official rulebook

official rulebook
OFFICIAL RULEBOOK
Deckbuilding
Quick Reference
This Starter game contains two preconstructed decks that you can play
right away. If you’d like to build your own decks from cards you collect here
and in booster packs, there are only a few rules you need to follow:
❂ Your deck must include at least 60 cards, not counting your starting hero. Your hero starts the game in play, and it isn’t considered a part of your deck.
❂ You can’t include more than four copies of a single card in your deck
unless that card has “unlimited” on its type line. You can include any
number of unlimited cards in your deck.
❂ You can include only cards that share one or more trait icons
with your hero in your deck. For example, Spellweaver Jihan has the
and
icons, which means you can include cards with either of
these icons in her deck. Some neutral cards don’t have any trait icons.
You can include those cards in any deck.
❂ Some cards can be used only by a hero with a certain trait. These
cards have “[Trait] Hero Required” in bold in their text box. You
can’t include these cards in your deck unless your hero has that trait. Check out the World of Warcraft ® TCG websites: WoWTCG.com, WoWRealms.com,
WoWCards.org, WoW.TCGPlayer.com, WarcraftCCG.com, WoWTCGDB.com
Table
of
Introduction.......................... 1
Game Overview..................... 1
Object of the Game................ 2
What’s in the Starter Box?..... 2
About This Rulebook.............. 2
Traits ............................... 3
Parts of a Card......................5
Basic Game Terms.................6
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Ready and Exhaust
Resources
Costs
Powers
Target
Uniqueness
Card Types............................9
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G. Hero
Ally
Ability
Weapon
Quest
Armor
Location
Game Zones.......................... 15
Setup ............................... 17
Turn Sequence...................... 18
A.
B. C. Start Phase
Action Phase
End Phase
Contents
Basic Combat........................20
A. B. C.
D.
Proposing and Attacking
Protecting and Defending
Combat Conclusion
Combat with a Hero
Keywords..............................22
Deckbuilding.........................23
The Chain and Responding.....24
A. The Chain
B. C. Responding
Resolving and Interrupting
Damage................................26
A. B. C. Sources and Types of Damage
Healing Damage
Preventing Damage
Limited Formats.....................27
Glossary...............................29
Credits ...............................37
Quick-Reference Rules..........39
What’s New in
Drums of WarTM?....................40
®
Introduction
Welcome to the World of Warcraft® Trading Card Game!
In this game, you control a hero in the world of Azeroth. As you play, your hero can invite allies
to join your party, complete quests, find weapons, and play abilities directly from the World of
Warcraft® online game.
The World of Warcraft® TCG draws from the rich lore of the Warcraft® universe. Two heroes will
meet in the fields of Hillsbrad, but only one will survive the battle. The question of magic vs. steel
will soon be answered. Take on the role of Spellweaver Jihan, the powerful Human Mage, or The
Longeye, the fierce Troll Hunter. May the most cunning hero prevail!
Human Mage
Troll Hunter
This TCG was created by loyal World of Warcraft fans. We hope you enjoy it!
®
Game Overview
Trading card games (TCGs) are different from other games in two ways. First, the cards
in a TCG can change or go beyond the game’s basic rules. The card is always right. That
means you should always do what the card says—even if the rules say something
different.
Second, you get to choose the cards you want to play in your deck.
You can play with the two preconstructed decks in this
Starter game right away, or you can customize your decks
with other cards from the World of Warcraft® TCG. You can
decide which hero to play, which abilities and weapons you
will use, which allies you will invite into your party, and which
quests you will complete. In this game, you have total control
over the power of your deck.
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Object of the Game
The object of the game is to defeat your opponents before they defeat you. Over the course of the
game, your hero and allies will deal damage to your opponents’ characters, and that damage is
permanent unless it is healed. If your opponent’s hero takes fatal damage (damage equal to or
greater than its health), you win the game.
You lose the game if your hero takes fatal damage, or if you run out of cards in your deck and you
can’t draw another card.
The Longeye wins if Spellweaver Jihan takes 25 or more damage.
Spellweaver Jihan wins if The Longeye takes 28 or more damage.
What’s in the Starter Box?
Each Starter box contains:
❂ Two preconstructed decks of 44 cards each (including the hero card), one for each player.
Each deck is wrapped together with its hero card. Each preconstructed deck comes with four
exclusive cards that you won’t find anywhere else!
❂ One UDE Points card. You can accumulate points to earn rewards such as in-game items for
your online World of Warcraft® character, or you can collect and redeem UDE Points cards for
exclusive Crafted promo cards! Go to www.ude.com/recipe for more details. (Note: In some
Starter boxes, the UDE Points card is replaced by a consumable Loot ™ card redeemable for
cosmetic upgrades for your online World of Warcraft® character.)
❂ Three random oversize hero cards from the full Drums of War ™ set. You can collect them or
build decks around them when you buy World of Warcraft® TCG booster packs.
About This Rulebook
The rest of this rulebook is divided into two parts: game rules and the glossary. The game rules will
tell you everything you need to know to start playing the World of Warcraft® TCG. You can reference the
glossary whenever you wish. For an interactive demo, visit www.WoWTCG.com.
Some information in this rulebook goes beyond what you’ll need to know to start
playing the Starter game. These sections are boxed off. You don’t need to learn these rules
to play the Starter game, but they are important for playing the full World of Warcraft®
TCG. For comprehensive tournament rules, visit www.ude.com/WoW/rules.
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Traits
GAME RULES
What a hero can do in the World of Warcraft® TCG is determined by his or her traits, which include
the hero’s faction, race, and class.
Faction Icon
Class Icon
Class
Race
❂ FACTION: The war between the Horde and the Alliance has settled into a tenuous peace. While open warfare may be over, the hostility is not, and skirmishes often break out between the two sides.
The Alliance: Founded just before the Second War, the Alliance currently includes the valiant
Humans of Stormwind, the mighty Bronzebeard Dwarves of Ironforge, the mysterious Night
Elves of Darnassus, and the brilliant Gnomes, refugees of the irradiated city of Gnomeregan.
The newest members of the Alliance are the spiritual Draenei, whose dimensional vessel
recently crashed on Azeroth as they fled there to find new allies against the Demons of the
Burning Legion.
The Horde: The races of the new Horde came together under Warchief Thrall in the wake of
the Second War and the journey to Kalimdor. The Horde is made up of the fierce Orcs, the
cunning Darkspear Trolls, the noble Tauren, and the ruthless Forsaken, Undead who broke
free of their enslavement to the Lich King. The newest members of the Horde are the Blood
Elves, who are shunned by the Alliance because they feed their magical addiction with
demonic energies.
❂ RACE: This Starter game includes heroes from the Human and Troll races, but all ten races are represented in the TCG.
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❂ CLASS: This Starter game includes heroes from the Hunter and Mage classes, and seven other classes are currently represented in the TCG. Read below to learn about the different classes you can unlock when you buy World of Warcraft® TCG booster packs.
Druid: Keepers of the natural order of the world, Druids can shapeshift into different
animal forms. They harness the power of nature to heal their allies and harm their
enemies.
Hunter: Hunters are deadly marksmen who share a special bond with the beasts of
Azeroth. Tracking down elusive prey and leading the unwary into cleverly placed traps,
the Hunter is further aided by an animal ally.
Mage: Channeling the volatile energies of the Twisting Nether, Magi can cast
powerful direct damage and area of effect spells that can harm or disable many
enemies at once.
Paladin:These champions of the Light are skilled fighters and healers, and they
offer great support to their teammates. With their blessings, auras, and plate armor,
Paladins are a force to be reckoned with.
