MODEL SR570

MODEL SR570
MODEL SR570
Low-Noise Current Preamplifier
1290-D Reamwood Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94089
Phone: (408) 744-9040 • Fax: (408) 744-9049
email: infor@thinkSRS.com • www.thinkSRS.com
Copyright © 1997 by SRS, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Revision 1.6
(03/2005)
SR570 Low-Noise Current Preamplifier
Table of Contents
Programming
Condensed Information
Safety and Use
Accessories Furnished
Environmental Conditions
Symbols
Specifications
Verifying Specifications
Abridged Command List
iii
iv
iv
v
vi
ix
x
Operation and Controls
Introduction
Overview
Quick Start Instructions
SR570 Block Diagram
1
1
1
2
Front Panel Operation
Power
Input
Defaults
Bias Voltage
Input Offset Current
Invert
Filters
Gain Mode
Sensitivity
Output
Filter Reset
Status
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
Rear Panel Operation
AC Power Input
Amplifier Power Output
Battery Charger
Blanking Input
Toggling Input
RS-232 Interface
7
7
7
7
8
Battery Care and Usage
Recharging
Battery Care
8
8
8
Remote Programming
Introduction
Command Syntax
10
10
10
Detailed Command List
Sensitivity Control
Input Offset Current Control
Bias Voltage Control
Filter Control
Other Commands
10
10
10
11
11
11
Programming Examples
BASIC
Microsoft C
12
12
13
SR570 Circuitry
Circuit Description
Front-End
Filters and Gain
Output Stages
Overload Detection
Microprocessor
Battery Charger and Preregs
Power Regulators
Rear Panel Interfaces
Batteries and P.E.M.
Front Panel
14
14
14
14
15
15
15
16
16
16
16
Calibration & Repair
Calibration
Front-end Replacement
Battery Replacement
Fuse Replacement
17
17
17
17
17
Appendices
8
8
A. Amplifier Noise Sources
Input Noise
Noise Sources
Johnson Noise
Shot Noise
i
A-1
A-1
A-1
A-1
SR570 Low-Noise Current Preamplifier
1/f Noise
Total Noise
External Noise Sources
Capacitive Coupling
Inductive Coupling
Ground Loops
Microphonics
Thermocouple Effects
Baluns
A-1
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-2
A-3
A-3
A-3
A-4
B. Gain Allocation
Front-end Amplifier
Op Amp Allocation
Dynamic Reserve
B-1
B-1
B-1
C. Capacitance Effects
Feedback Capacitance
Input Capacitance
C-1
C-1
Component Parts List
Main Circuit PC Board
Front & Rear Panel PC Boards
Miscellaneous Parts
Schematic Circuit Diagrams
D-1
D-1
D-11
D-15
Sheet No.
Input Stage
1/10
Filter and Gain 1
2/10
Filter and Gain 2
3/10
Output Stage
4/10
Microprocessor Section
5/10
Digital I/O & Front Panel Control 6/10
Battery Charger & Preregulators
7/10
Power Regs & Rear Panel Conn.
8/10
Front Panel
9/10
Rear Panel
10/10
ii
SR570 Low-Noise Current Preamplifier
Safety and Preparation for Use
WARNING: Dangerous voltages, capable of causing death, are present in this instrument. Use
extreme caution whenever the instrument covers are removed.
a protective ground. The exposed metal parts of
the instrument are connected to the outlet ground
to protect against electrical shock. Always use an
outlet which has a properly connected protective
ground.
************ CAUTION ************
This instrument may be damaged if operated
with the LINE VOLTAGE SELECTOR set for
the wrong ac line voltage or if the wrong fuse is
installed.
CONNECTION TO OTHER INSTRUMENTS
All front panel BNC shields are isolated from the
chassis ground and the power outlet ground via a
1MΩ resistor. Do not apply any voltage to either
the shields or to the outputs. The outputs are not
protected against connection to any potential other
than circuit ground.
LINE VOLTAGE SELECTION
When the AC power cord is connected to the unit
and plugged into an AC outlet, the unit
automatically switches the amplifier power source
from internal battery operation to line operation.
The internal batteries are charged as long as AC
power is connected.
VENTILATION
Always ensure adequate ventilation when
operating the SR570. The unit will generate heat
while charging batteries.
The SR570 operates from a 100V, 120V, 220V, or
240V nominal AC power source having a line
frequency of 50 or 60 Hz. Before connecting the
power cord to a power source, verify that the
LINE VOLTAGE SELECTOR card, located in the
rear panel fuse holder, is set so that the correct AC
input voltage value is visible.
POWER-UP
All instrument settings are stored in nonvolatile
memory (battery backed-up RAM) and are
retained when the power is turned off. They are
not affected by the removal of the line cord. If the
power-on self test passes, the unit will return the
settings that were in effect when the power was
last turned off. If an error is detected or if the
backup battery is exhausted, the default settings
will be used. Additionally, if the FILTER RESET
key is held down when the power is turned on, the
instrument settings will be set to the defaults
shown below:
Conversion to other AC input voltages requires a
change in the fuse holder voltage card position and
fuse value. Disconnect the power cord, open the
fuse holder cover door and rotate the fuse-pull
lever to remove the fuse. Remove the small
printed circuit board and select the operating
voltage by orienting the printed circuit board so
the desired voltage is visible. Push the card firmly
into its slot. Rotate the fuse-pull lever back to its
normal position and insert the correct fuse into the
fuse holder.
Sensitivity = 1 µA/V, calibrated
Invert = off
Input Offset = +1 pA, calibrated, off
Bias = 0 V, off
Filters = none
Hi Pass Freq = 0.03 Hz
Lo Pass Freq = 1 MHz
Gain Mode = Low Noise
LINE FUSE
Verify that the correct line fuse is installed before
connecting the line cord. For 100V/120V, use a
1 Amp fuse and for 220V/240V, use a 1/2 Amp
fuse.
LINE CORD
The SR570 has a detachable, three-wire power
cord for connection to an AC power source and to
iii
SR570 Low-Noise Current Preamplifier
connect the PMT output to the SR570 input before
turning the PMT on.
REPACKAGING FOR SHIPMENT
The original packing materials should be saved for
reshipment of the SR570. If the original packing
materials are not available, wrap the instrument in
polyethylene sheeting or equivalent and place in a
strong box, cushioning it on all sides by at least
three inches of high-density foam or other filler
material.
ACCESSORIES FURNISHED
- Power Cable
- Operating Manual
ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
USE IN BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS
OPERATING
Temperature: 10° C to 40° C
Relative Humidity: < 90% Non-condensing
Under certain conditions, the SR570 may prove to
be unsafe for applications involving human
subjects. Incorrect grounding, component failure,
and excessive common-mode input voltages are
examples of conditions in which the instrument
may expose the subject to large input currents.
Therefore, Stanford Research Systems does not
recommend or approve the SR570 for such
applications.
NON-OPERATING
Temperature: -25° C to +65° C Non-condensing
WARNING REGARDING BATTERY
MAINTENANCE.
Batteries used in this instrument are sealed lead
acid batteries. With usage and time these batteries
can leak. Always use and store this instrument in
the feet-down position. To prevent possible
damage to the circuitboard, it is recommended that
the batteries be periodically inspected for any
signs of leakage.
WARNING REGARDING USE WITH
PHOTOMULTIPLIERS
The front-end amplifier of this instrument is easily
damaged if a photomultiplier is used improperly
with the amplifier. When left completely
unterminated, a cable connected to a PMT can
charge to several hundred volts in a relatively
short time. If this cable is connected to the inputs
of the SR570, the stored charge may damage the
front-end op amps. To avoid this problem, always
iv
Specifications
v
Specifications
Input
Input
Input Impedance
Input Offset
Maximum Input
Noise
Sensitivity
Frequency Response
Grounding
Filters
Signal Filters
Filter Reset
Gain Allocation
Low Noise
High Bandwidth
Low Drift
Output
Gain Accuracy
DC Drift
Maximum Output
Slew Rate Limit
Rear Panel
Interface
RS-232
External Gating
General
Operating Temperatures
Power
Dimensions
Weight
Warranty
Virtual null or user set bias voltage (-5V to +5V).
See Table 1
±1 pA to ±5 mA full scale adjustable dc offset current.
±5 mA.
See graphs on next page.
1 pA/V to 1 mA/V in a 1-2-5 sequence. Vernier sensitivity in 1%
steps.
Flat to ±0.5 dB up to 1 MHz (1 mA/V sensitivity ). Frequency response
can be adjusted from the front panel to compensate for the effects of
source capacitance at the input.
Amplifier ground is fully floating. Amplifier and chassis grounds may be
connected together at rear panel banana plug connectors.
Two configurable (low or high pass) filters: 6 or 12 dB/octave. The -3 dB
point of each filter is settable in a 1-3-10 sequence from 0.03 Hz to 1 MHz
for lowpass filters and 0.03 Hz to 10 kHz for highpass filters.
Long time constant filters may be reset with a front panel button.
Most of the gain is allocated in the front end of the instrument to decrease
the magnitude of Johnson noise at the output.
Front-end gain is reduced to increase the amplifier’s frequency response.
A very low input bias current amplifier is used for more accurate
measurements on the higher sensitivity ranges.
±(0.5 % of output + 10 mV [50 mV High BW]) @ 25°C [100 pA/V - 1
mA/V sensitivities]
See Table 1
±5 V into a high impedance load (50W output impedance).
2 V peak to peak at 1 MHz.
±12 VDC @200 mA, referenced to amplifier ground.
Listen only, 9600 Baud DCE, 8 bit, no parity, 2 stop bits. All instrument
functions may be controlled. PC compatible serial connector. Optically
isolated.
TTL inputs to set gain to zero (blanking) or to invert gain polarity
(toggling).
0 to 50° C
100, 120, 220 or 240 VAC, 50/60 Hz from line. Internal batteries provide
up to 15 hours between charges. Batteries are charged while connected to
the line. Line power required is 30 watts while batteries are charging and 6
watts once fully charged.
8.3" x 3.5" x 13.0". Rack mounting hardware available.
15 lbs. (including batteries).
1 year.
vi
Specifications
High Bandwidth Mode
1
1
0
0
Gain / Nominal Gain (dB)
Gain / Nominal Gain (dB)
Low Noise Mode
-1
-2
-3
1 nA/V
-4
10 µA/V
100 nA/V
1 mA/V
-5
-6
1
100
10
4
10
6
-1
-2
-3
1 nA/V
-4
10 µA/V
100 nA/V
1 mA/V
-5
-6
8
10
1
4
10
100
Frequency (Hz)
10
6
8
10
Frequency (Hz)
Amplifier Bandwidth for several sensitivity settings (typical).
Low Noise Mode
10
High Bandwidth Mode
-9
10
-9
Current Noise (Amps/¦Hz)
Current Noise (Amps/¦Hz)
1 mA/V
1 mA/V
10
-11
10 µA/V
10
-13
100 nA/V
10
10
10 µA/V
-11
100 nA/V
-13
1 nA/V
1 nA/V
10
-15
1
10
100
1000
4
10
10
5
10
-15
1
Frequency (Hz)
10
100
1000
4
10
5
10
Frequency (Hz)
Current Noise as a function of Frequency for several sensitivity settings (typical).
Note: The amplifier bandwidth and noise data were taken with the front panel frequency compensation
adjusted for flat frequency response over the widest frequency range, with an input capacitance of
100 pF. Either the bandwidth or the noise specification can be improved at the expense of response
flatness.
vii
Specifications
Table 1
Sensitivity (A/V)
Bandwidth (3 dB) 1
Noise/√Hz2
High BW Low Noise Low Noise High BW
10-3
10-4
10-5
10-6
10-7
10-8
10-9
10-10
10-11
10-12
1.0 MHz
1.0 MHz
800 kHz
200 kHz
20 kHz
2 kHz
200 Hz
100 Hz
20 Hz
10 Hz
1.0 MHz
500 kHz
200 kHz
20 kHz
2 kHz
200 Hz
15 Hz
10 Hz
10 Hz
10 Hz
150 pA
60 pA
2 pA
600 fA
100 fA
60 fA
10 fA
5 fA
5 fA
5 fA
150 pA
100 pA
60 pA
2 pA
600 fA
100 fA
60 fA
10 fA
10 fA
5 fA
Temperature Coefficient
Low Drift (11 ° - 28 °C)
±(%input + offset) /°C
0.01 % + 20 nA
0.01 % + 2 nA
0.01 % + 200 pA
0.01 % + 20 pA
0.01 % + 2 pA
0.01 % + 400 fA
0.025 % + 40 fA
0.025 % + 20 fA
0.040 % + 20 fA
0.040 % + 20 fA
DC Input
Impedance
1Ω
1Ω
100 Ω
100 Ω
10 kΩ
10 kΩ
1 MΩ
1 MΩ
1 MΩ
1 MΩ
1
Frequency Compensation adjusted for flat frequency response (typical values).
