Center for Digital Education: Samsung Handbook

Center for Digital Education: Samsung Handbook
A Roadmap to Digitally
Delivered Education
Start the journey with an integrated plan for
reaping the academic, economic and
management benefits of technology innovations.
Produced by
For additional copies or to download this document, please visit:
www.centerdigitaled.com/paper/a-roadmap-to-digitally-delivered-education.html
© 2013 e.Republic. All rights reserved.
A Roadmap to Digitally
Delivered Education
Start the journey with an integrated plan for
reaping the academic, economic and
management benefits of technology innovations.
Table of Contents:
A Smart Strategy for Integrating Technology...................................................4
Step 1: Recognize the Rewards and Risks.....................................................5
Step 2: Develop a Roadmap...............................................................................7
Step 3: Prepare for Using Technology in the Classroom..............................11
Step 4: Innovate Outside the Classroom........................................................14
Step 5: Opt for an Integrated Solution........................................................19
Stepping into the Future..................................................................................21
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A Smart Strategy for
Integrating Technology
Every year, the education technology available to school leaders becomes
increasingly impressive. This can be both a blessing and a curse for K-12
schools and districts. With each new advancement comes the fresh promise
for creating better academic results by preparing students to reach higher
want to stay competitive and give students the best possible resources while
also integrating new technology into a cohesive whole that quickly delivers
academic results. Add the pressures of policies and initiatives that aim for
increasing achievement scores, addressing Common Core State Standard
(CCSS) requirements, Race to the Top imperatives and other performancebased programs, and the digital age can look like a whirlwind of programs,
policies and products ready to spin into chaos. What K-12 schools and districts
need is a plan.
Fortunately, as the elements of a smart strategy for digital education are
that together will deliver successful results. Even so, the foundation for digital
education can’t be rigid, cookie-cutter solutions. Each school district has
unique needs in and outside of the classroom and for this reason, the right
strategy and mix of technologies requires local control combined with an
understanding of what’s possible today. This Center for Digital Education
creating digital schools that not only serve students better, but increase the
effectiveness of administrators, teachers and support services for a price tag
that accommodates today’s economic realities.
ABOUT THIS HANDBOOK
Produced by the Center for Digital Education, with underwriting support from
Samsung, this handbook takes a realistic look at how to create a framework
for digital technology that solves today’s challenges and evolves to support
tomorrow’s innovations. Integrating ideas about technology, policy and
process, it includes examples from schools across the country that have
successful plans for adopting new technology and ensuring that these
innovations work together to achieve results that are bigger than the sum of
each individual part.
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Step 1:
Recognize the Rewards and Risks
With all the challenges schools face today — whether academic, budgetary
or regulatory — why even devote resources to going digital? The answer
is fundamental to the mission of every school: Technology offers exciting
new ways to better engage students and prepare them for life in the
21st century.
realities about the effectiveness of technology in education. First, and most
encouraging, the tie between technology and better outcomes in K-12
education is real. In a CompTIA study entitled “IT Opportunities in the Education
Market,” 78 percent of K-12 teachers and administrators said technology has
rose thanks to an increase in classroom technology.1
The second trend isn’t so encouraging — namely that technology success
isn’t guaranteed. While there are opportunities for school districts to reap
an ambitious program for 1:1 computing, follow-up studies found only a slight
uptick in student scores.2
Similarly, a New York Times
has spent around $33 million since 2005 on laptop computers and related
technologies. Despite this investment, while teachers anecdotally report
seeing more enthusiastic students as a result of the technology push, the
test scores.3
What’s the takeaway? In certain cases where school districts outperform
others in technology implementation and integration, key factors have a
bearing on success:
Commitment from administration and other leadership from the outset
for comprehensive technology integration
and thorough professional development for teachers
Frequent implementation of technology into core lessons
Innovative methods of integration both in and outside the classroom
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Step 1: Recognize the Rewards and Risks
What are the top objectives of your 1:1 computing program?
Enabling more personalized learning
58%
57%
53%
52%
Increasing access to digital curriculum
Increasing student engagement/attendance
Increasing collaboration or creativity
25%
Improving student assessments
Supporting online assessments
18%
Improving the ability to measure and monitor
student achievement
18%
Fostering a paperless environment
15%
SouRCE: CDE TEChnology InTEgRATIon SuRvEy, 2013
Considerations When Evaluating Opportunities and Challenges
The following is a list of considerations for school districts to address in the
very early stages of identifying the risks and rewards when implementing an
integrated technology framework.
the current educational strategy.
