Games to Play with a Pair of Dice

Games to Play with a Pair of Dice
Games to Play
with a Pair of
Dice
http://mathcoachscorner.blogspot.com/
BUILD THE BIGGEST
Players:
2
Materials:
2 dice, scratch paper
Object:
Build the biggest number possible
How to Play:
Players each draw a game board like the
one shown. Each player rolls their dice and decides where
to place the digit in their number. Once placed, a digit
cannot be moved. The throw away box is used to discard a
digit that a player doesn’t want to use to build their
number. Players continue rolling the dice and placing
digits until their game board is filled. Both players read
their numbers out loud and the largest number wins.
Variations:
 Use more or less digits
 Try to build the smallest number possible
http://mathcoachscorner.blogspot.com/
MORE FAMILY MATH GAMES
Check out these websites for additional math
activities.
Activity Village: http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/dice_games.htm
Instructions and printable score sheets for over 15 games using
dice, adaptable for kids of all ages. Includes tips for parents on
how to manage dice games.
MathWire.com: Games using one die
(http://www.mathwire.com/data/dicetoss1.html)
and two dice (http://www.mathwire.com/data/dicetoss2.html).
Many include printable game boards.
Mixing In Math:
http://mixinginmath.terc.edu/materials/athomewithmath.cfm
Ten math activities for parents and kids (English and Spanish)
US Department of Education, Helping Your Child Learn Mathematics:
http://www2.ed.gov/parents/academic/help/math/index.html
A 43-page booklet made up of fun activities that parents can use
with children from preschool age through grade 5 to strengthen
their math skills and build strong positive attitudes toward math
(English and Spanish)
MAKE 10
Players:
2
Materials:
1 or 2 dice, scratch paper (for
keeping score)
Object:
Make a 10 from the number rolled
One Die Version: One die is rolled. Players try to be the
first player to shout what number needs to be added to the
number on the die to make a ten. The number needed to
make ten becomes the player’s score for that round. For
example, if a 3 is rolled, players would shout 7, because 3
and 7 make 10. The first player to answer correctly earns 7
points.
Two Die Version: Two dice are rolled. Players must now
add or subtract to make ten. For example, if two 6s are
rolled, players would shout 2, because 6 + 6 = 12 and 12 - 2 =
10.
Players can use the ten-frames below for additional support.
CONTAIN THE FUN!
Try this great tip for using
dice! Put them in a small
plastic container. Kids
shake the dice in the
container and read the
numbers rolled through
the plastic.
http://mathcoachscorner.blogspot.com/
BLOCK OUT
PIG
Players:
2
Materials:
1 or 2 dice, 120 chart (optional)
Object:
Be the first player to reach 100
One Die Version: On a turn, a player can roll repeatedly
until one of two things happens (1) the player rolls a 1 or
(2) the player chooses to hold (stop rolling). Each number
rolled is added to the player’s total. If a 1 is rolled, all
points for that turn are lost!
Players:
2
Materials:
2 dice, graph paper, a colored
pencil or crayon for each player,
scratch paper (for totaling scores)
Object:
Cover the largest area by placing
rectangles on graph paper
How to Play:
Alternate turns. On a turn, a player rolls
two dice and draws a rectangle using the numbers rolled
as the length and width on graph paper. For example, if
the numbers rolled are 2 and 3, the player draws a 2 by 3
array.
Scoring examples:
1. Suzy rolls a 4 and decides to continue. She then rolls
5 more times (3, 4, 2, 6, 1). Because she rolled a 1,
her turn ends and she receives no points for the
numbers rolled.
2. Marcus rolls a 6 and decides to continue. He rolls 3
more times (4, 3, 5) and decides to hold. His score
for the round is 18 (6 + 4 + 3 + 5 = 18).
Two Dice Version: Two dice are rolled. If a single 1 is
rolled on either dice, the turn ends and all points are lost.
If two 1s are rolled on a single turn, the player scores 25
points. Doubles, for example a 2 and a 2, are worth double
points (4 x 2 = 8).
Play continues until a player can’t place a rectangle. Both
players add the areas of all of their rectangles, and the
highest score wins.
http://mathcoachscorner.blogspot.com/
CLOSEST TO 100
Players:
2
Materials:
2 dice, 120 chart (optional), scratch
paper for keeping score
Object:
Score as close to 100 as possible
after 5 rounds
How to Play:
Roll two dice and create a 2-digit
number. For example, if a 3 and 5 are rolled, you can
make 35 or 53. Mentally calculate the difference between
the 2-digit number and 100.
One way to find the difference is to count up. For
example, if the number rolled is 53, count up by 10s and
then add the 1s needed to get to 100. So, in the example
below, the difference is 47.
Scoring:
Play 5 rounds. For each round, players
calculate their score as the difference from 100. The player
with a score closet to 100 after 5 rounds wins. This
introduces the element of strategy as players decide how to
combine their numbers rolled to create a difference that
gets their total score as close to 100 as possible!
http://mathcoachscorner.blogspot.com/
CROSS OUT
ODD SQUAD
Players:
2
Players:
2
Materials:
2 dice, scratch paper
Materials:
2 dice, scratch paper
Object:
Have the smallest score
Object:
Have the largest score after 5
rounds
How to Play:
Players each write the digits from 1 to 9
on a piece of paper.
Alternate turns. On a turn, a player rolls two dice, adds the
numbers together, and crosses off one number or a
combination of numbers to equal the sum of the numbers
rolled.
Example: A player rolls a 4 and a 5, for a sum of 9. On
their board, they can cross out any combination of
numbers that equal 9, such as 3 + 6, 1 + 2 + 6, 4 + 5, 9, 4 +
3 + 2, etc.
Play continues. When a player rolls a sum that can’t be
crossed out, they are done rolling for the round. The other
player continues to roll and cross out until they can no
longer cross out a sum.
When both players have reached the point that they can
no longer cross out a sum, each player adds the uncovered
digits on their boards and the smallest sum wins.
How to Play:
Alternate turns. On a turn, a player rolls
both dice. If the number rolled is even, it is used at face
value. If the number rolled is odd, it is multiplied by 10.
Both numbers are then multiplied together, and the
product is the player’s score for that round.
Examples:
1. A player rolls a 2 and a 3. The 2, which is even, is
used at face value. The 3, which is odd, is multiplied
by 10 to get 30. The player then multiplies 2 x 30 for
a total of 60 on the round.
2. A player rolls a 3 and a 5. The player would multiply
30 x 50 for a total of 1,500 for the round.
3. A player rolls a 4 and a 4. The player would multiply
4 x 4 for a 16 on the round.
Play continues for 5 rounds, and the player with the
highest score wins.
Variation: Play by multiplying even numbers by 10 and
odd numbers by 100.
http://mathcoachscorner.blogspot.com/
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement