HP NetRAID Series Installation and Configuration Guide

HP NetRAID Series Installation and Configuration Guide
HP NetRAID Series
Installation and Configuration Guide
for HP NetRAID-3Si and HP NetRAID-1Si
HP Part Number 5969-5947
Printed in March 2000
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.
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material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard shall
not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential
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on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
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All rights are reserved. No part of this document may be photocopied,
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Hewlett-Packard Company.
3M® is registered trademark of the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing
Company. Intel i960RD® and Intel i960RP® are registered trademarks of Intel
Corporation. Novell NetWare® is a registered trademark of Novell, Inc. OS/2®
is a registered trademark of the International Business Machines Corporation.
SCO®, SCO OpenServer®, and UnixWare® are registered trademarks of The
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registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Hewlett-Packard Company
Network Server Division
Technical Communications/MS 45SLE
10955 Tantau Avenue
Cupertino, CA 95014 USA
© Copyright 2000, Hewlett-Packard Company.
Audience Assumptions
This Installation and Configuration Guide is for the person who installs,
administers, and troubleshoots LAN servers. Hewlett-Packard Company assumes
you are qualified in the servicing of computer equipment and trained in
recognizing hazards in products with hazardous energy levels.
ii
Contents
1 Introduction ................................................................................................. 1
HP NetRAID Series Adapters ........................................................................ 1
Features of the HP NetRAID Series Adapters................................................ 2
Channels and Devices............................................................................... 2
Adapter Hardware and Battery-backed Cache ........................................... 5
SCSI Termination and Firmware ............................................................... 6
New Features of HP NetRAID Series Adapters.......................................... 6
Physical Disk Roaming and Data Migration ............................................... 7
Fault-Tolerance and Management Features .............................................. 8
Changing Capacity and RAID Levels......................................................... 8
About This Guide........................................................................................... 9
Other Information Sources............................................................................. 9
Tools You May Need ................................................................................... 10
2 RAID Overview........................................................................................... 11
RAID Overview ........................................................................................... 11
Physical Drive ......................................................................................... 11
Arrays...................................................................................................... 11
Hot Spare................................................................................................ 12
Logical Drive ........................................................................................... 12
Understanding RAID Levels......................................................................... 13
Arrays with No Redundancy: RAID Level 0.............................................. 14
Non-spanned Arrays with Redundancy: RAID Levels 1, 3, and 5 ............. 15
Spanned Arrays: RAID Levels 10, 30, and 50.......................................... 18
3 Installation and Configuration Overview ................................................. 25
4 Planning..................................................................................................... 27
Overview..................................................................................................... 27
Step A. Plan Your Hardware........................................................................ 27
Gather Information .................................................................................. 27
Sample Worksheet A............................................................................... 28
Multiple Adapters..................................................................................... 29
Slot Selection and Boot Order ................................................................. 29
Channels................................................................................................. 33
Step B. Plan Arrays and Logical Drives ....................................................... 34
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Contents
Automatic Configuration .......................................................................... 34
Custom Configuration.............................................................................. 35
5 Installation and Configuration.................................................................. 45
Overview..................................................................................................... 45
Step C. Prepare the Adapter........................................................................ 45
If the Adapter is Too Long ....................................................................... 46
Install Additional Memory ........................................................................ 47
Connect Battery Backup Unit................................................................... 47
Step D. Install the Adapter........................................................................... 49
Turn Off the HP NetServer and Open It................................................... 49
Install the Adapter ................................................................................... 50
Step E. Install Cables and Set SCSI ID Switches ........................................ 51
Connect Cables and Set SCSI ID Switches ............................................. 51
Replace Cover ........................................................................................ 53
Step F. Start HP NetServer Navigator to Launch HP NetRAID Assistant .... 53
Boot HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM .................................................. 53
Boot Messages........................................................................................ 53
Select Configure Disk Array..................................................................... 53
Step G. Configure Arrays and Logical Drives............................................... 54
HP NetRAID Assistant ............................................................................. 54
Select Adapter to Configure..................................................................... 56
Clear Configuration ................................................................................. 56
Check Rebuild Rate................................................................................. 57
Assign Global Hot Spares........................................................................ 57
Select Wizard.......................................................................................... 58
Define Physical Arrays and Dedicated Hot Spares................................... 59
Define Logical Drives .............................................................................. 62
Preview Configuration ............................................................................. 65
Step H. Save Configuration and Initialize .................................................... 67
Save to Binary File.................................................................................. 67
Print Configuration .................................................................................. 67
Configure Any Other Adapters................................................................. 68
Initialize Logical Drives............................................................................ 68
Exit HP NetRAID Assistant ...................................................................... 69
6 HP NetRAID Software ................................................................................ 71
Overview..................................................................................................... 71
Step I. Decide I2O or Non-I2O Operation...................................................... 73
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Contents
Step J. Use HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM to Prepare Diskettes ........... 74
Check Latest Versions............................................................................. 75
Create Drivers Diskette and Instructions.................................................. 75
Make NOS-specific Configuration Utility Diskette .................................... 78
Print NOS Installation Instructions ........................................................... 79
Step K. Install NOS and HP NetRAID Drivers.............................................. 79
Install Network Operating System (If Necessary) ..................................... 79
Install HP NetRAID Series Driver ............................................................ 80
Step L. Install NOS-specific Configuration Utility ......................................... 81
Step M. Run HP NetRAID Express Tools..................................................... 83
To Start HP NetRAID Express Tools ....................................................... 84
To Disable the HP NetRAID BIOS ........................................................... 84
To Change the SCSI Transfer Rate ......................................................... 85
To Change the PCI Class Code to I2O .................................................... 85
To Exit HP NetRAID Express Tools......................................................... 86
Run Other Utilities, If Necessary.............................................................. 86
7 Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion ............................................... 87
Step N. Prepare for Online Capacity Expansion .......................................... 87
Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under NetWare 4.2...................... 88
About Capacity Expansion under NetWare 4.2 ........................................ 88
Planning for Online Capacity Expansion under NetWare 4.2 ................... 90
Preparation Steps for NetWare 4.2.......................................................... 91
Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under NetWare 5......................... 95
About Capacity Expansion under NetWare 5 ........................................... 95
Planning for Online Capacity Expansion under NetWare 5 ...................... 95
Preparation Steps for NetWare 5............................................................. 96
Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under Windows NT...................... 98
About Capacity Expansion under Windows NT ........................................ 98
Preparation Steps for Windows NT.......................................................... 99
Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under Windows 2000..................102
About Capacity Expansion under Windows 2000 ....................................102
Preparation Steps for Windows 2000......................................................103
8 Upgrading to an HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter...............107
Back Up Your Data.....................................................................................107
Load the Appropriate HP NetRAID Driver ...................................................108
Insert the New Adapter and Recreate the Configuration..............................108
v
Contents
9 Managing Servers Over the Network.......................................................113
Adapter Management .................................................................................113
Features.................................................................................................113
NOS Requirements ................................................................................113
Other Requirements ...............................................................................114
Understanding HP NetRAID Network Utilities .............................................115
Determine where to Install HP NetRAID Assistant ..................................115
Identify the Registration Server/Client ....................................................116
HP NetRAID Network Utilities to Install...................................................116
Make the Installation Disk, If Necessary .....................................................118
Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 2000 Client or Server Installation
Instructions.................................................................................................120
Run Setup ..............................................................................................120
Follow On-screen Instructions for Windows ............................................121
Edit the regserv.dat and hosts Files........................................................122
Finishing Up ...........................................................................................122
Novell NetWare Server Installation Instructions..........................................123
Using HP NetRAID Assistant to Manage Servers........................................124
Before Starting HP NetRAID Assistant....................................................124
Start HP NetRAID Assistant....................................................................125
Select Another Server-Adapter Pair........................................................127
Exit HP NetRAID Assistant .....................................................................127
10Understanding HP NetRAID Utilities .......................................................129
HP NetRAID Assistant ................................................................................129
HP NetRAID Assistant Menus.................................................................131
HP NetRAID Config....................................................................................132
HP NetRAID Config Menus ....................................................................133
HP NetRAID Express Tools ........................................................................134
HP NetRAID Express Tools Menus.........................................................135
HP NetRAID Monitor Utilities......................................................................136
11Changing HP NetRAID-3Si DRAM Modules.............................................137
12HP NetRAID-3Si Battery Backup Unit ......................................................139
Charging the Battery...................................................................................139
Checking the Status of the Battery Backup Unit..........................................139
To Check Battery Status with HP NetRAID Express Tools......................139
To Check Battery Status with HP NetRAID Config..................................140
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Contents
Warnings That Battery Needs Replacement ...........................................140
Changing the Battery Backup Unit ..............................................................140
Connecting the Battery Backup Unit ...........................................................140
Battery Specifications.................................................................................141
Charge Time for Battery Packs...............................................................141
Battery Life.............................................................................................142
Retention Time for Cache Memory.........................................................142
13Monitor Alert List......................................................................................143
Microsoft Windows NT and Windows 2000.............................................143
Novell NetWare Monitor Messages ........................................................143
IBM OS/2 Monitor Messages ..................................................................144
SCO OpenServer and UnixWare Monitor Messages ..............................144
14Alarm Control and Audible Warnings .....................................................145
15Troubleshooting.......................................................................................147
Power-up (Boot) Error Messages ................................................................147
Other BIOS Error Messages .......................................................................151
Other Troubleshooting ................................................................................152
Troubleshooting Management Over the Network ........................................154
Common Problems.................................................................................154
16Warranty and Support..............................................................................157
Hardware Accessories Limited Warranty ....................................................157
Hewlett-Packard Hardware Accessories..................................................157
Third-Party Hardware Products...............................................................158
HP Repair and Telephone Support .............................................................158
A Adapter Specifications.............................................................................159
HP NetRAID-3Si Specifications ..................................................................159
HP NetRAID-1Si Specifications ..................................................................160
B Regulatory Information ............................................................................161
Notice for USA ...........................................................................................161
FCC Radio Frequency Emissions Statements ........................................161
Statement Required for European Union: ...................................................161
C Worksheets ...............................................................................................163
Configuration Worksheets ..........................................................................163
Sample Configuration Worksheet ...............................................................166
Physical Arrays and Hot Spares .............................................................168
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Contents
Logical Drives ........................................................................................168
D Cabling Diagrams.....................................................................................169
Cables Required.........................................................................................169
Setting SCSI IDs ........................................................................................170
HP NetServer E40 and E45........................................................................171
HP NetServer E60......................................................................................172
HP NetServer E 60 with HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si but no Tape
Drive ......................................................................................................172
HP NetServer E 60, with HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si and a Tape
Drive ......................................................................................................173
HP NetServer LC II.....................................................................................174
Duplex, Disk Array..................................................................................174
Default Switch Settings...........................................................................174
Sample Alternate Switch Settings...........................................................175
Mass Storage Cables .............................................................................175
HP NetServer LC 3.....................................................................................176
HP NetServer LH Pro and LH II ..................................................................177
Non-Duplex Cabling ...............................................................................177
Duplex Cabling.......................................................................................178
Default Switch Settings...........................................................................179
Mass Storage Cables .............................................................................179
HP NetServer LPr.......................................................................................180
SCSI Cable as Originally Configured......................................................180
HP NetRAID Series Adapter Connected to Two Internal Hard Disk Drives182
HP NetServer LXe Pro ...............................................................................183
Non-Duplex, Disk Array ..........................................................................183
Mass Storage Cables .............................................................................184
Default Switch Settings...........................................................................184
HP NetServer LXr Pro ................................................................................185
Non-duplex Cabling to Single-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8 ..........185
Duplex Cabling to Dual-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8 ....................186
Mass Storage Cables .............................................................................186
HP NetServer LXr Pro8 ..............................................................................187
Non-duplex Cabling to Single-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8 ..........187
Cabling Two HP NetRAID Channels to a Dual-Bus HP NetServer Rack
Storage/8 ...............................................................................................188
Mass Storage Cables .............................................................................188
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Contents
HP NetServer LXr 8000 ..............................................................................189
Simplex Cabling to HP Rack Storage/12 ................................................189
Duplex Cabling to HP Rack Storage/12 ..................................................190
Glossary........................................................................................................191
Disk Array Terms and Technologies ...........................................................191
Index..............................................................................................................199
ix
1 Introduction
HP NetRAID Series Adapters
The HP NetRAID-3Si (D5955A) and HP NetRAID-1Si (D2140A), adapters
provide an interface between the host system and a disk array storage system.
The adapters use the PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) standard to
control data transfers on one to three SCSI channels.
The HP NetRAID Series adapters support the operating systems listed below, for
which drivers are provided. Refer to your HP NetServer documentation for the
operating systems supported on your server.
Network Operating System
®
Microsoft Windows 2000
®
HP NetRAID-3Si
HP NetRAID-1Si
yes
yes
Microsoft Windows NT 3.51
yes
yes
Microsoft Windows NT® 4.0, 4.0 for Small
Business, 4.0 Enterprise, 4.0 Enterprise with
MSCS, 4.0 Terminal Server
yes
yes
Novell NetWare® 3.2
no
no
yes
yes
®
Novell NetWare 4.2, 4.2 SMP, SMB 4.2
®
Novell NetWare SFTIII 4.2
yes
yes
Novell NetWare 5
yes
yes
SCO® Open Server 3.0
no
no
SCO Open Server 5.0.4 UP and SMP
yes
yes
SCO Open Server 5.0.5 UP and SMP
yes
yes
no
no
®
SCO UnixWare 2.1.x
SCO UnixWare 7.0.x
yes
yes
SCO UnixWare 7.1
yes
yes
Linux® 5.2, 6.0, 6.1
yes
no
®
IBM OS/2 Warp Server SMP 4.0
yes
yes
IBM OS/2®E-Business
yes
yes
1
Chapter 1
CAUTION
Introduction
To use the HP NetRAID-1Si or HP NetRAID-3Si adapter you
must update the adapter’s latest version of firmware for
proper operation. The latest version of firmware for each
HP NetRAID Series adapter can be downloaded from the
HP web site at:
http://www.hp.com/go/netserver
Features of the HP NetRAID Series Adapters
The HP NetRAID-3Si and HP NetRAID-1Si adapters are high-performance,
intelligent PCI-to-SCSI host adapters with RAID control capabilities. The
HP NetRAID Series adapters have SCSI channels with both internal and external
connections.
Channels and Devices
HP NetRAID Series adapters support channels with both internal and external
connections. For each channel, you can have either one internal, or one external
connection.
2
Chapter 1
Introduction
HP NetRAID-3Si
The HP NetRAID-3Si adapter has three channels with both internal and external
connections. The HP NetRAID-3Si adapter supports:
• Fast/Wide SCSI (at data transfer rates of up to 20 MB/sec per channel)
• Ultra/Wide SCSI (at data transfer rates of up to 40 MB/sec per channel)
• Ultra2 SCSI (at data transfer rates of up to 80 MB/sec per channel)
The HP NetRAID-3Si adapter supports a maximum of six to twelve devices per
channel depending on the HP system and enclosure used.
HP NetRAID-3Si Devices Per Channel
Channel
Maximum Internal
Connections
0
6
Maximum External
Connections*
6, 8, or 12
1
6
6, 8, or 12
2
6
6, 8, or 12
* External storage with the HP Storage System/6 supports a maximum of six Fast/Wide
SCSI devices. External storage with the HP Rack Storage/8 supports a maximum of eight
Fast/Wide or Ultra/Wide SCSI devices. External storage with HP Rack Storage/12
supports a maximum of 12 Ultra2 SCSI devices.
HP NetRAID-3Si External SCSI Cables
External Device
Length of
Cable
External SCSI Cable
HP Storage System/6
2.5 meters
D6020A
HP Rack Storage/8
2.5 meters
D6020A
HP Rack Storage/12
5 meters
10 meters
D6982A
D6983A
If the necessary cables were not supplied with your system, see HP’s Order
Assistant for ordering information. Order Assistant is available on the Internet at
http://www.hp.com/go/netserver.
3
Chapter 1
Introduction
HP NetRAID-1Si
The HP NetRAID-1Si adapter supports one SCSI channel using either an internal
or external connection. The HP NetRAID-1Si adapter supports:
• Fast/Wide SCSI (at data transfer rates of up to 20 MB/sec per channel)
• Ultra/Wide SCSI (at data transfer rates of up to 40 MB/sec per channel)
• Ultra2 SCSI (at data transfer rates of up to 80 MB/sec per channel)
The HP NetRAID-1Si adapter supports a maximum of six to twelve devices per
channel depending on the HP system and enclosure used.
HP NetRAID-1Si Devices Per Channel
Channel
Maximum Internal
Connections
0
6
Maximum External
Connections*
6, 8, or 12
* External storage with the HP Storage System/6 supports a maximum of six Fast/Wide
SCSI devices. External storage with the HP Rack Storage/8 supports a maximum of eight
Fast/Wide or Ultra/Wide SCSI devices. External storage with HP Rack Storage/12
supports a maximum of 12 Ultra2 SCSI devices.
HP NetRAID-1Si External SCSI Cables
External Device
Length of
Cable
External SCSI Cable
HP Storage System/6
2.5 meters
D6020A
HP Rack Storage/8
2.5 meters
D6020A
HP Rack Storage/12
5 meters
D6982A
D6983A
10 meters
If the necessary cables were not supplied with your system, see HP’s Order
Assistant for ordering information. Order Assistant is available on the Internet at
http://www.hp.com/go/netserver.
4
Chapter 1
Introduction
Adapter Hardware and Battery-backed Cache
IOP: The I/O processor (IOP) directs all functions of the adapter, including
command processing, PCI and SCSI bus transfers, RAID processing, drive
rebuilding, cache management, and error recovery.
• The IOP for the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter is the 32-bit Intel i960RD®
Intelligent I/O RISC processor running at 66 MHz.
• The IOP for the HP NetRAID-1Si adapter is the 32-bit Intel i960RP®
Intelligent I/O RISC processor running at 33 MHz.
ASIC: A custom ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) provides PCI
bus mastering with a burst data transfer rate of 132 MB/sec. The ASIC handles
data transfer between the PCI bus, the cache, and the SCSI bus. This ASIC
supports memory write and invalidate commands on the PCI bus. It also performs
RAID mirroring, parity generation, and checking in RAID levels 1, 3, 5, 10, 30,
and 50.
Cache: All HP NetRAID Series adapters have cache memory.
• For the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter, cache memory resides in a 16-MB
battery-backed 60-ns EDO (Extended Data Output) DRAM SIMM. You
can replace this SIMM with a 64-MB EDO DRAM SIMM.
• For the HP NetRAID-1Si adapter, cache memory resides in a 16-MB
60-ns EDO (Extended Data Output) DRAM SIMM.
The HP NetRAID Series adapters support Direct and Cached I/O and Write
Through or Write Back caching, which can be selected for each logical drive. To
improve performance in sequential disk accesses, the HP NetRAID Series
adapters use Adaptive Read Ahead caching by default, but it can be disabled to
Normal or set to simple Read Ahead caching.
Alarm: The HP NetRAID Series adapter’s onboard tone generator provides
audible warnings (alarms) when RAID system errors occur.
5
Chapter 1
Introduction
SCSI Termination and Firmware
Termination: Active termination on the SCSI bus conforms to Alternative 2 of
the SCSI-2 specifications. Termination enable/disable is automatic through cable
detection.
Firmware: The HP NetRAID Series firmware handles all RAID and SCSI
command processing and also supports the following functions:
• Disconnect/Reconnect feature optimizes SCSI Bus seek.
• Tagged Command Queuing allows multiple commands to be sent to the
controller, thus improving random access.
• Scatter/Gather supports multiple address/count pairs.
• Multi-threading supports up to 255 simultaneous commands with elevator
sorting and concatenation of requests per SCSI channel.
• Stripe size for each logical drive can be set from 2 KB to 128 KB.
• Multiple rebuilds and consistency checks have user-definable priority.
New Features of HP NetRAID Series Adapters
New features of HP NetRAID Series adapters include:
• Enhanced Array Spanning
• Enhanced Configuration Replication
• Support for Clustering (HP NetRAID-3Si only)
• I2O Support
Enhanced Array Spanning
The HP NetRAID Series adapters allow up to four arrays to be spanned together
as one logical drive. For example, HP NetRAID Series adapters can support a
RAID 10 logical drive with up to eight physical disks. HP NetRAID-3Si adapters
that use all three channels can group a maximum of 18 to 32 physical disks in a
RAID 30 or RAID 50 logical drive depending on the HP system and enclosure
used.
Enhanced Configuration Replication in HP NetRAID Assistant Utility
When you save a configuration using the HP NetRAID Assistant utility,
HP NetRAID-3Si adapters now save both logical drive and adapter configuration
6
Chapter 1
Introduction
settings. (Adapter settings include such parameters as the Rebuild Rate, Power
Fail Safeguard, and Autorebuild.)
NOTE
The HP NetRAID Config and HP NetRAID Express Tools
utilities save logical drive settings only and do not save
adapter settings.
Support for Clustering
The HP NetRAID Series adapters can be used with HP NetServer clusters.
HP NetServer clusters provide reliable, increased-availability solutions for
applications where unplanned downtime is unacceptable. For complete
information on clustering, visit the HP NetServer Clustering Solutions web site at
http://www.hp.com/go/netserver/products/
I2O Support
HP NetRAID-3Si and HP NetRAID-1Si adapters support I2O (Intelligent
Input/Output) with some operating systems.
Physical Disk Roaming and Data Migration
HP NetRAID Series adapters allow physical disk roaming, in which the adapter
keeps track of disk modules if they are moved to different slots in the hot-swap
cages, as long as the slots are all controlled by the same adapter.
HP NetRAID Series adapters allow disk modules to be moved to different
HP NetRAID Series adapters. HP NetRAID Series adapters can be swapped
without losing data readability.
7
Chapter 1
Introduction
Fault-Tolerance and Management Features
Fault-Tolerance features include the following:
• Automatic failed-drive detection with Autorebuild (automatic rebuild with
a hot spare or when a drive is replaced)
• Manual hot-swap replacement
• Battery-backed cache memory
Management features include the following:
• Monitoring of adapter configuration, data parity consistency, and SNMP
error messages
• Rapid online configuration change and capacity expansion without the
need to first back up all data, reconfigure the array, and reload the data
Changing Capacity and RAID Levels
HP NetRAID Series adapters can expand capacity and change RAID levels of
logical drives without powering down the server.
• Online Capacity Expansion: You can add a physical drive to a RAID 0,
3, or 5 logical drive. This can be an online operation if you are running
Microsoft Windows 2000, Windows NT, or Novell NetWare versions 4.2
and 5; otherwise, capacity expansion is an offline operation only.
(Preparations for capacity expansion must be made, as described in
Chapter 7, "Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion.")
• Online Changes to RAID Levels: You can convert a RAID 1, 3, or 5
logical drive to RAID 0.
NOTE
8
You cannot perform online conversions of logical drives that
span arrays (RAID level 10, 30, or 50).
Chapter 1
Introduction
About This Guide
This guide is intended to be used in conjunction with the HP NetRAID Series
Installation documentation. This guide provides detailed explanations of
instructions found in the road map.
This HP NetRAID Series Installation and Configuration Guide will help you
install your HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si adapter and plan the
configuration. It guides you through power-up, launching the HP NetServer
Navigator software, making the initial configuration of the adapter, and
installing a NOS-specific configuration utility. It contains a glossary, and its
appendices contain sample cabling diagrams and worksheets to use in planning
the configuration of physical and logical drives.
!
Fill in the worksheets in Appendix C as you read this guide and make your
configuration decisions. The worksheets contain the information you need to
enter into the HP NetRAID Assistant configuration utility launched by
HP Navigator. The pencil icon in the margin is a reminder to log your
configuration choices on the worksheets.
The HP NetRAID Series Installation and Configuration Guide is intended to be
used in conjunction with your HP NetServer documentation. Refer to your system
documentation for details such as cable product numbers and I/O slot boot order.
If you are setting up your HP NetServer for the first time, begin with the
Installation Road Map, if one was supplied with your system. Otherwise, begin
with your Installation Guide or User Guide. Return to this guide when the
documentation instructs you to install additional accessory boards and to
configure the mass storage subsystem.
Other Information Sources
Disk array administration and management are beyond the scope of this
document. Refer to the HP NetRAID Series User Guide in Information Assistant
on the HP NetServer Documentation CD-ROM. Access it, and other material in
Information Assistant, from any Microsoft Windows-based PC.
You should also consult the following HP NetServer documentation:
• Readme file for your HP NetServer on the HP NetServer Navigator
CD-ROM
• Your HP NetServer Installation Road Map, if supplied with your
HP NetServer
9
Chapter 1
Introduction
• Your HP NetServer Installation Guide or HP NetServer User Guide
• Technical Reference Cards or labels on the HP NetServer system chassis
(for cables and SCSI ID switch settings)
• Internet site: http://www.hp.com/go/netserver
Tools You May Need
Please refer to your HP NetServer documentation for the tools needed to open the
chassis. Usually a flat 1/4-inch screwdriver and a T15 Torx® driver is required. If
you need to set SCSI ID switches, a flashlight and a small metal pin, such as a
straightened paper clip, will be helpful. An antistatic kit (3M® 8501/8502/8505
or equivalent) is strongly recommended.
CAUTION
All HP NetRAID adapter cards are sensitive to static
electricity and can easily be damaged by improper handling.
Using a grounding strap is recommended. Read the following
information carefully before you handle the accessory:
• Leave the adapter card in the antistatic bag until you are
ready to install it.
• If possible, use an antistatic wrist strap and grounding
mat.
• Before you remove the adapter board from the bag, touch a
grounded, unpainted metal surface on the system to
discharge static electricity.
10
2 RAID Overview
This chapter summarizes concepts and terminology used to describe RAID
systems. It describes the different RAID levels available with the HP NetRAID
Series adapters. For definitions of terms not introduced here, see the Glossary.
RAID Overview
HP NetRAID Series adapters let you link multiple hard disk drives together and
write data across them as if they were one large drive. With the HP NetRAID
Series adapter, you can configure your linked drives into a RAID (Redundant
Array of Independent Disks) subsystem.
Physical Drive
The term "physical drive" refers to a single hard disk module.
Figure 2-1. Physical Drive
Arrays
HP NetRAID Series adapters can combine up to eight physical drives into one
array. It is recommended that all drives in an array have the same capacity. If you
use drives with different capacities in an array, all the drives in the array are
treated as though they have the capacity of the smallest drive.
Figure 2-2. Array of Physical Drives
11
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
Arrays can combine disk drives that are all on one channel, or they can combine
disk drives from two or three different channels.
Hot Spare
A hot spare is a powered-on, stand-by disk drive that is ready for use should
another disk drive fail. When a disk fails, the HP NetRAID adapter’s firmware
can automatically rebuild the data from the failed disk onto the hot spare. The
system administrator can then replace the failed disk and designate the
replacement as the new hot spare disk. Until a rebuild occurs, a hot spare does
not contain user data.
There are two types of hot spares:
• A global hot spare is used if a disk in any array on the adapter fails.
• A dedicated hot spare is reserved for use by a single array.
Logical Drive
The term "logical drive" refers to a virtual drive that is assigned some portion of
the total capacity of an array. For example, if you have an array of disk drives
with a total capacity of 80 GB, you can create a logical drive with a total capacity
of 20-GB within that array.
Logical drives can take three forms:
• A logical drive can use all of the storage capacity of one array. In
Figure 2-3, Logical Drive LD0 uses all storage capacity in Array A0.
• A logical drive can use less than the available storage capacity of one
array. In Figure 2-3, Logical Drive LD1 occupies only a part of Array A1.
• A logical drive can span arrays by spreading across two, three, or four
different arrays. In Figure 2-3, Logical Drive LD2 spans Arrays A1 and
A2.
12
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
The nine physical drives are in three arrays (A0, A1, and A2)
with one global hot spare.
Figure 2-3. Sample Configuration with Three Arrays and
Three Logical Drives
Understanding RAID Levels
During installation, you configure your logical drives by running a disk array
configuration utility. Each of the logical drives you define must have an assigned
RAID level. Each RAID level has different advantages in terms of performance,
redundancy, and capacity. HP NetRAID Series adapters support both nonspanned array and spanned array configurations.
• Non-spanned arrays have logical drives that are contained entirely within
the array. Non-spanned array configurations use RAID levels 0, 1, 3, or 5.
• Spanned arrays have logical drives that are spread across multiple arrays.
This permits the physical drives on two, three, or four arrays to function
as one large logical drive. Spanned array configurations use RAID levels
10, 30, and 50.
13
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
Arrays with No Redundancy: RAID Level 0
RAID 0: Striping
In RAID 0 configurations, data is distributed among hard disks in the array via
an algorithm called striping. Data written to a logical drive is divided into pieces
called blocks. RAID 0 provides no data redundancy. If one hard disk fails, the
data is lost from the entire logical drive and must be retrieved from a backup
copy. If you have five physical drives configured as one RAID 0 logical drive,
data blocks are written as follows:
Disk 1
Disk 2
Disk 3
Disk 4
Disk 5
Stripe 1
Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
Block 4
Block 5
Stripe 2
Block 6
Block 7
Block 8
Block 9
Block 10
The RAID 0 algorithm allows data to be accessed on multiple disks
simultaneously. Read and write performance on a multidisk RAID 0 system is
significantly faster than on a single drive system.
RAID 0 Advantages
Provides maximum data capacity, because all disk space is used for data.
Costs are low, because no disk space is allocated for redundancy.
Access time is fast for both reads and writes.
RAID 0 Disadvantages
RAID 0 provides no redundancy so if a hard drive fails, data must be restored
from backup.
Hot spares cannot be used with RAID 0 configurations.
RAID 0 Summary
Choose RAID 0 if redundancy is not required, and you need fast performance and
low costs.
14
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
Non-spanned Arrays with Redundancy: RAID Levels 1, 3, and 5
RAID 1: Mirroring
In RAID 1 configurations, data on one disk is completely duplicated on another
disk. This is called mirroring. RAID 1 must be configured on a two-disk array.
(The array cannot contain more than two disk drives.) With this algorithm, if
either of the two disks fail, data is available from the duplicate disk. Data is
written as follows:
Disk 1
Disk 2
Stripe 1
Block 1
Block 1
Stripe 2
Block 2
Block 2
Stripe 3
Block 3
Block 3
RAID 1 Advantages
There is no data loss or system interruption due to disk failure, because if one
disk fails, the other is available.
