Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya Aura

Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya Aura
Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya
Aura® Session Manager
Release 6.3
Issue 7
March 2015
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Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction.......................................................................................................... 14
Purpose................................................................................................................................ 14
Intended audience................................................................................................................. 14
Document changes since last issue........................................................................................ 14
Related resources................................................................................................................. 14
Documentation................................................................................................................ 14
Training.......................................................................................................................... 16
Viewing Avaya Mentor videos........................................................................................... 17
Support................................................................................................................................ 17
Warranty............................................................................................................................... 18
Chapter 2: General information............................................................................................. 19
Required troubleshooting equipment....................................................................................... 19
Session Manager software version ........................................................................................ 19
Customer account commands................................................................................................ 19
Restricted commands for the ASSET interface........................................................................ 21
hardware_info command........................................................................................................ 21
Chapter 3: Safety information................................................................................................ 24
General safety information..................................................................................................... 24
Safety Inspection................................................................................................................... 25
Electrical safety rules............................................................................................................. 25
Protecting against ESD damage............................................................................................. 27
Chapter 4: Accessing Session Manager............................................................................... 28
Using the Session Manager services ports for local access...................................................... 28
Remote access..................................................................................................................... 28
Configuring the laptop for direct connection to the server.................................................... 28
Disabling proxy servers in Microsoft Internet Explorer......................................................... 29
Disabling proxy servers in Mozilla Firefox.......................................................................... 30
Connecting a laptop to the server..................................................................................... 30
Chapter 5: Alarming................................................................................................................ 32
Alarm status.......................................................................................................................... 32
Alarm severities.................................................................................................................... 33
Viewing alarms...................................................................................................................... 33
Filtering displayed alarms....................................................................................................... 33
Changing the alarm status..................................................................................................... 34
Exporting alarms................................................................................................................... 34
Searching for alarms.............................................................................................................. 35
Configuring the throttling period alarm..................................................................................... 35
Alarming field descriptions..................................................................................................... 36
Troubleshooting alarms......................................................................................................... 40
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Alarm event codes................................................................................................................. 40
Chapter 6: Log files................................................................................................................ 41
Log Harvester....................................................................................................................... 41
Accessing the Log Harvester service................................................................................ 41
Creating a new log harvesting profile................................................................................ 42
Create New Profile field descriptions................................................................................. 43
Viewing details of a log harvesting profile.......................................................................... 44
Filtering log harvesting profiles......................................................................................... 44
Submitting a request for harvesting log files....................................................................... 44
Viewing details of a log harvesting request........................................................................ 45
Filtering log harvesting requests....................................................................................... 45
Viewing the contents of harvested log files........................................................................ 46
Searching for text in a log file........................................................................................... 46
Viewing the harvested log files in an archive...................................................................... 47
Downloading the harvested log files.................................................................................. 48
Harvest Archives field descriptions.................................................................................... 48
Profile Criteria View field descriptions............................................................................... 50
Search Archives field descriptions.................................................................................... 50
Harvest - View Harvest detail field descriptions.................................................................. 51
Log Viewer........................................................................................................................... 53
Viewing log details........................................................................................................... 53
Logging field descriptions................................................................................................. 53
Searching for logs........................................................................................................... 57
Filtering logs................................................................................................................... 57
Log Event Codes............................................................................................................. 58
Session Manager Logs.......................................................................................................... 58
SIP Tracing and Call Processing logs............................................................................... 58
SM100 (Asset) logs......................................................................................................... 58
SM100 SIP traces........................................................................................................... 59
Session Manager Management logs................................................................................. 59
DRS replication log.......................................................................................................... 59
PPM log......................................................................................................................... 59
Registration and Subscriptions event log........................................................................... 60
General System Manager log........................................................................................... 60
NPR audit logs................................................................................................................ 60
Alarm logs...................................................................................................................... 60
Chapter 7: Call Detail Recording on Session Manager....................................................... 61
Minimum requirements for CDR.............................................................................................. 62
CDR Data file naming and structure........................................................................................ 62
CDR login and password....................................................................................................... 63
CDR record transfer.............................................................................................................. 63
Retrieving CDR data files....................................................................................................... 64
CDR record deletion.............................................................................................................. 65
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CDR security provisions......................................................................................................... 65
CDR alarms.......................................................................................................................... 65
Administering CDR on a new Session Manager instance.......................................................... 66
Enabling CDR for an existing Session Manager instance.......................................................... 66
Chapter 8: SNMP support for Session Manager.................................................................. 68
Configuring Session Manager Serviceability Agent................................................................... 69
Managing SNMPv3 user profiles............................................................................................. 70
Creating an SNMPv3 user profile...................................................................................... 70
Editing an SNMPv3 user profile........................................................................................ 70
Viewing an SNMPv3 user profile....................................................................................... 71
Deleting an SNMPv3 user profile...................................................................................... 71
Filtering SNMPv3 user profiles......................................................................................... 72
SNMP User profile list...................................................................................................... 72
SNMPv3 user profiles field descriptions............................................................................. 73
Managing SNMP target profiles.............................................................................................. 74
Creating an SNMP target profile....................................................................................... 74
Editing an SNMP target profile.......................................................................................... 75
Viewing an SNMP target profile........................................................................................ 75
Deleting an SNMP target profile........................................................................................ 76
Filtering target profiles..................................................................................................... 76
SNMP Target profile list................................................................................................... 76
SNMP target profiles field descriptions.............................................................................. 77
Managing Serviceability Agents.............................................................................................. 78
Activating a serviceability agent........................................................................................ 78
Managing SNMPv3 user profiles for the selected serviceability agents................................. 78
Managing target profiles for the selected serviceability agents............................................ 79
Serviceability Agents list.................................................................................................. 79
System Manager TrapListener service.................................................................................... 80
Configuring the TrapListener service................................................................................. 80
TrapListener service field descriptions............................................................................... 80
Session Manager SNMP MIB................................................................................................. 81
Chapter 9: Session Manager Dashboard.............................................................................. 86
Session Manager Dashboard field descriptions........................................................................ 86
Chapter 10: Maintenance functions...................................................................................... 88
Session Manager maintenance procedures............................................................................. 88
Backup and Restore.............................................................................................................. 88
Backup and Restore field descriptions............................................................................... 88
Schedule Backup field descriptions................................................................................... 89
Creating a data backup on a local server........................................................................... 90
Scheduling a data backup on a local server....................................................................... 90
Viewing pending jobs....................................................................................................... 91
Pending Jobs field descriptions........................................................................................ 91
Viewing list of backup files............................................................................................... 93
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Restoring data backup from a local server......................................................................... 93
Backup data retention...................................................................................................... 94
Shut down or reboot the Session Manager server.................................................................... 95
Using the GUI to shut down or reboot the server................................................................ 95
Using the CLI to shut down or reboot the server................................................................. 96
Replacing server components................................................................................................ 96
Chapter 11: Data Retention ................................................................................................... 98
Data retention rules............................................................................................................... 98
