Akai, Apple, Ensoniq,Emu, IBM,Jaz, Kurzweil, Macintosh, Microsoft,
MS-DOS, Roland, Sample Vision, Windows, Zip) may either be trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
The Publisher/s and Author/s make no claim to these trademarks.
Contents
Introduction i
The Owner’s Manual
ii
QUICK GUIDE
Front Panel layout 2
Rear Panel (Connections) 5
Setting up and getting to know the instrument
Connecting a set of headphones 6
Connecting to an amplification system 6
Turn on the power 7
Adjust the volume 7
Connect the pedals 7
Using the wheels 8
Using Aftertouch 8
Playing with or without the effects 9
Transposing the instrument up or down 9
Using the Solo button 10
The basics of Equinox 11
6
USER GUIDE
1 • SOUND MODE 1. 2
Sound Families 1. 2
Drum Kits and Drum Sounds 1. 3
Selecting Sounds 1. 4
Moving Between Families 1. 6
Editing and changing Sounds 1. 6
Quick Edit - (using the Sliders) 1. 8
Storing Sounds 1. 11
User sound locations 1. 11
Mirror locations 1. 12
Advanced Edit - (using the Menus) 1. 13
Wave Menu 1. 14
Layers 1. 14
Layer 1. 15
Waveform 1. 16
Volume 1. 16
Amp. Envelope 1. 16
Filter 1. 17
Pitch Envelope 1. 18
L.F.O 1. 19
Pan 1. 20
Control Menu 1. 22
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Contents a
Effects Menu 1. 24
Effects functions 1. 25
Other Menu 1. 27
2 • PERFORMANCE MODE
Parts List 2. 2
Parts Menu 2. 2
The Parts List functions 2. 4
Part selection 2. 6
Mixer Menu 2. 7
Effects Menu 2. 8
Other Menu 2. 9
3 • DRUM MODE
Editing a Drum Kit 3. 2
Bank / Prog 3. 2
Volume 3. 2
Pan 3. 2
Transpose / Tuning 3. 3
Filter 3. 3
Exclude 3. 3
Reverb / Profx Send 3. 3
Audio Out 3. 3
Dynamic Switch 3. 4
Copy button 3. 5
Expand button 3. 5
Compare button 3. 5
Restore button 3. 6
Control, Effect and Other 3. 6
Storing your new Drumkit 3. 6
4 • SAMPLE MODE
Sample Mode -Playback/Edit 4. 2
Sample Translator 4. 3
Assigning Samples 4. 5
Other assign functions 4. 7
Editing Samples 4. 8
5 • DRAWBAR MODE
Function buttons 5. 2
Type Menu 5. 2
Setup Menu 5. 3
Effects Menu 5. 4
Split Menu 5. 5
Storing Drawbar settings 5. 6
Copying Drawbars to Performances 5. 6
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b Contents
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6 • ARPEGGIATOR
Edit Menu 6. 2
7 • GROOVES
Groove Library 7. 1
Groove Patches 7. 3
Creating a Groove Patch 7. 4
Storing your Groove Patch 7. 7
Transposing a Groove in real time 7. 8
Shuffle 7. 9
Editing single Grooves 7. 11
Groove Lab 7. 13
8 • DISK
Understanding the RAMFILE 8. 2
Save 8. 2
Load 8. 6
Utilities 8. 8
9 • SYSTEM 1
Controls 9. 2
Tune 9. 4
Master 9. 6
Other 9. 8
10 • MIDI
Stnth Menu 10. 2
Seq. Menu 10. 3
Master Menu 10. 4
Dump Menu 10. 7
11 • SEQUENCER
Recording a sequence - the basics 11. 2
Changing sounds and volume levels 11. 4
Navigating around your song 11. 5
Exiting and re-entering RECORD MODE 11. 5
Recording another song 11. 6
Record Mode functions 11. 7
Playback/Edit Mode functions 11. 10
The “UNDO” button 11. 11
Edit Menu 11. 12
Creating a groove from a song 11. 23
Events 11. 24
Using the Event list 11. 30
Editing Events in the list 11. 32
Master Menu 11. 41
Option Menu 11. 41
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Contents c
Clear Menu
Undo Menu
Effect Menu
Track Menu
Mixer Menu
11.
11.
11.
11.
11.
41
42
43
44
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12 • USER PANEL
Creating a new Panel configuration 12. 2
Slider settings 12. 4
Button settings 12. 5
13 • NOTEPAD
14 • Credits
APPENDIX
ROM-Sounds A. 2
Grooves list A. 13
Performances list A. 16
Drawbars list A. 16
Arpeggio list A. 16
Effects list - 3 Effect Configuration A. 17
Effects list - 2 + 2 Effect Configuration A. 17
PROFX Block diagrams A. 18
MIDI Implementation chart A. 28/29
Index A. 31
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d Contents
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Introduction
Thank you for purchasing the new Equinox Synthesizer Workstation from Generalmusic.
The Equinox, available in 61 key and 76 key versions, contains
enormous technological potential to give professional musicians
the essential tools for just about any situation - whether it’s for
composition, live or studio work.
•
An immense database (16 Mb samples) with over 1000 preset Sounds and user memory locations to store more than
2000 new sounds. 112 Performance memories and a Groove
machine featuring over 1000 user-programmable Grooves.
•
Unique Drawbar mode for instant access to vintage electronic organ sounds using the 8 panel sliders as drawbars with
key-click, percussion, overdrive, etc..
• 250.000 event, 16 track sequencer with advanced song editing facilities.
• Advanced Sound editing facilities with 64 note polyphony,
128 digital filters with resonance, up to 6 oscillators per voice,
3 Lfos and up to 21 independent Envelopes with 10 segment
resolution.
• Sample Translator to create user-samples and load new samples of the most popular formats (Wav (PC), Aiff (Mac), Akai™,
Kurzwail™, Smp, Snd. Future os versions will allow loading
of Roland™, Ensoniq™ and Emu™ samples.
•
Full MIDI implementation - The Equinox is the perfect Master Controller for advanced MIDI set-ups (32 MIDI Channel
control, 16 programmable Midi Zones, 8 programmable Sliders, 2 programmable Wheels, 3 assignable Pedals).
•
Flash-ROM memory which allows the instrument’s memory
to be instantly upgraded by simply inserting a special floppy
disk in the drive.
• The Equinox can be fitted with optional memory (8 Mb backed
Sample RAM and up to 32 Mb SIMMs), an internal Hard Disk
(2 Gigabytes) and a SCSI port (compatible with CD-ROM,
Zip™, Jaz™ external hard drives).
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Introduction i
The Owner’s Manual
To ensure long, trouble-free operation, please read this manual
carefully. The Owner’s Manual is supplied in a 3-ring binder which
can easily be updated as new features are added. The Quick
Guide introduces you to the functions of each button on the control panel and shows how to move around the display. Graphical
illustrations are included for better understanding of these examples. Once you are acquainted with the instrument’s basic functions, use the User Guide to discover the full potential of your
Equinox.
At the end of the manual is the Appendix containing various
tables, MIDI information and an index.
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ii Introduction
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Quick Guide
This Quick Guide explains briefly what each button and control
does on the Front panel and explains more about the jacks and
connectors of the Rear panel.
Following this you’ll find information about setting the instrument
up and some basic operating instructions.
CAPS
I/O SPACE
DELETE
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
1
R
2
S
T
3
U
4
V
5
W
X
6
Y
7
,
Z
.
8
9
'
0
Front panel
Rear panel
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Front & Rear Panel 1
Front Panel layout
5
6
3
4
9
8
7
10
1. Two programmable Wheels: The left wheel is spring loaded and normally used for Pitch Bend. The right wheel is freemoving and normally used for Modulation.
2
2. Disk Drive: Handles 3.5” double density (2DD) or high density (2HD) floppy disks.
3. Master and Input sliders: The Master slider controls the
overall volume of the instrument. The Input slider controls
the level of the Line/Mic signals fed into the Input jacks.
1
4. Controllers section: Totally programmable slider and but12 are used for real time
ton panel. In Sound mode, the sliders
sound editing (Envelope, Filter and LFO). In Drawbar mode,
the sliders operate as drawbars and the buttons 5-8 activate
typ-ical electronic organ functions (Click, Perc, Slow/Fast
Rotary). In Performance and Song modes, the sliders control the volumes of the 16 parts and the buttons select the
parts (Tracks).
5. User: Allows you to specify your own functions for the 8
sliders and buttons.
6. Drawbar: Activates Drawbar mode.
7. Transpose b/#: Master transposer in semitone steps (range
+/– 24 semitones).
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2 Quick Guide
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12
13
14
15
16
17
11
18
20
19
21
22
23
25
24
8. Octave –/+: Master and section octave transposer (range +/
– 5 octaves).
9. Solo: Isolates a single sound from the rest in multi-track
situations.
10. FX OFF: when on (LED on), the effects processors are bypassed and the sounds are emitted dry.
11. Display and selection buttons (F1 … F4): A 128 x 64
pixel, backlit graphic LCD display. The four buttons below F1
… F4 select functions shown in the display which change
according to the current mode.
12. Contrast: A small knob to control the display contrast.
13. Notepad: Utility to view text files, (song lists, lyrics etc.).
14. Undo: Cancels the last performed task in edit situations.
15. Help: Shows the on-line help menu in several different languages.
16. Store: Saves your modifications to memory (Performances,
Sounds, etc.).
17. Keypad: A numeric keypad used for entering specific values
(data selection, parameter editing, etc.).
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Front & Rear Panel 3
18. Data Entry Dial, Navigational cursors and Enter/Escape
buttons: A data entry Dial for the continuous selection of
data. 4 directional buttons (cursors) which move the display’s
negative highlight cursor in the direction of the arrow (up/
down/left/right). The Enter button is used in different situations either to delve deeper into a function or to confirm a
decision. The Escape button cancels operations and can
also be used to exit from certain edit menus.
19. Libraries: 4 buttons, used to recall the different types of
internal sounds (Sound, Performance, Drum, Sample).
20. System: Contains a number of different functions which affect the instrument as a whole (pedals, tuning, keyboard velocity, etc.).
21. Midi: Allows you to modify the functions which affect the
instrument’s Midi and Computer ports.
22. Disk: Contains all the necessary functions to load, save and
organize data on Floppy disks, the internal Hard Disk or any
external SCSI devices.
23. Sequencer: 5 buttons which control the sequencer functions (Play, Stop, Rew [<<], FF [>>], Record) and 2 buttons
for Song Selection and Song Edit.
24. Grooves: Allows you to listen to the on-board groove libraries as well as edit and create your own groove patches.
25. Arpeggiator: Activates the on-board Arpeggiator and allows
you to create your own custom arpeggio patterns.
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4 Quick Guide
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Rear Panel (Connections)
1
2
4
3
6
5
7
1. SCSI port (optional). Allows external storage media to be
connected to the unit (CD-ROM, Jaz™, Zip™ etc.).
2. Pedals: Damper, 1, 2, Volume. Three programmable pedal
jacks (Damper, 1, 2) for continuous control pedals and switch
action pedals (with reversible polarity) and a Volume jack for
a volume pedal.
3. Computer port: Serial connector for direct computer connection (Apple Macintosh or IBM PC and compatibles).
4. MIDI: Twin set of independent ports for MIDI connections.
MIDI IN 1/2, MIDI THRU 1/2, MIDI OUT 1/2).
5. Outputs: (Left, Right, 1, 2). Stereo Left/Right jacks and auxiliary 1, 2 jacks to monitor the Equinox through an external
amplification system. For Mono reproduction, use either the
Left or Right jack. Outputs 1 & 2 emit “dry” sounds (no effects).
6. Mic/Line Inputs: (1, 2, Gain 1, Gain 2). Audio inputs for
Microphone or Line signals (musical instrument, cassette recorder, CD player or microphone). For Mono connections,
use the In 1 jack. The volume of the Mic/Line signal fed into
the In 1 & 2 jacks is controlled by the Input panel slider. The
two Gain controls 1 & 2 control the impedance of the signal
fed into the respective In jacks. Fully anti-clockwise = Line
level. Fully clockwise = Mic level.
7. Power On/Off Switch and mains socket: The switch turns
the instrument on and off. Insert the supplied power cord
into the mains socket and the other end into a suitable wall
outlet.
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Front & Rear Panel 5
Setting up and getting to know the instrument
The Equinox does not have it ‘s own built in amplification so
either headphones or an external amplifier/speaker system are
required.
For external amplification, a high quality stereo keyboard amplifier system is recommended.
Connecting a set of headphones
If you prefer to play with headphones for high quality personal
monitoring, plug a standard stereo headphone set (8 Ω) into one
of the two headphones jacks located on the left side of the instrument, under the Wheels panel.
Use the Master volume slider to adjust the headphone volume.
Connecting to an amplification system
Before connecting audio cables, be sure that the power switch
on the rear panel is off and the master volume is at minimum.
Connect the power cord to the rear panel mains socket and insert the other end of the power cord into a suitable grounded wall
outlet.
Connect the audio cables to the stereo audio outputs (Left, Right)
and the other ends to your amplifier system. Use audio cables
with standard 1/4” jacks. To connect to domestic stereo units,
use RCA jacks. For mono reproduction, connect to either the
Left or Right output jack. The auxiliary outputs 1 and 2 emit “dry”
signals (i.e. no effects).
Stereo
amplification
system
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6 Quick Guide
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Turn on the power
The power switch is located on left side of the rear panel (when
sitting in front of the keyboard).
Turn the power on only after all the connections to other equipment (amplifiers, Midi devices, etc.) have been made.
After a short scanning period, the display will appear showing
the last used mode (Sound, Performance, Drawbar, etc.).
The various modes available are explained afterwards.
Adjust the volume
Adjust the general volume of the instrument with the Master panel slider.
Note: better results are obtained
by adjusting the volume of the
mixer or amplifier controls rather
than lowering the volume of the
instrument.
If you are using headphones, you should find that about three
quarter volume is a comfortable listening level.
Connect the pedals
There are four rear panel PEDALS jacks marked Volume, 1, 2
and Damper which accept control pedals.
The Volume jack is a non-programmable port for a standard Volume Pedal. The remaining three jacks (Damper, 1, 2) are fully
editable although their functions have been pre-set at the factory.
The default configuration of the pedals is as follows:
(All Generalmusic control pedals
are optional accessories).
Ped1
Ped2
Damper
Volume
=
=
=
=
Expression
Start/Stop
Damper (sustain)
Volume
Your pedals settings can either be stored with each performance
or they can be “locked” so that their functions are global.
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Setting-up 7
The pedal jacks 1, 2 and Damper are function assignable and
can be independently enabled or disabled for each of the 16 parts
in a Performance.
All three pedals (1, 2, Damper) can be programmed to accept
Switch action (on/off) or Continuous (graduated levels) control
pedals (Volume type). It is also possible to reverse the polarity of
the Switch action pedals.
Using the wheels
Pitch Bend wheel
The on-board controlling devices include two wheels on the left
key block.
The default configuration of the wheels is as follows:
Wheel 1 (left) = Pitch Bend
Wheel 2 (right) = Modulation
Wheel 1 is spring loaded to return to the central position.
Wheel 2 is free-moving and remains at the last set position.
Modulation wheel
The programmed Wheel configuration is a general setting which
applies to the instrument as a whole.
The Wheels can be independently enabled or disabled for each
of the 16 parts in a Performance.
Using Aftertouch
This feature makes is possible to vary the degree of modulation
by varying the pressure applied to the keys. No effect is produced with normal key pressure, but the effect can be introduced
by applying pressure to the keys after playing them.
The Aftertouch effect can be independently enabled or disabled
for each of the 16 parts in a Performance.
Press harder after playing
the keys
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8 Quick Guide
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Playing with or without the effects
Whether you are playing single Sounds, Performances, Drawbars, etc., you’ll find that in all cases one or more effects will be
applied to the sounds you are playing. If you prefer to play without effects, you can instantly bypass the internal digital effects
processors by pressing the FX OFF button.
When the LED is off, the sound(s) will play with their programmed
effects.
When the LED is ON, the sound(s) will play “dry” (without effects).
The on/off status of the FX OFF button cannot be memorised.
Transposing the instrument up or down
Master Transpose
The TRANSPOSE b/# buttons allow real time pitch adjustments
(transpositions) in steps of one semitone (range ± 24 semitones
= 2 octaves).
•
Press the TRANSPOSE # or TRANSPOSE b buttons to raise
(#) or lower (b) the pitch.
Transp b:
Transp #:
…
Note: Transposing with the #/b
buttons affects the instrument as a
whole. If, for example, you switch
from Sounds mode to Performance
mode, the Performances will also
play at the new pitch. If you turn
the instrument off, turning on again
will restore normal pitch.
The pitch of the instrument is instantly raised (#) or lowered
(b) one step and a window will appear showing the current
Transpose value (0 = standard pitch).
Press the Transpose # or b button as many times as necessary until you reach the desired pitch. The display returns to
normal after a few seconds. The LED of the Transpose # or
b button remians on to show that the instrument has been
transposed up or down.
To clear the keyboard transpose setting
•
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Press both TRANSPOSE buttons at the same time.
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Setting-up 9
Section transposer (Octaves)
If you are playing a single Sound (in Sounds mode), you can
transpose in octave steps within the range +/– 5 octaves (60
semitones) by means of the Octave +/– buttons.
If you are playing in Performance mode, the Octave +/– buttons
affect the currently selected part (shown in negative highlight in
the parts list).
•
Press the OCTAVE + or OCTAVE – button as many times as
desired until you reach the correct octave..
Octave +:
Octave –:
…
Note: Unlike the Master transposer, Octave transpositions only affect the current Sound or Performance part. If, for example, you are
playing in Sounds mode and you
change Sound or switch to Perform
mode, the octave transposition will
be cancelled.
The setting is shown in a temporary window and the LED on
the octave button turns on to show the raised or lowered status of the sound (or part). The display returns to normal after
a few seconds.
Using the Solo button
In multi-part situations (Performance, Drawbars, Song), the Solo
button isolates a sound from the rest in order that you may make
some changes and listen to the result without listening to all the
other sounds. Once you have obtained the sound you want, you
can select another part to solo or deactivate Solo to restore the
multi-part situation to normal.
•
Simply press the SOLO button to activate the function (LED
on).
In Performance and Song modes, the current Sound is shown
in the Parts list. To select another sound, simply press the
corresponding Part select button.
In Drawbar mode, the sound heard will correspond to the
selected Drawbar, shown in the Drawbar Setup display. To
listen to another Drawbar, simply move the corresponding
Slider.
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10 Quick Guide
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The basics of Equinox
The more you work with the Equinox, the more you will appreciate the user-friendly and logical panel layout.
The panel layout allows simple and direct access to all the functions and the backlit 128 x 64 pixel LCD graphic display tells you
where you are at all times, using simple, concise terminology
combined with easy to understand graphics.
The graphic LCD display
The Equinox display is the principal user interface which tells
you the status of the instrument at all times.
Each time you turn the instrument on, the display will be in the
same basic mode that you left it in before you switched it off,
(Sound, Performance, Drawbars etc.)
Current
mode
Bank and
Sound number
The last selected playing mode is memorized when you turn the
instrument off.
The display tells you where you are at all times by showing the
name of the current mode at the top and a menu of associated
functions at the bottom.
Current
Sound
Menu of
Sound functions
For example (opposite), the Sound mode display shows the name
of the current Sound, the Bank and Sound number and a menu
of four associated functions.
Other displays will be explained further on in this manual.
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The basics of Equinox 11
Selection, Navigation and Data Entry
In Play modes, the Dial and the Cursor buttons operate as the
principal selection tools. In other modes (Sequencer, Function,
Edit, Store), these controls transform into navigating and data
entry devices.
Selection - the Dial and the Cursors
In Play mode, the Dial is the principal selection device (Sounds,
Performances, etc.). Clockwise rotation selects continually in increasing numerical order, counter-clockwise rotation selects in
reverse order.
The Cursor Up/down buttons select items (Sounds, Perfs, etc.)
sequentially in single steps; the Up button in ascending numerical order, the Down button in descending order.
The Cursor Left/Right buttons activate a temporary window which
allows you to switch between banks (factory and user).
The Function buttons F1 - F4
The 4 buttons under the display select the functions that appear
at the bottom of many screens. Selecting one of these functions
will take you to a new edit environment.
Getting back to the main menu in a single step can be achieved
by pressing the MENU button, (F4), where applicable.
The Numeric Keypad
A secondary data entry tool is the numeric keypad (to the right of
the cursor buttons) which enters specific values.
Pressing any of these buttons activates an entry window where
you can type in the number required. Sometimes you may need
to enter two numbers separated by a dash (e.g. 55 - 2). In this
case, use the cursor right button to move to the right side of the
separator dash. When you’ve finished, confirm by pressing ENTER.
Also, for stepping through options in single steps, you can use
the Increase (>) and Decrease (<) buttons of the keypad.
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12 Quick Guide
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Navigating and entering data
In all modes other than Play mode, the Cursors are the principal
navigating tools and the Dial the data entry device. The display
cursor is a negative highlight zone which is moved up or down
with the cursor up/down buttons. In all displays that show a menu,
two small up/down arrows representing the cursors tell you at a
glance whether or not additional features are out of view.
Two white arrows means that no other features are available,
one black arrow means that other features are available if you
scroll in the direction of the black arrow, two black arrows means
that other features are available in either direction.
The value of the selected parameter is changed with the Dial (or
keypad). Clockwise rotation of the Dial enters data in increasing
order, counter-clockwise rotation in decreasing order.
Sliders and control buttons
The 8 Sliders and the 8 buttons underneath are used for selecting and controlling pre-defined functions or they can be re-programmed to control the functions that you choose.
In SOUND, DRUM and SAMPLE mode, the sliders operate as
real time editors, modifying the characteristics of the current
Sound according to the function assigned to the slider (Envelope, Filter, Lfo). When you edit a sound, the first three buttons
operate as switches for the three layers in the sound.
In PERFORMANCE and SONG mode, the sliders operate as
volume controls for the 16 parts or tracks while the buttons beneath the sliders are used as on/off switches for the corresponding part or track.
Enter/Escape
Generally, Enter confirms operations and, in some cases, also
executes a function, such as note copy or quantization in Song
Edit. Often you use the ENTER button to go a little deeper into a
particular edit menu. Sometimes an edit task may require stepping through various “levels” of edit pages using the ENTER button.
The ESCAPE button generally cancels operations and returns to
the previous display page. In editing situations, Escape steps
back through the various levels that you have been working on.
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The basics of Equinox 13
Text entry
When entering names (Sound name, Performance name, Song
name, etc.), the keys of the keyboard become a kind of typewriter where most of the keys are assigned to a particular letter,
symbol or number. The alphanumeric configuration of the keyboard is shown in the following illustration::
The white keys (A2 - B6) insert letters (A-Z) and various punctuation marks. The black keys (C#5 - A#6) insert the numbers 1-9
and 0. The keys D2, D#2, E2, F2 and G2 provide various word
processing functions. The letters and numbers are printed on
the metal rail which runs beneath the keyboard.
You enter the new name by pressing the corresponding keys of
the keyboard. Numbers can also be inserted using the key-pad.
The lower notes of the keyboard provide the following word
processing functions:
D2:CAPS - Caps On / Caps Off. Caps on inserts uppercase
letters. Caps off inserts lowercase letters.
D#2:
INS/OVER - toggles between Insert and Overwrite
mode. Insert mode inserts a character at the flashing cursor
position and all characters to the right of the cursor move
one space to the right. Overwrite mode replaces the selected character (flashing) with the new one.
E2: SPACE - inserts a space between two entries.
F2: DELETE - cancels the character to the right of the flashing cursor.
G2:<— (BACKSPACE) - cancels the previous character and
moves the cursor one step backwards.
Once you have entered the name, press ENTER to confirm and
close the name window, or press ESCAPE if you realize that you
don’t want to enter a name at this time.
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14 Quick Guide
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User Guide
The chapters of the User Guide explain all you need to know
about the Equinox.
The subjects discussed here are:
1. Sound mode, Quick Edit & Advanced Edit.
2. Performance mode.
3. Drum mode.
4. Sample mode.
5. Drawbar mode.
6. Arpeggiator.
7. Grooves.
8. Disk.
9. System.
10. Midi.
11. Sequencer.
12. User panel.
13. Notepad.
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Sound mode 1•1
1 • SOUND MODE
Note: All examples in this section require that the Equinox is in
SOUND MODE.
If you are uncertain how to return to the instrument to SOUND
MODE, simply turn the unit on from scratch and press the SOUND
button beneath the screen.
Sound Families
Because the Equinox has well over 1000 factory sounds as
standard, these sounds have been divided into 11 families, making it easier to find the right type of sounds quickly and easily.
Each family, (also called “Banks”), can contain up to 128 sounds.
Let’s take a closer look at these families;
1. SYNTH A
2. SYNTH B
3. SYNTH C
4. SYNTH D
5. ORCHESTRA
6. GMX 1
7. GMX 2
8. GMX 3
14. DRUM KITS
15. DRUM SOUNDS 1
16. DRUM SOUNDS 2
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1•2 User Guide
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SYNTH A, B, C, D
These are the “core” sounds of the Equinox. Many of these
sounds have been specially created by some of the most prominent programmers and musicians in the world. The sounds in
these families will also give you some insight of the creative possibilities of the Equinox as a synthesizer.
ORCHESTRA
In this family you will find authentic reproductions of traditional
orchestral instruments. Many of these sounds are further enhanced by appropriate effects, typical of the instrument’s playing
style, being assigned to either velocity or aftertouch.
GMX 1, 2 and 3
GMX is Generalmusic’s own standard set of sounds which are
included in every Generalmusic product. The first bank, GMX1,
contains the industry standard General MIDI sound library. This
family is designed to be used when the Equinox is required to
play General MIDI song disks or when the instrument is being
controlled by a computer program or some other device which
requires a General MIDI sound library. The second and third GMX
banks contain 256 sounds taken from Generalmusic’s own extensive sound library. These sounds, along with the 128 sounds
in the GMX1 bank, ensure compatibility with Generalmusic’s own
GMX song library, (not available in the U.S.A), and also with song
disks created on other Generalmusic instruments.
Drum Kits and Drum Sounds
The Drum Kits family includes just about every type of drum kit
you could imagine - from jazz to rock, orchestra to techno and
beyond. However, unlike many other keyboards, on the Equinox you can not only create your own drum kits but you can edit
each and every individual drum sound. For this reason, two families are provided in which you can find every single individual
drum sound. These sounds can be freely edited just like any
other sound. They can then be stored as new sounds, either for
individual use or for incorporating into the drum kits.
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Sound mode 1•3
Selecting Sounds
Sounds can be selected in three different ways.
1. Scrolling with the dial
Moving the dial in either direction will scroll sequentially through
all the sounds in the instrument’s memory. When you reach the
last sound of a particular family you automatically pass into the
next family until you have reached the end of all sounds in the
instrument’s memory.
2. Single steps
Using either the Cursor Up/Down buttons or the INC / DEC buttons of the numeric keypad you can step through individual sounds
one by one.
3. Directly entering a number
This method is the quickest way to go directly to the sound you
need but, first, you must know the exact number and location of
this sound. Pressing any of the buttons in the numeric keypad
will open up a small window as shown below:
You need to enter two numbers separated by a dash, (which is
inserted automatically for you). The first is a number between 1
and 128. This is the location of the desired sound within it’s family. After you’ve entered this first number, use the cursor right
button to move the display cursor to the right of the separator
dash. The next number you enter will indicate which family the
sound is in, (you can use the family numbers in the list on the
previous page as a guide).
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1•4 User Guide
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Example: How to directly select the sound SOLO VOX from the
keypad. SOLO VOX is sound number 86 in family number 6
(GMX 1).
Step 1. Press any numbered key on the numeric keypad.
Step 2. Type the number 86.
Step 3. Press the cursor right button to move the cursor to the
right side of the separator dash.
Step 4. Type the number 6.
Step 5. Press ENTER.
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Sound mode 1•5
Moving Between Families
Sometimes you might want to jump directly from one sound family to another when looking for a particular sound. Pressing either the Cursor Left button or the Cursor Right button will open
the BANK SELECT window.
The current family is highlighted and you can select any other
family by moving up or down in the families list using the cursor
controls. When the family you want is highlighted press ENTER.
You will now return to sound selection as before but you’ll be
working within the newly selected family.
Editing and changing Sounds
Immediately following the factory sound banks you will find the
USER sound banks, (called USER 1, 2, 3 etc.). There are 16 of
these USER banks and any new sounds which you create on the
instrument can be stored in any of these 2048, (16 x 128) locations.
Any sound on the Equinox can be edited to your taste. This
editing can consist of anything from the simplest adjustment of
the sound’s tone or volume level to a complete reconstruction of
the sound, resulting in a totally original and personal sound.
Editing always begins by selecting one of the sounds currently in
the instrument’s memory as a starting point for the sound you’re
going to create. When you edit a sound, you can decide, at any
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1•6 User Guide
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point, to either save the new sound you’ve made or to just quit
editing and go back to using the instrument as before. This procedure is explained in detail under STORING SOUNDS.
There are two different ways to edit a sound.
The first method is Quick Edit which lets you modify the sound
quickly and easily using the eight sliders on the left side of the
instrument.
The second method is Advanced Edit which uses the four buttons beneath the sound’s name as a starting point for complex
editing.
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Sound mode 1•7
Quick Edit - (using the Sliders)
The eight sliders on the left side of the instrument’s control panel
allow you to instantly edit the most essential characteristics of
any sound.
LEVEL: The overall volume of the sound. The level increases as
the slider is moved upwards. Most factory sounds are programmed with optimum volume level set. Sometimes, especially
if you use the filters for special effects, the overall volume of the
sound may rise sharply and will need to be decreased so that it
better matches the level of other sounds.
ATTACK: This slider adjusts the time taken for a sound to reach
it’s maximum volume level after a key has been pressed. The
attack time increases as the slider is moved upwards. Setting a
very fast attack time, (with the slider all the way to the bottom),
will make a sound more percussive. Setting a slower attack time
will cause the sound to fade in slowly when a key is pressed.
Since this slider can be used to either increase or decrease the
amount of attack that the sound originally had, the original attack
time of the sound can be restored by setting the slider to its centre position.
DECAY: This slider will only affect those sounds which feature
“decay”. Decay is the effect of something fading away as you
hold a key on the keyboard. A piano sound is a good example of
a sound which has decay. As you hold down the key, the sounds
fades away or “decays”. Eventually you will hear no sound at all.
An organ sound, on the other hand, has no decay. The level of
the sound remains the same as long as you hold down a key.
The decay slider is used to adjust the amount of time it takes a
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1•8 User Guide
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sound to decay, (in the case of our piano sound that would be the
amount of time it took between when the sound is at maximum
level and the point at which we no longer hear anything).
Since this slider can be used to either increase or decrease the
decay time of the original sound, the original decay time of the
sound can be restored by setting the slider to its centre position.
RELEASE: The release slider is used to adjust the amount of
time a sound continues to play after the key has been released.