Read performance is fast, because data is available from either disk.
RAID 1 Disadvantages
Costs are high, because 50% of all disk space is allocated for data protection.
Actual data capacity is only 50% of physical capacity.
RAID 1 Summary
Choose RAID 1 if high availability and performance are important, but cost is
not a major concern.
15
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
RAID 3: Striping with Dedicated Parity
In RAID 3 configurations, each data stripe generates one parity block to provide
redundancy and data protection. The parity block is encoded information that can
be used to reconstruct the data on that stripe if one of the disks fails. RAID 3
configurations dedicate one disk in the array to store all parity blocks. If you have
five physical drives configured as one RAID 3 logical drive, data blocks are
written as follows:
Disk 1
Disk 2
Disk 3
Disk 4
Disk 5
Stripe 1
Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
Block 4
Parity 1-4
Stripe 2
Block 5
Block 6
Block 7
Block 8
Parity 5-8
Stripe 3
Block 9
Block 10
Block 11
Block 12
Parity 9-12
With RAID 3, data reads are faster than writes, because parity must be calculated
for writes. RAID 3 performs better for long writes than for short ones, because
writes of less than one full stripe involve a parity calculation. RAID 3 works well
for long data transfers, such as CAD files and data logging.
RAID 3 Advantages
There is no data loss or system interruption due to disk failure, because if one
disk fails, data can be rebuilt.
Only one disk in the RAID 3 logical drive is reserved to provide redundancy.
HP NetRAID Series firmware optimizes RAID 3 data flow for long, serial data
transfers such as video or imaging applications.
RAID 3 Disadvantages
Performance is slower than RAID 0 or RAID 1.
RAID 3 Summary
Choose RAID 3 if cost, availability, and performance are equally important.
RAID 3 performs best when long, serial transfers account for most of the reads
and writes.
16
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
RAID 5: Striping with Distributed Parity
RAID 5 is the most common configuration because it provides good overall
performance and data protection with a minimum loss of storage capacity.
RAID 5 distributes the parity blocks equally among all disk drives to achieve
better overall performance than if a dedicated parity disk is used (RAID 3). If you
have five physical drives configured as one RAID 5 logical drive, data blocks are
written as follows:
Disk 1
Disk 2
Disk 3
Disk 4
Disk 5
Stripe 1
Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
Block 4
Parity 1-4
Stripe 2
Block 5
Block 6
Block 7
Parity 5-8
Block 8
Stripe 3
Block 9
Block 10
Parity 9-12
Block 11
Block 12
RAID 5 outperforms RAID 1 for read operations. The write performance,
however, may be slower than RAID 1, especially if most writes are small and
random. For example, to change Block 1 in the diagram above, the HP NetRAID
Series adapter must first read Blocks 2, 3, and 4 before it can calculate Parity
Block 1-4. Once it has calculated the new Parity Block 1-4, it must write Block 1
and Parity Block 1-4.
RAID 5 Advantages
There is no data loss or system interruption due to disk failure, because if one
disk fails, data can be rebuilt.
Capacity equivalent to only one disk in the RAID 5 logical drive is reserved to
store redundant data.
RAID 5 outperforms RAID 1 for read operations.
RAID 5 gives good performance if you have a high volume of small, random
transfers.
RAID 5 Disadvantages
Write performance is slower than RAID 0 or RAID 1.
RAID 5 Summary
Choose RAID 5 if cost, availability, and performance are equally important.
RAID 5 performs best if you have I/O-intensive, high read/write ratio
applications such as transaction processing.
17
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
Spanned Arrays: RAID Levels 10, 30, and 50
With HP NetRAID Series adapters, array spanning allows the capacity of two,
three, or four arrays to be combined into a single storage space. A spanned array
configuration must have the same number of disk drives in each array: each array
can have two disks, three disks, four disks, and so on.
RAID 10: Spanning with Mirrored Arrays
A RAID 10 configuration uses two, three, or four pairs of mirrored disks,
spanning two, three, or four arrays, respectively. (RAID 10 is a RAID 1
configuration with array spanning.) If your RAID 10 logical drive spans two
arrays with two physical drives each, data blocks are written as follows:
Array 1
Array 2
Disk 1
Disk 2
Disk 3
Disk 4
Stripe 1
Block 1
Block 1
Block 2
Block 2
Stripe 2
Block 3
Block 3
Block 4
Block 4
Stripe 3
Block 5
Block 5
Block 6
Block 6
RAID 10 Advantages
There is no data loss or system interruption due to disk failure, because if one
disk fails, its mirror image is available.
Read performance is fast, because data is available from either disk in each pair.
RAID 10 lets you create large logical drives. You can span up to four arrays
containing a maximum of eight physical drives.
RAID 10 Disadvantages
Costs are high, because 50% of all disk space is allocated for redundancy.
Capacity expansion is an offline operation only.
RAID 10 Summary
RAID 10 provides the best performance for most applications where redundancy
and large logical drive size are required, and cost is not a factor.
18
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
RAID 30: Spanning with Dedicated Parity Drives
In RAID 30 configurations, parity blocks provide redundancy to a logical drive
that spans two, three, or four arrays. (RAID 30 is a RAID 3 configuration with
array spanning.) If your RAID 30 logical drive has two arrays with four physical
drives each, data blocks are written as follows:
Array 1
Array 2
Stripe
1
Disk
1
Block
1
Disk
2
Block
2
Disk
3
Block
3
Disk
4
Parity
1-3
Disk
5
Block
4
Disk
6
Block
5
Disk
7
Block
6
Disk
8
Parity
4-6
Stripe
2
Block
7
Block
8
Block
9
Parity
7-9
Block
10
Block
11
Block
12
Parity
10-12
Stripe
3
Block
13
Block
14
Block
15
Parity
13-15
Block
16
Block
17
Block
18
Parity
16-18
RAID 30 Advantages
There is no data loss or system interruption due to disk failure, because if one
disk fails, data can be rebuilt.
Only one disk in each array of a RAID 30 logical drive is required to provide
redundancy.
HP NetRAID Series adapter firmware optimizes RAID 30 data flow for long,
serial data transfers such as video or imaging applications.
RAID 30 lets you create large logical drives. You can span up to four arrays
containing a maximum of 32 physical drives.
RAID 30 Disadvantages
Capacity expansion is an offline operation only.
Performance is slower than RAID 0 or RAID 10.
RAID 30 Summary
Choose RAID 30 if you need a large logical drive size, and cost, availability, and
performance are equally important. RAID 30 performs best when long, serial
transfers account for most of the reads and writes.
19
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
RAID 50: Spanning with Distributed Parity
In RAID 50 configurations, parity blocks are distributed throughout the logical
drive that spans two, three, or four arrays. (RAID 50 is a RAID 5 configuration
with array spanning.) If your RAID 50 logical drive has two arrays with four
physical drives each, data blocks are written as follows:
Array 1
Array 2
Disk
1
Disk
2
Disk
3
Disk
4
Disk
5
Disk
6
Disk
7
Disk
8
Stripe
1
Block
1
Block
2
Block
3
Parity
1-3
Block
4
Block
5
Block
6
Parity
4-6
Stripe
2
Block
7
Block
8
Parity
7-9
Block
9
Block
10
Block
11
Parity
10-12
Block
12
Stripe
3
Block
13
Parity
13-15
Block
14
Block
15
Block
16
Parity
16-18
Block
17
Block
18
RAID 50 Advantages
There is no data loss or system interruption due to disk failure, because if one
disk fails, data can be rebuilt.
Capacity equivalent to only one disk in each array of the RAID 50 logical drive is
required to provide redundancy.
RAID 50 lets you create large logical drives. You can span up to four arrays
containing a maximum of 32 physical drives.
RAID 50 gives good performance if you have a high volume of small, random
transfers.
RAID 50 Disadvantages
Capacity expansion is an offline operation only.
Performance is slower than RAID 0 or RAID 10.
RAID 50 Summary
Choose RAID 50 if you need a large logical drive size, and cost, availability, and
performance are equally important. RAID 50 performs best for I/O-intensive,
high read/write ratio applications such as transaction processing.
20
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
Table 2-1. RAID Level Summary for RAID Levels 0 to 5
RAID Level
RAID 0
RAID 1
RAID 3
RAID 5
Also Known As
striping
mirroring
striping with
dedicated parity
striping with
distributed parity
Fault Tolerance
Redundancy
Type
Hot Spare
Option
no
yes
yes
yes
none
duplicate
parity
parity
no
yes
yes
yes
one or more
two
three or more
three or more
Usable
Capacity
greatest
least
intermediate
intermediate
Capacity
Reduction
none
50%
capacity of one
disk
capacity of one
disk
fast (depends on
number of disks)
intermediate
fast
fast
Random Write
Performance
fastest
intermediate
slowest
slow
Sequential
Write
Performance
fastest
intermediate
slow
slowest
Typical Usage
Rapid reads and
writes with no
need for fault
tolerance
Mostly small
random writes
with fault
tolerance
Mostly large,
serial transfers
with fault
tolerance
Mostly small,
random transfers
with fault
tolerance
Disks Required
Read
Performance
21
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
Table 2-2. RAID Level Summary for Spanned Arrays
RAID Level
RAID 10
RAID 30
RAID 50
Also Known As
striping with
mirrored arrays
striping with
dedicated parity drives
striping with
distributed parity
yes
yes
yes
duplicate
parity
parity
yes
yes
yes
spans 2 arrays
4
6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16*
6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16*
spans 3 arrays
6
9, 12, 15, 18, 21, or 24*
spans 4 arrays
*
Fault Tolerance
Redundancy
Type
Hot Spare
Option
Disks Required:
*
9, 12, 15, 18, 21, or 24*
12, 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32*
8
12, 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32
Usable
Capacity
least
intermediate
intermediate
Capacity
Reduction
50%
capacity of one disk for
each array spanned
capacity of one disk for
each array spanned
Read
Performance
intermediate
fast
fast
Random Write
Performance
intermediate
slowest
slow
Sequential
Write
Performance
intermediate
slow
slowest
Typical Usage
Mostly small
random writes
with fault
tolerance and
enhanced speed
Mostly large serial
transfers with fault
tolerance and enhanced
speed
Mostly small, random
transfers with fault
tolerance and enhanced
speed
*The maximum number of devices per adapter depends on the number of channels and
types of enclosures being used. Internal channels support a maximum of six devices, and
external channels support a maximum of six to twelve devices.
22
Chapter 2
RAID Overview
Start
Data Protection
(Redundancy)
Required?
No
Yes
Complete
Duplication
Required?
RAID 0
Yes
No
Typical
Data
Transfers?
Number of
Disk Drives?
2
Disks
RAID 1
4, 6, or 8
Disks
Large,
Serial
Transfers
Small,
Random
Transfers
RAID 10
Number of
Disk Drives?
Number of
Disk Drives?
3-5
Disks
RAID 3
6 - 32
Disks
RAID 30
3-5
Disks
RAID 5
6 - 32
Disks
RAID 50
Figure 2-4. Decision Tree for Choosing a RAID Level
23
3 Installation and Configuration
Overview
To install and configure your HP NetRAID Series adapter, you need to perform
the following steps. Steps A through N are described in Chapters 4 through 7 of
this guide.
Step A. Plan Hardware (Chapter 4 and
Worksheet A)
Step H. Save Configuration and
Initialize (Chapter 5)
Step B. Plan Arrays and Logical Drives
(Chapter 4 and Worksheets A
and B)
Step I. Decide Which I2O or Non- I2O
Operation (Chapter 6)
Step C. Prepare the Adapter (Chapter 5)
Step J. Use HP NetServer Navigator
CD-ROM to Prepare Diskettes
(Chapter 6)
Step D. Install the Adapter (Chapter 5)
Step K. Install NOS and HP NetRAID
Driver (Chapter 6)
Step E. Install Cables and Set SCSI ID
Switches (Chapter 5)
Step L. Install NOS-specific
Configuration Utility (Chapter 6)
Step F. Start HP NetServer Navigator to
Launch HP NetRAID Assistant
(Chapter 5)
Step M. Run HP NetRAID Express
Tools (Chapter 6)
Step G. Configure Arrays and Logical
Drives (Chapter 5)
Step N. (Optional) Prepare for Online
Capacity Expansion (Chapter 7)
If you are replacing an existing HP NetRAID Series adapter with an
HP NetRAID-3Si or NetRAID-1Si adapter, follow the instructions in Chapter 8,
"Upgrading to an HP NetRAID-3Si or NetRAID-1Si Adapter."
25
Chapter 3
Installation and Configuration Overview
Once you have installed and configured your new adapter, refer to Chapter 9,
"Managing Servers Over the Network," and the HP NetRAID Series User Guide
for information on managing your adapter from a remote location.
Chapter 10, "Understanding HP NetRAID Utilities," provides menu maps for the
three utilities that are available to manage your HP NetRAID system.
26
4 Planning
Overview
Before attempting to install and configure your disk array subsystem, you should
invest some time in planning the configuration that best suits your computing
environment. The options you choose depend on factors such as the host
operating system used and your requirements for data protection, performance,
and capacity.
This chapter guides you through the planning process.
• Step A, Plan Your Hardware, is the first step.
• Step B, Plan Arrays and Logical Drives, is the second step.
Worksheets are provided in Appendix C to help you record your choices. You
should make one copy of Worksheet A and Worksheet B for each HP NetRAID
Series adapter you plan to install.
Step A. Plan Your Hardware
In Step A, Plan Your Hardware, you will begin to fill out Worksheet A. But first,
you must gather information about your HP NetServer and your user
requirements.
Gather Information
You need to know the following information about your system and its use to
create the best HP NetRAID configuration:
• Your host operating system and its block size
• Any special needs that certain work groups or users have for security, data
protection, or performance that will vary from the requirements of other
groups or users
• Redundancy requirements to protect data
27
Chapter 4
Planning
• Performance requirements
• Storage capacity requirements
• Whether you want hot spare capability
Sample Worksheet A
Figure 4-1 shows a sample Configuration Worksheet A. (See Appendix C for a
complete explanation of this example.)
WORKSHEET A (PHYSICAL DEVICES)
PCI Slot # _5_
Adapter # _0_
CH0
Channel 0:
Array # or
CH1
Rebuild Rate = __50_%
CH2
Channel 1:
Channel 0:
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
Array # or
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
_1_
*%
Array
____
0
_0_
*%
Array
1
____
_3_
_2_
*%
Array 0
_1_
*%
Array 1
_4_
_3_
*%
Array 0
_2_
*%
_6_
_4_
Dedicated
Hot Spare
Array 1
*%
Global
Hot Spare
Array # or
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
*%
Array
2
____
*%
Array 2
*%
Array 2
%
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
SCSI Transfer Rate (Fast, Ultra, Ultra2):
Channel 0: Ultra
Channel 1: Ultra
Channel 2: Ultra
Figure 4-1. Sample Worksheet A for HP NetRAID Series Adapter
28
Chapter 4
Planning
Multiple Adapters
The disk array drivers and firmware will support up to six adapters, but your
particular model of HP NetServer may have fewer PCI slots available. Be sure to
check your system’s PCI I/O slot availability and any slot restrictions before
purchasing another adapter.
If you will be configuring more than one adapter, make one photocopy of
Worksheets A and B for each adapter.
Slot Selection and Boot Order
If you purchased an HP NetServer array model, then the adapter is already
installed in the PCI slot recommended for your system.
The table below lists the slots recommended for your HP NetServer. Using other
slots may cause IRQ conflicts and other problems.
29
Chapter 4
Planning
Table 4-1. HP NetServer PCI Slot Numbers Recommended for HP NetRAID
Series Adapters
HP NetServer
HP NetRAID
-3Si
HP NetRAID
-1Si
E 40
Not
Supported
Slots 3 and 4
E 45
Slots 2 and 4
Slots 2 and 4
E 50
Slots 2 and 4
Slots 2 and 4
E 60
Slots 3 and 4
Slots 3 and 4
LC II
Slots 5 and 6
Slots 5 and 6
LC 3
Slots 5 and 6
Slots 5 and 6
LC
2000/2000r
Any Slot
Any Slot
LD Pro
Slots 9 and
10
Slots 9 and
10
LH II
Slots 9 and
10
Slots 9 and
10
LH Pro
Slots 9 and
10
Slots 9 and
10
LH 3/3r
Slots 7 and 8
Slots 7 and 8
30
Other Restrictions
Under IBM OS/2 Warp, limited
to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 Warp and
OS/2 E-Business, limited to 4
HP NetRAID Series adapters,
including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 Warp, limited
to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 Warp, limited
to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 E-Business,
limited to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 Warp, limited
to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 Warp, limited
to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Chapter 4
Planning
LH 4/4r
Slots 7 and 8
Slots 7 and 8
LH
3000/3000r
Slots 1-6
Slots 1-6
LH
6000/6000r
Slots 1-6
Slots 1-6
LPr
Slots 1 and 2
Slots 1 and 2
LT 6000r
Slot 2 Only
Slots 1 and 2
LX/LXe/
LXr Pro/LX
Pro/LXe
Pro/LXrPro 8
Slots 3 and 4
Slots 3 and 4
LXr 8000
Slots 7 and 8
Slots 7 and 8
LXr 8500
Slots 1-6
Slots 1-6
NOTE
Under IBM OS/2 Warp and
OS/2 E-Business, limited to 4
HP NetRAID Series adapters,
including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Supports maximum of 4
HP NetRAID Series adapter
accessory boards, NOT counting
integrated HP NetRAID
controller
Under IBM OS/2 E-Business,
limited to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 E-Business,
limited to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 Warp, limited
to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Under IBM OS/2 Warp, limited
to 4 HP NetRAID Series
adapters, including integrated
HP NetRAID controller
Not all HP NetRAID Series adapters are supported on all
HP NetServers. Please refer to the following web site for
further information:
http://www.hp.com/go/netserver
31
Chapter 4
Planning
Boot Order
The slot you choose for the adapter could affect the boot order of your devices.
The boot order differs among systems, so consult the mass storage section of your
system documentation for boot order information. (If you need to prevent booting
from the adapter, follow the instructions in Chapter 6, Step M during the
installation.)
Special Instructions on LX Pro and LXr Systems
If your system is set with normal boot order, follow these recommendations:
• If you have more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter, put all adapters
on the same PCI bus. In the LX family of systems, slots P1, P2, and P3 are
on Bus 0. Slots P4, P5, and P6 are on Bus 1.
• Do not put a HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si adapter in PCI slot 4
if you want it to be your boot device.
• If you have an HP NetRAID adapter that you want to be the first boot
device, put it in the first or lowest PCI slot available.
If your system is set with on-board boot order, follow this recommendation:
• Put all HP NetRAID Series adapters in the same bus.
Sharing IRQs
The adapter can share IRQs. To determine the implications of IRQ sharing for
slot selection, refer to your system documentation and the NOS Installation
Guide in the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM.
Cable Management
Cable management is another factor to consider when choosing a slot for the
adapter. Try to avoid having cables block access to other I/O cards in the system.
!
32
Log the adapter’s PCI slot on Worksheet A.
Chapter 4
Planning
Channels
!
In this section you determine which physical devices will connect to each SCSI
channel of the adapter. Record the SCSI ID number and physical capacity of each
disk drive in the correct channel on Worksheet A. No two devices on a single
channel can have the same SCSI ID. SCSI ID 7 is reserved for the HP NetRAID
Series adapter. For some HP NetServers and optional mass storage enclosures,
another SCSI ID is reserved for the processor managing the mass storage cage or
enclosure. Physical drives on different channels can be assigned to the same
array.
HP NetRAID Series adapters support all HP hot-swap SCSI devices and certain
non-hot-swap SCSI devices, such as the Wide hard disk drives installed in the
HP NetServer E 45, E 50, or E 60 and the HP NetServer LC II or LC 3.
As explained in Chapter 1, "Introduction," for each channel, you have either one
internal or one external connection. HP NetRAID Series adapters support the
following channels and connectors:
• The HP NetRAID-3Si adapter provides internal and external connectors
for Channels 0, 1, and 2.
• The HP NetRAID-1Si adapter provides an internal and external connector
for Channel 0.
SCSI Transfer Rate
!
On Worksheet A, record the SCSI transfer rate for each channel. The default
SCSI transfer rate is Fast, but you can change this rate to Ultra or Ultra2 for the
channels that use it.
HP NetRAID-3Si and HP NetRAID-1Si adapters support Ultra2 drives. Refer to
your system or external disk enclosure documentation to determine whether your
disk enclosure supports Ultra or Ultra2 SCSI drives.
33
Chapter 4
Planning
Step B. Plan Arrays and Logical Drives
There are two ways to set up arrays and logical drives.
• Automatic configuration is explained for those users who do not want to
customize their arrays and logical drives.
• Custom configurations permit you to create exactly the configuration that
best suits your needs.
Automatic Configuration
Automatic mode defines the arrays and logical drives for you, and sets their
parameters. It makes configuration easy.
Automatic mode uses the following rules to define arrays:
• It scans the physical drives, starting at SCSI ID 0 on Channel 0, and it
groups the physical drives by capacity, with up to five drives in an array.
• Each array is defined as a single logical drive, and array spanning is not
used.
• For each array, the system looks to see if you have asked to implement
redundancy (checked the Redundancy box). If you are not using
redundancy, all logical drives are assigned RAID level 0.
• If an array contains two drives, and you checked Redundancy, the logical
drive is assigned RAID level 1.
• If a group contains three to five drives, and you checked Redundancy, the
logical drive is assigned RAID level 5.
• If an array contains only one drive, the logical drive is assigned RAID
level 0. (No redundancy is possible on a logical drive containing just one
physical drive.)
• Automatic configuration does not create hot spares. You must create your
hot spares before you begin automatic configuration.
34
Chapter 4
Planning
If Automatic configuration will suit your needs, you can proceed to Chapter 5,
"Installation and Configuration." However, you are encouraged to read the entire
planning section to determine whether or not a custom configuration would better
meet your needs.
Custom Configuration
To plan a custom configuration, you will do the following:
• Plan your arrays
• Plan hot spares
• Decide the rebuild rate
• Plan logical drives
Plan Your Arrays
!
In this section you specify which physical drives are assigned to which arrays.
For each physical disk drive that is assigned to an array, log its array number in
Worksheet A.
When creating your arrays, please consider the following:
• Group together physical drives that have the same capacity. (If you use
drives with different capacities in an array, all the drives in the array are
treated as though they have the capacity of the smallest drive.)
• Arrays are numbered sequentially beginning with Array 0.
• Arrays can have between one and eight physical drives per array.
• The more disks you group together in an array, the better the
performance.
• All physical drives in an array must be controlled by the same adapter.
• The physical drives in an array can be all on the same channel, or they
can be on separate channels.
• You might plan to reserve one or more physical drives for use as a hot
spare. See "Plan Hot Spares (Optional)" later in this chapter for more
information.
35
Chapter 4
Planning
When you create your arrays, you should look ahead toward the logical drives
that you will configure later. (Logical drives are discussed in "Plan Logical
Drives" later in this chapter.) Here are some considerations about logical drives
that might impact how you set up your arrays:
• Consider what RAID levels you will need.
◊
Different RAID levels require different minimum numbers of physical
drives. For example, RAID 1 requires exactly two physical drives,
RAID levels 3 and 5 require at least three physical drives, and arrays
with only one physical drive must be assigned RAID 0.
◊
Different RAID levels reserve different amounts of capacity to provide
redundancy.
• A single array can be divided into a maximum of eight logical drives.
• A single HP NetRAID Series adapter can control a maximum of eight
logical drives.
• If you want to use the online capacity expansion feature later on, logical
drives cannot span arrays and there must be only one logical drive per
array.
• If you want one logical drive to span two or more arrays:
◊
Spanned arrays must be numbered consecutively.
◊
Spanned arrays must contain the same number of disk drives per
array.
◊
Although each physical drive in an array must have the same capacity,
one logical drive can span two or more arrays of different capacities.
For example, one array might contain three drives of 1 GB each, and
the second array might contain three drives of 5 GB each. One logical
drive can span both of these arrays.
◊
Spanned arrays must be controlled by the same adapter.
As you plan your arrays, it might help to sketch your configuration. See
Figures 4-2 and 4-3 for examples.
In Figure 4-2, Logical Drive 2 (labeled "LD2") spans arrays A1 and A2,
occupying space in both. Each array of physical drives is on a separate channel.
36
Chapter 4
Planning
Figure 4-2. Three Logical Drives Where Each Array Uses a Different Channel
Figure 4-3 shows the same configuration, except Array A1 contains physical
drives from both Channel 0 and Channel 1, and Array 2 contains physical drives
on Channels 1 and 2.
Figure 4-3. Three Logical Drives Where Arrays A1 and A2 Contain Drives
on More than One Channel
37
Chapter 4
Planning
Plan Hot Spares (Optional)
!
On Worksheet A for each adapter, log any hot spare disk modules and indicate
whether each is global or dedicated to a particular array.
A hot spare is a powered-on, stand-by disk that is ready for use should another
disk fail. When a disk fails, the disk array controller’s firmware can automatically
rebuild the data from the failed disk onto the hot spare. Unless a rebuild occurs, a
hot spare does not contain user data. When planning hot spares, keep these
considerations in mind:
• Hot spares are useful only for logical drives with RAID levels of 1, 3, 5,
10, 30, or 50.
• Hot spares cannot rebuild logical drives of RAID 0, because this RAID
level does not provide a means of recovering data.
• A dedicated hot spare is assigned to a specific array. Only one hot spare
can be dedicated to each individual array.
• Global hot spares stand ready to rebuild any physical drive for any array
with redundancy controlled by the adapter.
• A hot spare does not count toward the usable capacity of any array.
• A hot spare must have capacity equal to or greater than the capacity of the
physical drive it would replace.
• An adapter can support up to eight hot spares.
Decide the Rebuild Rate
!
During a rebuild, the contents of a complete physical drive is rewritten. Normal
operations can go on during a rebuild, but performance may be degraded. The
Rebuild Rate controls the rate at which a rebuild is done by specifying what
percentage of IOP resources will be dedicated to rebuilding the data on a failed
physical drive.
A high Rebuild Rate (over 50%) speeds up the rebuild, but slows system
performance. A low Rebuild Rate (under 50%) slows the rebuild process, but
speeds up system performance. The default is 50%.
RAID 0 data cannot be rebuilt because it has no redundancy.
Log the Rebuild Rate on Worksheet A.
38
Chapter 4
Planning
Plan Logical Drives
Logical drives are virtual drives configured within an array or across arrays.
Logical drives can take three forms:
• A logical drive can use all of the storage capacity of one array.
• A logical drive can use less than the available storage capacity of one
array. The remaining capacity can be used by one or more logical drives.
• A logical drive can span arrays by using capacity in two, three, or four
different arrays. Spanned logical drives can use all of the storage capacity
of the arrays they span, or they can use less than all the available capacity.
General Considerations
Consider the differing needs of work groups or users for security, data protection,
and performance as you decide how to configure the logical drives in each array.
Here are some considerations about logical drives that might impact how you set
up your arrays:
• You must configure at least one logical drive per array.
• A single array can be divided into a maximum of eight logical drives.
However, if you want to use the online capacity expansion feature later on,
plan to create just one logical drive per array.
• Consider what RAID levels you need. Review the information in
Chapter 2 and look at Tables 2-1 and 2-2 that compare the RAID levels.
• Look at the arrays you have defined so far. Ensure that the arrays contain
the minimum number of physical drives required for the RAID levels you
want to create.
• Make sure the redundancy requirements of the RAID levels you want
leave you with enough capacity for your data.
• If you want a logical drive to span two or more arrays, consider the
following:
◊
You cannot use the online capacity expansion feature with logical
drives that span arrays.
◊
Spanned arrays must contain the same number of disk drives per
array.
39
Chapter 4
Planning
◊
Although each drive in an array must have the same capacity, one
logical drive can span two or more arrays with different capacities. For
example, one array might contain three drives of 4 MB each, and the
second array might contain three drives of 12 MB each. One logical
drive can span both of these arrays.
◊
Spanned arrays must be numbered consecutively.
◊
When you use an HP NetRAID utility to configure your system, and
you specify that a logical drive will span arrays, the system will span
all eligible arrays that are numbered consecutively and that contain
the same number of disk drives, up to a maximum of four arrays.
◊
Spanned arrays must be controlled by the same adapter.
Sample Worksheet B
A sample Worksheet B is shown in Figure 4-4.
WORKSHEET B (LOGICAL DEVICES)
Logical
Drive #
Array
#
Span
RAID
Level
Logical
Drive Size
Stripe
Size
Write
Policy
Read
Policy
Cache
Policy
LD0
0
No
5
18 GB
64 KB
W. Thru. Adapt.
Cached
LD1
1
No
1
4 GB
16 KB
W. Thru. Adapt.
Cached
LD2
2
No
5
18 GB
64 KB
W. Thru. Adapt.
Cached
LD3
LD4
LD5
LD6
Figure 4-4. Sample Worksheet B
40
Cached I/O or Direct I/O
Normal, Read Ahead, or
Adaptive Read Ahead
Write Back or Write Thru
2 KB, 4 KB, 8 KB, 16 KB,
B,32 KB, 64 KB, or 128KB.
Optional. You can let the
HP NetRAID Assistant
Wizard calculate the size.
RAID Level 0, 1, 3, 5,
10, 30, or 50
Span this LD over the next
1-3 consecutive arrays?
Start with Array 0, and
number consecutively.
Use up to eight logical
drives, starting with LD0.
LD7
Chapter 4
Planning
Logical Drives, RAID Levels, and Array Spanning
!
On Worksheet B, logical drives are numbered LD0 through LD7. For each
logical drive you plan to create, record the following information:
• Array number to which the logical drive is assigned
• Whether the logical drive spans up to four sequentially numbered arrays
• RAID level
For each logical drive, you also need to define the logical drive size (capacity),
stripe size, write policy, read policy, and cache policy as defined in the sections
that follow.
Logical Drive Size
!
You can calculate the usable capacity to assign to each logical drive, or you can
let the HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard specify it during configuration. If you
calculate logical drive capacity, record it in Worksheet B.
If you want a logical drive to occupy less space than is available on one array,
you must enter the logical drive size.
Stripe Size (Stripe Depth)
!
Stripe size is the amount of data contiguously written to each disk in an array. It
is sometimes called "stripe depth." You can specify stripe sizes of 2 KB, 8 KB, 16
KB, 32 KB, 64 KB, and 128 KB for each logical drive. Consider the following
when setting your stripe size:
• The default stripe size is 8 KB.