Priest: The Priests of Azeroth are spread across many races and faiths. Those who
lean toward shadow have great power to melt faces, while those who specialize in holy
pursuits are incredible healers.
GAME RULES
Rogue: Masters of stealth and subtlety, Rogues are deadly assassins. They
complement their skills in combat with a seemingly endless supply of tricks. Rogues
have access to poisons, stealth, combo cards, and finishing moves.
Shaman: Shamans have an arsenal of weapons at their disposal. They are spiritual
leaders and masters of the elements, using healing abilities and totems to buff the
entire party.
Warlock: Warlocks channel demonic energies to destroy their enemies with curses,
damage over time effects, and the most powerful debuffs in the game.
Warrior: As tanks and damage dealers, Warriors are most at home in the thick of
battle. They have access to the most weapons, armor, and shields. Warriors are also the
best tanking class, which is represented by the protector power in the TCG.
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Parts of a Card
GAME RULES
World of Warcraft® TCG cards have:
❂ A name.
❂ A cost in the upper left corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust (turn sideways) to play the card from your hand.
❂ Trait icons, which are important when you construct your deck. (See the “Traits” and “Deckbuilding” sections for more information.)
❂ A type line between the art and the text box, which tells you what type of card it is. A card’s type line may have one or more tags (such as “pet” or “wand”) that other cards may reference.
❂ A text box under the type line, which tells you the card’s powers.
❂ A collector number that tells you the card’s number within the set and what set it’s from.
The color of the collector number also tells you the card’s rarity: white for common, green for uncommon, blue for rare, purple for epic, and orange for legendary.
Cost
Type Line
Collector Number
5
Card Name
Trait Icon
Text Box
Basic Game Terms
A. Ready and Exhaust
Exhausted
Ready
When a card enters play, it starts out ready,
as shown here.
When you want to use a card in play, you usually
exhaust it. To exhaust a card, turn it sideways
as shown here.
At the start of each of your turns, ready all of your cards in play.
B. Resources
Resources are like currency in this game. You exhaust resources to pay the costs of various
actions, such as inviting allies into your party or using your hero’s abilities.
GAME RULES
On each of your turns, you may choose any card from your hand to place (put into play) as a
resource. To place a resource, put it into play in your resource row face down. Quests and locations
may be placed face up. (See the “Card Types” and “Game Zones” sections for more information.)
C. Costs
Å cost is anything you must pay to play a card, use a power, or perform any other game action.
Resource costs on a card or power are represented by a number within a resource cost symbol.
These symbols are shown above. You pay a resource cost by exhausting that many resources. For
example, a Horde ally that you must exhaust two resources to play will have a 2 (
) in its upper
left corner, and a power that you must exhaust two resources to use will have a 2 as part of
its cost.
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D. Powers
GAME RULES
The text in a card’s text box tells you that card’s powers. Read the text and follow the instructions
to use a card’s power. Many powers have costs to use them.
Power
E. Target
If a card tells you to target something, you must choose a target as you play the card. If there is no
legal target (a target that fits the description given on the card), you can’t play the card.
Example: You play an ability that reads, “Exhaust target ally.” As you play it, you
choose an ally. If there are no allies in play, you can’t play that ability.
Once you choose a target, you can’t change your mind, even if something happens to the target you
picked.
F. Uniqueness
Some cards have “unique” on their type line. Any time you have more than one unique card in your
party with the same name, you must immediately destroy all but one of them. You choose which
one to keep.
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These cards are unique, so only one of each of
them can be in your party at the same time.
Some cards have a tag on their type line followed by a number in parentheses. That number tells
you how many cards with that tag you can have on your side at the same time. Any time you control
more than that number of cards with that tag, you must immediately destroy all but that number of
them. You choose which ones to keep.
Example: Zip has the Pet (1) tag, as shown here. This means you can have only
one Pet card in your party. Any time you have more than one, you must immediately
destroy all but one of them. You choose which one to keep.
GAME RULES
Only unique cards and cards with restricting tags have limits on how many you can have in your
party. For example, you can have more than one copy of the ally Orono the Great in your party at the
same time.
Orono isn’t unique and he doesn’t have any
restricting tags.
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GAME RULES
A. Hero
Card Types
Your hero represents you, the leader of your party.
Each hero has a health value printed in the lower right corner, which tells you how much damage
the hero can take. If your hero takes damage greater than or equal to its health (fatal damage),
you’re out of the game.
Your hero can attack and defend against opposing characters, but to deal damage in combat, your
hero usually must strike with a weapon.
Your hero is a member of either the Alliance or the Horde, but your faction doesn’t restrict whom you
can challenge in a match. For example, an Alliance hero can fight another Alliance hero.
Each hero card has two sides. You start the game with the side that has the type line on it face up.
During the game, you may use your hero’s power, which causes the hero to be flipped over to the side
that has full artwork. You can flip your hero card even if it’s exhausted.
Unless a card says otherwise, once a hero is flipped over, it won’t flip back to the other side again.
That means you can most likely use your hero’s power only once per game.
Spellweaver Jihan
Front
Back
Faction
Class
Race
Talent Spec
Power
Professions
Health
25
Spellweaver Jihan
To use Spellweaver Jihan’s power, you must flip her face down. Then, the next time you play an
ability card that turn that says “your hero deals” damage (such as Ice Lance), that much damage
+1 is dealt instead.
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The Longeye
Front
To use The Longeye’s power, you must
exhaust five of your resources, flip him
face down, and choose an opposing ally.
Then, you destroy that ally if it has or is Power
tied for the highest cost among opposing
allies. For example, if your opponent has
three allies on his or her side with cost 1,
3, and 3, respectively, you would target
either of the 3-cost allies.
Back
Health
You can use The Longeye’s power only on your turn.
Cost
B. Ally
Åt the start of the game, your party contains only your
hero, but as the game progresses you can invite allies
to join your party. Allies can attack and defend against
opposing characters, and many of them have powers that
you can use during the game.
Horde Ally Card
Power
Health
Ally cards can be played only during your turn unless they
have “instant” on their type line. Instant allies can be played
any time, including during your opponent’s turn.
You can attack with an ally only if it has been in your party since the start of your most
recent turn.
GAME RULES
In addition to the cost in the upper left corner, each ally card has:
❂ A health value in the lower right corner,
which tells you how much damage the ally
can take. An ally that takes fatal damage
(damage equal to or greater than its
health) is destroyed and goes to its owner’s
graveyard.
❂ An attack value (ATK) in the lower left corner,
which tells you how much damage the ally
deals in combat. There’s also a symbol
around the ATK that tells you what kind of
combat damage the ally deals. While the kind
of combat damage dealt has no impact on
the game, other cards may refer to it.
Cost
Alliance Ally Card
Faction
Power
Health
ATK and Damage Symbol
10
C. Ability
Cost
Ability Card
Åbilities represent your hero’s special skills and magical
GAME RULES
spells.
Ability cards can be played only during your turn unless they
have “instant” on their type line. Instant abilities can be
played any time, including during your opponent’s turn.
Power
Most abilities go to your graveyard after you play them from
your hand, but abilities with “ongoing” in their text box enter
play. The text after the word “ongoing” tells you what the
ability’s powers are while it’s in play.
If an ongoing ability tells you to attach it to a card in play, you
put the ability underneath that card as the ability enters play.
As a card leaves play, each ability attached to that card goes
to its owner’s graveyard.
Ongoing
More than one ongoing ability can be attached to the same
card—even abilities with the same name.
