Cisco TrustSec How-To Guide: AnyConnect Network Access

Cisco TrustSec How-To Guide: AnyConnect Network Access
Guide
®
Cisco TrustSec How-To Guide:
AnyConnect Network Access
Manager Enterprise Connection
Enforcement
For further information, questions and comments please contact ccbu-pricing@cisco.com
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Page 1 of 32
Contents
Introduction .............................................................................................................................................................. 3
Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................................. 3
About this Document ............................................................................................................................................. 3
Scenario Overview ................................................................................................................................................ 4
Architecture ........................................................................................................................................................... 4
Software and Hardware Requirements ................................................................................................................. 4
Technology Primer .................................................................................................................................................. 5
Design Parameters .................................................................................................................................................. 5
EAP Methods ........................................................................................................................................................ 5
Identity Source and Database ............................................................................................................................... 6
Encryption ............................................................................................................................................................. 6
Configuring the Wireless LAN Controller .............................................................................................................. 6
Configuring the Cisco Identity Services Engine ................................................................................................. 13
Defining Authentication Policies and Authorization Profiles ............................................................................ 17
Authentication Policies ........................................................................................................................................ 17
Configuring the AnyConnect Network Access Manager .................................................................................... 21
Testing Procedure ................................................................................................................................................. 29
Appendices ............................................................................................................................................................ 30
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Page 2 of 32
Introduction
Executive Summary
Employees connect to non-corporate WiFi access points while sitting at their desks or in a conference room, even
though the corporate WiFi network is in range and working fine. Some employees connect to a third-party WiFi
hotspot to check their personal email or shop on the Internet during normal business hours. Others try to gain
access to a competitor‟s network one floor above, or to a nearby apartment complex. Still others access the guest
network because it might have somewhat better performance. Employees should be connecting their corporate
laptops to the corporate network, not to these other networks.
Blacklisting is the first thought we think as far as keeping employees from wandering onto other peoples‟ networks
or their own guest networks. While this is a great idea for preventing employees from accessing the guest network,
it can have some unintended consequences.
Employees need to access their home networks and WiFi hotspots so they can use the VPN to access the
®
corporate network when they are traveling or working from home. So, while we would like to blacklist Linksys to
prevent employees from accessing a network at the apartment complex across the street during the day, we need
to let them access their own Linksys home network at night.
Blacklisting also ends up being site specific. Blacklisting one competitor that is in the same office tower in New
York does not apply in Paris or Tokyo, where there might be different competitors. Blacklisting is easy to deploy if
your business has one location. It is nearly impossible to manage if you are a multinational corporation with
hundreds or thousands of sites around the world.
®
Cisco approached the problem focusing on the corporate WiFi network rather than eliminating non-corporate
networks. When the corporate network is in range, there is no need to connect to any other network. When the
corporate network is not in range, employees are free to connect to other networks.
Enterprise Connection Enforcement gives IT administrators the ability to select one or more WiFi networks as
corporate networks. When any or all of those networks are in range, employees can connect to any of the specified
corporate WiFi networks, but employees are prevented from connecting to any third party networks.
Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE) will provide the back-end RADIUS functions and provide policy control for
802.1X authentication. In this document, EAP-FAST will be used as the authentication method.
About this Document
®
This document illustrates Cisco AnyConnect Network Access Manager‟s Enterprise Connection Enforcement
feature. It automatically connects to the corporate network designated by the administrator- defined corporate
service set identifiers (SSIDs) in the AnyConnect Network Access Manager profile. If any end users connect to
non-corporate access points, they will be denied.
When a user connects to a wired corporate network and obtains an internal IP address, the wireless connection will
be dropped. EAP-FAST (MSCHAPv2) will be used as the authentication method for wireless and configured within
the AnyConnect Network Access Manager profile by the administrator. Both machine and user connection types
will also be defined. The ISE server will be configured to use Microsoft AD for machine and user validation, EAPFAST (MSCHAPv2) for 802.1X authentication, and for creating the Authentication and Authorization policies.
Wireless controller configuration information is also included.
In this document, the wired connection will be configured for open authentication to simulate a wired corporate
connection.
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Page 3 of 32
Scenario Overview
The AnyConnect Network Access Manager profile will contain the EAP-FAST authentication method, and the
corporate wireless network designated SSID, which will be lab005. The user will automatically to connect to the
corporate wireless network. When the user tries to connect to non-corporate access points, he or she will be
denied.
When the user connects to the wired network, he or she will be automatically disconnected from the wireless
network.
ISE will be used as the back-end RADIUS server, and the successful authentication logs will be reviewed.
Architecture
Software and Hardware Requirements
Client:
●
Laptop or desktop computer with an Ethernet NIC or WiFi NIC and one of the following operating systems:
◦ Windows 7 SP1 x 86 (32-bit) and x64 (64-bit)
◦ Windows Vista SP2 x86 and x64
◦ Windows XP SP3 x86
●
Windows Server 2003 SP2 x86
●
Cisco AnyConnect 3.1 or greater with the Network Access Manager installed
●
Cisco AnyConnect 3.1 or greater Profile Editor
Authentication Server:
●
Cisco ISE System 1.1.1 or greater
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Network Infrastructure:
●
Ethernet switch or WiFi access point configured for 802.1X
Technology Primer
The Enterprise Connection Enforcement feature will only work with WiFi networks, as well as with administratively
defined networks. User-created network configurations will be ignored.
The AnyConnect Network Access Manager will initiate scan requests periodically and retrieve the scan-list to see if
any corporate networks are in range and probe for hidden SSIDs on Windows 7 hosts. On Windows XP hosts,
probing for hidden SSIDs is not possible and will be non-hidden.
In the event that no wired connections are available, a connection to wireless corporate networks will be allowed,
and a connection to non-corporate networks will be denied.
Each corporate network shall be tagged by AnyConnect Network Access Manager and all in-range corporate
networks are added to a list of available networks for matching, alternatively non-corporate networks are removed
from the list of available networks for matching.
The AnyConnect Network Access Manager will start matching one corporate network to one of the adapters:
●
The connection mode is automatic, the connection attempt will be made to corporate networks in the list of
available networks for matching one by one until one network is successfully connected.
●
If all networks in the list of available networks for matching are tried, but no successful connection is made,
the AnyConnect Network Access Manager will start over again from the beginning of the list, this is not
admin configurable. The AnyConnect Network Access Manager will not fall back to non-corporate networks.
There are no limitations imposed on the number of network profiles which are designated as corporate networks,
and whose SSIDs are configured as non-broadcasting (for example, hidden). However, due to technical limitations
in this release of the AnyConnect Network Access Manager, only one hidden SSID can be probed at a time.
Therefore, after reading the profiles sequentially from the configuration, the AnyConnect Network Access Manager
will choose the first corporate and hidden network and use its SSID for probing purposes. The remaining corporate
networks will be treated as broadcasting Wi-Fi networks for detection of hidden SSIDs, even though they are
configured as hidden.
Design Parameters
EAP Methods
The 802.1x authentication framework has been incorporated as part of the 802.3 (Wired Security) and 802.11
(Wireless Security) standard to enable layer-2 based authentication, authorization, and accounting functions in an
802.3 wired network. Today, there are several EAP protocols available for deployment in both wired and wireless
networks. The most common EAP protocols are LEAP, PEAP, EAP-FAST, and EAP-TLS. In this document EAPFAST will be used for 802.1X authentication.
EAP-FAST: EAP-FAST (Flexible Authentication using Secure Tunneling) is defined in RFC 4851 and was
developed by Cisco. The protocol was designed to address the weaknesses of LEAP while preserving the
lightweight implementation. Instead of using a certificate, mutual authentication is achieved by means of a
Protected Access Credential (PAC). PAC files details are covered in the Encryption section below.
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EAP-FAST has three phases:
●
Phase 0: An optional phase in which the PAC, can be provisioned manually or dynamically (used in this
case, with ISE server)
●
Phase 1: In this phase, the client and the authentication server uses the PAC to establish TLS tunnel.
●
Phase 2: In this phase, the client credentials are exchanged inside the encrypted tunnel, using an inner
method for authentication.
Identity Source and Database
When deploying in a wired/wireless network and seeking an authentication protocol, it is common to use an
existing database of user and machine authentication credentials. Typical databases are Windows Active Directory
(AD), LDAP, or a one-time password (OTP) database (for example, RSA SecureID). All of these databases are
compatible with the EAP-FAST protocol.