• For best performance, choose a stripe size equal to or smaller than the
block size used by your operating system.
• A large stripe size produces better performance if the system does mostly
sequential reads.
• Choose a small stripe size if your system performs mostly random reads.
• Online conversions of RAID 3 logical drives can be done only if the stripe
size is 64 KB.
For each logical drive, log the stripe size in Worksheet B.
NOTE
Consider the stripe size carefully, because once configured,
you cannot change the size.
41
Chapter 4
Planning
Write Policy
!
When the IOP writes to disk, the data is first written to the cache on the
assumption that the IOP will read it again soon. The two Write policies are:
• Write-Through: In a write-through cache, data is written to disk at the
same time it is cached. This setting provides better security because
entries are always copied to disk. If no Uninterruptible Power Supply (like
a battery backup unit) is connected, you should use the write-through
setting, because otherwise data could be lost from cache memory in a
power failure.
NOTE
Write-Through is the recommended write policy for
HP NetRAID-1Si adapters, because these adapters do not have
battery backup units.
• Write-Back: In a write-back cache, data is written to disk only when it is
forced out of the cache. Write-back is efficient, because an entry may be
written many times in the cache without a disk access. Write-Back can be
used if an Uninterruptible Power Supply maintains the data in cache
memory in the event of a power failure.
NOTE
Write-Back is NOT recommended unless one of the following
is true:
•
•
The adapter is HP NetRAID-3Si.
The system has an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).
Write-Back is not certified for any logical drive used as a
Novell NetWare volume.
For each logical drive, record the write policy in Worksheet B.
42
Chapter 4
Planning
Read Policy
!
The three Read policies for HP NetRAID are:
• Read-Ahead: This is a memory caching feature that tells the adapter to
read sequentially ahead of requested data and cache the additional data in
memory, anticipating that the additional data will be requested. ReadAhead supplies sequential data faster, but it is not as efficient when
accessing random data.
• Normal: This policy does not use the read-ahead memory caching feature.
This policy is efficient when most of the data reads are random.
• Adaptive: Adaptive policy causes the read-ahead feature to be used if the
last two disk accesses were in sequential sectors.
For each logical drive, record the read policy in Worksheet B.
Cache Policy
!
HP NetRAID lets you choose one of two cache policies:
• Cached I/O: Reads are always cached regardless of randomness. The
selected Read policy (Read-Ahead, Normal, or Adaptive) and Write policy
(Write-Through and Write-Back) always applies.
• Direct I/O: First reads to a new location always come directly from the
disk. If a location is read repeatedly, then the Read policy as selected will
apply and the read data will be cached. Read data is cached only if
accessed repeatedly. With 100% randomness, nothing is cached.
For each logical drive, record the cache policy in Worksheet B.
43
5 Installation and Configuration
Overview
This chapter covers Steps C, D, E, F, G, and H of the installation procedure. You
should already have completed Step A, "Plan Your Hardware," and Step B, "Plan
Arrays and Logical Drives" in Chapter 4.
Step C. Prepare the Adapter
In this step you install the adapter into the HP NetServer. Step C covers:
• Preparing the adapter if it is too long for the I/O board cage
• Installing additional memory on the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter
• Plugging in the Battery Backup Unit on the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter
CAUTION
The adapter is sensitive to static electricity and can easily be
damaged by improper handling. Using a grounding strap is
recommended. Read the following information carefully
before you handle the accessory:
• Leave the adapter in the antistatic bag until you are ready
to install it.
• If possible, use an antistatic wrist strap and grounding
mat.
• Before you remove the adapter from the bag, touch a
grounded, unpainted metal surface on the system to
discharge static electricity.
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Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
If the Adapter is Too Long
Some HP NetServers, such as the HP NetServer LXr Pro8, do not have space for
a full-length PCI board. If the adapter is too long, remove the board extender
(plastic "handle") from the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter before you install the
adapter, as shown in Figure 5-1.
Remove the board extender now, before you connect the Battery Backup Unit.
Save the board extender for future use if you move the adapter to another system.
Figure 5-1. Remove Board Extender Before Installing the Adapter in
HP NetServer LXr Pro Systems
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Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
Install Additional Memory
For the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter, cache memory resides in a 16-MB batterybacked 60-ns EDO (Extended Data Output) DRAM SIMM. You can upgrade the
cache memory to 64-MB, using the D7132A SIMM Upgrade for
HP NetRAID-3Si.
To upgrade cache memory:
1. Verify that the Battery Backup Unit is not plugged in on the
HP NetRAID-3Si adapter.
2. Install the new SIMM according to the instructions supplied with the
additional memory.
Connect Battery Backup Unit
NOTE
The HP NetRAID-1Si adapter does not have a Battery Backup
Unit.
The HP NetRAID-3Si adapters are shipped with the Battery Backup Unit for the
cache memory. The Battery Backup Unit is installed and charged, but
disconnected. Follow the directions below to connect the Battery Backup Unit
before you install the adapter.
CAUTION
When the Battery Backup Unit is connected:
• Do not place the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter on a
conductive surface.
• When installing the adapter, do not allow the adapter or
its Battery Backup Unit to touch any part of the
HP NetServer. Doing so could short the battery, and it
may damage other components. You may place the
adapter on an antistatic mat.
47
Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
To connect the battery pack, plug the connector on the wire in the lower-left
corner into the connector at J21, as shown in Figure 5-2. The connector is keyed
to make sure the proper connection is made.
Figure 5-2. Plugging in Battery Backup Unit on the HP NetRAID-3Si
48
Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
Step D. Install the Adapter
In this step, you will:
• Turn off the HP NetServer and remove the necessary covers or open the
panels
• Install the adapter
Turn Off the HP NetServer and Open It
CAUTION
HP NetRAID Series Accessory boards are not hot pluggable.
Unplug HP NetServer power cord(s) before installing a
HP NetRAID Series board.
NOTE
Before you begin, you may need to look up information about
your HP NetServer in Information Assistant on the
HP NetServer Documentation CD-ROM. You will need to
know how to open or remove the HP NetServer panels and
covers, as well as any special instructions for installing a
board in a PCI slot of the HP NetServer.
Turn off the HP NetServer and open it, as follows:
1. Bring down the operating system properly, as described in your
NOS documentation.
2. Turn off the HP NetServer power and disconnect the power cord(s) and all
telephone cords.
49
Chapter 5
CAUTION
Installation and Configuration
Before removing the cover, always disconnect the power
cord(s) and unplug telephone cables. Disconnect the power
cord to avoid exposure to high energy levels that may cause
burns when parts are short-circuited by metal objects, such as
tools or jewelry. Disconnect telephone cables to avoid
exposure to shock hazard from telephone ringing voltages.
Note that the power switch does not turn off standby power in
some HP NetServers. Disconnect the power cord(s) to turn off
standby power.
3. Open or remove the HP NetServer panels or covers over the PCI slots.
4. Remove the power supplies in an HP NetServer LH Pro or LH II system.
This is necessary to connect mass storage cables in these systems.
CAUTION
Follow the procedures in your system’s documentation or in
Information Assistant to successfully remove and replace the
power supplies. Failure to follow these procedures may result
in breaking the power management board.
5. To remove an existing adapter, disconnect its SCSI cables first. Follow the
procedures in Chapter 8, "Upgrading to an HP NetRAID-3Si or
HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter", to remove the adapter and to disconnect the
battery if it is an HP NetRAID-3Si.
Install the Adapter
CAUTION
Do not allow the adapter to contact any part of the
HP NetServer other than the PCI slot during installation.
Do not allow the Battery Backup Unit on HP NetRAID-3Si
adapters to contact any part of the HP NetServer during
installation. Any such contact could cause a short in the
battery pack and may damage other electrical components.
To install the adapter:
1. Refer to Worksheet A that you filled out while reading Chapter 4 for the
slot selected for the adapter. If the adapter is already installed, verify that
it is in the correct slot.
2. If there is a slot cover on the PCI slot, remove it.
50
Chapter 5
3.
Installation and Configuration
Install the adapter by following the installation instructions for installing
PCI boards in your host system manual and on the chassis labels. Align
the adapter card bus connector into the slot. Ensure that it does not
physically interfere with adjacent cards. Press the card gently but firmly
into the slot to seat it properly. The bottom edge of the card should be
flush with the slot. Secure the adapter to the system chassis with a
mounting screw.
CAUTION
The adapter is sensitive to static electricity and can easily be
damaged by improper handling. The use of a grounding strap
is recommended.
Before you remove the adapter from the bag, touch a
grounded, unpainted metal surface on the system to discharge
static electricity.
Step E. Install Cables and Set SCSI ID Switches
In this step you connect the adapter’s SCSI channels to the physical drives listed
in Worksheet A and, if necessary, set the SCSI ID switches.
Connect Cables and Set SCSI ID Switches
Install the cables to create the hardware setup you planned in Worksheet A. See
Appendix D for sample cabling diagrams and default switch settings. Also refer
to the system documentation and the Hot Swap Disk Subsystem Cabling
Information label on the chassis for factory default cable configurations and SCSI
ID switch settings. In general, use the SCSI IDs preset on the hot-swap
subsystems.
NOTE
For additional information, refer to:
•
•
•
HP NetServer Storage System/6 User’s Guide
HP Rack Storage/8 Installation Guide
HP Rack Storage/12 Installation Guide
Install and remove SCSI cables as follows:
• SCSI cable connectors must be plugged in or removed evenly, not one end
first, to avoid bending the pins. Use the white pull-tab, if present, when
removing a connector.
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Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
• For backplane connectors with locking ears, open the locking ears before
inserting the SCSI cable.
ΝΟΤΕ
For HP NetRAID-3Si, the external connectors for Channels 0
and 2 are very close together and require D6020A cables with
offset connectors.
Some nonstandard cable configurations and switch settings are listed in the
HP NetServer documentation. Refer to the mass storage section of your system
documentation for details on HP NetServer configurations.
If you need to set the SCSI ID, use the lowest SCSI ID numbers first. Set the
SCSI ID switches on the back of each drive cage. On many systems, it is easier to
reach the SCSI ID switches if you pull the drive cage at least halfway out. A
flashlight and small metal pin, such as a straightened paper clip, will help to
manipulate the switches. A magnifying glass may help you see them.
Avoid problems with your SCSI devices and adapter by observing the following
rules:
• Never set any SCSI device ID to 7, because 7 is reserved for the SCSI
controller. Set their SCSI IDs between 0 and 15, but not to 7.
• Connect a maximum of six, eight, or twelve (depending on the type of
enclosure used) Fast/Wide, Ultra SCSI, or Ultra2 SCSI devices to each
channel.
• See HP Order Assistant for non-hot swap disk support. HP Order
Assistant is available on the Internet at
www.hp.com/go/netserver/order.
• Do not connect a CD-ROM drive to an HP NetRAID Series adapter.
• Do not connect a tape drive to an HP NetRAID Series adapter.
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Chapter 5
CAUTION
Installation and Configuration
Handle disk modules carefully. They are more susceptible to
shock, vibration, and electrostatic discharge when they are
not in the cabinet. When removing a module while the system
is powered on, disengage the module and wait for it to stop
spinning before removing it from its hot-swap slot.
Also, do not touch the SCSI edge connector pins. The oils on
your skin could impair the electrical connection.
Replace Cover
If you removed the power supplies or fans, replace them according to the
instructions in your HP NetServer documentation.
Close or replace the panels or covers on the computer and reconnect the
HP NetServer to power and networks.
Step F. Start HP NetServer Navigator to Launch
HP NetRAID Assistant
Boot HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM
To launch the HP NetRAID Assistant, you must start from the HP NetServer
Navigator CD-ROM. Ensure that all the SCSI devices power up before or at the
same time as the host computer.
NOTE
HP NetRAID Series adapters do not support bootable
CD-ROM drives or tape drives.
Boot Messages
If you receive an error message during the boot process, refer to Chapter 15,
"Troubleshooting," or to the online help in Information Assistant for more
information. Some power-up (boot) messages are routine.
Select Configure Disk Array
If HP Navigator asks you to set the date, time, and so on, do so. The
HP NetServer Navigator Main Menu then appears.
53
Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
1. When the HP NetServer Navigator Main Menu is displayed, choose
NetServer Utilities.
2. Choose Configure Disk Array from the NetServer Utilities screen. This
launches the HP NetRAID Assistant utility.
Step G. Configure Arrays and Logical Drives
In this step, for each adapter that need to be configured, you will use Worksheets
A and B to:
• Configure the arrays of physical drives
• Configure the logical drives
HP NetRAID Assistant
Figure 5-3. HP NetRAID Assistant Window
The HP NetRAID Assistant, shown in Figure 5-3, is an object-oriented graphical
user interface (GUI) with conventions similar to those in Microsoft Windows.
Click on an object with the left mouse button to select or deselect it. Chapter 10
lists all the menus that are available by clicking on menu bar items.
54
Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
NOTE
Since HP NetRAID-1Si is a single-channel adapter, the
HP NetRAID Assistant window for this adapter contains only
Channel 0 information. Channel 1 and Channel 2 columns do
not exist.
Steps H and I only describe the features of the HP NetRAID Assistant needed to
configure the adapter initially. Refer to the HP NetRAID Series User Guide in
Information Assistant for more information about HP NetRAID Assistant.
The HP NetRAID Assistant window contains the following features from top to
bottom:
• Menu bar: The menu bar activates pull-down menus for Configuration,
Adapter, Physical Drives, Logical Drives, Progress, and Help.
• Toolbar: The toolbar icons are separated into four categories of functions:
Configuration, Properties, Miscellaneous, and Other. They provide
shortcuts to access the menu options.
Figure 5-4. HP NetRAID Assistant Main Menu Toolbar Options
• Adapter box: The Adapter box shows the number of the current adapter
that is being configured. If the HP NetServer contains more than one
adapter, you can change the current adapter by using the Adapter box
pull-down list.
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Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
• Physical Devices box: The Physical Devices box contains either one
channel box (for an HP NetRAID-1Si adapter), or three channel boxes
(for an HP NetRAID-3Si) adapter, which show the physical drives on the
SCSI channels of the current adapter. The number in parentheses to the
right of each physical drive icon is its SCSI ID (Target) on the channel.
The state of each physical drive appears to the right of the SCSI ID or
array designation. The possible states of a physical drive are as follows:
◊
Onln: The physical drive is online, functioning normally, and part of
a configured logical drive.
◊
Ready: The physical drive is functioning normally, but is not part of a
configured logical drive, nor configured as a hot spare.
◊
HotSp: The physical drive is configured as a hot spare, and is
powered up and ready for use as a spare in case an online drive fails.
◊
Failed: The physical drive failed and is out of service.
◊
Rebuilding: The physical drive is involved in a rebuild process to
recover data that was on a failed drive.
◊
Not Responding: The physical drive is not present, not powered-on,
or has failed.
• Logical Devices box: The Logical Devices box shows the current adapter
and its global hot spare pool. When arrays, logical drives, and hot spares
have been defined, they are displayed here. Clicking on Logical View or
Physical View switches between showing logical drives and physical
drives. Clicking on the + sign in the yellow diamond expands the view if
it is collapsed (physical or logical drives or hot spares are hidden).
• Status line: The status line at the bottom of the window shows the
progress of the scan required to build the displays on the HP NetRAID
Assistant window. It also suggests possible actions.
Select Adapter to Configure
Look in the Adapter box to see if the adapter you wish to configure is displayed.
If not, select it from the pull-down list.
Clear Configuration
You should clear the configuration of the adapter to prepare it for the new
configuration.
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Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
To clear the existing configuration:
1. Select the Configuration menu.
2. Choose Clear Configuration.
3. Click OK.
Check Rebuild Rate
During a rebuild, the content of a complete physical drive is rewritten. Normal
operations can go on during a rebuild, but performance may be degraded. The
Rebuild Rate controls the rate at which a rebuild is performed. A high Rebuild
Rate (over 50%) speeds up the rebuild, but slows system performance. A low
Rebuild Rate (under 50%) slows the rebuild process, but speeds up system
performance. The default setting for the Rebuild Rate is 50%.
To check the Rebuild Rate from the HP NetRAID Assistant window:
1. Choose Rebuild Rate from the Adapter menu.
2. Reset the rate by dragging the slider with the mouse.
3. Click OK.
NOTE
Clearing the configuration does not affect the rebuild rate.
Assign Global Hot Spares
NOTE
Refer to Worksheet A when assigning hot spares.
To assign any physical drives to the global hot spare pool for the adapter:
1. Click on a Ready physical drive in the Physical Devices box. This drive
must have capacity that is at least as great as any drive it will replace.
You can select more than one Ready drive if you want to create more than
one global hot spare. Clicking on a Ready drive either selects it or
deselects it.
2. Drag the selected drives into the global hot spare pool.
NOTE
To check the capacity of a physical drive, double-click on it to
display its properties.
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Select Wizard
NOTE
If any physical drives have been moved, added, removed,
changed, or changed in state since HP NetRAID Assistant was
started, rescan the drives by choosing the Adapter menu and
then selecting the Rescan option.
To launch the HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard:
1. Select the Configuration menu.
2. Choose the Wizard. The Wizard starting window is displayed, as shown
in Figure 5-5, with a choice of Custom and Automatic configuration
modes.
Figure 5-5. HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard Starting Window
3. Click one of the following configuration modes:
◊
58
Select Custom if you want to define the arrays and logical drives and
set their parameters.
Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
◊
Select Automatic if you want the HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard to
define the arrays and logical drives (and set their parameters) for you
automatically.
When you select Automatic mode, you can toggle the Redundancy
check box at the bottom of the window. If the Redundancy box
contains an "X," the arrays are automatically configured with
redundant logical drives if possible. They will be assigned RAID levels
of 1 or 5, depending on the number and capacities of the physical
drives. If the Redundancy box is empty, all logical drives are
configured as RAID 0, which is not redundant. See "Automatic
Configuration" in Chapter 4 for a complete list of the rules used in
Automatic configuration.
4. Click the Next button.
5. If you chose Automatic mode, skip to "Preview Configuration" later in
this chapter.
Define Physical Arrays and Dedicated Hot Spares
NOTE
Refer to Worksheet A when defining arrays.
The HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard Array Definition window appears, displaying
the Physical Devices and Logical Devices configured on your system. It will be
similar to the display shown in Figure 5-6 depending on your configuration. The
"new array" in the Logical Devices box shows where a new array can be defined.
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Figure 5-6. HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard Array Definition Window
To assign physical drives to the first array:
1. Select all the Ready physical drives that you want to put into the first
array. Clicking on a drive either selects or deselects it.
2. Click the Add to Array button.
Physical drives show "A:new" to indicate the drive has been added to a
new array, but has not been accepted yet.
3. If you want to remove a physical drive from a new array, select the drive
in the new array and click the Reclaim button.
4. When the array is complete, click the Accept Array button.
All physical drives assigned to arrays display their array numbers to the
right of the SCSI ID. The numbering is zero-based. For example, A0
designates a physical drive assigned to Array 0.
5. The next new array appears. Assign physical drives to it as described
above. Be sure to click the Accept Array button to close the array.
To assign physical drives to an existing (not new) array:
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1. Click one or more Ready physical drives to select (or deselect) them.
2. Drag the drives into the existing array. All selected Ready drives will be
added to the array.
Drives cannot be removed selectively from an existing array, but the entire array
can be undone. An array cannot be reclaimed if it has any logical drives defined.
To remove an entire array:
1. Select the array. (Make sure that nothing else is selected.)
2. Click the Reclaim button.
3. Click OK.
Hot Spares
Hot spares can be assigned to the global hot spare pool for the adapter, or they
can be dedicated to a specific array. Only one hot spare can be dedicated to a
given array.
To assign a dedicated hot spare:
1. Select a Ready physical drive. Be sure nothing else is selected.
2. Click the Add Spare button. The Hot Spare Target window appears.
3. Click the Dedicated to button, and then click on the down arrow to
display a list of valid arrays.
4. Click the array to which you want to dedicate the hot spare.
5. Click OK.
6. Continue defining arrays and hot spares.
To reclaim (undo) one or more hot spares:
1. Select one or more hot spares.
2. Click the Reclaim button to convert the hot spares to Ready physical
drives.
When you are finished defining arrays and hot spares:
Click the Next button.
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Define Logical Drives
NOTE
Refer to Worksheet B when defining logical drives.
After you finish defining arrays and hot spares, and click Next, the HP NetRAID
Assistant Wizard Logical Drive Definition window appears. A sample window is
shown in Figure 5-7. The window is ready for you to define Logical Drive 0.
Figure 5-7. HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard Logical Drive Definition Window
62
◊
The Logical Drive Parameters box shows the number of the logical drive
being defined and has boxes to set its RAID level and size.
◊
The Span Arrays check box turns array spanning on or off.
◊
The Advanced button leads to more parameters, which are preset but can
be changed.
Chapter 5
◊
Installation and Configuration
The Logical Devices box depicts the arrays on the current adapter, the
logical drives on each array, and the global hot spare pool for the adapter.
Logical drives are labeled as new and as LD0 through LD7. Click on the
+ sign in the yellow diamond if the view is collapsed (logical drives are
hidden).
The HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard is ready for you to set the parameters of the
new logical drive.
To define a logical drive that does not span arrays:
1. Make sure that the Span Arrays box does not have an "X" in it; if it does,
click on it to remove the "X."
2. Set the RAID level by clicking the arrow and selecting the RAID level
from the pull-down menu.
3. Set the logical drive size by either accepting the default in the box or by
clicking in the Size box and typing a smaller size. Setting a smaller size
leaves space for another logical drive on the same array.
4. Set the stripe size, read policy, write policy, or cache policy, by clicking
the Advanced button to display the Advanced Parameter window. Click
the arrows to view the choices, and select the ones you want. Disregard
the Virtual Sizing check box, because you can change this parameter only
in the HP NetRAID Express Tools utility. Click OK to return to the
Logical Drive Definition window.
5. When the logical drive parameters are set, click the Accept button.
The next logical drive to be defined is displayed. If there is still space in
the current array, the new logical drive is on it.
6. Define any other logical drives on the current array that will not span to
the next array. HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard keeps creating logical
drives on the same array until its capacity is used fully, or until there are
eight logical drives on the adapter.
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To create a logical drive that spans two or more arrays:
NOTE
The arrays to be spanned must have sequential array numbers
and each array must contain the same number of physical
drives.
HP NetRAID Assistant will attempt to span up to four arrays.
Array spanning will stop when:
• It has created a logical drive of the size you specify in
Step 2 below.
• The next sequentially numbered array has a different
number of drives. (Spanned arrays must contain the same
number of drives in each array.)
1. Click the Span Arrays box to mark it with an "X." An array labeled with
a hyphenated number, such as A0-1 or A0-3, appears in the Logical
Devices box.
2. If you know the exact size of the logical drive you want, enter it in the
Size (MB) box.
If you do not specify the size of the logical drive, the default size reflects
the maximum number of arrays that can be spanned.
3. Define the logical drive as described above.
To remove the last logical drive that was added:
1. Click the Undo button.
2. You can continue undoing logical drives by clicking Undo.
When you are done defining logical drives:
When all the logical drives are defined for the adapter and you have clicked the
Accept button for the last one, click the Next button.
The Next button does not operate until one of the following conditions has been
satisfied:
64
◊
All capacity has been assigned to logical drives.
◊
Eight logical drives have been defined.
Chapter 5
Installation and Configuration
Preview Configuration
NOTE
Refer to Worksheets A and B when checking the
configuration.
The HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard Configuration Preview window, shown in
Figure 5-8, displays the configuration proposed for the physical and logical
drives.
Figure 5-8. HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard Configuration Preview Window
NOTE
The RAID level of a logical drive that spans arrays lacks the
terminal zero. Mentally add it to make RAID 1 into RAID 10,
RAID 3 into RAID 30, and RAID 5 into RAID 50.
To switch between showing logical drives and physical drives:
Click Logical View or Physical View.
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To expand a view that has been collapsed (physical or logical drives, or hot
spares are hidden):
Click the + sign in the yellow diamond.
To display the properties of a logical drive:
Double-click the logical drive in the Logical Devices box.
To display the properties of a physical drive:
Double-click the physical drive in the Physical Devices box.
To change a logical drive:
1. Click the Back button to back up to the previous screen.
2. Delete the last logical drive defined (accepted) by clicking the Undo
button. Keep clicking Undo until you have removed the logical drive you
want to change.
3. Configure the logical drives again or click Back to back up and change
array definitions.
To correct the assignment of physical drives:
1. Undo any logical drives that are defined on the array by clicking Back,
then clicking Undo as necessary to delete the last logical drive.
2. Click the Back button to go to the Array Definition screen.
3. Select the array to be reclaimed, and click the Reclaim button.
4. Configure the physical drives and logical drives again.
To start the configuration over again:
Click the Cancel button.
To accept the final configuration:
Click the Finish button on the Configuration Preview screen.
To save your configuration and initialize logical drives:
1. Click OK at the message asking if you want to save the configuration.
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A Writing Configuration message appears briefly, indicating that the
configuration information is being written to the adapter’s NVRAM. This
is not a binary file that can be loaded to restore the configuration.
HP NetRAID Assistant asks if you want to initialize your logical drives
now. Logical drives must be initialized before they can be used. If you
have other adapters to configure, you may wish to do that first and then
initialize all the logical drives.
2. Click the Cancel button to defer initialization of the logical drives until
later, or click OK to initialize logical drives now.
Step H. Save Configuration and Initialize
In this step, you will do the following:
• Save the configuration to a binary file.
• Print a copy of the configuration.
• If you have more than one adapter, configure any other adapters.
• Initialize the logical drives if you have not done so already.
Save to Binary File
To save the configuration to a binary file:
1. Choose Save from the Configuration menu. The Save Configuration
dialog box appears.
2. Type the file name and directories to be used to save the configuration.
The file type should be *.cfg.
3. Click an "X" in the Read Only box if you want to make the saved file
read-only.
4. Click Save to save the configuration to the designated file.
NOTE
Be sure to save your adapter configuration to a file. This
information is essential when replacing a failed adapter.
Print Configuration
To print a copy of the configuration:
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Chapter 5
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1. Choose Print from the Configuration menu.
2. Keep a copy of configuration Worksheets A and B together with the
printed copy of your configuration file. They help you understand your
configuration, replace a failed adapter, or communicate with HP Customer
Support.
Configure Any Other Adapters
To configure another adapter from the HP NetRAID Assistant window:
1. Click the Adapter pull-down list and select the adapter.
2. Clear its configuration by choosing Clear Configuration from the
Configuration menu. Click OK to the warning prompts.
3. Check the Rebuild Rate by choosing Rebuild Rate from the Adapter
menu and reset the rate if necessary.
4. If global hot spares will be assigned, drag the desired Ready physical
drives into the global hot spare pool.
5. Launch the HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard by choosing Wizard from the
Configuration menu.
6. Configure the adapter as described in Step G.
7. Save the configuration and print it, as described in Step H.
Initialize Logical Drives
If you have not done so already, you must initialize your logical drives.
CAUTION
Initializing a logical drive destroys all data currently on the
disk modules.
To initialize the logical drives you defined for the adapter in the
HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard:
1. If you have more than one adapter, click the Adapter pull-down list and
select the adapter.
2. Select the logical drives to be initialized.
3. Choose Initialize from the Logical Drive menu and click OK.
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The Initialize screen appears with separate windows for each logical
drive. The bar graph for each logical drive shows the progress of the
initialization.
4. Click the Abort button if you need to stop the initialization of that logical
drive.
5. To rearrange individual windows, click the Arrange menu and make a
selection.
6. Repeat the initialization process for other logical drives and adapters as
necessary.
Exit HP NetRAID Assistant
To exit HP NetRAID Assistant, choose Exit from the Configuration menu.
You have now completed the installation and configuration of the disk array
subsystem hardware. The next chapter discusses HP NetRAID Series adapter
software.
69
6 HP NetRAID Software
Overview
In this chapter you will complete the next five steps of the configuration:
• Follow Step I if you plan to install NetWare 4.2 or 5. In Step I you choose
whether you want to use I2O (Intelligent Input/Output) operation or nonI2O (conventional) operation.
• In Step J you use the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM to prepare the
diskettes needed to install any of the following that are required for your
network operating system (NOS) and method of NOS installation:
◊
HP NetRAID drivers
◊
HP NetRAID NOS-specific utility
• In Step K you install the NOS, if necessary, and the appropriate
HP NetRAID drivers, if they are not installed automatically.
• In Step L you install the NOS-specific configuration utility you need to
manage your HP NetRAID system.
• In Step M you run HP NetRAID Express Tools, if necessary.
Table 6-1 summarizes the installation of HP NetRAID software.
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Table 6-1. Summary of HP NetRAID Software Installation
NOS
Windows 2000
Windows NT
Automatic
mode of
NOS
installatio
n
Step I
Does not
apply
Does not
apply
Automatic
mode of
NOS
installatio
n
Manual
mode of
NOS
installatio
n
72
If no special instructions:
Create diskette with NOSspecific configuration utility
Install NOS
If special instructions: Create
diskette with NOS installation
instructions and anything else
required in special instructions
Install NOS manually
Create diskette with NOSspecific configuration utility
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Print NOS installation
instructions, or create diskette
Install NOS
Create diskette with NOS
installation instructions and
HP NetRAID drivers
Create diskette with NOSspecific configuration utility
Decide if
you want
I2O or
non-I2O
Steps K and L
Step
M
First, read NOS Installation
Instructions for any special
instructions
Create diskette with NOSspecific configuration utility
Manual
mode of
NOS
installatio
n
NetWare (NonI2O)
Step J
Print NOS installation
instructions, or create diskette
Create diskette with NOSspecific configuration utility
Optional
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Optional
Install anything
required in special
instructions
Optional
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Install NOS manually
Optional
HP NetRAID drivers
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Install NOS
Optional
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Create diskette with NOS
installation instructions and
HP NetRAID drivers
Install NOS manually
Create diskette with NOSspecific configuration utility
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Install HP NetRAID
drivers
Optional
Chapter 6
HP NetRAID Software
Table 6-1. Summary of HP NetRAID Software Installation (continued)
NOS
Step I
NetWare (I2O)
Manual
mode of
NOS
installatio
n
IBM OS/2,
SCO UnixWare,
or SCO
OpenServer
Decide if
you want
I2O or
non-I2O
Does not
apply
Step J
Create diskette with NOS
installation instructions and
HP NetRAID drivers
Create diskette with NOSspecific configuration utility
Steps K and L
Step
M
Install NOS manually
for I2O, including
HP NetRAID OSM
and companion driver
Change
PCI class
code to
I2O
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Create diskette with NOS
installation instructions and
HP NetRAID drivers
Install NOS manually
NOS-specific configuration
utility is included on diskette
Install NOS-specific
configuration utility
Optional
Install HP NetRAID
drivers
Step I. Decide I2O or Non-I2O Operation
If you plan to install NetWare 4.2 or 5, decide whether you want to operate in I2O
mode or in conventional non-I2O mode. This determines whether you should load
the HP NetRAID OSM (for I2O) or the non-I2O HP NetRAID drivers in Step K.