2
Average noise in the freq. range below the 3 dB point but above the frequency where 1/f noise is significant.
Note: The values listed above are typical for a 100 pF source capacitance and an infinite source resistance.
Significantly higher values of source capacitance or finite source resistance can degrade these specifications.
Proper use of the “FREQ COMP” adjustment and signal filters allows the user to alter the rated noise or
bandwidth values. The LOW DRIFT mode has a much lower bandwidth than the LOW NOISE and HIGH
BW modes, and should only be used for low frequency measurements.
viii
Specifications
Keep in mind the following items when trying
to verify specifications or when making
sensitive measurements:
Verifying Specifications
To verify the specifications given for the
SR570 current amplifier, a few
straightforward procedures should be
followed. First, the unit must be warmed up
for about 60 minutes. Second, for best
performance, the input current should produce
an output voltage of about 1 V or less. This
eliminates problems with slew rate limiting in
the various amplifier stages. Finally, care must
be taken in selection of a current source for
any measurement. Since an ideal current
source has infinite impedance, any source
used for measurements should have an
impedance greater than the inverse of the
sensitivity in ohms. Most specifications listed
above were measured with an input
capacitance of 100 pF. Higher input
capacitance will lead to a decrease in
performance.
1. Make sure the source impedance is greater
than the inverse of the sensitivity (e.g.
with a sensitivity of 1 nA/V use a source
impedance greater than 1 GΩ).
2. If using a voltage source and a big resistor
to source the current, use several smaller
resistors in series instead of one larger
value to reduce the shunting capacitance.
3. Adjust the FREQ COMP pot on the front
panel to optimize frequency response for
the source character- istics and for the
sensitivity selected.
4. Use short lengths of high quality coaxial
cable to connect to the amplifier input.
Lets look at a simple example to illustrate
some of these principles. To test the gain and
frequency response of the instrument at 1
nA/V sensitivity, we might use a 1 V RMS
sine wave across a 1 GΩ resistor and through
1 meter of coax cable into the amplifier frontend. The cable itself has about 100 pF of input
capacitance to ground. Any other sources of
capacitance will only increase this value, and
degrade the noise performance of the
instrument. The 1 GΩ resistor, while a good
current source at DC, will be less accurate at
higher frequencies due to capacitance of the
resistor. A typical resistor will have about 0.1
pF capacitance, which will provide a parallel
impedance of 1 GΩ at about 1.6 kHz. Since
this effect provides an alternate path for
current, the actual current to the amplifier will
be increased and may be misinterpreted as a
peaking in the frequency response of the
amplifier near 1 kHz. These are only a few
examples of what can go wrong when making
a measurement. It is very important that the
current source be completely characterized
before performing specification verification.
5. Keep the amplifier output below 1 VRMS
to avoid slew rate limiting at high
frequencies.
6. Ground the chassis (green connector on
back) but do not connect the chassis to the
amplifier ground (white connector).
7. For low level measurements, disconnect
the power cord and use the internal
batteries.
ix
Abridged RS-232 Command List
Command Syntax
All RS232 commands consist of four letter codes, followed in most cases, by an integer value (n). Commands
must end with a carriage return and linefeed <CR><LF>.
The SR570 RS232 interface is configured as listen only, 9600 baud DCE, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits,
and is optically isolated to prevent any noise or grounding problems.
Sensitivity control commands
SENS n
SUCM n
SUCV n
Sets the sensitivity of the amplifier. n ranges from 0 (1 pA/V) to 27 (1 mA/V).
Sets the sensitivity cal mode. 0 = cal, 1 = uncal.
Sets the uncalibrated sensitivity vernier. [0 ≤ n ≤ 100] (percent of full scale).
Input Offset Current control commands
IOON n
IOLV n
IOSN n
IOUC n
IOUV n
Turns the input offset current on (n=1) or off (n=0).
Sets the calibrated input offset current level. n ranges from 0 (1 pA) to 29 (5 mA).
Sets the input offset current sign. 0 = neg, 1 = pos.
Sets the input offset cal mode. 0 = cal, 1 = uncal.
Sets the uncalibrated input offset vernier. [-1000 ≤ n ≤ +1000] (0 - ±100.0% of full scale).
Bias Voltage control commands
BSON n
BSLV n
Turns the bias voltage on (n=1) or off (n=0).
Sets the bias voltage level in the range. [-5000 ≤ n ≤ +5000] (-5.000 V to +5.000 V).
Filter control commands
FLTT n
LFRQ n
HFRQ n
ROLD
Sets the filter type. 0=6 HP, 1=12 HP, 2=6 BP, 3=6 LP, 4=12 LP, and 5=none.
Sets the value of the lowpass filter 3dB point. n ranges from 0 (0.03Hz) to 15 (1 MHz).
Sets the value of the highpass filter 3dB point. n ranges from 0 (0.03Hz) to 11 (10 kHz).
Resets the filter capacitors to clear an overload condition.
Other commands
GNMD n
INVT n
BLNK n
*RST
Sets the gain mode of the amplifier. 0=low noise, 1=high bw, 2=low drift.
Sets the signal invert sense. 0=non-inverted, 1=inverted.
Blanks the front end output of the amplifier. 0=no blank, 1=blank.
Resets the amplifier to the default settings.
x
Operation and Controls
regulated power supplies (or batteries) for use as a
voltage source.
INTRODUCTION
Why use a Current Amplifier?
Use this procedure as a quick orientation to the
instrument's features and capabilities. If you
encounter problems, read the detailed discussions
on operation.
Many people wonder why current amplifiers are
necessary. Why not simply terminate a current
source with a resistor and amplify the resulting
voltage with a voltage preamplifier? The answer
is twofold. First, to get a large voltage from a
small current, large resistors are necessary. In
combination with cable capacitance and other
stray capacitance, this can lead to unacceptable
penalties in frequency response and phase
accuracy. Current amplifiers have much better
amplitude and phase accuracy in the presence of
stray capacitance. Secondly, using resistive
terminations forces the current source to operate
into possibly large bias voltages–a situation that
is unacceptable for many sources and detectors.
Current amplifiers can sink current directly into
a virtual null, or to a selected DC bias voltage.
1) Make sure that the correct line voltage has been
selected on the rear panel power entry module.
2) With the unit's power switch "OFF", hold the
"FILTER RESET" key down and turn the unit
"ON". This will return all instrument settings to their
default state.
3) Select a filter from the "FILTER TYPE" menu.
Then use the up/down arrows of the "FILTER
FREQ" menu to choose the filter 3 dB points.
4) If an input offset current is desired, choose a
current level from the "INPUT OFFSET" menu with
the up/down arrow keys. The current will be applied
when the "ON" led is lit.
Overview
The SR570 is a low-noise current preamplifier,
providing a voltage output proportional to the
input current. Sensitivities range from 1 mA/V
down to 1 pA/V. The general architecture is
diagrammed in figure 1 on the following page.
5) When the bias voltage is off, the amplifier input
is a virtual null. To set a bias voltage, use the
up/down arrow keys of the "BIAS VOLTAGE"
menu. The test point will always reflect the selected
bias voltage, but the bias will only be applied when
the "ON" led is lit.
The DC voltage at the input can be set as a
virtual null or biased from -5V to +5V. An input
offset current from 1pA to 1 mA may also be
introduced. The user can choose between low
noise, high bandwidth, and low drift settings,
and can invert the output relative to the input.
Two configurable R-C filters are provided to
selectively condition signals in the frequency
range from DC to 1 MHz.
6) Set the sensitivity and gain mode to the desired
settings for the the amplitude of the signal to be
measured.
7) Adjust the "FREQ COMP" pot near the input
BNC to compensate the amplifier's frequency
response for any input capacitance. An external
square wave signal from the source under test can be
used for precise calibration.
The SR570 normally operates with a fully
floating ground with the amplifier ground
isolated from the chassis and the AC power
supply. Input blanking, output toggling and
listen-only RS-232 interface lines are provided
for remote instrument control. These lines are
optically isolated to reduce signal interference.
Digital noise is eliminated by shutting down the
processor clock when not executing a frontpanel button press or an RS-232 command.
8) Connect the signal to be measured to the
"INPUT" BNC. The signal will be converted to a
voltage, filtered and amplified. The amplifier output
voltage can be accessed from the "OUTPUT" BNC
connector.
Internal sealed lead-acid batteries provide up to
15 hours of line-independent operation. Rear
panel banana jacks provide access to the internal
1
Operation and Controls
Figure 1: SR570 Block Diagram
2
Operation and Controls
Figure 2: SR570 Front Panel
Charging status is indicated on the rear panel by the
CHARGE and MAINTAIN LED indicators.
FRONT PANEL OPERATING SUMMARY
The operation of the SR570 Low-Noise
Preamplifier has been designed to be as simple
and intuitive as possible. The effect of each
keypress on the front panel is reflected in the
change of a nearby LED. All front panel
functions, except power, can be controlled
through the rear-panel RS-232 interface.
Input
An insulated BNC is provided to connect the signal
of interest to the amplifier. Care should be taken in
choosing a cable to connect to the amplifier input.
Both cable capacitance and dielectric quality will
affect sensitive measurements. Whenever possible,
use low noise coaxial cable and always use the
shortest possible cable length. Above the input BNC
is the FREQ COMP adjustment potentiometer. This
feature allows the user to compensate for any input
capacitance by varying the capacitance across the
front-end amplifier feedback resistor. In this way,
the amplifier bandwidth can be easily adjusted to
compensate for source capacitance by measuring a
square wave signal from the source of interest and
using FREQ COMP to optimize the output
waveform. See Appendix C for further discussion of
the effects of source capacitance.
Power
The SR570 is turned on by depressing the
POWER switch. When disconnected from AC
power, the unit will operate for approximately
15 hours on internal sealed lead-acid batteries.
Up to 200 mA of unregulated battery power is
available at the rear panel banana jacks as long
as the power switch is in the ON position.
Battery life will be reduced when the unit is
providing external power through the rear panel
jacks. When operating on batteries, the front
panel LINE indicator will not be lit. As the
batteries near depletion, the LOW BATT LED
will light, indicating that the unit should be
connected to AC power to charge the batteries.
When connected to an AC power source,
amplifier power is derived from regulated line
power, and the internal batteries are
automatically charged. When operating on AC
power, the front panel LINE indicator is on to
indicate the source of amplifier power.
Defaults
Any changes made to the front panel settings of the
SR570 will be stored even when power is turned off,
as long as the batteries are hooked up. To reset the
SR570 to its default settings, simply turn the power
off, and while depressing the FILTER RESET
button, turn the power on. Alternatively, removing
3
Operation and Controls
the batteries from an SR570 with no AC power
connected will reset the unit to the default state.
The default settings are:
restore the unit to the previously calibrated current
setting, and turn off the UNCAL LED. The sign of
the current is set with the button directly below the
POS and NEG LEDs. A positive offset current is
defined to be a current that will produce a positive
output voltage with no signal connected to the input
BNC and INVERT not selected. The button below
the input offset ON LED turns the offset on and off.
The current level can be adjusted whether the offset
current is turned on or not.
Sensitivity = 1 µA/V, calibrated
Invert = off
Input Offset = +1 pA, calibrated, off
Bias = 0 V, off
Filters = none
Hi Freq = 0.03 Hz
Lo Freq = 1 MHz
Gain Mode = Low Noise
Invert
The INVERT pushbutton allows the user to invert
the output of the instrument with respect to the
input. A positive current will give a negative voltage
and visa versa. The INVERT LED displays the
output sense relative to the input unless the
TOGGLE feature is being used.
Bias Voltage
In the default configuration, the SR570 is a
virtual null at the input BNC. The bias voltage
provides a variable -5V to +5V voltage (12 bit,
1.22 mV resolution) at the input. This voltage
can be used to bias a photodiode or similar
device. The voltage level is set by the up/down
arrows in the bias voltage section of the front
panel. The up arrow increases the voltage
towards +5V, and the down arrow decreases the
voltage towards -5V. To enable the bias voltage,
simply push the button directly below the bias
ON LED. The selected voltage can be monitored
at the TEST point with a DC voltmeter whether
the bias voltage is turned on or not.
Filters
The SR570 contains two identical 1st-order R-C
filters whose cutoff frequencies and configuration
(high-pass or low-pass) are controlled from the front
panel. The maximum bandwidth of the instrument is
1 MHz.
The FILTER CUTOFFS can be configured in the
following six ways:
Input Offset Current
i. high-pass filter at +6 dB / octave
ii. high-pass filter at +12 dB / octave iii.
high-pass filter at +6 dB / octave, and
low-pass filter at -6 dB / octave (bandpass)
iv. low-pass filter at -6 dB / octave
v. low-pass filter at -12 dB / octave
vi. no filters in the signal path
The SR570 can provide a DC current offset to
suppress any background currents at the input.