This “release time: increases as the slider is moved upwards.
Maximum release times can last for more than twenty thirty seconds after a key has been released.
Since this slider can be used to either increase or decrease the
release time of the original sound, the original release time of the
sound can be restored by setting the slider to its centre position.
CUT OFF: In it’s simplest form, this is the sound’s most important tone control. Cut-Off is one half of the main filter controls,
(the other being “Resonance”). Usually these two are used in
combination for powerful manipulation of a sound’s tonal character. As the slider is moved downwards the filter closes allowing
less of the original sound to pass through. This generally has the
effect of making the sound warmer and less “fizzy”. Moving the
slider upwards opens the filter, increasing the brilliance of the
sound.
Since this slider can be used to either increase or decrease the
filter cut-off point of the original sound, the original cut-off point of
the sound can be restored by setting the slider to its centre position.
RESONANCE: This slider, the second essential element of filter
control, introduces complex harmonic overtones which are added to the final sound. Sometimes these overtones can only be
produced when the Filter Cut-Off setting is low enough. Try setting the Resonance slider fairly high and then moving the Cut-Off
slider while you play. The distinctive sound of a resonating filter
is one of the key elements in many classic synthesizer sounds.
Since this slider can be used to either increase or decrease the
amount of resonance in the original sound, the original amount
of resonance can be restored by setting the slider to its centre
position.
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Sound mode 1•9
LFO DEPTH: This control is used to set the amount of “vibrato”
or modulation applied to a sound. If the current sound includes
some type of modulation or vibrato, you can use this slider to
either increase, decrease or completely remove the effect, (by
setting the slider to minimum).
Since this slider can be used to either increase or decrease the
LFO depth in the original sound, the original LFO depth can be
restored by setting the slider to its centre position.
LFO RATE: This slider can be used to adjust the speed of the
“vibrato” or modulation in a sound. It is designed to be used in
conjunction with the LFO DEPTH slider.
Since this slider can be used to either increase or decrease the
LFO rate in the original sound, the original LFO rate can be restored by setting the slider to its centre position.
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1•10 User Guide
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Storing Sounds
Whenever you edit a sound you will, at some point, decide that
you either want to save your new sound or simply forget it and
return to using the instrument as before.
A modified Sound that has not been stored to memory shows a
small mark at the top left hand corner before the name.
To cancel an edit, simply use the dial or the cursor controls to
choose a different sound and everything will be instantly forgotten. If you’re using one of the advanced edit menus, (WAVE,
CONTROL, EFFECT or OTHER), or one of their related functions, simply press the ESCAPE button until you return the main
sound selection page. Then scroll to the next sound and your
previous edit is cancelled as before.
If you decide you want to store your sound into the instrument’s
memory, the next step will be to press the STORE button.
During the storing process, you will first be asked to select a
destination for your new sound and then given the opportunity to
name it.
User sound locations
Any sound that you create yourself is referred to as a “User
Sound”. Just like the factory sounds, User Sounds are also stored
in families, (or “Banks”). In addition to the 11 factory sound families that we’ve already looked at, the Equinox also contains 16
user banks and each bank has space for 128 sounds. This means
you can store up to 2048 of your own sounds in the Equinox.
When you press the STORE button to save a sound that you’ve
been working on, you are asked to select where, in these 16
User Banks, you would like to store your new sound.
Although you can choose any destination for your sound, the
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Sound mode 1•11
instrument starts out by suggesting a location which might make
your sound easy to find in the future. We call this the “mirror
location”.
Mirror locations
We know that the Equinox’s factory sounds are stored in 11 families containing up to 128 sounds each. We also know that there
are 16 User families available which are also capable of storing
up to 128 sounds each. This means that we are able to store at
least as many user sounds as there are factory sounds. It is from
here that we get the idea of “mirror locations”.
Each factory sound has an associated “mirror location”, where a
modified version of that sound can be stored. This mirror location is simply a slot in one of the User Banks. It is the slot with the
same number as the original sound and resides in the same User
Bank number as the original sound’s Factory Bank number.
For example, let’s say we edited the sound MOON WIND, which
is sound number 98 in factory family number 7, (GMX 2). When
we press the STORE button to save this new creation, the suggested slot for saving this sound is going to be Position #98 in
User Bank #7.
Of course, you don’t have to store your sound in this mirror location. You can store it anywhere you want. However, using the
mirror location eliminates a certain amount of extra work when
saving a sound you’ve created. If you accept the mirror location
then storing your sound is simply a case of pressing ENTER a
few times. You can safely ignore all the prompts to change the
location and to change the name. When you need to find your
sound in the future, you know exactly where it will be.
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1•12 User Guide
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Advanced Edit - (using the Menus)
If you’re serious about creating and editing sounds then it won’t
be too long before you yearn for a little more flexibility than is
offered by the sliders in Quick Edit mode. The advanced editing
controls are always visible in the screen when you’re in SOUND
mode. Here you will find the real key to the synthesizer power of
the Equinox
The advanced edit controls are divided into four categories:
WAVE: This is the heart and soul of the Equinox synthesizer
engine and the starting point for creating new sounds. Here you
can select the waveforms on which your sound will be based,
design complex envelopes, set dynamic filters, panning controls
and many other fundamental elements of your sound
CONTROL: Here a number of live expression controls can be
set up for your sound including assignment of the performance
wheels, portamento control, velocity and aftertouch
EFFECT: Up to four digital signal processors are available to be
assigned to your sound. These offer a wide range of popular
effects ranging from reverbs to a variety of choruses, phasers
and flangers, delay, distortion, pitch shifting, ring modulation,
compression, 3D and EQ.
OTHER: Some additional controls for final tweaking.
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Sound mode 1•13
Wave Menu
Layers
The first thing you need to know, when you enter the WAVE menu
to create or edit a sound, is that all Equinox sounds are created
using either 1, 2 or 3 layers. After pressing the WAVE button, as
soon as the WAVE menu is visible, look over at the first 3 buttons
below the slider panel.
These are the layer select buttons when you’re in WAVE edit.
Either 1, 2 or all 3 of these buttons will be lit, (don’t worry that one
of them is flashing). This tells you how many layers the current
sound is made from.
The flashing layer is the one which is currently available for editing. We will refer to this as the active layer. If you were to adjust
any of the settings in any of the menus currently in the screen,
you would be changing only the settings of the active layer. To
make a different layer active, simply press it’s button once. The
new layer button begins to flash and the previously active layer
now stops flashing. To mute a layer, (which can be useful when
you want to hear only the layer which you’re currently editing and
mute the others), simply press it’s associated button until the
light turns off.
So what actually is a layer ? In simple terms, a layer is a sound.
In fact, many of the Equinox sounds are created using only one
layer. When more complex sounds are needed, up to three layers can be combined together to form a single sound. Since the
process required to edit one layer is exactly the same as for another, we are going to concentrate our examples in this section
only on editing a single layer. Creating multi-layer sounds is a
relatively simple process once you know how to edit a single
layer.
Layers can also be of different types - single waveform or dual
waveform. For the explanation of edit features on the following
pages, we will assume that only the simplest type of layer is being used - a single waveform layer.
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1•14 User Guide
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For advanced users wishing to know more about the various dual
layer types here’s a quick guide;
Dual 1:
Separate Volume, Amp Envelope, Filter and
Pitch Envelope for each waveform.
As above but the two filters are in series and
common to both waveforms.
Volume and Amp. Envelope are common while
filters are separate for each waveform.
Everything is common to both waveforms.
Dual 2:
Dual 3:
Dual 4:
Layer
The LAYER button allows you to add new layers to a sound, (by
using CREATE), either of your own creation or from other sounds
already in memory, (by using IMPORT). Here you can also set
the velocity and key ranges for each layer allowing you to create
splits and velocity switching between layers.
Now let’s take a quick look at the main features of the WAVE
menu:
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Sound mode 1•15
WAVEFORM
Here you can select the waveform which this layer is going to
use. The other controls in this menu allow you to adjust the tuning and the way in which the waveform is affected by velocity
and aftertouch.
VOLUME
This menu allows you to control the overall volume level of this
layer and also to set by how much the volume level will change
when either velocity or aftertouch is applied.
AMP. ENVELOPE
The principal function of this menu is to allow you to “draw” two
envelopes, called the KEY ON and KEY OFF envelopes respectively. In each of these envelope screens, you draw a shape which
represents the way the volume level of the sound changes over
time.
In the KEY ON envelope screen, the shape you draw will describe the way the volume of the sound will change while the key
is held down.
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1•16 User Guide
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In the KEY OFF envelope screen, the shape you draw will describe the way the volume changes after the key is released.
Under the CONTROLS sub-menu, you will find a number of functions which control the way the sound responds to the envelopes
which you have drawn. These functions allow you create changes in the effectiveness of the envelopes when velocity and aftertouch effects are applied to the keyboard.
FILTER
Five different types of filter are available. For each filter, under
the CONTROLS menu, you can choose the Filter type, set it’s
Cut-off and Resonance and also assign Cut-Off and Resonance
values to be controlled by velocity and/or aftertouch.
The last three parameters of the FILTER/CONTROLS menu allow you to set the effectiveness of the two filter envelopes which
are available. These envelopes are called the KEY ON and KEY
OFF envelopes respectively. In each of these envelope screens,
you draw a shape which represents the way the Cut-off point of
the filter changes over time.
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Sound mode 1•17
In the KEY ON envelope screen, the shape you draw will describe the way the Cut-off point will change while the key is held
down.
In the KEY OFF envelope screen, the shape you draw will describe the way the Cut-off point changes after the key is released.
NOTE: In order to hear the effect
of these two envelopes, you must
first set the ENV. DEPTH, (in the
CONTROLS menu), to some value greater than zero:
PITCH ENVELOPE
This feature allows you to “draw” two envelopes, called the KEY
ON and KEY OFF envelopes respectively. In each of these envelope screens, you draw a shape which represents the way the
pitch changes over time.
In the KEY ON envelope screen, the shape you draw will describe the way the pitch changes while the key is held down.
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1•18 User Guide
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In the KEY OFF envelope screen, the shape you draw will describe the way the pitch changes after the key is released.
In the CONTROLS menu, you will also find some parameters
which allow you to modify the speed and depth of these envelopes according to velocity and aftertouch.
NOTE: In order to hear the effect
of these two envelopes, you must
first set the ENV. DEPTH, (in the
CONTROLS menu), to some value greater than zero.
…
L.F.O
The L.F.O section is used to add modulation, (which, in it’s simplest form can be thought of as vibrato or tremolo), to the current
layer. There are five different types of modulation which be applied. The type of modulation, it’s related speed and other features can be set under CONTROLS.
This modulation can then be applied to one of three sources PITCH,
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Sound mode 1•19
AMPLITUDE
or FILTER.
Each of these three menus contain identical features. In each
case you choose how much modulation to apply in general, (OSCILLATOR 1) and how much extra modulation to apply when
aftertouch is applied, (A/T OSCILLATOR1).
PAN
The PAN menu offers two different methods of varying the pan
position of this layer.
The first method allows you to change the pan position according to the keyboard velocity of aftertouch amount. This can be
set from the VELOCITY and AFTERTOUCH parameters in the
CONTROLS menu.
The second method of varying the pan position is by drawing two
envelopes.
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1•20 User Guide
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In a similar fashion to PITCH ENVELOPE, FILTER ENVELOPE
and AMP ENVELOPE, you can draw both a KEY ON;
and a KEY OFF envelope for the pan position.
As with the other envelope functions on the Equinox, you’ll need
to set the ENV. AMOUNT, (in the CONTROLS menu), before
these envelopes will have any effect.
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Sound mode 1•21
Control Menu
PITCH BENDER
Here you can set the amount of pitch shift available from the
pitch bend wheel.
You can independently set the amount of pitch bend when the
wheel is moved up and the amount of pitch bend when it is moved
down. This menu also contains the modulation wheel control.
PORTAMENTO
MODE: NORMAL portamento creates a pitch slide whenever a
new note is played. LEGATO portamento activates the pitch slide,
(portamento), effect only when a note is played while another
note is still being held.
TYPE: This feature only applies when, during the course of sliding from one note to another, you play an new note somewhere
in between the two, (which begins a separate portamento, [pitch
slide] of it’s own). The TYPE setting controls where this new slide
will commence from;
Floating: The new portamento will commence from the pitch
which the previous portamento had reached when
the new key was pressed.
Re-Start: The new portamento will commence from the ultimate destination of the previous portamento.
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1•22 User Guide
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SPEED: The time taken for the pitch slide to occur.
TIME/RATE: This control affects the way that the SPEED setting
is interpreted. When this parameter is set to TIME, the SPEED
value controls the actual amount of time it takes to slide from any
note to any other note regardless of the “distance” in pitch between the two. This means that the time taken to slide between
any two notes will always be the same.
When this parameter is set to RATE, the SPEED value controls
the amount of pitch change per second. This means that the
time it takes to slide from one note to another depends entirely
on the “distance” it has to travel between the two. This means
that the time taken to slide between any two notes will be different depending on which notes were played.
AFTERTOUCH
Here you can enable or disable the aftertouch effect.
VELOCITY
You can choose from eight different velocity curves. A small graphic is displayed to represent each curve. There are four normal
curves - 0, 1, 2 and 3, (where a lighter touch produces a quieter
sound), and four inverse curves - 4, 5, 6 and 7, (where a lighter
touch produces a louder sound).
This menu also allows you to set velocity limits to your sound by
using the VELOCITY RANGE parameter.
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Sound mode 1•23
Effects Menu
Three effects processors, (DSPs) are provided. They can be used
individually or in any combination - series or parallel.
REVERB
This section contains a library of different reverbs presets. Choose
a reverb preset from the library by selecting TYPE.
Below the selected type, you will see all of the available parameters for editing the current reverb. The output of the Reverb
section is “100% wet”, (meaning that it does not mix any of the
original “dry” signal with it’s output)
MULTIFX
This section contains a number of popular effects ranging from
Mono and Stereo Delays to Chorus, Distortion and Pitch Shift.
Choose the effect you want to use by selecting TYPE.
Below the selected type, you will see all of the available parameters for editing the current effect. The parameters offered will be
different depending on the type of effect currently selected.
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1•24 User Guide
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PROEFX
This section is the most important and powerful of all three effects sections.
In addition to containing a variety of high quality stereo effects,
(Flanger, Chorus, Overdrive etc.), it also contains a number of
popular studio post processing functions, (3D, EQ, Loudness
Maximizer, Audio Exciter etc.).
It is also the only section which offers a WET/DRY mix parameter in those effects where it is appropriate. It also has the ability
to be completely disabled and used as a direct stereo dry signal
control, (see SEND).
The ProEFX section also contains two “post send” controls which
allow you to send the sound, after it has been processed by the
ProEFX section, to the Reverb, (TO REVERB) or to the MultiFX,
(TO MULTIFX).
Effects functions
SEND (button F2): This function allows you to assign the amount
of each effect that you want to apply to the sound. For REVERB
and MULTIFX, simply select the amount of each effect that you
want - from 0 - 127.
The ProEFX section of the SEND menu operates slightly differently from the other two. Because both the Reverb and MultiFX
outputs are “100% wet”, the amount of dry signal in the sound is
controlled by the ProEFX send level.
If you are using an effect from the ProEFX section then, in many
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Sound mode 1•25
cases, it will have a WET/DRY parameter, (for example, STEREO WAH has this parameter). This is a value which can be set
from 0 to 100 where value 0 represents 100% dry, (no effect),
value 100 represents 100% wet and value 50 represents a 50/50
wet dry mix.
NOTE: Some of the effects in ProEFX do not offer a WET/DRY
parameter, (for example, 3D, EQ, Loudness Maximizer, Audio
Exciter etc.) because they are intended for attenuation and enhancement rather that for special effects.
If you don’t wish to use any effects from the ProEFX section then
you can switch it off and turn the ProEFX send into a simple DRY
LEVEL control. To do this, simply place the cursor over the word
ProEFX and turn the dial anti-clockwise.
Now the send level will control the amount of dry signal in the
mix.
MODE (button F3): When available, this function allows you to
select the effects mode. The normal mode is called “3 Effects”
and it offers the 3 effects processors as described above.
This should be used wherever possible to allow maximum flexibility in programming sounds.
The second mode, (2xSynth + 2xSeq) is designed only for situations where you wish to use the Equinox’s internal sequencer
while playing sounds or performances at the same time.
In this mode, only Reverb and MultiFX are available for sounds
and performances. However, the sounds used by the song are
given their own independent Reverb and MultiFX sections which
can be assigned separately, (under SONG EDIT / EFFECTS).
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1•26 User Guide
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Other Menu
MODE
Here you can set the polyphonic or monophonic mode of this
sound as follows;
POLY
:
Normal polyphonic mode;
MONO L :
Left note priority;
MONO R :
Right note priority;
MONO T :
Last note priority without retrigger;
MONO L+R:
Last note priority with retrigger.
LEGATO
Setting this feature to ON will cause the initial attack portion of
the sound to be bypassed when the keys are played “legato”.
RANDOM PAN
This function will automatically shift the pan position of the sound
by a random amount whenever a new note is played. The amount
of shift is limited by the value you select. At maximum level, (7),
the pan position may shift completely to the left or right channel.
MASTER TRANSP.
Usually you will want to leave this set to ON. It confirms that this
sound will be affected by the TRANSPOSE buttons on the front
panel. In some situations, for example, when creating drum
sounds, you may not want the track to be shifted. In this case,
set this function to OFF.
RANDOM PITCH
This function automatically applies a little detuning to the sound
each time a new note is played. The amount by which it detunes
the note is limited by the value you select. At maximum value,
(7), this automatic detuning may be as much as a half step sharp
or flat.
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Sound mode 1•27
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1•28 User Guide
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2 • PERFORMANCE MODE
A PERFORMANCE is a combination of up to 16 sounds either
layered together or split across the keyboard in any configuration. Pressing the PERFORM button will put the Equinox in
Performance play mode.
In this way you can scroll through all performances which already exist in memory. There are 112 performances preset from
the factory and an additional 112 memories into which you can
store your own creations.
To construct a Performance you start by selecting a number of
sounds or Parts, (in Performance mode, each constituent sound
is called a Part). A Performance can contain as little as only one
Part or as many as 16 Parts layered together. Regardless of
how many Parts you actually decide to use, you will always be
able to view 16 Parts within your Performance. These 16 parts
are arranged in what we call the Parts List. How many of the
sounds from this Parts List you actually decide to switch on and
use is entirely your choice. If you only decide, for example, that
you want to layer three sounds together then you only need to be
concerned with the first three parts in the Parts List.
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Performance mode 2•1
Parts List
The Parts List can be viewed by pressing the PARTS button (F1).
You can move from one part to another with the cursor up/down
keys. The part shown selected (negative highlight) is the active
zone of the display, therefore, sound selection is made either
from the dial or numeric keypad as in Sound mode. The cursor
Left and Right keys can be used to select different sound banks
in exactly the same way as Sound mode.
You can select the number of parts that you want to be active by
using the buttons beneath the 8 sliders in conjunction with the 18, 9-16 selector button.
1-8 / 9-16 Selector button
Each button is simply an on/off switch for the part with the corresponding number. If all these buttons are switched off you will
hear no sound. The slider above each button functions as a
volume control for that part.
Parts Menu
To adjust other values for the current part, (the one which the
cursor currently highlights), simply press ENTER. This will call
up the PARTS EDIT screen for the selected part.
You can return to the Parts List at any time by pressing ESCAPE.
Let’s take a look at some of the functions here;
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2•2 User Guide
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TRANSPOSE: Here you can change the pitch of the sound in
half tone steps, within a maximum range of 60 steps up or down.
To shift the sound up or down by an octave you can use the
OCTAVE +/- buttons on the front panel.
DETUNE: This allows you to adjust the fine pitch of the sound in
64ths of a half step.
RANDOM PITCH: As it’s name suggests, this function automatically applies a little detuning to the sound each time a new note
is played. The amount by which it detunes the note is limited by
the value you select. At maximum value, (7), this automatic detuning may be as much as a half step sharp or flat.
MASTER TRANSP. Usually you will want to leave this set to
ON. It confirms that this sound will be affected by the TRANSPOSE buttons on the front panel. In some situations, for example, when using drum kits, you may not want the track to be shifted. In this case, set this function to OFF.
PORTAMENTO MODE:
P. TYPE:
P: SPEED:
P. TIME / RATE:
These functions allow Portamento, (pitch slide) to be applied to
this sound. These features work the same way as in SOUND
MODE.
See the Portamento section of SOUND MODE for a description
of these functions.
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Performance mode 2•3
DELAY TIME: Selecting a value here will cause the sound to be
delayed for a brief period of time after a key is pressed. This
allows you to create a number of special effects using real time
delays. The delay time value is shown in “Ticks”. These ticks
are subdivisions of the beat based on the current “Clock Speed”,
(the tempo of the internal sequencer - this can be changed by
pressing SONG EDIT and using the dial). Each tick represents
1/192nd of a beat. Therefore if you set a delay time of 192, you
will hear a delay of exactly one beat between when you press
the key and when the sound is heard.
POLY PRIORITY: Setting this function to ON gives the current
sound “priority of polyphony”. This signifies that this particular
sound will never have notes “stolen” by other parts or tracks of
the sequencer. If you subsequently try to play this sound while
all of the available polyphony is being used, it will “steal” the notes
it needs from other parts.
Press MENU (button F4) or ESCAPE to return to the Parts List.
The Parts List functions
SPLIT (button F2): The SPLIT button allows you to select a
single split point, (called a Basic Split), on the keyboard. Parts
can then be assigned to either the left or right side of the assigned split point.
Under the SPLIT button, simply set the “Basic Split” to ON and
choose where you want the keyboard to be split.
Then return to the parts list with ENTER or ESCAPE.
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2•4 User Guide
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As you select each part in the list, you can assign it’s position,
either to the left or to the right of the split point, by pressing the
INCREASE or DECREASE buttons of the keypad.
For each part in the Parts List, you will see a small arrow icon
indicating which side of the split the sound is assigned to.
NOTE: The RANGE function is
not available if the Basic Split is
on.
RANGE (button F3): The RANGE button (F3) is used to specify, for each part, exactly how and when it will be activated from
the keyboard. You can select a range of notes and a range of
velocities, outside of which, this part will not be activated. This
allows the RANGE function to be used when you want to create
a Multi-Split or a Velocity Switch between a group of different
sounds.
Multi-Split
For example, to make a five part split, switch on parts 1, 2, 3, 4
and 5. Then assign the NOTES range as follows, (remember to
use the part buttons to switch between current parts);
PART 1: A0 to B2
PART 2: C3 to B3
PART 3: C4 to B4
PART 4: C5 to B5
NOTE: The complete span of an
88 note keyboard has A0 as it’s
lowest note and C8 as it’s highest.
PART 5: C6 to A8
This will give you a five part split where you have a different
sound in each octave, (for the 61 note model).
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Performance mode 2•5
Velocity Switch
For example, to make a three part velocity switch, switch on parts
1, 2 and 3. Then assign the VELOCITY range as follows;
PART 1: 0 to 40
PART 2: 40 - 80
PART 3: 80 - 127
NOTE: On any velocity sensitive
keyboard, the lightest possible
key velocity is 0 and the hardest
velocity is 127.
This will give you one sound across the whole keyboard. Depending on how hard you play, you will switch between three
different sounds.
Part selection
It is possible to stay in the PARTS edit screen and choose a
different part to edit without first having to escape and return to
the Parts List. Simply press the corresponding part select button, (the buttons beneath the sliders), and the selected part will
become the object of the current edit screen, (this works the same
way in MIXER, EFFECT and OTHER too).
Throughout this section these buttons will be referred to as the
part select buttons.
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2•6 User Guide
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Mixer Menu
The mixer controls the final output of the sounds in this performance.
Essentially it lets you select volume, pan position, and output
jack selection for each part. As with the PARTS edit menu, you
can stay in the MIXER screen while using the part select buttons
to select which part you want to adjust. While most of these
functions are easy to understand, there are a couple of noteworthy features;
RANDOM PAN: This function will automatically shift the pan position of the current part by a random amount whenever a new
note is played. The amount of shift limited by the value you select. At maximum level, (7), the pan position may shift completely to the left or right channel.
AUDIO OUT: The Equinox has 4 output jacks - Left, Right, Out1
and Out2. This function is used to select which of these the
current part will use. You can use these as two stereo pairs or,
instead, Out 1 and Out 2 can be used as mono outs.
The VOL button is provided to give you an overview of the relative levels of all 16 parts.
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Performance mode 2•7
Effects Menu
For instructions on using the effects, see the EFFECTS section
of SOUND MODE.
In Performance mode, the procedure for assigning effects to the
parts is fairly simple. First you choose the effects mode and set
up the actual effects you would like to use. Then, for each part,
you assign the amount of SEND to each effect.
After selecting the Effects Mode and choosing the actual effects,
pressing the SEND button will allow you to assign the effects to
the various parts. Use the part select buttons to choose the part
you want to assign, then set the send levels appropriate for that
part only.
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2•8 User Guide
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Other Menu
A few extra features are available under this menu which allow
you to activate or deactivate the various controllers on the instrument.
This includes the three pedals (whose actual functions can be
selected under SYSTEM/CONTROL), the pitch bend and modulation wheels and the keyboard velocity and aftertouch controls.
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Performance mode 2•9
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2•10 User Guide
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3 • DRUM MODE
There are two different ways to get to DRUM MODE. The first
method is to simply press the DRUM button in the LIBRARIES
section.
The second method is, from within SOUND MODE, call up the
BANK SELECT window, (with the cursor left or right button), and
scroll down to one of the three drum banks.
When the Equinox is in DRUM MODE you are able to select
either complete DRUM KITS or individual DRUM SOUNDS depending on the bank selected. The Equinox is unique among
synth workstations in allowing you to freely use and edit every
individual drum sound in the instrument.
For editing individual DRUM SOUNDS, the procedure is exactly
the same as in SOUND MODE. When editing DRUM KITS however, the edit environment is quite different. In SOUND MODE
the WAVE menu is always used to combine up to 6 waveforms
together to make a single multi-layered sound. This is also true
in DRUM MODE when editing individual DRUM SOUNDS. However, when editing DRUM KITS, the WAVE menu becomes an
entirely new editing environment.
Technically speaking, a DRUM KIT is not really a sound in its
own right. It is simply a collection of other sounds which have
been assigned to be triggered by specific keys of the keyboard.
For each key we can specify which sound to assign, (it doesn’t
have to be a drum sound. It can be any sound currently in the
instrument - even an imported sample). Once the sound has
been assigned to that key, we can set the Volume level, Pitch,
Panning, Effect Sends, Audio Out and many other assignments
specific to that one key.
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Drum mode 3•1
Editing a Drum Kit
Select any DRUM KIT, (DK1 - 1 through DK1 - 128) and press
the WAVE button, (F1).
You should now see the DRUM PATCH EDITOR as shown here.
In the top right corner of the display you will see the name of a
key. Press any key on the keyboard and this will instantly update
to show the key which you just pressed. You are now ready to
edit this key. Let’s examine the individual parameters which are
available for each key:
BANK / PROG
These two are used in combination to allow any sound to be
assigned to the current key.
VOLUME
This volume setting applies only to the current key. Use this to
balance the volume level of your selected sound with the rest of
the kit.
PAN
The stereo pan position of the current key.
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3•2 User Guide
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TRANSPOSE / TUNING
Coarse and fine pitch adjustments which allow any note in audible range to be triggered regardless of the current key’s location
on the keyboard.
FILTER
A simple lowpass filter which allows you to make fine adjustments to the timbre of the sound assigned to the current key.
Setting this to 0 indicates that the filter is off. Setting positive
values will increase the brightness of the sound while negative
values will make it “warmer”.
EXCLUDE
3 “exclude numbers” are available. Keys which are assigned the
same “exclude number” are not permitted to sound at the same
time. This is useful for creating authentic “canceling” effects.
For example an open hi-hat and closed hi-hat could not possibly
sound at the same time in a real drumkit so, for authenticity you
would assign them the same exclude number. The same might
be true for an open and closed triangle sound. However, there
would be no reason why the triangle and hi-hat couldn’t sound
simultaneously. This means that the triangle sounds would need
to be assigned to their own unique exclude numbers. Setting
EXCLUDE to 0 turns this effect off.
REVERB / PROFX SEND
These parameters set the amount of effect send from the current
key to the on board DSPs.
AUDIO OUT
Here you can specify which of the four available audio outs this
key will use. You may either use L+R or 1+2 as stereo pairs or
instead assign Out1 or Out2 as separate monophonic outs.
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Drum mode 3•3
DYNAMIC SWITCH
Each key can actually have two sounds assigned to it. Only one
of the sounds can be triggered at a time depending on the velocity of the keystrike. If you look over to the first two buttons beneath the slider panel, you see that there are two layers available for editing .
Currently we’ve only been working on LAYER1. If you now press
the LAYER2 button it should start to flash. Now you’ll see a new
screen containing the same choices of parameters we’ve just
used. This LAYER2 sound is ready to be triggered when the
current key is struck above a specified velocity. The velocity is
set by the value of the DYNAMIC SWITCH parameter.
Make some changes to the settings of LAYER2 so that it is distinctly from LAYER1. Then set the DYNAMIC SWITCH parameter to 100.
Now, when you play the key softly, (below velocity = 100), you
will hear the layer 1 sound. When you play harder, (above velocity=100), you will switch to the LAYER2 sound.
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3•4 User Guide
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COPY BUTTON, (F1)
Pressing the COPY button will copy all the parameter settings of
the current layer to the other. This function is a utility for creating
multi layered sounds. If you are editing a key, you might make
extensive changes to LAYER1 before you’ve changed anything
in LAYER2. In many cases, you might want LAYER2 to contain a
similar if not identical sound to LAYER1, (a good use of the DYNAMIC SWITCH function is simply to have the second layer producing the same sound as the first with a few parameter changes - volume levels, effect sends, tuning etc.).
EXPAND BUTTON, (F2)
This function is used to duplicate the settings of a single key
across a range of adjacent keys on the keyboard. Pressing the
EXPAND button will call up a window which allows you to set the
upper and lower limits of the group of keys across which you
want to spread the settings of the current key.
This function will automatically tune each key in the group chromatically one half step above or below its neighbor making it
ideal for tuned percussion and other instrumental sound to be
used within a DRUM KIT.
COMPARE BUTTON, (F3)
This function applies to the key currently being edited. Pressing
COMPARE will temporarily allow you to hear the settings of that
key as they were before you changed anything.
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Drum mode 3•5
RESTORE BUTTON, (F4)
Pressing this button will undo all editing and restore the current
DRUM KIT to its original settings.
CONTROL, EFFECT and OTHER
The CONTROL, EFFECT and OTHER menus in DRUM MODE
are identical to those in SOUND MODE. For this reason, details
of their operation are not described here as these functions have
already been covered in the SOUND MODE section of this manual.
STORING YOUR NEW DRUM KIT
Just like ordinary sounds, DRUM KITS, once edited to your liking, can be stored into any empty location by simply pressing the
STORE button.
During the storing process, you will first be asked to select a
destination for your new sound and then given the opportunity to
name it.
You may store as many edited DRUM KITS as you like.
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3•6 User Guide
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4 • SAMPLE MODE
The Equinox can load new sound samples into memory which
can then be edited and saved as new Equinox sounds. Before
new samples can be loaded, you must be sure that sufficient
memory has been installed to accommodate the samples you
wish to load. This can either be in the form of Generalmusic’s
own battery backed DRAM modules or SIMMs chips which can
be obtained from most computer suppliers. You can check the
amount of sample memory that has been installed by looking
under SYSTEM / OTHER / INFO, (F1 button).
When you press the SAMPLES button, one of two different things
will happen depending on whether or not you already have any
samples loaded into the instrument. If there are no samples loaded in, you will go directly to the SAMPLE TRANSLATOR screen.
If samples are present then you will go instead to the SAMPLE
MODE - PLAYBACK/EDIT screen.
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Sample Mode 4•1
SAMPLE MODE - PLAYBACK/EDIT
If the Equinox already contains some samples then pressing
the SAMPLE button will bring up the SAMPLE MODE - PLAYBACK/EDIT screen.
This screen allows you to select both the original samples which
you’ve loaded plus any edited sounds you’ve subsequently created which incorporate your new sample waveforms.
This mode is offered as a convenient way to recall your samples
without first having to search for them among the other sounds in
the instrument. The edit functions available in this mode are exactly the same as those offered in SOUND MODE. All instructions for WAVE, CONTR., EFFECT and OTHER can be found in
the SOUND MODE section of this manual.
New sounds which you create in this mode can be saved to any
available location in any of the 16 user sound families.
From this mode, you can go into the SAMPLE TRANSLATOR
environment, simply by pressing the SAMPLE button a second
time. You will be offered a choice to either “Re-Edit” the currently
selected sample or load a completely new one.
Press ENTER to “Re-Edit” the last selected sample or ESCAPE
to prepare for loading new samples.
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4•2 User Guide
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SAMPLE TRANSLATOR
The Equinox is capable of loading many different samples types
from a number of different companies’ formats. Because the list
of compatible sample types is constantly being updated, check
with your Generalmusic dealer or distributor to see which formats are compatible with the operating system version you are
currently using.
Samples can be loaded from floppy disks, from SCSI devices,
(CD-ROM, Removable drives etc. ) or via MIDI using the Sample
Dump Standard protocol. In these examples we are going to
work with a floppy disk which contains an MS-DOS format .WAV
sound file.
To start SAMPLE TRANSLATOR, press the SAMPLE button.
If the SAMPLE button is already pressed but you don’t see SMP.
TRANSLATOR in the title bar of the screen then press it one
more time and then press ESCAPE to bypass the “Re-Edit” option.
Now you are ready to load a sample.
To load a sample from a floppy disk or SCSI device:
1. Insert the sample disk in the floppy drive.
2. Press LOAD, (F1).
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Sample Mode 4•3
3. Select the device from the options list and press ENTER.
4. Use the cursor controls to locate and highlight the sample file
you wish to load.
5. Press ENTER.
To load a sample via MIDI using Sample Dump Standard:
1. Connect two MIDI cables between the sending device and
the Equinox, (MIDI OUT to MIDI IN and MIDI IN to MIDI
OUT).
2. Prepare the sending device to send the sample, (but don’t
start it yet).
3. Press LOAD, (F1).
4. Select MIDI SAMPLE REQ from the options list and press
ENTER.
5. Choose the number of the sample you want to load, (if you’re
not sure, try 0 or 1).
6. Press ENTER.
Now you’ve loaded a single sample and you can see it at the top
of the SAMPLE LIST. This list can contain up to 16 samples at
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4•4 User Guide
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the same time. These 16 samples can be mapped to different
regions of the keyboard and then saved as a single Equinox
waveform when you’ve finished.
If you want to load another sample at this time, move the cursor
down to the second line of the SAMPLE LIST, press LOAD, (F1)
and proceed as before.
ASSIGNING SAMPLES
Once you’ve loaded in the samples that you need, the only essential step you need to take before you can save them is to
ASSIGN, (or “map”), your samples to a specific range of keys.
Press the ASSIGN button, (F3) to open the ASSIGN MENU.
Assigning a single sample
If you’ve only loaded a single sample then you’ll probably just
want to assign it to the full range of keys. When you enter the
ASSIGN MENU, you will see the lowest and highest note range
displayed to the right of the sound name.
The default values are A0 to C8 - the full length of the keyboard.
To accept and confirm these settings, simply press the ENTER
button, then ESCAPE to return to the main SAMPLE TRANSLATOR screen.
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Sample Mode 4•5
You will now see a small check mark at the extreme right of the
sample name indicating that this sample has been assigned and
is now ready to be saved.
Now you can press STORE and select a destination and a name
for your new sound.
As mentioned before, you may save this sound into any available location in the user sound families. Press ENTER to complete the operation.
Assigning multiple samples
If you have loaded a number of different samples into SAMPLE
TRANSLATOR then you will need to use the ASSIGN MENU to
map your samples to specific areas of the keyboard.
Place the cursor over each sample and press the INCLUDE button, (F3). Now you will see an upper and lower note limit of A0 to
C8 for the selected sample. Place the cursor over the A0.
You can change this value either with the dial or, if you press the
MIDI button, (F2), you can change it by pressing a key on the
keyboard. Once you’ve assigned the lower note limit, move the
cursor to the upper note and assign this in the same way. This
process should be repeated for every sample in the list.
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4•6 User Guide
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You must assign unique and specific regions of the keyboard to
each sample in the list before you will be able to save your multisample. When you’ve finished assigning all samples in the list,
press ESCAPE to return the main SAMPLE TRANSLATOR
screen.
If you assigned every sample correctly then you should see a
small check mark at the extreme right of each sample name in
the list. If this is the case, you can press STORE and select a
name and destination for your new sound.
Other assign functions
If you wish to temporarily remove a sample from the assigned
group, press the EXCLUDE button, (F4).
This sample will either need to be re-assigned later or it must be
erased from the group, (using the ERASE button, (F2) from the
main SAMPLE TRANSLATOR screen), before you will be able
to save your multi-sample.
Another very useful function in the assign menu is the AUTO
button, (F1). This will prepare a “rough key map” for you by automatically assigning each of the samples in the list to it’s own
separate range of keys. It arranges the samples in order according to the source note of each sample, (the key on the keyboard
which plays back the sample at it’s original pitch) or, if the source
pitches are the same, the order of the samples in the list. To use
this function, simply go to the assign menu after loading your
samples and press the AUTO button.
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Sample Mode 4•7
EDITING SAMPLES
Some simple tools have been provided which allow you to edit
individual samples after they have been loaded. To edit a single
sample, highlight it from the main SAMPLE TRANSLATOR list
and press the EDIT button, (F4).
The functions available are as follows;
PITCH
The pitch reference shown here is the name of a key on the
keyboard. This allows you to change the source note - the key
on the keyboard which plays back the sample at it’s original pitch.
RATE
This function operates as a fine tuning control for the sample
allowing you to accurately adjust the playback speed of the source
sample.
LOOP START
Here you can set the start point of the sample loop. The number
displayed represents the byte number in the sample file. If the
sample had already been assigned a loop then this information
will be automatically copied to the loop start parameter. If no loop
point was found in the sample the LOOP START value will default to zero.
SAMPLE END
Here you can see the byte number at which the sample ends
and, consequently, the size of the sample in bytes. You can
change the end point, (without actually reducing the size of the
sample), by simply selecting a different value. When you play
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4•8 User Guide
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the keyboard, you will hear that the sample now finishes at an
earlier point.
At this stage you can also choose to “trim off” the surplus data
which still remains after the newly set end point. To do this, press
the CUT button, (F3).
LOOP ON / OFF
Setting this feature to on will activate a continuous loop between
the LOOP START and SAMPLE END points when a key is played.
TUNING BUTTON, (F1)
Pressing the TUNING button will assign an ordinary sound to the
keyboard. This sound is designed to be used as a reference pitch
when setting the PITCH and RATE parameters.
GAIN BUTTON, (F2)
This function will rewrite the sample data to increase or decrease
the overall gain. Pressing the gain button will display a window
where you can view an image of the sample.
Use the dial to select which level you want the gain to be changed
to, then press ENTER to start the rewriting process. Because
the gain function has to re-write all of the data in the sample file,
it can take quite a long time when working with larger samples.
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Sample Mode 4•9
CUT BUTTON, (F3)
See SAMPLE END for information about how to use this feature.
EXPORT BUTTON, (F4)
After editing, your sample can be saved back to a disk or sent to
a MIDI sample dump source with it’s new values.
To use this function, press EXPORT, choose the device you want
to send the sample to and press ENTER.
Now you can enter a name for your new sample and select the
format in which you want it to be exported. Press ENTER to complete the operation.
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4•10 User Guide
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5 • DRAWBAR MODE
Pressing the DRAWBARS button allows you to use the sliders
like a set of Hammond Organ® drawbars.
In DRAWBAR mode, you work in a separate environment with
special features and controls that are dedicated to coloring and
controlling organ sounds.
16 preset configurations have been provided to let you explore
some of the different possibilities of the Drawbar section. You
can scroll through these by turning the dial while in DRAWBARS
mode.
The eight sliders operate as eight of the drawbars on an organ.
Although you can change the pitch of each drawbar to make any
“footage” you like, the default settings are as follows.
1
2
3
4
SLIDER 1
SLIDER 2
SLIDER 3
SLIDER 4
SLIDER 5
SLIDER 6
SLIDER 7
SLIDER 8
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5
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6
7
8
16'
5 1/3'
8'
4'
2 2/3'
2'
1 3/5'
1'
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Drawbar mode 5•1
Function buttons
The last 5 buttons of the slider and button panel, (beneath sliders 4-8), operate as switches for traditional organ effects in DRAWBARS mode.
KEY CLICK: A typical effect of early drawbar organs, Key Click
is an important part of the classic rock or jazz organ sound. Switching off Key Click will give you a sound more reminiscent of later
drawbar organs.
PERC 4', PERC 2 2/3': For Jazz and Pop organ sounds, these
percussive effects can be added to the main drawbar sound.
SLOW / FAST CONTROL: This is the speed switch for the rotary loudspeaker emulator. Finer adjustments in the speed settings
can be made under “Effect”.
Type Menu
The TYPE setting controls the voicing of the drawbars allow you
to emulate different types of drawbar organs. The following types
are available:
SMOOTH: This gives each drawbar a very pure sinewave sound
typical of some of the transistorized organs of the 60’s and 70’s
HARD: This gives each drawbar the classic voicing of a vintage
Hammond organ.
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5•2 User Guide
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JAZZ: Similar in nature to the HARD setting but with a more percussive attack.
ROCK: This version of the classic drawbar organ sound is a little
thinner than the HARD setting and is perfect for “screaming Hammond” effects, (especially when used with the Overdrive effect).
Setup Menu
The SETUP menu allows you to change the attributes of each
Drawbar. Before you change one of the options in this menu,
you should first move the slider who’s values you wish to edit.
You will see the name of the slider in the title bar of the display.
The slider then becomes the “selected drawbar”.
The menu options are as follows;
TRANSPOSE: Allows coarse tuning of the selected drawbar in
half tone steps.
DETUNE: Allows fine tuning of the selected drawbar’s pitch.
PAN: Adjusts the stereo pan position of the selected drawbar.
Under the Utilities button:
PERC 4 VOL: This is a general setting for the volume of the
percussion effect assigned to button #5.
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Drawbar mode 5•3
PERC 2 VOL: This is a general setting for the volume of the
percussion effect assigned to button #6.
CLICK VOL: This is a general setting for the volume of the Key
Click effect assigned to button #4.
Effects Menu
In DRAWBARS mode there are three different effects available,
REVERB, ROTARY and OVERDRIVE.
These effects have been optimized at the factory so, although
you can edit every parameter of each effect if you wish, in most
cases it will be enough to simply adjust the amount of each effect. These levels can be adjusted under the SEND button.
If you wish to edit the parameters of each effect or choose a
different type of REVERB or ROTARY, simply place the cursor
over the section you want to edit and press ENTER. This will
open the parameter display for the selected effect.
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5•4 User Guide
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Split Menu
In DRAWBARS mode, it is possible to split the keyboard and
assign one additional sound to the left side of the keyboard split
point. Press the SPLIT button to turn the split function on and set
the split point.
The remaining features in the split display allow you to select the
sound for the left side of the split and also to adjust it’s relative
volume, pitch and effect send levels.
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Drawbar mode 5•5
Storing Drawbar settings
Once you have made a drawbar setting that you like, everything
can be memorized into a “Drawbar performance”. Simply press
the STORE button and select one of the 16 Drawbar performance locations (from 113-128) as a destination.
You can enter a name for your Drawbar performance during the
store procedure. These user Drawbar performances can be selected with the dial in the same way as the factory presets. The
first user performance appears after the last factory preset.
Copying Drawbars to Performances
For increased flexibility, you can also save any Drawbar setting
to one of the 112 user performance memories. This allows you to
layer up to 8 additional parts with the 8 Drawbars. The drawback
of using performances to store Drawbar settings, however, is that
the Rotary speed, click and percussion buttons will not function
as they do in DRAWBARS mode. Also, keep in mind that the
sliders will only operate as Drawbars if, after editing, you re-save
the performance with tracks 1-8 at the “top”.
To save a Drawbar setting as a Performance, press the STORE
button and select the Performance locations (from 1-112) instead
of the Drawbar locations (from 113-128) as the destination bank.
When you save your Drawbar setting as a Performance you can
continue editing it just like any other performance.
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5•6 User Guide
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The parts of Drawbar performance are configured in the following way;
Parts 1 - 8 :
Drawbar voices.
Parts: 12 - 13 :
Click and Percussions.
This means that, in order to retain the original Drawbar sound,
you should not change anything in these parts. You can use
parts 9-11 and 14-16 exactly as you wish.
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Drawbar mode 5•7
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5•8 User Guide
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6 • ARPEGGIATOR
The Arpeggiator works in both SOUND and PERFORM modes.
In PERFORM mode the Arpeggiator will control the part which is
specified under the ARP setting, (in the OTHER menu of the
PERFORM screen).
16 factory patterns have been provided to let you explore some
of the different possibilities of the Arpeggiator. After switching
the Arpeggiator ON, you can scroll through these preset patterns
by first pressing the PROGRAM button and then using the dial to
select the different presets.
Once an arpeggio is playing, you can lock it by pressing HOLD,
(in the PROGRAM menu). The pattern will continue to play until
you turn the HOLD function off.
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Arpeggiator 6•1
Edit Menu
You can create and store your own arpeggio patterns. Press EDIT,
(button F1), to see the menu;
BEAT: Here you choose the speed and style of the arpeggio.
The first options are simple subdivisions of the beat, 8th notes,
16th notes and so on.
Following these you will find a number of “groove quantized”
options. These are called 1/8B, 1/8C, 1/16B, 1/16C etc., each
offering a slightly different feel.
The last two options are “Glissandi”. These, instead of stepping
through the actual notes played like a real Arpeggio, play up or
down in half step increments, starting and finishing at the lowest
and highest notes played. When using one of these Glissando
settings, only the highest and lowest notes held will affect the
nature of the glissando. All other notes in between these two can
be omitted.
DIRECTION: Here you can choose whether the arpeggio steps
up, from lower notes to higher notes, down, or alternately up/
down or down/up. The last two settings are a little different;
Random: This will trigger, at random, the notes which are
being held. The pattern is completely nonrepetitive and will continue to “randomize” for as
long as the notes are held.
Input:
In this mode, the arpeggio will play the notes in
the order which they were pressed. Careful use
of this mode allows you to control the exact
nature and style of the arpeggio pattern.
OCTAVE: This function controls the “width” of the arpeggio in
octaves.
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6•2 User Guide
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VELOCITY: Although it is effectively a volume control, the velocity parameter actually controls “how hard the arpeggiator hits the
keys”. Depending on the sound selected, reducing the velocity
will reduce the volume of the arpeggio but it also reduces any
other parameters which have been assigned to velocity in that
sound, (e.g. Filter, Envelope speed etc. ). If you turn the dial past
the maximum setting, 127, you will find the setting for INPUT
velocity. When set, this means that the velocity of the arpeggio
pattern will be identical to the velocity with which the keys were
struck.
LENGTH: Here you can set the length of the individual notes
which make up the arpeggio. The longest notes are 1/4 notes.
As you increase the fractional amount, the length becomes shorter, (with the shortest possible setting being 1/192).
CRESCENDO: This causes the volume of the arpeggio to fluctuate as the pattern is repeated. This gives the interesting effect of
the arpeggio either going away from you or coming towards you.
The effect is repeated each time the arpeggio loops around. If
you set a positive value, (by turning the dial clockwise), this will
create the effect that the arpeggio is starting somewhere in the
distance and then coming towards you. If you set a negative value, the reverse effect will happen.
DELAY: This parameter allows you to adjust the amount of time
which elapses between the time you press the keys and the
moment at which the arpeggio starts. Each step represents 1/
192nd of a beat. Therefore, if you set it to 192, there will be a
delay of exactly 1 beat. A setting of 96 will delay it by exactly half
a beat and so on.
REPEAT: If this is set to OFF the arpeggio will only play through
once and then stop. If you set it to ON, the arpeggio will continue
until the keys are released, (or until HOLD is turned off)
TRANSPOSE: This allows you to create some interesting effects by having the arpeggio play in a different key from the notes
which were originally played. The amount of pitch shift can be
set in half step increment either up, (positive values - clockwise)
or down, (negative values - anti clockwise).
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Arpeggiator 6•3
HOLD: This setting allows you to choose what happens to this
pattern when the HOLD button is pressed.
There are two modes;
Build:
When HOLD is pressed, the current arpeggio will
continue to play. If new notes are subsequently
pressed they will be incorporated into the current
arpeggio pattern. This means that, as new notes
are added, the pattern continues to “build”.
Freeze:
When HOLD is pressed, the current arpeggio will
continue to play. If new notes are subsequently
pressed, the old pattern will be cancelled and a
new pattern, based solely on the newly played
notes will be created.
SYNC BUTTON, (F3)
Press this button to synchronize the arpeggio with the sequencer's clock.
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6•4 User Guide
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7 • GROOVES
The Grooves section of the Equinox contains over 1000 MIDI
grooves. These provide a valuable resource of inspiring drum,
bass and keyboard “riffs” which can be used either for real time
playing or can be incorporated into sequences and edited to your
taste.
Each groove is actually a small looping MIDI sequence. This
means that you have complete freedom to change any aspect of
these grooves - the sounds, the effects, the tempo, the key, the
pitch and so on.
When you press the PROGRAM button in the GROOVES section, the screen will show you the name of the current Groove
Patch, and you can immediately start to play it from the keyboard. Use the dial to scroll through some of the factory preset
Groove Patches.
Groove Library
The factory grooves have been arranged into 16 families with
each family containing 64 grooves. These families have been
organized into specific categories making it easier to quickly find
any particular groove quickly. There are also 8 user families into
which you can either copy the factory grooves or store your own
creations.
The factory groove families are listed below.
DRUM 1
DRUM 2
DRUM 3
PERCUSSION
BASS 1
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Grooves 7•1
BASS 2
BASS 3
KEYS 1
KEYS 2
KEYS 3
KEYS 4
KEYS 5
GUITAR
COMBI 1
COMBI 2
COMBI 3
With so many grooves available, the LIBRARY function has been
provided to give you a quick and easy way to audition all of the
grooves. To use it, turn on the PROGRAM button in the
GROOVES section and select LIBRARY, (F3).
The screen is divided into two parts. On the left side, you can
see the currently selected family. On the right side you can see
a list of the individual grooves contained in this family. A quick
and easy way to listen to any groove is to simply press a key on
the keyboard. Since each family contains 64 grooves, the 64
keys from C2 to D#7 can be used to audition every groove in a
family.
On the Equinox 61, since you don’t physically have these last
three keys for auditioning grooves 62-64, after pressing the last
key on the keyboard (C7), take the cursor to the right of the display and press the cursor down button. You will be able to listen
to these grooves simply by selecting them.
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7•2 User Guide
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Groove Patches
Once you find some grooves that you like, you can incorporate
them into a “Groove Patch”. A Groove Patch is a set of grooves
which can be recalled any time you need it. Within a Groove
Patch, you can define which grooves you want to assign to which
keys, how each groove will behave when triggered and also, if
you wish, modify the voicing, effect sends, transposition of each
groove independently.
In addition to containing 64 individual grooves, each family also
has space to store 64 Groove Patches. In the factory preset families, you will find a small number of patches which have been
created for you. You can audition these by pressing the PATCH
button under LIBRARY.
When you create your own patches, however, you must store
them in the USER groove families. Since there are 8 USER families available, you can store up to 512 of your own patches, (64
patches in each of the 8 families).
A groove patch can use any of the grooves from the 16 factory
families plus any groove from the current USER family. If you
wish to use a groove from a different USER family, you must first
copy it into the current USER family.
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Grooves 7•3
Creating a Groove Patch
Creating you own groove patch is easy. To make a Groove Patch
from scratch, press the CREATE button.
The first step is choose a groove template. You can assign as
many keys as you want to play grooves. Those keys which you
do not assign to the grooves can be played normally in PERFORM mode. To make this task a little quicker, a number of popular configurations are offered as templates.
Choose LOWEST OCTAVE and press ENTER.
Next you select which user family you will want to store this patch
into. This choice only matters when you are using grooves of
your own which you have stored into one of the USER families.
If you just want to create a patch from factory grooves then it
makes no difference which user group you choose.
For this example, we’ll select PATCH IN USER1. Press ENTER
to confirm. The last step asks you to choose a GROOVE Group.
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7•4 User Guide
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For this example, go up and select the COMBI1 Group and press
ENTER.
If you try to play the keyboard you will see that only the lowest
octave is assigned to triggering grooves while the rest of the keyboard is assigned to whichever performance was last selected.
Now you can explore the EDIT environment. Press the EDIT
button, (F1) and confirm that you want to edit this patch by pressing ENTER.
Pressing any key on the keyboard will instantly update the information you see in the screen. The system automatically “catches” the key that you pressed allowing you to instantly edit it’s
settings. Press one of the “active” groove keys and try experimenting by assigning some different grooves to that key.
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Grooves 7•5
Here are some of the main features of the edit menu;
TRIGGER
This controls how long the groove will continue playing after this
key is released. There are three choices;
MANUAL:
The groove will start when you press the key and
stop when you release it.
LATCH:
The groove will continue playing after you release
the key. You can stop the groove by either pressing the same key again or by pressing the STOP
button in the GROOVES section.
ONE-SHOT: The groove will play through once completely regardless of when the key is released.
START SYNC
Here you can select how soon the groove starts playing after you
press the key. There are three options;
REAL:
The groove will start the moment the key is
pressed
BEAT:
After you press the key, the groove will wait until
the beginning of the next beat before starting.
BAR:
After you press the key, the groove will wait until
the beginning of the next bar before starting.
STOP SYNC
Here you can select how soon the groove stops playing after you
release the key. There are three options;
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7•6 User Guide
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REAL:
The groove will stop the moment the key is released
BEAT:
After you release the key, the groove will wait until the beginning of the next beat before stopping.
BAR:
After you release the key, the groove will wait until the beginning of the next bar before stopping.
VELOCITY
This allows you to select whether or not the volume of the groove
is affected by the velocity of the keystrike.
EXCLUDE GROUP
This feature is designed to make it impossible for certain grooves
to be played together. When two or more grooves are assigned
the same exclude group number, it will no longer be possible to
play them both at the same time. There are 16 “exclude groups”
to choose from.
PLAY MODE
This feature allows the Groove to be played either forwards or
backwards, for a unique and intersting effect.
See also SHUFFLE mode, where you can change the Groove
play direction with the left and right cursor arrows.
Storing your Groove Patch
When you are satisfied with the groove patch you’ve created,
press STORE.
You can the choose a name and a final destination for your groove
patch. When you need to recall this groove patch in the future,
simply turn on the PROGRAM button in the GROOVES section
and use the dial or numeric keypad to select your patch. User
groove patches are listed after the factory presets.
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Grooves 7•7
Transposing a Groove in real time
While a groove is playing, either from a GROOVE PATCH or
from the SHUFFLE function, you may transpose its pitch from
the original to any other key.
In Groove Patch
At any time while using a GROOVE PATCH, press the EDIT button, (F1). You will now see the GROOVE TRANSPOSE function
on button F4.
In Shuffle mode
The GROOVE TRANSPOSE function can be found on button F4.
To transpose the current groove, press TRANSP, (F4) and press
any key on the keyboard.
The pitch of the current groove will instantly change The original
pitch of the groove relates to the key of C. To restore the original
pitch, repeat the transpose function and press any C key on the
keyboard.
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7•8 User Guide
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Shuffle
In simplest terms, the SHUFFLE function is a automated “idea
generator”. Drawing from the 16 factory groove families and the
8 user families, the SHUFFLE function can instantly create a multi
track groove, (up to 8 tracks), by randomly selecting a drum
groove, a bass line, a guitar riff and more, and letting you hear
how they sound together. The results from this simple but powerful feature can be quite astonishing.
Changing the Groove Play
direction
In Shuffle mode, the small arrow to
the left of each track name indicates the play direction. You can
change the direction for each track
by pressing the left or right cursor.
Up to 8 tracks can be “shuffled together”, but sometimes the best
results come from just using two or three tracks.
For each track listed there are three options:
SHUFFLE: The track will randomly select a new groove from
the libraries each time the MAKE button is pressed
OK:
The current groove is locked into this track. It will
not change when the MAKE button is pressed.
OFF:
The track is muted.
Try this example. Set Drum 1, Bass 1 and Synth 1 to SHUFFLE.
Then press MAKE.
You will instantly hear a three track groove created by three randomly selected tracks. To re-randomize everything, simply press
MAKE again.
If you hear something you like, for example, maybe you like the
drum track but the bass line doesn’t seem right, set the Drum 1
track to OK. The next time you press MAKE, the drum track will
not be changed.
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Grooves 7•9
If you want to assign a specific groove to a particular track, first
place the cursor over the track and then press GET.
Now you can select the groove you want from any of the available groove families.
After you confirm by pressing ENTER, your selected groove will
be locked into that track.
Any time you hear a pattern that you like, it can be saved as a
new groove by pressing the STORE button. Follow the prompts
to chose a name and location for this new groove.
Sometimes, when creating a groove shuffle pattern, you may
find that there are certain families whose grooves you don’t like
or which simply don’t seem to fit in well with the other patterns
you’re using. Pressing the WHAT button, (F2) allows you to specify which groove families the shuffle system will choose from.
Use the cursor keys to highlight any family and use the ENTER
button to either include or exclude that family from the shuffle
group. You can choose any or all of the 16 preset families and
the 8 user families. A negative highlight, (white on black), indicates a family that will be used in the next shuffle. Press ESCAPE when you’ve finished your selection.
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7•10 User Guide
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Editing single Grooves
Individual grooves can also be edited by pressing the EDIT button, (F1), and selecting the name and location of the groove you
want to edit in the bottom line of the display.
When you press ENTER, the groove will begin to play and you
will be presented with a menu of edit options.
When you’ve finished editing the groove press STORE to save
it.
You will see options to enter a name for your new groove and to
select it’s destination.
If you edit factory grooves you cannot save them back into the
factory groups, (factory grooves cannot be overwritten). You edited groove can be saved into any of the available user families.
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Grooves 7•11
Creating new Grooves
New grooves can be created by using the Equinox’s internal
sequencer in conjunction with the EXPORT TO GROOVE function.
You can also load MIDI grooves or extract grooves from longer
MIDI files using this feature. See the sequencer section of this
manual for more information.
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7•12 User Guide
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“GROOVE LAB”
Whenever you’re using grooves and viewing the GROOVES
PROGRAM display as shown here, the control sliders and pitch
wheel take on special functions which allow you to manipulate
the groove in real time to create some unique ”DJ” like effects.
These functions collectively are known as the “GROOVE LAB".
They can be used on any groove but are particularly effective
when used with the composite grooves in the COMBI1, 2 and 3
patches.
The GROOVE LAB functions are only active while the GROOVES
PROGRAM display is shown. If you press ESCAPE to return to
the performance display, the groove section itself will still be active but the GROOVE LAB functions will not. Let’s take a closer
look at the functions in GROOVE LAB.
PITCH WHEEL
In GROOVE LAB, the pitch wheel is used to simulate the speeding up and slowing down of a vinyl record on a turntable. Moving
the wheel upwards will cause the “virtual record” to spin faster
while moving it downwards will slow the turntable almost to a
stop. This complex effect can be used on any groove whenever
the GROOVE PROGRAM display is shown.
SLIDERS 1-8, (upper row selected)
The first 8 sliders are given the following functions in GROOVE
LAB which affect all 8 tracks of the current groove.
SLIDER 1: PAN CONTROL
SLIDER 2: ATTACK
SLIDER 3: REVERB DEPTH
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Grooves 7•13
SLIDER 4: RELEASE
SLIDER 5: FILTER CUT-OFF
SLIDER 6: FILTER RESONANCE
SLIDER 7: MODULATION
SLIDER 8: TEMPO
SLIDERS 9 - 16, (lower row selected)
When the lower row of sliders is selected, the entire section functions as a mixer for the 8 tracks of the groove.
They are assigned as follows:
SLIDER 9: VOLUME - DRUM 1
SLIDER 10: VOLUME - DRUM 2
SLIDER 11: VOLUME - BASS 1
SLIDER 12: VOLUME - BASS 2
SLIDER 13: VOLUME - SYNTH 1
SLIDER 14: VOLUME - SYNTH 2
SLIDER 15: VOLUME - SYNTH 3
SLIDER 16: VOLUME - SYNTH 4
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7•14 User Guide
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8 • DISK
The DISK section of the Equinox allows you to work with a
number of different types of storage devices.
The first step of any disk operation should be to select the type of
device you want to access. There are three choices available:
FLOPPY: The Equinox can work with MS-DOS formatted disks,
either HD, (1.44 Mbytes) or DD, (720 Kbytes). Alternatively, the
instrument can use it’s own special format, (1.62 Mbytes) which,
while being less interchangeable than the MS-DOS format, allows you to use more space on a standard floppy disk.
INT. HD: This button will only be available if your instrument has
been fitted with the optional internal hard disk drive, (2.5 inch
IDE type).
SCSI: Any connected SCSI devices, (CD-ROM, External Hard
Disk, Optical drive or other removable media), can be accessed
with this button.
After selecting the device that you want to work with, you next
choose which type of operation you want to perform, LOAD, SAVE
or ERASE.
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Disk 8•1
Understanding the RAMFILE
The easiest way to learn about how data is saved and loaded on
the Equinox is to try an example.
Save
Let’s try saving everything from the instrument’s memory onto a
floppy disk. Take a blank, MS-DOS formatted floppy disk and
insert it in the drive. Now press the FLOPPY button, (F1), place
the cursor over the word SAVE and press ENTER.
