Valley of the Kings: Afterlife rulebook

Valley of the Kings: Afterlife rulebook
Tom Cleaver’s
™
A deck-building game of ancient Egypt
For 1 - 4 players
Valley of the Kings: Afterlife
A Game by Tom Cleaver
For 1-4 players, ages 14 and up
Game Overview
Players are Egyptian nobles at the time of the pharaohs, preparing
for their death and burial in the Valley of the Kings. In the Egyptian
religion, when you die you can take it with you! Egyptians therefore
stocked their tombs with goods such as weapons, works of art, and
jewelry. You compete with the other players to accumulate the best
artifacts for your tomb. At the end of the game, you score the artifacts
stored there – the player with the most victory points wins!
Valley of the Kings: Afterlife plays as a stand-alone game, but it also
integrates seamlessly with the original Valley of the Kings game. This
means that you can use cards from both games interchangeably to
make the game a new experience every time you play. You can also use
the cards to expand the game to more than four players. See “Optional
Rules” on page 16 for more details.
Goal
Fill your tomb with the most valuable artifacts!
Components
Your game of Valley of the Kings: Afterlife should include the following.
If it does not, please contact [email protected] for
assistance.
• Rulebook (this book)
• 96 Artifact cards
(40 level I cards, 29 level II cards, 27 level III
cards)
2
• 4 Tomb cards
• 4 Reference cards
1
1
3
2
3
2
4
4
7
5
6
Artifact Cards
8
7
5
6
8
These cards represent the various jewelry, weapons, tomb art and other
treasures players try to accumulate during the game.
1.Card Title: The name of the card.
2.Gold Value: The gold value is used for buying other cards.
3.Cost: This is how much gold it costs to buy the card.
4.Frame Color: The frame color is coded to the set or card type. All
tomb art, for example, has the same light blue frame color. This
makes it easier to identify your set cards. The symbol in the upper
left hand corner of each card can also be used to identify the set or
card type.
5.Action: The action on the card can be executed instead of using
the card for its gold value.
6.Historical Text: This text features a story or historical
information regarding the artifact.
7.Type: There are three types of cards: starter cards, unique
artifacts, and sets. The number in parentheses indicates how many
different cards appear in that set.
8.Level: Levels are used to sort cards into stacks during setup. 3
Setup
1.Set Up Players: Each player takes a tomb card and a reference
card and places them in front of their play area.
2.Set Up Starter Cards: Take all of the level I cards and give each
player 4 Shabtis, 3 Urns, 2 Boxes of Food, and 1 Offering Table.
These are starter cards. When playing with fewer than four
players, return any remaining starter cards to the box as they will
not be used during this game.
3.Set Up Draw Decks: Each player shuffles their 10 starter cards
and places them face down to form their own draw deck. Then
each player draws 5 cards from their draw deck to form their
hand of cards.
4.Set Up Stock: Take all of the level II cards and shuffle them
in a face down stack. Take all of the level III cards and shuffle
them in a face down stack. Then take the stack of level II cards
and place it on top of the stack of level III cards. This combined
stack forms the stock.
5.Set Up Pyramid: Draw 6 cards from the stock and place them
face up to form a pyramid as shown in the diagram on the
following page.
6.Set Up Boneyard: Draw 1 card from the stock and place it face
up next to the stock to form the boneyard.
7. Determine Starting Player: The player who most recently visited
a museum takes the first turn. Players are now ready to begin the
game!
4
Card Levels
Each card features a level represented by a pyramid in the lower
right hand corner. Cards are sorted by levels during setup.
Level II
Level I
Level III
Example Game
Boneyard
Stock
Base of the Pyramid
Player’s Play Area
Reference Card
Discard Pile
Draw Deck
Pyramid
Tomb
5
Crumbling Pyramid
Whenever a card is removed from the pyramid (unless the card is
removed from the top row), the pyramid immediately crumbles. A
card from a row above crumbles down to fill the space left by the card
that was removed. Usually, only the one card diagonally above the
empty space is available to crumble down, but if the empty space is in
the center of the base, either of two cards may crumble down. In this
instance, you may choose which of the two cards fills the space. When
a card crumbles down, it may also leave an empty space that needs to
be filled by the card at the top of the pyramid, causing another card to
crumble down.
