PASSWORDS, LOGONS, AND USER ACCOUNTS

PASSWORDS, LOGONS, AND USER ACCOUNTS
ch11 Page 351 Thursday, January 27, 2005 11:17 AM
Chapter 11
CHAPTER 11
PASSWORDS, LOGONS, AND
USER ACCOUNTS
CHAPTER OBJECTIVES:
Understand a workgroup and a domain
Understand the differences between Windows XP Home and Professional
Create and edit user accounts
Change the logon process
Log on and off Windows
Change your password
Prerequisites
• Know how to use the mouse to click, double-click, drag and drop, and right-click.
• Know how to start programs in the Start Menu.
• Know how to use menus, toolbars, and dialog boxes.
Passwords have been used as a first-line of defense against intruders for thousands of years. A password assures an
individual’s identification: once they pass a test of identificationwhether it’s a secret knock or a spoken word
entrance is granted.
Technology has easily adapted this common-sense approach of ensuring a user’s identity, only on computers we
gain access to a user account, not a secret hideout or speakeasy. For example, to log on to an Internet e-mail
account, you must identify yourself with a user name, then prove who you are by entering a password.
This chapter will show you how to use and manage your own account to make sure it is secure. You will also learn
how to create and edit user accounts for everyone who shares a computer.
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LESSON
11.1
Workgroup vs. Domain
JaneDoe@zipcorp.com
Shared
files
User Name
This is the name
of the person’s
email account. It is
similar to the
person’s name
on an envelope.
Workstation
Shared files
Shared files
Workstation
Workstation
Peer-To-Peer Network
Figure 11-1. In a peer-to-peer network, everyone stores their
files on their own computer. Anyone on the network can
access files stored on any other computer.
Shared
files
Organization Name
This is the name
of the domain network
the computer is in. This
is similar to the city
name of an address.
Commercial Domain
This is the highest level
of the email address,
identifying the domain
as a business. This is
similar to the state or
country of an address.
Figure 11-3. The domain levels of an e-mail address.
There are two versions of Windows XP: Home and Professional. In most ways, the versions are not at all different. But because Home users are less likely to be part of a
big network, or domain, Microsoft made some actions
different, like creating user accounts on the computer.
This lesson explains the difference between a workgroup,
which is applicable to Windows XP Home users, and a
domain, which is applicable to Windows XP Professional
users.
Workgroup (Windows XP Home)
This is an example of a peer-to-peer network, so there is
no hierarchy of computers. Workgroups share resources
with each other, such as printers and folders, but there is
no centralized power. A network you might set up at
home would be considered a workgroup.
Server
Workstation
Workstation
Client/Server Network
Figure 11-2. In a client/server network, everyone stores their
files on a central computer called a server. Everyone on the
network can access the files stored on the server.
If you do not have a home network, your computer is
stand-alone and you can create and manage user
accounts on your computer the same as in a workgroup.
Domain (Windows XP Professional)
This is an example of a client/server network, which
means computers are connected to each other through a
main server computer. All the computers within a
domain work as a unit under the same rules and procedures.
Domains and computers within the domain also have a
specific identification on the Internet, called an IP
address. All devices sharing part of that address are in the
same domain. For example, in the e-mail address: jane-
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Chapter 11
Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
doe@zipcorp.com, zipcorp is the name of the domain
that Jane Doe’s computer is a part of. The .com also identifies the zipcorp domain as a business.
There is much more to learn about the basic differences
between a workgroup and a domain in the Networking
with Windows chapter in this book. But for the purposes
of lessons in this chapter, if you are on a workgroup, or
small network, follow the lessons for a workgroup. If you
are part of a domain, or larger corporate network, follow
the lessons for a domain.
QUICK REFERENCE
WORKGROUP:
DOM AIN:
•
1.
windows xp home users are configured to
be par t of a workgroup.
windows xp professional users are
configured to be par t of a dom ain
if you use windows xp home but are not par t
of a network, your computer is stand-alone
and follows the sa me procedures as a
workgroup.
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LESSON
11.2
Creating a New User Account on a Workgroup Computer
A description of the selected
account type appears below it.
Figure 11-4. Pick an account type.
Manage and create user
accounts in the User Accounts
screen.