The display now divides into two parts. On the left side, you can
see the man directory of something called the RAMFILE. The
RAMFILE is the name given to the Equinox’s internal memory.
Everything currently stored in memory, Sounds, Performances,
Songs, Grooves etc., are contained in the RAMFILE.
Initially, the RAMFILE is almost empty. The only thing it contains
at first is some system information about the way the keyboard is
currently set up, (basically the features found under the SYSTEM button). As you start to create things on the instrument, the
RAMFILE starts to fill up.
For example, the moment you store an edited sound, a new folder is created in the RAMFILE called SOUND and into this folder
is placed the sound which you created.
If you make a new performance, a folder called PERFORM will
be created and the performance you made will be stored inside
it.
At this stage then, by looking at the left side of the display, we
can see exactly what type of data the RAMFILE contains. At the
top of the “directory tree” you will see the main RAMFILE directory. Underneath, and slightly to the right, you will see a list of the
folders which the RAMFILE currently contains.
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8•2 User Guide
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If you haven’t stored anything into the instrument then the only
folder you should see is SYSTEM. If you have already stored
something, you will see a screen similar to the one shown here:
This “directory tree” is where you specify exactly what you want
to save. Taking a little time to really understand how it works will
be of great help to you and may spare you unnecessary headaches in the future.
Notice that, at the moment, in the lower left side of the screen,
the words SAVE ALL currently appear.
Since the cursor is currently over the word RAMFILE, pressing
ENTER now would tell the machine that you want to save all of
the RAMFILE, (in other words, saving everything which is currently in the instrument’s memory).
Now move the cursor down so that it covers the first folder beneath RAMFILE. Pressing ENTER at this stage would tell the
machine that you want to save all of the contents of the current
folder, (in other words, saving all of the SONGS or all of the PERFORMANCES without saving anything else).
You’ll also notice that you can now see something on the right
side of the display. The selected folder, on the left, is open and
the information you see on the right side is the contents of this
now open folder. This allows you to be even more specific about
what you want to save.
Move the cursor over to the right side and you’ll notice that the
wording at the lower left changes to SAVE SINGLE.
Pressing ENTER at this stage would tell the machine that you
want to save only the item which is currently selected in the right
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Disk 8•3
side of the display.
Following any of the above SAVE operations, after pressing ENTER, the right side of the display will show you what it finds on
the disk. At the top, you will see the MS-DOS icon. This is what
is known as the “root directory” of the disk and can ONLY be
used for saving Midi Files (SMF). Move the cursor to the dotted
line at the bottom of the list and press SAVE, (F3), followed by
ENTER.
You will be prompted to enter a BLOCK name.
Press ENTER when done and your new BLOCK will be created
on the disk.
Understanding BLOCKS
Whenever you save Equinox information onto a Floppy disk,
Hard Disk or any other type of storage media, the information
must be stored in something called a BLOCK. During any save
operation, before you can complete the procedure, you must first
tell the machine which BLOCK you want to save the information
into. In the majority of cases, you will probably decide to create
a new BLOCK and store your data there, (as we did in the previous example).
So what exactly is a BLOCK ?. The easiest way to think of a
BLOCK is as a replica of a RAMFILE. To use the simplest possible example, we could save everything in the instrument’s memory, (Save All RAMFILE), into a single BLOCK. When we want
to re-load this information in the future, we simply load the entire
BLOCK back into the RAMFILE, (the instrument’s memory).
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8•4 User Guide
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BLOCKS are primarily used as a convenient way of organizing
data on large storage devices such as hard disks and hi capacity
removable media. In theory, it would be possible to store millions
of different Equinox sounds on a single hard disk. This, however, would make it almost impossible to find a particular sound
quickly when you needed it. For this reason, sounds must be
stored into BLOCKS and no single BLOCK can ever contain more
than 2048 sounds, (that’s the same number of sounds that the
instrument can contain at any one time). Similarly, A BLOCK
cannot contain more than 112 Performances, (neither can the
Equinox), or more than 16 Songs, (once again, the same limit
as for the instrument itself).
Considering this, it becomes clear that a BLOCK can never actually be larger than the maximum amount of data that the Equinox can hold at any one time.
When saving information from the Equinox, there are two different ways to create a complete BLOCK,
Method 1:
First fill the instrument with Sounds, Perfs, Songs,
Grooves etc. and then save everything to a new
BLOCK when you’ve finished.
Method 2:
Over a period of time, create Sounds, Perfs,
Songs, Grooves etc. and, each time save them
individually into the same BLOCK.
The end result of both these methods will be the same. You will
have a BLOCK which can be loaded in one single operation.
When loaded, everything that was saved into that BLOCK will be
loaded into the instrument at once.
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Disk 8•5
Load
Loading data into the Equinox is a fairly simple procedure. It
uses the same “directory tree” structure that we’ve already seen
in the SAVE example.
When you first try to LOAD from any device, you will see the
familiar “root directory” at the top, (usually called “MS-DOS”) and,
if they exist, a list of the blocks that the disk contains.
Loading an entire block is simple. Place the cursor over the block
name, press LOAD, (F3) and follow the prompts.
To load only a part of a block, press ENTER while the cursor is
over the block’s name. This will expand the “directory tree” of the
block and allow you to specify what you want to load.
Keeping the cursor on the left side, you can load entire groups of
Sounds, Performances, Grooves, Songs etc. by pressing LOAD,
(F3) when the cursor is over the appropriate folder.
Moving the cursor to the right side allows you to load single elements in one of two ways:
1.
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8•6 User Guide
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Press LOAD, (F3) while the cursor is on the name of
the single element in the right side of the display. It will
be loaded into the exact same location in the RAMFILE.
2.
Press ENTER while the cursor is on the name of the
single element in the right side of the display. It will open
a new window where you can specify a new location in
the RAMFILE for it to be loaded into.
Non Equinox files
When a non-native disk is inserted into the drive, (for example a
MIDI file or sample disk from another company), the Equinox
should recognize the disk and, if it contains compatible files, the
instrument should automatically lead you to the right area to load
them.
After inserting the disk and choosing LOAD, check to see if any
files are displayed in the right side of the display. If they are,
move the cursor to the appropriate file name on the right and
press ENTER. If you do not see any files at first, you can explore
the disk by using ENTER to open any folders that you see on the
left. Any files contained in these folders will appear on the right.
If you have problems, either seeing files on an “alien” disk or
reading the disk at all, try going into SAMPLE environment and
reading the disk using LOAD, (F1).
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Disk 8•7
Utilities
The contents of the UTILS menu will be different depending on
whether the current device is FLOPPY, INT. HD or SCSI.
Here are the main options:
FORMAT 1.62
This can be used to format HD floppy disks to the Equinox’s
own high capacity standard. If you are creating disks which are
primarily to be used only with this instrument or to share with
other Equinox users then this format is more efficient and uses
more of the disk’s available space.
FORMAT 1.44
FORMAT 720K
The Equinox is able to format and use disks in either of the
popular MS-DOS sizes. MS-DOS formatted disks should be used
if you want to copy disks on a home computer of if you want to
send them via the internet.
PROTECTION
This setting prevents accidental overwriting and erasure to valuable data on a re-writeable device, (e.g Hard Disk)
BACKUP
This feature allows you to make a safety backup of a large block
from the Hard Disk or other media onto a series of floppy disks.
RESTORE
The accompaniment feature to BACKUP, this function will restore a large block to a hard disk or other media from the series
of floppies to which it was originally backed up.
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8•8 User Guide
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SLEEP TIME
Since even the most efficient internal hard disks can create unwanted audio noise, this feature allows you specify the amount
of time, following it’s use, after which the hard disk motor will
shut down.
REPAIR TOOL
From time to time, small errors can creep into hard disks and
other media making them unstable and troublesome. This tool
will scan the hard disk and try to fix any small errors it finds.
FORMAT HARD DISK
ONLY FOR USE IN AN EMERGENCY OR WHEN A NEW HARD
DISK HAS BEEN INSTALLED. This function will erase all of the
data on the installed device, preparing it for fresh use.
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Disk 8•9
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8•10 User Guide
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9 • SYSTEM
The SYSTEM button contains a number of important features
which affects the overall performance of the instrument. In most
cases, the settings found under the SYSTEM button are “global”. This means that, unlike many other features, once set, they
will remain the same regardless of which performance you select. They can be considered as the “master settings” of the instrument.
The only exceptions to this rule are the pedal and footswitch settings, (found under the CONTROLS button). Although these functions are not usually “global”, you can choose to make them so
by pressing the LOCK button.
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System 9•1
CONTROLS
The CONTROLS button is where you set up any pedals which
have been connected to the unit.
The Equinox can accommodate a maximum of three pedals and
each of the three pedal jacks on the rear panel can be set to
accommodate any type of pedal.
Place the cursor over either Pedal 1, Pedal 2 or Damper and
press the TYPE button, (F3).
You can now tell the instrument which type of pedal has been
connected to that jack. There three options are as follows:
CONTINUOUS: Also known as a CC Pedal, this setting
indicates that a variable volume type pedal has been connected to the corresponding pedal jack.
OPEN SWITCH: This indicates that a normally open footswitch has been connected to the corresponding pedal jack
CLOSED SWITCH:
This indicates that a normally
closed footswitch has been connected to the corresponding
pedal jack
Press ENTER after assigning each pedal. The functions available for each pedal can be selected by turning the dial while the
cursor is over the pedal name. You will find different options are
available depending on the type of pedal assigned.
The pedal settings you choose will remain in effect only until you
select a different PERFORMANCE from the current one. If you
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9•2 User Guide
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set up the pedal functions while in the process of creating a PERFORMANCE, these pedal functions will be memorized along with
the rest of the PERFORMANCE when you press STORE.
If you want your pedal settings to remain in effect even when the
PERFORMANCE is changed, press the LOCK button, (F1).
Now the pedal configuration will not change until LOCK is turned
off again.
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System 9•3
TUNE
Here you can control the tuning and intonation of the instrument.
PITCH
This function allows you to adjust the Equinox’s master pitch so
that it can be made to match the pitch of other instruments which
are not perfectly in tune.
TUNING PRESETS
At the top of the TUNE menu, you can select from a number of
different tuning presets (Scales). These re-tune each octave of
the keyboard allowing different musical styles to be interpreted
correctly.
In addition to these presets there are 8 User locations into which
you can store your own tuning presets. To create a new tuning,
press the EDIT button and use the cursor left/right buttons to
move across the “virtual keyboard” in the screen, selecting which
note in the octave you wish to detune.
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9•4 User Guide
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When the cursor is on the correct note. Use the dial to adjust it’s
tuning offset. You can instantly hear the results by playing anywhere on the keyboard.
When you are satisfied with your new tuning preset, press ENTER and you will see a prompt to select where you want to store
it. User tuning presets cannot be named.
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System 9•5
MASTER
The time and date for the internal system clock can be set here.
The internal clock has two functions. It’s first function is as a
regular clock which you will see every time you press the SYSTEM button. This can be useful for reference in live situations or
for timing performances. It’s second function is to time and date
stamp every file which is created on the instrument. This time
and date stamping is a part of the MS-DOS file system and it
allows you to see exactly when files were created while viewing
them on a computer.
The LCD mode function allows you to set the display to either
black-on-white (NORMAL) or white-on-black (INVERSE). This,
in conjunction with the LCD contrast knob, allows you set the
display for maximum visibility in difficult lighting conditions.
RESET
All or part of the instrument’s memory can be restored to factory
conditions by selecting one of the RESET options. When you
select one of these options, the factory presets will be restored
while all user programmed settings in this area will be erased.
Before using any of the RESET functions, make sure that you
have saved any valuable data onto a disk or other storage media. If you don’t, the data cannot be retrieved after a RESET
operation.
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9•6 User Guide
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NOTE: As an alternative to using RESET ALL, you can also try
the MEMORY CLEAR procedure if you are having problems and
need to clear everything from memory. Although it takes a little
longer to perform than RESET ALL, MEMORY CLEAR is a more
thorough procedure and will ensure that the instrument starts up
from cold with the memory completely empty.
To perform the MEMORY CLEAR function, turn the instrument
off and leave it for a couple of seconds. Before you switch it back
on, start to rotate the dial and continue to do so as you switch the
instrument on again. Keep rotating the dial until you see the
MEMORY CLEAR prompt.
Press ENTER to complete the operation.
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System 9•7
OTHER
KEY VEL.
KEYA/T
The main features of the OTHER screen are these master settings for keyboard velocity and aftertouch. These settings are
“global” and will affect the overall velocity and aftertouch response
of every sound and performance.
INFO
This button will give you information about which options have
been installed in this instrument.
It offers a simple way to check what’s inside the unit without having to open it up:
Volatile RAM size: Tells you the amount of SIMMs sample
memory installed
Backed Ram Size: Tells you the amount of battery backed
memory, (DRAM) installed
Hard Disk: Tells you whether or not the internal hard disk is
installed.
NOTE: For additional info about the amount of available memory
in these three areas, use the MEM button, (F1) under DISK /
UTILS.
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9•8 User Guide
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BATT&R, (Battery level and release number)
This button opens a window which contains two important pieces of information.
At the top of the screen, you will see the release date of the
operating system version which your Equinox is currently using.
This information is important to know, especially when seeking
technical support in case of problems.
The lower part of this window tells you the charge level of the
Equinox’s internal battery. This battery is used to retain information in the instrument’s memory after the unit has been switched
off. If you leave the unit off for a long period of time, the battery
will discharge completely and the information stored in memory
will be lost.
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System 9•9
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9•10 User Guide
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10 • MIDI
The Equinox contains two identical, 16 part multi-timbral, synthesizer engines. One is used by the synthesizer section, (for
sounds and performances), while the other is used by the sequencer, (for songs and grooves). The MIDI menu allows you to
select independent MIDI configurations for each engine.
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MIDI 10•1
SYNTH MENU
This menu allows you to set the midi configuration for each of the
16 available parts of the Equinox’s synth engine.
Each part can have separate assignments for MIDI IN and MIDI
OUT. After pressing the SYNTH button, (F1) from the MIDI menu,
choose IN, (F2) or OUT, (F3) and select the part who’s parameters you want to edit by using the part select buttons. The name
of the current part will be shown in the upper right corner of the
display.
LOCAL/ SOUND
When set to OFF, the current part of the Performance will be
disconnected from the internal sounds.
CHANNEL
The MIDI channel setting for the current part.
PORT
Selects between MIDI IN1 / MIDI IN 2 and MIDI OUT 1 / MIDI
OUT 2
FILTER 1 - 7
Each part has 14 filters available - 7 filters for MIDI IN and 7
filters for MIDI OUT. These filters allow you to specify up to 7
events which you do not want the selected part to either send or
receive.
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10•2 User Guide
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SEQ MENU
This menu allows you to set the midi configuration for each of the
16 available tracks of the Equinox’s sequencer engine.
Each track can have separate assignments for MIDI IN and MIDI
OUT. After pressing the SEQ button, (F2) from the MIDI menu,
choose IN, (F2) or OUT, (F3) and select the part who’s parameters you want to edit by using the part select buttons. The name
of the current part will be shown in the upper right corner of the
display.
The available parameters are identical to those already described
under the SYNTH MENU
LOCK BUTTON, (F1)
Both the SYNTH and SEQ menus offer a LOCK button. Normally, your MIDI settings are saved as a part of the current PERFORMANCE, (when you press the STORE button), and each
PERFORMANCE can have it’s own distinct MIDI settings. If,
however, you want the current MIDI settings to remain in effect,
regardless of which performance you select, turn on the LOCK
function.
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MIDI 10•3
MASTER MENU
These settings affect the overall MIDI configuration of the instrument:
COMMON CHANNEL
This channel, independent from the settings defined under the
SYNTH menu, allows a remote controller keyboard to emulate
the internal keyboard of the Equinox.
For example, if you selected a multi-part performance on the
Equinox and then tried to play this performance from an external controller keyboard connected to either of the Equinox’s MIDI
IN ports, you would normally only be able to play one of the constituent parts of that performance depending on the midi channel
that the controller keyboard was sending on. If, instead, you set
the controller keyboard to the COMMON CHANNEL, it would
play the complete performance exactly as though you were playing the internal keyboard of the Equinox itself.
The COMMON CHANNEL should be used when you wish to play
a PERFORMANCE, a DRAWBAR sound or a GROOVE PATCH
from an external controller.
Program change messages received on the COMMON CHANNEL are interpreted as PERFORMANCE CHANGE messages.
PORT COM CH. IN / PORT COM CH. OUT
These select which MIDI IN and MIDI OUT ports the COMMON
CHANNEL will use.
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10•4 User Guide
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CLOCK SOURCE
This allows you to select whether the sequencer, groove and
arpeggio sections will synchronize to the internal clock or to an
external clock.
CLOCK SEND
Selects whether or not the Equinox’s internal MIDI CLOCK information will be sent via MIDI OUT.
MIDI MERGE
Allows the data received at both MIDI IN 1 and MIDI IN 2 to be
passed to MIDI OUT 1 and MIDI OUT 2 after having been processed by the performance settings. This means that the MIDI IN
data can be processed by the volume, transpose, MIDI filters
etc. before being sent to MIDI OUT.
MIDI IN TRANSP.
This allows the simple pitch shifting, (in half step increments), of
all data received at MIDI IN.
FIX VELOCITY
This function will increase the velocity of all notes received at
MIDI IN by the specified amount.
SYSTEM EXCL.
Setting this function to ON allows the reception and transmission
of Equinox system exclusive data via MIDI.
SYSEX I.D #
Allows you to set the unique device I.D number to identify the
Equinox to other MIDI equipment
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MIDI 10•5
LOCAL OFF BUTTON, (F1)
When the LOCAL OFF function is selected (shown in negative
highlight), the built in keyboard of the Equinox will be disconnected from the internal sounds.
G.M BUTTON, (F2)
The G.M function allows optimum compatibility with the General
MIDI standard. Before loading a G.M file from disk, set this function to ON.
P.C I/O BUTTON, (F3)
This menu allows you to set the function of the computer port on
the instrument’s back panel. This is a direct interface with your
computer’s serial port and can be used as a reliable alternative
to MIDI without the need for a MIDI interface card. Normally set
to OFF, the port can be set to operate in any of the following
modes:
MACINTOSH: Appropriate setting for MAC computers.
PC 1: Fastest setting for Windows P.C. Use this mode when
possible.
PC 2: Slower setting for Windows P.C. Only use this mode if
you have problems with PC 1.
To use the computer port with your P.C, you will need the “Multimedia Kit” which is available from your Generalmusic dealer. This
kit includes both the interface cable and the PC / Mac driver disk.
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10•6 User Guide
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DUMP MENU
The DUMP menu allows you to transfer the contents of the Equinox’s internal memory to external storage devices, (such as Home
P.Cs or MIDI Data Filers), via MIDI.
Dump list
All
Setup
Sound
Drumkit
Performance
Drawbar
Song
Groove
Arpeggiator
User Panel
To send a MIDI dump:
Step 1: Select which part of memory you want to dump from the
available list.
Step 2: Prepare the external device to receive the dump.
Step 3: Press either SEND, (F1) or ENTER to start the dump.
It is not necessary to prepare the Equinox to receive a dump.
Dumps can be received at any time and the data will immediately be available for use.
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MIDI 10•7
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10•8 User Guide
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11 • SEQUENCER
The on-board sequencer of the Equinox offers 16 tracks with
250,000 events of memory available. Unlike other synth workstations, the sequencer in the Equinox has it’s own independent
sound generation. This means that, while the sequencer is playing up to 16 tracks, you can still play a 16 part performance using
16 different sounds over the top of it.
In effect, the Equinox is like two instruments in one, with each
instrument having 16 parts or tracks that can be played simultaneously. Until now, when working in Performance mode, we’ve
been viewing up to 16 parts of the instrument at once and using
the slider and button panel in conjunction with the 9-16 button to
adjust the volumes and mutes of these 16 parts. When working
with the sequencer on the Equinox, we will use this exact same
system that we’ve already worked with in Performance mode,
but we’ll be working with a totally separate 16 part sound generator. Also, in sequencer mode, we will refer to the parts as “tracks”
and the part select buttons will now be referred to as the “track
select buttons”.
The most important thing to understand when using the Equinox’s sequencer then is, which set of 16 tracks you’re currently
looking at - the 16 performance parts or the 16 sequencer tracks.
This can be easily determined by looking at one button - SONG
EDIT.
Whenever the SONG EDIT button is lit, the tracks you see in the
screen and the tracks represented by the slider and button panel
are the 16 tracks of the sequencer engine. If the SONG EDIT
button is not lit, then the tracks you see will be the 16 parts of the
Performance.
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Sequencer 11•1
Recording a sequence - the basics
Let’s try a “hands-on” example of recording a sequence.
The initial stages of setting up the instrument for recording a sequence have been simplified for you by the inclusion of 32 “Sequencer Performances”. These are special templates which will
automatically set up each of the 16 tracks with an appropriate
sound for creating a song in a particular musical style. These
templates are stored in the last 32 performance locations - from
#81 to #112.
To scroll through these different sequencer templates, put the
instrument into performance mode, (press PERFORM), press
any key on the numeric keypad, (to open the numeric input window), and then type the number 81).
You should now see the first sequencer performance - seq POP.
You can use the dial to scroll through all of the available sequencer
performances. When you’re ready to begin recording, simply
press the RECORD button.
Now you will see a display which asks you what performance
you want to use.
Since we want to use the performance which is selected at the
moment, (the template we just chose), press CURRENT, (F1).
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11•2 User Guide
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The screen will invert to a white-on-black display and we are
now in RECORD MODE. You will notice that the TRACK #1
button is flashing and a sound is displayed in the screen which is
also playable from the keyboard. You’re ready to record track #1.
Flashing
Press PLAY but don’t play anything for a moment. You will hear
the metronome, (click track), and, in the upper right corner of the
screen, you will see the song position locator which is divided
into bars, beats and ticks.
Let the metronome continue for a few measures and then press
STOP. You’ll notice that the STOP button is flashing. When you
press STOP once in this way, it functions as a pause button.
Press STOP a second time and you’ll see that the light now remains constantly on. This resets the locator to the beginning of
the song.
When you press PLAY, the first four clicks you hear are a countdown to the first measure of the song. This countdown period is
displayed by the locator as bar #0. After the countdown has finished, you can begin recording. Try to record a few measures
using the currently selected sound. When you finish recording,
press STOP twice to return to the beginning of the song.
If you made a mistake or wish to re-record the track, simply press
PLAY once more and try again. When you’re satisfied with your
recording, press the flashing TRACK #1 button to stop recording
that track.
Now you can listen to what you recorded by pressing PLAY again.
Make sure that playback starts from the beginning of the song by
pressing STOP twice.
Now let’s record another track. Pressing the TRACK #2 button
the first time will show you which sound is ready for recording in
that track. Pressing it a second time will set the button flashing
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Sequencer 11•3
so that the track is ready to be recorded.
Press PLAY and record something into this track. When you finish, press STOP twice as before. When you’re satisfied with
what you’ve recorded into this track, press the TRACK #2 button
one more time to switch from record to playback as we did with
the first track.
Changing sounds and volume levels
Now you’ve recorded a two track song. You can change the sound
of any track in the following way:
Step 1: Select the track whose sound you want to change by
pressing it’s track select button once.
Step 2: Use the cursor down button to highlight the sound name.
Step 3: Use the dial in conjunction with the cursor buttons or
the numeric keypad to select the sound you want.
Step 4: Press STORE followed by ENTER to memorize the settings into the song performance.
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11•4 User Guide
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While the song is playing back, you can also use the sliders above
the track buttons to adjust the volume levels of those tracks. If
you want to memorize your new volume levels into the song,
press STORE followed by ENTER as before.
Navigating around your song
Using the PLAY, STOP, FORWARD and REWIND, (>> and <<),
buttons in conjunction with the song position locator, you should
be able to easily move around from the beginning of your song to
the end and all points in between. At any time while a song is
playing, you can jump forwards or backwards by pressing the
FORWARD or REWIND buttons. For a longer song, holding down
these buttons will move rapidly in either direction.
If you press STOP once, it will pause your song at the current
position. While the song is paused, you can “cue” it to any measure using the forward and rewind buttons. When you press PLAY,
the song will resume from where you are currently paused, (actually it will start playback from one measure earlier than the
current position giving you a one bar countdown).
Exiting and re-entering RECORD MODE
During the process of recording your song, it is not necessary to
exit from RECORD MODE in between recording different tracks.
When you’ve finished recording a particular track, simply press
the track’s select button to stop it from flashing. To select a new
part to record, press the button of the new track until it begins to
flash. You can leave the RECORD button on all the time. The
only reason you should want to leave RECORD MODE is either
because you’ve either finished all recording or because you want
to access the features of SONG EDIT MODE
Whenever you want to leave RECORD MODE, simply turn off
the RECORD button. This will put you into SONG PLAYBACK
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Sequencer 11•5
MODE, (for which the screen returns to a normal black-on-white
display).
Now you can listen to your song and move around within it using
the PLAY, STOP, FORWARD and REWIND buttons.
If you want to re-enter RECORD MODE, just press the RECORD
button again.
Recording another song
Each time you press the RECORD button in the previous example, you will return to the current song to continue recording. If
you want to keep the current song in memory and start recording
a new song, (the Equinox can hold up to 16 songs in memory at
once), press the SONG SELECT button.
The SONG SELECT list will appear and you will see the current
song highlighted. Move the cursor down to any empty position,
(empty positions are displayed as *******), and press ENTER.
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11•6 User Guide
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Record Mode functions
MODE
Under the MODE button, (F1), you will find three different options which affect the way in which the instrument records.
The three modes available are:
REPLACE: When a track is in record mode, (flashing), each
time you press START it will erase everything that
was previously recorded from the start point onwards.
OVERDUB: When a track is in record mode, (flashing), each
time you press START you will hear the previously recorded material along with the new material
which you are currently playing. The two are then
merged together in the same track.
PUNCH:
NOTE: This mode requires that a pedal is connected to the instrument and that it’s function has
been set to PUNCH under SYSTEM / CONTROLS, (press the LOCK button once you’ve set
it).
When a track is in record mode, (flashing), each time you press
START you will hear the previously recorded material. You cannot record from the keyboard unless the punch pedal is held down
while you’re playing. While the punch pedal is held down, the
record system operates as it does in REPLACE mode - new notes
are recorded while previously recorded material is erased.
You can switch modes whenever you want. For example, recording drum tracks is usually easier in OVERDUB mode because
you can record individual drums with each overdub.
If you make a small mistake while recording a track, you can fix it
by switching to PUNCH mode. Listen to the playback of the problem track. When you get to the point where the mistake is about
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Sequencer 11•7
to occur, hold down the punch pedal and play the part correctly.
When you finish correcting the track, make sure you release the
punch pedal so as not to accidentally erase any of the good stuff.
OPTIONS
The OPTIONS button in RECORD mode offers a number of different functions;
QUANTIZE
This allows the track to be automatically “quantized”, (time corrected), during recording. The following quantize values are available:
1/4 -
Quantize to the nearest quarter note.
1/8 -
Quantize to the nearest eighth note.
1/12 -
Quantize to the nearest eighth note triplet.
1/16 -
Quantize to the nearest sixteenth note.
1/24 -
Quantize to the nearest sixteenth note triplet.
1/32 -
Quantize to the nearest 32nd note.
1/48 -
Quantize to the nearest 32nd note triplet.
1/64 -
Quantize to the nearest 64th note.
1/96 -
Quantize to the nearest 64th note triplet.
Free -
Do not quantize at all - record exactly as played.
1/8 B - 1/8 F - Eighth note groove quantize settings.
1/16 B - 1/16 F - Sixteenth note groove quantize settings.
NOTE: You can also quantize a track after it has been recorded.
See SONG EDIT MODE / QUANTIZE for more information.
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11•8 User Guide
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TEMPO REC.
Setting this feature to ON allows the current song to record tempo changes which are made while the song is playing.
P. VOLUME REC.
Setting this feature to ON allows the current song to record the
movements of the volume pedal while the song is playing.
EFFECTS REC
Setting this feature to ON allows the current song to record any
effects changes which are made while the song is playing.
COUNTDOWN
This feature allows you to enable or disable the one measure
countdown which precedes the start of any recording.
METR. VOLUME
This controls the volume of the metronome or “click track”.
RUN ON REC
Setting this option to ON will cause recording to start immediately each time the RECORD button is pressed.
EXIT ON STOP
Setting this option to ON will automatically exit from RECORD
MODE into EDIT MODE every time the STOP button is pressed.
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Sequencer 11•9
Playback/Edit Mode functions
SONG PLAYBACK/EDIT MODE offers a number of different playback options and also contains the buttons used to access the
four main edit menus of the sequencer.
The SONG PLAYBACK/EDIT MODE main screen will be seen
when you exit from recording by turning off the RECORD button.
In the main screen you can use the cursor controls to move between the various functions available. At the top left you can adjust the song tempo.
The LOOP function allows you to set a “from” and “to” marker
between which the song will loop during both playback and recording. Set LOOP to ON and then set the position of the two
markers. When you press START, the song will start from the
position of the first marker and continue to loop between the two
markers until you press stop.
The TIME SIGNATURE function below allows you to set the
master time signature for your recording. This can only be set
before commencing a new recording.
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11•10 User Guide
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The “UNDO” button
All recording and editing on the Equinox is monitored by the
UNDO function.
Any time you record something into a track or perform any kind
of edit, the UNDO function keeps a record of the way things were
before that last recording or that last edit. If, after editing or recording something, you wish to go back and try again, pressing
the UNDO button, (just above the dial) followed by ENTER will
restore the instrument to it’s previous condition so you can start
again.
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Sequencer 11•11
Edit Menu
The EDIT button, (F1) displays the main song editing menu:
REPEAT TRACK
This menu allows you to repeat all or part of any track as many
times as you wish.
To use it, first select the track you want to repeat by pressing it’s
track select button. You should see the name of the selected
track in the top right side of the display.
Next, specify which part of the track you want to repeat, (from
measure X to measure Y), by setting the values under the RANGE
button, (F1).
Press ENTER when you’ve finished.
Now select the number of repeats you want and press ENTER to
complete the operation.
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11•12 User Guide
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QUANTIZE TRACK
This menu allows you to quantize all or part of any track. Quantize is used to correct minor timing inaccuracies by adjusting the
positions of notes that have been played so that they fall into a
specific timing pattern.
To use it, first select the track you want to quantize by pressing
it’s track select button.
You should see the name of the selected track in the top right
side of the display.
Next, specify which part of the track you want to quantize, (from
measure X to measure Y), by setting the values under the RANGE
button, (F1).
You can also use this function to set a specific range of notes to
be quantized. Notes which fall outside the specified range will
not be affected by the operation. Press ENTER when you’ve finished.
There are two choices in the main QUANTIZE screen. The first
is to specify exactly which part of the note events you want to
correct:
ATTACKS: This will shift the start times of the selected notes
according to the specified value.
RELEASES: This will adjust the length of the selected notes
according to the specified value.