• Conventional non-I2O HP NetRAID drivers are provided for all network
operating systems supported by the integrated HP NetRAID controller.
• Novell NetWare versions 4.2 and 5 support I2O operation. They supply the
OS Services Module (OSM) required for I2O operation. The HP NetRAID
firmware supports I2O operation when the OSM is present and the PCI
class code is set to "I2O" mode for all I2O-capable HP NetRAID adapters
in the system, including the integrated HP NetRAID controller, if present.
◊
The boot controller cannot be the integrated HP NetRAID controller or
any other HP NetRAID Series adapter operating in I2O mode.
◊
To support I2O operation of HP NetRAID, install NetWare manually,
not automatically, in Step K and follow the installation instructions in
your NetWare documentation.
◊
For OSM installation instructions, refer to your NetWare
documentation.
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◊
To change the PCI class code, either see Step M in this chapter, or use
the Set Class utility " HP NetRAID Software for DOS" diskette in the
diskette library on the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM.
Data written or read during I2O operation is fully compatible with data written or
read during non-I2O operation.
Step J. Use HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM to
Prepare Diskettes
In this step, you will use the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM to create the
diskettes you need to install the HP NetRAID drivers and the HP NetRAID
configuration utility specific to your NOS. The diskettes that you need to create
may depend upon whether you plan to use Installation Assistant’s automatic
mode of NOS installation, or whether you plan to install the NOS manually.
Follow the instructions in this step to do the following:
• Verify that you have the most recent version of the HP NetServer
Navigator CD-ROM, if you have not already done so.
• For either automatic or manual installation of Windows 2000, view the
NOS installation instructions for Windows 2000.
◊
If there are no special instructions for installing Windows 2000,
create diskette(s) containing the NOS-specific configuration utility.
◊
If there are special instructions, create the following:
∗ Diskette(s) containing the instructions for installing the NOS and
anything else required in those instructions.
∗ Diskette(s) containing the NOS-specific configuration utility
• For automatic installation of Windows NT or NetWare not supporting
I2O, create the following:
◊
Diskette or printed copy of instructions for installing the NOS
◊
Diskette(s) containing the NOS-specific configuration utility
• For manual installation of Windows NT or NetWare not supporting
I2O, create the following:
◊
74
Diskette(s) containing the HP NetRAID drivers and instructions for
installing the NOS
Chapter 6
HP NetRAID Software
◊
Diskette(s) containing the NOS-specific configuration utility
• For installation of NetWare supporting I2O, create the following:
◊
Diskette(s) containing the HP NetRAID drivers and instructions for
installing the NOS
◊
Diskette(s) containing the NOS-specific configuration utility
• For IBM OS/2, SCO UnixWare, or SCO OpenServer, create the
diskette(s) containing the HP NetRAID drivers and instructions for
installing the NOS. The NOS-specific configuration utility will also be
copied to the drivers diskette(s).
Check Latest Versions
To ensure that you have the latest versions of the software, obtain the current
Status Report for your HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM. This report describes
any software updates since the CD-ROM was created, and indicates whether you
need any updates and how to obtain them.
Each version of the CD-ROM has a four-digit Document Number printed on the
disk. Obtain the Status Report for your CD-ROM in one of these ways:
• Internet: Access URL http://netserver.hp.com/netserver/.
Click on the line that corresponds to your document number.
• Internet FTP: Address: ftp://ftp.hp.com/pub/servers
Create Drivers Diskette and Instructions
NOTE
If you plan to use the automatic mode of NOS installation to
install NetWare or Windows NT, you do not need to make
diskettes of the HP NetRAID drivers. However, you should
copy the instructions for installing the NOS. To do so, refer to
the instructions below to either print a copy directly, or copy
the instructions to diskette to print later.
You can use the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM to create the diskette(s)
containing the drivers for your NOS and the instructions for installing them in
either of two ways:
• On a separate PC workstation running Windows 95, 98, NT, or 2000
and having a CD-ROM drive and mouse: Refer to "Using a Separate
Workstation to Create Drivers Diskette and Instructions" later in this
chapter.
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• On the HP NetServer you are configuring: Refer to "Using the
HP NetServer to Create Drivers Diskette and Instructions" later in this
chapter.
Using a Separate Workstation to Create Drivers Diskette and Instructions
To use a separate PC workstation to create the diskette(s) containing the drivers
for your NOS and the instructions for installing the NOS, do the following:
1. Turn on the workstation and monitor, if they are not already on, and log
on if necessary.
2. Insert the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM into the drive. HP NetServer
Navigator should start automatically if automatic startup is enabled for the
CD-ROM drive. If not, double-click launch32.exe on the CD-ROM to
launch HP NetServer Navigator. It looks different from HP NetServer
Navigator running on the HP NetServer.
3. On the NetServer Navigator screen’s drop-down menu of HP NetServers,
click the HP NetServer you are configuring. Then click the arrow in the
lower right corner of the screen.
4. On the NetServer Navigator menu of NOSs, click the NOS you plan to
install. Then click the arrow in the lower right corner of the screen.
5. The NetServer Navigator Main Menu is displayed. Click Guide to
Configure Server.
6. The Guide to Configure Server list the following items:
◊
NOS Installation Instructions
◊
Tested Configurations
◊
Diskette Library
Click NOS Installation Instructions. Then click the appropriate icon
either to save the instructions to diskette, or to print the instructions.
Follow the onscreen instructions. When you have finished saving or
printing, click the Close arrow.
7. On the Guide to Configure Server screen, click Diskette Library.
8. On the Diskette Library screen, double-click the NOS drivers for the NOS
you plan to install. Then follow the onscreen instructions to create the
diskette.
9. Go to "Make NOS-specific Configuration Utility Diskette" later in Step J.
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Using the HP NetServer to Create Drivers Diskette and Instructions
To use the HP NetServer you are configuring to create the diskette(s) containing
the drivers for your NOS and the instructions for installing the NOS, do the
following:
1. Turn on the HP NetServer and monitor, if they are not already on, and
insert the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM into the drive. Turn off the
HP NetServer power, wait 10 seconds, and turn it back on again.
2. From the HP Navigator Main Menu, choose Configuration and
Installation Assistant.
3. From the Configuration Assistant menu, choose Custom.
4. From the Gather Information window, choose your NOS. If necessary,
also select your version of the NOS.
5. When you see the message, "Would you like to use HP’s automated mode
of NOS installation?" click No.
6. From the Custom Configuration menu, choose Create Driver
Diskette(s).
7. From the Create Driver Diskette(s) window, choose Create Driver
Diskette(s). Select the diskette to create, click Execute, and follow the
onscreen instructions.
8. When the driver diskette is complete, click Back to return to the Custom
Configuration menu.
9. From the Custom Configuration menu, choose Show NOS Installation
Instructions.
10. On the Show NOS Installation Instructions window, click Save to Disk.
Later in Step J, you will print the Network Operating System Installation
Instructions.
11. Click Back to return to Configuration Assistant, and click Back again to
return to the Main Menu.
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Make NOS-specific Configuration Utility Diskette
If you plan to install Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Novell NetWare, you must
make another diskette containing the NOS-specific configuration utility.
NOTE
You can skip this step if you plan to install IBM OS/2,
SCO UnixWare, or SCO OpenServer. The NOS-specific
configuration utility was already copied to the drivers
diskette(s). Go to "Print NOS Installation Instructions" later in
this chapter.
You can use the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM to create the diskette(s)
containing the NOS-specific configuration utility in either of two ways:
• On a separate PC workstation running Windows 95, 98, NT, or 2000
and having a CD-ROM drive and mouse: Refer to "Using a Separate
Workstation to Create NOS-specific Configuration Utility Diskette " later
in this chapter.
• On the HP NetServer you are configuring: Refer to "Using the
HP NetServer to Create NOS-Specific Configuration Utility Diskette" later
in this chapter.
Using a Separate Workstation to Create NOS-specific Configuration Utility Diskette
1. If you created the NOS drivers diskette(s) on the PC workstation, the
Diskette Library screen is displayed. If you need to display the Diskette
Library, refer to "Using a Separate Workstation to Create Drivers
Diskette" earlier in this chapter.
2. On the Diskette Library screen, double-click one of the following:
◊
For Windows NT or Windows 2000, select HP NetRAID Software
for Windows. Previously, this diskette was named " HP NetRAID
Assistant for WinNT and Win95/98."
◊
For NetWare, select HP NetRAID Software for NetWare.
Follow the onscreen instructions to create the diskette(s).
3. To exit HP NetServer Navigator, click the Exit icon in the lower left
corner of the screen.
4. Remove the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM from the drive.
5. Go to "Print NOS Installation Instructions" later in this chapter.
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Using the HP NetServer to Create NOS-specific Configuration Utility Diskette
To use the HP NetServer to create the diskette(s) needed to install the
NOS-specific utility for Windows NT, Windows 2000, or NetWare:
1. From the HP Navigator Main Menu, choose NetServer Utilities.
2. Choose Diskette Library.
3. From the Diskette Library, do the following:
◊
For Windows NT or Windows 2000, create the utility diskette by
selecting HP NetRAID Software for Windows in the diskette library.
Previously, this diskette was named " HP NetRAID Assistant for
WinNT and Win95/98."
◊
For NetWare, select HP NetRAID Software for NetWare in the
diskette library.
4. Follow the onscreen instructions to create the NOS-specific diskette.
5. Remove the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM and click Exit to restart
the HP NetServer.
Print NOS Installation Instructions
If you saved the Network Operating System Installation Instructions or NOS
Installation Instructions to diskette, print them now. In Step K, you will follow
these instructions to load the drivers from the driver diskette.
Step K. Install NOS and HP NetRAID Drivers
Install Network Operating System (If Necessary)
If the NOS is not already installed on the HP NetServer, install it according to
the instructions you printed in Step J. If you are using Novell NetWare, also see
the Novell NetWare Installation book.
The NOS can be installed on a non-hot-swap drive, on a hot-swap drive not
under HP NetRAID control or on a logical drive under HP NetRAID control.
However, if you are installing NetWare to operate HP NetRAID in I2O mode, the
boot controller cannot be an integrated HP NetRAID controller or any other
HP NetRAID Series adapter operating in I2O mode.
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HP NetRAID Software
NOTE
For I2O operation under NetWare 4.2 or 5, load the NOS
manually, rather than using HP’s automatic mode of NOS
installation.
Install HP NetRAID Series Driver
Load the appropriate driver(s) as instructed in the NOS Installation Instructions
that you printed in Step J earlier in this chapter. The driver names are listed in
Table 6-2.
NOTE
For I2O operation under NetWare 4.2 or 5, load the
HP NetRAID I2O OSM and all necessary modules, as
described in your NetWare documentation. Also load the I2O
companion driver, mril4_xx.ham, which supports the
HP NetRAID Config utility. Do not load the non-I2O
NetRAID drivers. Remember to set the PCI class code to I2O
in Step M.
Table 6-2. HP NetRAID Drivers
Network Operating System
Microsoft Windows 2000
mraid35x.sys
Microsoft Windows NT
mraidnt.sys
Novell NetWare 4.2 and 5
Mega4_xx.ham
Mega4_xx.ddi
(Conventional, non-I2O)
Novell NetWare 4.2 and 5
(I2O support)
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HP NetRAID Drivers
HP NetRAID I2O OSM
mril4_xx.ham
IBM OS/2
mraid.add
SCO OpenServer
amird
SCO UnixWare
mega
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Step L. Install NOS-specific Configuration Utility
In this step, you install the configuration utility specific to your NOS.
• If you are using any version of Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 2000,
you install the HP NetRAID Assistant utility. This is the Windows NT
and Windows 2000 version of the utility you used to configure your
system in Chapter 5.
• If you are using Novell NetWare, IBM OS/2, SCO UnixWare, or SCO
OpenServer, you install the HP NetRAID Config utility.
Chapter 10, "Understanding HP NetRAID Utilities," has menu maps of both of
these utilities. For complete information about these utilities, see the
HP NetRAID Series User Guide in Information Assistant.
Install the utility as described for the NOS version below.
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000
1. Select Start from the taskbar.
2. Choose Run from the Start menu.
3. Insert diskette #1, " HP NetRAID Software for Windows."
4. Type <d>:\setup at the Open: prompt, where <d> is the drive letter of
the diskette drive you are using.
5. Follow the on-screen instructions.
NOTE
Setup installs the following HP NetRAID Series software:
• HP NetRAID Assistant (nraid.exe)
• HP NetRAID Monitor Service (megaserv.exe)
• HP NetRAID Consistency Check Scheduler
(megactrl.exe)
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Microsoft Windows NT Terminal Server Edition
NOTE
Windows NT Terminal Server Edition must be operating in
INSTALL mode when you install the HP NetRAID software
for Windows NT. Otherwise, the administrator may see it as
properly installed, but it may fail for other users.
There are three relevant commands for the DOS prompt:
• CHANGE USER /INSTALL = sets it to install mode.
• CHANGE USER /EXECUTE = sets it to execute mode.
• CHANGE USER /QUERY = show the current mode of
operation.
After the installation, return to the default EXECUTE mode.
This means that clients connected via the network can
connect to the server and run Windows NT sessions from it.
1. Select Start from the taskbar.
2. Choose Run from the Start menu.
3. Insert diskette #1, " HP NetRAID Software for Windows."
4. Type <d>:\setup at the Open: prompt, where <d> is the drive letter of
the diskette drive you are using.
5. Follow the on-screen instructions.
NOTE
Setup installs the following HP NetRAID Series software:
• HP NetRAID Assistant
• HP NetRAID Monitor Service
• HP NetRAID Consistency Check Scheduler
IBM OS/2 Warp or for E-business
1. Open a command prompt window.
2. Change to the drive where the utility is to be installed.
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3. Type cd\ and press the Enter key.
4. Type md NetRAID and press the Enter key.
5. Type cd NetRAID and press the Enter key.
6. Insert the diskette containing the HP NetRAID drivers for IBM OS/2.
7. Type copy <d>:\netraid\*.* and press the Enter key, where <d>
is the diskette drive.
8. Type megaconf.exe from the NetRAID directory to run the
HP NetRAID Config utility.
Novell NetWare 4.2 and 5
1. Exit to the DOS prompt.
2. Insert the diskette called " HP NetRAID Software for NetWare."
3. Type Copy <d1>:\NetRAID\*.* <d2>:\nwserver, where <d1>
is the drive letter for the diskette drive and <d2> is the hard disk where
NetWare is installed. Press Enter.
4. To load the HP NetRAID Config utility, type
load <d2>:\nwserver\megamgr.nlm and press Enter at the
NetWare console prompt.
SCO OpenServer 5.0.x and UnixWare 7.0
No instructions are necessary. The HP NetRAID Config utility was installed
automatically when you installed the HP NetRAID driver.
Step M. Run HP NetRAID Express Tools
After you have installed your software, you may need to run the HP NetRAID
Express Tools utility. Run HP NetRAID Express Tools if you need to do any of
the following:
• If you are using either Fast/Wide or Ultra/Wide devices in an external
mass storage enclosure, set the SCSI transfer rate.
◊
The default SCSI transfer rate is Ultra2.
◊
The alternative SCSI transfer rates are Fast and Ultra.
◊
Change the SCSI transfer rate for the external channel to match the
external devices or external enclosure.
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◊
You do not need to set the SCSI transfer rate if you are using internal
hot-swap mass storage only, since it is Ultra2.
• To operate in I2O mode, set the PCI class code to I2O mode.
NOTE
Instead of using HP NetRAID Express Tools to change the
PCI class code, you can use the Set Class utility in the "
HP NetRAID Software for DOS" utility in the diskette library
on the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM. This is faster if you
have multiple HP NetRAID Series adapters because it avoids
multiple restarts of the HP NetServer.
• If you need to prevent booting from the HP NetRAID subsystem,
disable the HP NetRAID BIOS.
HP NetRAID Express Tools is a configuration and management utility that
resides in a chip on the HP NetRAID board along with the HP NetRAID BIOS
and firmware. For more information about HP NetRAID Express Tools and its
functions, refer to the HP NetRAID Series User Guide in Information Assistant.
To Start HP NetRAID Express Tools
1. Start the host HP NetServer and watch for the flashing message:
Option: Experienced users may press <Ctrl> <M> for
HP NetRAID Express Tools now.
Firmware Initializing
2. While this message is flashing, press <Ctrl> <M>. When the system
stops scanning, HP NetRAID Express Tools starts and displays the Tools
Management menu.
To Disable the HP NetRAID BIOS
If you want to prevent the system from booting from any of the following
HP NetRAID Series adapters, or from the integrated HP NetRAID controller (if
present), you can disable the HP NetRAID BIOS:
• HP NetRAID (D4943A)
• HP NetRAID-1 (D4992A)
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• HP NetRAID-3Si (D5955A)
• HP NetRAID-1Si (D2140A)
To disable the HP NetRAID BIOS for all adapters in the system, choose Disable
BIOS from the Tools Management menu.
To Change the SCSI Transfer Rate
1. If you have installed one or more HP NetRAID Series adapters, select the
adapter controlling the SCSI channel on which Fast/Wide or Ultra SCSI
support is to be enabled:
◊
Choose Select Adapter from the Tools Management menu.
◊
Select the adapter controlling the SCSI channel of interest.
2. Choose Objects from the Tools Management menu.
3. Choose SCSI Channel from the Objects menu.
4. Select the channel on which the SCSI transfer rate is to be changed.
5. To change the SCSI transfer rate:
◊
Choose SCSI Transfer Rate from the SCSI Channel menu. A
submenu appears.
◊
Use the arrow keys to highlight your selection: Fast, Ultra, or Ultra2.
Press Enter.
◊
Choose Yes to confirm your selection.
6. Press Esc to return to the Tools Management menu.
To Change the PCI Class Code to I2O
To support I2O operation, set the PCI class code to I2O on all HP NetRAID
Series adapters in the system, other than HP NetRAID and HP NetRAID-1
adapters (which do not support I2O). Also set it to I2O for the integrated
HP NetRAID controllers, if present.
NOTE
Instead of using HP NetRAID Express Tools to change the
PCI class code, you can use the Set Class utility in the "
HP NetRAID Software for DOS" utility in the diskette library
on the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM. This is faster if you
have multiple HP NetRAID Series adapters because it avoids
multiple restarts of the HP NetServer.
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To use HP NetRAID Express Tools to change the PCI class code, do the
following:
1. If you have installed one or more HP NetRAID Series adapters, select the
integrated controller or an adapter:
◊
Choose Select Adapter from the Tools Management menu.
◊
Select the adapter of interest.
2. Choose Objects from the Tools Management menu.
3. Choose Adapter from the Objects menu.
4. Choose Emulation from the Adapter menu.
5. To change the PCI class code:
◊
Use the arrow keys to highlight I2O. Press Enter.
◊
Choose Yes to confirm your selection.
6. Restart the HP NetServer when prompted.
To Exit HP NetRAID Express Tools
To exit HP NetRAID Express Tools, press Esc repeatedly until the Exit? prompt
is displayed. Choose Yes. Then press any key to reboot. The new parameters
become effective after you reboot.
Run Other Utilities, If Necessary
You may need to enable or disable ports or change settings such as IRQs or MP
specifications. To do so, run the utility appropriate for your system, such as:
◊
Setup Utility
◊
EISA Configuration Utility (ECU)
Refer to your HP NetServer documentation for instructions.
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7 Preparing for Online Capacity
Expansion
Step N. Prepare for Online Capacity Expansion
The HP NetRAID Online Capacity Expansion feature allows you to add new
storage capacity to drives controlled by an integrated HP NetRAID controller
without rebooting the server.
Online Capacity Expansion has these restrictions:
• You can use Online Capacity Expansion with any logical drive of RAID
level 0, 3, or 5.
◊
Capacity expansion is impossible for RAID 1 logical drives because
RAID 1 mirrors one physical drive by one other physical drive.
◊
Capacity expansion cannot be done online for logical drives of RAID
levels 10, 30, or 50.
• You cannot use Online Capacity Expansion with an array that contains
more than one logical drive. The logical drive must be the only logical
drive in the array.
• Online Capacity Expansion is supported only for the Novell NetWare 4.2
and 5 and Microsoft Windows NT and Windows 2000 operating systems.
• You cannot use Online Capacity Expansion with SCO OpenServer, SCO
UnixWare, IBM OS/2.
This chapter explains how to prepare logical drives for future online expansion.
Your NOS documentation and the HP NetRAID Series User Guide in
Information Assistant describe how to actually expand capacity.
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Refer to one of the following sections in this chapter:
• See "Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion Under NetWare 4.2" if you
are using Novell NetWare 4.2.
• See "Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion Under NetWare 5" if you
are using Novell NetWare 5.
• See "Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under Windows NT" if you
are using Microsoft Windows NT.
• See "Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion Under Windows 2000" if
you are using Microsoft Windows 2000.
Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under
NetWare 4.2
About Capacity Expansion under NetWare 4.2
Normally, to add capacity you must shut down the server to reconfigure and then
restore data, or you must add the new storage space as a new volume. The Online
Capacity Expansion feature allows you to expand an existing logical drive
without shutting down the server.
Under NetWare 4.2, use virtual sizing to prepare for online capacity expansion.
Virtual sizing is enabled separately on each logical drive. When enabled, the
controller presents to the operating system a logical drive of 144-GB, which is
the default size. Only a part of the 144 GB logical drive exists as actual physical
storage; the remainder is virtual storage. You configure volumes to use only the
actual physical space, while the virtual space allows room for online expansion.
NOTE
88
The 144-GB default size of the logical drive that the controller
initially presents to the operating system is the minimum size.
The size can be increased.
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For example, assume you have one RAID-5 logical drive built from four physical
hard disk drives of 4 GB each. The result is 12 GB of actual storage space. If you
enable virtual sizing for this logical drive, then the operating system will see a
logical drive of 144 GB. Only the first 12 GB are real, 4 GB are used for parity,
and the last 128 GB are virtual.
Under NetWare 4.2, you create a 144-GB partition, but within that partition you
only create a logical drive totaling 12 GB or less. Since there is unused partition
space, the physical storage of 12-GB can be expanded online by adding another
hard disk drive, but the partition remains at 144 GB. To actually expand capacity
online, refer to the HP NetRAID Series User Guide and your NetWare
documentation.
Precautions
When using the Online Capacity Expansion feature, it is very important that you
do not create volumes that exceed the actual physical capacity. You must add up
the capacities of all volumes that may be using the physical storage space, such as
a DOS volume, SYS volume, Hot Fix Area, and any user volumes. This is most
important if NetWare 4.2 will be installed on the disk array (rather than a SCSI
disk outside of the HP NetRAID system). During installation, if the total physical
capacity is exceeded during volume creation, a NetWare abend and loss of the
installation occurs. As long as the physical capacity is not exceeded, the
installation will be successful.
Although undesirable, NetWare 4.2 allows you to create volumes into the virtual
space. (This is because during volume creation, NetWare 4.2 only looks at the
beginning of the volume and if there is real storage space there, the volume will
be created.) However, when writing to this volume, you cannot write beyond the
physical limit and write errors will be generated when the physical space is filled.
You need to be careful when creating volumes in a partition containing virtual
space. Use the HP NetRAID Config module to check the actual physical capacity
available, and be sure the total size of NetWare volumes does not exceed this
value.
One other useful measure is to set the capacity alarms under NetWare 4.2 so that
warnings will be generated when you approach the limit of a volume.
The Online Capacity Expansion feature cannot be used if a logical drive spans
multiple arrays. Each array can contain only one logical drive. Reconstruction
(for the purposes of adding a drive to an array) can be done only on an array
having a single logical drive. It is also important to plan future storage expansion
into your installation. This ensures that you can easily expand capacity without
the need for backup/restore operations or reconfiguration.
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NOTE
SFT-3 and mirroring users: Novell’s operating system,
which provides system level fault tolerance by mirroring two
systems, is not compatible with the Online Capacity
Expansion feature. SFT-3 mirrors disk storage on a partition
basis rather than a volume basis. Because of the virtual space
created within the partition, SFT-3 cannot successfully mirror
the partitions. This limitation also applies to regular mirroring
(without SFT-3) of volumes. SFT-3 users may add storage
capacity online without bringing the two systems down if
enough drives are added to create a new array and logical
drive on an integrated HP NetRAID controller. Under the
Install module, NetWare 4.2 can then scan for new devices
and detect the new logical drive.
Planning for Online Capacity Expansion under NetWare 4.2
To permit easy capacity expansion of a NetWare 4.2 installation, plan ahead and
consider your storage use.
• Since NetWare 4.2 permits only one NetWare partition per logical drive,
make the NetWare partition the size of the virtual logical drive in advance
so that you can expand that volume.
• Under NetWare 4.2, you cannot grow a partition, but you can add
additional segments within an existing partition. The added segments can
be "joined" to be part of the same volume, or they can be made into
separate volumes.
• NSS volumes are not supported in NetWare 4.2.
NOTE
If NetWare 4.2 must be installed on the disk array, create a
single logical drive with virtual sizing enabled. Create a DOS
partition of 500 MB or less for booting. NetWare volumes can
then be added after the DOS partition on the same logical
drive. The unused space on the partition can be used later for
capacity expansion. Be sure to follow the precautions above.
In most installations, the operating system is installed on a SCSI drive connected
outside of the HP NetRAID system. However, NetWare can reside on a disk array
in the HP NetRAID system to achieve redundancy.
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Preparation Steps for NetWare 4.2
This section makes the following assumptions:
• You have already configured your HP NetRAID system as discussed in
Chapter 5. You should have created only one logical drive per array.
• You have initialized your logical drives.
NOTE
It is important to initialize your logical drives. If the drives
have been previously configured under an operating system,
there can sometimes be residual partition/format information
which subsequently causes misrepresentation of logical drives
under the NetWare 4.2 Install module.
• You already installed NetWare 4.2 as discussed in Chapter 6.
The following steps are necessary to prepare your logical drive for online
capacity expansion:
I. Enable virtual sizing in HP NetRAID Express Tools
II. Create the NetWare partition in NetWare 4.2
III. Create the NetWare volume in NetWare 4.2
I. Enable Virtual Sizing
1. Restart the host HP NetServer, and watch for the message:
Option: Experienced users may press <Ctrl> <M> for
HP NetRAID Express Tools now.
Firmware Initializing
2. When the message is displayed, press <Ctrl> <M>. When the system
stops scanning, HP NetRAID Express Tools starts and displays the Tools
Management menu.
3. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter (including any
integrated HP NetRAID controller), do the following to select the
integrated controller or adapter controlling a logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion:
a. Choose Adapter from the Tools Management menu.
b. Choose the adapter controlling the logical drive.
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4. Choose Objects from the Tools Management menu.
5. Choose Logical Drive from the Objects menu.
6. From the Logical Drives menu, choose the logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion.
7. From the Logical Drive menu for the drive you want to prepare, choose
Properties.
8. Choose Virtual Sizing.
9. On the Virtual Size Feature menu, choose Enable, and confirm your
choice.
10. Press Esc twice to return to the Logical Drive menu.
If you need to enable virtual sizing on another logical drive, choose the
logical drive and repeat steps 6 through 10.
11. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter installed (including
any integrated HP NetRAID controller), press Esc to return to the Objects
menu. Enable virtual sizing on the logical drives of all adapters as
necessary.
12. To exit, press Esc until you see the Exit? box, then choose Yes.
NOTE
Clearing a previous configuration does not reset the virtual
sizing setting for a logical drive. Use the Reset to Factory
Defaults option in Express Tools to disable virtual sizing for
all logical drives, or manually change the setting.
II. Create the NetWare Partition
1. Start NetWare 4.2.
2. Type NetWare load install.
3. Select Standard Disk Options.
4. Select Modify Disk Partitions and Hot fix.
5. The Available Devices are displayed. For an initial installation, only Free
Space will be displayed. Select Create NetWare disk partition to create
a NetWare partition on the logical drive (which has virtual sizing
enabled). The partition size will be 144 GB. Press Enter.
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6. Press the F10 key to save the partition. The free space becomes a NetWare
partition. The Available Disk Options menu is displayed.
III. Create the NetWare Volume
How you create the NetWare volume depends on where you installed NetWare.
• For drives that do not contain the NetWare 4.2 operating system, see
"Create Volumes on Drives that do not Contain NetWare 4.2."
• If NetWare 4.2 was installed on a disk array, see "Create Volumes on
Drives That Contain NetWare 4.2."
Create Volumes on Drives that do not Contain NetWare 4.2
Do the following to create a volume that does not contain the NetWare 4.2
operating system:
1. The Available Disk Options menu is displayed. Select Volume Options.
Press Enter.
2. Press the Inset key or the F3 key to add a volume segment.
3. The available free space is displayed. Press Enter.
4. Select Make this segment a new volume. Press Enter.
5. Type the volume name. Press Enter.
6. Edit the disk segment size to be the actual physical size of the logical
drive.
7. Press the F10 key to save the changes.
8. The Volume Disk Segment list shows the volume size. Press F10 to save.
9. The volume name and size are displayed. Press Esc to save.
10. Select Yes when asked "Save Volume changes?"
11. Supply the administrator name and login.
12. The changes are displayed. Press Enter to continue.
13. Mount the volume.
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The new volume is now ready for use.
Assume, for example, that the volume is called VOL1 and that its physical
capacity is 12 GB. Its partition is 144 GB. Leave the remaining virtual storage
space (144 GB minus 12 GB) as unused. You can write data up to 12 GB on the
drive.
Create Volumes on Drives that Contain NetWare 4.2
Sometimes it is desirable to have the network operating system reside on a disk
array. The advantage is that the NOS resides on a redundant drive.
NOTE
A NetWare 4.2 SYS volume should be limited to 2-GB or to a
smaller size appropriate for your system. Use the balance for a
user volume.