The offset range can be changed from 1 pA to 5
mA (both positive and negative) in discrete
increments. Use the up/down arrow keys in the
Input Offset section to change the current level.
In addition to these fixed settings, the user may
specify arbitrary currents through the UNCAL
feature. To set an uncalibrated offset current, the
user must press both up and down buttons
simultaneously, lighting the UNCAL LED. In
this mode, by pressing the up or down
pushbuttons, the user may reduce the calibrated
current in roughly 0.1% increments from 100%
down to 0% of the selected offset value. In
contrast to other front-panel functions, when in
UNCAL the instrument's key-repeat rate will
start slowly and increase to a limit as long as
either button is depressed. Simultaneously
pressing both Offset buttons once again will
Filter settings are chosen by the FILTER TYPE
pushbutton. Each time the FILTER TYPE
pushbutton is pressed, the instrument configures the
two R-C filters in the progression shown above.
LEDs give a visual indication of the filter
configuration.
The filter cutoff frequencies are controlled by the
up/down arrows in the FILTER FREQ section.
When the FILTER TYPE section is configured
solely as high-pass or low-pass (i, ii, iv and v ), the
cutoff frequency is illuminated by one of sixteen
4
Operation and Controls
LEDs in the range from 0.03 Hz to 1 MHz. High
pass filters are not available for the four highest
frequency settings. When the filter section is
configured as band-pass (iii), the cutoff
frequencies are illuminated by two LEDs. The
lower frequency setting marks the cutoff for the
high-pass filter, and the higher setting is the
cutoff for the low-pass filter.
Sensitivity
The instrument's sensitivity is increased or decreased
using the SENSITIVITY section pushbuttons.
Sensitivity settings from 1 pA/V to 1 mA/V are
available and are displayed as the product of a factor
1, 2 or 5 and a multiplier (x1, x10, x100) with the
appropriate units. In addition to these fixed settings,
the user may specify arbitrary sensitivities through
the UNCAL feature.
To change the values of the bandpass cutoff
frequencies, use the up arrow button to change
the lowpass cutoff and the down arrow to
change the highpass cutoff. If the displayed
frequency is already at the highest or lowest
possible choice, then pushing the button again
will cause the frequency to “wrap around” to the
opposite extreme frequency. In this case the two
cutoffs can be set to the same frequency to
provide a narrow bandpass. The highpass
frequency can never exceed the lowpass
frequency. When both filters are removed from
the signal path (vi) all FREQ LEDs are
extinguished and the NONE LED is lit.
To set an uncalibrated or arbitrary sensitivity, the
user must press both up and down buttons
simultaneously, lighting the UNCAL LED. In this
mode, by pressing the up or down pushbuttons, the
user may reduce the calibrated sensitivity in roughly
1% increments from 100% down to 0% of the
selected sensitivity. In contrast to other front-panel
functions, when in UNCAL, the instrument's keyrepeat rate will start slowly and increase to a limit as
long as either sensitivity button is depressed.
Simultaneously pressing both sensitivity buttons
again will restore the unit to the previously
calibrated sensitivity setting, and turn off the
UNCAL LED.
Gain Mode
The allocation of gain throughout the instrument
is set using the GAIN MODE pushbutton. The
gain mode feature controls the tradeoffs between
dynamic reserve, bandwidth, and noise in the
amplifier circuits. The Gain Mode is displayed
by three indicator LEDs: LOW NOISE, HIGH
BW, and LOW DRIFT. For a given gain setting,
the LOW NOISE mode allocates gain toward
the front-end in order to quickly "lift" low-level
signals above the instrument's noise floor. The
LOW DRIFT mode allocates the gain just as the
LOW NOISE mode, except the front-end op
amp is switched to one with a very low input
bias current for high sensitivity settings. The
HIGH BW setting allocates more gain toward
the output stages after the filters. Since smaller
values of feedback resistance are needed for the
front-end gain, the bandwidth of the amplifier is
increased over that of the other two settings.
This also prevents signals which are attenuated
by the filters from overloading the amplifier. See
Appendix B for further details of op amp
selection for the different gain modes.
Output
The output of the instrument is an insulated BNC
with a 50 ohm output impedance. In most
applications, the instrument will be used to drive
high impedance loads (e.g. voltmeters or
oscilloscopes). Therefore, the instrument's gain is
calibrated for high impedance loads. When driving
a 50 ohm load, the gain of the amplifier is reduced
by a factor of two. The shields of the two front-panel
BNCs are connected together and form the
amplifier's floating ground. In addition, a balun is
used at the output to reduce common mode noise.
See the end of Appendix A for more details about
the output balun.
Filter Reset
If an overload occurs with filter settings of long time
constants, the FILTER RESET pushbutton will
speed the SR570's recovery from overload. The
filters will be discharged by momentarily grounding
the filter capacitors.
The FILTER RESET button is also used to return
the unit to its default settings. Simply hold down the
5
Operation and Controls
FILTER RESET button while turning on the
power and the default settings will be restored.
The ACTIVE LED indicates communication activity
via the SR570's optoisolated RS-232 port. The
ERROR LED indicates that the SR570 has received
an unknown or improperly worded command. The
error LED will remain lit until a valid command is
issued. Please refer to the Remote Programming
section for further details on controlling the
instrument via RS-232.
Status
The INPUT and OUTPUT overload LEDs
indicate a signal overload. This condition can
occur when a signal is too large or the dynamic
reserve is too low. Reducing the sensitivity,
reducing the input signal and/or switching to the
HIGH BW setting should remedy this condition.
An INPUT overload indicates a voltage greater
than 7V is present before the filter section, while
an OUTPUT overload indicates an overload
after the filters.
The BLANK LED indicates that the optoisolated
BLANK input (on the rear panel of the SR570) is
active. The SR570 responds to a blanking input by
internally grounding the amplifier signal path after
the front end and before the first filter stage. The
TOGGLE LED indicates that the optoisolated
TOGGLE input (on the rear panel of the SR570) is
active. The SR570 responds to a toggle input by
toggling the polarity of the INVERT function.
6
Operation and Controls
Figure 3: SR570 Rear Panel
connected to the AC line ground conductor.
REAR PANEL OPERATING SUMMARY
The SR570 rear panel is pictured in Figure 3.
Various interface and power connectors are
provided, along with fuses and charger status
LEDs.
Battery Charger
Two 3 A “slo-blo” fuses protect the battery supply
and charging circuitry. If these fuses are blown,
battery power will be unavailable, and charging of
the batteries will not be possible.
AC Power Input
When both the positive and negative supply batteries
are dead, the red CHARGE LED will be on brightly,
and the batteries will be charging at a fast rate.
When the batteries approach a fully charged
condition, the charging current will be reduced to a
trickle charge to maintain the batteries. Because the
batteries charge at different rates, the indicators on
the rear panel can reflect the charge status of the
positive and negative batteries independently. When
one set of batteries switches to the "MAINTAIN"
mode, the red CHARGE LED will be reduced to half
brightness, and the yellow MAINTAIN LED will
turn on at half brightness. When both batteries
switch to "MAINTAIN", the red CHARGE LED
will turn off and the yellow MAINTAIN LED will
be on full brightness.
The power entry module contains the receptacle
for the AC line cord and fuse. The line fuse
should be a 1 A “slo-blo” for 100/120 VAC
operation, or a 1/2 A “slo-blo” for 220/240 VAC
operation.
Amplifier Power Output
The -12 V, +12 V, and AMP GROUND banana
jacks provide external DC power up to 200 mA
for use as a bias source referenced to the
amplifier's floating power supplies.
The CHASSIS GROUND banana jack is
provided to allow the amplifier's ground to be
referenced to the chassis. If the unit is
connected to an AC power source via a three
prong grounding plug, the chassis ground is
7
Operation and Controls
Blanking Input
Recharging
The BLANK input accepts a TTL-level signal
and grounds the amplifier signal path after the
front end for as long as the input is held high.
The response time of the blanking input is
typically 5 µs after the rising edge (turn-on) and
10 µs after the falling edge (turn-off).
During battery operation, the front panel LOW
BATT LED will light when the batteries are low and
require charging. For the longest battery life, the
batteries should be immediately charged by plugging
the unit into AC power whenever the LOW BATT
indicator is lit. Internal protection circuitry will
disconnect the batteries from the amplifier if the unit
is operated for too long in the low battery condition.
This protects the batteries from permanent damage
which could occur if they were to remain connected
to a load while dead.
Toggling Input
The TOGGLE input accepts a TTL-level signal
and toggles the invert function as long as the
input is held high. The response time of the
toggling input is typically 5 µs after the rising
edge (turn-on) and 10 µs after the falling edge
(turn-off).
The internal battery charging circuitry of the SR570
will automatically charge dead batteries at a quick
rate until they are approximately 80% charged. The
charge rate is then lowered to a level that is safe for
maintaining the batteries. During AC operation, the
batteries will be in this "maintain" charge condition
indefinitely, and will suffer no degradation from
prolonged charging. The sealed lead-acid batteries
used in the SR570 differ in this respect from nickelcadmium batteries, which behave in exactly the
opposite manner. The sealed lead-acid batteries will
provide the longest service life if they are not
allowed to discharge too deeply and if they are
charged immediately after use.
The Toggle input can be used for synchronous
detection of an AC signal. If the signal is
toggled at the frequency of interest, in phase
with the signal being measured, with a TTL
square wave, then a DC component will be
produced that is proportional to the signal
amplitude. This is the basic principle of
operation of lock-in amplifiers. The modulated
signal is then passed through a low pass filter
and the DC signal is measured at the output.
Battery Care
RS-232 Interface
WARNING: For safety reasons, as with all
rechargeable batteries, the chemical recombination
processes within the cells require that the batteries
be allowed to vent non-corrosive gases to the
atmosphere. Always use the batteries in an area with
adequate ventilation.
The RS-232 interface connector allows listenonly communication with the SR570 at 9600
baud, DCE. Communication parameters should
be set to 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits. Data
sent must be delimited by <CR> <LF>. All
front panel functions, excluding power and
toggling, are available over the RS-232
interface. For more information on
programming and commands, see Appendix A:
Remote Programming.
With all instruments powered by rechargeable
batteries, the user must take some precautions to
ensure long battery life. Understanding and
following the precautions outlined below will result
in a long operating life for the batteries in the
SR570.
BATTERY CARE AND USAGE
The SR570's internal lead-acid batteries will have a
variable service life directly affected by the number
of discharge cycles, depth of discharge and ambient
temperature. The user should follow these simple
guidelines below to ensure longest battery life.
The SR570 can be powered from either an AC
power source or from three 12 V, 1.9 Amp-hour
maintenance-free sealed lead-acid rechargeable
batteries. Integral to the SR570 is an automatic
battery charger, along with battery protection
and charge indication circuitry.
8
Operation and Controls
• AVOID TEMPERATURE EXTREMES
• AVOID DEEP DISCHARGE
When using battery power, operate the SR570 at or
near room temperature. Operating at lower
temperatures will reduce the capacity of the
batteries. At low temperatures more time is required
to recharge the batteries to their rated capacity.
Higher temperatures accelerate the rate of reactions
within the cell, reducing cell life.
Recharge the batteries after each use. The twostep fast-charge / trickle-charge operation of the
SR570 allows the charger to be left on
indefinitely. ALWAYS recharge the batteries
immediately after the LOW BATT indicator
LED on the SR570 comes on. Built-in
protection circuitry in the unit removes the
batteries from the load once a dead-battery
condition is detected. Avoiding deep discharge
will provide the longest battery life – upwards of
1,000 charge / discharge cycles.
• KEEP THE BATTERIES COOL
When not in use, the SR570 should be stored in a
cool, dry place with the batteries fully charged. This
reduces the self-discharge of the batteries and
ensures that the unit will be ready for use when
needed.
• DON'T LET THE BATTERIES SIT IDLE
If the batteries are left for an extended period of
time without charging, they may become
irreparably damaged. An SR570 in storage
should be "topped off" every three months with
an overnight charge to maintain its batteries in
peak condition.
• INSPECT THE BATTERIES
Batteries used in this instrument are sealed lead acid
batteries. With usage and time these batteries can
leak. Always use and store this instrument in the
feet-down position. To prevent possible damage to
the circuitboard, it is recommended that the batteries
be periodically inspected for any signs of leakage.
9
PROGRAMMING
DETAILED COMMAND LIST
REMOTE PROGRAMMING
Sensitivity control commands
Introduction
SENS n
The SR570 is equipped with a standard DB-25
RS-232 connector on the rear panel for remote
control of all instrument functions. The
interface is configured as listen-only, 9600 baud
DCE, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits, and is
optically isolated to prevent any noise or
grounding problems.