Identify areas where the current policy requires revisions and updates to
address new opportunities and innovations.
Create an outcomes-oriented presentation that clearly demonstrates the
and parents.
Organize a cross-section of educators, technology staff and administrators
who back the digital strategy to explain and promote the idea to others.
Thoroughly review available industry research to understand the pros and
cons of digital classroom models.
Check with your state’s department of education to see what advice or
support it can offer.
the classroom (covered in more detail in Step 4).
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Step 2: Develop a Roadmap
It’s not enough to merely introduce the latest and greatest technologies into
classrooms. School districts must craft a careful strategy that seamlessly blends
technology into the district environment, and then merge that with the right
education plan and professional development activities within each school.
According to a recent CDE survey on the status of technology integration in K-12
to fully implement a district-wide technology initiative, so it is important to have a
well-thought-out strategy from the start.
ASSESS THE CURRENT ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOP A VISION
To start,
in when it comes to technology integration. IDC Government Insights provides
“The
Next-Generation Classroom: Smart, Interactive and Connected Learning
Environments,
paper-based learning, where there is no technology in the classroom, and
moving all the way up to student-centric learning, where all students have access
4
Interactive Classroom IT Adoption Trajectory
0
Paper-based
learning
processes:
1
Sporadic
teacher access:
lmS or admin
tools, one PC
or device in
classroom
2
Sporadic
student access:
Computer labs/
mobile labs,
some digital
content, no
interactive tools
3
Teacher centric:
Teacher uses
technology like
PCs, interactive
whiteboards,
lmS
4
Student centric:
All students
have access to
devices, digital
content and
software
no classroom
technology or
digital content
SouRCE: ADAPTED FRom IDC govERnmEnT InSIghTS whITE PAPER, “ThE nExT-gEnERATIon ClASSRoom:
SmART, InTERACTIvE AnD ConnECTED lEARnIng EnvIRonmEnTS”
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Step 2: Develop a Roadmap
Districts also need to assess their current IT infrastructure and identify what
upgrades are needed to prepare for the onslaught of technology and higher
attention needs to be paid to Internet capabilities, including the main public
connection, and wireless access points in classrooms and other areas of
the schools. Addressing these needs and building the appropriate support
structure will build a foundation that can scale into the future.
process and have addressed infrastructure needs, it is then equally important to
outline what they ultimately want to achieve with their technology implementation.
Innovative school districts are purchasing interoperable solutions that put tools
such as content sharing, polling and surveys; and device management into the
hands of teachers and students via tablets, laptops and interactive whiteboards to
truly transform learning inside and outside of the classroom.
START SMALL TO BUILD BIGGER
If your district is still closer to the paper-based learning stage, start by piloting
tablets in the classroom, or if you are further down the 1:1 computing path, start
looking at ways to expand technology outside of classroom walls.
For example, Richland School District Two in South Carolina is improving the
classroom experience with digital tools. Instructors and students connect
to the Web using Samsung Chromebooks for research and to access online
applications and class assignments.
“With the mobility of the Chromebooks, we can push together the tables in
arts and drama in Richland’s Kelly Mills Middle School. “This is a much
different experience than what I would’ve had with desktop PCs, which took
up a lot of space and couldn’t be moved easily.”5
An initial Chromebook rollout worked so well, Richland Two increased its
is helping the district stay on track with a 1:1 strategy it began more than a
decade ago, which had the eventual goal of providing a computing device
for students in every grade level.
“In our district, the responsibility for instructional technology is in IT,
not in academics,” adds Debra Hamm, CIO. “But we all know that while
it’s really all about the learning
that they enable.”
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Step 2: Develop a Roadmap
While a Chromebook
deployment and 1:1
strategy are steps
toward the right
direction, they are only
a part of becoming a
fully interoperable and
interactive classroom
learning environment.
IDC Government
Insights believes that,
“School education is
as classrooms that embed technology into the core learning processes and
curriculum become what we call a Smart Classroom.”
A smart classroom takes implementation a step further with tools like tablets,
interactive whiteboards and software designed to provide better student-teacher
interactions and improved classroom management. A smart classroom strategy
also needs to be applied in the context of the entire school or district.