Virtual sizing can be used with a disk array that is used as the boot device and
also contains user data. If NetWare 4.2 must reside on the disk array, follow
these steps:
1. Create a DOS partition of 500-MB or less for booting.
2. Create additional NetWare volumes after the DOS partition on the same
logical drive for data. Do not exceed the physical space capacity. Create
these volumes as described in "Create Volumes on Drives that do not
Contain NetWare 4.2."
3. The remaining virtual capacity must be left unpartitioned, and will be
available for future partitions as you add disk drives to the array.
NOTE
94
Be sure not to create volumes that exceed the actual physical
capacity. You must add up the capacities of all volumes that
may be using the physical storage space such as a DOS
volume, SYS volume, Hot Fix Area, and any user volumes.
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Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion
Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under
NetWare 5
About Capacity Expansion under NetWare 5
Normally, to add capacity you must shut down the server to reconfigure and then
restore data, or you must add the new storage space as a new volume. The Online
Capacity Expansion feature allows you to expand an existing logical drive
without shutting down the server.
The Online Capacity Expansion feature cannot be used if a logical drive spans
multiple arrays. Each array can contain only one logical drive. Reconstruction
(for the purposes of adding a drive to an existing array) can only be done on an
array having a single logical drive. It is also important to plan future storage
expansion into your installation. This will ensure that you can easily expand
capacity without backup/restore operations or reconfiguration.
Preparation for online capacity expansion under NetWare 5 is simply to leave
virtual sizing disabled (the factory default), or to disable it if it has been enabled.
Refer to the HP NetRAID Series User Guide and your NetWare 5 documentation
for information about online capacity expansion.
Planning for Online Capacity Expansion under NetWare 5
To permit easy capacity expansion of a NetWare 5 installation, plan ahead and
consider your storage use.
• Under NetWare 5, you cannot grow a partition, but you can add additional
partitions within an existing logical drive. The added volumes can be
"joined" to be part of the same volume, or they can be made into separate
volumes.
• Under NetWare 5 you can expand the capacity of a logical drive three
times online before you need to go offline to expand its capacity a fourth
time. The fourth expansion involves backing up your data and restoring it.
Then you can expand online three more times before you need to go
offline for the next expansion, and so forth.
• NSS volumes are not supported in NetWare 5.
NOTE
If NetWare 5 must be installed on the HP NetRAID disk array,
create a single logical drive with virtual sizing disabled.
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In most installations, the operating system is installed on a SCSI drive connected
outside of the HP NetRAID system. However, NetWare 5 can reside on a disk
array in the HP NetRAID system to achieve redundancy.
Preparation Steps for NetWare 5
This section makes the following assumptions:
• You have already configured your HP NetRAID system as discussed in
Chapter 5. You should have created only one logical drive per array.
• You have initialized your logical drives.
NOTE
It is important to initialize your logical drives. If the drives
have been previously configured under an operating system,
there can sometimes be residual partition/format information
that subsequently causes misrepresentation of logical drives
under NetWare 5.
• You already installed NetWare 5 as discussed in Chapter 6.
The only other requirement to prepare for online capacity expansion of your
logical drive is that virtual sizing is disabled. This is the factory default setting.
• If Virtual Sizing is Disabled (the factory default setting), no other
preparation is necessary.
• If Virtual Sizing is Enabled, disable virtual sizing in HP NetRAID
Express Tools, as described below.
To Disable Virtual Sizing
NOTE
Clearing a previous configuration does not reset the virtual
sizing setting for a logical drive.
Using the Reset to Factory Defaults option in Express Tools
disables virtual sizing for all logical drives.
To enable virtual sizing for a logical drive, manually change
the setting.
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1. Restart the host HP NetServer, and watch for the message:
Option: Experienced users may press <Ctrl> <M> for
HP NetRAID Express Tools now.
Firmware Initializing
2. When the message is displayed, press <Ctrl> <M>. When the system
stops scanning, HP NetRAID Express Tools starts and displays the Tools
Management menu.
3. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter installed (including
any integrated HP NetRAID controller), do the following to select the
integrated controller or adapter controlling a logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion:
a. Choose Adapter from the Tools Management menu.
b. Choose the adapter controlling the logical drive.
4. Choose Objects from the Tools Management menu.
5. Choose Logical Drive from the Objects menu.
6. From the Logical Drives menu, choose the logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion.
7. From the Logical Drive menu for the drive you want to prepare, choose
Properties.
8. Choose Virtual Sizing.
9. On the Virtual Size Feature menu, choose Disable, and confirm your
choice.
10. Press Esc twice to return to the Logical Drive menu.
If you need to disable virtual sizing on another logical drive, choose the
logical drive and repeat steps 6 through 10.
11. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter installed (including
any integrated HP NetRAID controller), press Esc to return to the Objects
menu. Disable virtual sizing on the logical drives of all adapters as
necessary.
12. To exit, press Esc until you see the Exit? box, then choose Yes.
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Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under
Windows NT
About Capacity Expansion under Windows NT
Normally, adding capacity requires shutting down the server to reconfigure or
restore an existing volume or to add the new storage space as a new volume.
Using the Online Capacity Expansion feature allows you to expand an existing
logical drive without shutting down the server.
NOTE
The additional capacity will have a different drive letter than
the original logical drive. If the expanded capacity and the
original capacity must share the same drive letter, you cannot
expand capacity online and you must reboot Windows NT. For
more information about drive letters, see "Capacity
Expansion" in the HP NetRAID Series User Guide in
Information Assistant.
Under Windows NT, use virtual sizing to prepare for online capacity expansion.
Virtual sizing is enabled separately on each logical drive. When enabled, the
controller presents to the operating system a logical drive of 500-GB. However,
only a part of the 500 GB logical drive exists as actual physical storage. You
configure logical drives to use only the actual physical space while the virtual
space allows room for online expansion.
For example, assume you have one RAID 5 logical drive built from four physical
hard disk drives of 4 GB each; the result is 12 GB of actual storage space. If you
enable virtual sizing for this logical drive, then the operating system will see a
logical drive of 500 GB. The first 12 GB are real, 4 GB is used for parity, and the
last 484 GB are virtual. Since there is unused logical drive space, the physical
storage of 12 GB can be expanded online, but the total logical drive remains at
500 GB. To actually expand capacity online, refer to the HP NetRAID Series
User Guide and to your Windows NT documentation.
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Precautions
When using the Online Capacity Expansion feature, it is important that you do
not create volumes that exceed the actual physical capacity. If you attempt to do
this under Windows NT, the format operation will fail. If you extend an existing
partition into virtual space, this will be detected upon rebooting. In either case, be
sure to use no more than the actual available physical capacity. Capacity of the
logical drive can be checked with the HP NetRAID Assistant under Windows
NT.
The Online Capacity Expansion feature cannot be used if a logical drive spans
multiple arrays. Each array can contain only one logical drive. Reconstruction
(for the purposes of adding a drive to an existing array) can only be done on an
array having a single logical drive. It is also important to plan future storage
expansion into your installation. This will ensure that you can easily expand
capacity without backup/restore operations or reconfiguration.
Preparation Steps for Windows NT
This section makes the following assumptions:
• You have already configured your HP NetRAID system as discussed in
Chapter 5. You should have created only one logical drive per array.
For example, you might have four physical drives of 4 GB. You might
have configured these four drives as a single RAID 5 logical drive. This
produces a logical drive with 12 GB of real storage capacity, with 4 GB
used for parity.
• You have initialized your logical drives.
NOTE
It is important to initialize your logical drives because, if the
drives have been previously configured under an operating
system, there may be residual partition/format information
that can subsequently cause misrepresentation of logical drives
under the Windows NT Disk Administrator.
• You have already installed Windows NT as discussed in Chapter 6.
The following steps are necessary to prepare your logical drive for online
capacity expansion:
I. Enable virtual sizing in HP NetRAID Express Tools
II. Start Windows NT and enter the Disk Administrator
III. Partition and format the drive
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I. Enable Virtual Sizing
NOTE
Clearing a previous configuration does not reset the virtual
sizing setting for a logical drive. Use the Reset to Factory
Defaults option in HP NetRAID Express Tools to disable
virtual sizing for all logical drives, or manually change the
setting as described below.
1. Restart the host HP NetServer, and watch for the message:
Option: Experienced users may press <Ctrl> <M> for
HP NetRAID Express Tools now.
Firmware Initializing
2. When the message is displayed, press <Ctrl> <M>. When the system
stops scanning, HP NetRAID Express Tools starts and displays the Tools
Management menu.
3. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter installed (including
any integrated HP NetRAID controller), do the following to select the
integrated controller or adapter controlling a logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion:
a. Choose Adapter from the Tools Management menu.
b. Choose the adapter controlling the logical drive.
4. Choose Objects from the Tools Management menu.
5. Choose Logical Drive from the Objects menu.
6. From the Logical Drive menu, choose the logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion.
7. From the Logical Drive menu for the drive you want to prepare, choose
Properties.
8. Choose Virtual Sizing.
9. On the Virtual Size menu, choose Enable, and confirm your choice.
10. Press Esc twice to return to the Logical Drive menu.
If you need to enable virtual sizing on another logical drive, choose the
logical drive and repeat steps 6 through 10.
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11. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter installed (including
any integrated HP NetRAID controller), press Esc to return to the Objects
menu. Enable virtual sizing on the logical drives of all adapters as
necessary.
12. To exit, press Esc until you see the Exit box, and choose Yes.
II. Start Windows NT and Enter the Disk Administrator
Start Windows NT, and enter the Disk Administrator.
Here you see the new logical drive shown as a single unpartitioned/unformatted
drive of 500 GB. Although there might be only 12 GB of real storage space on
the logical drive, the Online Capacity Expansion feature creates a virtual drive of
500 GB.
III. Partition and Format the Drive
How you partition and format a drive depends on where you installed
Windows NT.
• For drives that do not contain the Windows NT operating system, see
"Partition and Format Drives that do not Contain Windows NT" below.
• If Windows NT was installed on an HP NetRAID disk array, see
"Partition and Format a Drive that Contains Windows NT" below.
Partition and Format Drives that do not Contain Windows NT
Follow these instructions for drives that do not contain Windows NT.
1. Create a partition equal to (or less than) the real storage capacity.
In our ongoing example, you would create a 12-GB partition.
NOTE
If you try to create a partition that is larger than the real
storage capacity, the format operation will generate this
message: Warning: NT was unable to complete
the format.
2. Format the partition.
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The formatted drive is now ready for use. Assume for this example that the drive
is now E: and was partitioned as a primary partition. The remaining virtual
storage space (500 GB minus 12 GB) must be left unpartitioned. You can write
data up to 12 GB on the drive. Windows NT will not allow you to write beyond
12 GB and lose any data.
Partition and Format a Drive that Contains Windows NT
Sometimes it is desirable to have the network operating system reside on a disk
array. The advantage is that the NOS resides on a redundant drive.
Virtual sizing can be used with a disk array that is used as the boot device and
also contains user data. The key limitation is that Windows NT only allows a
FAT boot partition size of 4 GB or less.
If the NOS and data need to be on a single array (and single logical drive), and
you want to allow for capacity expansion, you must create multiple partitions.
1. Create a FAT boot partition of 4 GB or less for the NOS, which becomes
the C: volume.
2. Create a second partition for the data, which becomes, for example,
the D: volume.
3. The remaining virtual capacity must be left unpartitioned, and is available
for future partitions as you add disk drives to the array.
Preparing for Online Capacity Expansion under
Windows 2000
About Capacity Expansion under Windows 2000
Normally, adding capacity requires shutting down the server to reconfigure or
restore an existing volume or to add the new storage space as a new volume.
Using the Online Capacity Expansion feature allows you to expand an existing
logical drive without shutting down the server.
The Online Capacity Expansion feature cannot be used if a logical drive spans
multiple arrays. Each array can contain only one logical drive. Reconstruction
(for the purposes of adding a drive to an existing array) can only be done on an
array having a single logical drive. It is also important to plan future storage
expansion into your installation. This will ensure that you can easily expand
capacity without backup/restore operations or reconfiguration.
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This section describes preparation for online capacity expansion for logical drives
operating in Basic Disk Mode under Windows 2000. (Capacity cannot be
expanded online for logical drives operating in Dynamic Disk Mode.)
Preparation for capacity expansion under Windows 2000 operating in Basic Disk
mode is simply to leave virtual sizing disabled (the factory default), or to disable
it if it has been enabled.
To actually expand capacity online in Basic Disk Mode, you will create a new
volume with a new drive letter. Capacity can be expanded online again in the
future. Refer to the HP NetRAID Series User Guide and your Windows 2000
documentation for information about adding a new volume online to expand
capacity online.
Preparation Steps for Windows 2000
This section makes the following assumptions:
• You have already configured your HP NetRAID system as discussed in
Chapter 5. You should have created only one logical drive per array.
For example, you might have four physical drives of 4-GB. You might
have configured these four drives as a single RAID 5 logical drive. This
produces a logical drive with 12-GB of real storage capacity, with 4-GB
used for parity.
• You have initialized your logical drives.
NOTE
It is important to initialize your logical drives because, if the
drives have been previously configured under an operating
system, there may be residual partition/format information
that can subsequently cause misrepresentation of logical drives
under the Windows 2000 Disk Management.
• You have already installed Windows 2000 as discussed in Chapter 6.
• The logical drive that you plan to expand must be running in Basic Disk
Mode in Windows 2000.
• You have already installed HP NetRAID Assistant, as discussed in
Chapter 6. The version of HP NetRAID Assistant must be the same
version or newer than the version on the HP NetRAID Navigator
CD-ROM shipped with your HP NetServer.
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The only other requirement to prepare for online capacity expansion of your
logical drive is that virtual sizing is disabled. This is the factory default setting.
• If Virtual Sizing is Disabled (the factory default setting), no other
preparation is necessary.
• If Virtual Sizing is Enabled, disable virtual sizing in HP NetRAID
Express Tools, as described below.
To Disable Virtual Sizing
NOTE
Clearing a previous configuration does not reset the virtual
sizing setting for a logical drive. Use the Reset to Factory
Defaults option in HP NetRAID Express Tools to disable
virtual sizing for all logical drives, or manually change the
setting as described below.
The factory default is that virtual sizing is disabled. If virtual sizing has been
enabled, disable it as follows:
1. Restart the host HP NetServer, and watch for the message:
Option: Experienced users may press <Ctrl> <M> for
HP NetRAID Express Tools now.
Firmware Initializing
2. When the message is displayed, press <Ctrl> <M>. When the system
stops scanning, HP NetRAID Express Tools starts and displays the Tools
Management menu.
3. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter installed (including
any integrated HP NetRAID controller), do the following to select the
integrated controller or adapter controlling a logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion:
a. Choose Adapter from the Tools Management menu.
b. Choose the adapter controlling the logical drive.
4. Choose Objects from the Tools Management menu.
5. Choose Logical Drive from the Objects menu.
6. From the Logical Drive menu, choose the logical drive you want to
prepare for expansion.
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7. From the Logical Drive menu for the drive you want to prepare, choose
Properties.
8. Choose Virtual Sizing.
9. On the Virtual Size menu, choose Disable, and confirm your choice.
10. Press Esc twice to return to the Logical Drive menu.
If you need to enable virtual sizing on another logical drive, choose the
logical drive and repeat steps 6 through 10.
11. If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter installed (including
any integrated HP NetRAID controller), press Esc to return to the Objects
menu. Enable virtual sizing on the logical drives of all adapters as
necessary.
12. To exit, press Esc until you see the Exit? box, and choose Yes.
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8 Upgrading to an HP NetRAID-3Si or
HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter
This chapter explains how to replace an existing HP NetRAID Series adapter
with an HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si adapter. When you replace one
adapter with another, you do not need to worry about data compatibility. Data
created using any HP NetRAID Series adapter is compatible with any other
HP NetRAID Series adapter. Further, data written using an HP NetRAID Series
adapter operating in I2O mode is compatible with data written using an
HP NetRAID Series adapter operating in non-I2O mode (conventional mass
storage mode), and vice versa.
NOTE
A new adapter must have channels that are equal in number or
greater than the adapter it is replacing. Do not replace an
HP NetRAID-3Si adapter (using three channels) with a
NetRAID-1Si adapter (which can control only one channel).
After replacing an HP NetRAID-3Si or NetRAID-1Si adapter, you need to:
• Back up your data
• Load the appropriate driver
• Insert the HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si adapter and recreate the
configuration
CAUTION
HP NetRAID Series Accessory boards are not hot pluggable.
Unplug HP NetServer power cord(s) before installing a
HP NetRAID Series board.
• Restore your data from backup
Back Up Your Data
Back up all data on the drives controlled by the adapter that will be removed.
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Load the Appropriate HP NetRAID Driver
To load the required HP NetRAID drivers, you will follow these steps as
described in Chapter 6 of this guide:
1. Decide which HP NetRAID drivers you need as described in Step J of this
guide.
2. Use the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM to prepare the diskettes you
need to install the drivers and the HP NetRAID configuration utility
specific to your NOS. See Step J for complete instructions.
3. Uninstall the old HP NetRAID drivers and install the new HP NetRAID
drivers as described in Step K.
4. Install the NOS-specific configuration utility as described in Step M.
Insert the New Adapter and Recreate the
Configuration
CAUTION
All HP NetRAID Series adapters are sensitive to static
electricity and can easily be damaged by improper handling.
Using a grounding strap is recommended. Read the following
information carefully before you handle the accessory:
• Leave the new adapter in the antistatic bag until you are
ready to install it.
• If possible, use an antistatic wrist strap and antistatic
grounding mat.
• Before you touch the existing adapter, touch a grounded,
unpainted metal surface on the system to discharge static
electricity.
• When removing or installing an HP NetRAID or
HP NetRAID-3Si adapter, do not allow the adapter or the
Battery Backup Unit to touch any part of the
HP NetServer, or any other conductive surface (except an
antistatic mat), because that could cause a short in the
Battery Backup Unit.
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To remove any HP NetRAID Series adapter and replace it with a new adapter, do
the following:
1.
Turn off the system, unplug the power cord(s) from the system, open the
HP NetServer panel or remove the HP NetServer cover, and disconnect
the SCSI cables from the existing HP NetRAID Series adapter. Remove
the existing adapter, and place it on a grounding mat or other antistatic
surface. If you have removed an HP NetRAID or HP NetRAID-3Si
adapter, disconnect the Battery Backup Unit by unplugging the connector
shown in Figures 8-1 and 8-2.
Battery Backup Unit (BBU)
J21
Unplug BBU connector
Figure 8-1. Unplug Battery Backup Unit on HP NetRAID-3Si Board
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Battery Backup Unit (BBU)
J2 on BBU board
Unplug BBU connector
from J2 on BBU board
Figure 8-2. Unplug Battery Backup Unit on the HP NetRAID Board
2. Install the new adapter, as described in Step D of Chapter 5. If you are
installing an HP NetRAID-3Si adapter, be sure to plug in the Battery
Backup Unit first, as shown in Figure 8-3.
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Battery Backup Unit (BBU)
J21
Plug in BBU connector
Figure 8-3. Plug in Battery Backup Unit on HP NetRAID-3Si Board
3. Connect all SCSI cables to the new adapter, as described in Step E of
Chapter 5.
4. Close the HP NetServer panel or replace the HP NetServer cover, plug in
the power cord(s), and turn on power to the HP NetServer.
5. After you see the flashing message "Firmware Initializing," you
will see this message:
Configuration of NVRAM and drives mismatch for
Host Adapter X
Run View/Add Configuration option of Configuration
Utility
Press any key to enter the Configuration Utility.
This message tells you that the configuration information stored in the drives
(the correct configuration) does not match the configuration information stored
in NVRAM on the newly installed HP NetRAID Series adapter.
NOTE
If there is more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter
(including any integrated HP NetRAID controller), the
message tells you which adapter number has the mismatch. Be
sure to note which adapter needs to be reconfigured.
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6. Press any key and the HP NetRAID Express Tools utility starts
automatically. You see the Tools Management menu.
7. If you have more than one HP NetRAID Series adapter (including any
integrated HP NetRAID controller), do the following to select the adapter
you have just installed:
a. Choose Select Adapter from the Tools Management menu.
b. Choose the adapter with the mismatched configuration.
8. Choose Configure from the Tools Management menu.
9. Choose View/Add/Delete from the Configure menu.
10. Choose View Disk Configuration from the View/Add/Delete menu.
11. After scanning has finished, press ESC.
12. Choose Yes to save the configuration. The HP NetRAID Express Tools
utility now updates the configuration stored in NVRAM on the newly
installed adapter.
13. Press ESC repeatedly to exit HP NetRAID Express Tools.
14. Press CTRL+ALT+DELETE to restart the system. The new adapter
should recognize all the drives and the previous logical configuration.
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9 Managing Servers Over the Network
This chapter describes the installation and use of software to manage the
HP NetRAID Series adapters including integrated HP NetRAID controllers
installed over a network. It lists features of the software, identifies the operating
systems it supports, details installation instructions, and shows how to get started.
It contains instructions for servers running Microsoft Windows NT or Windows
2000 and Novell NetWare.
Adapter Management
Features
In a networked environment, it is desirable to access and manage servers from
clients or other servers. The HP NetRAID management software allows clients or
servers to manage integrated HP NetRAID controllers and HP NetRAID Series
adapters installed in servers on the network. Its key features include the
following:
• HP NetRAID Assistant GUI management utility
• Support for servers running Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, or
Novell NetWare
• Support for clients running Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, or
Windows 95/98
• Full access or view only modes
• Password authentication
NOS Requirements
The following NOS versions are supported for managing HP NetRAID-1Si and
HP NetRAID-3Si over the network:
◊
Microsoft Windows 2000
◊
Microsoft Windows NT versions 3.51 and 4.0
◊
Microsoft Windows versions 95 and 98 (for clients only)
◊
Novell NetWare versions 4.2 and 5
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NOTE
Microsoft Windows NT Terminal Server Edition is not
supported in either client or server for managing
HP NetRAID-1Si and HP NetRAID-3Si over the network.
The sections that follow identify the NOS requirements for different clients and
servers on the network.
Requirements for Clients That Manage HP NetRAID over the Network
• Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows 95/98 must be
installed.
• If the client will manage NetWare servers, you must install "Client
Service for NetWare," which is part of Windows NT, Windows 2000, and
Windows 95/98. You can find this in the Control Panel, Network Icon.
Refer to Windows documentation for more information.
• Optionally, the client can be your HP NetRAID Registration Server as
described later in this chapter.
Requirements for Servers That Manage HP NetRAID over the Network
• Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 2000 must be installed.
• If the server will manage NetWare servers, you must install "GateWay
Service for NetWare," which is part of Windows NT, Windows 2000, and
Windows 95/98. You can find this in the Control Panel, Network Icon.
Refer to Windows documentation for more information.
• Optionally, this server can be your HP NetRAID Registration Server as
described later in this chapter.
Requirements for Servers on the Network That Do Not Manage HP NetRAID
• Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Novell NetWare must be
installed.
• A server running either Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, or
Novell NetWare can be your HP NetRAID Registration Server.
Other Requirements
Before installing the software for HP NetRAID management, ensure that the
network is operating and that all of the following have been done:
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• HP NetRAID Series adapters and any integrated HP NetRAID controllers
are configured in all servers to be managed. (See Chapter 5 of this guide
for instructions.)
• NOS-specific HP NetRAID drivers (or for I2O support, the HP NetRAID
OSM and its companion driver) are installed in all servers. (See Chapter 6
of this guide for instructions.)
• TCP/IP is configured and operational on all clients and servers.
• You must know the server names and their IP addresses.
Understanding HP NetRAID Network Utilities
The software that lets you manage HP NetRAID Series adapters and integrated
HP NetRAID controllers over a network is built on remote procedure calls (RPC)
using TCP/IP protocol. In NetWare 5, sockets are used instead of RPC. The
HP NetRAID network utilities include the following:
• HP NetRAID Assistant is the GUI utility that provides a user interface to
the adapters in the servers on the network. This utility can run on either
clients or servers on the network.
• HP NetRAID Access Service is installed on all servers with
HP NetRAID Series adapters or integrated HP NetRAID controllers that
will be managed over the network. This utility makes the server and its
integrated HP NetRAID controller or HP NetRAID Series adapters,
accessible to a client or another server running HP NetRAID Assistant.
• HP NetRAID Registration Server is installed on one server or client,
and it maintains the list of servers that can be accessed over the network.
When the servers start, they check in with the Registration Server, which
keeps track of the servers available for access by HP NetRAID Assistant.
When HP NetRAID Assistant is started, it obtains the list of available
servers from the Registration Server. Each network requires one
Registration Server in order to support the HP NetRAID network utilities.
Determine where to Install HP NetRAID Assistant
HP NetRAID Assistant can be installed on any client running Microsoft
Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows 95/98.
HP NetRAID Assistant can be installed on any server running Microsoft
Windows NT or Windows 2000.
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Identify the Registration Server/Client
Only one server or client on the network can be identified as the Registration
Server. The Registration Server does not have to be the same server or client that
is running HP NetRAID Assistant.
The HP NetRAID Registration Server utility can be installed on only one server
running Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Novell NetWare.
The HP NetRAID Registration Server utility can be installed on only one client
running Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows 95/98.
HP NetRAID Network Utilities to Install
For each client or server, refer to Table 9-1 to determine which HP NetRAID
utilities to install on it, as indicated by an X in Table 9-1.
All clients and servers should be running HP NetRAID network utilities
upgraded to the versions on the most recent HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM.
• HP NetRAID remote management is now done through NetWare Sockets
for NetWare 4.x and NetWare 5. (RPC was previously used under
NetWare 4.x.) Be sure to upgrade all existing HP NetRAID remote
management installations, as well as the HP NetRAID Assistant utility.
• All Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows 95/98 clients and servers
should be running the versions of the HP NetRAID utilities supplied on
the current HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM. If they are not running the
same versions, some clients and servers may not be able to communicate
with each other.
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Table 9-1. HP NetRAID Network Utilities Installation
HP NetRAID Management
Functions
Server:
- is the Registration Server
- has no HP NetRAID controller
- cannot run HP NetRAID
Assistant
HP NetRAID
Registratio
n Server
X
Server:
- is not a Registration Server
- has HP NetRAID controller
- can run HP NetRAID Assistant
- can be accessed over the network
Client:
- is the Registration Server
- can run HP NetRAID Assistant
Client:
- is not the Registration Server
- can run HP NetRAID Assistant
Standalone Server:
- is not a Registration Server
- cannot be accessed over network
- can run HP NetRAID Assistant
HP NetRAID
Assistant
X
Server:
- is not a Registration Server
- has HP NetRAID controller
- cannot run HP NetRAID
Assistant
- can be accessed over the network
Server:
- is the Registration Server
- has HP NetRAID controller
- can run HP NetRAID Assistant
- can be accessed over the network
HP NetRAID
Access
Service
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
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Make the Installation Disk, If Necessary
The files needed to install the HP NetRAID Network utilities can be found on the
following utilities diskette(s) created by the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM:
• For Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows 95/98, there
are two diskettes titled " HP NetRAID Software for Windows."
• For Novell NetWare, there is one diskette titled " HP NetRAID Software
for NetWare."
If you do not have these diskettes, you can generate them using the HP NetServer
Navigator CD-ROM in either of two ways:
• On a separate PC workstation running Windows 95, 98, NT, or 2000
and having a CD-ROM drive and mouse: Refer to "Using a Separate
Workstation to Create Network Utilities Diskette" later in this chapter.
• On the HP NetServer you are configuring: Refer to "Using the
HP NetServer to Create Network Utilities Diskette" later in this chapter.
Using a Separate Workstation to Create Network Utilities Diskette
To use a separate PC workstation to create the HP NetRAID network utilities
diskette(s), do the following:
1. Turn on the workstation and monitor, if they are not already on, and log
on if necessary.
2. Insert the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM into the drive. HP NetServer
Navigator should start automatically if automatic startup is enabled for the
CD-ROM drive. If not, double-click launch32.exe on the CD-ROM to
launch HP NetServer Navigator. It looks different from HP NetServer
Navigator running on the HP NetServer.
3. On the NetServer Navigator screen’s drop-down menu of HP NetServers,
click the HP NetServer you are configuring. Then click the arrow in the
lower right corner of the screen.
4. On the NetServer Navigator menu of NOSs, click the NOS you plan to
install. Then click the arrow in the lower right corner of the screen.
5. The NetServer Navigator Main Menu is displayed. Click Guide to
Configure Server.
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6. The Guide to Configure Server list the following items:
◊
NOS Installation Instructions
◊
Tested Configurations
◊
Diskette Library
7. On the Guide to Configure Server screen, click Diskette Library.
8. On the Diskette Library screen, double-click one of the following:
◊
For Windows NT, select HP NetRAID Software for Windows.
Previously, this diskette was named " HP NetRAID Assistant for
WinNT and Win95/98."
◊
For NetWare, select HP NetRAID Software for NetWare.
Follow the onscreen instructions to create the diskette(s).
9. To exit HP NetServer Navigator, click the Exit icon in the lower left
corner of the screen.
10. Remove the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM from the drive.
Using the HP NetServer to Create Network Utilities Diskette
To use the HP NetServer to create HP NetRAID network utilities diskette(s), do
the following:
1. Turn on the HP NetServer and monitor, if they are not already on, and
insert the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM into the drive. Turn off the
HP NetServer power, wait 10 seconds, and turn it back on again.
2. From the HP Navigator Main Menu, choose NetServer Utilities.
3. Select More NetServer Utilities, then choose Diskette Library.
4. From the Diskette Library, do the following:
◊
For Windows NT or Windows 2000, create the utility diskette by
selecting HP NetRAID Software for Windows in the diskette library.
Previously, this diskette was named " HP NetRAID Assistant for
WinNT and Win95/98."
◊
For NetWare, select HP NetRAID Software for NetWare in the
diskette library.
5. Follow the onscreen instructions to create the NOS-specific diskette.
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6. Remove the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM and click Exit to restart
the HP NetServer.
Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 2000 Client or
Server Installation Instructions
For each client or server operating under Microsoft Windows NT or Windows
2000, or for each client running under Windows 95/98 or Windows 2000, run
Setup and then follow the on-screen instructions to install the appropriate
utilities.
All Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows 95/98 clients and servers should
be running the same versions of the HP NetRAID utilities supplied on the current
HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM. If they are not running the same versions,
some clients and servers may not be able to communicate with each other.