Click the Guest account to turn
it on. This allows limited access
to the computer for individuals
without an account.
Figure 11-5. The User Accounts category of the Control Panel.
TIP
Creating a new user account on your computer
is not adding a computer to a network. See the
chapter on Networking with Windows for this information.
Many home computers aren’t used by just one, but several family members. If you share your computer with
several people, you may want to create a new user
account for each person so they can have personalized
settings on the computer. Each user account allows settings for:
354
• Permissions: These have to be set up by a network
administrator. Permissions provide access to some
areas of the network, while restricting access to others.
• Background and screen colors: Each user can personalize their desktop with the background and Windows
screen colors that suit their own personal tastes.
• Start menu and shortcuts: Each user account has its
own personalized Start menu and Desktop. For example, a shortcut added to the Desktop in Joe Schnook’s
account won’t appear on Mary Johnson’s Desktop.
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Chapter 11
Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
NOTE
To create a new user account you must be
logged on to Windows XP as an administrator (or
know the administrator password).
This lesson will show you how to add new user accounts
to a computer using Windows XP Home.
1
Make sure you are logged on to an account with
Administrator status.
Only administrators can create new accounts on a
computer.
2
5
Choose the access level for the user. Click Create
Account.
The new user account appears in the User Accounts
dialog box.
That’s all there is to adding a new user account to your
Windows XP Home computer, if you have administrator
status, that is! Now that the account is created you can
explore more account management tasks, such as creating a password, in a later lesson.
Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
The Control Panel appears.
3
Click the User Accounts category. Click the Create
a new account task.
QUICK REFERENCE
TO CREATE A NEW USER ACCOUNT
USING WINDOWS XP HOME:
1.
log on to a computer administr ator
account.
User Accounts
The User Accounts dialog box appears.
First, create a name for the user. This name will
appear in the Welcome screen when the user logs in to
their account.
NOTE
User names cannot be the same as any
other user or group name, and can contain up to 20
uppercase or lowercase characters including
spaces. User names cannot contain the following
characters: \ / : * ? " | + * ?
2. click the Star t but ton and select
Control Panel.
3. click the User Accounts categor y.
4. click the Create a new account task.
5. enter a user na me for the account.
click Next.
6. select the access level for the user
(computer administr ator or limited).
click Create Account.
4
Type the user name in the User name box. Click
Next.
Now assign a permission level to the user. There are
two levels to choose from:
• Computer Administrator: This type of account
grants the user access to system settings, installing
programs, and files. This user can also create, edit
and delete other user accounts. This is a good permission level for parents or the owner of the computer.
• Limited: This type of user has access to programs
on the computer, but cannot change system settings
or delete important files. This is a good level for
children or users that do not need to maintain the
computer.
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LESSON
11.3
Creating a New User Account on a Domain Computer
Figure 11-6. Enter a User name and the Domain the user is in.
Figure 11-7. Specify the level of access you want to give the new user.
Figure 11-8. The new user account appears in the Users tab of the User Accounts dialog box.
If your computer uses Windows XP Professional, you can
create an account on your computer for other users in
the domain. This is different from creating an account in
Windows XP Home, because the user already has to be in
the domain: if Windows doesn’t recognize the account
name you’re trying to create, it won’t let you create the
account.
356
NOTE
To create a new user account you must be
logged on to Windows XP as an administrator or
know the administrator password. However, network policy settings may still prevent you from completing this procedure.
Here’s how to create new accounts on a computer that
uses Windows XP Professional.
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Chapter 11
Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
1
7
Make sure you are logged on to an account with
Administrator status.
Select the level of access you want to grant to the
new user and click Finish.
Only administrators can create new accounts on a
computer.
The new user account appears in the User Accounts
dialog box.
2
8
Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
The Control Panel appears.
If your account has administrator status you can add
users to the computer. Otherwise, you may have to
call your organization’s computer support department.
Click OK to close the User Accounts dialog box.
That’s all there is to adding a new user account to your
Windows XP Professional computer, if you’re able to log
on as an administrator, that is! You may want the new
user to log on to the computer using their domain user
name and password to make sure everything works okay.
3
Click the User Accounts category. Click User
Accounts.
QUICK REFERENCE
User Accounts
The User Accounts dialog box appears.
You’re ready to start entering the new user account.