When planning for deployment, there are compatibility requirements, such as EAP Chaining, which requires AD for
machine and user validation. For the purpose of this document, AD will be used as the database. EAP Chaining
will be enabled in the EAP-FAST protocol selection on the ISE node.
Encryption
EAP-TLS is a strong authentication method, requiring server and client-based X.509 certificates that also need PKI
for certificate deployment. Another strong authentication method, EAP-FAST, does not require client side
certificates for mutual authentication. Instead, Protected Access Credential (PAC) files are used, which can be
provisioned either manually or automatically.
In this document, the PAC files are automatically provisioned from the ISE server to the client if the client does not
contain as existing PAC file. Anonymous PAC provisioning uses EAP-TLS with an anonymous key agreement
protocol to establish a highly secure TLS tunnel. In addition, MSCHAPv2 is used to authenticate the client and
prevent early MITM attack detection.
Authenticated In-Band PAC provisioning uses TLS server-side authentication, requiring server certificates for
establishing the highly secure tunnel. Since unauthenticated PAC provisioning does not require server side
validation, it has some security risks, such as allowing rogue authentications to mount a dictionary attack. In this
document, the AnyConnect Network Access Manager configuration profile will be configured for unauthenticated
PAC provisioning for testing purposes only.
A PAC file is a security credential generated by the ISE server that holds information specific to the client. These
PAC files, machine tunnel (also known as machine authentication) are used to establish the highly secure TLS
tunnel, and user authorization for validation of user credentials during inner method authentication exchanges.
They also prove that the client and machine were authenticated and the current authentication process can be
optimized and bypassed. PAC type 4 has been added to support EAP Chaining.
Configuring the Wireless LAN Controller
This configuration requires the following steps:
Configure the Wireless LAN Controller (WLC) with the details of the Authentication Server
Configure WLAN parameters
Configure the dynamic interfaces (VLANs)
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Configuring the WLC with the Details of the Authentication Server
The WLC needs to be configured to forward the machine and user credentials to the ISE server. The ISE server
then validates these credentials (using the configured Windows database) and provides access to the wireless
clients. Based on the initial WLC script install, RADIUS was configured and the values will be prefilled.
Step 1. From the controller GUI, click Security->Radius ->Authentication->New.
Step 2. Enter the IP address of the RADIUS server and the Shared Secret key used between the RADIUS
server and the WLC.
Note:
Values will be prefilled if RADIUS is configured as part of WLC installation script
The Network User and Management check boxes determine if the RADIUS-based authentication applies for
users (for example, WLAN clients) and management (for example, administrative users).
In this example, the ISE is used as the RADIUS server with the IP address of 192.168.1.20 and the communication
port as 1645.
Figure 1.
RADIUS Configuration
Configure WLAN Parameters
Configure the WLAN (the WLAN specifies a SSID and associated security parameters) which the clients use to
connect to the wireless network. When you configured the basic parameters for the WLC using the configuration
wizard, you also configured the initial SSID for the WLAN Controller. You can use the SSID for the WLAN or create
a new SSID.
Step 1. From the GUI, select ->WLANS, to display the WLANs page. This page lists the WLANs that are created
by the initial script controller.
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Figure 2.
WLAN Parameters
Step 2. From the GUI, select->WLANs->WLAN ID 1. In this page, you can define various parameters specific to
this WLAN, including General Policies, RADIUS Servers, Security Policies, and 802.1X parameters.
Notice that Broadcast SSID and Status are enabled.
Note that although non-broadcast of SSID is not considered a broadcast mechanism, it is recommended
to disable SSID broadcast to discourage casual WLAN observers and inadvertent client association
attempts. You can also elect to create new WLANs by selecting Create New-Go
Figure 3.
WLAN Screen
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Step 3. From the GUI, select->WLANs->WLAN ID 1->Security->AAA Servers to select the configured ISE
server.
Figure 4.
RADIUS Server Selection
Step 4. Under Security Policies, configure L2 Security for WPA+WPA2. Also select the appropriate encryption
types under WPA+WPA2 Parameters. Although network access manager supports all of these encryption
types, the settings chosen here depend on the client NIC card capabilities.
In this example, WPA2 Encryption AES was used.