Crumbling Example
The bottom middle card of the pyramid is
removed, causing it to immediately crumble.
Either of the cards in the center row may
crumble down to fill the space. The player chooses
to fill the space with the Goddess Nut.
The Brooch in the top row then crumbles
down to fill the empty space that the
Goddess Nut left.
6
How to Play
The starting player takes the first turn of the game; then play
continues clockwise around the table. Players continue taking turns
until the end of the game (see “End of Game” on page 11).
Taking a Turn
During your turn you must follow these four steps in order:
1.Play Cards: Each card in your hand can be played for only one
of these purposes:
Buy a card from the base of the pyramid.
Execute the action listed on the card.
Entomb the card (once per turn).
You may buy cards, execute actions, and entomb a card in any
order you wish during your turn.
2.Discard: When you have played all the cards you chose to play,
discard all of your cards in play and all cards remaining in your
hand. Cards may be discarded in any order you wish. All cards go
to your personal discard pile – not the boneyard.
3.Rebuild Pyramid: If you have made no changes whatsoever to
the pyramid during your turn, sacrifice any card in the pyramid
by putting the selected card on top of the boneyard. The pyramid
will then crumble as normal. Regardless of whether or not you
changed the pyramid, replace cards removed from the pyramid
with cards from the stock. Draw cards one at a time and fill the
empty spaces in the pyramid, starting from the base up.
4.Draw New Hand: Draw a new hand of 5 cards. If at any time you
are required to draw a card and your draw deck is empty, shuffle
your discard pile to form a new deck.
After you have completed each step, the next player clockwise around
the table takes their turn.
7
Buying Cards
Cards are bought one at a time from the base of the pyramid. You may
only buy cards from among the 3 cards in the base of the pyramid:
cards in the middle and top row cannot be bought until they crumble
down to the base of the pyramid. You may buy any number of cards
during your turn that you can afford.
To buy a card you must follow these three steps in order:
1. Lay out cards with sufficient gold value to pay the card’s cost.
If you overpay, no change is given and the extra gold is
immediately lost.
2.Remove the purchased card from the pyramid and place it on top
of your discard pile.
3. The pyramid crumbles to fill in the empty space in the base.
When a card is played for its gold value, you cannot use its action.
Do not discard the cards you used for gold. They remain on the table
as part of your cards in play until the end of your turn.
Buying Example
Jay chooses to buy the Goddess
Nut which has a cost of 4.
He lays out an Offering
Chapel with a gold value of
2 and a Spear with a gold
value of 3.
This provides a total gold value of 5 which is sufficient to buy the tomb
art. Note that the 1 extra gold value is lost and does not count towards an
additional purchase.
8
Executing Actions
Place your card on the table and carry out its action. If a card has more
than one part to its action, you must complete all parts. Furthermore,
you must execute the parts in order, completing one part before
you move on to the next. If one of the parts cannot be executed (for
example, because a required card is not available), you may not execute
the action.
You must complete all the action parts on a card before doing
anything else.
Unless otherwise noted, the effects of actions end at the conclusion of
your turn.
You may execute any number of actions during your turn. The cards
you play as actions are not discarded until the end of the turn.
When a card is played for its action, you cannot use its gold value.
9
Action Terms
Buy – Buy a card from the base of the pyramid.
Cards in your hand – These are cards you haven’t played yet.
Cards in play – These are cards already on the table that have
been played for their gold value or as actions.
Cost – This is the number in the upper right corner of the card.
Draw – Cards must be drawn from your own draw deck unless
the action specifically states otherwise.
Entomb – Choose a card from your hand and put it into your
tomb, under the tomb card.
May – When “may” occurs in an action, it means that the
following text is optional. For example, “You may draw a card”
means that you are allowed, but not required, to draw. If it is
impossible for you to draw a card, you can still do the rest of the
action.