The ERROR LED on the front panel will light if
the SR570 receives an unknown or improperly
worded command. The LED will remain lit until
a proper command is received.
Data are sent to the instrument on pins 2 and 3,
which are shorted together. The data flow
control pins (5,6,8,20) are shorted to each other.
The ground pins (1 & 7) are connected to each
other but optically isolated from the amplifier
circuit ground and the chassis ground.
Sets the sensitivity of the amplifier
according to the following table:
n
scale
0, 1, 2
3 ,4, 5
6 ,7, 8
9, 10, 11
12, 13, 14
15, 16, 17
18, 19, 20
21, 22, 23
24, 25, 26
1, 2, 5 pA/V
10, 20, 50 pA/V
100, 200, 500 pA/V
1, 2, 5 nA/V
10, 20, 50 nA/V
100, 200, 500 nA/V
1, 2, 5 µA/V
10, 20, 50 µA/V
100, 200, 500 µA/V 27 1 mA/V
SUCM n
Sets the sensitivity cal mode. 0 = cal, 1
= uncal.
SUCV n
Sets the uncalibrated sensitivity vernier.
[0 ≤ n ≤ 100] (percent of full scale).
Command Syntax
The following is a list of commands used to
program the SR570. All RS-232 commands
consist of four letter codes followed, in most
cases, by an integer value (n). Commands must
end with a carriage return and line feed <CR>
<LF>.
Input Offset Current control commands
10
IOON n
Turn the input offset current on (n=1) or
off (n=0).
IOLV n
Sets the calibrated input offset current
level according to the following table:
n
scale
0, 1, 2
3, 4, 5
6, 7, 8
9, 10, 11
12, 13, 14
15, 16, 17
18, 19, 20
21, 22, 23
24, 25, 26
27, 28, 29
1, 2, 5 pA
10, 20, 50 pA
100, 200, 500 pA
1, 2, 5 nA
10, 20, 50 nA
100, 200, 500 nA
1, 2, 5 µA
10, 20, 50 µA
100, 200, 500 µA
1, 2, 5 mA
HFRQ n
IOSN nSets the input offset current sign. 0 =
neg, 1 = pos.
IOUC n
Sets the input offset cal mode. 0 =
cal, 1 = uncal.
IOUV n
Sets the uncalibrated input offset
vernier. [-1000 ≤ n ≤ +1000]
(0 - ±100.0% of full scale).
Bias Voltage control commands
BSON n
Turn the bias voltage on (n=1) or off
(n=0).
BSLV n
Sets the bias voltage level in the
range. [-5000 ≤ n ≤ +5000] (-5.000
V to +5.000 V).
Sets the value of the highpass filter 3dB
point. n ranges from 0 (0.03Hz) to 11
(10 kHz). See table below.
n
filter frequency
0
1, 2
3, 4
5, 6
7, 8
9, 10
11, 12
13, 14
15
0.03 Hz
0.1, 0.3 Hz
1, 3 Hz
10, 30 Hz
100, 300 Hz
1, 3 kHz
10, 30 kHz
100, 300 kHz
1 Mz
ROLD
Resets the filter capacitors to clear an
overload condition.
Filter control commands
Other commands
FLTT n
GNMD n Sets the gain mode of the amplifier.
Sets the filter type according to the
following table:
n
filter type
0
1
2
3
4
5
6 dB highpass
12 dB highpass
6 dB bandpass
6 dB lowpass
12 dB lowpass
none
LFRQ n
Sets the value of the lowpass filter
3dB point. n ranges from 0 (0.03Hz)
to 15 (1 MHz). See table below
HFRQ.
n
gain mode
0
1
2
Low Noise
High Bandwidth
Low Drift
INVT n
Sets the signal invert sense. 0=noninverted, 1=inverted.
BLNK n
Blanks the front-end output of the
amplifier. 0=no blank, 1=blank.
*RST Resets the amplifier to the default settings.
11
Programming Examples
PROGRAMMING EXAMPLES
Program Example 1
IBM PC, BASIC, via RS232
In this example, the IBM PC's COM2 serial port is used to communicate with the SR570. The program sets
up the SR570 for a typical measurement.
10 ' Example program to set up for a measurement. This
20 ' program uses IBM Basic and communicates via the COM2:RS-232 port.
30 '
40 '
50 ' setup COM2 for 9600 baud, no parity, 8 data bits, 2 stop bits, ignore cts, dsr, and cd
60
70 OPEN "COM2:9600,N,8,2,CS,DS,CD" AS #1
80 '
90 PRINT #1," "
' clear COM2:
100 '
110 PRINT #1,"*RST"
' reset SR570 to the default settings
120 PRINT #1,"SENS22;SUCM0"
' set the sensitivity to 20 µA/V (calibrated)
130 PRINT #1,"IOON0;GNMD0"
' turn the input offset current off and set LOW NOISE mode
140 PRINT #1,"BSON1;BSLV-2500"
' turn the bias voltage on and set to -2.500 V
150 PRINT #1,"FLTT2;HFRQ11;LFRQ14"
' put in a bandpass filter between 10 kHz and 300 kHz
160 END
12
Programming Examples
Program Example 2
IBM PC, Microsoft C, via RS232
In this example, the IBM PC's COM2 serial port is used to communicate with the SR570. The program asks
the user to enter an SR570 command to send to the instrument. Before running the program, use the DOS
'MODE' command to set up the serial port parameters, e.g. MODE COM2: 9600,n,8,2
/* Program written in Microsoft C to send commands to the SR570 current amplifier */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define BUFFER 0x2fd
#define OUT 0x2f8
#define MASK 0x20
/* COM2 output status : use 0x3fd for COM1 */
/* COM2 output port : use 0x3f8 for COM1 */
/* mask to pick out "buffer empty" bit */
void main(void)
{
int i,j;
char string[20];
while(1)
{
printf("input command string: ");
gets(string);
printf("\n");
j=strlen(string);
string[j]=13;
string[j+1]=10;
/* Loop forever (use 'control C' to exit) */
/* Get command from user */
/* Append <CR><LF> to the command */
for ( i=0 ; i <= (j+1) ; i++ )
/* Send the command via RS-232 port */
{ /*
one character at a time */
while (( inp(BUFFER) & MASK ) == 0 ); /* Wait until transmit buffer is empty
*/
outp( OUT , string[i] );
/* Output the next character to COM2 */
}
}
}
13
CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
CONFIGURABLE FILTERS AND
GAIN
LOW-NOISE Current to Voltage FRONT
END
The two filter stages in the SR570 each consist of 16
R-C filters which can be configured as either high
pass or low pass by a relay. In the following
description, part references in parentheses refer to
filter two. Relay K201, (K301) selects either the
high-pass or low-pass configuration for all of the
sixteen filters. The output of one R-C section is
selected by multiplexer U202 or U203, (U301 or
U302) and passed on to non-inverting buffer U204,
(U303).
The current signal to be amplified is connected
to BNC J104. Relays K103, K104, & K105
choose the sensitivity range. Resistors R132R135 serve to protect the inputs to the amplifier
and to limit the maximum noise gain due to
input capacitance. The value of resistance is
chosen to produce less than a 0.1% error in the
voltage output. Resistors R124-R127 are the
feedback resistors that control the gain of the
main amplifier circuit. Switch U109 and
resistors R121-R123 can multiply the effective
feedback resistance by 1 or 10, to double the
number of sensitivity ranges. Capacitors C117C120 can be used to limit the bandwidth of the
amplifier circuit. The FREQ COMP pot on the
front panel controls the fraction of voltage that is
fed back through the capacitors to the amplifier
inputs, providing a variable feedback
capacitance. Relays K106 & K107 choose
between the two main amplifier op amps U107
& U108.
Approximately 80 pF input capacitance of the
multiplexers is included in the calculation of the R-C
time constants of the filters. The four highest
frequency stages are not available as high-pass
filters because of unacceptable attenuation of the
signal that occurs when the filter capacitance forms a
divider with the input capacitance of the
multiplexers.
DG444 U205D, (U206C) is used to bypass the filter
sections entirely and U206A, (U206B) is used to
"reset" the filter stages by discharging them through
R228, (R329).
Voltage regulator U101 provides a +5V source
for both the bias voltage and input offset current.
U111B is used as an inverter to create a -5V
source. U102 switches the noninverting input of
U107 & U108 between ground and a selected
bias voltage, and controls the sign of the bias
and offset. The 12-bit DAC U103 allows
processor control of both bias and offset levels.
U110, U111A, and R136-R143 generate the
input offset current by providing a constant
voltage, with respect to the bias voltage, across
the offset resistors R128-R131. U110, which can
switch between x1 and x10 modes, and relays
K101 & K102, choose the input offset range.
U106A and R104, R105, R108, R109 are part
of a differential amplifier circuit that gives an
output voltage that is referenced to ground,
regardless of the value of bias voltage.
Potentiometer P103 can be used to calibrate any
offset in the differential amplifier, while P104
balances any offset created by the INVERT
function. U105 controls the blank, toggle, &
invert features by flipping the polarity of the
signal into U106A for inverting (& toggling)
and providing open circuits for blanking.
U201, (U305) is the second, (third) gain stage with a
fixed gain of 5. The input attenuator U205, (U304)
allows setting the gain of these stages to 1, 2, or 5
under processor control.
OUTPUT STAGES
The next gain stage consists of op-amp U402 which
is configured as a non-inverting amplifier with a
gain of 5. U401 is a DG444 that again serves to
switch the input attenuation of this stage for overall
gains of 1, 2, or 5. Additionally, output offset
adjustment is provided by this stage. U405B, half of
an AD7528 dual 8-bit DAC is used to provide a ±5
volt offset voltage at the inverting input of U402.
Following amplifier U402 is the other half of the 8bit DAC U405A, which along with op-amp U404
forms a digital gain vernier. This vernier is used in
calibration to compensate for gain variances that
occur with configuration changes such as input
coupling and filter settings. This DAC also provides
the front panel "uncal" gain vernier function.
14
The final gain stage consists of U403 and output
buffer U406, configured for a gain of 5 and with
input attenuator U409 to select overall gains of
1, 2, or 5. The LM6321 (U406) provides the
output drive capability for the 50 ohm output.
BATTERY CHARGER
AND PRE-REGULATORS
The 17 volt AC line transformer provides
unregulated power for both amplifier operation and
battery charging. Diode bridge D706 and filter
capacitors C706 and C707 generate unregulated DC
voltages that are pre-regulated to ±12 VDC by U706
and U707 to take the place of the batteries when the
instrument is operating on AC line power. Relay
U705 switches the amplifier from battery to preregulated AC whenever the AC line cord is plugged
in.
OVERLOAD DETECTION
The overload detectors constantly monitor the I
to V amplifier output, front end output, filter 1
output, U402 (after the second filter) output, and
final stage output for excessive signal levels.
Comparators U408 and U410 compare both
positive and negative signal excursions against a
5 volt reference and light the front panel output
or input overload indicators if any levels are
excessive.
D712, D713 and C709, C710 provide unregulated
DC to charge the batteries. U701 and U702 operate
as "AC" regulators, limiting peak battery charging
voltage. As there are two positive batteries and one
negative battery, U701 is a LM350 regulator that
provides twice the current of the LM337 negative
battery regulator.
MICROPROCESSOR
The system processor U503 is a CMOS Z80
processor running at 4 MHz. The system clock
consists of Schmitt trigger U506A and an R-C
network. The oscillator is designed so that latch
U508A can shut down the clock oscillator
completely, thereby disabling all digital circuits
in the amplifier so that no digital noise will be
present. The processor and clock only run when
a front panel key is pressed and instrument
settings are to be changed, or while there is
activity on the RS-232 port.
Charging is controlled by changing the set voltage of
the regulators based on battery charge status. Flipflop U703 determines whether the charge regulators
will be set to 15.5 volts for a quick charge or 13.8
volts for a trickle or "maintain" charge by grounding
the bottom of P701 and P702. C712 and R704
insure that the charger always powers up in the
"quick" charge mode. P701 and P702 are provided
to adjust the open circuit trickle charge voltage to
13.8 volts. D701 and D703 are blocking diodes for
the charging circuits while not charging, and D707
and D708 are clamps to guard against battery
polarity reversal.
The SR570 uses a 8 K x 8 CMOS
EPROM,(U504) containing system firmware
and calibration bytes, along with a 2 K x 8
CMOS RAM, (U505) which is battery backedup at all times to retain instrument settings.
U708 and U709 are LP365 micropower comparators
that monitor the battery voltage. A resistive divider
chain sets the four trip points for each comparator.
D709 provides a stable 2.5 volt reference against
which levels are compared. For each battery, three
level indications are provided, and are decoded by
multiplexer U704. The "trip" level is 14.5 volts.