D. Weapon
Your hero starts the game with no ATK, but while your hero
is in combat, you can strike with a ready weapon to increase
your hero’s ATK for the combat. To strike with a weapon, pay
its strike cost and exhaust it. Weapon cards can be wielded
only by your hero.
Weapon cards can be played only during your
turn unless they have “instant” on their type
line. Instant weapons can be played any time,
including during your opponent’s turn.
You can strike with a weapon on the same
turn that it enters play.
Cost
Weapon Card
Power
You can strike with only one weapon during
ATK and Damage
a combat, but you can strike with that
Symbol
weapon multiple times if you can find a way
to ready it.
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Attachment
Power
Strike Cost
If you strike with a weapon multiple times in the same combat, you add its ATK to your hero’s each
time you strike.
If your weapon leaves play after you’ve struck with it, your hero gets to keep the ATK bonus for the
duration of the combat.
Your hero doesn’t have to be attacking to strike with a weapon. You can also strike with a weapon if
your hero is defending. Even if your hero is exhausted, you can still strike with a weapon.
In addition to the cost in the upper left corner, each weapon card has:
❂ A strike cost in the lower right corner, which tells you how many resources you must exhaust to
strike with the weapon.
❂ An ATK in the lower left corner, which tells you how much ATK the weapon gives your hero for
the combat after you strike with it. There’s also a symbol around the ATK that tells you what
kind of damage is dealt.
E. Quest
On each of your turns, you may choose any card from your hand to place (put into play) face down
as a resource. When you choose a quest card to place as a resource, you may place it face up.
Quests have an exclamation point instead of a cost in the upper left corner.
While a quest is face up in your resource row, you can pay costs with it like you would with a facedown resource (by exhausting it), and you can also complete it to receive its reward.
Quest Power
GAME RULES
As you complete a quest, you must turn the card face down to show that it’s been completed. You
can complete a quest whether it’s ready or exhausted.
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GAME RULES
Example: You have a quest face up in your resource row that reads, “Pay to
complete this quest. Reward: Draw a card.” If you exhaust three resources and
turn this quest face down, you draw a card. (Note that you can exhaust the quest
itself to pay part of the resource cost.) Once turned over, a quest stays face down
in your resource row. You can still use it as a resource to pay costs, but you can’t
complete it again because it’s no longer face up.
Unless the card says otherwise, you can complete a quest on the same turn that it enters play, or
during any phase of any player’s turn.
F. Armor
Åny time damage would be dealt to your hero—both inside and outside of
combat—you can exhaust a ready armor card to prevent damage equal to that armor’s
DEF. Armor can prevent all types of damage, including damage from abilities. Armor can
be used only by your hero.
Armor cards can be played only during your turn
unless they have “instant” on their type line.
Instant armor can be played any time, including
during your opponent’s turn.
You can exhaust an armor or use its
on the same turn that it enters play.
Cost
powers
You can exhaust multiple armor cards to prevent
damage from a single source. For example, you
can exhaust both an armor with 1 DEF and an
armor with 2 DEF to prevent 3 damage that would
be dealt to your hero.
DEF
Unlike other cards and effects that prevent damage:
❂Using armor is optional. You exhaust an armor only if you want to use it.
❂If an armor prevents damage that’s less than its DEF, the remaining DEF
is wasted.
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Example: Your hero would be dealt 2 damage, and you control a
ready armor with 3 DEF. If you exhaust the armor, it prevents the
2 damage, and the remaining 1 DEF is wasted. That armor won’t
prevent any additional damage later in the turn unless you ready it
and use it again.
You can exhaust armor to prevent damage only while you’re taking damage. For
example, if your opponent plays an ability that destroys a piece of your armor, you can’t
exhaust that armor to prevent future damage.
G. Location
L ocations are a new card type in Drums of War™ booster packs. They have a map
instead of a cost in the upper left corner.
Like quests, locations enter play only as
resources, and you may place them face up.
Unlike quests, locations stay face up in your
resource row, even after you use their powers.
However, if you ever have more than one
location face up in your resource row, you must
immediately turn all but one face down. You
choose which one stays face up.
Power
GAME RULES
Some locations have the word “objective” on their
type line. Each objective in Drums of War ™ has
one or more powers that refer to the number of
capture counters on it. In addition, each has a
capacity value in its lower right corner, which is
the maximum number of capture counters that
location can have.
Capacity
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GAME RULES
Game Zones
Your cards can be in any one of six game zones. Each player has a deck zone, a hand zone, a
graveyard zone, and a removed from game zone. All players share the chain zone and the play zone.
While you’re playing a game, your zones will look something like this:
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15
❂ You shuffle your deck and allow your opponent to cut it before each game starts. During a
game, cards in your deck are face down, and you can’t look through any player’s deck.
❂ Your hand is where you hold the cards you draw. Only you get to see the cards in your hand.
❂ Your graveyard is where your “dead” cards go. Cards that have been destroyed or discarded
go into your graveyard. Cards in a graveyard are face up, and you can look through any player’s
graveyard.
❂ The chain is where cards and effects go after you play them but before they have an impact on
the game. For more information, see “The Chain and Responding.”
❂ The play zone is where most of the game’s action happens. Allies, equipment (including
weapons), resources, and ongoing abilities enter play here. Each player has an ally row for
allies; a hero row for equipment, ongoing abilities, and his or her hero; and a resource row
for resources. To see where the different types of cards belong in the play zone, look at the
diagram.
❂ The removed from game zone is where players put cards that have been removed from
the game. The removed from game zone isn’t the same as the graveyard, so cards in the
removed from game zone aren’t accessible by cards like Crusader Strike, for example.
GAME RULES
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16
GAME RULES
Setup
This Starter game comes with two preconstructed decks that are ready to play. The only other
things you need are counters or dice to represent damage. Remember that damage on a character is
permanent unless the damage is healed or the character leaves play.
Each player starts by putting his or her hero into play. Then, flip a coin. The winner of the flip
decides which player goes first.
After shuffling, each player draws an opening hand of seven cards.
Starting with the first player, each player who doesn’t like his or her opening hand can mulligan. To
mulligan, shuffle your opening hand of cards into your deck and then draw a new opening hand of
seven cards. Each player can mulligan only once each game, and only at the start of the game.
Example: Your opening hand contains seven ability cards, each with cost 5 or
greater. If you keep that opening hand, you probably won’t be able to do anything
for the first few turns of the game, so you decide to mulligan.
After each player has settled on an opening hand, the first player’s turn starts.
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Turn Sequence
Each player’s turn is divided into three phases, and some phases are divided into steps.
Propose Combats
GAME RULES
A. Start Phase
Your start phase is divided into two steps: the ready step and the draw step.
Ready Step
As your ready step starts, you ready (turn upright) all your cards in play.
Draw Step
As your draw step starts, you draw a card.
On the first player’s first turn, he or she doesn’t draw a card.
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B. Action Phase
GAME RULES
During your action phase, you can do any of four actions in any order: play a card, use a power,
place one resource, and propose a combat.
You may place only one resource a turn, but you may perform each of the other actions as
many times as you like.
1. Play a Card
To play a card, take it from your hand, pay its cost (the number in the upper left corner) by
exhausting that many of your resources, and follow the instructions in its text box.
Once you’ve done that:
❂ If the card is a weapon, it enters play beside your hero in your hero row.
❂ If it’s an ally, it enters play in your ally row.
❂ If it’s an attachment, it enters play underneath the card it’s attaching to.