Note:
Enabling WPA encryption permits the flexibility to support older WPA clients, as well as newer WPA2-
capable clients.
Step 5. Click Apply
Figure 5.
L2 Security
Configure Dynamic Interfaces (VLANS)
In this document, the wireless client will be placed in VLAN 12 after authentication. Note the VLAN ID specified
under the Tunnel-Private-Group ID attribute of the RADIUS server must also exist in the WLC.
The end user is specified with the Tunnel-Private-Group ID of 12 VLAN=12) on the RADIUS server. You can see
the same dynamic interface (VLAN=12) configured in the WLC.
Step 1. From the controller GUI, click Controller->Interfaces.
Step 2. Enter vlan12 for both the Interface Name and 12 the VLAN id.
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Figure 6.
VLAN Interface Configuration
Step 3. Click Apply on this window.
Step 4. Enter the IP Address and default Gateway of this Network Access Manager interface.
Figure 7.
Enter IP and Gateway address
Step 5. Click Apply.
Configure WLANs (SSID)
This procedure explains how to configure the WLANs in the WLC.
Step 1. From the controller GUI, select->WLANs->New to create a new WLAN.
Step 2. Enter the WLAN ID and WLAN SSID information.
In this example, VLAN12 was used for both.
Figure 8.
WLAN Configuration
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Step 3. Click Apply.
Figure 9.
VLAN Information
Figure 10.
VLAN Information
Normally, in a wireless LAN controller, each WLAN is mapped to a specific VLAN (SSID) so that a particular user
that belongs to that WLAN is put into the specific VLAN mapped. This mapping is normally done under the
Interface Name field of the WLAN SSID window.
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Step 4. From the GUI, select->WLANS->WLAN ID->and change the interface name from Management to VLAN
12->Apply.
Figure 11.
Interface Name
Figure 12.
RADIUS server configuration for VLAN 12
In the example provided, the RADIUS server assigns a wireless client to a specific VLAN upon successful
authentication. The WLANs need not be mapped to a specific dynamic interface on the WLC. Even though the
WLAN to dynamic interface mapping is done on the WLC, the RADIUS server overrides this mapping and assigns
the user that comes through that WLAN to the VLAN specified under the user Tunnel-Group-Private-ID field in the
RADIUS server.
Step 5. Check the Allow AAA Override check box to override the WLC configurations by the RADIUS server.
Step 6. Enable the Allow AAA Override in the controller for each WLAN (SSID) configured.
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Step 7. From the GUI, select ->WLANS->WLAN ID->Advanced.
Figure 13.
VLAN 12 Advanced Configuration
When AAA Override is enabled, and a client has AAA and controller WLAN authentication parameters that conflict,
client authentication is performed by the AAA (RADIUS) server. As part of this authentication, the operating system
moves clients to a VLAN returned by the AAA server. This is predefined in the controller interface configuration
Step 8. Select->Save Configuration.
Configuring the Cisco Identity Services Engine
This section describes how to configure the Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE), starting with adding the WLC as
a network device. Active Directory will be added as en external Identity Source, and an Authentication and
Authorization Policy will be created.
Add Networking Devices to ISE
Add WLC controller to ISE and provide a shared secret under Authentication Settings.
Step 1. Select->Network Resources-Network Devices->Administration->Add.
Step 2. Enter the name of the WLC
In this example, WLC was used.
Step 3. Enter the IPAddress.
In this example, 192.168.1.5 was used.
Step 4. Click on Authentication Settings and enter the shared secret.
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Figure 14.
Network Device Name and IP Address Configuration
Figure 15.
Authentication Settings
Step 5. Click on Submit.
Add Microsoft Active Directory as the External Identity Store
Machine and user credentials will be validated against the AD domain and identified as an external identity store.
Step 1. Select->Administration->Identity Management->External Identity Sources->Active Directory.
Step 2. Enter Domain Name.
In this example, cfacres007.com was used.
Step 3. Enter the Identity Store Name.
In this example, the default ”AD1” was used.
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Figure 16.
Active Directory Configuration)
Step 4. Click on Save Configuration.
Step 5. Select the ISE node, ISE, and Join Domain.
Figure 17.
Joining the Domain
Step 6. Click on OK. You should see a message that the node was joined successfully.