The second choice is the actual QUANTIZE VALUE. These values are explained in detail under the OPTIONS section of
RECORD MODE. Press ENTER to complete the operation.
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Sequencer 11•13
COPY TRACK
This menu allows you to copy all or part of any track to another
track. You can also use it to copy portions of the entire song, (all
16 tracks) to a different part of the same song or even to a different song.
Copying a single track to another track: First select the track
you want to copy by pressing it’s track select button. You should
see the name of the selected track in the top right side of the
display.
Next, specify which part of the track you want to copy, (from
measure X to measure Y), by setting the values under the RANGE
button, (F1). You can also use this function to set a specific range
of notes to be copied. Notes which fall outside the specified range
will not be copied.
Press ENTER when you’ve finished
Now make the following selections:
Mode:
REPLACE mode will erase whatever was in the
target portion of the destination track to make way
for the new data. MERGE mode will simply combine the new data with whatever was in the destination track before.
To Track: Select the destination track
To Bar:
Select where in the destination track you want the
new data to start.
No. of Copies: After the first copy, you can specify that you
want the section to repeated any number of times.
Press ENTER to complete the operation.
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11•14 User Guide
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Copying a portion of the entire song: Press the TRACK button, (F4) and select “All 16 Tracks”.
Now use the RANGE button, (F1) to specify which portion of the
song you want to copy, (from measure X to measure Y). The “To
Bar” and “No. of Copies” functions work the same way as before.
If you want to copy this section of the current song to a different
song, choose the destination song by pressing the SONG button, (F3).
Press ENTER to complete the operation.
NOTE: A third option under the TRACK button allows you to copy
events from the MASTER TRACK. This is a special track which
stores information such as tempo changes, volume pedal movements, effect changes and other master events.
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Sequencer 11•15
ERASE EVENTS
This principle use of this feature is to erase sections of a track or
sections of an entire song. It’s second application allows you to
strip out specific unwanted events from individual tracks.
First select the track you want to erase from by pressing it’s track
select button. You should see the name of the selected track in
the top right side of the display. If you want to erase data from
every track then press the TRACK button, (F4), and choose “All
16 Tracks”.
Next, specify which section you want to erase, (from measure X
to measure Y), by setting the values under the RANGE button,
(F1).
Press ENTER when you’ve finished.
Now you can choose which type of events you want to erase
from the selected track or tracks by setting EVENT TYPE accordingly. Press ENTER to complete the operation.
NOTE: A third option under the TRACK button allows you to erase
events from the MASTER TRACK. This is a special track which
stores information such as tempo changes, volume pedal movements, effect changes and other master events.
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11•16 User Guide
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SHIFT EVENTS
This feature allows you move recorded events either forwards or
backwards in time.
To use it, first select the track you want to shift by pressing it’s
track select button. You should see the name of the selected
track in the top right side of the display.
Next, specify which part of the track you want to shift, (from measure X to measure Y), by setting the values under the RANGE
button, (F1).
Press ENTER when you’ve finished.
Now you can set the amount of shift required. There are two
different ways to use this feature. For tiny movements, (to create
MIDI delays or give tracks a little more feeling), you can specify
the exact number of “ticks” that you want to shift the selected
track in either direction, (a “tick” is 1/192nd of a quarter note).
For larger movements, (to shift the recorded data to an entirely
different part of the song), you can specify the destination locator
where you want the data to be moved to.
These two functions are just different ways of representing the
same information. Changing the value of one will also change
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Sequencer 11•17
the value of the other. For this reason, you only need to adjust
one of them - whichever seems more convenient for your purpose.
Press ENTER to complete the operation.
NOTE: If you find that you cannot shift a track backwards, it’s
probably because the RANGE is set to start from 1 1 1 and a
track cannot be moved to an earlier point than this.
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11•18 User Guide
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NOTE VALUES
This menu allows you to change both the velocity and the pitch
of any notes in the selected track.
First select the track you want to change by pressing it’s track
select button. You should see the name of the selected track in
the top right side of the display.
Next, specify which part of the track you want to change, (from
measure X to measure Y), by setting the values under the RANGE
button, (F1). You can also use this function to set a specific range
of notes to be edited. Notes which fall outside the specified range
will not be affected by the operation.
Press ENTER when you’ve finished.
Adjusting velocities: There are two different ways to adjust the
velocity of the selected notes
NORMAL: When this is set, use the VELOCITY CHANGE parameter to select how much you want to increase
or decrease the current velocity values by. To set a
decrease simply choose a negative value.
FIXED:
Choosing this setting will automatically convert all
velocity values in the selected track to the value
of VELOCITY CHANGE.
Press ENTER to complete the operation.
Adjusting pitch: Set the TRANSPOSE value to the number of
half steps you want the selected notes to be shifted by. You can
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Sequencer 11•19
also transpose down by setting negative values.
Press ENTER to complete the operation.
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11•20 User Guide
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INSERT BARS
This feature allows you to increase the length of the current song
by inserting a number of extra measures at a particular point.
These new measures can even have a different time signature
from the rest of the song.
DELETE BARS
This feature allows you to delete a number of measures from
any point in the song. Unlike the ERASE EVENTS function, when
you delete events using DELETE BARS, it does not leave an
empty space in the song. The measures which existed before
and after the deleted section will be “spliced together” when the
operation is performed.
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Sequencer 11•21
EXPORT TO GROOVE
This function is used to extract a section of the current song and
make it into a groove. In order to use this feature effectively, it’s
important to understand something about the structure of grooves.
Groove Format
A groove can contain up to 8 tracks. These tracks are assigned
special names and each track has a particular application. Although you can copy anything you want into any groove track
using EXPORT TO GROOVE, your grooves will be more flexible
and more compatible with the existing factory grooves if you follow these guidelines
DRUM 1 TRACK - Used for primary drum tracks.
DRUM 2 TRACK- Used for percussion and other secondary
drum tracks.
BASS 1 TRACK - Used for primary bass lines.
BASS 2 TRACK - Used for secondary bass lines, Clavinet
riffs and other keyboard riffs which might include
bass notes.
SYNTH 1 TRACK - Used for Electric piano and other “melodic” keyboard riffs.
SYNTH 2 TRACK - Used for Funk guitar and other single note
or highly percussive riffs.
SYNTH 3 TRACK - Used for Organ, and other chord type keyboard riffs.
SYNTH 4 TRACK - Used for special vintage synth, analog and
dance effects.
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11•22 User Guide
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Creating a groove from a song
While the song is selected, choose EXPORT TO GROOVE. At
the top of the export menu, you select which groove, in which of
the eight user families you are going to create. Each family can
hold 64 grooves.
Once you’ve made this selection, press the RANGE button, (F1)
and specify which portion of the current song, (from measure X
to measure Y), is going to be the source for your new groove.
Press ENTER when you’ve finished.
Now you’ll return to the EXPORT TO GROOVE menu. The only
thing to do now is to choose which tracks of the current song will
be copied to the specified groove tracks. Press ENTER to complete the operation.
Once your new grooved is created, you will be able to find it in
the groove library. To continue editing it, (to select sounds, tempo, effect sends etc.), press the PROGRAM button in the
GROOVES section, choose EDIT, (F1), and then select your new
groove in the second line of the display.
Press ENTER to start editing.
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Sequencer 11•23
EVENTS
This menu allows you to precisely modify any “event” which has
been recorded into one of the 16 tracks.
What is an “event” ?
If you are already familiar with the concept of MIDI “events”, (as
used in many software sequencers), then you can skip to the
next section - Using The Event List.
Anything that can be recorded into a MIDI sequencer or song
recorder is called an “event”. The simplest example of an event
would be the pressing of a key on the keyboard. In order to
correctly play back that keypress the sequencer has to memorize a number of important pieces of information;
1. At what point during the song was the key pressed ?
2. Which key was it ?
3. At what speed was it pressed ?
4. At what speed was it released ?
5. After what period of time was it released ?
Armed with these five essential pieces of information, the sequencer will be able to accurately reproduce the key exactly as it
was played. The above information can be represented in a single line of our EVENT LIST. Thus:
All of the information described in the earlier list is represented in
one single line of the above event list. Let’s step through the first
line of the list and examine the information it contains.
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11•24 User Guide
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LOCATOR
The LOCATOR tells us exactly when the event occurred. This is
represented by three numbers separated by spaces. The first
number, in this case 1, tells us which bar the event occurred in.
The next number, also 1, tells us at which beat of that bar it happened. The last number, a 49, tells us exactly where, in the first
beat of the first bar, the event occurred. It does this by subdividing each beat into 192 separate parts, (usually referred to as
“pulses” or “ticks”). So this event occurred on the 49th “pulse” of
the first beat of the first bar.
STATUS or EVENT TYPE
The STATUS section simply tells us what type of event this is. In
this case its a note event. Other types of events are discussed
further on.
1V - (NOTE VALUE)
Any displayed event has three values called 1V, 2V and 3V. Here
we are looking at a note event, (probably the type of event you’ll
be dealing with most often), so we can discuss the specific meanings of each value as they apply to this type of event. Please
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Sequencer 11•25
note that, for a different type of event, (like a CONTROL or PITCH
BEND event), the three values will have quite different meanings. In the case of a note event, the first value will always be the
Note Value - the actual name of the key that was pressed. In this
case it was F3, (F below middle C).
2V - (INITIAL VELOCITY)
For a note event, the second value represents the INITIAL VELOCITY of the key or, as we asked in our original question list,
“At what speed was the key pressed ?” Minimum velocity would
be shown as 0 and maximum would be 127. This key was pressed
at value 78 - about medium velocity.
3V - (RELEASE VELOCITY)
The third value of a note event represents the speed with which
the key was released or RELEASE VELOCITY.
LENGTH / GATE TIME
This final event tells us how long the key was held for. This is
known as the “GATE TIME” of the note event. The unit of measurement used for this is the same system of 192 “ticks” or “puls○
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11•26 User Guide
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es” that we discussed earlier. Therefore if a note had a GATE
TIME of 192, it was held for exactly one beat.
The Equinox’s EVENT LIST allows you to view and instantly
modify any of these events. In this way, even the smallest of
errors can be quickly and accurately corrected. So far we’ve
only looked at NOTE EVENTS. There are a number of other
events which you will typically find in a track’s event list.
THE CONTROL CHANGE EVENT
The CONTROL CHANGE EVENT serves, not one, but 128 different functions. Whenever you move one of the sliders on the
front panel or press one of the pedals while recording, a particular type of CONTROL CHANGE EVENT is inserted into that track’s
event list. These various control events are not given names in
the event list but simply referred to by numbers. Most of these
numbers are standardized on all MIDI keyboards. You can find a
list of the CONTROL CHANGE NUMBERS which the Equinox
uses in the MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART at the back of this
manual.
In the above example, the highlighted event indicates that the
volume level slider was moved. This slider movement occurred
on the 168th pulse or Beat #4 of Bar #3. We know that it was the
volume slider because the CONTROL CHANGE NUMBER for a
volume level event is 7. With a controller event, (when the STATUS line shows “CNTR.” as above), the value of 1V is always
the CONTROL CHANGE NUMBER. If this number was 10 instead of 7 then we would know, by referring to the MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART, that this event represented the movement
of a PAN control instead of a VOLUME control. The value of 2V
is the actual level to which that control was set. So in the above
example, the volume was adjusted to a level of 85.
In this example we looked at a single volume level event. Usually, however, when a control like a slider is moved, it generates a
continuous stream of individual events. Moving a slider from its
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Sequencer 11•27
minimum position, (0), to its maximum position, (127) will generate 128 individual volume control events like the one we just studied.
PITCH BEND
The PITCH BEND event is easily recognized by its name in the
event’s STATUS line. Unlike the CONTROL CHANGE event, we
do not need to be concerned with the value of 1V when using the
pitch bend wheel for the Equinox’s internal sounds. The amount
of pitch bend applied is indicated by the value of 2V. When the
Pitch Bend wheel is resting in its centre position it is said to be at
value 64. No events are actually inserted into the track however
unless the wheel is moved to a different position. As the wheel is
raised, increasing the pitch of the sound, it generates a stream of
PITCH BEND EVENTS with 2V values of 65 upwards. At its
maximum position, the wheel sends a 2V value of 127. A similar
thing happens if the wheel is moved downwards from its centre
position. A stream of events is generated descending from 63 to
0 at the minimum position.
Remember that for any movement of the Pitch Bend wheel, events
will not only be generated when the wheel is moved up or down,
but also an equal number of events will be generated as the
wheel is allowed to return to its centre stop position. Usually,
moving the pitch wheel for just a few seconds will result in hundreds of individual pitch bend events.
MONO TOUCH
The MONOPHONIC AFTERTOUCH EVENT is generated as you
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11•28 User Guide
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apply extra pressure to a key already being held down. Only 1V
is used to show how much aftertouch was applied at the specified time. The range is from 0 to 127.
NOTE: Since many of the Equinox’s internal sounds are programmed with this feature on, you may often generate a large
quantity of MONO TOUCH EVENTS without realizing that you’re
doing so. The generation of MONO TOUCH EVENTS can be
disabled before commencing a recording by turning off the AFTERTOUCH function in the PERFORM / OTHER option and storing your changes. Alternatively, accidentally recorded MONO
TOUCH EVENTS may be “stripped out” of any offending track
by using the ERASE EVENTS function and setting “Mono Touch”
as the EVENT TYPE.
PROGRAM CHANGE
If you change a sound while recording, this change will be reflected in the event list by the addition of a PROGRAM CHANGE
EVENT. This event displays 1V, 2V and 3V values. For Equinox
internal sounds however, only 1V and 2V need to be considered,
(3V is only used when addressing extended sound libraries on
external instruments). The value of 1V is the actual location of
the sound from 1 to 128 while the value of 2V tells the instrument
which bank to take the sound from. Therefore, in the above example, the PROG EVENT is being used to select sound #35
from the 3rd bank, (BANK C - SYNTH 3).
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Sequencer 11•29
Using the Event list
To use the event list, select EVENTS from the EDIT list and press
ENTER. Now select the track whose events you want to edit by
pressing its track select button. You should see the name of the
selected track in the top left side of the display.
The events are presented in the form of a continuous list. At the
top of the list is the first event which occurred in that track. At the
end of the list is the last event. You will only normally be able to
view about four events at a time. There are a few different ways
to view a specific section of the event list;
METHOD 1: Manual Scroll: Use the cursor up and down buttons to scroll in either direction, one event at a time. As you scroll
through each individual event, you will hear it being executed in
real time.
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11•30 User Guide
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METHOD 2: Catch Locator. Quite often, you will be listening to
the playback of the track when you suddenly notice an error which
needs to be fixed. When this happens, simply press the STOP
button once so that it flashes. The sequencer is now paused at
the point where you pressed STOP. It is now possible to view the
event list for the exact point where you paused the playback by
using the CATCH LOCATOR function. Here’s how to do it:
1. Press STOP once at the desired point during playback.
2. Go to EDIT / EVENTS.
3. Press the corresponding track button whose events you
wish to edit, (you’ll see the track name in the top left corner of
the display).
4. Press the LOC button, (F2).
5. Check that the CATCH LOCATOR function is selected and
press ENTER.
Remember that, if you pressed STOP after hearing an error in
the track, the problem section is probably a few events before
those currently being displayed.
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Sequencer 11•31
METHOD 3: Go To Bar. You can use this function to display the
events for a specific section of the current song.
1. Once in the event list view, press the LOC button, (F2),
select GO TO BAR and press ENTER.
2. Now you can use either the dial or the numeric keypad to
specify which bar of the song you wish to view the events for.
3. Press ENTER to move to the specified part of the list.
Editing Events in the list
Modifying any event in the list is simplicity itself. Use the cursor
keys to move in any direction and place the cursor over any event
of your choice.
Once highlighted, an event can be changed by using either the
dial, (for small adjustments), or the numeric keypad. Any changes you make will have an instant effect on the current track.
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11•32 User Guide
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SHOW BUTTON, (F1)
Often, when trying to pinpoint specific errors, you will find yourself having to scroll through streams of events which are of no
interest to you. For example, maybe you’re trying to find a wrong
note which was played while the pitch bend wheel was being
moved up and down. In this case, you would have to scroll through
hundreds of pitch bend events to look for a single note event.
The SHOW function allows you to specify which type of events
you will see in the list at any given time so, in the above example,
we could simply ask not to look at all those pitch bend events.
To use the SHOW function, simply press the SHOW button, (F1).
Now use the cursor up and down button in conjunction with the
dial to specify which type of events you wish to see included in
the list and press ENTER to return to the event list.
INSERT BUTTON, (F3)
Events can be manually inserted into any track using the INSERT function. Pressing this button calls up a selection window
where you can specify the type of event you wish to insert.
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Sequencer 11•33
After you’ve made your choice, press ENTER and your new event
will appear in the current screen position.
The location of the inserted event, (Bar, Beat, Pulse), in this case
a Program change event, will be identical to that of the event
which was selected prior to pressing the INSERT button. The
remaining values, (1V, 2V and 3V as applicable), will initially be
set to minimum or average values. These can be manually
changed after the event has been inserted.
DELETE BUTTON, (F4)
If you wish to delete an event completely, in this case, the Program change event inserted in the example above, simply press
the DEL button, (F4).
The last deleted event can always be recovered by pressing the
UNDO button.
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11•34 User Guide
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MASTER EVENTS
The Equinox’s sequencer provides a second event list called the
MASTER EVENT LIST which allows you to view the contents of
the instrument’s MASTER TRACK. This track has already been
discussed briefly in the ERASE EVENTS and COPY TRACK sections. Here we’ll take a closer look at how this track works.
Every time you commence a new recording on the Equinox, a
MASTER TRACK is automatically created for you.
This track contains some essential information:
1. The START and END points of the song.
2. The initial tempo.
3. The master volume setting.
The MASTER TRACK can be used to change any of these, plus
a number of other events automatically while the song is being
played back. Available events are as follows;
TEMPO: Causes an immediate change in the song playback
speed.
VOLUME: Adjusts the master volume of the instrument.
EFFECT DEVICE SEL. / TYPE / VOL: Changes the parameters of the specified DSP device.
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Sequencer 11•35
ROTARY: Sets the fast or slow speed of the rotary effect, (for
DRAWBARS mode).
SCALE: Switches to the specified alternate tuning, (from those
available under SYSTEM / TUNE).
Under RECORD / OPTIONS, we’ve already seen the settings
for TEMPO RECORD, VOLUME PEDAL RECORD and EFFECT
RECORD. When recording any of these control movements,
the results can be viewed and edited from the MASTER EVENTS
menu.
The MASTER EVENTS are presented in the form of a continuous list. If you haven’t recorded any tempo changes or other long
streams of events then the MASTER EVENTS list may only contain two or three lines. In this case you can view the entire list in
the screen at once. If you have created a longer list of master
events then you will need to navigate through the list to reach
any desired point. You will only normally be able to view about
four events at a time. There are a few different ways to view a
specific section of the list;
METHOD 1: Manual Scroll. Use the cursor up and down buttons to scroll in either direction, one event at a time.
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11•36 User Guide
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METHOD 2: Catch Locator. To show the exact point in the MASTER EVENTS list at the current point of playback, press the STOP
button once so that it flashes. The sequencer is now paused at
the point where you pressed STOP. It is now possible to view the
MASTER EVENTS list for the exact point where you paused the
playback by using the CATCH LOCATOR function. Here’s how
to do it:
1. Press STOP once at the desired point during playback.
2. Go to EDIT / MASTER EVENTS.
3. Press the LOC button, (F2).
4. Check that the CATCH LOCATOR function is selected and
press ENTER.
Remember that, if you pressed STOP after hearing an error in
the track, the problem section is probably a few events before
those currently being displayed.
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Sequencer 11•37
METHOD 3: Go To Bar. You can use this function to display the
MASTER EVENTS for a specific section of the current song.
1. Once in the MASTER EVENTS view, press the LOC button, (F2), select GO TO BAR and press ENTER.
2. Now you can use either the DIAL of the numeric keypad to
spcify which bar of the song you wish to view the MASTER
EVENTS for.
3. Press ENTER to move to the specified part of the list.
Editing Events in the list
Modifying any event in the list is simplicity itself. Use the cursor
keys to move in any direction and place the cursor over any event
of your choice
Once highlighted, an event can be changed by using either the
dial, (for small adjustments), or the numeric keypad.
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11•38 User Guide
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SHOW BUTTON, (F1)
Often, when trying to pinpoint specific errors, you will find yourself having to scroll through streams of events which are of no
interest to you. For example, maybe you’re trying to find an effect selection which was made during a tempo change. In this
case, you would have to scroll through hundreds of tempo events
to look for a single effect type event. The SHOW function allows
you to specify which type of events you will see in the list at any
given time so, in the above example, we could simply ask not to
look at all those tempo events.
To use the SHOW function, simply press the SHOW button, (F1).
Now use the cursor up and down button in conjunction with the
dial to specify which type of events you wish to see included in
the list.
INSERT BUTTON, (F3)
Events can be manually inserted into the master track using the
INSERT function. Pressing this button calls up a selection window where you can specify the type of event you wish to insert.
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Sequencer 11•39
After you’ve made your choice, press ENTER and your new event
will appear in the current screen position.
The location of the inserted event, (Bar, Beat, Pulse), in this case
the Tempo event, will be identical to that of the event which was
selected prior to pressing the INSERT button.
The actual value of the event will be set to a default setting. This
can be manually changed after an event has been inserted.
DELETE BUTTON, (F4)
If you wish to delete an event completely, simply press the DEL
button, (F4).
The last deleted event can always be recovered by pressing the
UNDO button.
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11•40 User Guide
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MASTER MENU, (F1)
Under this button you will find options to change the name of the
current song, (press ENTER while the cursor is over the name),
and also to adjust the master tempo and master volume level.
OPTION MENU, (F2)
Here you will find some options which we’ve already seen in
RECORD MODE / OPTION. These can be selected in either mode
and operate in the same way.
CLEAR MENU, (F3)
This button offers a quick and convenient way to completely erase
either a single track or an entire song.
To erase a single track: First press the track select button
for the track you want to erase. Then press CLEAR. You will
see an option to clear the chosen track. Select this option
and press ENTER to clear the track.
To erase an entire song: Press CLEAR and select CLEAR
THIS SONG. Press ENTER to complete the operation.
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Sequencer 11•41
UNDO MENU, (F4)
This menu allows you to set the function of the UNDO button,
(just above the dial). When the UNDO button is enabled, it absorbs half of the available sequencer memory. For this reason,
the option to disable it is provided, allowing you to use all of the
available memory.
When you disable the UNDO function, however, the last edit you
made is still stored in the “undo buffer”. If after disabling the UNDO
function you still find that you don’t have enough memory, try
using the CLEAR BUFFER option.
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11•42 User Guide
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EFFECT MENU
Most of the functions in the EFFECT menu should be familiar by
now because we’ve already seen them in both SOUND and PERFORMANCE mode.
The only unique feature offered by the sequencer’s EFFECT
menu is found under the MODE button, (F3).
Although the Equinox has two separate sound engines for the
sequencer and synthesizer respectively, there is only one set of
effects which is common to both. For this reason, when the sequencer and the synth are to be used simultaneously, you must
specify who is going to take control of the effects. There are three
options:
2xSynth + 2x Seq: This mode is the most versatile since it
allows the synthesizer and the sequencer to each have two
independent effects. When this mode is set, the EFFECT
menus in both the sequencer and the performance environments will show two effects - one Reverb and one MultiFX.
SHARE MASTER: In this mode the sequencer becomes the
“master instrument” in a sharing situation. This means that
there will be three effects - one Reverb, one MultiFX and one
ProEFX and their settings will be governed by the EFFECT
menu of the sequencer. When you recall a different performance, it will not attempt to change the effects but simply share
the effects which have been set up by the sequencer.
SHARE SLAVE: In this mode the sequencer becomes the
“slave instrument” in a sharing situation. This means that, as
before, there will be three effects - one Reverb, one MultiFX
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Sequencer 11•43
and one ProEFX but this time, their settings will be governed
by the EFFECT menu of the PERFORMANCE. When you
recall a different performance, the effects will change and
the sequencer will share them with the performance.
TRACK MENU
This menu is used to configure tracks of the sequencer engine in
same way that we configure the various parts of a performance.
When you change something in the TRACK menu, you can save
it into the current song performance by pressing STORE followed
by ENTER.
The functions of the TRACK menu are identical to those found in
PERFORMANCE / PARTS. Please refer to the PERFORMANCE
MODE section of the manual for instructions on all these functions.
MIXER MENU
The mixer menu controls the final output of the sounds in this
song. Changes that you make to the mixer settings can be stored
into the current song performance by pressing STORE followed
by ENTER.
The functions of the MIXER menu are identical to those found in
PERFORMANCE / MIXER. Please refer to the PERFORMANCE
MODE section of the manual for instructions on all these functions.
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11•44 User Guide
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12 • USER PANEL
The USER button is where you can completely reconfigure the 8
sliders and 8 buttons to perform the functions you specify instead of their normal functions. You can store up to 16 different
configurations for the slider and button panel which can then be
easily recalled with the dial whenever the USER PANEL screen
is displayed.
Pressing the USER button activates the USER PANEL screen
where you can choose a preset slider/button configuration by
rotating the DIAL.
The choices are:
Portamento, external Volume, external Expression, external Reverb, external Chorus, Seq. Volume, Seq. Expression, external
Start, Groove Lab.
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User panel 12•1
Creating a new Panel configuration
To create a new configuration, first press the USER button and
then press EDIT, (F1).
Now can choose which control you’re going to program by simply touching any one of the sliders or buttons. As soon as you
operate one of these controllers, you will see it’s name appear in
the top right corner of the screen and you’re ready to begin editing it. Begin by moving Slider 1 so we can take a look at the
slider edit menu:
MODE BUTTON, (F2)
Probably the first thing to decide is whether this slider is going to
control the Equinox’s internal sounds or whether it’s going to be
used only for sending MIDI to external instruments. The available options are as follows:
1. INTERNAL: The slider will control the sounds of the Equinox’s synth engine.
2. EXTERNAL OUT 1: The slider will send data only to MIDI
OUT 1.
3. EXTERNAL OUT 2: The slider will send data only to MIDI
OUT 2.
4. SEQUENCER: The slider will control the sounds of the
Equinox’s sequencer engine
Make a selection and then press ENTER to return to the main
edit screen.
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12•2 User Guide
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PART # BUTTON, (F1)
Each slider and button can be set to control any number of parts,
tracks or channels at the same time. Here is where you define
which parts, tracks, or MIDI channels the selected control is going to affect.
Pressh the PART# button will display a window which shows
16 square blocks. Each numbered block represents a part, (if
you’re in INTERNAL mode), a MIDI channel , (if you’re in EXTERNAL mode) and a sequencer track, (if you’re in SEQUENCER mode) .
To assign which of the 16 parts this control is going to affect, use
the cursor buttons to move to any part and assign it either on,
(black background) or off with the ENTER button. Press ESCAPE
when you’ve finished.
NOTE: For INTERNAL configurations, if you want the control to
work in SOUND MODE then the only part you need to activate is
part #1
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User panel 12•3
SLIDER SETTINGS
FUNCTION
Here you can choose which function you want this slider to have.
The choice of available functions will be different depending on
whether you set internal or external mode.
CURRENT VAL
This setting allows you to see the value represented by the position of the selected slider at the moment. This value changes
continuously as the slider is moved.
MIN VAL and MAX VAL
Here you can program the range of the slider. Normally, a MIDI
slider would have a minimum value of 0 and a maximum value of
127. Using these two parameters, you can set the slider to have
any range you want.
For example, maybe you want to adjust the volume of a sound
but wan †¸o avoid being able to accidentally make it too loud. By
reducing the MAX VAL you can set the upper limit of this slider.
Alternatively, maybe you want the slider to be able to vary the
tempo of a song between 80 and 90 bpm. This can also be
achieved by setting these parameters appropriately.
The MIN VAL does not necessarily have to be lower than the
MAX VAL either. This allows you to program sliders which operate in the reverse direction.
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12•4 User Guide
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BUTTON SETTINGS
FUNCTION
Here you can choose which function you want this button to have.
The choice of available functions will be different depending on
whether you set internal or external mode.
DATA 1 and DATA 2
Up to two values can be assigned to the button. These values
will have a different effect depending on the selected FUNCTION.
Here are some examples:
NOTE ON: DATA 1 sets the MIDI note number while DATA 2
sets the velocity amount.
PROGRAM CHANGE: DATA 1 sets the bank number and
DATA 2 sets the sound number. Note that, because the DATA
1 and 2 values range from 0 to 127, there is an offset of -1
between these values and the normal sound and bank numbers. This means that, to select sound numbers 1, 2 and 3,
you would need to use DATA 2 values of 0, 1 and 2 respectively, (the same applies to bank numbers).
PERFORM CHANGE: DATA 1 sets the bank number, (0 for
factory, 1 for user) and DATA 2 sets the PERFORMANCE
number. The same -1 offset applies as in PROGRAM
CHANGE.
PERFORM +, PERFORM -: DATA 1 and DATA 2 do not operate with these functions.
TEMPO: Only DATA 1 works to set the required tempo.
CONTROLLER: DATA 1 sets the MIDI controller number,
DATA 2 sets the value of that controller function.
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User panel 12•5
TYPE
Type 0 sets the button to operate as a “momentary” switch, (only
ON when it is being held down). Type 1 sets the button to operate as a “latching” switch, (press once for ON then again for
OFF).
SAVING YOUR CONFIGURATION
Once you’re satisfied with your USER configuration it can be
saved into one of the 16 USER PANEL memories. Press STORE
and enter a name for your configuration.
Then move the cursor down and select which of the 16 locations
you want to store it in. Press ENTER to complete the operation.
To recall your configuration at any time simply press the USER
button and select it using the dial.
User panel configurations can be saved and loaded independently to disk. They can be found in the USER folder of the RAMFILE or BLOCK.
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12•6 User Guide
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13 • NOTEPAD
The Notepad function is a simple but useful utility which allows
you to load a standard MS-DOS text file, (.TXT format) into the
instrument which can then be read from the display whenever
you need it.
The NOTEPAD feature can be useful for storing set lists, performance notes, pick up lines etc.
To load a text file, insert the disk containing the file into the drive
and press NOTEPAD.
Now press the IMP button, (F2), to see a list of the text files
contained on the current disk.
Place the cursor over the name of the file you wish to view and
press ENTER to load the file into the NOTEPAD.
When the file has loaded, press VIEW to see it.
You can navigate around the file using the cursor buttons. The
cursor up and down buttons will scroll through the file one line at
a time. The cursor left and right buttons function as page up and
page down.
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Notepad 13•1
In the top right corner of the display, you can see the current line
number which can be used a reference if you need to find a specific section in the future.
Pressing TOP will automatically return to the beginning of the
file.
You can leave NOTEPAD at any time by either pressing ESCAPE
or by simply pressing the NOTEPAD button again. When you
return to NOTEPAD, the text will be in the same position.
To clear the NOTEPAD, press RESET, (F3).