Data Retention field descriptions............................................................................................ 98
Changing the Retention Interval Value.................................................................................... 99
Chapter 12: Data Replication Service................................................................................. 100
Viewing replica groups......................................................................................................... 100
Viewing replica nodes in a replica group................................................................................ 100
Repairing a replica node...................................................................................................... 101
Repairing all replica nodes in a replica group......................................................................... 101
Viewing replication details for a replica node.......................................................................... 102
Removing a replica node..................................................................................................... 102
Removing a replica node from queue.................................................................................... 103
Troubleshooting steps......................................................................................................... 103
Replica Groups field descriptions.......................................................................................... 104
Replica Nodes field descriptions........................................................................................... 105
Replication Node Details field descriptions............................................................................ 107
Chapter 13: Security Module Status................................................................................... 110
Viewing Security Module status............................................................................................ 110
Security Module Status field descriptions............................................................................... 110
Security Module Status actions............................................................................................. 111
Investigating Security Module status..................................................................................... 112
Connection Status............................................................................................................... 113
Connections Status field descriptions.............................................................................. 113
NIC bonding........................................................................................................................ 115
Chapter 14: Session Manager maintenance tests............................................................. 117
Maintenance Tests page field descriptions............................................................................ 117
Running maintenance tests.................................................................................................. 118
Maintenance Test descriptions............................................................................................. 118
Test Call Processing status............................................................................................ 118
Test data distribution and redundancy link....................................................................... 118
Test host name resolution of each Session Manager........................................................ 119
Test management link functionality................................................................................. 119
Test Postgres database sanity........................................................................................ 119
Test sanity of Secure Access Link (SAL) agent................................................................ 119
Test Security Module Status........................................................................................... 119
Test network connections to each Session Manager........................................................ 120
Test User Data Storage sanity........................................................................................ 120
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Contents
Chapter 15: SIP Entity Monitoring....................................................................................... 121
Session Manager SIP Entity Monitoring................................................................................. 121
Viewing the SIP Monitoring Status Summary page................................................................. 122
SIP Entity Link Monitoring Status Summary page field descriptions......................................... 122
Chapter 16: SIP Tracing....................................................................................................... 124
Session Manager SIP Tracing.............................................................................................. 124
SIP Tracer Configuration...................................................................................................... 124
Tracer Configuration page field descriptions.................................................................... 125
Configuring SIP tracing.................................................................................................. 128
Filtering by user............................................................................................................ 128
Filtering by Call ID......................................................................................................... 129
Deleting a filter.............................................................................................................. 129
SIP Trace Viewer................................................................................................................ 130
Viewing trace logs......................................................................................................... 130
Trace viewer output....................................................................................................... 130
Trace viewer buttons..................................................................................................... 131
Trace viewer file options................................................................................................ 131
Remote logging................................................................................................................... 132
Unsecure UDP syslog server.......................................................................................... 132
Secure TCP syslog server.............................................................................................. 134
Chapter 17: Call Routing Test.............................................................................................. 137
Call Routing Test for Session Manager................................................................................. 137
Call Routing Test page field descriptions............................................................................... 137
Setting up a Call Routing Test.............................................................................................. 139
Call Routing Test results...................................................................................................... 139
Troubleshooting a Call Route Test failure.............................................................................. 140
Chapter 18: IP address and host name changes............................................................... 141
Changing the Security Module IP address............................................................................. 141
Changing the Session Manager IP address or host name....................................................... 143
Changing the IP address or FQDN in System Manager.......................................................... 145
For Session Manager.................................................................................................... 145
For Branch Session Manager......................................................................................... 146
Chapter 19: Managed Bandwidth Usage............................................................................ 147
Viewing Managed Bandwidth Usage..................................................................................... 147
Managed Bandwidth Usage errors........................................................................................ 147
Chapter 20: Postgres database recovery........................................................................... 149
Postgres database corruption............................................................................................... 149
pg_resetxlog command........................................................................................................ 149
Troubleshooting Postgres database problems....................................................................... 150
Troubleshooting pg_resetxlog.............................................................................................. 151
pg_resetxlog won’t start................................................................................................. 151
pg_resetxlog cannot determine valid data........................................................................ 151
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Contents
References................................................................................................................... 152
Chapter 21: Testing the System Manager and Session Manager installation................ 153
Generating a test alarm....................................................................................................... 154
Chapter 22: Session Manager upgrades............................................................................ 156
Chapter 23: Supported servers........................................................................................... 157
Ethernet port labels by server type........................................................................................ 157
S8510 Servers.................................................................................................................... 158
S8510 field replaceable hardware................................................................................... 158
S8510 server upgrade................................................................................................... 162
S8800 Servers.................................................................................................................... 165
S8800 Field replaceable hardware.................................................................................. 165
S8800 Disk upgrade...................................................................................................... 182
™
™
Dell PowerEdge R610..................................................................................................... 183
Replacing the Dell R610 Server...................................................................................... 183
Removing the Dell R610 server from the rack.................................................................. 185
Installing the Dell R610 server in the rack........................................................................ 186
™
™
Dell PowerEdge R620..................................................................................................... 187
HP ProLiant DL360 G7 Server.............................................................................................. 187
HP ProLiant DL360p G8 Server............................................................................................ 187
Replacing a server with a different server type....................................................................... 187
Appendix A: Alarm and Log Event IDs............................................................................... 190
Alarm Event ID descriptions................................................................................................. 190
Log Event ID descriptions.................................................................................................... 196
Action on Session Manager.................................................................................................. 201
Action on System Manager.................................................................................................. 201
Alarms for NFS Disk Space.................................................................................................. 201
Battery power is low............................................................................................................ 202
BGI completed with uncorrectable errors............................................................................... 202
BSM Entity links not administered......................................................................................... 202
BSM missing avaya-lsp entry............................................................................................... 203
Call Admission Control Call Denial........................................................................................ 203
Camp-on busyout mode....................................................................................................... 204
CDR Not Operational........................................................................................................... 204
Certificate Expiration............................................................................................................ 204
Certificate status................................................................................................................. 205
Connection limit exceeded................................................................................................... 205
Controller battery malfunction............................................................................................... 206
Cooling fan failure............................................................................................................... 206
Data Distribution/Redundancy is down.................................................................................. 206
Database connection........................................................................................................... 207
Database DELETE.............................................................................................................. 208
Database error.................................................................................................................... 208
Database INSERT............................................................................................................... 208
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Contents
Database Query.................................................................................................................. 209
Database UPDATE.............................................................................................................. 209
Disk drive failed................................................................................................................... 210
Disk drive malfunction.......................................................................................................... 210
DRS failure due to reinstallation of System Manager.............................................................. 210
DRS Synchronization failure................................................................................................. 210
No entity link with correct transport type................................................................................ 211
Exceeding Location Bandwidth............................................................................................. 211
Failed binding a listener....................................................................................................... 212
Troubleshooting failed binding listener............................................................................ 212
Failure to install the unique authentication file........................................................................ 212
Troubleshooting unique authentication file failure............................................................. 213
Hard disk drive data save errors........................................................................................... 213
Host name resolution failed.................................................................................................. 213
ELIN entity link missing........................................................................................................ 214
Management BSM instance check failed............................................................................... 214