4
1.
click the Star t but ton and select
Control Panel.
2. click the User Accounts icon. click
Click Add.
The Add New User dialog box appears.
5
TO CREATE A NEW USER ACCOUNT
USING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL:
User Accounts.
3. click Add.
4. enter the user’s dom ain user na me.
Type the user name in the User name box.
Because the user is already in the domain, you don’t
have to make up a new user name. Just make sure the
user name you type is the same as the user name in
the domain.
5. enter the dom ain the user is on. click
Next.
6. select the t y pe of access you want
to gr ant the new user and click
Finish.
Now enter the domain that the user is in.
7. click OK.
6
Type the domain in the Domain box. Click Next.
The last step in adding a new user account is assigning
their level of access. You have three options:
• Standard user: Users can modify the computer and
install programs, but cannot read or modify files
that belong to other users.
• Restricted user: Users can operate the computer
and save documents, but cannot install programs
or make changes to the system files and settings.
• Other: Select from other types of user access, such
as Administrators, who can read or modify files that
belong to other users, share folders on your computer, and create user accounts.
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LESSON
11.4
Editing a User Account on a Workgroup
Figure 11-9. Editing account tasks in the User Accounts dialog box.
When a user account is created, only basic settings like
the user name and account type are established. But you
can also change many of the account’s settings, such as
the password, account type, or the name. Once a user
account has been created, it’s easy to edit its settings.
1
Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
User Accounts
The User Accounts dialog box appears.
3
Click the user account you want to change.
The Control Panel appears. You must have administrator status to edit user accounts.
The User Accounts dialog box appears with a list of
tasks that change the account.
2
To perform a task, just click it and enter the information requested on the screen. Review the following
table for more information on each task.
Click the User Accounts category.
Table 11-1. Change Account tasks
358
Task
Description
Change the name
Change the name that appears in the account.
Create a password
Increase security by requiring the user to enter a password when logging in to the account.
Other users can see the account password hint in the Welcome screen.
Change the picture
Select from a number of available images, or select your own image, that appears with the
account name in the Welcome screen and Start menu.
Change the account type
Changes the account from Limited to Computer Administrator, or vice versa.
Delete the account
Delete the account from the computer. This deletes the user’s customized settings such as email messages or Internet favorites, but you can save the items on the user’s desktop.
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Chapter 11
Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
QUICK REFERENCE
TO CHANGE A USER ACCOUNT IN WINDOWS
XP HOME:
1.
click the Star t but ton and select Control
3. click the account you want to change.
4. click a task to change the account
set tings.
Panel.
2. click the User Accounts icon.
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LESSON
11.5
Editing a User Account on a Domain
4
Select the level of access you want to grant to the
user and click OK.
The General tab may
appear in this dialog box,
depending on the type of
account being changed.
The user’s account now belongs to a different access
group.
QUICK REFERENCE
TO EDIT A USER ACCOUNT IN
WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL:
1.
click the Star t but ton and select
Control Panel.
Figure 11-10. The Group Membership tab of the User
Account Properties dialog box.
2. click the User Accounts categor y.
click User Accounts.
3. select the user account you want to
Over time, you may find that a user needs more or less
access to the computer. When a domain user account is
created, basic settings like the user name and password
are already established on the domain, you’re just giving
that user permission to use your computer. The user has
control over their user name and password, but you can
change the level of access the user has on your computer.
1
Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
The Control Panel appears. You must have administrator status to edit user accounts.
2
Click the User Accounts category. Click User
Accounts.
The User Accounts dialog box appears.
3
Select the user account you want to change from
the list of users. Click Properties and click the Group
Membership tab if necessary.
The Group Membership tab of the Account Properties dialog box appears.
Remember when you gave the user a level of access to
the computer? This is where you can change that status.
360
change.
4. click Proper ties and click the Group
membership tab if necessar y.
5. select the level of access you want
to gr ant to the user and click OK.
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LESSON
11.6
Logging Off Windows on a Workgroup
you’ve been working on and consider backing up any
vital information on a removable storage device.
2
Click the Windows Start button and select Log Off.
The Log Off Windows dialog box appears, as shown
in Figure 11-12. Click one of the following options:
• Switch User: Keeps the current user account and its
programs open so you can switch to another
account in the Welcome screen. This option is not
available if the Welcome screen has been turned off.