Sacrifice – Choose a card and put it on top of the boneyard face
up. Some actions call for sacrificing cards from your hand while
others for sacrificing cards from the pyramid. Cards already in
play cannot be sacrificed. Unless stated otherwise, cards are
sacrificed from your hand.
Set Card – A set card is anything other than a starter card or a
unique card.
Take – Unless otherwise noted, this means to take a card from
anywhere in the pyramid and place it on top of your discard pile.
10
Entombing Cards
Once per turn you may put a card from your hand
into your tomb. Some actions allow you to place
additional cards into your tomb. When a card is
entombed, you cannot use its gold value or action.
The cards put in your tomb are public knowledge.
Lay out your tomb as shown in the example image
so that all players know what cards you have.
End of Game
Example
Tomb Layout
The game continues until all of the following conditions have
been met:
No cards are left in the stock.
No cards are left in the pyramid.
All players have taken the same number of turns.
Scoring
After the game ends, all players count their victory points (VP).
Only the cards in your tomb count; the cards in your hand, deck,
and discard pile are worthless. There are three types of cards: starter
cards (Shabti, Urns, Boxes of Food, and Offering Tables), unique
artifacts (Sphinx, Ibex Statue, etc.), and sets (mummification,
jewelry, chambers, weapons, and tomb art). Scoring of starter cards
and unique artifacts is easy – just add up the victory points listed on
the cards. For sets, determine how many different cards in each set
you have (do not count duplicates) and square the result (multiply the
result by itself). For example, if you have 6 different kinds of Tomb
Art, you score 6×6 = 36 points. Add up all your points. The player
with the most points wins! In case of ties, the player with the fewest
cards in their tomb wins. Further ties result in a shared victory.
11
Scoring Example
Jay has the following cards in his tomb: 3
Shabti (1 VP each), a Burial Chamber,
2 Axes, and a Dagger. Jay scores 3 points
for his 3 Shabti (1+1+1 = 3), 1 point for
his Burial Chamber (1×1 = 1), and 4
points for his 2 different weapons (2×2
= 4). His total is 8 points. Note that the
extra Axe is worthless.
Number of
cards in set
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Victory
Points
1
4
9
16
25
36
49
Rule Clarifications
You may not look at the contents of the boneyard, other than the
top (face up) card.
You may look at your own discard pile (without rearranging the
cards) when it is not your turn. During your turn, you may only
look at your discard pile if directed by an action.
You may count the number of cards remaining in the stock
(without rearranging the cards) when it is not your turn.
If an action allows you to put a card into your tomb, it does not
count towards the limit of entombing once per turn.
If a player has accidentally placed any extra cards in their tomb,
the cards are placed in their discard pile instead. For all other
errors, if the error is caught before the next player plays a card, the
error is corrected. If the next player has already played a card, the
error is not corrected.
You cannot use the gold value of a card to buy more than one card
at a time. For example, if you have a card with a gold value of 6,
you cannot buy two cards at a cost of 3 each.
12
Card Clarifications
Antechamber – Search your discard pile. Put a card from your discard pile
into your hand.
Once you begin the search, you must complete the action.
Axe – If you discard Axe as the result of an action, each opponent discards
the highest cost card in their hand.
The action could be an action you take, or an action an opponent
takes. Opponents should reveal their hands to verify that they have
discarded their highest-cost cards.
Bow – Take a set card that is not of the same set as any card in your tomb
and entomb it.
Unique cards are not set cards and cannot be entombed with the Bow.
Example: Jane has no weapons in her tomb. She can use the Bow to
take a Sling from the pyramid and put it in her tomb.
Brooch – Entomb a card from the pyramid. Sacrifice a set card in your
tomb.
Starter cards and unique cards are not sets and cannot be sacrificed by
Brooch. If you do not have any set cards in your tomb to sacrifice, you
cannot entomb a card from the pyramid.
Burial Ceremony – Entomb and number of starter cards.
The starter cards must come from your hand.
Dagger – If there are at least as many cards in the boneyard as there are
players, each player, starting with you, takes the top card of the boneyard.