Management Instance check failed....................................................................................... 215
Memory error...................................................................................................................... 217
Memory failing.................................................................................................................... 217
Missing file.......................................................................................................................... 217
Motherboard voltage issues................................................................................................. 218
Network Configuration......................................................................................................... 218
Network firewall critical event............................................................................................... 219
Network Firewall Pinholing................................................................................................... 219
Network firewall stopped...................................................................................................... 219
No master System Manager................................................................................................. 219
PPM Connection problem.................................................................................................... 220
Performance data storage disk usage................................................................................... 220
Postgres database sanity check failed................................................................................... 220
Power supply malfunction.................................................................................................... 222
Power supply overheating.................................................................................................... 222
Troubleshooting power supply overheating...................................................................... 222
Product Type Error in Configuration File................................................................................ 222
Troubleshooting product type error in configuration file..................................................... 223
Registration authorization failure........................................................................................... 223
Registration component failure storing subscriptions.............................................................. 223
Registration service unavailable for a given user.................................................................... 224
Route Through.................................................................................................................... 224
SAL Agent sanity check failed.............................................................................................. 224
Security Module Management Agent unable to configure Security Module............................... 226
Security Module multiple DNS resolutions............................................................................. 226
Security Module Sanity Failure............................................................................................. 227
Service <name of service> has totally failed.......................................................................... 228
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Session Manager Instance Resolution.................................................................................. 228
Switched Session Manager.................................................................................................. 229
SIP Firewall actions............................................................................................................. 229
SIP firewall configuration...................................................................................................... 230
SIP FW Block flow action summary log................................................................................. 231
SIP Monitor Alarm............................................................................................................... 231
SMART configuration change............................................................................................... 231
Subscription authorization failure for a given user.................................................................. 232
System overheated.............................................................................................................. 232
Troubleshooting system overheated............................................................................... 232
Temperature reading errors.................................................................................................. 232
Unexpected data................................................................................................................. 232
User failed over, manual failback mode................................................................................. 233
User failed over to Branch Survivability Server....................................................................... 234
Version Error in Configuration File........................................................................................ 235
Troubleshooting version error in configuration file............................................................ 235
Zone File I/O....................................................................................................................... 235
Appendix B: S8510 and Dell R610 Server alarms.............................................................. 237
S8510/DellR610 hardware and environment alarm events...................................................... 237
Power supply detected a failure............................................................................................ 239
Device failed....................................................................................................................... 239
Virtual disk failed................................................................................................................. 239
Virtual disk degraded........................................................................................................... 239
Troubleshooting a virtual disk degradation....................................................................... 240
Virtual disk check consistency failed..................................................................................... 240
Physical disk initialize failed................................................................................................. 240
Physical disk rebuild failed................................................................................................... 240
Temperature exceeded maximum threshold.......................................................................... 241
Temperature dropped below minimum threshold.................................................................... 241
SMART configuration change............................................................................................... 241
Rebuild completed with errors.............................................................................................. 241
Controller battery needs to be replaced................................................................................. 242
Storage Management has lost communication....................................................................... 242
Physical disk Clear operation failed....................................................................................... 242
Uncorrectable media error detected...................................................................................... 243
Physical disk puncture......................................................................................................... 243
Hot spare SMART polling failed............................................................................................ 244
Multi-bit ECC error............................................................................................................... 244
Bad physical connection...................................................................................................... 244
Bad block table is full........................................................................................................... 245
Single-bit ECC error............................................................................................................ 245
Single-bit ECC error, no further alerts................................................................................... 245
BGI completed with uncorrectable errors............................................................................... 246
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Rebuild failed on source physical disk................................................................................... 246
Rebuild failed on target physical disk.................................................................................... 246
Bad disk block could not be reassigned................................................................................. 247
Unrecoverable disk media error during rebuild....................................................................... 247
Appendix C: S8800 Alarm Messages.................................................................................. 248
Appendix D: S8800 Server Light path diagnostics............................................................ 250
About light path diagnostics.................................................................................................. 250
Using light path diagnostics to identify system errors.............................................................. 250
Operator information panel................................................................................................... 251
Accessing the light path diagnostics panel............................................................................. 253
Light path diagnostics panel................................................................................................. 253
Troubleshooting light path diagnostic LEDs........................................................................... 254
OVERSPEC LED lights up............................................................................................. 254
LOG LED lights up........................................................................................................ 255
LINK LED lights up........................................................................................................ 255
PS LED lights up........................................................................................................... 255
PCI LED lights up.......................................................................................................... 256
SP LED lights up........................................................................................................... 256
FAN LED lights up......................................................................................................... 256
TEMP LED lights up...................................................................................................... 257
MEM LED lights up........................................................................................................ 257
NMI LED lights up......................................................................................................... 258
CNFG LED lights up...................................................................................................... 258
CPU LED lights up........................................................................................................ 259
VRM LED lights up........................................................................................................ 259
DASD LED lights up...................................................................................................... 259
RAID LED lights up........................................................................................................ 260
BRD LED lights up........................................................................................................ 260
System board LEDs............................................................................................................. 260
Hard disk drive LEDs........................................................................................................... 260
Troubleshooting hard disk drives.......................................................................................... 261
Failed hard disk drive..................................................................................................... 261
A newly installed hard disk drive is not recognized........................................................... 261
Multiple hard disk drives fail........................................................................................... 262
Multiple hard disk drives are offline................................................................................. 262
A replacement hard disk drive does not rebuild................................................................ 262
Power supply LEDs............................................................................................................. 263
Power supply LEDs....................................................................................................... 263
Identifying power supply problems.................................................................................. 263
Troubleshooting power supply problems............................................................................... 264
Server has no AC power................................................................................................ 264
Error LED lights up for one power supply......................................................................... 264
Power supply AC LED lights up...................................................................................... 265
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Faulty power supply....................................................................................................... 265
Appendix E: Product notifications...................................................................................... 267
Viewing PCNs and PSNs..................................................................................................... 267
Registering for product notifications...................................................................................... 268
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Chapter 1: Introduction
Purpose
This guide contains procedures to identify and troubleshoot problems for Avaya Aura® Session
Manager. This guide describes how to run maintenance tests, replace hardware, set up and view
Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) tracing, monitor system components, and troubleshoot errors and
alarms.
Intended audience
The primary audience for this document is anyone who is involved with maintaining and
troubleshooting Session Manager.
Document changes since last issue
The following changes were made to this document since the last issue:
• Changed the description for alarm event OP_MMTC20045 to be the correct description (Host
name resolution failure).
Related resources
Documentation
The following documents are available at http://support.avaya.com.
For the latest information, see the Session Manager Release Notes.
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Related resources
Title
Description
Audience
Overview
®
Avaya Aura Session Manager
Overview and Specification
®
Avaya Aura Virtualized Environment
Solution Description
Describes the key features of Session
Manager.
IT management
Describes the Avaya Virtualized
Environment, design considerations,
topology, and resources requirements.
Sales engineers
System administrators
Implementation
engineers
Support personnel
®
Avaya Aura Session Manager
Security Design
Describes the security considerations,
features, and solutions for Session
Manager.
Network
administrators,
services, and support
personnel
Avaya Aura® Session Manager 6.3.x
Release Notes
Contains enhancements, fixes, and
workarounds for the various Session
Manager 6.3 releases.
System administrators
Services and support
personnel
Implementation
®
Deploying Avaya Aura Session
Manager
Describes how to install and configure a
Session Manager instance.
Services and support
personnel
Deploying Avaya Aura® Branch
Session Manager
Describes how to install and configure
Branch Session Manager.
Services and support
personnel
Deploying Avaya Aura®
Communication Manager on System
Platform
Describes how to install the appropriate
Communication Manager template,
including Branch Session Manager, on the
server.