❂ If it’s an ongoing ability that doesn’t attach to a card, it enters play in your hero row.
❂ If it’s a non-ongoing ability (an ability that doesn’t have “ongoing” in its text box), it goes to
your graveyard.
2. Use a Power
You can use payment powers during any phase of any player’s turn. You can recognize a payment
power by the arrow symbol ( ) in its text. The text before the
is the cost to use the payment
is what happens when you do. To use a payment power, pay its
power, and the text after the
cost and then do whatever the text after the
says to do.
Unless a card says otherwise, you can use a payment power as many times as you’d like, as long as
you can afford to pay the cost each time.
You can also complete quests in your resource row during any phase of any player’s turn.
3. Place One Resource
You may place one resource on each of your turns. To place a resource, take any card from your
hand and put it face down into your resource row. If the card is a quest or location, you may place it
face up. If you do, you can use its powers once it’s in play.
4. Propose a Combat
You can attack with your ready hero and allies. You’ll learn about how combat works in the “Basic
Combat” section.
C. End Phase
Åfter you’re done with your action phase, you move into your end phase.
During your end phase:
❂ You can no longer place a resource, propose combats, or play cards other than instants.
❂ Any player can play instants, use powers, and complete quests.
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Once all players have performed the actions they want to do, you move into your wrap-up step.
During your wrap-up step, if you have more cards in hand than the maximum hand size (seven
cards), you must discard until you have only the maximum hand size.
After a player’s wrap-up step is over, the next player begins his or her start phase.
Basic Combat
A. Proposing and Attacking
To propose a combat, choose a proposed defender and a ready hero or ally in your party to be the
proposed attacker.
Your opponents get a chance to respond to your attack proposal. If they exhaust the proposed
attacker or use a power that says the proposed attacker can’t attack, that hero or ally never
exhausts to attack, and that combat never starts. (See “The Chain and Responding” for more
information.) Otherwise, a combat step begins.
As a combat step starts, your proposed attacker exhausts (turns sideways) to attack. At this point,
there’s a window for you and your opponents to play cards and use powers. Only instant cards can
be played during a combat.
B. Protecting and Defending
If an opponent is attacking and you have a ready protector, you can choose to exhaust that protector
GAME RULES
to have it become the proposed defender. This represents the power for classes to “tank.”
The protectors in this Starter game are Hovin the Shield, Nok’tal the Savage, and Swordsmith Hanso.
These allies can protect other friendly characters.
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This is the only time a character can protect. You can’t, for example, exhaust a protector to protect
against an ability that’s targeting one of your characters.
GAME RULES
Next, the proposed defender starts defending, then there’s a second window for you and your
opponents to play instants and use powers.
C. Combat Conclusion
Ås a combat concludes, if the attacker and defender are both still in combat, they deal combat
damage to each other equal to their ATK. Characters deal combat damage whether they are ready
or exhausted.
There are other things that can happen in a combat if the attacker or defender is a hero, but for now,
let’s look at an example of a combat between two allies.
Example: You propose an ally in your party to attack an opposing ally. Your proposed attacker has 2
ATK / 3 health, and the proposed defender has 1 ATK / 2 health. Your opponent has no responses, so
you exhaust your attacker. Your opponent has no protectors, so the proposed defender becomes the
defender. As the combat concludes, your attacker deals 2 combat damage to the defender, and the
defender deals 1 combat damage to your attacker. The defender is destroyed because it has taken
fatal damage. Your attacker has taken 1 damage, but it is not destroyed because it has 3 health.
D. Combat with a Hero
If your hero is the attacker or defender, there are two things you can do in addition to the steps
listed above:
❂Strike with a weapon: After the defender starts defending, you can strike with a weapon to
add its ATK to your hero’s ATK for the rest of the combat. This is the only time a player can
strike with a weapon. To strike with a weapon, pay its strike cost and exhaust it. You can
only strike with one weapon per combat, but you can strike with it multiple times if you find a
way to ready it.
Example: Your hero has 6 damage.
You propose your hero to attack an
opposing ally with 1 ATK / 2 health.
Your opponent has no protectors, so
that ally becomes the defender. Your
hero has a ready weapon with 2 ATK, so
you pay that weapon’s strike cost and
exhaust it to give your hero +2 ATK for
the combat. As the combat concludes,
your hero deals 2 combat damage to
the defender, and the defender deals
1 combat damage to your hero. The
defender is destroyed because it has
taken fatal damage. You add 1 damage
to your hero, for a total of 7.
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❂ Use armor: Any time your hero would be dealt damage, you may exhaust your armor to
prevent damage to your hero equal to the armor’s DEF. Armor can be used to prevent
all types of damage, even damage outside of combat.
Keywords
Some words have special meaning in the World of Warcraft® TCG. These keywords appear on cards
in bold text. Some cards with keywords also have reminder text in italics, mainly for the benefit of
newer players.
The following keywords appear in the text box:
❂ Berserking: A Troll with berserking has +1 ATK for each damage on it.
❂ Elusive: Elusive characters can’t be attacked. However, they can still attack, and they can still
be targeted by cards and effects as usual.
❂ Ferocity: An ally with ferocity can attack on the same turn that it joins a party.
❂ Long-Range: While a character with long-range is attacking, defenders deal no combat
damage to it.
❂ Protector: A character with protector can exhaust to defend in place of a proposed defender.
(See “Basic Combat.”)
❂ Diplomacy: A Human with diplomacy lets you pay
to a minimum of .
GAME RULES
❂ Conspicuous: Any opposing character may protect against a conspicuous attacker.
less to play a certain kind of ally,
❂ Shadowmeld: A Night Elf with shadowmeld is elusive and untargetable while ready.
❂ Stealth: While a character with stealth is attacking, opposing characters can’t protect.
❂ Trap: You may exhaust your defending hero rather than pay the cost of a trap ability.
❂ Untargetable: An untargetable card in play can’t be targeted by any player’s cards or
effects.
❂ War Stomp: When a Tauren with war stomp attacks or defends, you may exhaust target
opposing hero or ally.
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GAME RULES
Deckbuilding
With a TCG, you get to decide what cards you want to have in your deck. Once you’ve played some
games with the preconstructed decks, you can get more cards to build a deck of your own.
There are only a few rules you need to follow when building your deck:
❂ Your deck must include at least 60 cards, not counting your starting hero. Your hero starts the game in play, and it isn’t considered a part of your deck.
❂ You can’t include more than four copies of a single card in your deck unless that card has “unlimited” on its type line. You may include any number of unlimited cards in your deck.
❂ You can include only cards that share one or more trait icons with your hero in your deck. For example, Spellweaver Jihan has the
and
icons, which means you can
include cards with either of these icons in her deck. Some neutral cards don’t have any trait
icons. You can include those cards in any deck.
❂ Some cards can be used only by a hero who has
a certain trait. These cards have “[Trait] Hero
Required” in bold in their text box. You can’t include
these cards in your deck unless your hero has that trait.
The Red Bearon is a neutral ally
and can be used by Horde and
Alliance heroes.
Netherbane can be used
by Paladins, Shamans, and
Warriors.
❂ Some Constructed tournaments allow players to bring a ten-card side deck. If a side deck is
used, it can contain any card that would be allowed in your main deck. You can switch out
cards from your side deck on a one-for-one basis after the first game of a match. Some cards
have interesting mechanics that interact with your side deck.
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The Chain and Responding
There are often times when you want to do something after your opponent plays a card but before
that card affects the game. The chain allows you to do that.