Run Setup
To run the Setup program, follow the steps listed below either for Microsoft
Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, and Windows 95/98, or for Microsoft
Windows NT 3.51:
Step
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0,
Windows 2000, and
Windows 95/98
Microsoft Windows NT 3.51
1.
Select Start from the taskbar. Then
choose Run from the Start menu.
Select File/Run from the Program
Manager.
2.
Insert Diskette 1 of " HP NetRAID
Software for Windows."
Insert Diskette 1 of " HP NetRAID
Software for Windows."
3.
Type <d>:\setup at the Open
prompt, where <d> is the drive letter
of the diskette drive you are using.
Type <d>:\setup at the Run prompt
and click OK, where <d> is the drive
letter of the diskette drive you are
using.
4.
Go to Step 5.
Go to Step 5.
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Follow On-screen Instructions for Windows
5.
On the User Information screen, type the user name and the company.
6.
For Windows 95/98, go to Step 7.
For Windows NT or Windows 2000 on the Select Installation Options
window, select one of the following options:
7.
◊
Manage HP NetRAID adapter(s) in this server only. (If you choose this
option, skip Step 7 and go on to Step 8.)
◊
Manage HP NetRAID adapter(s) in this server and in other Windows
NT and NetWare servers on the network. (If you choose this option, go
on to Step 7.)
For clients running Windows 95/98, select one or both of the following
utilities:
◊
HP NetRAID Registration Server manages a list of HP NetRAID
adapters.
◊
HP NetRAID Assistant is the management utility.
For clients or servers running Windows NT or Windows 2000, select one
or more of the following utilities to install:
◊
HP NetRAID Registration Server manages a list of HP NetRAID
adapters.
◊
HP NetRAID Access Service allows server management over the
network.
◊
HP NetRAID Assistant is the management utility.
8.
For the Destination Directory, type the path of the directory in which to install
the utilities on this client or server.
9.
For Select Folder, accept the default or type the name of the folder in which to
install the utilities on this client or server.
10. When Setup asks for the next diskette, remove Diskette 1 and insert Diskette 2 of
" HP NetRAID Software of Windows." Setup copies various files.
11. In the Setting Password window, type the password that must be given for Full
Access mode to manage this server. Passwords are case-sensitive.
NOTE
The Setting Password Screen appears only if you
installed HP NetRAID Access Service in Step 7.
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12. Choose to restart Windows now or defer this until later. The Setup program is
now complete.
Edit the regserv.dat and hosts Files
13. Edit the regserv.dat file to replace localhost with the name of the
Registration Server for this network.
◊
In Windows NT and Windows 2000 systems you will find
regserv.dat under this pathname where <winnt path> is the path
to the Windows files:
<winnt path>\system32\drivers\etc\regserv.dat
◊
In Windows 95/98 systems you will find regserv.dat under this
pathname where <win95/98 path> is the path to the Windows files:
<win95/98 path>\system\regserv.dat
14. Add to the hosts file the names and IP addresses of servers with adapters to be
managed over the network.
◊
In Windows NT and Windows 2000 systems you will find the hosts
file under this pathname where <winnt path> is the path to the
Windows files:
<winnt path>\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
◊
In Windows 95/98 systems you will find the hosts file under this
pathname where <win95/98 path> is the path to the Windows files:
<win95/98 path>\system\hosts
NOTE
HP recommends that all servers and clients that manage
integrated HP NetRAID controllers or HP NetRAID
Series adapters over the network have the same hosts
file content. This prevents problems in resolving server
names and addresses.
Finishing Up
15. Read the Release Notes.
16. Restart Windows NT, Windows 2000, or Windows 95/98 if you did not do so in
Step 12.
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Novell NetWare Server Installation Instructions
NOTE
All NetWare servers that contain HP NetRAID Series
adapters that will be managed by HP NetRAID Assistant
must be running the same version of HP NetRAID
Software for NetWare. Be sure to update any existing
installations.
The client or server managing these HP NetRAID
adapters must be running HP NetRAID Assistant version
A.02.02 or newer.
For each server operating under Novell NetWare and containing an integrated
HP NetRAID controller or HP NetRAID Series adapters to be managed over the
network, install HP NetRAID Software for NetWare as follows:
1. For NetWare 4.2 only, the file rpcbstub.nlm is a read-only file. This
file attribute must be changed to read/write before installing the
HP NetRAID Software for NetWare on a client connected to NetWare
through the network. Exit to the DOS prompt and change the file attribute
to r/w with the attrib command. The file is located in the \system\
directory of NetWare on the SYS volume.
2. Start the NetWare server and insert the "HP NetRAID Software for
NetWare" diskette.
3. At the NetWare console prompt, type load a:\raidinst.nlm
4. Choose Install Package.
5. To the question "Install registration server?" select yes or no.
◊
Select yes if you want this server to be the Registration Server.
◊
Select no if this server will not be the Registration Server. Enter the
name of the Registration Server when prompted.
6. Files are copied.
NOTE
For NetWare 4.2, if you get the error message "Not able
to create SYS:SYSTEM\RPCBSTUB.NLM," go back to
Step 1 and change the file attribute to r/w.
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7. Enter and retype the password that will be required for access to this
server. Passwords are case-sensitive.
8. Verify that the regserv.dat file located at
sys:\etc\regserv.dat contains the name of the system that will be
the Registration Server for this network.
9. Edit the hosts file located at sys:\etc\hosts. It should contain the
IP address and name of each server with integrated HP NetRAID
controllers (or HP NetRAID Series adapters) to be managed over the
network.
10. Restart NetWare.
NOTE
If the NetWare server is a Registration Server, the
reg_serv.nlm will be put in autoexec.ncf to
automatically start it. However, if the software was
installed previously, but not as a Registration Server,
edit the autoexec.ncf file to add the statement
load reg_serv.nlm so that the Registration Server
will automatically start under NetWare.
Using HP NetRAID Assistant to Manage Servers
Before Starting HP NetRAID Assistant
The Registration Server must be running before any other servers are started.
• If the Registration Server is a NetWare server, it must be running
reg_serv.nlm.
• If the Registration Server is a Windows NT or Windows 2000 server, it
must be running the HP NetRAID Registration Server icon (under the
HP NetRAID program group).
To access an HP NetRAID Series adapter in a server from the network, the three
services listed below must be running. Start them in the order listed. You may set
them for automatic start, if desired.
1. NobleNet Portmapper: It should have been installed by the HP NetRAID
software and set for automatic start in Windows NT or Windows 2000. In
NetWare 4.x, load rpcstart.nlm. In NetWare 5, it is not needed
because sockets are used instead.
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2. HP NetRAID Registration Server: Start it before the others by
double-clicking on its Windows icon or by loading NetWare module
reg_serv.nlm.
3. HP NetRAID Access Service: Start it by double-clicking on its Windows
icon or by loading NetWare module raidserv.nlm.
NOTE
To change the password for a server using Windows NT or
Windows 2000, run setpass.exe under
\netraid\dll\.
To change the password for a server using NetWare, reinstall
the HP NetRAID management software, as described in this
chapter, with the new password.
Start HP NetRAID Assistant
Run HP NetRAID Assistant from a client or server in which the HP NetRAID
Assistant utility was installed.
• To start HP NetRAID Assistant under Windows 95 or 98, click the
HP NetRAID Assistant icon in the HP NetRAID program group (or group
you specified).
• To start HP NetRAID Assistant under Windows NT or Windows 2000,
click the Start button, point to Programs, point to HP NetRAID in the
Programs menu, and click HP NetRAID Assistant.
If HP NetRAID Assistant is started on a standalone server, the main window
(shown in Figure 9-1) is displayed immediately.
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Configuration
Menu
Logical
Adapter Physical
Progress
Menu
Drive Menu Drive Menu Menu
Help
Menu
Toggle to switch
between views
Server
Selector
Adaptor Selector
Physical
Drives
Figure 9-1. HP NetRAID Assistant Window
If HP NetRAID Assistant is started on a client or server that can access
integrated HP NetRAID controllers or HP NetRAID Series adapters over the
network, you must select the server you want to access. The HP NetRAID
Assistant Main window has a Server pull-down list next to the Adapter pulldown list.
When you select a server from the server selector box on HP NetRAID Assistant,
a window appears with the choice of access modes: Full Access and View Only.
Select one.
• Full Access mode requires that authorized users enter a password. The
password is case-sensitive. The password must be given before full access
can be established to a server, and each server can require a unique
password. Full Access mode activates features that let you change the
HP NetRAID configuration and the states of physical and logical drives.
For example, in Full Access mode, you can initiate recovery from a disk
failure, or make a new hot spare.
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• View Only mode does not require a password, and does not permit users
to change the configuration. All menu selections that would change the
configuration are inactive. Examples of operations that you can perform in
View Only mode are displaying the properties of physical and logical
drives and viewing the configuration.
NOTE
You cannot enter Full Access mode on a server if it is already
being managed by HP NetRAID Assistant in Full Access
mode, or by another HP NetRAID utility. However, View Only
mode can always be entered.
The only distinction the Main Screen shows between the Full Access and View
Only modes is that in View Only mode various actions are inoperative and the
related menu options are grayed out.
To change to another adapter within the server, use the Adapter pull-down list.
Select Another Server-Adapter Pair
Use these pull-down lists on the HP NetRAID Assistant Main Screen to select the
next server-adapter pair to be viewed or modified.
NOTE
You cannot leave the current server-adapter pair if any
operations--such as Performance Monitor or the rebuilding or
reconstruction of a drive--are running in Full Access mode.
You cannot change from View Only mode to Full Access
mode. Instead, exit HP NetRAID Assistant and restart. Choose
the server and Full Access mode. Then enter the password.
When selecting a new server in Full Access mode, a dialog box appears. Enter
the new server’s password, which is case-sensitive. The new server cannot be
accessed if it is already being managed by a system in Full Access mode, or if
either of the following utilities is running on the new server:
• HP NetRAID Assistant
• HP NetRAID Config
Exit HP NetRAID Assistant
Exit HP NetRAID Assistant by choosing Exit from the Configuration menu, or
by clicking the Exit button in the toolbar, or by double-clicking the upper-left
corner of the main window.
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10 Understanding HP NetRAID Utilities
After you have installed the adapter and configured your system, there are four
utilities that help you manage HP NetRAID Series adapters. Two of these utilities
only work with specific network operating systems. The utilities are:
• HP NetRAID Assistant (used with Microsoft Windows NT or Windows
2000 or from the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM)
• HP NetRAID Config (used with Novell NetWare, IBM OS/2,
SCO OpenServer, and SCO UnixWare)
• HP NetRAID Express Tools (used with all network operating systems)
• HP NetRAID Monitor utilities (available with each network operating
system)
HP NetRAID Assistant
All users configure their systems for the first time using HP NetRAID Assistant.
This utility has an object-oriented GUI.
You can start this utility in two ways:
• If your NOS is Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 2000, click the
HP NetRAID icon in the Windows Program Manager.
• If your NOS is Novell NetWare, SCO OpenServer, SCO UnixWare, or
IBM OS/2, you can start HP NetRAID Assistant from the HP NetServer
Navigator CD-ROM as you did during initial installation. To use
HP NetRAID Assistant from the HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM, you
must reboot your HP NetServer.
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NOTE
Understanding HP NetRAID Utilities
For internal mass storage in some HP NetServers, SCSI ID 5
is reserved for the SAF-TE processor that manages the hotswap mass storage cage.
For external mass storage, a SCSI ID may be reserved for a
SAF-TE processor. The number of the reserved SCSI ID
varies with the type of external enclosure.
The SAF-TE processor is displayed as PROC.
For a list of functions performed by HP NetRAID Assistant, see the menu chart
that follows.
For complete instructions on using HP NetRAID Assistant, see the HP NetRAID
Series User Guide.
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HP NetRAID Assistant Menus
Main Menu
Configuration
Adapter
Physical Drive
Logical Drive
Progress
Help
Configuration Menu
Wizard
Display
Print
Save
Load
Clear Configuration
Exit
Adapter Menu
Update Firmware
Flush Cache
Performance Monitor On/Off
Properties
Rebuild Rate
Rescan
View Log
Alarm Control
Alarm Control Menu
Disable/Enable Alarm
Silence Alarm
Physical Drive Menu
Change Status Menu
Rebuild
Format
Update Drive Firmware
Change Status
Properties
Make Online
Make Offline
Spin Up
Spin Down
Make Hot Spare
Logical Drive Menu
Change Config Menu
Initialize
Check Consistency
Properties
Change Config
Cache
Read
Write
RAID Level
Virtual Size
Add Capacity
Progress Menu
Rebuild Progress
Diagnostics Progress
Initialize Progress
Check Consistency
Reconstruction Progress
Performance Monitor
Help Menu
Help
About...
Figure 10-1. HP NetRAID Assistant Menu Chart
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HP NetRAID Config
HP NetRAID Config performs the same functions as HP NetRAID Assistant, but
it runs under Novell NetWare, SCO UnixWare, SCO OpenServer, and IBM
OS/2. HP NetRAID Config allows you to reconfigure and manage your RAID
system and monitor its status.
You do not need to reboot your HP NetServer to use HP NetRAID Config.
The command you use to start HP NetRAID Config utility depends on which
NOS you are using.
• For Novell NetWare, type load megamgr
• For SCO UNIX, type megamgr
• For SCO UnixWare, type megamgr
• For SCO OpenServer, type megamgr
• For IBM OS/2, type megaconf
NOTE
For internal mass storage in some HP NetServers, SCSI ID 5
is reserved for the SAF-TE processor that manages the hotswap mass storage cage.
For external mass storage, a SCSI ID may be reserved for a
SAF-TE processor. The number of the reserved SCSI ID
varies with the type of external enclosure.
The SAF-TE processor is displayed as PROC.
For a list of functions performed by HP NetRAID Config, see the menu chart that
follows.
For complete instructions on using HP NetRAID Config, see the HP NetRAID
Series User Guide.
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HP NetRAID Config Menus
Figure 10-2. HP NetRAID Configuration Menu Chart
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HP NetRAID Express Tools
HP NetRAID Express Tools is a text-based configuration utility that is contained
in the adapter firmware and available to all network operating systems.
HP NetRAID Express Tools contains some advanced management and diagnostic
features that are not available with HP NetRAID Assistant or HP NetRAID
Config.
To start HP NetRAID Express Tools:
1. Log off all users, close all applications, and power down the
HP NetServer.
2. Reboot the HP NetServer.
3. When the following prompt appears, press <Ctrl> <M>.
Option: Experienced users may press <Ctrl> <M> for
HP NetRAID Express Tools now.
Firmware Initializing
NOTE
For internal mass storage in some HP NetServers, SCSI ID 5
is reserved for the SAF-TE processor that manages the
hot-swap mass storage cage.
For external mass storage, a SCSI ID may be reserved for a
SAF-TE processor. The number of the reserved SCSI ID
varies with the type of external enclosure.
The SAF-TE processor is displayed as PROC.
For a list of functions performed by HP NetRAID Express Tools, see the menu
chart that follows.
For complete instructions on using HP NetRAID Express Tools, see the
HP NetRAID Series User Guide.
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HP NetRAID Express Tools Menus
Tools Management Menu
Adapter Menu
Configure Menu
Configure
Initialize
Objects
Format
Rebuild
Check Consistency
Disable BIOS
Change Adapters
Alarm Control
Easy Configuration
New Configuration
View/Add/Delete Configuration
Clear Configuration
Objects Menu
Adapter
Logical Drive
Physical Drive
SCSI Channel
Battery Backup
Reset to Default Settings
Power Fail Safeguard
Memory Type
Read Modify Write Mode
Change Disk Geometry
Disk Spin-up Timings
Cache Flush Timings
View/Update Rebuild Rate
Diagnostics
Adapter Type
Emulation
Auto Rebuild
Initiator ID
Logical Drive Menu
Initialize
Check Consistency
Properties
Battery Backup Menu
Backup Module
Battery Pack
Temperature
Voltage
Fast Charging
√No of Cycles
Physical Drive Menu
Rebuild
Format
Make Online
Fail Drive
Make Hot Spare
Properties
Synchronous Negotiation
SCSI-2 Command Tagging
SCSI Channel Menu
Terminate High 8 Bits
Terminate Wide Channel
Disable Termination
Automatic Termination
SCSI Transfer Rate
Figure 10-3. HP NetRAID Express Tools Menu Chart
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HP NetRAID Monitor Utilities
The HP NetRAID monitor utilities provide information about the status of
HP NetRAID drives and adapters. A complete list of monitor alert messages is
available in the HP NetRAID Series User Guide.
The HP NetRAID monitor utilities start automatically every time you restart the
HP NetServer for all NOSs except Novell NetWare and IBM OS/2.
To start the monitor utility for Novell NetWare:
• Type load <d2>:\nwserver\megamon.nlm and press Enter every
time you reboot the NetServer.
or
• Add the megamon.nlm file to your autoexec.ncf file to have the
monitor utility start automatically each time you reboot.
To start the monitor utility for IBM OS/2:
• Type monitor.cmd from the HP NetRAID directory every time you
reboot the NetServer.
or
• Add the monitor.cmd file to your startup.cmd file to have the
monitor utility start automatically each time you reboot.
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11 Changing HP NetRAID-3Si DRAM
Modules
The HP NetRAID-3Si adapter ships with one 16-MB DRAM module. It has a
connector for one additional DRAM module.
DRAM Module
Battery Backup Unit (BBU)
BBU connector
Figure 11-1. HP NetRAID-3Si DRAM Module and Battery Backup Unit
NOTE
The Battery Backup Unit must be disconnected before you add
a DRAM to or remove a DRAM from the HP NetRAID-3Si
adapter board. Refer to Chapter 9, "Battery Backup Unit," for
instructions on disconnecting the Battery Backup Unit.
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Changing HP NetRAID-3Si DRAM Modules
To change DRAM modules, perform the following steps:
1. Bring down the operating system properly. Make sure that the adapter’s
cache memory has been flushed. You must perform a system reset if
operating under DOS. When the HP NetServer restarts, the HP NetRAID
Series adapter flushes cache memory.
2. Turn off the HP NetServer power and disconnect the power cord(s).
3. To remove the HP NetServer cover or to open its panel, refer to your
HP NetServer documentation or to HP Information Assistant.
4. Disconnect SCSI cables from the adapter.
5. Remove the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter. (See Chapter 8, "Upgrading to an
HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-3Si Adapter" for complete
instructions.)
6. Disconnect the battery pack cable from the Battery Backup Unit.
7. You can now add or remove DRAM modules from the HP NetRAID-3Si
adapter.
8. Reconnect the battery pack cable.
9. Reinstall the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter.
10. Reconnect the SCSI cables to the adapter.
11. Replace the HP NetServer cover or panel.
12. Reconnect the power cord(s), and power up the HP NetServer.
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12 HP NetRAID-3Si Battery Backup Unit
The Battery Backup Unit preserves data handled by the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter
by providing protection from power supply interruptions to the HP NetRAID
cache memory.
The HP NetRAID Battery Backup Unit monitors the voltage level of the DRAM
modules installed on the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter and supporting circuitry. If
the voltage drops below a predefined level, the Battery Backup Unit switches the
memory power source from the adapter to the battery pack attached to the
adapter. As long as the voltage level is below the predefined value, the
HP NetRAID Battery Backup Unit provides the memory refresh cycles necessary
to retain the contents of the HP NetRAID-3Si memory modules. If the voltage
level returns to an acceptable level, the Battery Backup Unit switches the power
source back to the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter.
Charging the Battery
The battery pack is shipped fully charged, and it recharges automatically.
NOTE
The full data retention time is not available unless the battery
pack is fully charged. If the battery pack is not charged, set the
HP NetRAID cache write policy option to Write-Through
while charging the battery pack. After the battery pack is fully
charged, you can change the cache write policy to Write-Back.
Checking the Status of the Battery Backup Unit
The batteries installed in the Battery Backup Unit carry a one-year warranty, but
you can expect them to last at least twice that long. The battery life is considered
to be "low" if the battery has been through 1,000 recharge cycles. You can check
the status of the battery, and the software will warn you if the battery needs to be
replaced.
To Check Battery Status with HP NetRAID Express Tools
1. Restart the HP NetServer, and press <Ctrl> <M> at the prompt to start
the HP NetRAID Express Tools utility.
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2. Choose Objects from the Tools Management menu.
3. Choose Battery Backup to view the battery status.
To Check Battery Status with HP NetRAID Config
1. Start HP NetRAID Config.
2. Choose Objects from the Management menu.
3. Choose Battery Backup to view the battery status.
Warnings That Battery Needs Replacement
• Power-up diagnostics include a battery life check. An on-screen message
alerts you if the battery life is low.
• HP NetRAID sends an SNMP error message that alerts you of the
condition.
Changing the Battery Backup Unit
Do not attempt to install a new Battery Backup Unit. If the battery needs to be
changed, call an HP Service Representative.
Connecting the Battery Backup Unit
The HP NetRAID-3Si adapter is shipped with the Battery Backup Unit installed
and charged, but disconnected. Follow the directions below to connect the Battery
Backup Unit.
CAUTION
When the Battery Backup Unit is connected:
• Do not place the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter on a
conductive surface.
• When installing the adapter, do not allow the adapter or
its Battery Backup Unit to touch any part of the
HP NetServer. Doing so could short the battery, and it
may damage other components. You may place the
adapter on an antistatic mat.
The Battery Backup Unit is a battery pack already installed on the
HP NetRAID-3Si adapter. To connect the battery pack, plug the connector
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HP NetRAID-3Si Battery Backup Unit
on the wire in the lower-left corner into the connector at J21, as shown in the
following figure. The connector is keyed to make sure the proper connection is
made.
Battery Backup Unit (BBU)
Plug BBU connector into J21.
Figure 12-1. HP NetRAID-3Si Battery Backup Unit with the Battery Pack
Connected
Battery Specifications
Charge Time for Battery Packs
The following time-to-charge values are calculated assuming 80% efficiency in
the charging process. The time-to-charge values may vary depending on
individual battery packs.
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Table 12-1. HP NetRAID-3Si Battery Charge Time and Charge Rates
Fast Charge
Time
Fast Charge
Rate
Trickle Charge
Rate
Operating
Environment
6 hours
190 mA
28 mA
25°C - 35°C ambient
(77°F - 95°F ambient)
Battery Life
The HP NetRAID Series software warns you when the battery needs to be
replaced. Under normal usage, the battery should last twice the warranty period
of the HP NetRAID-3Si adapter. A new battery pack should be installed every 1
to 5 years.
Retention Time for Cache Memory
The Battery Backup Unit can preserve data in the HP NetRAID-3Si DRAM for
up to 40 hours. The retention time for cache memory varies with the number of
SIMMs installed, the number of chips on the installed SIMMs, the DRAM
memory size, and the DRAM manufacturer. The more SIMMs the adapter has,
the faster the battery drains.
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13 Monitor Alert List
This chapter lists monitor messages for the supported network operating systems
that provide information about the monitor utility, adapters (HP NetRAID Series
adapters and integrated HP NetRAID controllers), physical drives, and logical
drives.
For BIOS error messages, audible warnings, and other troubleshooting, refer to
the "Troubleshooting" chapter in the HP NetRAID Series Installation and
Configuration Guide or the Integrated HP NetRAID Controller Configuration
Guide.
Microsoft Windows NT and Windows 2000
NOTE
For Windows NT and Windows 2000, the monitor capability
is integrated into the HP NetRAID Assistant utility.
Novell NetWare Monitor Messages
Table 13-1. NetWare Monitor Messages
Condition
Messages
Physical drive state
change
HP NetRAID-Adapter # (Channel: SCSI ID#) state
(previous state) to (new state)
Logical drive state
change
HP NetRAID-Adapter # LD-# state (previous state) to (new
state)
Physical drive
rebuilding at startup of
monitor
Warning: HP NetRAID-Adapter # Channel: SCSI ID# at
startup is in REBUILD state
Logical drive state at
startup
HP NetRAID-# LD-# state at startup is X
The number of adapters
found by monitor
HP NetRAID Mon: # HP NetRAID Adapters Found
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Monitor Alert List
IBM OS/2 Monitor Messages
Table 13-2. OS/2 Monitor Messages
Condition
Messages
Logical drive state
change
Adp = # LogDrv # state changed from (previous state)
to (new state).
Physical drive state
change
Adp = # PhysDrv at Ch # Tid # state changed from
(previous state) to (new state).
Monitor started
HP NetRAID Monitor for OS/2
Memory allocation
failure
Malloc Failure
Adapter not identified
No HP NetRAID Adapters Found
Adapter rebuild
completed X%
Adp = # Rebuilding Ch# Tid # Percent Rbld = X
SCO OpenServer and UnixWare Monitor Messages
Table 13-3. SCO OpenServer and UnixWare Messages
Condition
Messages
Monitor starts
HP NetRAID Monitor activated
Monitor deactivated
HP NetRAID Monitor deactivated
No adapter found
No HP NetRAID adapter found
Adapter inquiry failed
HP NetRAID inquiry failed for adapter x
Physical drive state
change
Adapter: # PDrv Channel: SCSI ID # state change from
(previous state) to (new state).
Physical drive rebuilding
(when monitor starts)
Adapter: # PDrv Channel: SCSI ID# At startup is in
Rebuild state
Rebuild percentage
completed
Adapter: # PDrv Channel: SCSI ID# Rbld X% over
Rebuild failed
Adapter: # PDrv Channel: SCSI ID# Rbld failed
Rebuild over (completed)
Adapter: # PDrv Channel: SCSI ID# Rbld over
Logical drive state
change
Adapter: # LDrv # state change from (previous state) to
(new state).
Logical drive state at
startup
Adapter: # LDrv # state at startup is (current state)
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14 Alarm Control and Audible
Warnings
HP NetRAID Series adapters have onboard tone generators that indicate events
and errors.
NOTE
The integrated HP NetRAID controller does not have alarm
control or audible warnings.
Table 14-1. Audible Warnings
Tone Pattern
Meaning
Three seconds on and
one second off
A logical drive is offline.
Examples
One or more drives in a RAID 0
configuration failed.
Two or more drives in a RAID 1, 3,
5, 10, 30, or 50 configuration
failed.
One second on and
one second off
A logical drive is running
in degraded mode.
One drive in a RAID 3, 5, 30, or 50
configuration failed.
One second on and
three seconds off
An automatically initiated
rebuild has been
completed.
While you were away from the
system, a disk drive in a RAID 1, 3,
5, 10, 30, or 50 configuration failed
and was rebuilt.
To silence a sounding alarm (or to disable or enable the alarm), you must use the
Alarm Control selection in one of the HP NetRAID management utilities. To
reach the Alarm Control setting do the following:
• In HP NetRAID Assistant, select the Adapter menu, then Alarm
Control.
• In HP NetRAID Config, select Objects, then Adapter, then Alarm
Control.
• In HP NetRAID Express Tools, select Objects, then Adapter, then
Alarm Control.
Alarm Control has two options:
• Enable/Disable Alarm: Choose this option to enable or disable the
onboard tone generator. The default setting is Enabled.
• Silence Alarm: This setting stops the alarm when it goes off.
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15 Troubleshooting
Power-up (Boot) Error Messages
Adapter BIOS Disabled. No Logical Drives Handled by BIOS
Problem: The adapter BIOS is disabled. (This is not a problem if the BIOS is
intentionally disabled to prevent booting from the adapter.)
Suggested solution: Enable the BIOS by using HP NetRAID Express Tools, as
described in "Run Configuration Utilities" in Chapter 6.
Host Adapter at Baseport xxxxh not Responding
Problem: The BIOS cannot communicate with the firmware on the adapter.
Suggested solutions:
• Verify that the adapter card is plugged all the way into its slot.
• Moving the adapter card to another slot.
• Run diagnostics under HP NetRAID Express Tools to verify that the
adapter card is functioning properly.
No HP NetRAID Adapter
Problem: The BIOS cannot communicate with the firmware on the adapter.
Suggested solutions:
• Verify that the adapter card is plugged all the way into its slot.
• Try moving the adapter card to another slot.
• Run diagnostics under HP NetRAID Express Tools to verify that the
adapter card is functioning properly.
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Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
Configuration of NVRAM and drives mismatch
Run View/Add Configuration option of Configuration Utility.
Press any key to enter the Configuration Utility.
Problem: There is a single adapter, and the configuration stored in the adapter’s
NVRAM does not match the configuration stored in the drives. All drives contain
one set of configuration information, and NVRAM contains a different set.
Suggested solution: Do the following to pick the correct configuration from either
NVRAM or from the disks.
1. Press any key to enter HP NetRAID Express Tools.
2. From the Configure menu, choose the View/Add Configuration option.
View/Add Configuration asks which configuration you want to view:
NVRAM or disk.
3. Use View/Add Configuration to examine both configurations.
4. Resolve the configuration mismatch by selecting and saving one of the
two configurations.
Configuration of NVRAM and drives mismatch for Host Adapter - x
Run View/Add Configuration option of Configuration Utility.
Press any key to enter the Configuration Utility.
Problem: You have installed more than one adapter, and the configuration stored
in NVRAM of adapter x does not match the configuration stored in the drives.
All drives on that adapter contain one set of configuration information, and
NVRAM contains a different set.
Suggested solution:
1. Press any key to enter HP NetRAID Express Tools.
2. From the Configure menu, choose the View/Add Configuration option.
View/Add Configuration asks which configuration you want to view:
NVRAM or disk.
3. Use View/Add Configuration to examine both configurations.
4. Resolve the configuration mismatch by selecting and saving one of the
two configurations.
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Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
Unresolved configuration mismatch between disk(s) and NVRAM on the adapter
Problem: The configuration stored in the adapter’s NVRAM does not match the
configuration stored on the drives, and configuration information on some drives
conflict with configuration information on other drives.
Suggested solution: Do the following to reconfigure your drives and restore you
data.
1. Press <Ctrl> <M> to start HP NetRAID Express Tools, as described in
Step M in Chapter 6.
2. From the Configure menu, choose the View/Add Configuration option.
3. Use View/Add Configuration to examine the configuration stored in
NVRAM. Write down all configuration information, including the SCSI
IDs of the physical drives in each array, the array and logical drive
numbers, stripe size, logical drive size, and the adapter settings.
4. Clear your configuration and reconfigure all of your drives using one of
the HP NetRAID utilities (HP NetRAID Assistant, HP NetRAID Config,
or HP NetRAID Express Tools). See the HP NetRAID User’s Guide for
more information.