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13•2 User Guide
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14 • Credits
A product like the Equinox does not evolve without a great deal of
effort. Many thousands of hours of work and dedication, from some
of the most creative minds in the music industry, have gone into
creating the instrument you see before you today. For all their hard
work and dedication we would like to use this space to give credit
to everyone involved in the development of the Equinox;
The Equinox Team, (in alphabetical order).
Massimo Ambrosini
Chris Anthony
Enzo Bocciero
Anselmo Bordi
Fabrizio Bracalenti
Bruno Cesanelli
Marcello Colò
Pino Consorte
Dani Jankowski
Giuliano Margaretini
Giovanni Mazzotti
Jason Miles
Gervasio Pannelli
Nazzareno Riccobelli
Andrew Schlesinger
Special thanks also to;
Vincenzo Ametrano
Gianni Giudici
Andi Jud
Claudio Morosi
Dave Spiers
Studio Imagina
Aard Van Asseldonk
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Credits 14•1
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14•2 User Guide
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Appendix
• Sound tables
• Groove tables
• Performance table
• Drawbars table
• Arpeggio table
• Effects table
• ProFx Block diagrams
• MIDI Implementation
• Index (alphabetical)
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
001-01
002-01
003-01
004-01
005-01
006-01
007-01
008-01
009-01
010-01
011-01
012-01
013-01
014-01
015-01
016-01
017-01
018-01
019-01
020-01
021-01
022-01
023-01
024-01
025-01
026-01
027-01
028-01
029-01
030-01
031-01
032-01
033-01
034-01
035-01
036-01
037-01
038-01
039-01
040-01
041-01
042-01
043-01
044-01
045-01
046-01
047-01
048-01
049-01
050-01
051-01
052-01
053-01
054-01
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Name
Equinox(3)
SinginSolo(3)
Technoid(2)
Outburst(2)
Joe4lead(2)
FatAttak1(2)
RazorSolo(2)
TranceMan(2)
PulseWave(1)
JM_Melodee(2)
GringeBoy(2)
WappySawz(2)
BossMic(2)
ArenaTron(5)
Zinkler(2)
Beezeel(3)
SevenSynth(1)
WeepyThin(2)
Its1985(2)
303Like(2)
Saw_You(3)
Buzzed(2)
CrossSharp(2)
Soulfulead(2)
TooAnalog(3)
DigGrunge1(2)
SpicySolo(2)
Boss(1)
SnapCompr(4)
CoolComp(3)
WoodySyn(1)
Maj7Stack(4)
BapanLead(3)
LoggStratt(3)
FvSleep(2)
TwangPad(2)
Horizons(6)
JMGhosty(3)
TheArrival(3)
IcePad1(2)
RichPad(2)
PluckPadD(3)
Voxxlaine(2)
The_2_Pad(2)
Crystalize(6)
ShadowVox(3)
Smoothie(3)
JMPluckPad(3)
TrnglPad(3)
JMMtlVce(3)
Fantasy1(3)
BassPad(2)
BandSweep(2)
StereoFrm1(2)
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A•2 Appendix
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Sound group
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
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Eqx num.
055-01
056-01
057-01
058-01
059-01
060-01
061-01
062-01
063-01
064-01
065-01
066-01
067-01
068-01
069-01
070-01
071-01
072-01
073-01
074-01
075-01
076-01
077-01
078-01
079-01
080-01
081-01
082-01
083-01
084-01
085-01
086-01
087-01
088-01
089-01
090-01
091-01
092-01
093-01
094-01
095-01
096-01
097-01
098-01
099-01
100-01
101-01
102-01
103-01
104-01
105-01
106-01
107-01
108-01
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Name
Stationer(4)
DigiVox(3)
Gargantuan(5)
Timespin(6)
Atomic(2)
HiJoe(2)
Highhh(1)
LifeCycle(3)
Enveloop(2)
SawModula(2)
BounSync(2)
StabSynth(2)
HitThePipe(2)
SeqCook(1)
SnapOff(2)
BlasteRel(2)
DopePiano(2)
FunkyKlav(2)
Inharmonik(4)
BellSpectm(3)
Marimba3(1)
Kalimba3(1)
Darmisen(4)
LA_strum(2)
DreamPickr(2)
HyperPickr(2)
FunkinPluk(2)
StratoGt(1)
Grunger(3)
LeadDist1(3)
NewPickBS(2)
Fretless1(1)
AcoustcBs4(1)
D_Bass(2)
ClickBass(1)
HomeyBass(2)
RumpBass(2)
MeloballBs(2)
RezzedBass(2)
WedgeBass(1)
BleepBass(1)
StringMass(4)
Strings101(5)
StereoSlow(2)
StringPad(3)
SynStrings(3)
ArcoString(3)
PianoStrng(3)
QuartetOct(4)
DreamVoxx(4)
Choirshift(2)
Choiring(4)
BackVocals(1)
LotsaBoys(4)
Sound group
Synth effects
Synth pad
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Piano
Piano
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Ethnic
Ethnic
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Strings
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
109-01
110-01
111-01
112-01
113-01
114-01
115-01
116-01
117-01
118-01
119-01
120-01
121-01
122-01
123-01
124-01
125-01
126-01
127-01
128-01
001-02
002-02
003-02
004-02
005-02
006-02
007-02
008-02
009-02
010-02
011-02
012-02
013-02
014-02
015-02
016-02
017-02
018-02
019-02
020-02
021-02
022-02
023-02
024-02
025-02
026-02
027-02
028-02
029-02
030-02
031-02
032-02
033-02
034-02
Name
WarmGlow(5)
ArtOfVoice(3)
Tooter(4)
ColorBrass(2)
DynSection(2)
SectBrass(4)
I’mSaxy(3)
FiftDrawbr(3)
JazFunkOrg(2)
DirtyOrgan(3)
SkreeOrgan(3)
Hamperc(1)
BoatAnchor(2)
AccordEnv(1)
HittorIt(3)
CrashOut(4)
RndEnArm(2)
SciFiJM(3)
Halloween(3)
OddSpace(2)
Colossus(3)
RockAnthem(5)
WarmSolo(2)
Sneaky(4)
PulseKlav(2)
SpittyLead(2)
Wavestran(3)
Digi1lite(3)
Digi2lite(2)
SnapSynth(1)
PowerPop(2)
CrossWires(2)
BtSynth(1)
Shape(1)
Sharp(1)
FmIsh(1)
ProphSaw(1)
RdPhas(1)
FatSynth(2)
FatAttak2(2)
TrianWave(1)
SeqTone(1)
StrnNoise(1)
FxShape(2)
DigiWave1(1)
DigiWave2(1)
ThinWah(2)
CrossShape(2)
StlSynth(1)
LfxSynth(1)
MiniPulse(1)
MiniSaw(1)
GiveItUp98(3)
FMbefore(2)
Sound group
Ensemble
Ensemble
Pipe
Brass
Brass
Brass
Reed
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Ensemble
Ensemble
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead pd
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead sq
Synth lead
Eqx num.
035-02
036-02
037-02
038-02
039-02
040-02
041-02
042-02
043-02
044-02
045-02
046-02
047-02
048-02
049-02
050-02
051-02
052-02
053-02
054-02
055-02
056-02
057-02
058-02
059-02
060-02
061-02
062-02
063-02
064-02
065-02
066-02
067-02
068-02
069-02
070-02
071-02
072-02
073-02
074-02
075-02
076-02
077-02
078-02
079-02
080-02
091-02
092-02
093-02
094-02
095-02
096-02
097-02
098-02
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Name
Saw_Me(3)
MkSynth(1)
Buzz(1)
OlFaithful(3)
SynthLead(1)
Thin(1)
DigGrunge2(2)
StickSyn(1)
Gring(1)
RaveRip(2)
ClavWave(1)
SharpBuzz(2)
MinBitSyn1(2)
MinBitSyn2(2)
WhaSynth(2)
VocoWah(2)
SuperSaw(4)
TechnoSeq(1)
AnaWmetal(3)
PerComp98(4)
PannedSeq(2)
Mech_Wv(1)
ToneZone1(2)
ToneZone2(2)
ToneZone3(2)
ToneZone4(2)
Inharm1(1)
Inharm2(1)
Inharm3(1)
Inharm4(1)
MajStack(4)
MinStack(4)
Min7Stack(4)
Maj5Stack(4)
DimStack(4)
Eerie1(2)
Eerie2(2)
Eerie3(2)
Eerie4(2)
JMTinComp(3)
JMHrdBass(3)
JMPlkOrgBs(3)
JMDigiBas(3)
JMChirpBas(3)
JMGrowlBss(3)
JMRuffBass(3)
JMPLead(3)
JMClasical(4)
JMRealCool(3)
JMIntrstng(4)
JMFlmLead(3)
Vangelis1(1)
Vangelis2(1)
Vang.Bass1(1)
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Sound group
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead sq
Synth lead sq
Synth lead sq
Synth lead sq
Synth lead sq
Synth effects
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead fx
Synth lead
Synth lead (bass)
Synth lead (bass)
Synth lead (bass)
Synth lead (bass)
Synth lead (bass)
Synth lead (bass)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth bass (short)
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Tables A•3
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
099-02
100-02
101-02
102-02
103-02
104-02
105-02
001-03
002-03
003-03
004-03
005-03
006-03
007-03
008-03
009-03
010-03
011-03
012-03
013-03
014-03
015-03
016-03
017-03
018-03
019-03
020-03
021-03
022-03
023-03
024-03
025-03
026-03
027-03
028-03
029-03
030-03
031-03
032-03
033-03
034-03
035-03
036-03
037-03
038-03
039-03
040-03
041-03
042-03
043-03
044-03
045-03
046-03
047-03
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Name
Vang.Bass2(1)
An A.Logic(1)
Spiral(1)
Phat Pulse(2)
Soft Seq.(1)
Soft Lead(1)
Alf’s Lead(1)
JMFat(3)
FunkHold(3)
VibePadJM(3)
LovePad(2)
TheBlanket(3)
Poppin_Up(3)
NicePad(3)
JMCoolPad(3)
MelloPad(3)
IcePad2(2)
EPPianoPad(3)
RichForm(2)
Form1(1)
Form2(1)
Form3(1)
Form4(1)
Form5(1)
Form6(1)
Form7(1)
PpgPad(2)
Bright1(3)
Fantasy4(3)
PureSilk(3)
Loggess(3)
DarkNLuvly(3)
CelloDream(3)
JMMtlStrng(3)
JMEthPad(3)
JMPad(2)
MetalWHA(3)
FatPad(4)
PanPad(2)
StereoFrm2(2)
StereoFrm3(2)
StereoFrm4(2)
BellPad01(2)
BellPad02(2)
BellPad03(2)
BellPad04(2)
BellPad05(2)
EpicPan(2)
PadZone1(1)
PadZone2(1)
FizzyPad(2)
MyVox(1)
Pad4U(1)
PrettyPad1(2)
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A•4 Appendix
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Sound group
Synth bass (short)
Synth lead
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead (short)
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth pad ld
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
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Eqx num.
048-03
049-03
050-03
051-03
052-03
053-03
054-03
055-03
056-03
057-03
058-03
059-03
060-03
061-03
062-03
063-03
064-03
065-03
066-03
067-03
068-03
069-03
070-03
071-03
072-03
073-03
074-03
075-03
076-03
077-03
078-03
079-03
080-03
091-03
092-03
093-03
094-03
095-03
096-03
097-03
098-03
099-03
100-03
101-03
102-03
102-03
001-04
002-04
003-04
004-04
005-04
006-04
007-04
008-04
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Name
PrettyPad2(3)
MarimVox(1)
StarTheme3(2)
StarTheme4(3)
Synthex3(2)
Synthex4(2)
Synthex5(2)
Synthex6(2)
JMSynthGtr(3)
JMCoolPad(3)
JMLghtLead(3)
JMClangLd(3)
JMRezoPad(3)
JMGetIt(3)
JMClsicPad(3)
JMRmbaPad(4)
JMPlucky1(3)
JMBrite(3)
JMZavPluk(3)
JMIceRink(3)
JMJapMovie(3)
JMStringy(3)
JMClsicPad(3)
JMArpPad(3)
JMLayrPad(3)
JMMtlPadSt(3)
JMAwww(3)
JMMiniFunk(3)
JMZipPad(3)
JMAnaChiff(3)
JMVceFunk(3)
JMPretyPad(3)
JMExcelent(3)
JMClavOrg(3)
MrmbaSus(3)
JMFat1(3)
JMCheese(3)
NicePadJM(3)
JMBigUgly(3)
JMMetlkybd(3)
JMNylonSyn(3)
JMBigPad1(3)
JMBigWacPd(3)
JMPhysc(3)
Alf’s Pad(1)
Alf’s Pad2(2)
Submarin(2)
AwalaSweep(2)
Synkro(2)
Babbling(1)
Yowww(3)
Waiting(2)
Waveaura(2)
Budweis(2)
Sound group
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth effects pd
Synth effects pd
Synth effects pd
Synth effects pd
Synth effects pd
Synth effects pd
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad (short)
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects sh
Synth effects sh
Synth effects sy
Synth pad fx
Synth pad fx
Synth pad fx
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
009-04
010-04
011-04
012-04
013-04
014-04
015-04
016-04
017-04
018-04
019-04
020-04
021-04
022-04
023-04
024-04
025-04
026-04
027-04
028-04
029-04
030-04
031-04
032-04
033-04
034-04
035-04
036-04
037-04
038-04
039-04
040-04
041-04
042-04
043-04
044-04
045-04
046-04
047-04
048-04
049-04
050-04
051-04
052-04
053-04
056-04
057-04
058-04
064-04
065-04
066-04
067-04
068-04
069-04
Name
Tibet(2)
OcBreath(2)
PercoPad(3)
NativeCall(4)
Hybrid(4)
JMWeird(3)
Analyse(3)
WindPlus(2)
StrngeLead(4)
MusicNoize(4)
Latigid(4)
KeyOffEFX(4)
Prodigy(3)
Ekoendls(2)
Jets(2)
OnOff(2)
REMsleep(4)
SynRain(2)
ColorBlast(2)
Spect1(1)
Spect2(1)
Spect3(1)
BigSound(3)
Stars(2)
I_Give_Up(3)
GoyaAcid(3)
Acoubrid(4)
JimisDream(2)
WhaWha1(1)
WhaWha2(1)
WhaWha3(1)
WhaWha4(1)
Impact(1)
SeqSnap(1)
Mech_Lp(1)
Metalwork(2)
Woodcutter(2)
TunedNoise(1)
SilicaPick(2)
Yourimba(2)
GlockSeq(1)
VibeSeq(1)
MandolnSeq(1)
ElPianoSeq(1)
SynthMarim(1)
ToyOrgan(2)
Kalimbaret(4)
Tremlade(3)
HitsRev(2)
JMXFiles(4)
JMBugJuce(3)
JMMtlNze(3)
JM2000Ld(3)
JMClub(3)
Sound group
Synth pad fx
Synth pad fx
Synth pad fx
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects sq
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Ensemble
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Eqx num.
070-04
071-04
072-04
073-04
074-04
075-04
076-04
077-04
078-04
128-04
001-05
002-05
003-05
004-05
005-05
006-05
007-05
008-05
009-05
010-05
011-05
012-05
013-05
014-05
015-05
016-05
017-05
018-05
019-05
020-05
021-05
022-05
023-05
024-05
025-05
026-05
027-05
028-05
029-05
030-05
031-05
032-05
033-05
034-05
035-05
036-05
037-05
038-05
039-05
040-05
041-05
042-05
043-05
044-05
○
○
○
○
Name
JMContact(4)
JMMvieEFX1(3)
JMTech1(3)
JMElKoto(3)
JMNoTone(3)
JMFactory(3)
JMHorror(3)
JMPercNz(3)
JMAgresive(3)
Sinus(1)
PianoStage(2)
LogPiano(2)
PianoTine(3)
ArcoPiano(3)
RhodxFilt(2)
Phased_EP(2)
E.PianoX(2)
DrewEP(2)
CheapEP(1)
ClaveHarpy(3)
Balarimba(1)
JMPluck1(3)
JMPluck2(3)
DaBellz(3)
BirAttak(1)
Boink(1)
Ethnott(4)
Sitaran(3)
Santorinia(2)
NylonGtr2(3)
SteelGtr2(1)
SteelWood(4)
Mandolin(1)
PedalSteel(2)
JazzStrato(2)
JazzGtr2(1)
JazzPick(2)
ElGuitar2(2)
ElGuitar3(2)
MutedClean(1)
MutedFunk(1)
MutedWha(1)
Crunch(1)
LeadDist2(3)
CrunchStab(2)
5thDistort(3)
FingerdBs1(1)
FingerdBs2(2)
Fretless2(1)
Fret_Less(1)
PckBass3(1)
HarmAcBs(1)
FingAndSlp(2)
DanceBass(2)
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Sound group
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Tables A•5
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
045-05
046-05
047-05
048-05
049-05
050-05
051-05
052-05
053-05
054-05
055-05
056-05
057-05
058-05
059-05
060-05
061-05
062-05
063-05
064-05
065-05
066-05
067-05
068-05
069-05
070-05
071-05
072-05
073-05
074-05
075-05
076-05
077-05
078-05
079-05
080-05
081-05
082-05
083-05
084-05
085-05
086-05
087-05
088-05
089-05
090-05
091-05
092-05
093-05
094-05
095-05
096-05
097-05
098-05
○
○
○
○
Name
ContraSynB(2)
SynSlapBs(1)
SynthBass(2)
WowBass(1)
SerialBass(2)
ToneBass(1)
PriorBass(2)
RazorBass(2)
DubbedRezo(2)
TranzBass(2)
Popcorn(2)
Drawbars(1)
OctaDrawbr(3)
SixtDrawbr(3)
OrgTheatre(1)
Organ1W(2)
Organ2W(2)
Organ3W(1)
OrganC3(2)
16’1’Draw(2)
Phantom(4)
PipeOrg2(2)
PipeChiff(2)
DaCheeze(2)
RockinOrgn(4)
Hamclick(1)
RockOrgSeq(1)
PercOrgan(2)
LowDown(3)
EvocativOr(2)
OldWorld(3)
Accord3(1)
Accord4(2)
OctAccordn(2)
Bandoneon2(2)
Bandoneon3(1)
Diatonic(2)
Quartet(1)
WideEnsemb(2)
Strings2(1)
DualStrgs(2)
StereoOctv(3)
CoolCarpet(5)
SlwString2(1)
OctSlowStr(2)
SympMemory(2)
StrEthnic(2)
SawStrings(2)
SimStrings(2)
OrchHits2(1)
NoiseUuh(2)
PannedVoxs(4)
Skyvox(3)
Whispers(3)
○
○
○
○
A•6 Appendix
○
○
○
○
Sound group
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Strings
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Eqx num.
099-05
100-05
101-05
102-05
103-05
105-05
105-05
106-05
107-05
108-05
109-05
110-05
111-05
112-05
113-05
114-05
115-05
116-05
117-05
118-05
119-05
120-05
121-05
122-05
123-05
124-05
125-05
126-05
127-05
128-05
001-06
002-06
003-06
004-06
005-06
006-06
007-06
008-06
009-06
010-06
011-06
012-06
013-06
014-06
015-06
016-06
017-06
018-06
019-06
020-06
021-06
022-06
023-06
024-06
○
○
○
Name
Trumpet2(1)
NoiseTrp(3)
TrombnSlop(2)
ClassicBrs(1)
BrassTrp(2)
ModernBrs(1)
StereoBrs(2)
OctBrass1(3)
OctBrass2(3)
ZipBrass(2)
BrashBrass(3)
BrassFall(2)
PercSynBrs(3)
SynBrass3(2)
SynBrass4(2)
SynBrass5(2)
HouseTrump(3)
BreathSopr(2)
SoftSax2(1)
TouchSax(2)
TenSaxSolo(1)
SaxQuartet(1)
LiscioSax(1)
LiscioClar(1)
DualPan(2)
PanFilt(1)
Awala(1)
ColorWind(2)
Tull_Blow(2)
BloTribe(4)
Piano1(2)
Piano2(2)
Piano3(2)
HonkyTonk(2)
E.Piano1(1)
E.Piano2(2)
Harpsicord(1)
Clavinet(1)
Celesta(2)
Glockenspl(2)
MusicBox(2)
Vibraphone(1)
Marimba(1)
Xylophone(1)
TubularBel(2)
Santur(2)
Organ1(2)
Organ2(1)
Organ3(2)
ChurchOrg1(2)
ReedOrgan(1)
Musette(1)
Harmonica(1)
Bandoneon(1)
Sound group
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
025-06
026-06
027-06
028-06
029-06
030-06
031-06
032-06
033-06
034-06
035-06
036-06
037-06
038-06
039-06
040-06
041-06
042-06
043-06
044-06
045-06
046-06
047-06
048-06
049-06
050-06
051-06
052-06
053-06
054-06
055-06
056-06
057-06
058-06
059-06
060-06
061-06
062-06
063-06
064-06
065-06
066-06
067-06
068-06
069-06
070-06
071-06
072-06
073-06
074-06
075-06
076-06
077-06
078-06
Name
NylonGtr(1)
SteelGtr(1)
JazzGtr1(1)
CleanGtr(1)
MutedGtr(1)
Overdrive(1)
DistGtr(1)
HarmonxGtr(1)
AcoustcBs1(1)
FingeredBs(2)
PickBass(1)
Fretless(2)
SlapBass1(1)
SlapBass2(2)
SynBass1(1)
SynBass2(2)
Violin(1)
Viola(1)
Cello(1)
Contrabass(1)
TremoloStr(1)
Pizzicato(1)
Harp(1)
Timpani(1)
Strings(1)
SlwStrings(1)
SynStrg1(2)
SynStrg2(2)
Choir(1)
VoiceOohs(2)
SynVox(2)
OrchHits(2)
Trumpet(1)
Trombone(1)
Tuba(2)
MutedTrp1(1)
FrenchHorn(2)
Brass(2)
SynBrass1(2)
SynBrass2(2)
Soprano(1)
SoftSax(1)
TenorSax(1)
BaritonSax(1)
Oboe(1)
EnglisHorn(2)
Bassoon(1)
Clarinet(1)
Piccolo(1)
Flute(1)
Recorder(2)
PanFlute(1)
BottleBlow(2)
Shakuhachi(2)
Sound group
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Eqx num.
079-06
080-06
081-06
082-06
083-06
084-06
085-06
086-06
087-06
088-06
089-06
090-06
091-06
092-06
093-06
094-06
095-06
096-06
097-06
098-06
099-06
100-06
101-06
102-06
103-06
104-06
105-06
106-06
107-06
108-06
109-06
110-06
111-06
112-06
113-06
114-06
115-06
116-06
117-06
118-06
119-06
120-06
121-06
122-06
123-06
124-06
125-06
126-06
127-06
128-06
001-07
002-07
003-07
004-07
○
○
○
○
Name
Whistle(1)
Ocarina(2)
SquareWave(2)
SawWave(2)
SynCalliop(2)
ChiffLead(3)
Charang(2)
SoloVox(2)
5thSawWave(4)
BassLead(3)
Fantasia(3)
WarmPad(2)
Polysynth(2)
SpaceVoice(2)
BowedGlass(2)
MetalPad(2)
HaloPad(3)
SweepPad(2)
IceRain(3)
Soundtrack(2)
Crystal(2)
Atmosphere(2)
Brightness(3)
Goblin(2)
EchoDrops(1)
StarTheme(2)
Sitar(1)
Banjo(2)
Shamisen(1)
Koto(1)
Kalimba(1)
Bagpipe(1)
Fidle(1)
Shanai(1)
TinkleBell(2)
Agogo(1)
SteelDrums(2)
Woodblock(1)
Taiko(2)
Melo.Tom1(1)
SynthDrum(1)
ReverseCym(1)
GtFretNois(1)
BreathNois(1)
Seashore(2)
Bird(2)
Telephone1(1)
Helicopter(2)
Applause(2)
GunShot(1)
PianoMk1(2)
PianoW2(2)
E.G.Piano1(2)
DetPiano(2)
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Sound group
Pipe
Pipe
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Tables A•7
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
005-07
006-07
007-07
008-07
009-07
010-07
011-07
012-07
013-07
014-07
015-07
016-07
017-07
018-07
019-07
020-07
021-07
022-07
023-07
024-07
025-07
026-07
027-07
028-07
029-07
030-07
031-07
032-07
033-07
034-07
035-07
036-07
037-07
038-07
039-07
040-07
041-07
042-07
043-07
044-07
045-07
046-07
047-07
048-07
049-07
050-07
051-07
052-07
053-07
054-07
055-07
056-07
057-07
058-07
○
○
○
○
Name
ThinRhodx(2)
E.Piano3(2)
Harpsich2(2)
SynClav(1)
CelestaPlk(2)
GlockVibes(2)
WineGls1(2)
Vibes2(1)
Marimba2(2)
Xylophone2(1)
SoftBell(2)
BarChimes(1)
16’1’Draw(1)
16’8’5’Drw(1)
SwOrgan(2)
Church2(1)
PipeOrgan(2)
Accord1(1)
Blusette(1)
Cassotto(1)
SoloGtr(1)
12StrGtr(2)
OctJzGtr(1)
ElGuitar1(1)
Muted2(2)
WhaGtr1(2)
FuzzGtr(2)
SlowHarmx(2)
AcoustcBs2(1)
Dyn.Fingrd(1)
Dyn.Bass2(1)
AcidBass1(2)
Dyn.Bass3(1)
WxBass(2)
SynBass3(1)
SynBass4(2)
SlowViolin(1)
BowedViola(2)
SlowCello(1)
BowedBass(2)
OctTremolo(2)
OctPizz(2)
HarpDelay(2)
TimpaniEFX(2)
StereoStrg(2)
StrgOrch(2)
SynStrg3(2)
SynStrg4(2)
VoiceUuh(2)
VoiceAah(2)
SkatVoices(1)
Rave(2)
FlugelAttk(1)
Trombone3(1)
○
○
○
○
A•8 Appendix
○
○
○
Sound group
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Brass
Brass
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Eqx num.
059-07
060-07
061-07
062-07
063-07
064-07
065-07
066-07
067-07
068-07
069-07
070-07
071-07
072-07
073-07
074-07
075-07
076-07
077-07
078-07
079-07
080-07
081-07
082-07
083-07
084-07
085-07
086-07
087-07
088-07
089-07
090-07
091-07
092-07
093-07
094-07
095-07
096-07
097-07
098-07
099-07
100-07
101-07
102-07
103-07
104-07
105-07
106-07
107-07
108-07
109-07
110-07
111-07
112-07
○
○
Name
ShortTuba(1)
MutedTrp2(1)
Dyn.FrHorn(3)
Brass2(2)
SynBras2(2)
SlowHorn(2)
Soprano2(2)
SaxNoise(2)
OctaveSax(2)
BaritDet(2)
OboeChiff(2)
EngHorn2(2)
Bassoon2(1)
ClarSolo(2)
HardFlute1(2)
Dyn.Flute1(2)
Recorder2(2)
PanFlute2(2)
BottleNois(2)
ShakuPad(2)
Whistle1WX(1)
OcarinaPan(2)
Pulse1(2)
ObxFilter(2)
Azimut(2)
Chopper(2)
Jump(2)
FiltRes1(2)
Decay1(2)
Obx2(2)
NewAge(2)
Obx1(2)
Fantasy2(2)
VocBells(2)
Prophet1(2)
Bright2(2)
Slave(2)
Machiner(2)
Noiseres(2)
MoonWind(2)
Wind(2)
Arp26000(2)
WithGas(2)
Resonance(2)
Synthex1(2)
StarTheme2(2)
SitarDet(2)
BanjoOct(2)
ShamSitar(2)
Kanoun(2)
ShrtKalimb(2)
BagpipeEns(2)
Hukin(2)
BacktoWS(2)
Sound group
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
113-07
114-07
115-07
116-07
117-07
118-07
119-07
120-07
121-07
122-07
123-07
124-07
125-07
126-07
127-07
128-07
001-08
002-08
003-08
004-08
005-08
006-08
007-08
008-08
009-08
010-08
011-08
012-08
013-08
014-08
015-08
016-08
017-08
018-08
019-08
020-08
021-08
022-08
023-08
024-08
025-08
026-08
027-08
028-08
029-08
030-08
031-08
032-08
033-08
034-08
035-08
036-08
037-08
038-08
Name
DK_STAND.1
DK_ROOM
DK_POWER
DK_ELECT.
DK_HOUSE
DK_JAZZ1
DK_BRUSH
DK_ORCH.
Gtr.WhaWha(1)
Zapp(1)
TickTack(1)
Scratch1(1)
Telephone2(1)
SynPerc(2)
HeartBeat(2)
Explosion(2)
PickPiano(2)
Pianoctave(3)
E.G.Piano2(2)
Western(2)
E.Piano4(2)
E.Piano5(2)
Harpsich3(1)
WowClav(2)
ToyPiano(2)
GlockChoir(2)
MusicBell(2)
SynVibes(2)
Mallet(2)
XyloTribal(2)
Oohlalaa(2)
Climbing(2)
Organ1WX(2)
JazzOrgan3(2)
SynOrg1(2)
Organ3WX(2)
Organ4(2)
Accord2(2)
WestHarmon(1)
OrganLfo(2)
VocalGtr(2)
SteelGtr1(1)
Hawaiian(2)
ChorusGtr(2)
Dyn.Muted(1)
5thOverdr(2)
HeavyGtr(2)
HarmGtr3(2)
AcoustcBs3(2)
Dyn.Bass1(1)
PckBass2(2)
Flanged(1)
SlapSynBass(2)
StopBass(2)
Sound group
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Piano
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Chrom.percuss.
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Organ
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Bass
Eqx num.