If you must count the cards in the boneyard, do so without revealing
them to yourself or anybody else.
13
Goddess Nut – Select an opponent. That opponent may take the card with
the lowest cost. You take the card with the highest cost.
In case of ties for the lowest-cost card, your opponent chooses which
one to take. In case of ties for the highest-cost card, you choose which
one to take. If your opponent chooses not to take a card, you may still
take the card with the highest cost.
Hounds and Jackals Game – Put a card in play into your hand.
Cards in play are any cards you have played this turn for their actions
or for their gold value.
Judgment – Set aside a card from your hand and take the top card of the
boneyard. Repeat this as often as desired. Then sacrifice the set-aside cards.
You may not examine the contents of the boneyard at any time while
executing this action. You may put the set-aside cards on top of the
boneyard in any order.
Mirror Case – Take a card. Put Mirror Case into the pyramid as though
you were rebuilding the pyramid.
After you take a card from the pyramid, the pyramid crumbles. Then
put Mirror Case into the top of the pyramid and let it crumble into
position.
Necklace – Entomb the top card of your deck. If it’s a starter card, you may
entomb a second card from the top of your deck.
If necessary, you may shuffle your discards to create a draw deck. You
cannot entomb more than two cards with this action.
Offering Chapel – Each player may entomb the top card of their discard
pile.
Players with empty discard piles do not participate in this action.
14
Pesesh-kef – Take a card selected by the player to your left.
You do the pyramid crumbling of this action.
Ring – The next card you play this turn has double gold value.
If you play this card as the last play of your turn, the effect does not
carry over into your next turn.
Senet Game – Draw a card. Put Senet Game on top of an opponent’s
discard pile. That opponent puts a set card on top of your discard pile, or
reveals a hand with no set cards.
Draw a card. Then put Senet Game on top of a selected opponent’s
discard pile. That opponent then searches their hand and selects a set
card to put on top of your discard pile. If the opponent does not have a
set card, they must show you their hand to prove it.
Serdab – Set aside any number of cards. When you draw a new hand, add
these set-aside cards to your hand.
The cards to set aside are unplayed cards from your hand.
Sling – When an opponent entombs a card, discard Sling and entomb a card
costing 3 or less.
The card to entomb comes from your hand.
Victory – Entomb a card in play.
Cards in play are any cards you have played this turn for their actions
or for their gold value.
15
Optional Rules
To create more variety in your games, there are a number of optional
rules you can use. If players want to use any of the rules discussed
here, they should make sure that everyone understands and agrees to
the rules before the game begins.
Playing Valley of the Kings Sets Together
If you own a copy of the original Valley of the Kings game, you have
many more ways to play. Some suggestions for integrating the two
games are given as follows.
Mixed Sets
Each version of Valley of the Kings contains sets of 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7
distinct cards, as shown in the table below.
Different kinds
of cards per set
3
4
5
6
7
Valley of the Kings
Sarcophagi
Canopic Jars
Amulets
Books
Statues
Valley of the Kings:
Afterlife
Mummification
Jewelry
Chambers
Weapons
Tomb Art
Choose a three-card set from either version (sarcophagi or
mummification), a four-card set from either version (canopic jars or
jewelry), etc. The selection may be deliberate or at random. You may
also use the unique cards (purple cards) from either set.
16
Half Sets
There are two identical copies of each set card. For example, there are
8 chamber cards, but only 4 of each kind of chamber. Splitting up
this set means that you would use only 4 cards from the chambers set.
Use half of each set from each of the two versions. There will then be
no duplicates in the game, but there will be the same number of total
cards in the game.
There are two ways to play with half sets:
Treat the Sets Independently – In this version of the game,
there will be 10 different sets. With no duplicate cards, getting a
full set of anything is quite challenging.
Combine the Sets by Color Group – In this version of the game,
there will be 5 supersets: The sarcophagi/mummification superset,
the canopic jars/jewelry superset, etc. For the statues/tomb art
superset, there are 14 distinct cards. If you were to complete this
set, you would get 14 x 14 = 196 points!