5. Restore your data from a backup copy.
1 Logical Drive Failed
Problem: One logical drive failed to sign on.
Suggested solution:
1. Verify that all physical drives are connected and powered on.
2. Use a utility, such as HP NetRAID Assistant or HP NetRAID Config, to
determine which physical drives are not responding and thereby make the
logical drive unavailable.
3. Correct the problem with the physical drive by reconnecting, replacing, or
rebuilding it.
x Logical Drives Degraded
Problem: x number of logical drives signed on in the degraded (critical) state.
Suggested solution:
149
Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
1. Use a utility, such as HP NetRAID Assistant or HP NetRAID Config, to
determine which physical drive(s) is not responding and thereby makes
the logical drives degraded.
2. Correct the problem with the physical drive(s) by reconnecting, replacing,
or rebuilding the physical drive(s).
1 Logical Drive Degraded
Problem: One logical drive signed on in the degraded (critical) state.
Suggested solution:
1. Use a utility, such as HP NetRAID Assistant or HP NetRAID Config, to
determine which physical drive is not responding and thereby makes the
logical drive degraded.
2. Correct the problem with the physical drive by reconnecting, replacing, or
rebuilding it.
Insufficient Memory to Run. Press any Key to Continue ...
Problem: There is insufficient memory in the HP NetServer to run the
HP NetRAID BIOS.
Suggested solution: Check the HP NetServer to be sure that the memory is
properly installed.
Insufficient Memory
Problem: There is insufficient memory on the adapter for the current
configuration.
Suggested solution: Check the adapter to be sure that the memory is properly
installed.
Following SCSI ID’s are not Responding
Channel-x:a.b.c
Problem: On the channel listed (x), the physical drives with the SCSI IDs listed
(a, b, c, and so on) are not responding.
Suggested solution: Verify that the physical drives are connected and powered
on.
150
Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
Other BIOS Error Messages
Warning: Battery voltage Low
Problem: The voltage of the battery backing the cache memory is low.
Suggested solution: Fast charge the battery. This occurs automatically when the
system is on.
Battery life Low
Problem: The battery backing the cache memory is approaching its predicted end
of life.
Suggested solution: Call an HP Service Representative to replace the battery
backup module.
Battery temperature out of range
Problem: The temperature of the battery backing the cache memory is too low or
too high.
Suggested solution:
• If the battery is too cold, allow it to warm up first. The battery will not fast
charge if it is too cold.
• If the battery is too hot, check the system for overheating or fan failure.
The battery will not fast charge if it is too hot.
Error: Following SCSI Disk not found and No Empty Slot Available for mapping it
Problem: The physical disk roaming feature failed to find the physical drive with
the listed SCSI ID, and no slot is available in which to map the physical drive.
The controller cannot resolve the physical drives into a current configuration.
Suggested solution: Reconfigure the array because the adapter cannot resolve the
physical drives into the current configuration.
Following SCSI ID’s have the same data <v.z>
Channel-x:a.b.c
Problem: The physical disk roaming feature found the same data on two or more
physical drives on channel (x) with the listed SCSI IDs (a, b, c, and so on). The
adapter cannot determine which drive with duplicate information to use.
Suggested solution: Remove the drive or drives that should not be used.
151
Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
Other Troubleshooting
NOS Does Not Load (Boot)
Problem: Operating system does not load at start up time in a computer with an
adapter.
Suggested solutions:
• Verify that the system is trying to boot from the drive/adapter with the
NOS.
• Use HP NetRAID Express Tools to enable/disable the HP NetRAID BIOS
as required.
Hard Drive Fails Often
Problem: One of the hard drives in the array fails often.
Suggested solutions:
• Check the drive error counts using HP NetRAID Assistant Physical Drive
Properties. Be aware that the drive error counter clears if the drive is
moved or powered off while the adapter remains powered on.
• Format the drive.
• Rebuild the drive.
• If the drive continues to fail, replace the drive with another drive with the
same capacity, and rebuild.
System Hangs When Scanning Devices for New Configuration
Problem: Ran HP NetRAID Express Tools or HP NetRAID Config and tried to
make a new configuration. The system hangs when scanning devices.
Suggested solutions:
• Check the drives’ SCSI IDs on each channel to make sure each device has
a different ID.
• Check the cables for bent pins.
152
Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
Management Menu Not Displayed
Problem: Running HP NetRAID Express Tools or HP NetRAID Config does not
display the Management Menu.
Suggested solution: Use a color monitor.
Cannot Flash or Update the EEPROM
Problem: Cannot flash or update the EEPROM.
Suggested solution: Make sure that Pins 2-3 of J5 are shorted on the adapter card.
If J5 is OK, you may need a new EEPROM.
BIOS Banner Not Displayed
Problem: The BIOS and firmware banner does not appear.
Suggested solution: Make sure that J2 (Enable Expansion BIOS) is jumpered on
at least one of the adapters in the system.
Firmware Continues to Initialize
Problem: "Firmware Initializing..." appears and remains on the screen.
Suggested solutions:
• Be sure that TERMPWR is properly provided to each channel populated
with peripheral devices.
• Verify proper termination of each end of the SCSI channel chain with the
recommended terminator type for the peripheral device. The channel is
automatically terminated at the adapter card if only one cable is connected
to it (that is, if only one of the card connectors for the channel has a cable
connected).
• Verify that no channel of the adapter card has more than one cable
connected. One internal or one external connector can be used on each
channel, but not both.
• Be sure that the memory modules are rated as 70-ns or faster.
• Be sure that the adapter card is properly seated in its PCI slot.
• If the adapter is installed in a hot-plug PCI slot, verify that the slot is
powered on.
153
Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
Message "Some Inconsistency Cured" Appears the First Time Consistency Check
is Run
If you have an HP NetRAID-3Si or NetRAID-1Si, and are running a consistency
check for the first time, the disk area on which nothing is written will be cleared.
It is normal for the system to indicate that this has occurred and is not a warning
of errors in the system.
Troubleshooting Management Over the Network
Only the most common problems are covered here. For more troubleshooting for
HP NetRAID Assistant, refer to the HP NetRAID Series User Guide.
Common Problems
Without HP NetRAID Assistant, the client(s) and server(s) connect normally, but the
HP NetRAID Assistant cannot connect to any servers
For HP NetRAID Assistant to connect to a server, it must resolve the server via
TCP/IP. Ping the server by name from the client or server that will run
HP NetRAID Assistant. If this is unsuccessful, then the client or server that will
run HP NetRAID Assistant cannot resolve the server using TCP/IP. Confirm the
following conditions:
• The IP addresses are unique.
• The subnet mask is not causing a group resolution problem.
• The hosts file contains correct names and IP addresses for all servers with
HP NetRAID Series adapters to be managed.
No response when connecting to a server; may get Server Not Responding
message after several minutes
The server is likely to be down and the connection attempt/timeout may take two
minutes before a message is generated. Be sure the selected server is up.
NOTE
154
If the server is still not up when the timeout message is
displayed, HP NetRAID Assistant will exit.
Chapter 15
Troubleshooting
Can’t unload raidserv.nlm
If the adapter in a NetWare server is being accessed by a configuration utility
(HP NetRAID Assistant in Full Access mode or HP NetRAID Config), the
raidserv.nlm module cannot be unloaded until the adapter is no longer being
accessed. This prevents a critical operation in the adapter, such as a disk rebuild,
from being interrupted.
HP NetRAID Assistant does not list any servers when started (other than "local")
When HP NetRAID Assistant starts, the Main Screen only lists
"<clientname>(Local)" in the pull-down list of servers. The Registration Server
may be down, or no servers may have checked in with it.
Be sure that the Registration Server is working and that it started before the other
servers. Servers can only log into the Registration Server when the access server
(Windows NT or Windows 2000) or raidserv.nlm (NetWare) executes.
155
16 Warranty and Support
The hardware warranty below applies to components purchased as accessories. If
your component was factory installed as part of an HP NetServer model, refer to
the HP NetServer Warranty and Service/Support Booklet for the warranty
limitations, customer responsibilities, and other terms and conditions.
Hardware Accessories Limited Warranty
Hewlett-Packard Hardware Accessories
An HP NetServer Hardware Accessory is an internal HP hardware product that
is specifically designated for use with HP NetServers; is added on or integrated
into an HP NetServer in order to provide higher performance, capacity, or
increased capability; and is listed as a product in HP’s Corporate Price List. Upon
installation inside an HP NetServer, the HP NetServer Hardware Accessory
carries a System-Matching Warranty. This warranty includes a one-year
Return-to-HP warranty or the remainder of the warranty period for the original
HP NetServer in which it is installed, whichever is longer.
This accessory may be serviced through expedited part shipment. In this event,
HP will prepay shipping charges, duty, and taxes; provide telephone assistance
on replacement of the component; and pay shipping charges, duty, and taxes for
any part that HP asks to be returned.
HP warrants this HP NetServer Hardware Accessory against defects in material
and workmanship, under normal use, for the period specified in the section titled
HP NetServer Limited Warranty Coverage. The warranty commences on receipt
of this product by Customer from HP or Reseller. If HP or Reseller receives
notice of such defects during the warranty period, HP or Reseller will either, at
its option, repair or replace products that prove to be defective.
Should HP or Reseller be unable to repair or replace the hardware accessory
within a reasonable amount of time, Customer’s alternate remedy shall be a
refund of the purchase price upon return of the hardware accessory product.
157
Chapter 16
Warranty and Support
HP products external to the system processor unit, such as external storage
subsystems, printers, or other peripherals, are covered by the applicable warranty
for those products. HP SureStore drives are considered external accessories and
carry their own warranty.
The customer may be required to run HP-supplied configuration and diagnostic
programs before a replacement will be dispatched or an on-site visit is
authorized.
Third-Party Hardware Products
HP does not warrant third-party hardware products. Third-party hardware
products may be warranted in accordance with the third-party warranty statement
accompanying the product. On-site visits caused by third-party hardware
products—whether internal to the HP NetServer system processor unit (such as
non-HP DIMMs) or external to the system processor unit (such as LAN
cabling)—are subject to standard per-incident travel and labor charges.
HP Repair and Telephone Support
Refer to the Warranty and Service/Support Booklet supplied with your
HP NetServer system documentation for instructions on how to obtain HP repair
and telephone support.
158
A Adapter Specifications
HP NetRAID-3Si Specifications
Parameter
Product Number
Specification
D5955A
Card Size
12.3" x 4.2" (full length PCI)
Processor
Intel i960RD @ 66 MHz
Bus Type
PCI 2.1 @ 33 MHz
PCI Adapter
Custom ASIC
PCI Edge Connector
5V
Bus Data Transfer Rate
Up to 132-MB per second
BIOS
HP NetRAID BIOS
Cache Configuration
16-MB using 60-ns EDO DRAM, upgradeable to 64-MB cache
Firmware
1-MB flash ROM
Nonvolatile RAM
32-KB of NVRAM for disk configuration space
Operating Voltage
5.00 V ± 0.25 V
SCSI Controllers
LSI Logic 53C895 on each channel
SCSI Data Transfer Rate
Up to 80-MB/sec with Ultra2 drives; 40-MB/sec with Ultra
drives
SCSI Bus
Low voltage differential or single-ended SCSI
SCSI Termination
Active
Termination Disable
Automatic through cable detection
Devices per SCSI Channel
6, 8, or 12 depending on SCSI mode and storage cabinet
SCSI Device Types
Low voltage differential or single-ended SCSI disk drives
SCSI Channels
Three
RAID Levels Supported
0, 1, 3, 5,10, 30, and 50
SCSI Connectors
Three 68-pin, high-density internal connectors
Three 68-pin, ultra-high-density external connectors
Multiple Cards
Up to six HP NetRAID Series adapters per system
Battery Backup
On-board battery backup circuitry provides up to 40 hours of
data retention for 16-MB cache
159
Appendix A
Adapter Specifications
HP NetRAID-1Si Specifications
Parameter
Product Number
Specification
D2140A
Card Size
7.4" x 4.2" (half length PCI)
Processor
Intel i960RP™ @ 33 MHz
Bus Type
PCI 2.1 @ 33 MHz
PCI Adapter
Custom ASIC
PCI Edge Connector
5V
Bus Data Transfer Rate
Up to 132-MB per second
BIOS
HP NetRAID BIOS
Cache Configuration
16-MB using 60-ns EDO DRAM
Firmware
1-MB flash ROM
Nonvolatile RAM
32-KB of NVRAM for disk configuration space
Operating Voltage
5.00 V ± 0.25 V
SCSI Controllers
LSI Logic 53C895 on each channel
SCSI Data Transfer Rate
Up to 80-MB/sec with Ultra2 drives; 40-MB/sec with Ultra
drives
SCSI Bus
Low voltage differential or single-ended SCSI
SCSI Termination
Active
Termination Disable
Automatic through cable detection
Devices per SCSI Channel
6, 8, or 12 depending on SCSI mode and storage cabinet
SCSI Device Types
Supported
Low voltage differential or single-ended SCSI disk drives
SCSI Channels
One
RAID Levels Supported
0, 1, 3, 5,10, 30, and 50
SCSI Connectors
One 68-pin, high-density internal connector
One 68-pin, ultra-high-density external connector
Multiple Cards
Up to six HP NetRAID Series adapters per system
Battery Backup
No battery
160
B Regulatory Information
Notice for USA
FCC Radio Frequency Emissions Statements
Class B Product Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates and uses, and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may
cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this
equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which
can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to
correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to
which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for help.
Hewlett-Packard’s system certification tests were conducted with HP-supported
peripheral devices and HP shielded cables, such as those you receive with your
computer. Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Hewlett-Packard
could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment. Cables used with this
device must be properly shielded to comply with the requirements of the FCC.
Statement Required for European Union:
The HP NetRAID disk array controller was tested for EMC compliance per EN
55022:1994 to class B limits in the HP NetServer LD Pro. EMC compliance is
achieved in HP NetServer applications.
161
Appendix B
Regulatory Information
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
according to ISO/IEC Guide 22 and EN 45014
Manufacturer’s Name:
Manufacturer’s Address:
Hewlett-Packard Company
10955 Tantau Avenue
Cupertiino, Ca. 15014 USA
declares, that the product
Product Name:
Model Number(s):
Product Options:
NetRaid Disk Array Controller
HP NetRAID-3Si, HPNetRaid-1Si
ALL
conforms to the following Product Specifications:
Safety:
EMC:
IEC 950:1991+A1+A2+A3, A4 / EN 60950:1992+A1+A2+A3,A4 & All
CISPR 22:1993 / EN 55022:1994
EN 50082-1:1992 - Generic Immunity
IEC 801-2:1991, 4 kV CD, 8 kV AD
IEC 801-3:1984, 3 V/m
IEC 801-4:1988, 0.5 kV Signal Lines, 1 kV Power Lines
Supplementary Information:
1) The product was tested in a typical configuration with Hewlett-Packard peripherals.
2) The product complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions:
- This device may not cause harmful interference, and,
- This device must accept any interference received including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
The product herewith complies with the requirements of the following Directives and carries the CEmarking accordingly:
the EMC directive 89/336/EEC.
the Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC
Cupertino, CA, USA Jun 22, 1999
For Compliance Information ONLY, contact:
North American Contact: Hewlett-Packard Company Product Regulations Manager
3000 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, Ca. 94304 Phone: 415-857-1501
European Contact: Your local Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Office or Hewlett-Packard GmbH,
Department ZQ / Standards Europe, Herrenberger Strabe 130, D-7030 Boblingen (FAX: +49-7031
Australian Contact: May Yeow, Regional Product Regulations Manager,
Quality Management Services & Systems Phone: ++ 61 3 9272 8355
162
C Worksheets
Configuration Worksheets
Figures C-1 and C-2 are worksheets for you to record your configuration choices
for the hardware and logical drives. HP recommends that you make one copy of
Worksheet A and B for each adapter you have. Log your configuration selections
on the photocopies.
NOTE
SCSI ID 7 is reserved for the integrated HP NetRAID
controller.
For internal mass storage in HP NetServer LH 3000/3000r,
LH 6000/6000r, and LT 6000r, SCSI ID 5 is reserved for the
SAF-TE processor that manages the hot-swap mass storage
cage.
For an external mass storage enclosure with a SAF-TE
processor, a SCSI ID is reserved for that processor. The
number of the reserved SCSI ID varies with the type of
external enclosure.
163
Appendix C
Worksheets
WORKSHEET A (PHYSICAL DEVICES)
PCI Slot # __
Adapter # __
CH0
Channel 0:
Array # or
Rebuild Rate = ___%
CH1
CH2
Channel 1:
Channel 0:
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
Array # or
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
Array # or
____
_________
_____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
SCSI Transfer Rate (Fast, Ultra, Ultra2):
Channel 0:
_________
Channel 1:
_________
Channel 2:
_________
Figure C-1. Worksheet A
NOTE
164
Since HP NetRAID-1Si is a single-channel adapter, only
Channel 0 applies.
Appendix C
Worksheets
Figure C-2. Worksheet B
165
Appendix C
Worksheets
Sample Configuration Worksheet
WORKSHEET A (PHYSICAL DEVICES)
PCI Slot # _5_
Adapter # _0_
CH0
Channel 0:
Array # or
CH1
Rebuild Rate = __50_%
CH2
Channel 1:
Channel 0:
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
Array # or
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
_1_
*%
Array
____
0
_0_
*%
Array
1
____
_3_
_2_
*%
Array 0
_1_
*%
Array 1
_4_
_3_
*%
Array 0
_2_
*%
_6_
_4_
Dedicated
Hot Spare
Array 1
*%
Global
Hot Spare
Array # or
SCSI Disk
Hot Spare
ID Capacity
Type
*%
Array
2
____
*%
Array 2
*%
Array 2
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
____
_________
_____
_________
____
_________
SCSI Transfer Rate (Fast, Ultra, Ultra2):
Channel 0: Ultra
Channel 1: Ultra
Channel 2: Ultra
Figure C-3. Sample Worksheet A
166
Array
#
No
Span
1
5
RAID
Level
18 GB
4 GB
18 GB
Logical
Drive Size
64 KB
16 KB
64 KB
Stripe
Size
W. Thru. Adapt.
W. Thru. Adapt.
W. Thru. Adapt.
Write
Policy
Cached
Cached
Cached
Cache
Policy
167
Worksheets
0
No
5
Appendix C
LD0
Logical
Drive #
1
No
Cached I/O or Direct I/O
WORKSHEET B (LOGICAL DEVICES)
LD1
2
Normal, Read Ahead, or
Adaptive Read Ahead
Read
Policy
LD2
Figure C-4. Sample Worksheet B
Write Back or Write Thru
LD3
2 KB, 4 KB, 8 KB, 16 KB,
32 KB, 64 KB, or 128 KB.
LD4
Optional. You can let the
HP NetRAID Assistant
Wizard calculate the size.
LD5
RAID Level 0, 1, 3, 5,
10, 30, or 50
LD6
Span this LD over the next
1-3 consecutive arrays?
LD7
Start with Array 0, and
number consecutively.
Use up to eight logical
drives, starting with LD0.
Appendix C
Worksheets
Figures C-3 and C-4 are samples of Worksheets A and B for an HP NetRAID
adapter with ten physical drives, three arrays, and three logical drives. It is
adapter #0 in PCI Slot #5 in the HP NetServer, and it has a 50% rebuild rate.
Physical Arrays and Hot Spares
• Array 0 on Channel 0 contains three 9-GB physical drives (SCSI ID # 1,
2, 3).
• Array 1 on Channel 1 contains two 4-GB physical drives (SCSI ID # 0
and 1).
• Array 2 on Channel 2 contains three 9-GB physical drives (SCSI ID # 3,
4, 6).
• A dedicated hot spare is reserved for Array 1 only. The physical drive
has SCSI ID #2 on Channel 1.
• A global hot spare is available in case a drive fails in any array. The
physical drive has SCSI ID #4 on Channel 0. The 9-GB capacity of the
global hot spare is greater than or equal to the physical capacity of the
individual physical drives in all three arrays.
Logical Drives
• Logical Drive 0 is on Array 0 and does not span another array. It uses
RAID level 5 with a capacity of 18 GB. (The capacity of one physical
drive is used for parity.) Logical Drive 0 has a stripe size of 64 KB. Its
write policy is Write Through, its read policy is Adaptive Read Ahead,
and its cache policy is Cached.
• Logical Drive 1 is on Array 1 and does not span another array. It uses
RAID level 1 with a capacity of 4 GB. (Mirroring uses up half the
physical capacity.) Logical Drive 1 has a stripe size of 16 KB. Its write
policy is Write Through, its read policy is Adaptive Read Ahead, and its
cache policy is Cached.
• Logical Drive 2 is on Array 2 and does not span another array. It uses
RAID level 5 with a capacity of 18 GB. (The capacity of one physical
drive is used for parity.) Logical Drive 2 has a stripe size of 64 KB. Its
write policy is Write Through, its read policy is Adaptive Read Ahead,
and its cache policy is Cached.
168
D Cabling Diagrams
Examples of cabling are shown for the systems listed below.
• HP NetServer E40 and E45
• HP NetServer E60
• HP NetServer LC II
• HP NetServer LC 3
• HP NetServer LH Pro and LH II
• HP NetServer LPr
• HP NetServer LXe Pro
• HP NetServer LXr Pro
• HP NetServer LXr Pro8
• HP NetServer LXr 8000
If you are mounting any of these systems in a rack assembly, refer to the
HP NetServer Rack Assembly and Cabling Reference Guide and to the
documentation for all components.
Cables Required
Cable examples are provided for each HP NetServer model. Other cabling
configurations are possible, but they may require additional cables not listed in
the examples.
169
Appendix D
CAUTION
Cabling Diagrams
Do not use cables other than those specified for use with your
HP NetServer model. While cables from other HP NetServer
models may be identical in length and connector
compatibility, the impedance rating of each cable is unique
and cables are not interchangeable. Installing cables from
other HP NetServer models may show no adverse symptoms
if installed in your HP NetServer, but may result in decreased
overall performance.
Setting SCSI IDs
Set SCSI IDs as described in the mass storage section of your HP NetServer
system documentation. Be careful when changing the switch settings. The mass
storage subsystem will not function properly if these switches are set incorrectly.
The default settings depend on the HP NetServer model and are described on the
Technical Reference Label located on the HP NetServer chassis or cover.
170
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer E40 and E45
System Board
IDE 1
IDE 2
Flexible Disk
Controller
FDD Cable
HP NetRAID-1Si
Adapter
CD-ROM
Cable
C34
Flexible Disk
Shelf 1
CD-ROM
Shelf 2
*
Shelf 5
Shelf 6
Shelf 3
Shelf 4
Figure D-1. HP NetServer E Series Single Channel Cabling
Cabling
Diagram
Label
Description
FDD cable
CD-ROM cable
C34
*
SCSI cable for four SCSI devices
and HP NetRAID Series adapter
Built-in SCSI terminator
171
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer E60
HP NetServer E 60 with HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si but no
Tape Drive
A
Shelf 1
FDD
Shelf 2
CD-ROM
Shelf 3
Reserved for
(Optional)
Tape Drive
B
*
(Unused Connector)
Shelf 4
Hard Disk Drive
Shelf 5
Hard Disk Drive
Shelf 6
Hard Disk Drive
Shelf 7
Hard Disk Drive
FDD Connector
Primary IDE
Secondary IDE
SCSI B
C
SCSI A
NetRAID-1Si
Figure D-2. HP NetServer E60 Cabling
Cabling Diagram Label
172
Cable Description
A
Flexible Disk Cable
B
IDE CD-ROM Cable
C
SCSI Cable for five SCSI devices (bundled with NetServer)
*
Built-in terminator
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer E 60, with HP NetRAID-3Si or HP NetRAID-1Si and a
Tape Drive
A
*
E
B
Shelf 1
FDD
Shelf 2
CD-ROM
Shelf 3
Tape Drive
*
(Unused Connector)
Shelf 4
Hard Disk Drive
Shelf 5
Hard Disk Drive
Shelf 6
Hard Disk Drive
Shelf 7
Hard Disk Drive
FDD Connector
Primary IDE
Secondary IDE
D
SCSI B
C
SCSI A
NetRAID-1Si
Figure D-3. HP NetServer E60 Cabling with Tape Drive
Cabling Diagram Label
Cable Description
A
Flexible Disk Cable
B
IDE CD-ROM Cable
C
SCSI Cable for five SCSI devices (bundled with NetServer)
D
Accessory SCSI cable for two SCSI devices (Product D8212A)
E
68-pin to 50-pin adapter (remove this from the unused connector
on cable C and place on the connector attached to the tape drive
on cable D)
*
Built-in terminator
173
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LC II
Duplex, Disk Array
System Backplane
Flexible
Disk Drive
Connector
2
IC
IDE
Connector
Flexible Disk
Drive
F6
D6
CD-ROM
Drive
C82
SCSI or IDE
Device
SCSI
Connector
T
Unused
T
CH0
HP NetRAID-1Si
Adapter
C52
I2 C
Route all cables through the
hole in the system backplane.
(Rear View)
Figure D-4. Duplex, Disk-Array Cabling of Hot-Swap Model
HP NetServer LC II with HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter
Default Switch Settings
On
Off
1
2
3
4
5
6
174
ID
1
ID
0
ID
3
These are the default SCSI switch settings for this
configuration. SCSI ID 2 is reserved for an optional
DAT (Digital Audio Tape) drive that can be
installed in upper shelf 3 or 4. The standard
CD-ROM drive is shipped with SCSI ID 5.
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
Sample Alternate Switch Settings
Mass Storage Cables
Some of the optional mass storage configurations require additional cables. This
table lists the cables used in configuring mass storage devices for this
HP NetServer. Only these HP cables and adapters are supported:
Cabling
Diagram
Label
Location
Description
C52
System backplane (or
HP NetRAID controller) SCSI
connector to hot swap backplane
3-connector, Wide (68-pin) SCSI
cable
C82
System backplane SCSI
connector to upper shelf SCSI
devices
2-connector, Wide 68-pin SCSI
cable with built-in terminator
D6
System backplane IDE connector
to IDE devices (CD-ROM or
other)
3-connector IDE cable
F6
System backplane FDD
connector to diskette drive
2-connector flexible disk cable
I2 C
I C cable, system backplane to
hot swap backplane
T
2
2
2-connector I C (3-pin) cable
SCSI terminator built into board
or cable
175
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LC 3
NetRAID-1Si
SCSI
PCI Slot 5
Backplane
C52
Shelf 1
Shelf 2
Shelf 3
Hot-swap Drives
Figure D-5. Cabling Diagram of HP NetServer LC 3 with HP NetRAID-1Si
Cabling Diagram Label
C52
176
Description
68-pin SCSI Cable
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LH Pro and LH II
CAUTION
To remove or install mass storage cables to an HP NetRAID
Series adapter in this HP NetServer, you must first remove
the power supply(s). Follow the procedures in your system’s
road map or in Information Assistant to successfully remove
and replace the power supplies. Failure to follow these
procedures may result in breaking the power management
board.
Non-Duplex Cabling
T
Flexible Disk
Drive
CD-ROM
Drive
SCSI or IDE
Device
IDE
C11
System Board
A
T
C14
SCSI A
HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter
CH0
SCSI B
B1
C22
Ext. Conn.
C23
2
IC
C22
B1
(Rear View)
Route this cable through the rear access hole
located below the HP NetServer system board.
Figure D-6. Non-Duplex Cabling of HP NetServer LH Pro or LH II with an
HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter
177
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
Duplex Cabling
T
IDE
Flexible Disk
Drive
CD-ROM
Drive
SCSI or IDE
Device
C11
System Board
A
SCSI A
HP NetRAID-3Si Adapter
CH0 CH1
2
IC
T
B1
C22
Ext. Conn.
T
C23
SCSI B
B1
(Rear View)
C22
C22
Route these cables through the rear access hole
located below the HP NetServer system board.
Figure D-7. Duplex Cabling of HP NetServer LH Pro or LH II with an
HP NetRAID-3Si Adapter
178
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
Default Switch Settings
The default switch settings are the same for both of the cabling examples shown.
Off
These are the default SCSI switch settings for this
configuration. SCSI ID 2 is reserved for an
optional DAT (Digital Audio Tape) drive that can
be installed in upper drive tray 3. The standard
CD-ROM drive is shipped with SCSI ID 5.
On
UPPER
CAGE
1
SCSI ID
2
3
ID
ID
ID
4
1
0
3
5
UPPER CAGE
6
LOWER
CAGE
1
2
ID
ID
ID
4
5
6
3
4
LOWER CAGE
5
6
Mass Storage Cables
Cabling
Diagram
Label
Location
A
Internal narrow (50-pin) to
wide (68-pin) adapter
B1
I C cable, system board to hot
swap backplane
2
Description
Narrow-to-Wide SCSI
adapter (50 pin to 68 pin)
2
3-pin I C cable
Narrow 50-pin SCSI cable
C11
C14
Internal backplane to
backplane
Wide 68-pin SCSI cable
C22
Internal SCSI port to hot swap
backplane
Wide 68-pin SCSI cable
C23
Internal SCSI port to external
connector
Wide 68-pin SCSI
connector
Built into board or cable
SCSI terminator
T
179
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LPr
SCSI Cable as Originally Configured
I/O Board
SCSI Controller
Hard Disk
Drive
B
SCSI Repeater
Card
Hard Disk
Drive
A
SCSI
Backplane
C
SCSI Cable with
Connectors A, B, and C
Figure D-8. NetServer LPr SCSI Cable When Not Configured for HP NetRAID
Figure D-8 shows how the SCSI cable is connected in the NetServer LPr. The
next figure shows where these connectors appear in the NetServer LPr.
As seen in Figure D-10, to connect the two internal drives to a HP NetRAID
Series adapter, you will need to move the two connectors labeled "B" and "C."
180
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
System Board
B
PCI Slot #3
I/O Board
PCI Slot #2
PCI Slot #1
A
SCSI Backplane
B
Hard Disk
Drives
C
SCSI Repeater
Card
NetRAID
Series Adapter
SCSI Cable
Figure D-9. NetServer LPr System Diagram
181
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetRAID Series Adapter Connected to Two Internal Hard Disk
Drives
I/O Board
SCSI Controller
Hard Disk
Drive
T
SCSI Repeater
Card
Hard Disk
Drive
A
SCSI
Backplane
B
SCSI
Cable
NetRAID-1Si
Adapter
C
Figure D-10. NetServer LPr When Configured for HP NetRAID
As shown in Figure D-10, to make an internal connection to a HP NetRAID
Series adapter, you must:
• Disconnect connector "B" from the SCSI controller. Leave it
disconnected.