Services and support
personnel
Deploying Avaya Aura® Session
Manager using VMware® in the
Virtualized Environment
Describes how to deploy the Session
Manager virtual application in a VMware
environment.
Services and support
personnel
Administration
®
Administering Avaya Aura Session
Manager
Describes the procedures to administer
Session Manager using System Manager.
System administrators
Administering Avaya Aura®
Communication Manager Server
Options
Describes the procedures to administer
Communication Manager as a feature
server or an evolution server. Provides
information related to Session Manager
administration.
System administrators
Avaya Aura® Session Manager Case
Studies
Provides common administration scenarios.
System administrators
Installation and upgrades
Installing Service Packs for Avaya
Aura® Session Manager
Describes the procedures to install service
packs on Session Manager.
Services and support
personnel
Table continues…
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Introduction
Title
Description
Audience
Installing Patches for Avaya Aura
Session Manager
Describes the procedures to install patches
on Session Manager.
Services and support
personnel
Installing the Avaya S8800 Server for
Avaya Aura® Communication
Manager
Describes the installation procedures for the
S8800 Server.
Services and support
personnel
Installing the Avaya S8510 Server
Family and Its Components
Describes the installation procedures for the
S8510 Server.
Services and support
personnel
Installing the Dell™ PowerEdge™
R610 Server
Describes the installation procedures for the
Dell™ PowerEdge™ R610 server.
Services and support
personnel
Installing the Dell™ PowerEdge™
R620 Server
Describes the installation procedures for the
Dell™ PowerEdge™ R620server.
Services and support
personnel
Installing the HP ProLiant DL360 G7
Server
Describes the installation procedures for the
HP ProLiant DL360 G7 server.
Services and support
personnel
Installing the HP ProLiant DL380p
G8 Server
Describes the installation procedures for the
HP ProLiant DL380p G8 server.
Services and support
personnel
Upgrading Avaya Aura® Session
Manager
Describes the procedures to upgrade a
Session Manager to the latest software
release.
Services and support
personnel
®
Maintaining
Maintaining and Troubleshooting
Avaya Aura® Session Manager
Describes the procedures to troubleshoot
Session Manager, resolve alarms, and
replace hardware.
Services and support
personnel
Training
The following courses are available on https://www.avaya-learning.com. To search for the course, in
the Search field, enter the course code and click Go .
Course code
Course title
1A00236E
Knowledge Access: Avaya Aura® Session and System Manager Fundamentals
4U00040E
Knowledge Access: Avaya Aura® Session Manager and System Manager
Implementation
5U00050E
Knowledge Access: Avaya Aura® Session Manager and System Manager Support
5U00095V
System Manager Implementation, Administration, Maintenance and
Troubleshooting
5U00096V
Avaya Aura® Session Manager Implementation, Administration, Maintenance and
Troubleshooting
5U00097I
Avaya Aura® Session and System Manager Implementation, Administration,
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
5U00103W
Avaya Aura® Session Manager 6.2 Delta Overview
Table continues…
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Support
Course code
Course title
5U00104W
Avaya Aura® Session Manager 6.2 Delta Overview
5U00105W
Avaya Aura® Session Manager Overview
ATU00171OEN
Avaya Aura® Session Manager General Overview
ATC00175OEN
Avaya Aura® Session Manager Rack and Stack
ATU00170OEN
Avaya Aura® Session Manager Technical Overview
ATC01840OEN
Survivable Remote Avaya Aura® Session Manager Administration
3U00100O
Designing Avaya Aura 6.2 Part 1
3U00101O
Designing Avaya Aura 6.2 Part 2
Viewing Avaya Mentor videos
Avaya Mentor videos provide technical content on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot Avaya
products.
About this task
Videos are available on the Avaya Support website, listed under the video document type, and on
the Avaya-run channel on YouTube.
Procedure
• To find videos on the Avaya Support website, go to http://support.avaya.com and perform one
of the following actions:
- In Search, type Avaya Mentor Videos to see a list of the available videos.
- In Search, type the product name. On the Search Results page, select Video in the
Content Type column on the left.
• To find the Avaya Mentor videos on YouTube, go to www.youtube.com/AvayaMentor and
perform one of the following actions:
- Enter a key word or key words in the Search Channel to search for a specific product or
topic.
- Scroll down Playlists, and click the name of a topic to see the available list of videos posted
on the website.
Note:
Videos are not available for all products.
Support
Go to the Avaya Support website at http://support.avaya.com for the most up-to-date
documentation, product notices, and knowledge articles. You can also search for release notes,
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Introduction
downloads, and resolutions to issues. Use the online service request system to create a service
request. Chat with live agents to get answers to questions, or request an agent to connect you to a
support team if an issue requires additional expertise.
Warranty
Avaya provides a 90-day limited warranty on Session Manager . For more information about the
terms of the limited warranty, see the sales agreement or other applicable documentation . In
addition, see the standard warranty and details about Session Manager support during the warranty
period on the Avaya Support website at https://support.avaya.com. You can find the warranty
information at the bottom of the page under Help & Policies > Policies & Legal > Warranty &
Product Lifecycle. See also Help & Policies > Policies & Legal > License Terms.
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Chapter 2: General information
Required troubleshooting equipment
For maintenance and troubleshooting activities, you need:
• A laptop
• A DVD burner
• A USB keyboard
• An SVGA monitor
• A network sniffer, such as Wireshark
Session Manager software version
The Session Manager version string has the format w.x.y.z., where
w = Major release number
x = Minor release number
y = Service pack number
z = Patch number
# = Build number
For example: 6.2.0.0.620019
The list of administered Session Managers is displayed on Avaya Aura® System Manager. On the
System Manager Home page, select Elements > Session Manager to view the Session Managers
and their software versions.
Customer account commands
The following is the list of commands that can be run by using the cust or craft login from the shell of
the Session Manager server:
• arp
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General information
• badblocks
• changeMgmtIP
• configureNMS
• displaypwd
• dnat_failover.sh
• generateTestAlarmSM.sh
• hardware_info
• initDRS
• initTM
• loadpwd
• mii-diag
• mii-tool
• mountiso
• patchSM
• rebootSM
• reconfigure
• restart
• setup_snmp
• shutdownSM
• sm
• sm-report
• smconfig
• SMnetSetup
• sshkeys
• start
• statapp
• swversion
• tshark
• traceroute
• traceSM
• upgradeSM
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Restricted commands for the ASSET interface
Restricted commands for the ASSET interface
Caution:
Only use System Manager to manipulate the ASSET interface. Do not use any of the Linux
administration tools that involve the ASSET interface, other than status commands, on the Session
Manager platform. The following commands can cause the Session Manager to enter an
irrecoverable state.
Do not use the following Linux commands. These commands do not work correctly or persistently:
• service network stop/start/restart
• ifup
• ifdown
• route
• ip
• ethtool
• iptables
hardware_info command
The hardware_info command provides detailed information about the server. See the example
below showing the console output of the command run on an S8800 server.