• Log Off: Logs off the user account.
3
Click Log Off.
Windows logs you off the system and displays the
Welcome to Windows dialog box, or the Welcome
screen, allowing another person to log on to Windows
to use the computer.
Select Log Off to log off Windows XP.
Figure 11-11. To log off your account, click the Start button
QUICK REFERENCE
and select Log Off.
TO LOG OFF WINDOWS XP HOME:
1.
The Switch User option
does not appear if the
Welcome screen is turned
off.
save all your work and exit all your
progr a ms.
2. click the Star t but ton and select
Log Off.
3. click Log Off.
or…
click Switch User to keep the account
Figure 11-12. Select a Log Off option.
open, and log on to a different
account.
When you’re finished using the computer, log off your
account so that it’s ready for the next person. Windows
XP Home also has the unique option of switching user
accounts, instead of logging off. This allows you to switch
easily between open user accounts without logging on
and off.
1
Save all your work and exit all your programs.
There really isn’t a lot of difference between logging
off your computer and shutting it down. Save any files
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LESSON
11.7
Logging Off Windows on a Domain
• To gain administrative rights to a shared folder or
printer: Some critical or confidential areas of your
computer or network may be restricted so that only
authorized users can access them. User accounts with
administrative rights pretty much have access to everything on your computer. You must be logged on as an
administrator or a user with administrative rights to
add or change user accounts and to share folders on
your computer.
In this lesson you will learn the complex task of logging
off Windows XP Professional.
1
Save all your work and exit all your programs.
There really isn’t a lot of difference between logging
off your computer and shutting it down. Save any files
you’ve been working on and consider backing up vital
information on a removable storage device.
2
Select Log Off to log
off Windows XP
Figure 11-13. To log off your account, click the Start button
and select Log Off.
Click the Start button and select Log Off.
The Log Off Windows dialog box appears.
3
Click Log Off.
Windows logs you off the system, allowing another
person to log on to the domain to use the computer.
QUICK REFERENCE
Figure 11-14. Windows XP asks if you are sure you want to
log off.
TO LOG OFF WINDOWS XP
PROFESSIONAL:
1.
save all your work and exit all your
progr a ms.
In Windows XP Professional, there are several security
reasons for logging off your computer.
• To secure your computer from unauthorized access: If
your computer contains sensitive information you
may want to log off Windows when you step out of the
office to prevent unauthorized users from using your
computer.
• You share the same computer with another user: If
you share your computer with one or more people,
you can create and log on to different user accounts so
that each person can use their own personalized files
and settings.
362
2. click the Star t but ton and select
Log Off.
3. click Log Off.
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LESSON
11.8
Logging On to Windows on a Workgroup
To log in, click your user
account
Figure 11-15. The Welcome screen is the default log in screen.
Enter the account user name and
password.
If the account does not have a
password, leave the text box blank.
Figure 11-16. The Log On to Windows dialog box appears if the Welcome screen has been turned off.
1
The procedure for logging back on to Windows XP really
isn’t any different from turning your computer on—
except that you don’t have to wait as long.
Enter your user name and password. If your
account doesn’t have a password, leave the text box
blank.
The default log in screen is the Welcome screen, as shown
in Figure 11-15.
Remember that when you enter your password, Windows will display a series of •••••••s to protect your
password from prying eyes.
1
Click your account user name.
If your account has a password, you will be prompted
to enter it.
2
Press Enter or click OK.
Windows logs in using your account settings.
Logging on to Windows couldn’t be easier.
If the Computer Administrator wants to increase security
and has turned off the Welcome screen, logging in will be
a little different, as shown in Figure 11-16.
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Lesson 11.8
Logging On to Windows on a Workgroup
QUICK REFERENCE
TO LOG ON TO WINDOWS XP HOME USING
THE WELCOME SCREEN:
TO LOG ON TO WINDOWS XP HOME
WITHOUT THE WELCOME SCREEN:
•
1.
click your account user na me. enter your
account passwor d if promp ted.
enter your user na me and passwor d. if your
account doesn’t have a passwor d, leave the
text box blank.
2. press Enter or click OK
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LESSON
11.9
Logging On to Windows on a Domain
Figure 11-17. The Welcome to Windows XP dialog box.