• Disconnect connector "C" from the SCSI repeater card.
• Connect "C" to an internal connector of the HP NetRAID Series adapter.
• Connect the SCSI terminator plug ("T") that was shipped with the
NetServer LPr to the embedded SCSI controller.
NOTE
182
Once you have cabled the two internal drives to a
HP NetRAID Series adapter, your embedded SCSI controller
is not in use. If you want to cable the embedded SCSI
controller to external storage, you can buy the HP NetServer
LPr SCSI Cable Kit (product D7082A). The user guide that
comes with this kit has complete instructions on cabling your
embedded SCSI controller to external storage.
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LXe Pro
Non-Duplex, Disk Array
CAUTION
The HP NetServer LXe Pro comes with one power supply
module. Do not attempt to run the HP NetServer with any
mass storage devices installed in the right side (including
shelves B1 or B2, illustrated below) without first installing a
second power supply module. Installing any mass storage
devices on the right side requires the addition of a second
power supply module.
Flexible
Disk Drive
CD-ROM
Drive
SCSI or IDE
Device
*
B1
A1
C11
B2
A2
A
Flexible
Disk
Connectors
C12
**
C14
System
Board
SCSI A
Right Cages
Rear View
Left Cages
Rear View
C15
SCSI B
C13
CH0
Rear Panel
Connector
HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter
*Termination resistor is
incorporated into cable.
** Backplane terminates
automatically if no
cable is connected.
Figure D-11. Non-duplex, Disk-Array Cabling of HP NetServer LXe Pro with
an HP NetRAID-1Si Adapter
183
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
Mass Storage Cables
Cabling
Diagram
Label
Cable
C11
Narrow SCSI (50 pin) extension cable with built-in terminator
C12
Wide SCSI (68 pin) internal cable
C13
Wide SCSI (68 pin) cable, external port
C14
Wide SCSI (68 pin) bridge cable
C15
Wide PCI-SCSI (68 pin) internal cable
Narrow-to-Wide SCSI (68 pin) to narrow SCSI (50 pin)
adapter
A
Default Switch Settings
Off
On
1
2
3
4
5
6
Upper
Left
Cage
Shelf #
1
2
3
4
5
6
SCSI ID #
Lower
Left
Cage
Rear view
184
L1 L2 L3
1
2
3
L4 L5 L6
4
0
6
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LXr Pro
CAUTION
Before cabling any rack-mounted components, refer to the
HP NetServer Rack Assembly and Cabling Reference Guide
and the documentation for the components.
Non-duplex Cabling to Single-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8
HP NetServer LXr
HP Rack Storage/8
(Single Bus)
Bus 1
Input
Bus 1
Output
Bus 2
Input
Single-ended
Terminator on
Bus 2 Output
HP NetRAID-3Si
Channel 0
Option Switches Set to
Short
Bridge
Cable
Figure D-12. Cabling One External Channel from an HP NetRAID3Si Adapter
in an HP NetServer LXr to a Single-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8.
(Any external connector for any channel of an HP NetRAID Series
adapter can be used.)
185
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
Duplex Cabling to Dual-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8
HP NetServer LXr
HP Rack Storage/8
(Dual Bus)
HP NetRAID-3Si
Channel 0
Single-ended
Bus 1 Terminator on
Input Bus 2 Output
Single-ended
Bus 2 Terminator on
Input Bus 2 Output
HP NetRAID-3Si
Channel 1
Option Switches Set to
Figure D-13. Cabling Two External Channels from an HP NetRAID Adapter in
an HP NetServer LXr to a Dual-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8.
(The external connectors for any two channels of an
HP NetRAID or HP NetRAID-3Si adapter can be used.)
Mass Storage Cables
SCSI cables (2.5 m long and not extendible) limit the distance between a storage
unit and its associated server. The HP NetServer Rack Assembly and Cabling
Reference Guide guidelines for rack layouts take this distance limitation into
account.
186
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LXr Pro8
CAUTION
Before cabling any rack-mounted components, refer to the
HP NetServer Rack Assembly and Cabling Reference Guide
and the component manuals.
Non-duplex Cabling to Single-Bus HP NetServer Rack Storage/8
HP NetServer LXr Pro8
HP NetRAID-3Si
Channel 0
HP Rack Storage/8
(Single Bus)
Bus 1
Input
Bus 1
Output
Option Switches Set to
Bus 2
Input
Single-ended
Terminator on
Bus 2 Output
Short
Bridge
Cable
Figure D-14. Cabling One External Channel from an HP NetRAID-3Si Adapter
in an HP NetServer LXr Pro8 to a Single-Bus HP NetServer Rack
Storage/8. (Any external connector for any channel of an
HP NetRAID Series adapter can be used.)
187
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
Cabling Two HP NetRAID Channels to a Dual-Bus HP NetServer
Rack Storage/8
HP NetServer LXr Pro8
HP NetRAID-3Si
Channel 0
HP Rack Storage/8
(Dual Bus)
HP NetRAID-3Si
Channel 1
Single-ended
Bus 1 Terminator on
Input Bus 2 Output
Single-ended
Bus 2 Terminator on
Input Bus 2 Output
Option Switches Set to
Figure D-15. Cabling Two External Channels from an HP NetRAID-3Si
Adapter in an HP NetServer LXr Pro8 to a Dual-Bus HP NetServer
Rack Storage/8. (The external connectors for any two channels
of an HP NetRAID or HP NetRAID-3Si adapter can be used.)
Mass Storage Cables
SCSI cables (2.5 m long and not extendible) limit the distance between a storage
unit and its associated server. The HP NetServer Rack Assembly and Cabling
Reference Guide guidelines for rack layouts take this distance limitation into
account.
188
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
HP NetServer LXr 8000
Simplex Cabling to HP Rack Storage/12
NetServer LXr 8000
HP NetRAID-3Si
Adapter
Rack Storage/12
Ultra2 SCSI
Host Connector 1
Figure D-16. Cabling One External Channel to an HP Rack Storage/12
NOTE
For complete information on the necessary switch settings for
the HP Rack Storage/12, see the HP Rack Storage/12
Installation Guide.
189
Appendix D
Cabling Diagrams
Duplex Cabling to HP Rack Storage/12
NetServer LXr 8000
HP NetRAID-3Si
Adapter
Rack Storage/12
Ultra2 SCSI
Ultra2 SCSI
Host Connector 2 Host Connector 1
Figure D-17. Cabling Two External Channels to an HP Rack Storage/12
NOTE
190
For complete information on the necessary switch settings for
the HP Rack Storage/12, see the HP Rack Storage/12
Installation Guide.
Glossary
Disk Array Terms and Technologies
Array: An array of disk modules combines the storage space on the disk modules
into a single segment of contiguous storage space. The integrated HP NetRAID
controller can group disk modules on one or more of its SCSI channels into an
array. A hot spare disk module does not participate in an array.
Array Spanning: Array spanning by a logical drive combines storage space in
two, three, or four arrays of disk modules into the logical drive’s single
contiguous storage space.
Logical drives of the integrated HP NetRAID controller can span consecutively
numbered arrays that each consist of the same number of disk modules. Array
spanning promotes RAID levels 1, 3, and 5 to RAID levels 10, 30, and 50,
respectively.
ASIC: Application Specific Integrated Circuit.
BIOS: (Basic Input/Output System) The part of the operating system of the
computer that provides the lowest level interface to peripheral devices. The
adapter BIOS resides on the adapter.
Cache Policy: HP NetRAID lets you choose one of two cache policies:
• Cached I/O: Reads will always be cached regardless of randomness, and
the selected Read policy (Read Ahead, Normal, or Adaptive) and Write
policy (Write-Through and Write-Back) applies.
• Direct I/O: First reads to a new location will always come directly from
the disk. If a location is read repeatedly, then the Read policy (Read
Ahead, Normal, or Adaptive) as selected will apply and the read data will
be cached. Read data is cached only if accessed repeatedly. With 100%
random reads, nothing is cached.
Capacity Expansion (or Volume Expansion): Allows you to increase the size of
an existing volume while remaining online under Microsoft Windows NT or
Windows 2000 or under Novell NetWare 4.2 or 5.
• Under Microsoft Windows 2000 or NetWare 4.2 or 5, leave virtual sizing
disabled to prepare for online capacity expansion.
191
Glossary
• Under Windows NT or NetWare 4.2, enable virtual sizing to prepare for
online capacity expansion. The controller creates virtual space when the
"virtual sizing" option is enabled in the HP NetRAID Express Tools
utility. A volume can then be expanded into the virtual space by adding a
physical disk through reconstruction.
Reconstruction is only permitted on a logical drive that occupies a single array
and is the only logical drive in the array. You cannot use online capacity
expansion on logical drives that span arrays (RAID levels 10, 30, or 50).
Channel: An electrical path for the transfer of data and control information
between a disk and a disk adapter.
Format: The process of writing zeros to all data fields in a physical drive (hard
drive) and to map out unreadable or bad sectors. Because most hard drives are
factory formatted, formatting is usually only done if a hard disk generates several
media errors.
GB: A gigabyte; an abbreviation for 1,073,741,824 (2 to the 30th power) bytes
used for memory or disk capacities.
Hot Spare: An idle, powered-on, stand-by disk module ready for use should
another disk module fail. It does not contain any user data. Up to eight disk
modules can be assigned as hot spares for an adapter. A hot spare can be
dedicated to a single redundant array, or it can be part of the global hot-spare
pool for all the arrays controlled by the adapter. Only one hot spare can be
dedicated to a given array.
When a disk fails, the adapter’s firmware automatically replaces and rebuilds the
data from the failed disk onto the hot-spare disk. Data can only be rebuilt from
logical drives with redundancy (RAID levels 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, or 50; not RAID 0),
and the hot-spare disk must have sufficient capacity. The system administrator
can replace the failed disk module and designate the replacement disk module as
a new hot spare.
Hot-Swap Disk Module: Hot swap modules allow a system administrator to
replace a failed disk drive in a server without powering down the server and
suspending network services. The hot swap module simply pulls out from its slot
in the drive cage because all power and cable connections are integrated into the
server backplane. Then the replacement hot-swap module can slide into the slot.
Hot swapping only works for RAID 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 50 configurations.
I2O: Intelligent Input/Output (I2O) is an industry-standard, I/O subsystem
architecture independent of the network operating system and the peripheral
devices supported. I2O uses drivers that are split into operating system services
192
Glossary
modules (OSMs) and hardware device modules (HDMs). I2O increases overall
system performance by shifting I/O computations from the system CPUs to
dedicated I/O processors. It also makes driver management easier and less
expensive.
Initialization: The process of writing zeros to the data fields of a logical drive
and generating corresponding parity to put the logical drive in a Ready state.
Initializing erases previous data, generating parity so that the logical drive will
pass a Consistency Check. Arrays work without initializing, but they may fail a
Consistency Check because parity fields may not have been generated.
IOP: The IOP (I/O Processor) for the integrated HP NetRAID controller directs
all functions of the controller, including command processing, PCI and SCSI bus
transfers, RAID processing, drive rebuilding, cache management, and error
recovery.
Logical Drive: A virtual drive within an array, which may consist of more than
one physical disk.
Logical drives divide up the contiguous storage space of an array of disk modules
or a spanned group of arrays of disks. The storage space in a logical drive is
spread across all the disks in the array or spanned arrays. Each HP NetRAID
Series adapter can be configured with up to eight logical drives in any
combination of sizes. Configure at least one logical drive for each array.
A logical drive can be in one of five states (also see the SCSI Disk Status below):
• Online: all participating disk modules are online.
• Degraded: (Critical) a single disk module in a redundant array (not
RAID 0) is not online. Data loss may result if a second disk module fails.
• Offline: two or more disk modules in a redundant array (not RAID 0), or
one or more disk modules in a RAID 0 array are not online.
• Reconstructing: participating disk modules are being reconstructed.
• Rebuilding: participating disk modules are being rebuilt.
I/O operations can only be performed with logical drives that are online or
degraded (critical).
Logical Volume: A virtual disk made up of logical disks rather than physical
ones. Also called a partition.
LVD SCSI: Low Voltage Differential SCSI.
193
Glossary
MB: A megabyte; an abbreviation for 1,048,576 (2 to the 20th power) bytes; used
for memory or disk capacities.
Mirroring: The style of redundancy in which the data on one disk completely
duplicates the data on another disk. RAID levels 1 and 10 use mirroring.
Parity: Parity is an extra bit added to a byte or word to reveal errors in storage
(in RAM or disk) or transmission. It is used to generate a set of redundancy data
from two or more parent data sets. The redundancy data can be used to
reconstruct one of the parent data sets; however, parity data do not fully duplicate
the parent data sets. In RAID, this method is applied to entire drives or stripes
across all disk drives in an array. Parity consists of Dedicated Parity, in which the
parity of the data on two or more disks is stored on an additional disk, and
Distributed Parity, in which the parity data are distributed among all the disks in
the system. If a single disk fails, it can be rebuilt from the parity of the respective
data on the remaining disks.
Physical Disk Roaming: The ability of a controller to keep track of a hot swap
disk module that has been moved to a different slot in the hot swap cages. Both
slots must be controlled by the same controller.
Power Fail Safeguard: When this setting is enabled, during a reconstruction
process (not a rebuild) a copy of the data that is being restructured will always be
stored on disk, so that if a power failure occurs during the reconstruction, there
will be no risk of data loss.
RAID: Redundant Array of Independent Disks (originally Redundant Array of
Inexpensive Disks) is an array of multiple small, independent hard disk drives
that yields performance exceeding that of a Single Large Expensive Disk
(SLED). A RAID disk subsystem improves I/O performance using only a single
drive. The RAID array appears to the host HP NetServer as a single storage unit.
I/O is expedited because several disks can be accessed simultaneously.
RAID Levels: A style of redundancy applied to a particular logical drive. It may
increase the fault tolerance and performance of the logical drive, and it may
decrease its usable capacity. Each logical drive must have a RAID level assigned
to it.
RAID levels 1, 3, and 5 are for logical drives that occupy a single array (nonspanned array). Table 2-1 in Chapter 2 describes RAID levels for logical drives
that do not span arrays. Briefly,
• RAID 0 has no redundancy. It requires one or more physical drives.
• RAID 1 has mirrored redundancy. It requires two physical drives in an
array.
194
Glossary
• RAID 3 has parity redundancy with a dedicated parity disk. It requires
three or more physical drives in an array.
• RAID 5 has parity redundancy distributed over all the disks in the array.
It requires three or more physical drives in an array.
RAID levels 10, 30, and 50 result when logical drives span arrays. Table 2-2 in
Chapter 2 describes RAID levels for logical drives that span arrays.
• RAID 10 results when a RAID 1 logical drive spans arrays.
• RAID 30 results when a RAID 3 logical drive spans arrays.
• RAID 50 results when a RAID 5 logical drive spans arrays.
Read Policy: The three Read policies for HP NetRAID are:
• Read-Ahead: This is a memory caching ability that tells the adapter to
read sequentially ahead of requested data and cache the further data in
memory, anticipating that the further data will be requested. Read-Ahead
supplies sequential data faster, but is not as effective when accessing
random data.
• Normal: This policy does not use the read-ahead memory caching feature.
This policy is efficient when most of the data reads are random.
• Adaptive: Adaptive policy causes the read-ahead feature to be used if the
last two disk accesses were in sequential sectors.
Ready State: A condition in which a workable hard drive is neither online nor a
hot spare, and therefore is available to add to an array, or to designate as a hot
spare.
Rebuild: The regeneration of all data from a failed disk in a RAID level 1, 3, 5,
10, 30, or 50 array to a replacement disk. A disk rebuild normally occurs without
interruption of application access to data stored on the logical drive.
Rebuild Rate: The speed at which the rebuild operation proceeds. Each adapter
is assigned a rebuild rate, which specifies the percentage of CPU resources to be
devoted to rebuild operations.
Reconstruct: The act of remaking a logical drive after changing RAID levels.
Redundancy: See RAID Levels
195
Glossary
SAF-TE: SCSI Access Fault-Tolerant Enclosure; a processor that manages a
hot-swap mass storage cage or enclosure.
SCSI Channel: The HP NetRAID Series adapters control the disk drives
via SCSI-2 buses called "channels" over which the system transfers data in
Fast-and-Wide, Ultra SCSI, or Ultra-2 SCSI mode. Each HP NetRAID-3Si and
HP NetRAID adapter can control up to three SCSI channels. Each HP
NetRAID-1Si and HP NetRAID-1 adapter can control one SCSI channel.
SCSI Disk Status: A SCSI disk module (physical drive) can be in one of five
states:
• Ready: a powered-on and operational disk that has not been configured.
• Online: a powered-on and operational disk that has been configured.
• Hot Spare: a powered-on, stand-by disk ready for use should a disk fail.
• Not Responding: the disk is not present, not powered-on, or has failed.
• Failed: errors on the disk have caused it to fail, or you have used an
HP NetRAID utility to take the drive offline.
• Rebuilding: a disk in the process of having data restored from one or
more critical logical drives.
SCSI ID: Each SCSI device on a SCSI bus must have a different SCSI address
number (Target) from 0 to 15, but not 7, which is reserved for the SCSI
controller. A SCSI ID is also be reserved for the SAF-TE processor, if one is
present on the mass storage enclosure.
Stripe Size: The amount of data contiguously written to each disk. Also called
"stripe depth." You can specify stripe sizes of 2-KB, 4-KB, 8-KB, 16-KB, 32-KB,
64-KB, and 128-KB for each logical drive. For best performance, choose a stripe
size equal to or smaller than the block size used by your host operating system. A
larger stripe depth produces higher read performance, especially if most of the
reads are sequential. For mostly random reads, select a smaller stripe width. You
may specify a stripe size for each logical drive. A 128-KB stripe requires 8-MB
of memory.
Stripe Width: The number of disk modules across which the data is striped.
Equivalent to the number of disks in the array.
Striping: Segmentation of logically sequential data, such as a single file, so that
segments can be written to multiple physical devices in a round-robin fashion.
This technique is useful if the processor is capable of reading or writing faster
196
Glossary
than a single disk can supply or accept it. While data is being transferred from
the first disk, the second disk can locate the next segment. Data striping is used
in some modern databases and in certain RAID devices.
Virtual Sizing: This setting, when enabled for a logical drive, causes the
controller to report the logical drive size larger than the actual physical capacity.
The "virtual" space allows for online capacity expansion.
Write Policy: When the processor writes to main memory, the data is first
written to the cache on the assumption that the processor will probably read it
again soon. The two Write policies for HP NetRAID are:
• Write Back: In a write-back cache, data is written to main memory only
when it is forced out of the cache. Write-back requires the cache to initiate
a main memory write of the flushed entry, followed (for a processor read)
by a main memory read. Write-back is efficient, because an entry may be
written many times in the cache without a main memory access.
• Write Through: In a write-through cache, data is written to main
memory at the same time as it is cached. Write-through is simpler than
write-back, because an entry that is to be replaced can be overwritten in
the cache, as it will already have been copied to main memory. WriteThrough is the recommended write policy for HP NetRAID-1Si adapter,
because this adapter does not have a battery backup unit.
197
Index
A
Abort button, 69
Accept Array button, 60
Accept button, 63
Adapter
features, 8
firmware, 6
multiple, 29
NVRAM, 67
rescan, 58
setting current adapter, 56
Add to Array button, 60
Advanced button, 62
Antistatic kit, 10
Array, 191
adding physical drive, 61
defining, 59–61
planning, 35
Array Definition window, 59–61
Array spanning, 191
Array Spanning, 6, 18
Arrays, 11
ASIC, 5
Automatic configuration mode, 34, 59
B
Basic Disk Mode, 103
Battery backup
connecting, 47
Battery Backup
of cache memory, 5
Binary file save, 67
BIOS, 191
BIOS disable, 84
BIOS Enable/Disable, 32
Board extender, 46
Boot error messages, 147
Boot Order, 29–32
C
Cable routing
guidelines for server and storage
unit, 186, 188
Cables
installing, 51
Cabling diagrams, 169
HP NetServer E40 and E45, 171
HP NetServer E60, 172
HP NetServer LC 3, 176
HP NetServer LC II, 174
HP NetServer LH Pro and LH II, 177
HP NetServer LPr, 180
HP NetServer LXe Pro, 183
HP NetServer LXr, 185
HP NetServer LXr 8000, 189
HP NetServer LXr Pro8, 187
Cache memory
installing, 47
Cache Memory SIMMs, 5
Cache policy, 191
planning, 43
setting, 63
Capacity
expansion, 8
logical drives, 41
RAID Levels, 21, 22
setting for logical drive, 63
Channels. See SCSI Channels
Chassis label
adapter card installation, 51
SCSI ID switch settings, 51
Class code, PCI, 73, 74, 84, 85
Clear (reset) configuration, 56
Clustering, 7
Configuration Overview, 25
199
Index
Configuration Preview window, 65
Configuration Replication, 6
Configuration utilities, 71
Configuration Wizard. See
HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard
Configuration worksheets, 163
sample Worksheet A, 166
sample Worksheet B, 167
Configure disk array, 53
Critical state of logical drive, 193
Current adapter setting, 56
Custom configuration mode, 35, 58
D
Dedicated hot spare
configuring, 61
planning, 38
Degraded state of logical drive, 193
Disable HP NetRAID BIOS, 84
Disconnect/Reconnect, 6
Disk modules handling, 53
Disk roaming, 7
Drag and drop
physical drive into existing array, 61
Drivers diskette, 75, 79
creating on HP NetServer, 77
creating on separate workstation, 76
Dynamic Disk Mode, 103
E
Error messages, 113–38
Existing array
adding a physical drive to, 61
Exiting
HP NetRAID Express Tools, 86
Exiting HP NetRAID Assistant, 69
Expansion, capacity, 8, 87
F
Failed
status of SCSI disk, 56, 196
Fast-and-Wide SCSI
200
channels, 52
Fault tolerance, 8
RAID Levels, 21
Fault Tolerance
RAID Levels, 22
Firmware, adapter, 6
G
Global hot spare
assigning, 57
planning, 38
H
Hardware accessories limited warranty,
157
Hot spare, 12, 192
assigning global, 57
dedicated, 61
planning, 38
reclaiming, 61
status of SCSI disk, 196
undoing, 61
HOTSP (hot spare) state of physical
drive, 56
Hot-swap disk module, 192
HP NetRAID Access Service, 115
starting, 125
HP NetRAID Assistant, 81, 115, 129
exiting, 69
features and use, 54
launching, 53–54
menu map, 131
screen, 54
starting, 125
toolbar, 55
HP NetRAID Assistant Wizard, 57–66
Array Definition window, 60
automatic mode, 34
Configuration Preview window, 65
custom mode, 35
Logical Drive Definition window, 62
starting window, 59
Index
HP NetRAID BIOS, 191
disable, 84
HP NetRAID Config, 81, 83, 132
menu map, 133
HP NetRAID driver installation, 79
HP NetRAID Express Tools, 134
exiting, 86
menu map, 135
starting, 84
HP NetRAID Monitor Utilities, 136
HP NetRAID Registration Server, 115
HP NetRAID Series User Guide, 9
HP NetRAID-1Si specifications, 160
HP NetRAID-3Si specifications, 159
HP NetServer E40 and E45, 171
HP NetServer E60, 172
HP NetServer LC 3, 176
HP NetServer LC II, 174
HP NetServer LH Pro and LH II, 177
HP NetServer LPr, 180
HP NetServer LXe Pro, 183
HP NetServer LXr, 185
HP NetServer LXr 8000, 189
HP NetServer LXr Pro8, 187
HP NetServer Navigator CD-ROM
latest version, 75
I
I/O cache policy
setting, 63
I/O Cache policy
planning, 43
I2O, 75
I2O operation, 73, 84, 85
Information
needed for planning, 27
sources of, 9–10
Information Assistant
in HP Navigator CD-ROM, 9
Initializing logical drives, 68
Installation
adapter, 49
drivers, 74
network operating system (NOS), 79
NOS-specific utilities, 81
overview, 25
Interference, 161
IRQ Sharing, 32
L
Logical Devices box
Array Definition window, 59
HP NetRAID Assistant, 56
Logical Drive Definition screen, 63
Logical Drive Definition window, 62
Logical Drive Parameters box, 62
Logical drives, 193
capacity, 41
defining, 62, 61–64
defining new, 63
in arrays, 37
initializing, 68
planning, 39, 41
properties, 66
setting parameters, 63
spanning arrays, 64
states of, 193
undoing, 64, 66
Logical Drives, 12
Logical volume, 193, 194
LVD SCSI, 193
M
Management, 81
Memory, cache, 5
Multi-threading, 6
N
Navigator CD-ROM
main menu, 53
NetWare, 74, 75, 78, 79, 80, 81, 118,
123
201
Index
configuration utility installation, 83
NetWare 4.2, 87, 88, 123
NetWare 5, 87, 95
Network operating system (NOS), 79
Network utilities diskette, 118, 119
New array, 59–61
Non-I2O (conventional) operation, 73
Non-I2O drivers, 73
NOS installation instructions, 76, 77,
79, 80
NOS-specific configuration utility
diskette, 78
creating on HP NetServer, 79
creating on separate workstation, 78
Not responding status of SCSI disk,
196
NVRAM, 67
O
Offline state of logical drive, 193
Online
state of logical drive, 193
status of SCSI disk, 196
Online capacity expansion
Windows 2000, 102
Online Capacity Expansion, 87
Novell NetWare 4.2, 88
Novell NetWare 5, 95
Windows NT, 98
Onln (Online) state of physical drive,
56
OpenServer, 75, 80, 81, 87
configuration utility installation, 83
OS Services Module (OSM), 73
OS/2
configuration utility installation, 82
P
Parity, 194
PCI class code, 73, 74, 84, 85
Performance
RAID Levels, 21, 22
202
Physical Devices box
HP NetRAID Assistant, 56
Physical disk roaming, 7, 194
Physical Disk Roaming, 7
Physical drive
adding to existing array, 61
array numbering, 60
assigning to new array, 59–61
in array, 37
properties, 66
states, 56
Physical Drive, 11
Physical drives
undoing, 66
Planning Overview, 27
Power fail safeguard, 194
Power-up error messages, 147
Print configuration, 67
Properties
logical drives, 66
physical drive, 66
R
RAID level, 194
setting, 63
RAID Level
RAID 50, 20
tables, 21
Tables, 22
RAID Level
RAID 0, 14
RAID 1, 15
RAID 10, 18
RAID 3, 16
RAID 30, 19
RAID 5, 17
Read policy, 195
planning, 43
setting, 63
Readme file in HP Navigator, 9
Ready state of physical drive, 56
Ready status of SCSI disk, 196
Index
Rebuild
operation, 195
status of SCSI disk, 196
Rebuild rate, 38, 195
planning, 38
setting or verifying, 57
Rebuilding state of physical drive, 56
Reclaim button
for hot spare, 61
Recreate a configuration, 108
Redundancy check box, 59
Regulatory information, 161
Remote management, 113
Rescan, 58
Reset (clear) configuration, 56
Restore data, 196
Roaming, disk, 7
S
SAF-TE processor, 163, 196
Save binary file, 67
Scatter/Gather, 6
SCSI cables
illustration of connections, 186, 188
SCSI channels
HP NetRAID, 196
physical drives on, 56
SCSI Channels
planning, 33
SCSI disk status, 196
SCSI ID
in HP NetRAID, 196
of physical drive, 56
SCSI transfer rate, 84
Set PCI class code, 74, 84, 85
SIMMs, Cache Memory, 5
Slot Selection, 29
Span Arrays check box, 62, 64
Spanning arrays, 64
Starting
HP NetRAID Access Service, 125
HP NetRAID Assistant, 125
HP NetRAID Express Tools, 84
States of physical drives, 56
Static electricity, 10, 45, 51, 108
Step A. Plan Your Hardware, 27
Step B. Plan Arrays and Logical
Drives, 34
Step C. Prepare the Adapter, 45
Step D. Install the Adapter, 49
Step E. Install Cables and Set SCSI
Switches, 51
Step F. Start HP NetServer Navigator
to Launch HP NetRAID Assistant,
53
Step G. Configure Arrays and Logical
Drives, 54
Step H. Save Configuration and
Initialize, 67
Step I. Decide I2O or Non-I2O, 73
Step J. Use the HP NetServer Navigator
CD-ROM to Prepare Diskettes, 74
Step K. Install NOS and HP NetRAID
Drivers, 79
Step L. Install NOS-specific
Configuration Utility, 81
Step M. Run HP NetRAID Express
Tools, 83
Step N. Prepare for Online Capacity
Expansion, 87
Stripe size (depth)
HP NetRAID, 196
planning, 41
setting, 63
Stripe width, 197
Striping, 196
Support, 158
T
Tagged Command Queuing, 6
Tools, 10
203
Index
disabling, 96, 104
enabling, 91, 100
U
Ultra SCSI
channels, 52
Ultra2 SCSI
channels, 52
Undo button, 64
Undoing
hot spares, 61
logical drives, 64, 66
physical drives, 66
UnixWare, 75, 80, 81, 87
configuration utility installation, 83
Upgrading to an HP NetRAID-1Si
adapter, 107
Upgrading to an HP NetRAID-3Si
adapter, 107
Utilities
configuration, 71
HP NetRAID Assistant, 54, 81, 129
HP NetRAID Config, 81, 83, 132
HP NetRAID Express Tools, 134
HP NetRAID Monitor, 136
installing NOS-specific, 81
latest versions, 75
V
Virtual sizing, 63, 88, 90, 94, 95, 96,
98, 100, 102, 103, 104, 192, 197
204
W
Warranty
hardware accessories limited, 157
Windows 2000
configuration utility installation, 81
Windows 2000, 78, 79, 80, 81, 87, 118,
120
Basic Disk Mode, 103
Dynamic Disk Mode, 103
online capacity expansion, 102
Windows 95/98, 118
Windows NT
configuration utility installation, 81
Windows NT, 74, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82,
87, 98, 118, 120
Windows NT Terminal Server Edition,
82, 114
configuration utility installation, 82
Wizard. See HP NetRAID Assistant
Wizard
Worksheet A, 164
Worksheet B, 165
Write policy, 197
planning, 42
setting, 63
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