039-08
040-08
041-08
042-08
043-08
044-08
045-08
046-08
047-08
048-08
049-08
050-08
051-08
052-08
053-08
054-08
055-08
056-08
057-08
058-08
059-08
060-08
061-08
062-08
063-08
064-08
065-08
066-08
067-08
068-08
069-08
070-08
071-08
072-08
073-08
074-08
075-08
076-08
077-08
078-08
079-08
080-08
081-08
082-08
083-08
084-08
085-08
086-08
087-08
088-08
089-08
090-08
091-08
092-08
○
○
○
○
Name
TecknoBass(2)
RaveBass(2)
ViolinOrch(2)
ViolaPad(2)
CelloEns(2)
Staccato(1)
Plectra(1)
EchoPizz(1)
Spacehar(2)
Dyn.Orch(2)
StrgGlock(2)
St.SlwStrg(2)
SynStrg5(2)
Strings3(2)
SlowUuh(2)
SlowAah(2)
Vocoder(2)
Dyn.St.Hit(3)
FlugelHorn(1)
WowTromb2(1)
WowTuba(1)
Dyn.MtTrp(2)
TotoHorns(2)
BrassRips(1)
SyntHorn(2)
AttkHorn(2)
SoprFilter(1)
SoftFilter(1)
TenFilter(1)
BariFilter(1)
OboeFilter(1)
HornFilter(2)
BassoonFlt(1)
ClarFilter(1)
HardFlute2(2)
DynHiFlute(2)
Bubbler(1)
Dyn.Pan(1)
Tube(1)
ShakuVoice(2)
Whistle3WX(2)
OcarinaSyn(2)
Pulse2(2)
Lyle(2)
SynLead1(2)
Digital(2)
SoundTrk(2)
FiltRes2(2)
Decay2(2)
Obx3(2)
PPG(2)
AnlgPad(2)
Fantasy3(2)
Angels(2)
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Sound group
Bass
Bass
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Strings
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Ensemble
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Brass
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Reed
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Pipe
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth lead
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Tables A•9
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
093-08
094-08
095-08
096-08
097-08
098-08
099-08
100-08
101-08
102-08
103-08
104-08
105-08
106-08
107-08
108-08
109-08
110-08
111-08
112-08
113-08
114-08
115-08
116-08
117-08
118-08
119-08
120-08
121-08
122-08
123-08
124-08
125-08
126-08
127-08
128-08
001-14
002-14
003-14
004-14
005-14
006-14
007-14
011-14
012-14
016-14
017-14
020-14
021-14
022-14
026-14
027-14
028-14
030-14
○
○
○
○
Name
Prophet2(2)
Analogic(2)
Atmosphere(2)
Decay3(2)
BigRoom(2)
Slope(2)
SynLead2(2)
GlockAthm(2)
PopUp(2)
NoGravity(2)
Synthex2(2)
PowerBad(2)
SynSitar(2)
EthnicGtr(2)
SynSham(2)
TrpClarin(1)
SaxTrumpt(1)
BrassEns(2)
FiddleBell(2)
VoiceSpect(2)
DK_STAND.2
DK_WS
DK_STD.1WX
DK_DANCE
DK_TECHNO
DK_JAZZ2
DK_M1
DK_SY77
GtrNoise(1)
KeyClick(1)
Drop(1)
Water(1)
Door(1)
Clackson(2)
PickScrape(1)
Bomb(2)
DRUMKIT_1
DRUMKIT_2
DRUMKIT_3
DRUMKIT_4
DRUMKIT_5
DRUMKIT_6
DRUMKIT_7
DK_HYBRID1
DK_HYBRID2
DK_TEK’90A
DK_TEK’90B
DK_TEKBRSH
DK_DNC1999
DK_HIPHOP
DK_STD’70
DK_FUSION
DK_ROCK
DK_TUNED
○
○
○
○
○
A•10 Appendix
○
○
Sound group
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth pad
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Eqx num.
031-14
032-14
036-14
037-14
038-14
041-14
046-14
047-14
048-14
113-14
114-14
115-14
116-14
117-14
118-14
119-14
120-14
121-14
122-14
123-14
124-14
125-14
126-14
127-14
128-14
001-15
002-15
003-15
004-15
005-15
006-15
007-15
008-15
009-15
010-15
011-15
012-15
013-15
014-15
015-15
016-15
017-15
018-15
019-15
020-15
021-15
022-15
023-15
024-15
025-15
026-15
027-15
028-15
029-15
○
○
○
Name
JAZZ_KIT
BRUSH_KIT
ELECT_KIT
HOUSE_KIT
DANCE_KIT
DK_POLY
BD_ONLY_KT
SD_ONLY_KT
DJ_ONLY_KT
DK_STAND.1
DK_STAND.2
DK_ROOM
DK_WS
DK_POWER
DK_STD.1WX
DK_ELECT.
DK_DANCE
DK_HOUSE
DK_TECHNO
DK_JAZZ1
DK_JAZZ2
DK_BRUSH
DK_M1
DK_ORCH.
DK_SY77
ACOUST_KIK(1)
BD_70_F(1)
BD_70_P(1)
BD_AC_1A(1)
BD_AC_1B(1)
BD_AC_1DYN(1)
BD_AC_2A(1)
BD_AC_2B(1)
BD_AC_2DYN(1)
BD_DEEP_DN(2)
BD_DMG_SD(2)
BD_DMGD_LN(1)
BD_DN1_ZP(2)
BD_DN2_HI(2)
BD_DN2_ZP(2)
BD_DN3_HI(2)
BD_DN3_SD(2)
BD_DN3_ZP(2)
BD_DNC2_LN(1)
BD_DNC3(1)
BD_KIK(1)
BD_ROCK(2)
BD_Z1_HHC(2)
BD_Z1_LAYH(2)
BD_Z1_LAYL(2)
BD_Z2(1)
BD1(1)
BDELECT1(1)
BDHOUSE1(1)
Sound group
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Synth effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
030-15
031-15
032-15
033-15
034-15
035-15
036-15
037-15
038-15
039-15
040-15
041-15
042-15
045-15
046-15
047-15
048-15
049-15
050-15
051-15
052-15
053-15
054-15
055-15
056-15
057-15
058-15
059-15
062-15
063-15
064-15
065-15
066-15
067-15
068-15
069-15
070-15
071-15
072-15
073-15
074-15
075-15
076-15
077-15
078-15
079-15
080-15
081-15
082-15
083-15
084-15
085-15
086-15
087-15
Name
BDHOUSE2(1)
BDJAZZ(1)
BDORCH(1)
BDPOWER(1)
BDROOM1(1)
BDSTD1(2)
BDSTD2(1)
BDSTD3(1)
BDTEKNO(1)
BROKENOISE(2)
DNC_BD1(1)
FALLING_BD(2)
LNG_BD1(1)
HOU_TOM(1)
HOUSETCON(1)
TIMP_JM(1)
TIMPANI(1)
TOM_10_DYN(2)
TOM_13_DYN(2)
TOM_14(1)
TOMBRUSH(2)
TOMELEC(1)
TOMHIGH(1)
TOMHIGH2(2)
TOMJAZZ(1)
TOMLOW(1)
TOMROOM(1)
WAYAW(2)
909_SD_LNG(2)
BEAT_SD(1)
BORDER_1(2)
BORDER_2(2)
BRUSHSLP(1)
BRUSHTAP(1)
BRUSREV(1)
BRUSRIG(1)
D_SD(1)
DYNSDJAZZ(1)
EFF_RIM(1)
EFF_SD2(1)
HATORSNARE(2)
HOUSERIM(1)
HOUSESD2(1)
HOUSSD1(1)
NOISNARE1(2)
NOISNARE2(2)
NOISNARE3(2)
NOISNARE4(2)
RIM_1(1)
RIM_2(1)
RIM_70(1)
RIMSHOT1(1)
RIMSHOT2(1)
ROLL_70(1)
Sound group
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Ethnic
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Percussive
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Percussive
Synth effects
Synth effects
Percussive
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Eqx num.
088-15
089-15
090-15
091-15
092-15
093-15
094-15
095-15
096-15
097-15
098-15
099-15
100-15
101-15
102-15
103-15
104-15
105-15
106-15
107-15
108-15
109-15
110-15
111-15
112-15
113-15
114-15
115-15
116-15
117-15
118-15
119-15
120-15
121-15
122-15
123-15
124-15
001-16
002-16
003-16
004-16
005-16
006-16
007-16
008-16
009-16
010-16
011-16
012-16
013-16
014-16
015-16
016-16
017-16
○
○
○
○
Name
ROLL_F(1)
ROLL_F_LN(2)
ROLLSNARE(1)
SD_909(1)
SD_BB(1)
SD_BR(1)
SD_BR_DYN(2)
SD_F70(1)
SD_FSN(1)
SD_HEAVY1(2)
SD_HEAVY2(2)
SD_HEAVY3(2)
SD_HEAVY4(2)
SD_P70(1)
SD_ROCK(2)
SD_SH1(1)
SD_SH2(1)
SD_SH3(1)
SD_STD1(1)
SD_STD2(1)
SD_STD3(1)
SD_STD4(1)
SD1(2)
SD2(2)
SD3(2)
SDELECT(1)
SDJAZZ2(1)
SDJAZZ3(1)
SDORCH(1)
SDROOM1(1)
SDROOM2(1)
SDSTD1(1)
SDSTD2(1)
SDSTD3(1)
SDSTD4(1)
SMASH(1)
TEKBRUSH(2)
808_CL_HH(1)
808_OC_HH(1)
808_OPHHLP(1)
9091_CHH(1)
9091_OCHH(1)
9092_CHH(1)
9092_OPHH(1)
HH_CL1_DR(1)
HH_CL2_DR(1)
HH_LOOP_CL(1)
HH_LOOP_OP(1)
HH_OP_DR(1)
HH_PED_DR(1)
HHCL_70(1)
HHCLO1L(1)
HHCLO1S(1)
HHCLO2(1)
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Sound group
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Synth effects
Ethnic
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Percussive
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Tables A•11
ROM-Sounds
Eqx num.
018-16
019-16
020-16
021-16
022-16
023-16
024-16
025-16
026-16
027-16
028-16
029-16
030-16
031-16
032-16
033-16
034-16
035-16
036-16
037-16
038-16
039-16
040-16
041-16
042-16
043-16
044-16
045-16
046-16
047-16
048-16
049-16
050-16
051-16
052-16
053-16
054-16
055-16
056-16
057-16
058-16
059-16
060-16
061-16
062-16
063-16
064-16
065-16
066-16
067-16
068-16
069-16
070-16
071-16
○
○
○
○
Name
HHFT_70(1)
HHOP_70(1)
HHOPEN1(1)
HHOPEN2(1)
HHPEDAL(1)
HHTGHT1(1)
HHTGHT2(1)
HOUSEHH(1)
NOISE_C1HH(1)
NOISE_C2HH(1)
NOISE_OPHH(1)
NOISE_OPRV(1)
CHINA(1)
CRASH(1)
CRASH_18(1)
CRASHORCH(1)
HOUSERIDE(1)
RIDE(1)
RIDECUP(1)
RIDECUP2(1)
RIDECYM(1)
SPLASH(1)
BONGOHISL(1)
BONGOLOW(1)
CABASA(1)
CABASAL(1)
CASTANETS(1)
CLAP(1)
CLAP_MIX(1)
CLAVES(1)
CONGAHIGH(1)
CONGAHSLAP(1)
CONGALOW(1)
CONGALSLAP(1)
COWBELL(1)
COWBL2(1)
DARBKHIGH(1)
DARBKLOW(1)
DYNA_PERC(2)
DYTEK_TIMB(2)
FINGBELL(1)
FINGERSNAP(1)
GUIROLONG(1)
GUIROSHORT(1)
HARD_CLAP(1)
HOUSCLAP(1)
HOUSECOWB(1)
JINGLEBELL(1)
LOGDRUM(1)
MARACAS(1)
MTSURDO(1)
MUTBELL(2)
OPSURDO1(1)
OPSURDO2(1)
○
○
○
○
○
A•12 Appendix
○
○
○
Eqx num.
072-16
073-16
074-16
075-16
076-16
077-16
078-16
079-16
080-16
081-16
082-16
083-16
084-16
085-16
086-16
087-16
088-16
089-16
090-16
091-16
092-16
093-16
094-16
095-16
096-16
097-16
098-16
099-16
100-16
101-16
102-16
103-16
104-16
105-16
106-16
107-16
108-16
109-16
110-16
111-16
112-16
113-16
114-16
115-16
116-16
117-16
118-16
119-16
120-16
121-16
122-16
123-16
124-16
125-16
128-16
Sound group
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Synth effects
Synth effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Synth effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Synth effects
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
Name
QUICAHIGH(1)
QUICALOW(1)
SHAKER(1)
SQCLICK(1)
STICK(1)
TAMBOURINE(1)
TAMBSLP(1)
TIMBALES(1)
TIMBLOW(1)
TOMLOW2(2)
TRIANLONG(1)
TRIANSHORT(1)
VIBRASLAP(1)
VOXHHCL(1)
WINDCHIMES(1)
WOODBLOCKH(1)
BABYVOX(1)
CLAKSON(1)
DOLLYVOX(1)
DOOR_2(1)
DROP_2(1)
Glasses(1)
KITCHEN(1)
VOICES1(1)
VOICES2(1)
VOICES3(1)
VOXTAP(1)
VOXTIP(1)
WATER_2(1)
WHISTLE_2(1)
GLASSALG(2)
LONG_REVRS(1)
NOISE(1)
NOISEPERC(1)
PHONEWAVE(1)
RASPYRIDE(1)
REVERSEBD1(1)
REVERSEBD2(1)
REVERSEBD3(1)
REVERSHRT1(1)
REVERSHRT2(1)
REVERSHRT3(1)
REVERSNAR1(1)
REVERSNAR2(1)
REVERSNAR3(1)
REZO_IT(3)
SCRATCH2(1)
SCRATCH3(1)
SCRATCH4(1)
SCRATCH5(1)
SCRATCH6(1)
SMAK(2)
WEEP(1)
ZAPP_2(1)
Empty(1)
Sound group
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Synth effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Sound effects
Ethnic
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Ethnic
Ethnic
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Ethnic
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Percussive
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Sound effects
Synth effects
Sound effects
Percussive
Sound effects
EQUINOX GROOVE LIST : Single Grooves # 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
ROM 1
ROM 2
ROM 3
ROM 4
ROM 5
ROM 6
ROM 7
DrSwing1
DrSwing2
DrSwing3
DrSwing4
DrSwing5
DrSwing6
DrSoul1
DrSoul2
DrSoul3
DrSoul4
DrSoul5
DrSoul6
DrSoul7
DrSoul8
DrSoul9
SwBeat1
SwBeat2
SwBeat3
SwBeat4
SwBeat5
SwBeat6
SwBeat7
SwBeat8
SwBeat9
SwBeat10
SwBeat11
SwBeat12
SwBeat13
SwBeat14
SwBeat15
SwBeat16
UpBeat1
UpBeat2
UpBeat3
UpBeat4
UpBeat5
UpBeat6
UpBeat7
UpBeat8
UpBeat9
UpBeat10
UpBeat11
UpBeat12
UpBeat13
UpBeat14
UpBeat15
UpBeat16
UpBeat17
UpBeat18
UpBeat19
UpBeat20
UpBeat21
UpBeat22
UpBeat23
UpBeat24
UpBeat25
SlowRap1
SlowRap2
SlowRap3
SlowRap4
RockGroov1
RockGroov2
RockGroov3
RockGroov4
DrRap1
DrRap2
DrRap3
DrRap4
DrRap5
DrRap5
DrRap7
DrRap8
DrRap9
DrRap10
DrRap11
DrRap12
DrRap13
DrRap14
DrRap15
DrRap16
DrRap17
DrRap18
DrRap19
DrRap20
DrRap21
DrRap22
DrRap23
DrRap24
DrRap25
DrRap26
DrRap27
DrRap28
DrRap29
DrRap30
DrRap31
DrRap32
Jungle1
Jungle2
Jungle3
Jungle4
Jungle5
Jungle6
Jungle7
Jungle8
Jungle9
Jungle10
Jungle11
Jungle12
Jungle13
Jungle14
Jungle15
Jungle16
Jungle17
Jungle18
Jungle19
Jungle20
Jungle21
Jungle22
Jungle23
Jungle24
Jungle25
Jungle26
Jungle27
Jungle28
Jungle29
Crossover1
Crossover2
Crossover3
DrumPatt1
DrumPatt2
DrumPatt3
DrumPatt4
DrumPatt5
DrumPatt6
DrumPatt7
DrumPatt8
DrumPatt9
DrumPatt10
DrumPatt11
DrumPatt12
DrumPatt13
DrumPatt14
DrumPatt15
DrumPatt16
DrumPatt17
DrumPatt18
DrumPatt19
DrumPatt20
DrumPatt21
DrumPatt22
DrumPatt23
DrumPatt24
DrumPatt25
DrumPatt26
DrumPatt27
DrumPatt28
DrumPatt29
DrumPatt30
DrumPatt31
DrumPatt32
DrumPatt33
DrumPatt34
DrumPatt35
DrumPatt36
DrumPatt37
DrumPatt38
DrumPatt39
DrumPatt40
DrumPatt41
DrumPatt42
DrumPatt43
DrumPatt44
DrumPatt45
DrumPatt46
DrumPatt47
DrumPatt48
DrumPatt49
DrumPatt50
DrumPatt51
DrumPatt52
DrumPatt53
DrumPatt54
DrumPatt55
DrumPatt56
DrumPatt57
DrumPatt58
DrumPatt59
DrumPatt60
DrumPatt61
DrumPatt62
DrumPatt63
DrumPatt64
Conga1
Conga2
Conga3
Conga4
Conga5
Conga6
Conga7
Conga8
Conga9
Conga10
Conga11
Conga12
Conga13
Conga14
Conga15
Conga16
Conga17
Conga18
Conga19
Conga20
Conga21
Conga22
Conga23
Conga24
Conga25
Conga26
Conga27
Conga28
Conga29
Conga30
Conga31
Conga32
Perc1
Perc2
Perc3
Perc4
Perc5
Perc6
Perc7
Perc8
Perc9
Perc10
Perc11
Perc12
Perc13
Perc14
Perc15
Perc16
Tamb1
Tamb2
Tamb3
Tamb4
Tamb5
Tamb6
Tamb7
Tamb8
Tamb9
Tamb10
Tamb11
Tamb12
Tamb13
Tamb14
Tamb15
Tamb16
HipHopBs1
HipHopBs2
HipHopBs3
HipHopBs4
HipHopBs5
HipHopBs6
HipHopBs7
GoGoBass1
GoGoBass2
GoGoBass3
GoGoBass4
GoGoBass5
80sHipBas1
80sHipBas2
80sHipBas3
80sHipBas4
80sHipBas5
80sHipBas6
80sHipBas7
80sHipBas8
FuseBass1
FuseBass2
FuseBass3
FuseBass4
FuseBass5
FuseBass6
FuseBass7
FuseBass8
FuseBass9
FuseBass10
SwingBass1
SwingBass2
SwingBass3
SwingBass4
SwingBass5
SwingBass6
SwingBass7
SwingBass8
SwingBass9
RareBass1
RareBass2
RareBass3
RareBass4
RareBass5
RareBass6
RareBass7
RareBass8
RareBass9
RareBass10
RareBass11
RareBass12
RareBass13
OctavBass1
OctavBass2
OctavBass3
OctavBass4
OctavBass5
FunkBass1
FunkBass2
FunkBass3
FunkBass4
FunkBass5
FunkBass6
FunkBass7
BassRiff1
BassRiff2
BassRiff3
BassRiff4
BassRiff5
BassRiff6
BassRiff7
BassRiff8
BassRiff9
BassRiff10
BassRiff11
BassRiff12
BassRiff13
BassRiff14
BassRiff15
BassRiff16
BassRiff17
BassRiff18
BassRiff19
BassRiff20
BassRiff21
BassRiff22
BassRiff23
BassRiff24
BassRiff25
BassRiff26
BassRiff27
BassRiff28
BassRiff29
BassRiff30
BassRiff31
BassRiff32
BassRiff33
BassRiff34
BassRiff35
BassRiff36
BassRiff37
BassRiff38
BassRiff39
BassRiff40
BassRiff41
BassRiff42
BassRiff43
BassRiff44
BassRiff45
BassRiff46
BassRiff47
BassRiff48
BassRiff49
BassRiff50
BassRiff51
BassRiff52
BassRiff53
BassRiff54
BassRiff55
BassRiff56
BassRiff57
BassRiff58
BassRiff59
BassRiff60
BassRiff61
BassRiff62
BassRiff63
BassRiff64
SlapBass1
SlapBass2
SlapBass3
SlapBass4
SlapBass5
SlapBass6
SlapBass7
SlapBass8
SlapBass9
SlapBass10
SlapBass11
SlapBass12
SlapBass13
SlapBass14
SlapBass15
SlapBass16
SynthBass1
SynthBass2
SynthBass3
SynthBass4
SynthBass5
SynthBass6
SynthBass7
SynthBass8
SynthBass9
SynthBas10
SynthBas11
SynthBas12
SynthBas13
SynthBas14
SynthBas15
SynthBas16
Fretless1
Fretless2
Fretless3
Fretless4
Fretless5
Fretless6
Fretless7
Fretless8
Fretless9
Fretless10
Fretless11
Fretless12
Fretless13
Fretless14
Fretless15
Fretless16
SynthBas17
SynthBas18
SynthBas19
SynthBas20
SynthBas21
SynthBas22
SynthBas23
SynthBas24
SynthBas25
SynthBas26
SynthBas27
SynthBas28
SynthBas29
SynthBas30
SynthBas31
SynthBas32
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○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
○
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Tables A•13
EQUINOX GROOVE LIST : Single Grooves # 2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
○
○
ROM 8
ROM 9
ROM 10
ROM 11
ROM 12
ROM 13
FunkEP1
FunkEP2
FunkEP3
FunkEP4
FunkEP5
FunkEP6
FunkEP7
FunkEP8
FunkEP9
FunkEP10
FunkEP11
FunkEP12
FunkEP13
FunkEP14
FunkEP15
FunkEP16
FunkEP17
FunkEP18
FunkEP19
FunkEP20
CoolEP1
CoolEP2
CoolEP3
CoolEP4
CoolEP5
CoolEP6
CoolEP7
CoolEP8
CoolEP9
CoolEP10
FancyEP1
FancyEP2
FancyEP3
FancyEP4
FancyEP5
FancyEP6
FancyEP7
FancyEP8
FancyEP9
FancyEP10
FancyEP11
FancyEP12
FancyEP13
FancyEP14
FancyEP15
FunkClav1
FunkClav2
FunkClav3
FunkClav4
FunkClav5
FunkClav6
FunkClav7
FunkClav8
FunkClav9
FunkClav10
FunkClav11
FunkClav12
FunkClav13
FunkClav14
FunkClav15
FunkClav16
FunkClav17
FunkClav18
FunkClav19
FunkClav20
FunkClav21
FunkClav22
FunkClav23
FunkClav24
FunkClav25
FunkClav26
FunkClav27
FunkClav28
FunkClav29
FunkClav30
FunkClav31
FunkClav32
FunkClav33
FunkClav34
FunkClav35
FunkClav36
FunkClav37
FunkClav38
FunkClav39
FunkClav40
FunkClav41
FunkClav42
FunkClav43
FunkClav44
FunkClav45
FunkClav46
FunkClav47
FunkClav48
SynPik1
SynPik2
SynPik3
SynPik4
SynPik5
SynPik6
SynPik7
SynPik8
SynPik9
DanceSyn1
DanceSyn2
DanceSyn3
DanceSyn4
DanceSyn5
DanceSyn6
DanceSyn7
DanceSyn8
DanceSyn9
DanceSyn10
DanceSyn11
DanceSyn12
DanceSyn13
DanceSyn14
DanceSyn15
DanceSyn16
DanceSyn17
DanceSyn18
DanceSyn19
DanceSyn20
DanceSyn21
DanceSyn22
DanceSyn23
DanceSyn24
DanceSyn25
DanceSyn26
KeyRiff1
KeyRiff2
KeyRiff3
KeyRiff4
KeyRiff5
KeyRiff6
KeyRiff7
KeyRiff8
KeyRiff9
KeyRiff10
KeyRiff11
KeyRiff12
KeyRiff13
KeyRiff14
KeyRiff15
KeyRiff16
KeyRiff17
KeyRiff18
KeyRiff19
KeyRiff20
KeyRiff21
KeyRiff22
KeyRiff23
KeyRiff24
KeyRiff25
KeyRiff26
KeyRiff27
KeyRiff28
KeyRiff29
KeyRiff30
KeyRiff31
KeyRiff32
KeyRiff33
KeyRiff34
KeyRiff35
KeyRiff36
KeyRiff37
KeyRiff38
KeyRiff39
KeyRiff40
KeyRiff41
KeyRiff42
KeyRiff43
KeyRiff44
KeyRiff45
KeyRiff46
KeyRiff47
KeyRiff48
KeyRiff49
KeyRiff50
KeyRiff51
KeyRiff52
KeyRiff53
KeyRiff54
KeyRiff55
KeyRiff56
KeyRiff57
KeyRiff58
KeyRiff59
KeyRiff60
KeyRiff61
KeyRiff62
KeyRiff63
KeyRiff64
Rhodes1
Rhodes2
Rhodes3
Rhodes4
Rhodes5
Rhodes6
Rhodes7
Rhodes8
Rhodes9
Rhodes10
Rhodes11
Rhodes12
Rhodes13
Rhodes14
Rhodes15
Rhodes16
Organ1
Organ2
Organ3
Organ4
Organ5
Organ6
Organ7
Organ8
Organ9
Organ10
Organ11
Organ12
Organ13
Organ14
Organ15
Organ16
Organ17
Organ18
Organ19
Organ20
Organ21
Organ22
Organ23
Organ24
Organ25
Organ26
Organ27
Organ28
Organ29
Organ30
Organ31
Organ32
Organ33
Organ34
Organ35
Organ36
Organ37
Organ38
Organ39
Organ40
Organ41
Organ42
Organ43
Organ44
Organ45
Organ46
Organ47
Organ48
Sequence1
Sequence2
Sequence3
Sequence4
Sequence5
Sequence6
Sequence7
Sequence8
Sequence9
Sequence10
Sequence11
Sequence12
Sequence13
Sequence14
Sequence15
Sequence16
Arpegg1
Arpegg2
Arpegg3
Arpegg4
Arpegg5
Arpegg6
Arpegg7
Arpegg8
Arpegg9
Arpegg10
Arpegg11
Arpegg12
Arpegg13
Arpegg14
Arpegg15
Arpegg16
Arpegg17
Arpegg18
Arpegg19
Arpegg20
Arpegg21
Arpegg22
Arpegg23
Arpegg24
Arpegg25
Arpegg26
Arpegg27
Arpegg28
Arpegg29
Arpegg30
Arpegg31
Arpegg32
Arpegg33
Arpegg34
Arpegg35
Arpegg36
Arpegg37
Arpegg38
Arpegg39
Arpegg40
Arpegg41
Arpegg42
Arpegg43
Arpegg44
Arpegg45
Arpegg46
Arpegg47
Arpegg48
GtrPik1
GtrPik2
GtrPik3
GtrPik4
GtrPik5
GtrPik6
GtrPik7
GtrPik8
GtrPik9
GtrPik10
GtrPik11
GtrPik12
GtrPik13
GtrPik14
GtrPik15
GtrPik16
GtrPik17
GtrPik18
GtrPik19
GtrPik20
GtrPik21
GtrPik22
GtrPik23
GtrPik24
GtrPik25
GtrPik26
GtrPik27
GtrPik28
GtrPik29
GtChink1
GtChink2
GtChink3
GtChink4
GtChink5
GtChink6
GtChink7
GtChink8
GtChink9
GtChink10
GtChink11
GtChink12
GtChink13
GtChink14
GtChink15
GtChink16
GtChink17
GtChink18
GtChink19
GtChink20
GtChink21
GtChink22
GtChink23
GtChink24
GtChink25
GtChink26
GtStrum1
GtStrum2
GtStrum3
GtStrum4
GtStrum5
GtStrum6
GtStrum7
GtStrum8
GtStrum9
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○
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○
A•14 Appendix
○
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○
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○
EQUINOX GROOVE LIST : Composite Grooves
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
ROM 14
ROM 15
ROM 16
Amb.01
Amb.02
Amb.03
Amb.04
Amb.05
Amb.06
Amb.07
Amb.08
Amb.09
Amb.10
Amb.11
Amb.12
Amb.13
Amb.14
Amb.15
Amb.16
Amb.17
Amb.18
Amb.19
Amb.20
Amb.21
Amb.22
Amb.23
Amb.24
Amb.25
Amb.26
Amb.27
Amb.28
Amb.29
Amb.30
Amb.31
Amb.32
Amb.33
Amb.34
Amb.35
Amb.36
Amb.37
Brbt1
Brbt2
Brbt3
Brbt4
Brbt5
Brbt6
Brbt7
Brbt8
Brbt9
Brbt10
Brbt11
Brbt12
Brbt13
Brbt14
Dance1
Dance2
Dance3
Dance4
Dance5
Dance6
Dance7
Dance8
Dance9
Dance10
Dance11
Dance12
Dance13
Funk1
Funk2
Funk3
Funk4
NewFunk1
NewFunk2
NewFunk3
NewFunk4
NewFunk5
NewFunk6
NewFunk7
NewFunk8
NewFunk9
House1
House2
House3
House4
House5
House6
House7
House8
House9
House10
House11
House12
Tech.1
Tech.2
Tech.3
Tech.4
Tech.5
Tech.6
Tech.7
Tech.8
Tech.9
Tech.10
Tech.11
Tech.12
Tech.13
Tran.1
Tran.2
Tran.3
Tran.4
Tran.5
Tran.6
Tran.7
Drbs1
Drbs2
Drbs3
Drbs4
Drbs5
Jungle01
Jungle02
Jungle03
Jungle04
Jungle05
Jungle06
Jungle07
Jungle08
Jungle09
Jungle10
Jungle11
Jungle12
Jungle13
Jungle14
Arithm1
Arithm2
Arithm3
Arithm4
Arithm5
Arithm6
Hybrid1
Hybrid2
Hybrid3
Hybrid4
Hybrid5
Hybrid6
Hybrid7
Hybrid8
Hybrid9
Hybrid10
Hybrid11
Hybrid12
Hybrid13
Hybrid14
Hybrid15
Hybrid16
Hybrid17
Goa01
Goa02
Goa03
Goa04
Goa05
Goa06
Goa07
Goa08
Goa09
Goa10
Goa11
Goa12
Goa13
Goa14
MrJ.01
MrJ.02
MrJ.03
MrJ.04
MrJ.05
MrJ.06
MrJ.07
MrJ.08
MrJ.09
MrJ.10
MrJ.11
MrJ.12
Delirium1
Delirium2
Delirium3
Delirium4
Delirium5
Delirium6
Delirium7
Excess1
Excess2
Excess3
Excess4
Excess5
Excess6
Excess7
Excess8
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Tables A•15
Performances list
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
○
The Dream
WaitForMe
Speilberg
DeathSlide
DoTheStrat
ThePianist
Saxuality
Galaxians
EpicSplit
Gloworm
12String
Ooooooooze
GoodTines
FunkySolo
FilmStrngs
TheDepths
3D Brass
Breathless
Cauldron
PoppySynth
BeBoppin’
Melotron99
Tarkus
Wildlife
PianoDream
LuurveJam
BackRhodes
TheSnapper
SilkyPad
TheStrings
RainClouds
Goin’Solo
FullStack
FiestaBras
TapeEcho
Chinatown
WarriorGtr
SetEmUpJoe
PeakPad
InTheReeds
Industry
CoolSunset
ThunderPad
FusionPno
OnTheBeat
2hot4u
PianoOrch
AllPraise
Joopiter
SmoothF.M
Digilogue
Orchestra
ElasticPop
RaveOn
ThatPiano
ZingyPad
PadLite
PluckIt
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59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
○
A•16 Appendix
○
○
○
○
JazzQintet
BrittlePad
OnTheRun
Labyrinth
Hollywood
HeavnStack
Droplets
DynaSplit
Gleee
Phat7s
5thOrgan
Phys.Synt
XoverPiano
IceDream
Bibble
Blusette
MultiSax
OverYou
60’E.Piano
HeavyClavi
ShadowVox
HouseTrp
seqPOP
seqJAZZ
seqPROG
seqTECHNO
seqDISCO
seqROCK
seq60s
seqBALLAD
seqGRUNGE
seqBLUES
seqBIGBAND
seqFUSION
seqCLASSIC
seqELECTRO
seqUNPLUG
seqRn’B
seqSOUL
seq70s
seqCOUNTRY
seqFUNK
seqHOUSE
seqFRENCH
seqETHNIC
seqMEXICO
seqEURO
seqGOSPEL
seqDANCE
seqDIXIE
seqRAP
seqLATIN
seqITALIAN
seqGERMAN
○
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Drawbars list
Arpeggio list
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
B3Rotary
B3ScanVib
Brian’s B3
C3Wheels
Full 1
Jazz 1
Rock 1
Gospel 1
Perc.4'
Rock 2
C3Chorale
Rock 3
EmerDrome
ProcolHamm
Split_1
Dual Jazz
Up-Down 1
Up_Down 2
Up_Down 3
Up_Down 4
Down_Up 1
Down_Up 2
Down_Up 3
Down_Up 4
Grooovi 1
Grooovi 2
Bumble B
KindaFunky
FollowMe
MadScience
WideSpan
Takin’Off
Effects list - 3 Effect Configuration
Effects list - 2 + 2 Effect Configuration
Reverb list
ProEFX list
Reverb list
MultiFX list
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
28
29
30
Hall 1
Hall 2
Hall 3
Hall 4
Plate 1
Plate 2
Matrix 1
Matrix 2
Gated
Studio Room
MultiFX list
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
28
29
30
Mono Delay1
Mono Delay2
StereoDelay1
Stereo Delay 2
MultiTap Delay 1
MultiTap Delay 2
Ping Pong
Pan Mix
Chorus 1
Chorus 2
Ensemble 1
Ensemble 2
Phaser1
Phaser2
Flanger 1
Flanger 2
Chorus Delay 1
Chorus Delay 2
Flanger Delay 1
Flanger Delay 2
Dubbing
Distortion
Dist Delay
Pitch Shifter 1
Pitch Shifter 2
Shift Delay
Rotary 1
Rotary 2
EQ Jazz
EQ Pops
EQ Rock
EQ Classic
Stereo Wah
Guitar FX
Overdrive/Delay
Compressor
10 Band EQ
St. Graphic EQ
Loudness
St. Parametric
EQ + 3D
Audio Exciter
2 x PitchShift
4 x PitchShift
Hex Chorus
Stereo Chorus
St. Chorus Delay
Stereo Phaser
Stereo Flanger
St. FlangerDelay
Stereo Tremolo
3 Tap Delay
MultiTap Delay
Stereo Delay
Chorus/Tremolo
Chorus/Flanger
Rotary/EQ
Overdv/Chorus
Overdv/Flanger
Exciter/Chorus
Exciter/Flanger
Ring Modulator
Overdrv/Vibrato
Damper Ph. Model
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Hall 1
Hall 2
Hall 3
Warm Hall
Long Hall
Stereo Concert
Chamber
Studio Room 1
Studio Room 2
StudioRoom 3
Club Room 1
Club Room 2
Club Room 3
Vocal
Metal Vocal
Plate 1
Plate 2
Church
Mountains
Falling
Early 1
Early 2
Early 3
Stereo
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Mono Delay1
Mono Delay2
StereoDelay1
Stereo Delay 2
MultiTap Delay 1
MultiTap Delay 2
Ping Pong
Pan Mix
Chorus 1
Chorus 2
Ensemble 1
Ensemble 2
Phaser1
Phaser2
Flanger 1
Flanger 2
Chorus Delay 1
Chorus Delay 2
Flanger Delay 1
Flanger Delay 2
Dubbing
Distortion
Dist Delay
Pitch Shifter 1
Pitch Shifter 2
Shift Delay
Rotary 1
Rotary 2
EQ Jazz
EQ Pops
EQ Rock
EQ Classic
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Tables A•17
PROFX Block diagrams
STEREO WHA
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
WAH
WAH
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
GUITAR FX
Left
Wet / Dry
Distortion
Gate
Drive
4 band EQ
DELAY
Right
OVERDRIVE/DELAY
Left
Wet / Dry
OVERDRIVE
EQ
GATE
Drive
DELAY
Right
COMPRESSOR
Pre Gain
Left
Post Gain
COMPRESSOR
Pre Gain
Right
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A•18 Appendix
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Post Gain
COMPRESSOR
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EQ
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○
EQ
10 BAND EQ
Left
10 BAND EQ
Right
STEREO GRAPHIC EQ
Left
5 BAND EQ
Right
5 BAND EQ
LOUDNESS
Mid Gain
Mid
Left
Low + High
Compressor
Pre Gain
Post Gain
Mid Gain
Mid
Right
Low + High
Compressor
Pre Gain
Post Gain
STEREO PARAMETRIC
Left
Right
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Tables A•19
PROFX Block diagrams
EQ 3D
Left
STEREO
ENHANCER
5 Band EQ
Right
AUDIO EXCITER
Left
Wet / Dry
Pre Gain
EXCITER
EQ
STEREO
ENHANCER
Pre Gain
EXCITER
EQ
Wet / Dry
Right
2XPITCH SHIFT / 4XPITCH SHIFT
Wet/Dry
Left
EQ
PITCH SHIFTER
Right
Wet/Dry
HEX CHORUS
Left
Wet/Dry
EQ
HEX CHORUS
Right
Wet/Dry
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A•20 Appendix
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STEREO CHORUS
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
CHORUS
DELAY
CHORUS
DELAY
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
STEREO CHORUS DELAY
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
DELAY
CHORUS
CHORUS
DELAY
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
STEREO PHASER
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
Feedback
High Damp
PHASER
PHASER
High Damp
Feedback
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
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Tables A•21
PROFX Block diagrams
STEREO FLANGER
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
Feedback
High Damp
FLANGER
FLANGER
High Damp
Feedback
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
STEREO FLANGER / DELAY
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
DELAY
FLANGER
FLANGER
DELAY
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
STEREO TREMOLO
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
TREMOLO
DELAY
TREMOLO
DELAY
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
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A•22 Appendix
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3 TAP DELAY
Left
Wet / Dry
EQ
L Depth
L Delay
C Depth
C Delay
Feedback
High Damp
Low Damp
R Depth
R Delay
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
MULTI TAP DELAY
Left
Wet / Dry
EQ
Tap 6 Delay
Tap 5 Delay
Tap 4 Delay
Tap 3 Delay
Tap 2 Delay
Tap 1 Delay
Feedback
High Damp
Low Damp
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
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Tables A•23
PROFX Block diagrams
STEREO DELAY
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
High Damp
Depth Left
Low Damp
DELAY
Feedback
Normal/Cross
Feedback
DELAY
Depth Left
High Damp
Low Damp
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
CHORUS / TREMOLO
Left
Wet/Dry
EQ
HEX CHORUS
TREMOLO
Right
Wet/Dry
CHORUS / FLANGER
Left
Chorus Wet/Dry
EQ
HEX CHORUS
Flanger Wet/Dry
FLANGER
Right
Chorus
Wet/Dry
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A•24 Appendix
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Flanger Wet/Dry
ROTARY / EQ
Wet/Dry
Left
5 BAND EQ
ROTARY
Right
Wet/Dry
OVERDRIVE / CHORUS
Left
Wet / Dry
OVERDRIVE
GATE
EQ
CHORUS
EQ
FLANGER
Drive
Right
OVERDRIVE / FLANGER
Left
Wet / Dry
OVERDRIVE
GATE
Drive
Right
EXCITER / CHORUS
Left
Ch Wet / Dry
EX Wet / Dry
Pre Gain
EXCITER
CHORUS
EQ
Pre Gain
EXCITER
CHORUS
EQ
EX Wet /
Dry
Ch Wet / Dry
Right
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Tables A•25
PROFX Block diagrams
EXCITER / FLANGER
Left
EX Wet / Dry
Pre Gain
Fl Wet / Dry
EXCITER
EQ
FLANGER
Pre Gain
EXCITER
EQ
Fl Wet / Dry
EX Wet /
Dry
Right
RING MODULATOR
Mod
(
Source = Internal Oscillator )
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
RING MODULATOR
Sine Osc.