Enter the
account user
name and
password.
Specify the
computer
domain you
want to log
on to.
This setting probably won’t ever change, but you
should be aware that it is required to log in to the
domain.
4
Press Enter or click OK.
Presto! You’re logged on to Windows XP and are
ready to get back to work.
Click Options to display/hide the Log on
To list, which lets you specify which
network domain you want to log on to.
QUICK REFERENCE
Figure 11-18. The Welcome to Windows XP dialog box.
Logging on to a computer using Windows XP Professional is a little different because you are logging in to a
network, not just a computer, so security needs to be
tight.
The first screen is a defense against hackers or worms
that might try to hack into your computer while you’re
not using it.
1
TO LOG ON TO WINDOWS XP
PROFESSIONAL:
1.
press Ctrl + Alt + Delete.
2. enter your user na me and passwor d.
3. make sure you are logging in to the
correct dom ain.
4. press Enter or click OK.
Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete.
The Log on to Windows dialog box appears, as shown
in Figure 11-16.
2
Enter your user name and password.
Remember that when you enter your password Windows will display a series of •••••••s to protect your
password from prying eyes.
3
If necessary, click Options and click the Log on To
list arrow to select the domain name that you want to
log on to.
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LESSON
11.10
Changing Your Password on a Workgroup
Click to change or create
your account password.
Displays the user
account that is
currently logged on.
Figure 11-19. User Account tasks.
Enter the required
information to create
or change your
password.
Figure 11-20. Changing or creating your password.
TIP
The most secure passwords combine letters
and numbers.
Windows XP Home accounts don’t require passwords,
but you can add one to your account for more privacy.
Change your password regularly to ensure your account
is secure.
1
Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
The Control Panel appears.
2
Click the User Accounts icon.
The User Accounts screen appears.
366
3
Click your account. To create a password, click the
Create a password task. To change a password, click
the Change my password task.
The information required to create and change a password is very similar.
4
Enter the information required to create or change
your password.
5
Click Create password or Change password to
confirm the password.
Now the new or changed password will be required
whenever you log in to the account.
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Chapter 11
Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
QUICK REFERENCE
TO CHANGE OR CREATE YOUR PASSWOR D
ON WINDOWS XP HOME:
1.
click the Star t but ton and select Control
4. click the Create a passwor d task.
or…
click the Change my passwor d task.
Panel.
5. enter the required infor m ation to change or
2. click the User Accounts icon.
3. click your account.
create the passwor d.
6. click Create passwor d or Change
passwor d.
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LESSON
11.11
Changing Your Password on a Domain
Displays the user
account that is
currently logged on.
Click to change
your logon
password.
Figure 11-21. The Windows Security dialog box.
Displays the computer
or domain you are
logged on to.
Figure 11-22. The Change Windows Password dialog box.
TIP
The most secure passwords combine letters
and numbers.
As a domain user, you were probably assigned a user
name and password the first time you logged in to your
computer. But you have control over your own password,
and it’s a good idea to change passwords regularly for
security purposes.
3
Type your current password in the Old Password
box and press Tab.
Now enter your new password.
4
Type your new password in the New Password
box, press Tab, and type your new password again in
the Confirm New Password box.
The Windows Security dialog box appears.
When you pick a password, don’t use words or numbers that are easily associated with you, such as the
name of your dog or your birthday.
2
5
1
Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete.
Click the Change Password button.
The Change Password dialog box appears, displaying
your user name and the domain that you are logged
on to. First, tell Windows XP your old password.
Click OK.
A dialog box appears, confirming that your password
has been changed.
6
Click OK. Click Cancel to close the Windows Security dialog box.
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Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
That’s all there is to changing your password. Make
sure you write it down so that you don’t forget it next
time you have to log on to Windows XP!
QUICK REFERENCE
TO CHANGE YOUR ACCOUNT PASSWOR D ON
WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL:
1.
press Ctrl + Alt + Delete.
4. ty pe your new passwor d in the new
passwor d box, press Tab and t y pe your new
passwor d again in the confir m new
passwor d box.
2. click the Change Passwor d but ton.
5. click OK to close the dialog box, click OK
3. ty pe your old passwor d in the Old
to confir m the new passwor d and click
Passwor d box and press the Tab key.