Figure 18.
Join Operation Successful
You should now see that ISE is successfully connected to the domain in Figure 5.
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Figure 19.
ISE successfully connected to domain
Configure Active Directory Groups
Step 1. Select->Administrative->Identity Management->External Identity-Sources-Active Directory.
Step 2. Select->Groups->Add.
Step 3. Select any active directory groups that you will use for your deployment.
Note:
If you leave the “*” by default, this will display all the AD groups (up to 100).
Figure 20.
Retrieved Groups from Active Directory
Step 4. Click OK, and then Save Configuration.
Define Identity Store Source
Identity Source Sequences define the order in which the Cisco ISE will look for the validation of user and machine
credentials in the different databases, and will be configured to search in Active Directory.
Step 1. Select->Administration->Identity Management->Identity Source Sequence->Add.
Step 2. Enter name of Identity Source.
In this case, CorpUsers was used
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Step 3. Under Authentication Search List, select AD1 and click on >. This will show up under Selected.
Figure 21.
Identity Source Sequence
Step 4. Click on Submit.
Defining Authentication Policies and Authorization Profiles
Authentication Policies
Authentication policies define the conditions between the client and ISE node when 802.1X occurs. They define the
RADIUS attribute conditions and authentication protocols that are required for successful authentication, as well as
for the external or internal database used for validation of machine and user credentials.
The Authentication policy consists of the following elements:
Results: Define authentication protocols
Configure the authentication method between ISE server and client.
In this example, EAP-FAST is defined as the authentication protocol.
Note:
We could have chosen to use the default authentication protocol. In this document, we have elected to
add the EAP-FAST protocol to provide the reader with experience for creating authentication protocols.
Conditions: Set the RADIUS attributes to match on 802.1X-based RADIUS authentication requests.
ISE ships with pre-defined 802.1X conditions that will be used when configuring policies.
In this example, predefined wireless 802.1X condition rule will be used.
Defining Identity Source Sequence: Authentication policy will use the identity source to validate the end user and
machine credentials.
In this example, CorpUsers will be defined as the identity source.
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Defining the Authentication Policies
In this document, we will define a Wireless Authentication policy, use EAP-FAST for the authentication protocol,
and select CorpUsers as the identity source for credential validation.
Adding EAP-FAST as the Authentication Protocol
The following illustrates adding the EAP-FAST protocol.
Step 1. Select Policy->Authentication->Policy Elements->Results->Authentication->Allowed Protocols>Add.
Step 2. Enter the name of the allowed protocol.
In this example, EAP-FAST was entered.
Step 3. Enable Allow Anonymous In-band PAC provisioning.
Step 4. Enable Allow Authenticated In-band PAC provisioning, then enable the following:
●
Server Returns Access Accept After Authenticated Provisioning
Step 5. Enable Allow Machine Authentication.
Step 6. Enable Stateless Session Resume.
Figure 22.
Adding EAP-FAST Authentication Protocol)
Step 7. Click on Submit
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Define Authentication Policy
A wireless authentication policy will be created, EAP-FAST selected as the allowed protocol, and CorpUsers
selected as the Identity Store.
Step 1. Select Policy->Authentication->by the gear, select Actions, then insert new row above.
Figure 23.
Adding Authentication Policy rule
Step 2. Replace standard rule 1 name with wireless.
Step 3. Click on + next to Condition(s)
Step 4. Select Existing Condition from the library from the drop-down menu, then select ->Compound
Condition->Wireless 802.1X
Step 5. Click on >, click on the + next to Internal Users, then select CorpUsers for the Identity Source
Figure 24.
Authentication Policy
Step 6. Click on Save.
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Define the Authorization Profiles
Authorization occurs once the end user has successfully authenticated. Authorization policies provide the rules that
must be met before the end user is provided with full or restricted network access as determined by the associated
authorization profile.
The authorization profile contains common data such as VLAN information and other RADIUS attributes, and
consists of the following elements:
Authorization Profile: Defines full or restricted network access.
In this example, we will define one profile to match the authorization condition for wireless, and provide full network
access.
Conditions: Contain the authorization rules that determine the required network permissions or level of access
In this example, the default wireless condition rule will be used.
Create Authorization Profile
In this document, we will define, a Wireless Authorization Policy, based on the default wireless 802.1X condition.