RING MODULATOR
EQ
Right
Wet / Dry
Mod
(
Source = Right Channel )
Wet / Dry
Left
EQ
RING MODULATOR
HF DAMP
Right
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A•26 Appendix
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Tables A•27
0-127
*****
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Cntrl 80 (ONE SHOT):
61†
Rotary 1 slow/fast
62†® Rotary 2 slow/fast [Seq.]
64
Start/Stop
66,67† Tempo inc. dec.
68,69† Preset inc. dec.
Cntrl 81
OFF [0,63] ON[64,127]
61†
Rotary 1 (Off=slow)
62†® Rotary 2 (Off=slow) [Seq.]
0-127
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Mode 2 OMNI ON - MONO
Mode 4 OMNI OFF - MONO
† These messages are available on the Common channel only
Program
Change
True number
System Exclusive
System
Song Position
Song Select
Common
Tune
System
Clock
Real Time
Commands
Aux
Active sensing
Messages
All Sound Off
Reset All Contr.
Local ON OFF
All Note Off
Notes
Mode 1 OMNI ON - POLY
Mode 3 OMNI OFF - POLY
®Effects Engine in split mode
61 = Rotary 1 Slow, 125 = Rotary Fast
62 = Rotary 2 Slow, 126 = Rotary 2 Fast
0-127
Start, Stop
Continue
o: YES x: NO
A•28 Appendix
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True voice
Note ON
Note OFF
Key’s
Ch’s
Default
Changed
Default
Messages
Altered
Manufacturer: Generalmusic S.p.A.
FUNCTION
Basic
Channel
Mode
Note
Number
Velocity
After
Touch
Pitch Bender
Control
Change
Version: 1.00 26/10/98
Bank
P.change
1st 2nd Value
C#0 C#0-15† 0-127
Int. Sounds.
C#0 C#16-31† 0-127
User Sounds.
C#0 C#48†
0-111 Int .Performances
C#0 C#51†
0-111 User .Performances
C#0 C#48†
112-127 Int DrawBars
C#0 C#51†
112-127 User DrawBars
C#0 C#55†
0-15 Songs
Bank change recognized on
common channel, only in reception:
true voice depends on
selected sound
Remarks
2 MIDI IN; 2 THRU; 2 MIDI OUT
EXTRA COMMON/CHORD CH.
MIDI Implementation Chart
Model: EQUINOX
Bank change
Modulation
Data Entry
Volume
Pan
Expression Controller
Effects selection
Effects volume
Tuning control
Damper Pedal
Sustain (Sostenuto)
Soft pedal
Resonance
Release time
Attack time
Filter 1 cut-off freq.
Wah Control
Reverb depth
MultiEfx depth]
Reverb depth [Sequ.]
MultiEfx depth[Sequ.]
ProEfx depth
NRPN
RPN
Transmitted
Recognized
1-16
1-16
1-16
1-16
Multimode
Multimode
X
X
X
X
0-127
0-127
*****
o
o
x
o
o
Bank change
Modulation
Data Entry
Volume
Pan
Expression Contr.
Tuning control
Damper Pedal
Sustain (Sostenuto)
Soft pedal
Reverb depth
MultiEfx depth
Reverb depth [Seq.]
MultiEfx depth[Seq.]
ProEfx depth
NRPN
RPN
0,32
1
6,38
7
10
11
18,50†
64
66
67
91
93
92®
94®
95
98,99
100,101
o
o
o
o
o
0,32
1
6,38
7
10
11
16,48†
17,49†
18,50†
64
66
67
71
72
73
74
86†
91
93
92♦
94♦
95
98,99
100,101
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Tables A•29
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A•30 Appendix
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Index
A
Add modulation 1. 19
Adjust the volume 7
Adjusting pitch 11. 19
Adjusting velocities (Seq Edit) 11. 19
Advanced Edit 1. 7, 1. 13
Aftertouch (System) 9. 8
Aftertouch effect 8, 1. 23
Amp. Envelope 1. 16
Arpegggiator 6. 1
Arpeggio 6. 1
Arpeggio list A. 16
Arpeggio patterns 6. 2
Assign menu 4. 5
Assigning a single sample 4. 5
Assigning effects (Perf parts) 2. 8
Assigning multiple samples 4. 6
Assigning Samples 4. 5
Attack 1. 8
Audio Exciter 1. 25
Audio Out 2. 7
Audio Out, Drumkit edit 3. 3
Auto button 4. 7
B
Backup 8. 8
Bank / Prog, drumkit edit 3. 2
Banks 1. 2
Bar (Grooves) 7. 6
Bars 11. 3
Basic Split 2. 4
Basics of Equinox 11
Battery level (System) 9. 9
Beat (Arpeggiator) 6. 2
Beat (Grooves) 7. 6
Beats 11. 3
Block (Disk) 8. 4
Build (Arpeggiator) 6. 4
Button settings (User) 12. 5
Bypass the DSP 9
Byte number 4. 8
C
Catch Locator 11. 31, 11. 37
CD-ROM, Loading samples from 4. 3
Change pitch (Seq Edit) 11. 19
Change Song name 11. 41
Change the pitch of the sound 2. 3
Change velocity (Seq Edit) 11. 19
Changing sounds (Sequencer) 11. 4
Chaning volume levels (Sequencer) 11. 4
Channel (Midi) 10. 2
Chorus 1. 24, 1. 25
Clear Menu (Seq Edit) 11. 41
Clear the keyboard transpose setting 9
Click vol (Drawbar mode) 5. 4
Clock send (Midi) 10. 5
Clock source (Midi) 10. 5
Clock Speed 2. 4
Closed Switch (System) 9. 2
Common channel (Midi) 10. 4
Compare button, Drumkit edit 3. 5
Composite Grooves A. 15
Computer port 10. 6
Configure tracks (Sequencer) 11. 44
Connect the pedals 7
Connecting headphones 6
Connecting to an amplification system 6
Construct a Performance 2. 1
Continuous (System) 9. 2
Control 1. 13
Control Change Event 11. 27
Control pedals 7
Controller (User) 12. 5
Controls (System) 9. 2
Copy button, Drumkit edit 3. 5
Copy track (Seq Edit) 11. 14
Copying Drawbars to Performances 5. 6
Core sounds 1. 3
Countdown 11. 3, 11. 9
Create a new Panel configuration 12. 2
Creating a groove from a song 11. 23
Creating a Groove Patch 7. 4
Creating multi-layer sounds 1. 14
Creating new Grooves 7. 12
Crescendo (Arpeggiator) 6. 3
Current (Sequencer) 11. 2
Current Value (User) 12. 4
Cursor Left/Right buttons 12
Cursor Up/down buttons 12
Cursors 12
Cut-Off 1. 9, 1. 17
Cut-off point 1. 17
D
Damper 9. 2
Data (User) 12. 5
Data Entry 12
Decay 1. 8
Degree of modulation 8
Delay (Arpeggiator) 6. 3
Delay time 2. 4
Delet Bars (Seq Edit) 11. 21
Delete button 11. 34, 11. 40
Detune 2. 3
Detune (Drawbar mode) 5. 3
Device I.D number 10. 5
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Index A•31
Dial 12
Direction (Arpeggiator) 6. 2
Directory tree 8. 3
Disk 8. 1
Display 11
Distortion 1. 24
Drawbar 5. 1
Drawbar mode 5. 1
Drawbar performance 5. 6
Drawbar section 5. 1
Drawbars list A. 16
Drum Kits family 1. 3
Drum mode 3. 1
Drum sounds 3. 1
Drumkits 3. 1
Dry Level control 1. 26
Dry signal 1. 24
Dual 1 1. 15
Dual 2 1. 15
Dual 3 1. 15
Dual 4 1. 15
Dual waveform 1. 14
Dump Menu (Midi) 10. 7
Dump to external storage devices 10. 7
Dynamic Switch, Drumkit edit 3. 4
Exclude Group (Grooves) 7. 7
Exit on Stop 11. 9
Exiting Record mode 11. 5
Expand button, Drumkit edit 3. 5
Export (Sample editing) 4. 10
Export to Groove (Seq Edit) 11. 22
External Out (User) 12. 2
F
Filter 1. 17
Filter 1-7 (Midi) 10. 2
Filter, Drumkit edit 3. 3
Filter envelopes 1. 17
Filter type 1. 17
Fix Velocity (Midi) 10. 5
Flanger 1. 25
Floating portamento 1. 22
Floppy (Disk) 8. 1
Footage 5. 1
Format 1.44 (Disk) 8. 8
Format 1.62 (Disk) 8. 8
Format 720K 8. 8
Format Hard Disk 8. 9
Forward (Sequencer) 11. 5
Freeze (Arpeggiator) 6. 4
Front Panel layout 2
Function (User) 12. 5
Function (User) 12. 4
Function buttons (Drawbar mode) 5. 2
Function buttons F1 - F4 12
Fx Off button 9
E
Edit a single sample 4. 8
Edit Menu (Sequencer) 11. 12
Editing a Drum Kit 3. 2
Editing Events 11. 32, 11. 38
Editing Samples 4. 8
Editing single Grooves 7. 11
Editing/changing Sounds 1. 6
Effect 1. 13
Effect Menu (Sequencer) 11. 43
Effects list - 2 + 2 Effect Configuration A. 17
Effects list - 3 Effect Configuration A. 17
Effects Menu 1. 24, 2. 8
Effects Menu (Drawbar mode) 5. 4
Effects processors 1. 24
Effects Rec 11. 9
Emulating different types of drawbar organs 5. 2
Enter 13
EQ 1. 25
Equinox Groove list A. 13
Equinox waveform 4. 5
Erase a single track (Seq Edit) 11. 41
Erase an entire song (Seq Edit) 11. 41
Erase events (Seq Edit) 11. 16
Escape 13
Event Type, status 11. 25
Events 11. 24
Exclude button 4. 7
Exclude, Drumkit edit 3. 3
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A•32 Index
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G
Gain (Sample editing) 4. 9
Gate Time, length 11. 26
General MIDI sound library 1. 3
General MIDI standard 10. 6
Global settings 9. 1
GMX 1. 3
Go To Bar 11. 32, 11. 38
Graphic LCD display 11
Groove Format 11. 22
Groove Lab 7. 13
Groove Library 7. 1
Groove Patch 7. 1
Groove Patches 7. 3
Groove template 7. 4
Grooves 7. 1
H
Hammond Organ drawbars 5. 1
Hard (drawbar organ types) 5. 2
Hard disk drive 8. 1
Hold (Arpeggiator) 6. 1, 6. 4
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I
Loudness Maximizer 1. 25
Imp button (Notepad) 13. 1
In (Midi) 10. 2
Independent MIDI configurations 10. 1
Initial Velocity 11. 26
Input (Arpeggiator) 6. 2
Insert Bars (Seq Edit) 11. 21
Insert button 11. 33, 11. 39
Internal (User) 12. 2
Internal clock 9. 6
Internal configurations (User) 12. 3
Internal Hard disks 8. 9
Internal Midi clock, 10. 5
Internal system clock 9. 6
Intonation (System) 9. 4
M
J
Jazz (drawbar organ types) 5. 3
K
Key Click 5. 2
Key Off envelope 1. 16
Key On envelope 1. 16
Keyboard velocity (System) 9. 8
Keystrike velocity 3. 4
L
L.F.O section 1. 19
Last note priority 1. 27
Latch (Grooves) 7. 6
Latching switch (User) 12. 6
Layer 1. 15
Layers 1. 14
LCD mode (System) 9. 6
Left note priority 1. 27
Legato 1. 27
Legato portamento 1. 22
Length (Arpeggiator) 6. 3
Length, gate time 11. 26
Level 1. 8
LFO depth 1. 10
LFO rate 1. 10
Listen to any groove 7. 2
Load (Disk) 8. 6
Load a sample from floppy disk
or SCSI device 4. 3
Load a sample via MIDI 4. 4
Load a standard MS-DOS text file 13. 1
Load a text file 13. 1
Local/Sound (Midi) 10. 2
Locator 11. 25
Lock (System) 9. 3
Lock button (Midi) 10. 3
Loop (Sequencer) 11. 10
Loop Start (Sample editing) 4. 8
Macintosh 10. 6
Manual (Grooves) 7. 6
Map your samples 4. 6
Master (System) 9. 6
Master events 11. 35
Master Menu (Midi) 10. 4
Master Menu (Seq Edit) 11. 41
Master pitch (System) 9. 4
Master settings 9. 1
Master tempo (Seq Edit) 11. 41
Master Track 11. 35
Master Transpose 9, 1. 27, 2. 3
Master volume level (Seq Edit) 11. 41
Memory Clear 9. 7
Metronome volume 11. 9
MIDI 10. 1
MIDI channel 10. 2
Midi configuration 10. 2, 10. 3
Midi filters 10. 2
Midi In Transpose 10. 5
MIDI menu 10. 1
Midi Merge 10. 5
Mirror locations 1. 12
Mixer Menu 2. 7
Mixer Menu (Sequencer) 11. 44
Mode (Sequencer) 11. 7
Mode button (User) 12. 2
Modifying any event 11. 32
Modo Touch event 11. 28
Modulation 8
Modulation wheel control 1. 22
Mono and Stereo Delays 1. 24
Monophonic Aftertouch events 11. 28
Ms-Dos icon (Disk) 8. 4
Multi track groove 7. 9
Multi-Split 2. 5
Multifx 1. 24
N
Navigating (Sequencer) 11. 5
Navigation 12
Non Equinox files (Disk) 8. 7
Normal portamento 1. 22
Note On (User) 12. 5
Note value 11. 25
Note values (Seq Edit) 11. 19
Notepad 13. 1
Numeric Keypad 12
O
Octave (Arpeggiator) 6. 2
Octave +/– buttons 10
Octave transpose 2. 3
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Index A•33
One-Shot (Grooves) 7. 6
Open Switch (System) 9. 2
Option Menu (Seq Edit) 11. 41
Options (Sequencer) 11. 8
Oscillator 1. 20
Other (Sound Edit menu) 1. 13
Out (Midi) 10. 2
Output jacks 2. 7
Overdrive 1. 25
Overdrive (Drawbar mode) 5. 4
Overdub mode (Sequencer) 11. 7
Port (Midi) 10. 2
Port Com Ch. (Midi) 10. 4
Portamento 1. 22, 2. 3
Portamento mode 2. 3
Post send controls 1. 25
Power switch 7
Profx 1. 25
PROFX Block diagrams A. 18
Program Change (User) 12. 5
Program Change event 11. 29
Protection (Disk) 8. 8
Pulses 11. 25
Punch mode (Sequencer) 11. 7
P
P. Volume Rec 11. 9
P.C I/O button 10. 6
Pan 1. 20
Pan (Drawbar mode) 5. 3
Pan, Drumkit edit 3. 2
Pan position 1. 20, 1. 27
Panel configuration 12. 2
Part # button (User) 12. 3
Part (Performances) 2. 1
Part selection 2. 6
Parts button 2. 2
Parts List 2. 2
Parts Menu 2. 2
PC 1 10. 6
PC 2 10. 6
Pedal 1 9. 2
Pedal 2 9. 2
Pedal jacks 9. 2
Percussion effect 5. 3
Percussive effects 5. 2
Perform +, Perform – (User) 12. 5
Performance 2. 1
Performance Change (User) 12. 5
Performance mode 2. 1
Performances list A. 16
Pitch (Sample editing) 4. 8
Pitch (System) 9. 4
Pitch Bend 8
Pitch Bend events 11. 28
Pitch bend wheel 1. 22
Pitch Bender 1. 22
Pitch changes over time 1. 18
Pitch Envelope 1. 18
Pitch Shift 1. 24
Pitch shift 1. 22
Pitch slide 1. 22, 2. 3
Play button 11. 3
Playback speed of the source sample 4. 8
Playback/Edit (Sample mode) 4. 2
Playback/Edit Mode functions 11. 10
Poly priority 2. 4
Polyphonic mode 1. 27
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A•34 Index
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Q
Quantize 11. 8
Quantize track (Seq Edit) 11. 13
Quick Edit 1. 7, 1. 8
R
Ramfile 8. 2
Ramfile directory 8. 2
Random (Arpeggiator) 6. 2
Random Pan 1. 27, 2. 7
Random Pitch 1. 27, 2. 3
Range 2. 5
Rate (Sample editing) 4. 8
Re-entering Record mode 11. 5
Re-Start portamento 1. 22
Real (Grooves) 7. 6
Rear Panel 5
Rear Panel (Connections) 5
Reconfigure sliders & buttons 12. 1
Record button 11. 2
Record mode 11. 3
Record Mode functions 11. 7
Recording a sequence 11. 2
Release 1. 9
Release date of the operating system 9. 9
Release Velocity 11. 26
Remote controller keyboard 10. 4
Remove a sample (Exclude) 4. 7
Repair tool (Hard disk) 8. 9
Repeat (Arpeggiator) 6. 3
Repeat track (Seq Edit) 11. 12
Replace mode (Sequencer) 11. 7
RESET (System) 9. 6
Resonance 1. 9, 1. 17
Restore 8. 8
Restore button, Drumkit edit 3. 6
Restore to factory conditions 9. 6
Retrigger 1. 27
Reverb 1. 24
Reverb (Drawbar mode) 5. 4
Reverb / Profx Send, Drumkit edit 3. 3
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Reverbs presets 1. 24
Rewind (Sequencer) 11. 5
Right note priority 1. 27
Rives (Grooves) 7. 1
Rock (drawbar organ types) 5. 3
ROM-Sound tables A. 2
Root directory (Disk) 8. 6
Rotary (Drawbar mode) 5. 4
Rough key map 4. 7
Run on Rec 11. 9
S
Sample button 4. 3
Sample Dump Standard protocol 4. 3
Sample End (Sample editing) 4. 8
Sample list 4. 4
Sample loop 4. 8
Sample memory 4. 1
Sample mode 4. 1
Sample Translator 4. 1, 4. 3
Save (Disk) 8. 2
Save All (Disk) 8. 3
Save new sound 1. 11
Save Single (Disk) 8. 3
Scales (System) 9. 4
SCSI 8. 1
Section transposer (Octaves) 10
Selecting Sounds 1. 4
Selection 12
Selector button 2. 2
Send 1. 25, 2. 8
Send a MIDI dump 10. 7
Sending MIDI (User) 12. 2
Seq Menu (Midi) 10. 3
Sequencer 11. 1
Sequencer (User) 12. 2
Serial port 10. 6
Setting up 6
Share Master (Sequencer) 11. 43
Share Slave (Sequencer) 11. 43
Shift Events (Seq Edit) 11. 17
Show button 11. 33, 11. 39
Shuffle (Grooves) 7. 9
Single Grooves # 1 A. 13
Single Grooves # 2 A. 14
Single split point 2. 4
Single waveform 1. 14
Sisxteen (16) part sound generator 11. 1
Sleep time (Hard disk) 8. 9
Slider range (User) 12. 4
Slider settings (User) 12. 4
Sliders 1. 7
Sliders and control buttons 13
Sliders as Hammond Organ drawbars 5. 1
Slow/Fast control 5. 2
Smooth (drawbar organ types) 5. 2
Solo 10
Solo button 10
Song Edit button 11. 1
Song Playback/Edit mode 11. 10
Song position locator 11. 3
Song Select button 11. 6
Song tempo 11. 10
Sound banks 2. 2
Sound Families 1. 2
Sound file(.WAV) 4. 3
Sound mode 1. 2
Sound samples 4. 1
Source note (Sample editing) 4. 8
Speed (Arpeggiator) 6. 2
Split button 2. 4
Split point 2. 5
Split the keyboard (Drawbar mode) 5. 5
Start Syn (Grooves) 7. 6
Status, event type 11. 25
Stereo dry signal control 1. 25
Stereo effects 1. 25
Stop button (Sequencer) 11. 5
Stop Syn (Grooves) 7. 6
Storage devices 8. 1
Store button 1. 11
Storing Drawbar settings 5. 6
Storing Drumkits 3. 6
Storing Sounds 1. 11
Storing your Groove Patch 7. 7
Studio post processing functions 1. 25
Style (Arpeggiator) 6. 2
Synth Menu (Midi) 10. 2
Sysex I.D # 10. 5
System 9. 1
System Exclusive 10. 5
T
Tempo (User) 12. 5
Tempo Rec 11. 9
Text entry 14
Three part velocity switch 2. 6
Ticks 2. 4, 11. 3, 11. 25
Time and date stamping 9. 6
Time signature 11. 10
Top (Notepad) 13. 2
Totary loudspeaker emulator 5. 2
Track Menu (Sequencer) 11. 44
Traditional organ effects 5. 2
Transistorized organs 5. 2
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Index A•35
Transpose (Arpeggiator) 6. 3
Transpose (Drawbar mode) 5. 3
Transpose b/# buttons 9
Transpose, Drumkit edit 3. 3
Transposing a Groove 7. 8
Transposing the instrument 9
Tremolo 1. 19
Trigger (Grooves) 7. 6
Tune (System) 9. 4
Tuning (System) 9. 4
Tuning, Drumkit edit 3. 3
Tuning presets (System) 9. 4
Tweaking 1. 13
Two independent effects (Sequencer) 11. 43
Type (User) 12. 6
Type of pedal (System) 9. 2
W
Wave 1. 13
Waveform 1. 16
Wet signal 1. 24
Wet/Dry mix parameter 1. 25
What is an “event” ? 11. 24
Wheels 8
Width of arpeggio 6. 2
U
Understanding Blocks 8. 4
Understanding the Ramfile 8. 2
Undo button (Sequencer) 11. 11
Undo Menu (Seq Edit) 11. 42
User button 12. 1
User Panel 12. 1
User sound banks 1. 6
User sound locations 1. 11
Using Aftertouch 8
Using the Event list 11. 30
Using The Event List. 11. 24
Using the Solo button 10
Using the wheels 8
Utilities (Disk) 8. 8
V
Varying the pan position 1. 20
Velocity 1. 23
Velocity (Arpeggiator) 6. 3
Velocity (Grooves) 7. 7
Velocity curves 1. 23
Velocity range 1. 23
Velocity Switch 2. 6
Vibrato 1. 10, 1. 19
View (Notepad) 13. 1
Vintage Hammond organ 5. 2
Volume 1. 16
Volume, Drumkit edit 3. 2
Volume of Key Click 5. 4
Volume of the percussion 5. 4
Volume Pedal 7
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A•36 Index
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FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant
to Part 15 of FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this instrument does
cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the instrument
off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
-
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
CAUTION: Changes or modifications to this product not expressly approved by the manufacturer could void
the user’s authority to operate this product.
Stock Code 271221
Specifications are subject to change without prior notice.
PRINTED IN ITALY
Sales Division: I -47048 S.Giovanni in Marignano (RN) - Italy – Via delle Rose, 12
Tel. +39 541 959511 – fax +39 541 957404 – tlx 550555 GMUSIC I
Internet: http://www.generalmusic.com
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