The chain is the zone where cards and effects go after they are played but before they have an
impact on the game. While a card or effect is waiting on the chain, you can do things that will
impact the game before that card or effect does.
A. The Chain
Most actions you take in this game don’t happen right away. First, they put a card or effect on the
chain, where it waits to resolve. Only when that card or effect resolves does something happen. The
chain keeps track of the order in which things happen in the game.
Cards and effects resolve off the chain in reverse order. This means that if you put something on
the chain after your opponent does, your card or effect will have an impact on the game first.
B. Responding
The turn player always gets to act first at the start of a phase or step.
Whenever a card or effect goes on the chain, players get a chance to respond to it by using payment
powers, completing quests, or playing instants of their own. If no one wants to respond, the card
or effect resolves and has its impact on the game right away. If someone does respond, the chain
determines the order in which things happen.
GAME RULES
The player who put the last card or effect on the chain gets priority to respond to it with as many
actions as he or she wants. Once that player passes priority (which means he or she is done making
actions), the other player gets priority to respond with as many actions as he or she wants.
When there are no more responses to the last card or effect on the chain, it resolves and has its
impact on the game. Then, the next-to-last card or effect on the chain is ready to resolve. At this
point, the turn player gets priority to respond to that card or effect, and that player can continue
making actions until he or she passes to the next player. This process continues until everything
has resolved off the chain. Once the chain is empty, if no one adds to it, the game moves on.
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GAME RULES
Example: Your opponent’s hero, Spellweaver
Jihan, has 25 health and 22 damage. During your
turn, you target Jihan with Sudden Shot, which
says, “Your hero deals 3 ranged damage to target
hero or ally.” Your ability card goes on the chain,
and then you pass priority to your opponent.
Your opponent responds by paying
and
destroying Conjured Cinnamon Roll, which adds
an effect to the chain that says, “Your hero heals
1 damage from itself for each of your resources.”
Then your opponent passes priority back to you.
You choose not to respond, so the last thing added
to the chain (your opponent’s healing effect)
resolves. As it resolves, your opponent has seven
resources, so Jihan heals 7 damage from herself.
You both get another chance to respond to Sudden
Shot, with priority going to you first (since you’re
the turn player). Neither one of you chooses to
respond, so your ability resolves and your hero
deals 3 ranged damage to Jihan. When everything
is done resolving, Jihan has 18 damage.
C . Resolving and Interrupting
When a card or effect resolves, it does what its text says it does (or as much as it can) and then
leaves the chain. The only exception is when that card or effect has one or more targets and none
of those targets is legal when it tries to resolve. If that happens, the card or effect is interrupted.
A card or effect that’s interrupted is simply stopped, with no other impact on the game.
An interrupted card is put into its owner’s graveyard.
Example: You play an ability that says, “Your hero deals 2 damage to target ally.
Draw a card,” targeting an opposing ally. In response, your opponent uses a power
that destroys that ally. When your ability tries to resolve, none of its targets is
legal, so the ability is interrupted, which means you don’t draw a card and the
ability goes into your graveyard.
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Damage
A. Sources and Types of Damage
The source of damage is whoever dealt it. Heroes and allies are the source of combat damage they
deal, and other cards that deal damage will tell you who the source of that damage is.
Damage also has a type. Most cards that deal damage will tell you what type of damage they deal.
The symbol around an ally’s ATK tells you what type of combat damage it deals, and the symbol
around a weapon’s ATK tells you what type of combat damage a hero deals with that weapon. While
damage types have no impact on the game, other cards may refer to them.
These are the eight damage symbols:
Arcane
Fire
Frost
Holy
Melee
Nature
Ranged
Shadow
Some cards refer to the type of damage dealt to a character. For example, Hunter’s Mark has a
power that says, “If attached hero would be dealt ranged or
damage, it’s dealt that much +1
instead.” This means that if a
ally or a hero striking with a
weapon deals combat damage
to the hero that Hunter’s Mark is attached to, or if a card says that a character deals “ranged
damage” to that hero, another point of damage will be added to the damage total.
B. Healing Damage
GAME RULES
Damage on a character is permanent unless it is healed or the character leaves play. If damage
is healed from a character, simply remove that many damage counters from it. Conjured Cinnamon
Roll is the only card in this Starter game that heals damage.
You can’t heal damage that hasn’t been dealt, and once a character has taken fatal damage, it’s
too late to heal it.
Example: An ally in your party has 2 health and no damage. Your opponent plays
a card that reads, “Your hero deals 2 damage to target ally,” and you have a card
in your hand that reads, “Your hero heals 1 damage from target ally.” However,
playing that card in response won’t do anything because your ally has no damage.
As your opponent’s card resolves, 2 damage is added to your ally, which destroys
it immediately. You don’t have a chance to heal fatal damage once it has been
dealt.
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C. Preventing Damage
GAME RULES
Some cards and effects prevent damage from being dealt to a character. When one of
these resolves, the damage that would be dealt is prevented until the described amount of
damage has been prevented or the duration ends (whichever comes first).
Cards and effects that prevent damage are always applied after anything that increases
damage.
Example: Your opponent controls an ability that reads, “If your hero would
deal damage, it deals that much +1 instead.” That opponent attacks your
hero with his hero, striking with a weapon with 2 ATK. You use a power
that reads, “Prevent the next 2 damage that would be dealt to your hero
this turn.” The damage is first increased to 3, and then 2 of that damage is
prevented. Your opponent’s hero deals 1 combat damage to your hero.
If the damage that would be dealt is greater than the amount prevented, the character takes
damage equal to the difference.
Example: Your opponent plays a card that reads, “Your hero deals 1
melee damage to target hero or ally” and targets your hero. In response,
you use a power that reads, “Prevent the next 2 damage that would be
dealt to your hero this turn.” Your effect resolves first and prevents the
damage. Later that turn, your hero is attacked by an ally with 2 ATK. As
that combat concludes, the 1 remaining damage is prevented, and the ally
deals 1 combat damage to your hero.
If a card or effect says, “Put X damage on a hero or ally,” you can’t prevent that damage,
because putting damage on a card is different from dealing damage to it.
Limited Formats
Whether you’re seeing some of the cards for the first time or looking for that last rare to complete
your deck, one of the most fun things about a TCG is cracking open new packs. One way to do this
is by playing in a Limited event, which means you build your decks from a limited card pool that’s
provided for you. In the World of Warcraft® TCG, there are two Limited formats: Sealed Pack and
Booster Draft. These formats combine the fun of tearing into new packs with the challenge of
deckbuilding and playing with your new cards. When you play Sealed Pack or Booster Draft, you
get to play with all of your new cards, not just the ones that you’re going to put into your
Constructed decks.
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You can play Sealed Pack with any number of your friends. To play, each person will need six
boosters. Open your boosters and then set aside all Loot ™ and UDE Points cards, as they aren’t
allowed in Sealed decks. After that, look through the remaining cards and decide which hero you
want to be. You can be any hero available in the sets used at the tournament. Once you’ve chosen
your hero and built a deck of at least 30 cards to go with it, you’re ready to play. The cards that
don’t make your Sealed deck will become your side deck if you choose to play with one or if side
decks are allowed at your tournament.
You can choose to be any hero in the sets allowed at
your event.
When you build your deck, make sure you have a good mix of quests and other cards. Also keep in
mind that the fewer cards you have in your deck, the more likely you are to draw your best ones, so
you should stick as close to the 30-card minimum as you can.