A guided and methodical approach to a smart school strategy can be measured
and controlled, and proper support can be given at each phase. It can take a
school environment that is paper-based with limited technological access to
teachers and students, to a school that is student centric and fully interactive.
This type of cohesive framework not only improves student learning, but creates
positive effects throughout the district as a whole.
Roadmap Considerations
Interview schools that have already implemented digital classroom strategies
to learn from their experiences.
Establish a vision and develop an internal impact study to identify potential
training and other resources that must be addressed.
If new investments in technology, infrastructure and training will be required,
clearly document the costs and then support the proposals with a return on
investment (ROI) analysis.
Identify resources that will be easily adapted to class instruction with a
concentration on providing measurements of success.
Decide on the best way to roll out new digital tools — start with small pilot
school and district.
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Step 2: Develop a Roadmap
SMART CLASSROOM IN ACTION
Shelby County Schools in Tennessee provides a perfect example of how
a smart classroom platform can enable a more interactive and engaged
learning experience.
The 6th-grade math class at geeter middle School, part of Shelby County
Schools, has adopted the Samsung School solution. The class uses 35
Samsung galaxy note 10.1 tablets, a 65-inch Samsung interactive whiteboard
and a wireless printer. Instructors are leveraging the digital resources to
lead interactive lessons and real-time group activities thanks to integrations
that allow teachers and students to share screens and content. learning
management tools included in the solution give students access to course
materials, as well as general school notices through their tablets.
“Samsung School is the perfect opportunity to nurture our students’ growth
through interactive technology, which helps the teachers to track individual
progress, as well as enabling dynamic lesson plans,” says Cleon Franklin,
director of instructional technology for Shelby County Schools.7
Because teachers no longer have to stand near traditional chalkboards during
their presentation, they can interact more with students by roaming the
classroom while displaying content from their touchscreen tablets.
The tablet’s stylus, or S Pen, is an ideal solution for math students as they can
write directly onto their tablets in numeric notations. Franklin says a math
class was chosen for the pilot because in many ways the subject presented the
greatest challenges for getting students engaged and overcoming study anxiety.
“The most powerful thing for me was how re-energizing this was,” Franklin
says. “During one math class, I heard a student say, ‘This was the best day of
my life.’ how often does a student feel that way about a learning environment?
The typical answer you get is, ‘I hate school.’ As an educator, that reminds you
about why you do this work and why you put in the extra hours.”
Samsung School has not only helped geeter achieve a more participatory,
engaged learning environment, it’s also allowed the teacher to better track
progress. “Typically, teachers don’t get feedback until the class is over and they
grade a test,” Franklin says. “with this solution, the teacher gets the feedback
right away, so they can tell if the students didn’t grasp the concept and need to
revisit it.”
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Step 3: Prepare for Using Technology
in the Classroom
When students and teachers have access to interoperable digital tools in the
classroom such as tablets, Chromebooks, laptops, printers and interactive
these tools enables:
Collaborative, circular learning. When students and teachers can easily share
content via mobile devices, it enables greater collaboration or circular learning.
This type of learning encourages students to work in teams to share ideas and
solve problems. It also hones the communication and interpersonal skills that
will help today’s learners function more effectively in their later professional lives.
Personalized learning. New digital tools allow teachers
to personalize lessons to meet students’ unique learning
And when teachers can view in real time how students are
sign of a struggle.
When students and
teachers have access
to interoperable
digital tools in the
classroom such as
tablets, Chromebooks,
laptops, printers
and interactive
whiteboards, learning
is transformed.
Blended learning. Blended learning combines online
instruction with some form of student control over pace, path
or time. When teachers and students have access to mobile
devices, teaching and learning can be extended outside of
classroom walls. This type of learning also raises student engagement:
Seventy-seven percent of teachers said students are more motivated to
learn thanks to technologies that enable blended learning.8
INVEST IN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
in professional development for teachers. The CDE survey on technology
integration found that professional development was in the top three challenges
to implementing a 1:1 computing program, with 52 percent of respondents
stating this. To overcome this challenge, schools and districts should focus on
methods and changing classroom dynamics, and aiding them in developing
skills to use the latest technologies effectively. District-wide professional
share lessons they’ve learned as they expand digital classroom strategies.
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Step 3: Prepare for Using Technology in the Education Environment
Districts can augment these sessions with input from other digitally advanced
schools and with professional development services.
In other instances, the information technology or instructional technology
department will take charge of the skills development necessary for new
technologies. Fortunately, extensive in-depth training may not always
be necessary, since many of the hardware and software interfaces take
advantage of touchscreens and other innovations that simplify interaction
with the applications. Nevertheless, hands-on sessions can help teachers
and administrators become familiar with the devices and answer any initial
questions. Outside of the classroom, similar professional development will
also need to take place for administrators and staff using new technology to
Passaic City Public Schools in New Jersey implemented a 1:1 computing
initiative for nearly 5,000 middle and high-school students. Previously, none of
the district’s classrooms had wireless Internet and up to half of its students
didn’t have access to the Internet at home. The district needed to prepare its
teachers and staff to effectively use the new technology to reach students in
ways not previously possible.
version of their textbook, says Joanna Antoniou, technology coordinator at the
district’s Lincoln Middle School. “The Chromebook isn’t a really expensive pencil.”9
In order to make sure teachers and staff were prepared for the new
technologically advanced learning environment, Passaic City Public Schools
held a series of workshops to target key areas of concern. The workshops
targeted the changing dynamics between teachers and students, the
importance of students understanding the impact of their digital footprint,
and the guidelines for taking and posting pictures, among other things.
Considerations for Professional Development
Educate instructors about the three transformational learning models.
Facilitate discussions with instructors to address questions and concerns about
new teaching methods and use this feedback to create an overall changemanagement program to help staff members accept and adopt the new methods.
Consider organizing a focus group with select students to introduce the new
learning models and solicit feedback; use the insights to develop plans for
rolling out the changes to the larger student body.
Set aside time and resources for workshops and other training to help
instructors understand the opportunities of digital classrooms, and consider
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Step 3: Prepare for Using Technology in the Education Environment
Consider professional development for administrators and other staff, which
Make the expertise of the IT staff available to teachers and administrators via
internal wikis and blogs. These central resources for addressing common
questions and concerns grow over time and can incorporate lessons
learned from teachers and administrators.
Create a best practices handbook based on
interviews with vendor reference accounts.
SAMSUNG SOLUTIONS DELIVER:
Interoperable Digital Learning Environments
Samsung School harnesses Samsung’s latest
technology to create the ultimate interactive learning
environment. Built for the galaxy note 10.1 tablet, the solution provides
interactive teaching tools and an intuitive learning management system
that helps empower teachers and engage students in digital learning.
Mobile Devices
Samsung offers a full-range of mobile computing devices, from Samsung
Chromebooks to Android-powered galaxy tablets and windows 8-based ATIv
notebooks, tablets and hybrids.
Interactive Whiteboards
Samsung interactive whiteboards support multiple points of touch and are
interoperable with classroom computing devices, providing a focal point for
learning and energizing classroom discussions.
Cloud Displays
Samsung Cloud Displays are all-in-one zero-client solutions that are an ideal
solution for crowded computer labs, reducing cable clutter and IT support time.
Digital Signage
Easily share information within schools and with the larger community with
lED-lit digital signs and video walls.
Output Devices
Samsung’s multi-function and networked printers help schools reduce printing
costs and better manage information.
For more information, visit www.samsung.com/education.
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Step 4:
Innovate Outside the Classroom
tools. These areas of support have their individual needs and challenges, and
ARM THE ADMINISTRATION
Because of administrators’ responsibilities to teachers, students and parents
alike, they need powerful tools to perform various tasks — tools to help them
access to critical data.
Unlike original tablets that ran stripped down operating systems, newer devices
can support standard Microsoft Windows business applications. This enables
administrators to consume and create content using a variety of input methods,
such as touchscreen interfaces, digitized pens or optional Bluetooth keyboards.
Docking stations turn the tablets into full-powered notebooks, complete with
high-performance processors found in the fastest desktop machines. This
use of new technology is connecting administrators to teachers, students and
parents in ways not possible before.
At Franklin County School District (FCSD) in North Carolina, administrators
are using tablets as part of a more effective teacher evaluation process.
Following the state’s adoption of online teacher evaluations, administrators
to classroom or transcribing handwritten notes after observations. The
solution the district chose was to equip each administrator with a lightweight
wireless tablet.