Example
$ hardware_info
[Bios Information]
Vendor: HP
Version: P68
[System Information]
Manufacturer: HP
Product Name: ProLiant DL360 G7
[CPU Information]
CPU #0
Model: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5620 @ 2.40GHz
MHZ: 2400.468
Cores: 8
CPU #1
Model: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5620 @ 2.40GHz
MHZ: 2400.468
Cores: 8
[Memory Information]
Total RAM: 12315280 kB
[Raid Information]
Disk /dev/mapper/sysvg-lv_root doesn't contain a valid partition table
Disk /dev/mapper/sysvg-lv_var doesn't contain a valid partition table
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General information
Serial Number: 50014380106258C0
Controller Status: OK
Firmware Version: 3.52
Battery/Capacitor Status: OK
Array: A
Logical Drive: 1
Size: 136.7 GB
Fault Tolerance: RAID 1
Status: OK
physicaldrive 1I:1:1 (port 1I:box 1:bay 1, SAS, 146 GB, OK)
physicaldrive 1I:1:2 (port 1I:box 1:bay 2, SAS, 146 GB, OK)
[Disk Information]
physicaldrive 1I:1:1
Size: 146 GB
Serial Number: 6SD0W0M90000B10406LN
Model: HP
EG0146FAWHU
physicaldrive 1I:1:2
Size: 146 GB
Serial Number: 6SD0VZ5Z0000B1040HVN
Model: HP
EG0146FAWHU
Disk /dev/sda: 146.8 GB, 146778685440 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 17844 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00051456
Device Boot
Start
End
Blocks
Id
/dev/sda1
*
1
26
204800
83
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2
26
1070
8388608
82
/dev/sda3
1070
17845
134744064
8e
System
Linux
Linux swap / Solaris
Linux LVM
Disk /dev/mapper/sysvg-lv_root: 51.5 GB, 51539607552 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6266 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000
Disk /dev/mapper/sysvg-lv_var: 83.8 GB, 83751862272 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 10182 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000
[Network Information]
eth0:
MAC: D4:85:64:50:36:94
IP: 135.9.148.18
Speed: 1000Mb/s
Duplex: Full
Link detected: yes
eth1:
MAC: D4:85:64:50:36:96
IP: 192.11.13.6
Speed: Unknown!
Duplex: Unknown! (255)
Link detected: no
eth2:
MAC: D4:85:64:50:46:60
IP: 192.168.0.102
Speed: 1000Mb/s
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hardware_info command
Duplex: Full
Link detected: yes
eth3:
MAC: D4:85:64:50:46:62
IP:
Speed: Unknown!
Duplex: Half
Link detected: no
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Chapter 3: Safety information
General safety information
Follow these rules to ensure general safety:
• Observe good housekeeping in the area of the system units during and after maintenance.
- Place removed covers and other parts in a safe place, away from all personnel, while you
service the system unit.
- Keep your tool case away from walk areas so that people do not trip over the tool case.
• When lifting any heavy object:
1. Verify that you can stand safely without slipping.
2. Distribute the weight of the object equally between your feet.
3. Use a slow lifting force. Never move suddenly or twist when you attempt to lift.
4. Lift by standing or by pushing up with your leg muscles. This action removes the strain
from the muscles in your back. Do not attempt to lift any objects that weigh more than 16
kg (35 lb.) or objects that you think are too heavy for you.
• Do not perform any action that causes hazards to the customer or that makes the equipment
unsafe.
• Before you start the system unit, ensure that other technical support staff and customer
personnel are not in a hazardous position.
• Do not wear loose clothing that can be trapped in moving parts. Ensure that your sleeves are
fastened or rolled up above your elbows. If your hair is long, fasten it.
• Insert the ends of your necktie or scarf inside clothing or fasten the necktie or scarf with a
nonconductive clip, approximately 8 cm (3 inches) from the end.
• Do not wear jewelry, chains, metal-frame eyeglasses, or metal fasteners for your clothing.
Metal objects are good electrical conductors.
• Remove items from your shirt pocket, such as pens and pencils, that could fall into the server
as you lean over it.
• Wear safety glasses when you are working in any conditions that might be hazardous to your
eyes.
• Avoid dropping any metallic objects, such as paper clips, hairpins, and screws into the server.
• After service, reinstall all safety shields, guards, labels, and ground wires. Replace any safety
device that is worn or defective.
• Reinstall all covers correctly before returning the server to service.
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Safety Inspection
Warning:
To prevent access to electrical hazards by unauthorized personnel and to ensure continued
compliance with international radiated emissions requirements, tighten all captive screws
securely so they cannot be loosened without the use of a tool.
Safety Inspection
Use this list to identify potentially unsafe conditions related to the server. When the server was
designed and built, the required safety items were installed on each server to protect users and
technical support staff from injury. If any unsafe conditions are present, determine how serious the
apparent hazard is and whether you can safely continue without first correcting the problem.
Consider these conditions and the safety hazards they present:
• Electrical hazards, especially primary power. Primary voltage on the frame can cause serious
or fatal electrical shock.
• Explosive hazards, such as a damaged monitor face or bulging capacitor.
• Mechanical hazards, such as loose or missing hardware.
Perform the following safety checks when servicing this unit:
1. Check exterior covers for damage such as loose, broken, or sharp edges.
2. Shutdown the system and unplug the AC power cords.
3. Check the power cord:
• Verify that the third-ground connector is in good condition. Use an ohmmeter to measure
third-wire ground continuity for 0.1 ohm or less between the external ground pin and frame
ground.
• Verify that the power cord is the appropriate type.
• Verify that insulation is not frayed or worn.
4. Check inside the server for any obvious unsafe conditions, such as metal filings,
contamination, water or other liquids, or signs of fire or smoke damage.
5. Check for worn, frayed, or pinched cables.
6. Verify that the power-supply cover fasteners, such as screws or rivets, have not been
removed or tampered with.
7. If you notice any damage, replace the appropriate system components.
Electrical safety rules
Electrical current from power, telephone, and communication cables can be hazardous. To avoid
any shock hazard, you must disconnect all power cords and cables.
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Safety information
Observe the following rules when working on electrical equipment.
• Find the room emergency power-off (EPO) switch, disconnecting switch, or electrical outlet. If
an electrical accident occurs, you can then operate the switch or unplug the power cord
quickly.
• Do not work alone under hazardous conditions or near equipment that has hazardous voltages.
• Disconnect all power before:
- Doing a mechanical inspection
- Working near power supplies
- Removing or installing servers
• Before you start to work on the server, unplug the power cord. If you cannot unplug it, ask the
customer to switch off the wall box that supplies power to the server. Afterwards, lock the wall
box in the off position.
• If you must work on a server that has exposed electrical circuits, observe the following
precautions:
- Ensure that another person, familiar with the power-off controls, is near you. Another person
must be there to switch off the power if necessary.
- Stand on suitable rubber mats to insulate you from grounds such as metal floor strips and
system unit frames. Obtain the mats locally, if necessary.
- When using testers, set the controls correctly and use the approved probe leads and
accessories for the tester.
- Use only one hand when working with powered-on electrical equipment. Keep the other
hand in your pocket or behind your back. This precaution can prevent current from passing
through your body.
• Regularly inspect and maintain your electrical hand tools for safe operational condition. Do not
use worn or broken tools and testers.
• Never assume that power was disconnected from a circuit. First, verify that the unit is turned
off.
• Always look carefully for possible hazards in your work area. Examples of hazards are moist
floors, non-grounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.
• Do not touch live electrical circuits with the reflective surface of a plastic dental mirror. The
surface is conductive. Touching a live circuit can cause personal injury and damage to the
server.
• Use only approved tools and test equipment. Some hand tools have handles covered with a
soft material that does not insulate you when working with live electrical currents.