Then, we will provide the appropriate level of access as defined by the corresponding authorization profile,
WIRELESSACCESS
Step 1. Select->Policy->Authorization->Policy Elements->Results->Authorization->Authorization Profiles>Add
Step 2. Enter name of profile.
In this example, WIRELESSACCESS was used
Step 3. Select VLAN, and enter VLAN ID.
In this example, VLAN ID 12 was used
Figure 25.
Wireless Authorization Profile
Step 4. Click on Submit.
Defining Authorization Condition Rules and Authorization Policies
Once the authorization profile has been created, define the authorization policy rule and the condition rule.
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Define Authorization Policy
Step 1. Select->Policy->Authorization->, click on the down arrow, and Insert New Rule above.
Figure 26.
Adding Authorization Policy Rule
Step 2. Replace standard rule 1 name with wireless, click on + next to select condition, and select wireless
802.1X for the condition name.
Step 3. Click on the „+‟ sign next to Authz profile, then select ->Standard->Wireless Access.
Figure 27.
Authorization Policy for Wireless
Step 4. Click on Save.
Configuring the AnyConnect Network Access Manager
Network Access Manager Installation and Configuration
Installing AnyConnect Network Access Manager
Step 1. Extract the contents of the AnyConnect ISO image to a folder
Run setup
Note:
Please note that you will require local admin rights during the installation.
Step 2. Enable AnyConnect Diagnostics and Reporting Tool.
Step 3. Enable AnyConnect Network Access Manager
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Figure 28.
Note:
Installation Selector)
You will see the message in Figure 28 after a completed install of the AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client.
As part of the core install, the AnyConnect Quality Improvement feature is enabled by default. This feature provides
Cisco with customer-installed AnyConnect modules, and enabled features. Crash dumps may also be included.
This feature can be completely disabled by using the Profile Editor or just for disabling crash dumps. Corporate
privacy is maintained by hashing the machine name; however, crash dumps may contain personal information,
which is why the EULA license is displayed.
Figure 29.
AnyConnect Quality Improvement Feature
Creating an AnyConnect Network Access Manager Profile with the Profile Editor
The Profile Editor will also be required to configure the AnyConnect Network Access Manager Configuration Profile
for EAP-FAST authentication.
Note:
Please note that the AnyConnect Network Access Manager configuration should be saved as
configuration.xml, and saved to the „NewConfigFiles‟ directory. Right-click on the AnyConnect GUI in the system
tray, then select „Network Repair‟. This will place the configuration.xml file into the AnyConnect Network Access
Manager system directory.
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Open the profile editor, and access the current system configuration.
Step 1. Select file open from the drop-down menu, and open the configuration.xml file as shown in Figure 30.
Figure 30.
Opening Configuration.xml file)
Step 2. Keep the defaults, and select->Networks.
Step 3. Define your networks.
In this example, Corporate was defined for the administrative network profile,
as illustrated in Fig 31.
Step 4. Enable WiFi network, then enter SSID value.
In this example, lab005 was used.
Step 5. Enable the following:
●
Hidden Network
●
Corporate Network
Figure 31.
Wireless Network Profile Description
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Step 6. Select ->Next.
Step 7. Select->Authenticating Network.
Authenticating Network settings contain the 802.1X settings that contain
MACSec configuration settings, and also 802.1X network connectivity settings
Step 8. Under Association Mode, from the drop-down menu, select encryption to match your WLC configuration.
In this example, WPA2 enterprise (AES) was selected
Figure 32.
Network Security Level
Step 9. Select ->Next.
Step 10. Select Machine and User Connection.
Note:
Machine and User Connection determines the network connection types
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Figure 33.
Network Connection Type
Step 11. Select->Next.
Step 12. Select EAP-FAST as the EAP method, then uncheck Validate Server Identity.
Note:
EAP-FAST will be the method of Authentication, and EAP-MSCHAPv2 will be the inner method.
In this example, root certificate and ISE identity certificate are not installed, which is why Validate Server
Identity is unchecked.
Step 13. Leave the defaults.
Figure 34.
EAP-FAST Selection
Step 14. Select->Next.
Step 15. Leave PAC files set for empty, as shown in Figure 22, then select Next.