The trip outputs control the state of U703 and switch
the battery charge voltage settings. The "low" level
is 11.3 volts and activates the front panel LOW
BATT indicator. R730 provides some level
hysteresis for the low battery indication to prevent
oscillation around the trip point. The "dead" level is
10.7 volts and is used to disconnect the load from
the batteries before they are damaged by an
excessively deep discharge. Q701 and Q703 are
power MOSFET switches used to disconnect battery
U507 generates port strobes for system IO, and
U510 provides a buffered data bus. The
buffered data bus is active only during IO
instructions to keep digital noise in the amplifier
to a minimum while the processor is running.
U601 through U607 are control latches
providing the 56 DC control lines that configure
all of the instrument's hardware. U608 is an
input buffer that takes data from the front panel
and RS-232, and provides a processor input
indicating line operation.
15
power from the amplifier. Dead level hysteresis
is provided by R724. R731 and D711 provide
un-interrupted battery power to the system RAM
so that stored instrument settings are retained
when the power is switched off.
echoing data back to the sender. Hardware
handshaking lines CTS, DSR, and CD are tied to
DTR. See the Remote Programming section for
more info.
BATTERIES AND P.E.M.
POWER REGULATORS
The batteries used in the SR570 are of sealed leadacid construction. There are three 12 volt, 1.9 amphour batteries, two of which serve as the positive
power supply, and one of which serves as the
negative power supply. Powering the SR570 alone,
battery life should be 10-15 hours. The batteries
should last for more than 1000 charge / discharge
cycles, provided the guidelines under the usage
section are followed. Two 3A “slo-blo” fuses on the
rear panel protect the battery supplies and amplifier
against excessive currents.
The +5 V and +10 V supplies are produced with
three-terminal regulators U801 and U802,
respectively. The -10 V supply is constructed of
op-amp U803 and Q801, a N-channel MOSFET,
as the pass element. The +10 V supply serves as
the reference for the -10 V supply through
divider R809 and R810.
The power output banana jacks on the rear
panel(J801 and J803) are connected to the preregulated voltages after the power switch and
before the regulators. This output can provide
up to 200 mA of power for use as an external
bias source, etc. Under some conditions, these
jacks may be used to supply the unit with
external DC power.
The power entry module (P.E.M.) contains the AC
line fuse, RFI filter, and voltage selection card. To
change the operating voltage of the unit, the voltage
selector printed circuit card must be pulled out and
reinserted into the P.E.M. with the desired operating
voltage visible.
U506C and U506D generate the TTL level input
to the processor to indicate when the unit is
operating on the AC line.
FRONT PANEL
Capacitors C801 through C811 are logic supply
bypass capacitors distributed throughout the
printed circuit board.
The front panel contains the pushbuttons, LED
indicators and serial shift registers. The front panel
pushbuttons are decoded in a 3 x 5 matrix fashion.
The front panel LEDs are controlled by shift
registers U1 through U7, which allow the 7 eight-bit
control bytes to be serially shifted-in one bit at a
time. The red overload LEDs are controlled directly
from the output of the overload comparator. The
LINE, LOW BATT, BLANK, and TOGGLE LEDs
are also controlled directly from their respective
main board circuits.
REAR PANEL INTERFACES
Three optically isolated rear panel interfaces are
provided on the SR570. The blanking input
accepts a TTL-level signal and opens the
amplifier signal path before the front end
differential amplifier for as long as the input is
held high. The toggling input also accepts a
TTL level signal and toggles the invert status of
the I to V amplifier output signal before the
front end differential amplifier for as long as the
input is held high. The response time of both
the blanking and toggling inputs is typically 5 µs
after the rising edge (turn-on) and 10 µs after the
falling edge (turn-off).
The FREQ COMP pot P1 is mounted on the front
panel printed circuit board and is used to control the
main amplifier feedback capacitance.
The RS-232 interface allows calibration and
control of the instrument at 9600 baud. Data in
and out on the connector are tied together,
16
CALIBRATION AND REPAIR
and 1 µA/V sensitivity selected), adjusting P101 to
give 0 volts at U107, pin 6.
CALIBRATION
Six pots exist which may be used to calibrate
various voltages on the SR570. Two are used to
adjust the battery voltages, while the rest are
used to null out offsets in the front-end amplifier
stage. The bottom panel of the SR570 must be
removed to access the pots.
FRONT END REPLACEMENT
The most commonly damaged components are the
front-end input op amps U107 (Analog Devices
AD546) and U108 (Analog Devices AD743). Both
are located under the metal shield near the front of
the PCB. If the unit is constantly overloaded, or
doesn’t amplify any signals, chances are one of these
op amps has been damaged. Switching between gain
modes while referring to the op amp allocation table
in Appendix B should determine which device needs
to be replaced.
Pots P701 and P702 adjust the battery voltage
levels. The batteries must be disconnected to
make these adjustments. To adjust the positive
supply voltage, adjust P701 while measuring the
voltage at U701, pin2. For the negative supply,
adjust P702 while measuring U702, pin 3. The
recommended voltages are +/- 14.0 V and
should have been set at the factory.
When replacing an op amp, make sure that all eight
pins make firm contact in the socket and that the
orientation for pin 1 is observed (match the notch on
the IC with the notch on the socket). After
replacement, the op amp input offset voltage should
be nulled out using either P101 or P102 (cf.
Calibration).
Pots P103 and P104 are used to ensure that the
applied input bias voltage is completely
subtracted from the front-end output.
P104 should be adjusted first. Turn off the
SR570. Using an ohmmeter, measure between
U107, pin 3, and U105, pin 4, and adjust P104
so that the resistance is equal to that measured
across R105.
BATTERY REPLACEMENT
After three to five years or about 1000
charge/discharge cycles, the sealed lead-acid
batteries degrade. When the battery operation time
shortens, or if the unit stays very warm for more
than a day after it is plugged into the line, the
batteries may require replacement.
Turn on the SR570. Select a 1 mA input offset
current and 1 mA/V sensitivity from the front
panel. The SR570 should otherwise be in its
default start-up state (Low Noise, no filters, etc.
see p. 4 )
Measure the voltage at U106, pin 1.
The three batteries are a standard size which are
available from several different distributors. All are
12 VDC with a charge capacity of about 2.0 Amphours, and measure 7.02" X 1.33" X 2.38". Two of
the batteries are wired in parallel to provide the high
current required for the positive supply. Take care
to observe battery polarities when replacing!
Now select a 3V bias from the front panel.
Adjust P103 until the output at U106, pin 1 is
the same as that measured without the bias.
Op amp input offset voltages can be nulled with
pots P101 and P102.
To null out the offset for U108 (Low Noise
input), attach a “shielded open” to the input of
the SR570 and select the 1 mA/V sensitivity.
The unit should otherwise be in the default startup mode. Adjust pot P102 to give 0 volts at
U108, pin 6.
FUSE REPLACEMENT
There are three fuses on the back panel of the
instrument. The fuse located inside the power entry
module will blow if the unit draws excessive line
current. The replacement should be a standard 1A
“slo-blo” fuse.
To adjust the Low-Drift mode op amp, repeat
the procedure as above (with Low Drift mode
17
The other two fuses are in-line with the batteries
and are rated at 3 A. These fuses will blow if the
rear panel ±12 VDC supplies are shorted or if
excess current flows to or from the batteries.
18
APPENDIX A
Amplifier Noise Sources
Input noise
The input noise of the SR570 current amplifier
varies depending upon the sensitivity setting. On
the 1 mA/V setting, the noise is dominated by
the voltage noise of the op amps in the circuit.
Typically, this figure is about 100 nV/√Hz,
which, when divided by the 1 kW feedback
resistor, gives a current noise of 100 pA/√Hz.
On the other hand, the noise on the higher
sensitivity ranges is dominated by the Johnson
noise of the feedback resistor. On the 1 nA/V
scale, the 1 GW resistor alone produces an input
current noise of 4 pA/√Hz, while the 100
nV/√Hz of amplifier voltage noise gives an input
current noise of about 0.1 fA/√Hz. Therefore, all
the possible sources of noise must be considered
in order to calculate a noise figure for a current
amplifier.
Noise Sources
There are two types of noise we have to worry
about in laboratory situations, intrinsic noise and
external noise. Intrinsic noise sources like
Johnson noise and shot noise are inherent to all
physical processes. Though we cannot get rid of
intrinsic noise sources, by being aware of their
nature their effects can be minimized. External
noise sources are those found in the
environment, such as power line noise and
broadcast stations. The effect of these noise
sources can be minimized by careful attention to
grounding, shielding and other aspects of
experimental design. We will first discuss some
sources of intrinsic noise.
Johnson noise
Every resistor generates a noise voltage across
its terminals due to thermal fluctuations in the
electron density within the resistor itself. These
fluctuations give rise to an open-circuit noise
voltage:
V noise (rms)
4k TR f
1/2
where k=Boltzmann's constant (1.38x10-23 J/°K), T
is the temperature in Kelvin (typically 300 K), R is
the resistance in Ohms, and Df is the bandwidth of
the measurement in Hz. Using this formula, the
Johnson current noise is given by:
I noise (rms)
1. 27x10
10
R
1/2
A/
Hz
For example, a 100 MW resistor will produce a
Johnson current noise of about 13 fA/√Hz. It is
important to remember that Johnson voltage noise is
proportional to the square root of the measurement
bandwidth. Therefore, using signal filters in a
measurement will affect the actual value of noise
measured in the circuit.
Shot noise
Electric current has noise due to the finite nature of
the charge carriers. There is always some nonuniformity in the electron flow which generates
noise in the current. This noise is called shot noise.
This can appear as voltage noise when current is
passed through a resistor, or as noise in a current
measurement. The shot noise, or current noise, is
given by:
Inoise (rms)
2q I f
1/2
where q is the electron charge (1.6x10-19 Coulomb),
I is the RMS AC current or DC current depending
upon the circuit, and Df is the bandwidth.
Shot noise is usually not a problem in typical
measurement setups. For example, a 1 µA current,
measured with a 100 kHz bandwidth, will have only
180 pA of shot noise or 0.02% of the signal
amplitude. For very small currents, shot noise will
be more appreciable. Take, for instance, a 1 pA
current measured with a bandwidth of 100 Hz. The
shot noise will be 6 fA or 0.6% of the signal
amplitude, which might be important.
A-1
1/f noise
Capacitive coupling
Every 10W resistor, no matter what
composition, has the same Johnson noise.
However, there is excess noise in addition to
Johnson noise which arises from fluctuations in
resistance due to the current flowing through the
resistor. For carbon composition resistors, this is
typically 0.1 µV-3 µV of rms noise per Volt of
applied across the resistor. Metal film and wirewound resistors have about one-tenth the noise.
This noise has a 1/f spectrum and makes
measurements at low frequencies more difficult.
Other sources of 1/f noise include vacuum tubes
and semiconductors.
An AC voltage from a nearby piece of apparatus can
couple to a detector via a stray capacitance.
Although Cstray may be very small, the coupled
noise may still be larger than a weak experimental
signal. This is especially damaging if the coupled
noise is synchronous (at the signal frequency).
Stray Capacitance
Experiment
Noise
Source
Detector
Total noise
All intrinsic noise sources are incoherent. The
total random noise is the square root of the sum
of the squares of all the incoherent noise
sources.
We can estimate the noise current caused by a stray
capacitance by:
i
C
stray
dV
dt
C
stray
V
noise
External noise sources
In addition to the intrinsic noise sources
discussed previously, there are a variety of
external noise sources within the laboratory.
Most of these noise sources are asynchronous,
i.e. they are not related to the signal frequency.
Examples include lighting fixtures, motors,
cooling units, radios, computer screens, etc.
These noise sources affect the measurement by
increasing the required dynamic reserve or
lengthening the time constant.
Some noise sources, however, are related to the
signal and, if picked up in the measurement, will
add or subtract from the actual signal and cause
errors in the measurement. Typical sources of
synchronous noise are ground loops between the
experiment, detector and amplifier, and
electronic pick up from the experimental
apparatus.
where w is 2p times the noise frequency, Vnoise is
the noise amplitude, and Cstray is the stray
capacitance.
For example, if the noise source is a power circuit,
then f = 60 Hz and V noise = 120 V. Cstray can be
estimated using a parallel plate equivalent capacitor.
If the capacitance is roughly an area of 1 cm2
separated by 10 cm, then Cstray is 0.009 pF. The
resulting noise current will be 400 pA (at 60 Hz).
This small noise current can be thousands of times
larger than the signal current. If the noise source is at
a higher frequency, the coupled noise will be even
greater.
Cures for capacitive noise coupling include:
1) Removing or turning off the noise source.