• Many customers place rubber floor mats that contain small conductive fibers to decrease
electrostatic discharges near the equipment. Do not use this type of mat to protect yourself
from electrical shock.
If an electrical accident occurs:
• Use caution. Do not become a victim yourself.
• Turn off power.
• Send another person to get medical aid.
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Protecting against ESD damage
Protecting against ESD damage
Any system component that contains transistors or integrated circuits is sensitive to electrostatic
discharge (ESD). ESD damage can occur when there is a difference in charge between objects.
Protect against ESD damage by equalizing the charge. The server, the part, the work mat, and the
person handling the part must all be at the same charge.
Packaging materials that contain ESD-sensitive components are usually marked with a yellow and
black warning symbol.
Caution:
You must observe proper grounding techniques to prevent the discharge of static electricity from
your body into ESD-sensitive components.
To avoid damaging ESD-sensitive components:
• Limit your movement. Movement can cause static electricity to build up around you.
• Keep the parts in protective packages until you are ready to install them into the server. If it is
necessary to set down a part, put it back into its static-protective package. Do not place the
part on the server cover or on a metal surface.
• Place parts on a grounded surface before removing them from their containers.
• Handle the components only after attaching a wrist strap to your bare wrist. Attach the other
end of the wrist strap to a ground that terminates at the system ground, such as any unpainted
metallic chassis surface.
• Handle a circuit board by the faceplate or side edges only. Avoid touching pins, leads, or
circuitry. Hold devices such as a hard disk drive in the same manner. The ESD-sensitive area
of these components is located on the bottom surface.
Caution:
Make sure that the unprotected part of your hand is not in contact with the non-component
side of the board.
• Keep components away from plastics and other synthetic materials such as polyester clothing.
Most clothing is insulative and retains a charge even when you wear a wrist strap.
• Do not hand components to another person unless that person is grounded at the same
potential level. In general, avoid contact with other people.
• Use the black side of a grounded work mat to provide a static-free work surface. The mat is
especially useful when handling ESD-sensitive devices.
• Take additional care when handling devices during cold weather. Heating reduces indoor
humidity and increases static electricity.
• Verify that the ESD protective devices you use are ISO 9000 certified as fully effective.
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Chapter 4: Accessing Session Manager
You do not need to gain access to Session Manager except during installations and upgrades.
Note:
See the topics under Authentication files for Session Manager in the book Deploying Avaya
Aura® Session Manager for login authentication using Avaya’s Access Security Gateway (ASG).
Using the Session Manager services ports for local access
Each service port of the Session Manager server provides local access for installing the Session
Manager instance and upgrades.
Procedure
1. Connect a USB keyboard to a USB port.
2. Connect the SVGA monitor to the video connector on the front panel of the server.
Remote access
Secure Access Link (SAL) uses the existing Internet connectivity of the customer for remote support
and alarming. All communication from the customer environment is sent by Secure Hypertext
Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS). SAL requires upload bandwidth, for example, from customer to
Avaya or Avaya Partner, of at least 90 Kbs with round trip latency no greater than 150 ms.
Business Partners without SAL Concentrator must provide their own IP-based connectivity, for
example, B2B VPN connection, to deliver remote services.
Configuring the laptop for direct connection to the server
About this task
You must manually configure the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway of the laptop before
you connect the laptop to the server.
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Remote access
Note:
The following procedure is for Microsoft Windows XP, but the steps can vary slightly with other
versions of Windows.
Procedure
1. Click Start > Control Panel.
2. Double-click Network Connections > Local Area Connection.
3. In the Local Area Connection Status dialog box, click Properties.
4. In the This connection uses the following items box, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).
5. Click Properties.
6. In the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box, select Use the following IP address
on the General tab.
Caution:
Do not click the Alternate Configuration tab.
7. In the IP address field, enter a valid IP address.
For example: 192.11.13.5
8. In the Subnet mask field, enter a valid IP subnet mask.
For example: 255.255.255.252
9. In the Default gateway field, enter the IP address that is assigned to the default gateway.
For example: 192.11.13.6
10. Click OK.
Disabling proxy servers in Microsoft Internet Explorer
About this task
Before connecting directly to the services port, disable the proxy servers in Microsoft Internet
Explorer.
Procedure
1. Start Microsoft Internet Explorer.
2. Select Tools > Internet Options.
3. Click the Connections tab.
4. Click LAN Settings.
5. Clear the Use a proxy server for your LAN option.
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Accessing Session Manager
Tip:
To re-enable the proxy server, select the Use a proxy server for your LAN option
again.
6. Click OK to close each dialog box.
Disabling proxy servers in Mozilla Firefox
Before connecting directly to the services port, disable the proxy servers in Firefox.
Note:
This procedure is for Firefox on a Windows-based computer. The steps can vary slightly if you
are running Linux or another operating system on your laptop.
Procedure
1. Start Firefox.
2. Select Tools > Options.
3. Select the Advanced option.
4. Click the Network tab.
5. Click Settings.
6. Select the No proxy option.
Tip:
To re-enable the proxy server, select the appropriate option again.
7. Click OK to close each dialog box.
Connecting a laptop to the server
Before you begin
• Ensure that you have an SSH client application, such as PuTTY, installed on your laptop.
• Configure the IP settings of the laptop for direct connection to the server.
• Disable the use of proxy servers.
The use of the the remote services laptop is only for SSH access to the Session Manager. Session
Manager does not support Web access.
Procedure
1. Connect the laptop to the services port Eth1 with a standard or crossover Ethernet cable.
See Ethernet port labels by server type on page 157 for the port assignments on a particular
server.
2. Start an SSH client application session, such as PuTTY.
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Remote access
3. In the Host Name (or IP Address) field, enter 192.11.13.6.
The system assigns the IP address 192.11.13.6 to the services port.
4. Verify the protocol is SSH.
5. Verify that the Port is 22.
6. Click Open.
Note:
When you connect to the server for the first time, the system displays the PuTTY
Security Alert window.
7. Click Yes to accept the server host key and display the PuTTY window.
8. Log in using craft on Session Manager, or admin on System Platformand System Manager.
9. To close PuTTY, enter exit.
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Chapter 5: Alarming
The System Manager Web interface provides the following operations for alarms:
• Viewing alarms
• Changing alarm status
• Exporting alarms to a comma separated values (csv) file
• Configuring alarm throttling
Alarms are classified by their effect on system operation and identify the system component which
generates the alarm.
Session Manager and Survivable Remote Session Manager send alarms through SNMP traps
directly to the Secure Access Link (SAL) gateway. The SAL gateway then forwards the alarms to the
Avaya Data Center (ADC) for processing and resolution. Session Manager may send alarms to up
to ten Network Management System (NMS) destinations that the customer may have installed. One
of the destinations must be the SAL gateway.
Alarm throttling is a mechanism to reduce the frequency of alarm generation for the same events in
a specified interval of time. You can configure alarm throttling and can stop the occurrence of alarm
flooding events.
References
Avaya Aura™ Session Manager R6.1 — SNMP Agent Whitepaper describes the SNMP capabilities
of the Session Manager server.
SNMP support for Session Manager on page 68 describes how to create SNMP User and Target
profiles and attach the Target profiles to Serviceability Agents, and lists the Session Manager SNMP
MIB tables.