Cancel to close the windows securit y
dialog box.
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LESSON
11.12
Changing the Logon Process on Windows XP Home
Deselect this checked box to turn off
the Welcome screen when users
log on to the computer.
Fast User Switching allows
you to switch between open
user accounts on the
computer.
Figure 11-23. Change the way users log on or off.
TIP
You must be logged in as a computer adminis-
trator to change the logon process.
When logging in, Windows XP Home users are greeted
with a Welcome screen that displays all the accounts on
the computer. But if you want to increase security, you
can change the logon process so that instead of a Welcome screen that lists all the user accounts, a blank dialog
box appears, so that the user must enter their own
account information.
This lesson shows you how to turn off the Welcome
screen and log on to the computer using the standard
Log On to Windows dialog box.
1
Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
The Control Panel appears.
2
Click the User Accounts category.
The User Accounts screen appears.
370
3
Click the Change the way users log on or off task.
Another dialog box appears with controls on how
users begin and end their sessions with Windows.
As you can see, by default the “Use the Welcome
screen” check box is selected. To turn off the Welcome
screen, uncheck this option.
4
Click the Use the Welcome screen check box so it
is not selected. Click Apply Options.
The Home page of the User Accounts category
appears.
The Welcome screen will no longer appear when users
log on to their accounts. Instead of clicking their
account name on the Welcome screen, they will have
to type their account information, such as user name
and password, in the Log On to Windows dialog box.
This is similar to the dialog box that appears when
logging on to computer in a domain.
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Chapter 11
Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
QUICK REFERENCE
TO CHANGE THE LOGON PROCESS ON A
WORKGROUP:
4. click the use the welcome screen check box
1.
5. click apply op tions.
click the star t but ton and select control
so it is not selected.
panel.
2. click the user accounts categor y.
3. click the change the way users log on or
off task.
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Chapter Eleven Review
Lesson Summary
Workgroup vs. Domain
Logging Off Windows on a Workgroup
Workgroup: Windows XP Home users are configured to
be part of a workgroup. If you use Windows XP Home
but are not part of a network, your computer is standalone and follows the same procedures as a workgroup.
To Log Off Windows XP Home: Save all your work and
exit all your programs. Click the Windows Start button
and select Log Off. Click Log Off, or click Switch User to
keep the account open, and log on to a different account.
Domain: Windows XP Professional users are configured
to be part of a domain.
Logging Off Windows on a Domain
Creating a New User Account on a Workgroup Computer
To Create a New User Account Using Windows XP
Home: Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
Click the User Accounts category and click the Create a
new account task. Enter a user name for the account and
click Next. Select the access level for the user (Computer
Administrator or Limited) and click Create Account.
Creating a New User Account on a Domain Computer
To Create a New User Account Using Windows XP Professional: Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
Click the User Accounts icon and click User Accounts.
Click Add. Enter the user’s domain User name. Enter the
domain the user is on and click Next. Select the type of
access you want to grant the new user and click Finish.
Click OK.
Editing a User Account on a Workgroup
To Change a User Account in Windows XP Home: Click
the Start button and select Control Panel. Click the User
Accounts icon. Click the account you want to change and
click a task to change the account settings.
Editing a User Account on a Domain
To Change a User Account in Windows XP Professional:
Click the Start button and select Control Panel. Click the
User Accounts icon and click User Accounts. Select the
user account you want to change, click Properties, and
click the Group Membership tab if necessary. Select the
level of access you want to grant to the user and click OK.
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To Log Off Windows XP Professional: Save all your work
and exit all your programs. Click the Windows Start button and select Log Off. Click Log Off.
Logging On to Windows on a Workgroup
To Log On To Windows XP Home Using the Welcome
Screen: Click your account user name. Enter your
account password if prompted.
To Log On To Windows XP Home Without the Welcome
Screen: Enter your user name and password. If your
account doesn’t have a password, leave the text box
blank. Press Enter or click OK.
Logging On to Windows on a Domain
To Log On to Windows XP Professional: Press Ctrl + Alt
+ Delete. Enter your user name and password. Make sure
you are logging in to the correct domain. Press Enter or
click OK.
Changing Your Password on a Workgroup
To Change or Create Your Password on Windows XP
Home: Click the Start button and select Control Panel.