2) Keeping the noise source far from the
experiment (reducing Cstray). Do not bring
the signal cables close to the noise source.
Many of these noise sources can be minimized
with good laboratory practice and experiment
design. There are several ways in which noise
sources are coupled into the signal path.
3) Installing capacitive shielding by placing
both the experiment and detector in a metal
box.
A-2
Inductive coupling
Experiment
An AC current in a nearby piece of apparatus
can couple to the experiment via a magnetic
field. A changing current in a nearby circuit
gives rise to a changing magnetic field which
induces an emf (dØB/dt) in the loop connecting
the detector to the experiment. This is like a
transformer with the experiment-detector loop as
the secondary winding.
B(t)
Experiment
Detector
Noise
Source
Cures for inductively coupled noise include:
I(t)
Noise Source
In this illustration, the detector is measuring the
signal relative to a ground far from the rest of the
experiment. The experiment senses the detector
signal plus the voltage due to the noise source's
ground return current passing through the finite
resistance of the ground between the experiment and
the detector. The detector and the experiment are
grounded at different places which, in this case, are
at different potentials.
Cures for ground loop problems include:
1) Grounding everything to the same physical
point.
1) Removing or turning off the interfering
noise source.
2) Using a heavy ground bus to reduce the
resistance of ground connections.
2) Reduce the area of the pick-up loop by
using twisted pairs or coaxial cables, or
even twisting the 2 coaxial cables used
in differential connections.
3) Using magnetic shielding to prevent the
magnetic field from crossing the area of
the experiment.
4) Measuring currents, not voltages, from
high impedance detectors.
Resistive coupling or ground loops
Currents flowing through the ground
connections can give rise to noise voltages. This
is especially a problem with signal frequency
ground currents.
Detector
3) Removing sources of large ground currents
from the ground bus used for small signals.
Microphonics
Not all sources of noise are electrical in origin.
Mechanical noise can be translated into electrical
noise by microphonic effects. Physical changes in
the experiment or cables (due to vibrations for
example) can result in electrical noise over the entire
frequency range of the amplifier.
For example, consider a coaxial cable connecting a
detector to a amplifier. The capacitance of the cable
is a function of its geometry. Mechanical vibrations
in the cable translate into a capacitance that varies in
time, typically at the vibration frequency. Since the
cable is governed by Q=CV, taking the derivative,
we have:
C dV
dt
A-3
V dC
dt
dQ
dt
i
Mechanical vibrations in the cable which cause a
dC/dt will give rise to a current in the cable.
This current affects the detector and the
measured signal.
Some ways to minimize microphonic signals
are:
1) Eliminate mechanical vibrations near the
experiment.
2) Tie down cables carrying sensitive
signals so they cannot move.
3) Use a low noise cable designed to
reduce microphonic effects.
Thermocouple effects
The emf created by junctions between dissimilar
metals can give rise to many microvolts of
slowly varying potentials. This source of noise is
typically at very low frequency since the
temperature of the detector and experiment
generally changes slowly. This effect is large on
the scale of many detector outputs and can be a
problem for low frequency measurements,
especially in the mHz range. Some ways to
minimize thermocouple effects are:
A few words about Baluns
To reduce the effects of ground loops, the SR570
has a balun (BALanced/UNbalanced common-mode
choke) connected to the output stage. This may be
thought of as two wires wrapped about a magnetic
core, forming a pair of inductors. One wire carries
the output signal and the other the return, forming
essentially a differential signal which can pass
through the balun with little to no attentuation over
the SR570's bandwidth.
Non-differential (“common-mode”) signals, like
ground-loop pickup, however, are effectively
blocked by the balun. The degree of rejection varies
with frequency and is determined by the choke
inductance and the resistance of the windings.
The presence of the balun effectively breaks the
ground loop which would have occurred if the
SR570 and the device connected to the output were
both connected to ground. However, this also means
that the output is “differential” and cannot be used as
a ground reference when attempting to trace noise in
the SR570 circuitry. Measurements of this type
should be referenced to the input ground or the
SR570 chassis.
1) Hold the temperature of the experiment
or detector constant.
2) Use a compensation junction, i.e. a
second junction in reverse polarity
which generates an emf to cancel the
thermal potential of the first junction
(both held at the same temperature).
A-4
APPENDIX B
as 5 mA (60 dB greater than full scale) can be
tolerated at the input without overload.
FRONT-END AMPLIFIER
On the high sensitivity scales, since noise is
dominated by DC current offset, an op amp with
a very low input current is used on all gain
modes. On intermediate sensitivity scales, a low
noise op amp is switched in for the LOW
NOISE and HIGH BW modes to improve the
AC response of the front-end. On the less
sensitive scales, where DC drift is dominated by
drift in the offset voltage, the low noise op amp
is used in all gain modes. On all scales, the High
BW mode is obtained by shifting some of the
gain from the front-end to the output stage.
Op Amp Allocation Table
Scale
1 mA/V
100 µA/V
10 µA/V
1 µA/V
100 nA/V
10 nA/V
1 nA/V
100 pA/V
10 pA/V
1 pA/V
Low Noise High BW
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
Low Drift
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1 = AD743 (Low Noise)
2 = AD546 (Low Input Current)
DYNAMIC RESERVE
The term “Dynamic Reserve” comes up
frequently in discussions about amplifiers. It’s
time to discuss this term in a little more detail.
Assume the amplifier input consists of a full
scale signal at fsig plus noise at some other
frequency. The traditional definition of dynamic
reserve is the ratio of the largest tolerable noise
signal to the full scale signal, expressed in dB.
For example, if full scale is 5 µA, then a
dynamic reserve of 60 dB means noise as large
The problem with this definition is the word
'tolerable. Clearly the noise at the dynamic reserve
limit should not cause an overload anywhere in the
instrument. This is accomplished by adjusting the
distribution of the gain. To achieve high reserve, the
input signal gain is set very low so the noise is not
likely to overload. This means that the signal at the
filter section is also very small. The filters then
remove the large noise components from the signal
which allows the remaining component to be
amplified to reach full scale. There is no problem
running the input amplifier at low gain. However,
large noise signals almost always disturb the
measurement in some way.
The most common effect of high dynamic reserve is
to generate noise and drift at the output. This comes
about because the output amplifier is running at very
high gain and front-end noise and offset drift will be
amplified and appear large at the output. The noise is
more tolerable than the DC drift errors since
increasing the time constant of the filters will
attenuate the noise.
Lastly, dynamic reserve depends on the noise
frequency. Clearly noise at the signal frequency will
make its way to the output without attenuation. So
the dynamic reserve at fsig is 0 dB. As the noise
frequency moves away from the signal frequency,
the dynamic reserve increases. Why? Because the
filters after the front-end attenuate the noise
components. The rate at which the reserve increases
depends upon the filter time constant and rolloff.
The reserve increases at the rate at which the filter
rolls off. When the noise frequency is far away, the
reserve is limited by the gain distribution and
overload level of each gain element.
In the SR570, decreasing front-end gain to increase
dynamic reserve can only be accomplished by
decreasing the value of the input op amp’s feedback
resistor. Thus, the high dynamic reserve mode is also
a high bandwidth mode due to a smaller time
constant between the input capacitance and the
feedback resistor. On the other hand, a smaller
resistor means that even though the Johnson noise is
less, the extra gain of 10 at the output makes the
B-1
noise greater. So, when making a measurement,
it is important to keep in mind the tradeoff
between high dynamic reserve (bandwidth) and
low noise performance.
reserve is 3 dB at the filter frequencies of 100 Hz
and 1 kHz. The dynamic reserve rises by 6 dB/oct
(or 20 dB per decade) as the signal moves away
from the pole frequency, since each RC filter
attenuates the signal. If a faster rolloff for
interfering signals was required, a 12 dB/octave HP
or LP filter could be used.
The dynamic reserve is a function of frequency
and depends on the amplifier configuration
(sensitivity, filters and gain mode setting). The
figure below shows the dynamic reserve for a
SR570 set to sensitivities of 20 µA/V, 50 µA/V,
and 100 µA/V, with the high pass filter set to
100 Hz and the low pass filter set to 1 kHz (for a
bandpass from 100 Hz to 1 kHz). The dynamic
reserve characteristics are shown for both "High
Bandwidth" and "Low Noise" gain modes. The
Low Drift mode has the same dynamic reserve
as the Low Noise mode.
The DR rises to a maximum which depends on the
gain distribution in the amplifier circuit. The plot
gives the DR for a 1-2-5 sequence of sensitivities on
two different gain modes. It turns out that between
20 pA/V and 100 µA/V, the curves are exactly the
same for any other 1-2-5 sequence. Below 20 pA/V,
the maximum DR increases by 20 dB for all gain
modes over those in the plot. Above 100 µA/V the
Low Noise curves are the same as in the plot and the
High Bandwidth curves are the same as the Low
Noise. Keep in mind that the amplifier bandwidth
may limit the DR at the higher frequencies on some
sensitivities.
There are several features to note. In the
bandpass region between 100 Hz and 1 kHz the
dynamic reserve is near 0 dB. The dynamic
Dynamic Reserve vs. Frequency
40
Dynamic Reserve (dB)
High Bandwidth
Bandpass
Filter
100 Hz - 1 kHz
30
20 µA/V
50 µA/V
100 µA/V
20
Low Noise
6 dB/octave
20 dB/decade
(due to filters)
20 µA/V
10
50 µA/V
100 µA/V
0
1
10
100
1000
Frequency (Hz)
B-2
10
4
10
5
APPENDIX C
CAPACITANCE EFFECTS
Feedback Capacitance
All op amps have some parasitic capacitance
associated with their inputs and output. Together
with the capacitance of the source being
measured and the resistors in the amplifier
circuit, the parasitics affect the frequency
response of the amplifier. Typically, this effect
is manifested as overshoot or “ringing” in the
square wave response of an instrument. One way
to compensate for these unwanted effects is to
put a capacitor in the feedback loop of the op
amp. The value of this capacitor is chosen to
optimize the frequency response of the circuit.
In the SR570, we have implemented a variable
feedback capacitance across the amplifier which
can be controlled from the instrument’s front
panel. To get the best frequency response, the
FREQ COMP can be adjusted to give a clean
square wave output with a square wave input. It
is important that the source resistance and
capacitance be the same for the adjustment
procedure as it will be for the actual
measurement to get the best results.
virtual null at the input and an essentially infinite
input resistance, any voltage noise that appears at the
input to the op amp will also appear at the output
without any gain. On the other hand, if we introduce
some capacitance from the input to ground – say,
coaxial cable capacitance (about 100 pF/m) – then
we have gain for the op amp input voltage noise.
Let’s look at the effect that input capacitance would
have on a typical measurement. If we make a
measurement on the 1 nA/V scale, then the feedback
resistor in the low noise mode is 1 GW. The
bandwidth of this sensitivity range, without any
filters in the circuit, is about 20 Hz. If we use one
meter of coax cable at the input, then we have about
100 pF of input capacitance , which at 20 Hz is
about 80 MW to ground. Therefore, the input
voltage noise of the op amp is amplified with a gain
of around 13! Even more important is that this gain
increases with increasing values of input
capacitance.
Incidentally, the FREQ COMP capacitor mentioned
above also has the effect of limiting the ultimate
value of noise gain in the circuit to the ratio of the
input capacitance to the feedback capacitance.
There are a few straightfoward precautions that can
be taken to minimize the effects of input
capacitance:
1) Place the amplifier as close as possible to the
signal being measured and use the shortest cable
length necessary to connect them.
2) Use high quality, low noise coaxial cables.
3) Reduce any stray capacitance to ground at the
output of the circuit being measured.
Input Capacitance
One of the most important differences between
using a current amp instead of a voltage amp is
the effect that input capacitance has on the noise
performance of the instrument. In the figure
above, we see that in the traditional
configuration of a current amplifier, with a
4) If the amplifier must be placed a large distance
from the circuit under test, then use triaxial cable
with both a guard and a shield to reduce the
capacitance to ground.