Alarm status
The status of an alarm can be:
• Raised: An alarm has been generated. Software recovery actions have failed to correct the
problem.
• Acknowledged: The alarm is being investigated. This state is set manually.
• Cleared: The problem has been fixed and the alarm has been cleared. This state is set
manually.
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Alarm severities
Alarm severities
Critical alarms indicate the system or certain system components are unusable. These alarms
require immediate attention.
Major alarms identify failures that are causing a critical degradation of service. These alarms require
immediate attention.
Minor alarms identify failures that are causing service degradation. These failures do not cause the
system to be inoperable.
Warning alarms identify failures that cause no significant degradation of service. Warning alarms are
not reported to a services organization.
Indeterminate alarms indicate the alarm matches one of the established alarm rules. Indeterminate
alarms do not specify a severity.
Note:
You can change the default colors of the severities.
Viewing alarms
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Events > Alarms.
3. On the Alarming page, select an alarm from the Alarm List. You can select multiple alarms.
4. Click View.
The system displays the alarm details on the Alarm - View Alarm Detail page.
Filtering displayed alarms
You can filter alarms displayed on the alarm screen based on certain criteria. You can use more
than one filter criterion on the selected alarms.
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Services > Events.
2. On the Alarming page, select the alarms you want to filter.
3. Select Filter: Enable at the top right corner of the Alarm List table.
4. Select the filter criteria you want to apply to the selected alarms.
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Alarming
The Status and Severity fields have drop-down menus.
You can enter the alarm code in the Message field to find all alarms that contain a particular
alarm code.
5. Click Filter: Apply.
Note:
The system displays a message if no matching records are found for the specified filter
criteria.
The page displays the alarms matching the filter criteria.
Changing the alarm status
The status of an alarm can be:
• Acknowledged: Maintenance support must manually set the alarm to this state. Indicates the
alarm is under investigation.
• Cleared: Maintenance support must manually set the alarm to this state. Indicates the error
condition has been resolved.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Events > Alarms.
3. On the Alarming page, select an alarm and click Change Status.
You can select multiple alarms.
4. Click the status that you want to apply to the selected alarms.
Exporting alarms
You can export alarms to a Comma Separated Values (.csv) file. You can open the CSV file using a
text editor such as Wordpad or a spreadsheet application such as Microsoft Excel.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Events > Alarms.
3. On the Alarming page, perform one of the following actions:
• To export an alarm to a CSV file, select an alarm and click More Actions > Export
Selected.
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Searching for alarms
• To export the filtered alarms to a CSV file, click More Actions > Export All.
When you use Advanced Search or Filter option to filter alarms based on some criteria,
Export All exports all the filtered data.
4. Click Save to save the exported file to the local disk.
Searching for alarms
Use the Advanced Search function to find alarms based on certain specified conditions. The system
displays only those alarms that satisfy the search conditions. You can specify multiple search
conditions.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Events > Alarms.
3. On the Alarming page, click Advanced Search.
4. In the Criteria section, from the first and second drop-down fields, select the search criterion
and the operator.
The default value in the first drop-down field is Time Stamp.
5. Select or enter the search value in the third field.
6. To add another search condition, click + and perform the following:
a. Select the AND or OR operator from the drop-down field.
b. Repeat Step 4 and Step 5.
To delete a search condition, click -. You can delete a search condition only if you added
more than one search condition.
7. To find alarms for the given search conditions, click Search.
Configuring the throttling period alarm
About this task
You can configure the throttling period in minutes as threshold for all alarms or alarms specific to
events at SAL Agent from Avaya Aura®. The system eliminates any redundant alarms raised within
the configured period at SAL Agent.
Procedure
1. Log in to System Manager through CLI as root.
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Alarming
2. Open the AlarmThrottle.properties properties file from the $SPIRIT_HOME/
config/agent location.
3. Type AlarmThrottlePeriod=2 in the file.
The system sets the throttle period in minutes and applies the configured period to all
outgoing alarms.
4. To configure the throttle time for a specific event, open the EP_BAse_Rules.xml files
which contain the events and add the following lines:
<tns:ExtraAttribute>
<tns:ExtraAttributeName>alarmThrottleInterval</tns:ExtraAttributeName>
<tns:ExtraAttributeValue>2</tns:ExtraAttributeValue>
</tns:ExtraAttribute>
You can apply the alarmThrottleInterval as the alarm throttle period for a specific event. If
you do not use the generic and the specific mechanisms, the system disables alarm
throttling. The system sets the default alarm throttling period to 720 minutes or 12 hours. If
you reconfigure the period, you must restart SAL Agent.
5. To disable alarm throttling, perform the following steps:
a. In the $SPIRIT_HOME/config/agent/AlarmThrottle.properties file, set
AlarmThrottlePeriod=-1.
b. Restart SAL Agent.
Alarming field descriptions
The Alarming home page contains two sections: upper and lower. The upper section contains
buttons that you can use to view the details of the selected alarms, change the status of alarms,
search for alarms , and set filters to view specific alarms. The lower section displays alarms in a
table. The table provides information about the status of the alarms along with their severity. You
can click a column title to sort the information in the table in ascending or descending order.
Field
Description
Time Stamp
The date and time when the alarm is generated.
Severity
The severity of the alarm.
Status
The current status of the alarms.
Host Name / SysName
The name of the host server that generated the
alarm.
In case of the trap listener service, this column
displays the system name.
Source IP Address
The IP address of the system that generated the
alarm.
Table continues…
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Alarming field descriptions
Field
Description
Description
The detailed description of the problem that
generated the alarm.
M/E Ref Number / SysOID
The unique identification number assigned to the
product, also called the product ID. This number
helps in identifying the component that generated the
alarm.
For alarms that are generated from trap listener, the
system displays the System OID.
Identifier
The unique identifier for an alarm.
Event ID
The log event ID if the alarm is generated from logs
or the Event OID if the alarm is generated from the
trap listener service.
NotificationOID
The SNMP OID of the alarm.
Button
Description
View
The details of the selected alarms.
Change Status
Changes the status of the selected alarm. The
options are:
• Acknowledged
• Cleared
Auto-Refresh Mode
Changes over to the Auto-Refresh mode. When the
Alarming page is set in this mode, it automatically
updates the alarms in the table. A toggle button.
More Actions > Export Selected
Exports the selected alarms to a CSV file. You can
view the logs using the Wordpad or Excel
application.
More Actions > Export All
Exports all the alarms to a CSV file. You can view
the logs using the Wordpad or Excel application.
Note:
When you use Advanced Search or Filter
option to filter alarms based on some criteria,
Export All exports all the filtered data.
More Actions > Delete Selected
Deletes the alarms that you select from the list.
More Actions > Delete ALL
Deletes all alarms that the system displays on the
page.
Advanced Search
Displays fields that you can use to specify the search
criteria for searching an alarm.
Refresh
Refreshes the log information in the table.
Filter: Enable
Displays fields under select columns that you can
use to set filter criteria. A toggle button.
Table continues…
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Alarming
Button
Description
Filter: Disable
Hides the column filter fields without resetting the
filter criteria. A toggle button.
Filter: Clear
Clears the filter criteria.
Filter: Apply
Filters alarms based on the filter criteria.
All
Selects all the alarms in the table.
None
Clears the check box selections.
Previous
The logs in the previous page. This button is not
available if you are on the first page.