“We had been looking at different tablets to build cases for instructional use
and to help administrators increase their productivity,” says Christopher Shearer,
could be solved through wireless tablets.”10
The tablets reduced the amount of time it took administrators to complete
evaluations, and decreased the amount of errors by eliminating the previously
manual process.
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Step 4: Innovate Outside the Classroom
IMPROVE SCHOOLWIDE COMMUNICATION AND COLLABORATION
New interoperable technology solutions not only make it easier for schools
to communicate effectively to teachers, students and staff, but also enable
collaboration — two core tenets of effective education environments.
Large-format digital displays are bridging the communication
gap typically present in schools. Displays can be used to deliver
messages about upcoming events for the school and community
at large, deliver important bulletins to the study body or even to
show the lunch menu in the cafeteria.
Hall County Schools’ Academies of Discovery in Georgia recently
upload video clips or slide shows by connecting a USB stick.
The Academies of Discovery is also using displays to create
New interoperable
technology
solutions not
only make it
easier for schools
to communicate
effectively to
teachers, students
and staff, but
also enable
collaboration.
the Learning Commons — a two-level lounge area for students — with
students to connect their individual mobile computing devices and share their
work. The lounge also has a video wall comprised of nine LED-lit LCD displays,
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Step 4: Innovate Outside the Classroom
which is used for a variety of visual communications and also serves as a
backdrop for student presentations and performances.
“LED large-format displays were the perfect solution for our needs as they
allow our students to work together in a much more direct and engaging
way,” says Dr. Aaron Turpin, executive director of technology at Hall
County Schools.11
School libraries are also encouraging collaboration through technology with
display screens in table tops that students can navigate using touch or a variety
of pointing devices. These technologies let multiple students see and respond
INCREASE BACKOFFICE EFFICIENCIES
Despite the transition to digital tools, many schools and districts still operate in
a paper-based environment. This leads to timely manual processes and makes it
MFPs enable schools to easily convert paper records into digital formats,
and play a pivotal role in achieving document management goals. Lifecycle
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Step 4: Innovate Outside the Classroom
management tools can characterize and store data by when it was created,
and by whether certain regulations require any special management and
these rules to individual records, the data automatically moves to the most
appropriate storehouse, such as front-line education applications or archival
systems, enabling greater access. In addition, print management solutions
consolidation and optimization of the print environment.
Software solutions that combine with MFPs to automate testing and
analyze areas for improvement when it comes to standardized tests
and regulatory requirements.
EASE IT MANAGEMENT AND ENSURE SECURITY
The increase in digital tools coupled with tight resources
presents management, maintenance and security challenges
for IT teams. Fortunately, technologies are also emerging that
provide solutions to these issues.
Desktop virtualization is one such solution by allowing IT
departments to centrally manage computing resources. This
centralized management enables better security because
IT managers can apply security patches and updates to
anti-malware programs to all devices simultaneously versus
maintaining each end-user device individually.
Desktop virtualization also eases device deployment. Aledo
Cloud displays
offer centralized
management
and use a secure
connection to
designated
portions of the
public Internet
— all according
to management
and security
policies enforced
by the school’s
IT department.
and much more when it implemented VMware virtualization
software and Samsung Cloud displays. “Deploying a Samsung Cloud
display was as easy as installing a monitor,” says Brooks Moore, manager
of technology services. “All we had to do was take it out of the box, plug in
the keyboard, mouse, LAN cable and point it to the VMware broker. Instead
minutes.”
other schools running traditional PCs might face. Reduced electricity costs are
another plus. The school estimates the cloud displays are cutting the power bill
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Step 4: Innovate Outside the Classroom
Cloud displays, similar to what Aledo Independent School District deployed,
monitor enclosure for all-in-one units that connect to a cloud-based application
center to access content. They offer centralized management and use a secure
connection to designated portions of the public Internet — all according to
management and security policies enforced by the school’s IT department.
When students shut down their devices for the day, all the data is erased from
the individual machines but stored safely in the cloud, easing security concerns.
Considerations for Innovations Outside the Classroom
decision-making and access to data.
Poll students, teachers and staff to discover how school-wide communication
and collaboration can be improved.
Develop a cost analysis to determine the value of transitioning traditionally
paper-based tasks to digital processes.