C-1
Parts List
Main Circuit Board Parts List
B 401
C 101
C 102
C 103
C 104
C 105
C 106
C 107
C 108
C 109
C 110
C 111
C 112
C 113
C 114
C 115
C 116
C 117
C 118
C 119
C 120
C 201
C 202
C 203
C 204
C 205
C 206
C 208
C 209
C 210
C 211
C 212
C 213
C 214
C 215
C 216
C 217
C 218
C 219
C 220
C 221
C 222
6-00137-601
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00016-501
5-00015-501
5-00011-501
5-00215-501
5-00019-501
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00010-501
5-00022-501
5-00063-513
5-00065-513
5-00067-513
5-00023-529
5-00194-542
5-00194-542
5-00193-542
5-00193-542
5-00213-546
5-00213-546
5-00033-520
5-00033-520
5-00031-520
15MH
2.2U
2.2U
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
2.2U
2.2U
470P
39P
27P
20P
68P
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
270P
.001U
.0033U
.01U
.033U
.1U
.47U MIN
.47U MIN
2.2U MIN
2.2U MIN
4.7U
4.7U
47U
47U
220U
Inductor
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Mylar/Poly, 50V, 5%, Rad
Capacitor, Mylar/Poly, 50V, 5%, Rad
Capacitor, Mylar/Poly, 50V, 5%, Rad
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electro, 100V, 20%, Rad
Cap, Mini Electro, 100V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
D-1
Parts List
C 223
C 224
C 225
C 226
C 227
C 228
C 230
C 301
C 302
C 303
C 304
C 306
C 307
C 308
C 309
C 310
C 311
C 312
C 313
C 314
C 315
C 316
C 317
C 318
C 319
C 320
C 321
C 322
C 323
C 324
C 325
C 326
C 327
C 328
C 330
C 401
C 402
C 403
C 404
C 405
C 406
C 407
C 408
C 409
5-00031-520
5-00232-520
5-00232-520
5-00192-542
5-00192-542
5-00008-501
5-00100-517
5-00159-501
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00008-501
5-00010-501
5-00022-501
5-00063-513
5-00065-513
5-00067-513
5-00023-529
5-00194-542
5-00194-542
5-00193-542
5-00193-542
5-00213-546
5-00213-546
5-00033-520
5-00033-520
5-00031-520
5-00031-520
5-00232-520
5-00232-520
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00192-542
5-00192-542
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00017-501
5-00107-530
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00021-501
220U
470U
470U
22U MIN
22U MIN
22P
2.2U
6.8P
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
22P
270P
.001U
.0033U
.01U
.033U
.1U
.47U MIN
.47U MIN
2.2U MIN
2.2U MIN
4.7U
4.7U
47U
47U
220U
220U
470U
470U
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
22U MIN
22U MIN
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
47P
1.8-6P
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
82P
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Mylar/Poly, 50V, 5%, Rad
Capacitor, Mylar/Poly, 50V, 5%, Rad
Capacitor, Mylar/Poly, 50V, 5%, Rad
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electro, 100V, 20%, Rad
Cap, Mini Electro, 100V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 16V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Cap, Mini Electrolytic, 50V, 20% Radial
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Variable, Misc.
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
D-2
Parts List
C 410
C 411
C 412
C 413
C 414
C 415
C 416
C 417
C 419
C 420
C 502
C 503
C 703
C 704
C 705
C 706
C 707
C 708
C 709
C 710
C 711
C 712
C 713
C 714
C 715
C 716
C 717
C 718
C 719
C 720
C 801
C 802
C 803
C 804
C 805
C 806
C 807
C 808
C 809
C 810
C 811
C 822
C 823
C 824
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00002-501
5-00022-501
5-00022-501
5-00022-501
5-00022-501
5-00023-529
5-00023-529
5-00104-530
5-00233-532
5-00023-529
5-00023-529
5-00023-529
5-00234-551
5-00234-551
5-00100-517
5-00227-526
5-00227-526
5-00100-517
5-00023-529
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00023-529
5-00023-529
5-00100-517
5-00297-567
5-00297-567
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00225-548
5-00023-529
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
100P
.001U
.001U
.001U
.001U
.1U
.1U
3.5-20P
22P
.1U
.1U
.1U
1000U
1000U
2.2U
100U
100U
2.2U
.1U
2.2U
2.2U
2.2U
.1U
.1U
2.2U
2.2U 50V RAD
2.2U 50V RAD
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U AXIAL
.1U
2.2U
2.2U
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10%, SL
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Capacitor, Variable, Misc.
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 10% NPO
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Capacitor, Electrolytic,35V,20%, Ax
Capacitor, Electrolytic,35V,20%, Ax
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Electrolytic, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Non-polarized Electrolytics
Capacitor, Non-polarized Electrolytics
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Capacitor, Ceramic, 50V,+80/-20% Z5U AX
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
D-3
Parts List
C 825
C 826
C 827
C 828
C 829
C 830
C 831
C 832
D 201
D 202
D 203
D 204
D 301
D 302
D 303
D 304
D 401
D 402
D 403
D 404
D 405
D 406
D 407
D 408
D 409
D 410
D 501
D 502
D 503
D 505
D 701
D 702
D 703
D 704
D 705
D 706
D 707
D 708
D 709
D 711
D 712
D 713
D 801
D 802
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00023-529
5-00023-529
5-00023-529
5-00100-517
5-00100-517
5-00023-529
3-00368-301
3-00368-301
3-00203-301
3-00203-301
3-00368-301
3-00368-301
3-00203-301
3-00203-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00226-301
3-00004-301
3-00226-301
3-00009-303
3-00011-303
3-00062-340
3-00226-301
3-00226-301
3-00306-340
3-00198-301
3-00391-301
3-00391-301
3-00226-301
3-00004-301
2.2U
2.2U
.1U
.1U
.1U
2.2U
2.2U
.1U
1N753A
1N753A
1N5711
1N5711
1N753A
1N753A
1N5711
1N5711
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N5822
1N4148
1N5822
YELLOW
RED
KBP201G/BR-81D
1N5822
1N5822
LM385BZ-2.5
1N5231B
MBR360
MBR360
1N5822
1N4148
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Capacitor, Tantalum, 35V, 20%, Rad
Cap, Monolythic Ceramic, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
LED, T1 Package
LED, T1 Package
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Diode
Diode
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
D-4
Parts List
D 803
D 804
DU105A
DU105B
K 101
K 102
K 103
K 104
K 105
K 106
K 107
K 201
K 301
N 701
N 702
P 101
P 102
P 103
P 104
P 701
P 702
PC1
Q 501
Q 701
Q 702
Q 703
Q 801
R 101
R 102
R 103
R 104
R 105
R 106
R 107
R 108
R 109
R 110
R 111
R 112
R 113
R 114
R 115
R 116
R 117
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
3-00523-335
4-00497-421
4-00501-425
4-00011-441
4-00799-441
4-00370-441
4-00326-441
4-00011-441
4-00011-441
7-00468-701
3-00021-325
3-00310-329
3-00887-325
3-00374-329
3-00376-329
4-00188-407
4-00188-407
4-00138-407
4-00188-407
4-00194-407
4-00194-407
4-00194-407
4-00188-407
4-00194-407
4-00194-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00194-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
G6AK-234P-ST-UC
1.5KX4
1.0MX5
10K
2M
500
200
10K
10K
SR570 MAIN
2N3904
MTP25N05
MPS2907A
MTP20P06
MTP5N05
4.99K
4.99K
10.0K
4.99K
5.11K
5.11K
5.11K
4.99K
5.11K
5.11K
10
10
5.11K
10
10
10
10
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Relay
Relay
Relay
Relay
Relay
Relay
Relay
Relay
Relay
Res. Network, SIP, 1/4W,2% (Isolated)
Resistor Network SIP 1/4W 2% (Common)
Pot, Multi-Turn Trim, 3/8" Square Top Ad
Pot, Multi-Turn Trim, 3/8" Square Top Ad
Pot, Multi-Turn Trim, 3/8" Square Top Ad
Pot, Multi-Turn Trim, 3/8" Square Top Ad
Pot, Multi-Turn Trim, 3/8" Square Top Ad
Pot, Multi-Turn Trim, 3/8" Square Top Ad
Printed Circuit Board
Transistor, TO-92 Package
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
Transistor, TO-92 Package
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
D-5
Parts List
R 118
R 119
R 120
R 121
R 122
R 123
R 125
R 126
R 127
R 129
R 130
R 131
R 132
R 133
R 134
R 135
R 136
R 137
R 138
R 139
R 140
R 141
R 142
R 143
R 144
R 145
R 146
R 147
R 201
R 202
R 203
R 204
R 205
R 206
R 207
R 208
R 209
R 210
R 211
R 212
R 213
R 214
R 215
R 216
4-00398-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00776-407
4-00136-407
4-00165-407
4-00139-407
4-00142-407
4-00204-407
4-00449-407
4-00192-407
4-00193-407
4-00022-401
4-00138-407
4-00141-407
4-00800-401
4-00164-407
4-00138-407
4-00132-407
4-00801-407
4-00164-407
4-00138-407
4-00132-407
4-00801-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00141-407
4-00329-407
4-00516-407
4-00164-407
4-00516-407
4-00168-407
4-00516-407
4-00168-407
4-00600-407
4-00168-407
4-00600-407
4-00600-407
4-00600-407
4-00600-407
4-00600-407
4-00030-401
4-00165-407
4-00030-401
499K
10
10
178
1.82K
200
10.0M
100K
750
4.99M
49.9K
499
1.0M
10.0K
100
1
20.0K
10.0K
1.10K
5.49K
20.0K
10.0K
1.10K
5.49K
10
10
100
402
14.3K
20.0K
14.3K
22.6K
14.3K
22.6K
15.8K
22.6K
15.8K
15.8K
15.8K
15.8K
15.8K
10
200
10
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
D-6
Parts List
R 217
R 218
R 219
R 220
R 221
R 222
R 223
R 224
R 225
R 226
R 227
R 228
R 229
R 301
R 302
R 303
R 304
R 305
R 306
R 307
R 308
R 309
R 310
R 311
R 312
R 313
R 314
R 315
R 316
R 317
R 318
R 319
R 320
R 321
R 322
R 323
R 324
R 325
R 326
R 327
R 328
R 329
R 330
R 401
4-00325-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00296-407
4-00165-407
4-00165-407
4-00148-407
4-00519-407
4-00135-407
4-00067-401
4-00067-401
4-00031-401
4-00305-401
4-00516-407
4-00164-407
4-00516-407
4-00168-407
4-00516-407
4-00168-407
4-00600-407
4-00168-407
4-00600-407
4-00600-407
4-00600-407
4-00030-401
4-00165-407
4-00030-401
4-00433-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00296-407
4-00165-407
4-00165-407
4-00600-407
4-00600-407
4-00148-407
4-00519-407
4-00135-407
4-00067-401
4-00067-401
4-00030-401
4-00031-401
4-00065-401
4-00296-407
845
10
10
604
200
200
12.1K
4.75K
1.50K
3.9K
3.9K
100
4.3K
14.3K
20.0K
14.3K
22.6K
14.3K
22.6K
15.8K
22.6K
15.8K
15.8K
15.8K
10
200
10
931
10
10
604
200
200
15.8K
15.8K
12.1K
4.75K
1.50K
3.9K
3.9K
10
100
3.3K
604
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
D-7
Parts List
R 402
R 403
R 404
R 405
R 406
R 407
R 408
R 409
R 410
R 411
R 412
R 413
R 414
R 415
R 416
R 417
R 418
R 419
R 420
R 421
R 422
R 423
R 424
R 425
R 426
R 427
R 428
R 429
R 430
R 431
R 432
R 433
R 434
R 435
R 436
R 437
R 440
R 441
R 501
R 502
R 503
R 701
R 702
R 703
4-00165-407
4-00165-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00325-407
4-00190-407
4-00165-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00296-407
4-00165-407
4-00165-407
4-00030-401
4-00030-401
4-00317-407
4-00031-401
4-00030-401
4-00130-407
4-00272-407
4-00616-453
4-00030-401
4-00138-407
4-00138-407
4-00138-407
4-00138-407
4-00188-407
4-00021-401
4-00021-401
4-00021-401
4-00021-401
4-00021-401
4-00022-401
4-00022-401
4-00022-401
4-00022-401
4-00034-401
4-00034-401
4-00305-401
4-00027-401
4-00027-401
4-00032-401
4-00088-401
4-00032-401
200
200
10
10
845
42.2K