GAME RULES
To do a Booster Draft, you’ll need between four and eight people, and each person will need three
packs. Everyone sits around a table, and then each player opens his or her first booster and sets
aside all Loot™ and UDE Points cards. After that, each player picks a card from the pack to go into
his or her deck and passes the rest of the cards to the player on the left. You repeat this process
for each booster that’s passed to you, taking one card to add to your deck and passing the rest.
Once all the cards from the first set of packs have been drafted, the process is repeated for the
second set of packs, and then the third. Alternate the direction that you pass cards for each set.
Once all the cards have been drafted, you choose your hero—like in Sealed Pack, it can be any hero
available in the sets used at the tournament—and build a 30-card (minimum) deck from the cards
you drafted. The cards that don’t make your Draft deck will become your side deck.
While you’re drafting, in addition to following the guidelines for building a Sealed deck, make sure
you decide early on which hero you’re going to be. You don’t just want to take the best card out of
every pack; you want to take the card that’s going to be the best in your deck, so it’s important to
know what traits you’ll be able to play. You also want to get a healthy mix of card types and card
costs, because no matter how good each of your cards is on its own, you probably won’t win if your
deck is made up of eighteen armor cards and only four allies, or if everything in your deck costs 5
or more.
Playing Sealed Pack or Booster Draft is a great way to familiarize yourself with all the cards in a set.
Because you’ve got a limited number of cards to work with, you’ll find yourself playing with (and
playing against) a lot of cards that you might not have considered including in a Constructed deck.
This increases your chances of knowing what tricks your opponents might have put into their decks,
and it also lets you find new cards and combos to put into Constructed decks of your own.
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Glossary
ABILITY: An ability is a type of card. Most abilities go to your graveyard after you play them, but
ongoing abilities enter play.
ACTIVATE: Some payment powers have an activate symbol (
) as part of their
cost. To activate a card, you exhaust it (turn it sideways). An exhausted card can’t
be activated. You can use an ally’s activated powers only if it has been in your party
continuously since the start of your most recent turn. Only allies have this restriction.
You can use the activated powers of any other card type the turn that it enters play.
ALLY TOKEN: Some cards tell you to put an ally token into play. You can use anything to represent
an ally token. An ally token is just like a regular ally while it’s in play, so you can’t attack with it
until it’s been in your party since the start of your most recent turn. An ally token has cost 0 and
can exist only in the play zone—if it moves to another zone, it ceases to exist. Ally tokens don’t go
into your deck or graveyard.
ATK: This is the attack value of a card. A card’s ATK is the number in its lower left
corner. A hero or ally’s ATK is how much combat damage it deals, and the symbol
around the ATK tells you what type of damage it is. If you strike with a weapon,
its ATK and damage type are added to your hero. The symbol around the weapon’s
ATK tells you what type of combat damage your hero deals after you strike with the
weapon. Most weapons deal melee or ranged damage.
ATTACH: If an ability tells you to attach it to a card, you put the ability underneath that card as
the ability enters play. If a card leaves play, each ability that is attached to it goes to its owner’s
graveyard. More than one ongoing ability can be attached to the same card—even abilities with the
same name. For example, several copies of Turn the Blade could be attached to the same weapon
or ally.
GLOSSARY
ATTACHMENT: An attachment card can be identified by the words “attach to” followed by a
description of what the card attaches to.
ATTACKER: An attacker is a hero or ally that’s attacking. A hero or ally becomes an attacker as it
exhausts to attack, and it stops being an attacker if it is removed from combat or the combat ends.
BEAR FORM: This is a keyword that a Druid hero can have. While a Druid is in bear form, it’s a
protector. Ability cards will usually tell you when your hero is in bear form. Those abilities are
destroyed when you strike with a weapon or play any ability other than a Feral one.
CARD TYPE: There are eight different card types: hero, ally, ability, weapon, armor, item, quest, and
location.
CAT FORM: This is a keyword that a Druid hero can have. While a Druid is in cat form, it has +1 ATK
29
while attacking. Ability cards will usually tell you when your hero is in cat form. Those abilities are
destroyed when you strike with a weapon or play any ability other than a Feral one.
GLOSSARY
CHAIN: The chain is the zone where cards and effects go before they resolve. The chain keeps track
of the order in which things happen in the game. The order that things resolve off the chain is “last
on, first off.”
CHARACTER: A character is a hero, ally, or Totem.
COMBAT: During your action phase, you can propose combats with ready heroes and allies in your
party. A hero or ally can attack any opposing character, unless the opposing character is elusive.
COMBAT DAMAGE: Combat damage is damage that’s dealt by an attacker or defender during the
conclusion of a combat. Any other damage is not combat damage, even if it is dealt during a combat
step.
CONTROL: You control your hero and all cards you put into play, including any abilities that you
attach to a card in play, even if that card is controlled by another player. You also control cards and
effects that you add to the chain.
COST: The number in the upper left corner of each card is its cost, which tells you how many
resources you must exhaust to play the card.
COUNTER: A card may tell you to put one or more counters on a card in play. It will also tell you what
those counters do. You can track counters on a card with dice, beads, or other small items, but you
should be careful not to get different kinds of counters confused with each other.
DAMAGE: Damage on a character stays on it until the damage is healed or the character leaves
play. Damage greater than or equal to a character’s health is called fatal damage. If an ally or
Totem has fatal damage, it is destroyed. If a hero has fatal damage, its controller loses the game.
DEF: This is the defense value of an armor card. An armor’s DEF is the number in its lower right
corner. The DEF tells you how much damage the armor prevents as you exhaust it.
DEFENDER: A defender is a character that’s defending. A character defends when it enters combat
with an attacker, and it stops being a defender if it is removed from combat or the combat ends.
DESTROY: To destroy a card is to put it into its owner’s graveyard from play. If a character has fatal
damage, it is destroyed.
DICE, DIE: Some cards will tell you to roll dice. All die rolls in the World of Warcraft® TCG are done
with six-sided dice.
DISCARD: To discard a card is to put it from a player’s hand into his or her graveyard. Cards can be
discarded only from hand.
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DUAL WIELD: A hero with dual wield can have a second one-handed Melee weapon instead of an
Off-Hand equipment. (A one-handed weapon doesn’t have “Two-Handed” on its type line.) Dual
wield also allows you to strike with two different Melee weapons during the same combat.
EFFECT: An effect is a placeholder on the chain. Using a power, completing a quest, proposing a
combat, and striking with a weapon all add effects to the chain. Triggering also creates an effect
that is added to the chain. An effect waits on the chain until it resolves or is interrupted.
EMPTY CHAIN: The chain is empty if there are no cards or effects waiting to resolve.
ENTER PLAY: When a card enters the play zone from any other zone, it “enters play.”
EQUIPMENT: An equipment card is an armor, item, or weapon.
EXHAUST: To exhaust a card in play, turn it sideways; once that’s been done, the card is referred
to as “exhausted.” You can’t exhaust a card that’s already exhausted to pay a cost. The opposite of
exhausted is “ready.”
FATAL DAMAGE: Fatal damage is damage on a character that’s greater than or equal to its health.
FLIP: To flip a face-up card, you turn it face down, and vice versa. Cards can be flipped whether
they are ready or exhausted.
FRIENDLY: All the characters controlled by you and the players on your team are friendly. This can
be very important for multiplayer games when several people are on the same team.
HEAL: When something heals damage from a character, it removes the described amount of
damage from that character. You can only heal damage that has already been dealt. You can’t use
healing to raise a character’s health above the value printed on its card. You can target a character
for healing even if it is fully healed.
GLOSSARY
HEALTH: The number in the lower right corner of a character card is its health.