Assess ways to simplify management and ensure security of the current
IT environment.
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Step 5: Opt for an Integrated Solution
As schools and districts expand their use of digital technologies, best practices
are emerging to help ensure success. When creating a plan for more effective use
of technology throughout a district, it’s important to remember that technology
isn’t monolithic. Solutions are multi-faceted and each piece of the digital
classroom platform must be integrated into a larger, smoothly operating whole.
The fastest way to achieve this integration is with a complete solution that is
comprehensive range of technology components for classrooms, administrative
with each related piece of the total solution. So, for example, the default
settings on classroom tablets automatically connect the devices to a secure
wireless network and communicate with the nearest multi-function printer
Which of the following are integrated into your digital learning platform?
Student information system
67%
Classroom audio/video system or interactive whiteboards
66%
50%
learning management system
group collaboration functionality
45%
Course scheduling and administration
44%
School announcements and bulletin board
44%
Content management
Instant messaging or other districts’ or institutions’
42%
31%
SouRCE: CDE TEChnology InTEgRATIon SuRvEy, 2013
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Step 5: Opt for an Integrated Solution
with little investment from the IT staff. This saves time and money during the
implementation process and assures that schools quickly see the value of their
technology investments.
Districts and schools should look for three
important components when evaluating
integrated solutions:
1. Interactive Management System (IMS) —
An IMS should offer a way for instructors
64% of respondents
to the CDE Technology
Integration survey
strongly agree or
agree that creating
an integrated digital
learning environment
using interoperable
technologies is a
top priority within
their district.
that students will use during class time. For
example, an instructor could use an IMS to
share images on his or her own computer
display, or content from a student’s device,
to initiate a class discussion. Similarly,
instructors could use IMS collaboration
and interactive technology tools to manage small group, circular learning
centrally locking student screens to refocus attention to the task at hand.
2. Learning Management System (LMS) — These systems should provide a reliable
way for instructors to distribute course materials, assignments, schedules,
school bulletins and other essential content to students or parents in a way that
makes the information available in class or after normal school hours.
3. Student Information System (SIS) — Instructors need to monitor student
attendance, track grades and motivate students with recognition awards or
disciplinary demerits. SIS tools should provide a digital platform for managing
these important areas.
Considerations for Integrated Solutions
Send requests for information (RFI) and requests for proposal (RFP) to
vendors of integrated solutions and use the replies to develop a short list
of candidates.
Ask short-list vendors to install a digital classroom test bed using all the
relevant hardware and software to show teachers, administrators, IT staff,
students and parents the technologies in action.
Obtain customer references and schedule interviews.
Work with selected vendors to develop implementation plans.
Negotiate service and support agreements with solutions vendors.
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Stepping into the Future
The age of digitally delivered education is here. Comprehensive, integrated
technology solutions make it possible for school districts to adopt the latest
innovations to better engage students, improve classroom dynamics and help
administrators meet demands for additional services while closely managing
tight budgets. But no technology comes with a guarantee of success. Schools
and districts need to develop a workable roadmap for digital education, then
choose and implement their solutions carefully. For a growing number of
schools, this upfront work is paying off, and the biggest winners are those
who need it most: today’s students.
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Endnotes
ENDNOTES:
1. www.usnews.com/education/high-schools/articles/2011/07/14/
study-emerging-technology-has-positive-impact-in-classroom
2.
One-to-One_Laptop_Programs_Are_No_Silver_Bullet.aspx
3. www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/technology/
technology-in-schools-faces-questions-on-value.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
4. www.samsung.com/global/business/business-images/resource/
RR-CS/2012/10/EBT15_1210_Samsung_Smart_School_WP-0.pdf
5. www.centerdigitaled.com/paper/sponsored/
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Inside and Outside the Classroom,” Samsung Case Study.
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Embracing 21st Century Learning With BYOD,” Samsung Case Study.
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A R O A D M A P T O D I G I TA L LY D E L I V E R E D E D U C AT I O N
At Samsung we create groundbreaking solutions that empower educators and students to embrace
tomorrow’s opportunities today. our innovative offerings add value to any curriculum by giving
instructors the tools they need to engage students, inspire imaginations, elevate learning and bring
lesson plans to life.
Learn More 1-866-SAM4BIZ | samsung.com/education
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