Note:
PAC file will be provisioned from ISE
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Figure 35.
PAC Files
Step 16. Leave defaults for machine identity, then select ->next.
Note:
Machine identity credentials will be sent to the ISE server for validation.
Figure 36.
Machine Identity Credentials
Step 17.
Select ->EAP-FAST for user authentication, then uncheck Validate Server Identity.
Step 18.
Leave the defaults.
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Figure 37.
EAP-FAST for user authentication
Step 19. Select -> Next.
Step 20. Leave PAC files empty, then select ->Next.
Figure 38.
PAC Files
Step 21. Leave the defaults for user credentials.
Note:
User credentials will be sent to the ISE server for validation
Figure 39.
User Identity Credentials
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Step 22. Select->Done.
Figure 40.
Completed Profile
Step 23. Click file and save as configuration.xml.
Figure 41.
Saving configuration.xml
Step 24. Run network repair, then right-click on AC GUI, and click on Network Repair.
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Figure 42.
Run Network Repair
Testing Procedure
●
Click on the AC GUI, and then connect to Corporate.
Figure 43.
●
Connect to Corporate
Click on any other non-corporate APs. You should see the following error message:
Figure 44.
Non-Corporate Connection
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Page 29 of 32
●
View the ISE Authentication Live Logs. You will see separate transactions for successful machine and
user credentials.
Figure 45.
Live Authentication Logs
Appendices
Configuring the Switch for Multiple VLANs
In order to allow multiple VLANs through the switch, the following commands were configured on the
switch port connecting to the controller:
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/6
description Trunk Port to WLC
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport mode trunk
Interface VLAN Configuration is listed below:
Interface VLAN12
Description of AP VLAN
ip address 10.3.1.2 255.255.255.0
Gigabit Switch Port Configuration is listed below:
Interface Gigabit Ethernet 1/0/10
Description of access port connection to Cisco AP
switchport access vlan 12
switchport mode access
© 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.
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Configure the WLC for Basic Operation and Register the Lightweight APs to the Controller
Use the startup configuration wizard on the command-line interface (CLI) to configure the WLC for basic operation.
Alternatively, you can also use the GUI to configure the CLI. This document explains the configuration on the WLC
with the startup configuration wizard on the CLI.
After the WLC boots the first time, it enters into the startup configuration wizard. Use the configuration wizard to
configure basic settings. You can access the wizard using the CLI or the GUI. The output shows an example of the
startup configuration on the GUI:
Welcome to the Cisco Wizard Configuration Tool
Use the '-' character to backup
System Name: Cisco_63:75:80
Enter Administrative User Name (24 characters max): jeppich
Enter Administrative Password (24 characters max): *******
Management Interface IP Address: 192.168.1.5
Management Interface Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Management Interface Default Router: 192.168.1.1
Management Interface VLAN Identifier (0=tagged):
Management Interface DHCP Server IP Address: 192.168.1.1
AP Manager Interface IP Address: 192.168.1.6
AP Manager is on Management subnet, using same values
AP Manager Interface DHCP Server 192.168.1.1
Virtual Gateway IP Address: 1.1.1.1
Mobility/RF Group Name: lab005
Network Name (SSID): lab005
Allow Static IP Addresses [YES][no] yes
Configure a Radius Server now [YES][no] yes
Enter Country Code (enter 'help' for a list of countries) (US):
Enable 802.11b Network [YES][no] yes
Enable 802.11a Network [YES][no] yes
Enable 802.11g Network [YES][no] yes
Enable Auto-Rf [YES][no] yes
Configuration saved!
Resetting system with new configuration
© 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.
Page 31 of 32
These parameters set up the WLC for basic operation. In this example configuration the WLC uses 192.168.1.5 as
the management interface IP address and 192.168.1.6 as the AP-manager interface IP address.
Before any other features can be configured on the WLC, the Lightweight APs have to register with the WLC. This
document assumes that the Lightweight AP is registered to the WLC.
Refer to the “Register the Lightweight AP to the WLC section of WLAN Controller Failover for Lightweight Access
Points Configuration Example” for information on how the Lightweight APs register with the WLC. For reference
with this configuration example, the AP 1130 is deployed on the same subnet.
Printed in USA
© 2012 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.
C07-713768-00
08/12
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