If a character accumulates damage equal to or greater than its health (fatal
damage), it’s destroyed. If a hero is destroyed, its controller loses the game.
IN COMBAT: An attacker or defender is in combat while there’s an opposing attacker or defender.
IN PLAY: Any card in the play zone is considered to be in play. This includes heroes, allies, items,
weapons, armor, resources, quests, locations, and ongoing abilities.
IN RESPONSE: See “Respond.”
INSTANT: Some cards have this word on their type line. You can play an instant any time you have
priority—even during your opponent’s turn. In this Starter game, the instant cards are Hunter’s
Mark, Mystic Denial, Sudden Shot, and Wand of Biting Cold.
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GLOSSARY
INTERRUPT: A card or effect on the chain can be interrupted. An interrupted card or effect
is removed from the chain and does nothing. If a card is interrupted, it is put into its owner’s
graveyard. A card can be interrupted only while it’s on the chain. Mystic Denial is an example of a
card that interrupts.
ITEM: An item is a type of card. Items are the equipment your hero can have in addition to weapons
and armor. When you play an item, it enters play in your hero row.
LEAVE PLAY: A card leaves play when it moves from the play zone to any other zone. A card leaves
play when it’s destroyed, removed from the game, returned to its owner’s hand, or put into the
graveyard.
LOCATION: A location is a type of card. Locations enter play only as resources, and you may place
them face up. Unlike quests, locations stay face up even after you use their powers.
MAXIMUM HAND SIZE: The maximum number of cards you can have in your hand when your turn is
over. During your wrap-up step, if you have more cards in your hand than your maximum hand size,
you must discard until you have only that many cards. The starting maximum hand size is seven
cards, but it can be changed by cards that you play.
MULLIGAN: At the start of each game and only once each game, you can decide to mulligan your
starting hand of cards by shuffling those cards into your deck and then drawing a new hand of
seven cards.
NEUTRAL: A neutral card is neither Horde nor Alliance, so it can go into a deck of either type.
OBJECTIVE: An objective is a location with “objective” on its type line. Each one has powers that
refer to the number of capture counters on it. In addition, each has a capacity value in its lower
right corner, which is the maximum number of capture counters that location can have.
ONGOING: Most abilities go to your graveyard after you play them, but ongoing abilities enter play.
The text after the word “ongoing” tells you what the ability’s powers are while it’s in play.
OPPOSING: Opposing cards are cards in play or on the chain controlled by opponents, or cards in
opposing zones.
OWNER: You are the owner of your hero and any card that started the game in your deck. If a card
would be put into a deck, hand, or graveyard, it is put into its owner’s deck, hand, or graveyard.
PARTY: Your party is made up of your hero, allies, and Totems. Your party is not limited to five
characters.
PASS: A player with priority may add a link to the chain or pass priority clockwise to the next player.
PAY: Cards and effects have costs that you must pay to play them. You can’t pay only part of a cost,
and you can’t pay more of something than you have.
32
PAYMENT POWER: Some cards have payment powers. A payment power is identifiable by the arrow
symbol in its text. The text before the
is the cost that you must pay to use the power, and the
tells you what happens when it resolves. Unless a card says otherwise, you can
text after the
use payment powers during any phase of any player’s turn.
PLACE: Once on each of your turns, you may place a resource. To place a resource, choose a card
from your hand and put it into your resource row. Quests and locations may be placed face up in the
resource row; other cards can only be placed face down.
PLAY: When you play a card, you put it on the chain, choose any targets it describes, and pay
its costs.
POWER: When a card has text in its text box that has an impact on the game, that text is a power.
Powers are active only on cards in play unless otherwise specified.
PREVENT: Some cards and effects prevent damage that would be dealt to a character. Damage that
is prevented is treated as though it were never dealt.
PRIORITY: A player has the choice of adding to the chain while he or she has priority. Priority is like
a baton that’s handed from player to player—only one player can hold it at a time. The turn player
is always the first to get priority at the start of a phase or step. If the player with priority adds to
the chain, that player keeps priority. Otherwise, priority passes clockwise. After a card or effect
resolves, priority returns to the turn player.
GLOSSARY
PROFESSION: Each hero has two professions. You can find a hero’s professions on the right side of
its type lines.
PROPOSE: To propose a combat, choose a proposed defender and a ready hero or ally in your party
to be the proposed attacker.
PROTECT: Some characters can protect other friendly characters. To protect, the character exhausts
and becomes the defender in place of the proposed defender in a combat.
QUEST: A quest is a type of card. Quests enter play only as resources, and you may place them face
up. As you complete a quest, you must turn it face down to show that it’s been completed.
RARITY: The color of a card’s collector number tells you its rarity: white for common, green for
uncommon, blue for rare, purple for epic, and orange for legendary.
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REMOVE FROM COMBAT: If an attacker or defender is removed from combat, it is no longer
considered an attacker or defender. The combat will conclude as normal, but no combat damage will
be dealt. If the defender is removed from combat, the attacker remains exhausted. If a character
exhausts to protect and then the attacker is removed from combat, the character that protected
remains exhausted.
REMOVED FROM GAME ZONE: To remove something from the game, take it from whatever zone
it’s currently in (hand, deck, play, etc.) and move it to its owner’s removed from game zone. This is
different than putting something into your graveyard. Each removed from game zone is normally an
area on the table that’s clearly separate from the play area. Cards that have been removed from the
game are face up unless otherwise noted.
RESOLVE: When there are no responses to the last card or effect on the chain, it resolves and has
its impact on the game. An ability card goes to its owner’s graveyard after it resolves, unless it’s
ongoing. An ongoing ability, ally, or equipment card that resolves enters play.
RESOURCE: You exhaust resources to pay the costs to play cards, use payment powers, complete
quests, and strike with weapons. You may place one resource on each of your turns. Any type of card
can be placed face down as a resource, but only quests and locations can be placed face up.
RESOURCE COST: Resource costs on a card or power are represented by a
number within a resource cost symbol. To pay a resource cost, you exhaust that
number of resources. For example, an Alliance ally that you must exhaust two
resources to play will have a 2 (
) in its upper left corner, and a power that
you must exhaust two resources to use will have a 2 as part of its cost.
RESPOND: While a card or effect is on the chain, players can respond to it with
cards and effects of their own. If a player responds, that response will resolve and have an impact
on the game before the original card or effect. If a player says that he or she is doing something “in
response,” that player is acting before the most recent card or effect on the chain resolves.
REVEAL: If something tells you to reveal a card, you must turn that card face up so that all players
can see it. Revealing a card doesn’t move it out of the zone that it’s in. After a card is revealed, you
put it back into its previous (hidden) position.
SEARCH: If something tells you to search a deck for a certain kind of card, you look through that
deck for a card of that kind and then the owner of that deck shuffles it.
SIDE DECK: A side deck consists of additional cards outside of a player’s main deck. Players may
swap cards between their side and main decks between games in a match. In Constructed play, a
side deck is exactly ten cards. In Sealed Pack or Draft, a player’s side deck is all cards that player
34
GLOSSARY
READY: A card in play is ready when it isn’t exhausted (which means it hasn’t been turned
sideways). All cards enter play ready. Only ready cards can be exhausted to attack or pay costs. As
you ready a card, you change it from the exhausted position to the ready (upright) position.
received that didn’t make his or her main deck.
STRIKE: While a hero is in combat, its controller may strike with a ready weapon by paying its strike
cost and exhausting it. This adds the weapon’s ATK and damage type to the hero for the rest of the
combat.