Longer Games
If you want more challenge, and higher scores, you can make the
game longer by including extra cards, as described in the “Five- and
Six-Player Games” optional rule on page 18.
17
Five- and Six-Player Games
Valley of the Kings: Afterlife includes enough starter cards for four
players. By using the starter cards from the original Valley of the Kings,
you can play with up to eight players. We found that five- and sixplayer games work well.
Five-player Game – Take all six Sarcophagus cards from Valley
of the Kings and all six Mummification cards from Valley of the
Kings: Afterlife to form a red superset. Take all eight Canopic Jar
cards from Valley of the Kings and all eight Jewelry cards from
Valley of the Kings: Afterlife to form a brown superset. For your
additional sets, use Amulets or Chambers, Books or Weapons,
and Statues or Tomb Art. Use any six purple unique cards from
either set.
Six-player game – This is the same as the five-player game,
except that you use all ten Amulet cards from Valley of the Kings
and all ten Chamber cards from Valley of the Kings: Afterlife to
form a yellow-orange superset. Use any ten purple unique cards.
Valley of the Kings Solitaire
Below are two Valley of the Kings solitaire games: Starter Solitaire
and Master Solitaire. These two games will sharpen your skills when
playing against others.
For both games the following additional rules apply:
You may examine the boneyard whenever you wish.
You may examine your discard pile whenever you wish.
You may not execute an action that refers to another player.
Duplicate set cards in your tomb count against you.
18
Starter Solitaire
To win you must get a perfect score, that is, you must entomb 3
mummification, 4 jewelry, 5 chambers, 6 weapons, 7 tomb art, 6
uniques, and 10 starter cards. This scores a total of 164 points.
Master Solitaire
This game has the same goal as Starter Solitaire by scoring a total of
164 points, except that you no longer get one free entombment per
turn. You must therefore use card actions to populate your tomb.
Credits
Game Design: Tom Cleaver
Development: John Goodenough
Art: Banu Andaru
Graphic Design: John Goodenough
Proofing: Nicolas Bongiu, Todd Rowland, Mark Wootton
Production: David Lepore
Playtesters: Jason Aemisegger, Jon Bancroft, Walt Brewer, Martin
Campion, Latricia Fahringer, Thomas Froman, John Hicks, Dave
Johnston, Cory Maloney, Nick Maloney, Jill Patrick, Will Pell, Lonny
Robinson, Michael Runge, Jason Stucker, Richard Tatge, Thorin
Tatge, Christie Thompson
Copyright & Contact
© 2015 Alderac Entertainment Group. Valley of the Kings, Alderac
Entertainment Group, and all related marks are ™ and © Alderac
Entertainment Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Printed in China.
Warning: Choking Hazard! Not for use by children under 3 years of age!
For more information, visit our website:
www.alderac.com/valleyofthekings and www.alderac.com/forum
Questions? Email [email protected]
19
Quick Reference
Setup
End of Game
1. Set Up Players
2.Set Up Starter Cards
The game continues until all
conditions have been met:
3. Set Up Draw Decks
No cards are left in the stock.
5. Set Up Pyramid
All players have taken the same
number of turns.
4. Set Up Stock
6.Set Up Boneyard
7. Determine Starting Player
Taking a Turn
No cards are left in the pyramid.
Players then count their victory points
(VP) in their tomb and the player with
the most points wins!
During your turn you must follow these four steps in order:
1.Play Cards: Each card in your hand can be used for only one of
these purposes:
Buy a card from the base of the pyramid.
Entomb the card (once per turn).
Execute the action listed on the card.
2.Discard: When you have played all the cards you chose to play,
discard all of your cards in play and all cards remaining in your
hand to your personal discard pile.
3.Rebuild Pyramid: If you have made no changes whatsoever to
the pyramid during your turn, sacrifice any card in the pyramid
by putting the selected card on top of the boneyard. Regardless of
whether or not you changed the pyramid, replace cards removed
from the pyramid with cards from the stock starting from the
base up.
4.Draw New Hand: Draw a new hand of 5 cards.
After you have completed each step, the next player clockwise around
20table takes their turn.
the
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