200
10
10
10
604
200
200
10
10
422
100
10
1.00K
221
49.9
10
10.0K
10.0K
10.0K
10.0K
4.99K
1.0K
1.0K
1.0K
1.0K
1.0K
1.0M
1.0M
1.0M
1.0M
10K
10K
4.3K
1.5K
1.5K
100K
51K
100K
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, 2W, 1%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
D-8
Parts List
R 704
R 705
R 706
R 707
R 708
R 709
R 710
R 711
R 712
R 713
R 714
R 715
R 716
R 717
R 718
R 719
R 720
R 721
R 722
R 723
R 724
R 725
R 726
R 727
R 728
R 729
R 730
R 731
R 801
R 802
R 803
R 804
R 805
R 806
R 807
R 808
R 809
R 810
R 811
R 812
R 813
R 814
R 815
R 816
4-00022-401
4-00169-407
4-00042-401
4-00042-401
4-00376-407
4-00169-407
4-00058-401
4-00035-401
4-00035-401
4-00612-407
4-00278-407
4-00576-407
4-00386-407
4-00614-407
4-00155-407
4-00363-407
4-00383-407
4-00615-407
4-00207-407
4-00021-401
4-00203-407
4-00169-407
4-00169-407
4-00582-407
4-00582-407
4-00309-407
4-00022-401
4-00032-401
4-00032-401
4-00092-401
4-00056-401
4-00034-401
4-00034-401
4-00031-401
4-00192-407
4-00192-407
4-00192-407
4-00155-407
4-00787-407
4-00081-401
4-00081-401
4-00076-401
4-00081-401
4-00076-401
1.0M
249
15K
15K
2.87K
249
220K
10M
10M
768K
10.7K
17.8K
30.9K
174K
150K
21.5K
12.7K
8.25K
806K
1.0K
75.0K
249
249
2.15K
2.15K
3.32K
1.0M
100K
100K
56K
22
10K
10K
100
49.9K
49.9K
49.9K
150K
768
470
470
390
470
390
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Metal Film, 1/8W, 1%, 50PPM
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
D-9
Parts List
R 817
R 818
R 819
SO504
SO708
SO709
T1
U 101
U 102
U 103
U 104
U 105
U 106
U 107
U 108
U 109
U 110
U 111
U 112
U 113
U 201
U 202
U 203
U 204
U 205
U 206
U 301
U 302
U 303
U 304
U 305
U 401
U 402
U 403
U 404
U 405
U 406
U 407
U 408
U 409
U 410
U 501
U 502
U 503
4-00094-401
4-00079-401
4-00022-401
1-00026-150
1-00570-150
1-00570-150
6-00067-610
3-00116-325
3-00385-340
3-00430-340
3-00091-340
3-00402-340
3-00296-340
3-00451-340
3-00535-340
3-00371-340
3-00385-340
3-00536-340
3-00195-340
3-00195-340
3-00382-340
3-00270-340
3-00270-340
3-00090-340
3-00371-340
3-00371-340
3-00270-340
3-00270-340
3-00090-340
3-00371-340
3-00382-340
3-00371-340
3-00297-340
3-00382-340
3-00090-340
3-01017-340
3-00383-340
3-00087-340
3-00143-340
3-00371-340
3-00143-340
3-00155-340
3-00045-340
3-00298-340
6.8K
4.7K
1.0M
28 PIN 600 MIL
16 PIN
16 PIN
SR560
78L05
74HC4053
AD7547JN
LF412
74HC4052
OPA404
AD546
AD743JN
DG444
74HC4053
AD706
CA3082
CA3082
OPA37
74HC4051
74HC4051
LF411
DG444
DG444
74HC4051
74HC4051
LF411
DG444
OPA37
DG444
LT1028
OPA37
LF411
TLC7528CN
LM6321
LF347
LM393
DG444
LM393
74HC04
74HC32
Z84C0008PEC
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Socket, THRU-HOLE
Socket, THRU-HOLE
Socket, THRU-HOLE
Transformer
Transistor, TO-92 Package
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
D-10
Parts List
U 505
U 506
U 507
U 508
U 509
U 510
U 601
U 602
U 603
U 604
U 605
U 606
U 607
U 608
U 701
U 702
U 703
U 704
U 705
U 706
U 707
U 708
U 709
U 801
U 802
U 803
U 804
U 805
U 806
U 807
3-00081-341
3-00039-340
3-00158-340
3-00049-340
3-00277-340
3-00537-340
3-00411-340
3-00411-340
3-00411-340
3-00411-340
3-00411-340
3-00411-340
3-00411-340
3-00044-340
3-00384-329
3-00141-329
3-00067-340
3-00152-340
3-00239-335
3-00149-329
3-00141-329
8-00072-860
8-00072-860
3-00112-329
3-00307-340
3-00090-340
3-00446-340
3-00446-340
3-00446-340
3-00262-340
2KX8-100
74HC14
74HC154N
74HC74
74HC11
74HC373
74HC273
74HC273
74HC273
74HC273
74HC273
74HC273
74HC273
74HC244
LM350T
LM337T
CD4013
CD4051
HS-212-12
LM317T
LM337T
SR566 ASSY
SR566 ASSY
7805
LM2940T-10
LF411
6N137
6N137
6N137
74HC86
STATIC RAM, I.C.
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Relay
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
SRS sub assemblies
SRS sub assemblies
Voltage Reg., TO-220 (TAB) Package
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Front and Rear Panel Parts List
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D 10
D 11
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
D-11
Parts List
D 12
D 13
D 14
D 15
D 16
D 17
D 18
D 19
D 20
D 21
D 22
D 23
D 24
D 25
D 26
D 27
D 28
D 29
D 30
D 31
D 32
D 33
D 34
D 35
D 36
D 37
D 38
D 39
D 40
D 41
D 42
D 43
D 44
D 45
D 46
D 47
D 48
D 49
D 50
D 51
D 52
D 53
D 54
D 55
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00885-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00885-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00012-306
3-00885-306
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
YELLOW
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
YELLOW
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
GREEN
YELLOW
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
D-12
Parts List
D 56
D 57
D 58
D 59
D 60
D 61
D 62
D 63
D 64
D 65
D 66
D 67
J4
J5
J 104
J 401
J 601
J 805
J 806
JP801
N1
N2
N3
N4
N5
P1
PC2
Q1
Q2
Q3
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
SW1
SW2
SW3
SW4
SW5
SW6
SW7
SW8
SW9
3-00884-306
3-00885-306
3-00885-306
3-00012-306
3-00884-306
3-00884-306
3-00884-306
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
3-00004-301
1-00139-130
1-00197-101
1-00073-120
1-00073-120
1-00139-130
1-00073-120
1-00073-120
1-00016-160
4-00288-425
4-00288-425
4-00288-425
4-00298-425
4-00298-425
4-00802-452
7-00469-701
3-00022-325
3-00022-325
3-00021-325
4-00057-401
4-00057-401
4-00059-401
4-00026-401
4-00803-401
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
RED
YELLOW
YELLOW
GREEN
RED
RED
RED
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
1N4148
28 PIN DIL
TEFLON TEST JAC
INSL
INSL
28 PIN DIL
INSL
INSL
RS232 25 PIN D
470X9
470X9
470X9
470X5
470X5
2.0K
SR570 FP
2N3906
2N3906
2N3904
220
220
22K
1.3K
910
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
LED, Rectangular
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Diode
Connector, Male
Vertical Test Jack
Connector, BNC
Connector, BNC
Connector, Male
Connector, BNC
Connector, BNC
Connector, D-Sub, Right Angle PC, Female
Resistor Network SIP 1/4W 2% (Common)
Resistor Network SIP 1/4W 2% (Common)
Resistor Network SIP 1/4W 2% (Common)
Resistor Network SIP 1/4W 2% (Common)
Resistor Network SIP 1/4W 2% (Common)
Pot, Multi Turn Trim, Mini
Printed Circuit Board
Transistor, TO-92 Package
Transistor, TO-92 Package
Transistor, TO-92 Package
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Resistor, Carbon Film, 1/4W, 5%
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
D-13
Parts List
SW10
SW11
SW12
SW13
SW14
SW15
U1
U2
U3
U4
U5
U6
U7
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
2-00031-201
3-00303-340
3-00303-340
3-00303-340
3-00303-340
3-00303-340
3-00303-340
3-00303-340
0-00014-002
0-00017-002
0-00042-010
0-00043-011
0-00077-030
0-00079-031
0-00089-033
0-00096-041
0-00109-050
0-00122-053
0-00126-053
0-00128-053
0-00136-053
0-00153-057
0-00194-043
0-00195-020
0-00202-021
0-00231-043
0-00237-016
0-00240-026
0-00243-003
0-00259-021
0-00268-052
0-00277-053
0-00299-000
0-00312-000
0-00314-040
0-00321-035
0-00322-035
0-00323-035
0-00324-035
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
D6-01-05
74HC164
74HC164
74HC164
74HC164
74HC164
74HC164
74HC164
6J4
TRANSCOVER
4-40 HEX
4-40 KEP
3/16"X5/16"NYLN
4-40X3/16 M/F
4"
#4 SPLIT
1-1/2" #18
2-1/4" #24
3-1/2" #24
4" #24
8-1/2" #24
GROMMET2
#4 SHOULDER
6-32X3/8PF
4-40X1-1/2PP
1-32, #4 SHOULD
F1404
4-40X3/8PF
TO-220
4-40X1/2"PP
6-1/2" #22 BL
4" #24 BLK
1/8" ADHES TAPE
FUSEHOLDER
#8 18-8 SS
BLACK
RED
GREEN
WHITE
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Switch, Momentary Push Button
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Integrated Circuit (Thru-hole Pkg)
Power Entry Hardware
Power Entry Hardware
Nut, Hex
Nut, Kep
Spacer
Standoff
Tie
Washer, Split
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire #24 UL1007 Strip 1/4x1/4 Tin
Wire #24 UL1007 Strip 1/4x1/4 Tin
Wire #24 UL1007 Strip 1/4x1/4 Tin
Wire #24 UL1007 Strip 1/4x1/4 Tin
Grommet
Washer, nylon
Screw, Flathead Phillips
Screw, Panhead Phillips
Washer, nylon
Power Button
Screw, Black, All Types
Insulators
Screw, Panhead Phillips
Wire #22 UL1007
Wire #24 UL1007 Strip 1/4x1/4 Tin
Hardware, Misc.
Hardware, Misc.
Washer, Flat
BANANA JACK
BANANA JACK
BANANA JACK
BANANA JACK
D-14
Parts List
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
0-00325-032
0-00327-050
0-00328-050
0-00329-050
0-00330-050
0-00333-052
0-00334-052
0-00350-053
0-00355-050
0-00466-050
0-00523-048
0-00524-048
0-00666-050
0-00667-050
1-00124-178
1-00125-179
1-00126-176
1-00127-177
1-00194-171
4-00541-435
5-00027-503
6-00004-611
6-00050-612
6-00074-611
7-00201-720
7-00460-709
7-00462-709
7-00463-720
7-00464-720
7-00795-720
7-00796-720
9-00267-917
9-00792-917
2-520182-2
8" #18 WHITE
8" #18 RED
8" #18 BLACK
5-1/2" #18
6" #22
1-3/4" #22
2-1/4" #24
20" #18 RED
23" #18 BLACK
5-5/8" #18
8-1/4" #18
23" #18 WHITE
20" #18 WHITE
4 PIN
4 PIN
.062" DIAM
.062" DIAM
28 CON DIL
130V/1200A
.01U
1A 3AG
GB1219-36
3A 3AG
SR500-32
SR570
SR570
SR570-4&5
SR570-6
BATTERY PAN
BATTERY RETAINR
GENERIC
EC WARNING
Termination
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire #22 UL1007
Wire #22 UL1007
Wire #24 UL1007 Strip 1/4x1/4 Tin
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire, #18 UL1015 Strip 3/8 x 3/8 No Tin
Wire, #18 UL1015 Strip 3/8 x 3/8 No Tin
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Wire #18 UL1007 Stripped 3/8x3/8 No Tin
Connector Housing, Plug
Connector Housing, Receptacle
Terminal, Male
Terminal, Female
Cable Assembly, Ribbon
Varistor, Zinc Oxide Nonlinear Resistor
Capacitor, Ceramic Disc, 50V, 20%, Z5U
Fuse
Battery
Fuse
Fabricated Part
Lexan Overlay
Lexan Overlay
Fabricated Part
Fabricated Part
Fabricated Part
Fabricated Part
Product Labels
Product Labels
Miscellaneous and Chassis Assembly Parts List
R 124
R 128
U 504
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
4-00857-458
4-00864-458
3-00305-342
0-00150-026
0-00179-000
0-00180-000
0-00185-021
0-00204-000
1.0G .5W 200PPM
500M 3/4-WATT
27C64-255
4-40X1/4PF
RIGHT FOOT
LEFT FOOT
6-32X3/8PP
REAR FOOT
Resistor, Metal Oxide
Resistor, Metal Oxide
EPROM/PROM, I.C.
Screw, Black, All Types
Hardware, Misc.
Hardware, Misc.
Screw, Panhead Phillips
Hardware, Misc.
D-15
Parts List
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
Z0
0-00248-026
0-00315-021
0-00326-026
0-00471-021
7-00122-720
7-00217-735
7-00259-720
7-00260-720
7-00465-720
7-00466-720
10-32X3/8TRUSSP
6-32X7/16 PP
8-32X1/4PP
4-40X1"PP
DG535-36
PS300-40
SR560-28
SR560-27
SR570-7
SR570-8
Screw, Black, All Types
Screw, Panhead Phillips
Screw, Black, All Types
Screw, Panhead Phillips
Fabricated Part
Injection Molded Plastic
Fabricated Part
Fabricated Part
Fabricated Part
Fabricated Part
D-16
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