STRIKE COST: The strike cost of a weapon is the number in its lower right
corner. That number tells you how many resources you must exhaust to strike
with the weapon.
TALENT: Each hero has a talent specialization along with its faction, race, and
class. “Talent” is also a tag that some cards have. If a card with this tag has “Survival Hero
Required” (for example) in its text, that means only a hero with the Survival talent specialization
can include that card in its deck.
TARGET: If a card or effect tells you to target something, you must choose the target as you play it.
If there is no legal target, you can’t play it. Once you choose a target, you can’t change your mind,
even if something happens to the target you picked. If a card or effect tries to resolve and none of
its targets is legal, it is interrupted. If at least one target is legal, it resolves.
TOTEM: Totems are ongoing abilities that have “Totem” on their type line. Totems can’t attack or
gain ATK, but they can be attacked. They can be targeted as though they were allies while they are
in play, but they aren’t actually allies.
UNIQUE: Some cards have the word “unique” on their type line. Any time you control more than one
unique card with the same name, you must immediately destroy all but one of them. You choose
which one to keep.
UNLIMITED: Some cards have the word “unlimited” on their type line. A deck can include any
number of unlimited cards.
GLOSSARY
X: Sometimes, a cost will include an “X” amount. When you exhaust
resources to pay that cost, you can exhaust any number. X is then
equal to the number of resources you exhausted this way.
35
Notes
36
Upper Deck Entertainment TCG Credits
Drums of War ™ Design Lead: Danny Mandel
Drums of War ™ Development Lead: Antonino De Rosa
Drums of War ™ Design and Development Team: Ben Cichoski, Mike Girard, Mike Hummel,
Ken Ho, Jeff Liu, Paul Ross, Patrick Sullivan
World of Warcraft ® TCG Head Gameplay Design: Danny Mandel
World of Warcraft ® TCG Head Gameplay Development: Ken Ho
World of Warcraft ® TCG Engine Design: Mike Hummel, Brian Kibler, Danny Mandel
Additional Engine Design: Eric Bess, Ben Brode, Shawn Carnes, Ben Cichoski, Jeff Donais,
Dave Hewitt, Ken Ho, Cory Jones, Paul Ross, Kate Sullivan, Morgan Whitmont
Brand Management: Dan Bojanowski (lead), Angel Sanchez, Joeri Hoste (Europe)
Editing: Cate Gary (lead), Katsuyo Nagasawa
Rules Team: Paul Ross (lead), Dave DeLaney, Edwin Teh
Graphic Design: Brian Bateman (lead), Michele Mejia, Scott Reyes
Creative Content: Brandon Male (lead), Ben Cichoski, Mike Girard, Danny Mandel, Jeff Quick,
Marc Schmalz, Geordie Tait, Drew Walker
Rulebook: Cate Gary, Brandon Male, Paul Ross
Art Direction: Ben Thompson
Production: Louise Bateman, Rudy Diaz, Mike Eggleston, Kim Forrai, Adam Kelzer, Rick Miller,
Anita Spangler, Gordon Tucker, Wendy Wagner, Armando Villalobos, Tracey Fraser-Elliott,
Geert Van Slambrouck, Bart Hoorn
Project Management: Sean Dillon, Jennifer Perrigo, Eva Breedijk (Europe)
Chairman and CEO, Upper Deck Company: Richard McWilliam
Vice President, Upper Deck Entertainment: Bernd Becker
Director, Game Development Group: Jeff Donais
CEO, Upper Deck Europe BV: Nico Blauw
COO, Upper Deck Europe BV: Bruno Van Speybroeck
UDE Special Thanks: Gwenn Cichoski, Gus Cichoski, New Cichoski, Antonio and Laura DeRosa,
Irena Pereira, Jack and Sharon Mandel, Benson Ho, Jack Fu, Richard Woo, David Ho, Hondo,
Kate Sullivan, Gina Hummel, Feitsuki, Tuskfyre, Thundgot, Aeus, Aguilar, Vaneck, and Nazamur
37
Blizzard Entertainment TCG Credits
Lead Developer: Shawn Carnes
Art Director: Glenn Rane
Producer: Ben Brode
Director, Global Business Development and Licensing: Cory Jones
Licensing Manager: Gina Pippin
Additional Development: Sean Wang, Tony Hsu
Additional Flavor Text: Tim Daniels, Brandan Vanderpool, Tony Hsu, Darian Vorlick
Blizzard Special Thanks: Chris Metzen, Ben George, Arec Nevers, Gareth Hughes,
Stuart Massie, Justin Parker, Samwise Didier, J. Allen Brack, Elizabeth Cho,
Dave Maldonado, and all of the Blizzard employee TCG fanatics!
38
Quick-Reference Rules
For Experienced TCG Players
• Start game by putting your hero card into play. Bottom right number is your health total.
• Object of the game is to use your hero, allies, and abilities to destroy enemy heroes.
• Opening hand is seven cards. Draw one card per turn. First player doesn’t draw on first turn.
• Place one resource per turn. You can place any card face down as a resource. Exhaust (turn
sideways) your resources to play cards, use payment powers, complete quests, and strike with
weapons.
• You can place a quest or location card face up as a resource. When you complete a quest, turn it
face down.
• Play ally, armor, weapon, item, and ability cards on your turn. Instant ability, ally, armor, item,
and weapon cards may also be played on another player’s turn.
• Play instant cards any time, even during an opponent’s turn.
• Play armor, weapon, and item cards on your hero only, not on ally cards.
• You can attack with allies or with your hero. You can attack enemy allies, enemy heroes, and
enemy Totems directly.
• Exhaust (turn sideways) your hero and allies when they attack.
• While your hero is attacking or defending, exhaust one of its weapons and pay the strike cost to
strike with it.
• Exhaust (turn sideways) a piece of armor to prevent that much damage to your hero.
• You can propose any number of combats on your turn. You choose the attacker and defender for
each combat.
• Characters with protector can step in front of attacks.
• Damage is permanent.
• Damage on characters can be removed by healing abilities or effects.
• Decks are 60 cards (minimum). Maximum 4 copies per card, except for ones tagged as
unlimited.
• Alliance heroes can only use Alliance allies. Horde heroes can only use Horde allies. Either
faction can use neutral allies. Some quests, equipment, and abilities are also limited to the
Alliance or Horde faction.
• Heroes are restricted to using armor, weapons, items, and abilities with their class symbol on
the card.
• Multiplayer works just like a two-player game. Heroes and allies can attack any opposing
character, and characters can protect against any opposing character.
39
What’s New in Drums of War ?
TM
❂ Locations are a new card type that can be placed face up in your resource row like quests,
but they stay face up even after you use their powers. See the “Card Types” section for more
information.
❂ Allies have four new racial keywords: berserking (Troll), diplomacy (Human), shadowmeld
(Night Elf), and war stomp (Tauren). See the “Keywords” section for more information. You
can look forward to more racial keywords in future sets!
❂ Armor sets are powerful equipment cards that occupy multiple uniqueness slots.
❂ Dual-class abilities can be included in the decks of two different classes.
40
© 2008 UDC. 985 Trade Drive, North Las Vegas, Nevada 89030. All rights reserved. Patent pending.
Upper Deck Europe BV, Flevolaan 15, 1382 JX Weesp, The Netherlands.
© 2008 Blizzard Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved. Drums of War is a trademark, and Warcraft,
World of Warcraft, and Blizzard Entertainment are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of
Blizzard Entertainment, Inc., in the U.S. and/or other countries. All other trademarks referenced herein
are the properties of their respective owners.
Printed in the USA.
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