Click the User Accounts icon and click your account.
Click the Create a password task, or if you already have a
password, click the Change my password task. Enter the
required information to change or create the password.
Click Create password or Change password.
Changing Your Password on a Domain
To Change Your Password on Windows XP Professional:
Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete and click the Change Password
button. Type your old password in the Old Password box
and press the Tab key. Type your new password in the
New Password box, press Tab and type your new pass-
ch11 Page 373 Thursday, January 27, 2005 11:17 AM
Chapter 11
Passwords, Logons, and User Accounts
word again in the Confirm New Password box. Click OK
to close the dialog box, click OK to confirm the new password and click Cancel to close the Windows Security dialog box.
Changing the Logon Process on a Workgroup
To Change the Logon Process for Windows XP Home:
Click the Start button and select Control Panel and click
the User Accounts category. Click the Change the way
users log on or off task. Click the Use the Welcome screen
check box so it is not selected and click Apply Options.
Quiz
1. What is the difference between a workgroup and a
domain? (Select all that apply.)
A. A workgroup has centralized file and account
maintenance. A domain is not centralized.
B. A workgroup is a network of computers that share
resources, but does not have a presence on the
Internet. A domain has an identification on the
Internet, called an IP address.
C. A workgroup is more common in organizations
and businesses. A domain is more suitable for
home users.
A. When you create a user account, you can limit the
user’s access on the computer by choosing the
account type.
B. You must be logged in to an administrator
account to create a user account on a computer.
C. User accounts on Windows XP Home require a
password.
D. User accounts on Windows XP Professional use
the user name and password they use to log on to
a domain.
D. A workgroup is a peer-to-peer network. A
domain is a client/server network.
6. The Guest account in Windows XP Home gives
unlimited access to individuals without an account
on the computer. (True or False?)
2. What kind of network is Windows XP Home configured for?
7. Which of the following statements are NOT true?
(Select all that apply.)
A. A domain.
B. A workgroup.
C. A client/server network.
D. It isn’t configured for a network. You must purchase networking software to create a network
with Windows XP Home.
3. Which settings are personalized in a user account?
A. Permissions.
B. Start menu.
C. Desktop background.
D. All of the above.
4. When you create a user account on your domain
computer, the user must already be part of the
domain. (True or False?)
5. Which of the following statements is NOT true?
A. You can change the picture associated with an
account in Windows XP Professional.
B. Changing your account password regularly helps
keep your account secure.
C. You can change the picture associated with an
account in Windows XP Home.
D. Only an administrator can change an account
password.
8. Why should you log off your account when you’re
finished using the computer? (Select all that apply.)
A. Log off so the computer is ready for the next user.
B. Don’t log off, just shut down the computer.
C. Log off to prevent an unauthorized user from
accessing your account or network.
D. All of the above.
9. You can change how users log on or off their
accounts in Windows XP Home by turning off the
Welcome screen. (True or False?)
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ch11 Page 374 Thursday, January 27, 2005 11:17 AM
Chapter 11
Chapter Eleven Review
Homework
1. Create a new user account on your computer.
5. Log off the new account.
2. ‘Log off your administrator account.
6. Log in to your administrator account. Change the
account type of the new user account.
3. Log in to the new account and change the account
password.
7. (Windows XP Home) Turn off the Welcome screen.
4. Change the Desktop background and add a shortcut
to the desktop.
Quiz Answers
1. B and D. A workgroup is a peer-to-peer network of
computers that share resources, but does not have a
presence on the Internet. A domain is a client/server
network of computers that has an identification on
the Internet called an IP address.
2. B. Windows XP Home is configured for a workgroup
network.
3. D. User accounts have personalized settings for permissions, the Start menu, the Desktop background,
and more.
4. True.
5. C. User accounts on Windows XP Home do not
require a password.
374
6. False. The Guest account in Windows XP Home
allows a user without an account limited access to the
computer.
7. A and D. Accounts do not have pictures in Windows
XP Professional, and users can change their own
account passwords.
8. A and C. Log off your computer when you’re finished
so the computer is ready for the next user and to prevent an unauthorized user from accessing your
account or network.
9. True. Turning off the Welcome screen in Windows
XP Home helps increase security on your computer.
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