Next
The logs in the next page. This button is not
available if you are on the last page.
Criteria section
This system displays the section when you click Advanced Search on the upper-right corner of
page.
Name
Description
Criteria
Use this section to specify search conditions. Select
the search criteria from the first drop-down list.
Select the operator from the second drop-down list.
Enter the search value in the text field.
Select following search criteria from the first dropdown list:
• Time Stamp: Searches all of the alarms that match
the specified date and time. The valid format for
entering the date is MM/DD/YYYY. The valid
format for entering the time is HH:MM.
• Severity: Searches all the alarms that match the
specified severity level.
• Status: Searches all the alarms that match the
specified status.
• Host Name: Searches all of the alarms that are
generated from the specified host.
• M/E Ref Number: Searches all the alarms that
match the specified M/E Ref Number.
• Event ID: Searches all the alarms that match the
specified Event ID.
• Source IP address: Searches all of the alarms that
are generated from the specified source IP
address.
• NotificationID: Searches all the alarms that match
the specified NotificationID.
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Alarming field descriptions
Name
Description
• Identifier: Searches all the alarms that match the
specified identifier.
• Description: Searches all the alarms that match the
specified description.
The operators available are based on the search
criterion that you select in the first drop-down field.
The following table lists the operators that are
available for a search criterion:
Criterion
Operators
Time
Stamp
=, >, <, >=, <=, >=, !=
Severity
Equals, Not Equals
Status
Equals, Not Equals
Host
Name
Equals, Not Equals, Starts With, Ends
With, and Contains
Identifier
=, >, <, >=, <=, >=, !=
Source IP
address
Equals, Not Equals, Starts With, Ends
With, and Contains
Event ID
Equals, Not Equals, Starts With, Ends
With, and Contains
Descriptio
n
Equals, Not Equals, Starts With, Ends
With, and Contains
M/E Ref
Number
Equals, Not Equals, Starts With, Ends
With, and Contains
When you select Begin Date and End Date from the
first drop-down list, you are prompted to enter the
date in the third field.
Button
Description
Clear
Clears the entered search criteria and sets the
default search criteria.
Search
Searches the alarms based on the search
conditions.
Close/Advanced Search
Hides the search fields.
+
Adds a search condition.
-
Deletes a search condition.
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Alarming
Troubleshooting alarms
The system does not automatically acknowledge or clear alarms. Some alarms, such as OS or
platform alarms, do not have an event code that clears the event.
Use the corrective actions associated with an alarm as guidelines for troubleshooting the alarm.
Alarm event codes
For the table on alarm event codes, descriptions, and troubleshooting actions, see Alarm Event ID
descriptions on page 190.
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Chapter 6: Log files
This section describes the options for logging on the Events > Logs menu. The options to view the
logs are:
• Log Harvester
• Managing log settings
• Log Viewer
Log Viewer is only used for viewing audit logs, including Session Manager administration changes.
To view Session Manager logs, either use the System Manager Log Harvester or look at the logs on
the Session Manager server directly.
Log Harvester
Log Harvester supports retrieval, archival, and analysis of harvested log files stored on Secure
Access Link (SAL) Agent-enabled hosts or elements. SAL communicates between the Log
Harvesting Agent and the Logging Service.
To harvest log files, you create a unique Harvest Profile that contains a specific type of harvest
criteria. This profile can be used anytime for logs that require the particular set of harvesting
requirements. Each time you run the saved profile, a new version of the archive is created, based on
the selected profile criteria. The collected logs are compressed into a single archive and stored on
System Manager. Archives are rotated based on the number of files and age.
You can specify the host machine from which logs files are to be collected and which log files to
collect.
Log Harvester provides a log viewer to view and analyze log files related to the profile. The log
viewer has browse and search features which help with troubleshooting and diagnosing problems.
Accessing the Log Harvester service
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
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Log files
Result
The system displays the Log Harvester page.
Creating a new log harvesting profile
About this task
To create a new log harvesting profile, you must specify:
• The host name of the server on which the product is running
Note:
If you do not see the host name of CS 1000 when you create the profile, at the command
prompt of CS 1000, run the following command:
cd /opt/nortel/oam-logging
./configureSpiritAgentClient.sh <enrollment password>
The system now enrolls CS 1000 to the log harvester of System Manager.
• The product name
• The directories or the log files
• The filter text if you select one or more directories
To harvest log files for products running on different servers, you must specify multiple filter criteria.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, click New.
4. On the Create New Profile page, enter the appropriate information in the Profile Name and
Profile Description fields.
5. Select the host name of the server, product, and directories or files from the respective
fields.
• To select multiple directories or files from the respective list boxes, press CTRL and click
the directories or files.
• To clear a selection, press CTRL and click the item.
• To add another log harvesting request for a different product or for another instance of the
same product running on the same server or on a different server, click plus (+).
6. If you select one or more directories, in the File Name Filter field, enter a text pattern as the
filter criteria.
During the harvesting operation, the system harvests only those files that match the filter
criteria.
7. To save the profile and the log harvesting requests in the profile, click Save Profile.
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Log Harvester
Create New Profile field descriptions
Use this page to create a new log harvesting profile for harvesting log messages from the log files
for one or more products. The files can reside on one or more servers.
Name
Description
Profile Name
The name of the log harvesting profile.
Profile Description
A brief description of the profile. This is an optional
field.
Host Name
The host name of the servers on which products are
installed.
If you do not see the host name of CS 1000 when
you create the profile, at the command prompt of CS
1000, run the following command:
cd /opt/nortel/oam-logging
./configureSpiritAgentClient.sh
<enrollment password>
Product
The products for which you can harvest logs.
Directories / Filter Text
A list of directories that contains the log files for the
selected product.
Files
The log files that you can harvest for the selected
product.
Filter Text
The text based on which the log files present under a
selected directory are filtered for harvesting.
If you select the directory /a/b/c and enter com in
this field, the harvest operation for this profile
harvests the log files that are in the
directory /a/b/c. The log files contain com in the
file name. The field does not support wild cards.
Button
Description
+
Specifies another log harvesting request for a
product.
-
Deletes the log harvesting request for the product.
Commit
Commits the filter criteria for the selected directories.
Save Profile
Saves the new profile and settings for log harvesting
requests in the database.
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Log files
Viewing details of a log harvesting profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a profile and click View.
The Profile Criteria View page contains the details of the log harvesting profile you selected.
Filtering log harvesting profiles
Use this feature to set filter criteria to view only those log harvesting profiles that meet the set filter
criteria. The titles of the columns of the table that displays the log harvesting profiles are the filter
criteria.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, click Filter: Enable.
You can find this button at the top right of the table containing log harvesting profiles.
4. Enter or select the filter criteria.
You can filter the log harvesting profiles by the name, description and creator of the profiles.
5. Click Filter: Apply.
Note:
If no records matching the filter criteria are found, the Log Harvester page displays a
message that no records matching the search criteria are found.
The log harvesting profile table displays the profiles that matches the specified filter criteria.
Submitting a request for harvesting log files
About this task
Use this feature to submit a log harvesting request to one or more products running on the same or
different servers. After the request is successfully processed, the system on which the products are
installed returns the harvested log files that are specified in the request. When you select a profile
and click Request, the system generates a single request for all the requests contained in the
profile.
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Log Harvester
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a log harvesting profile and click Requests.
4. On the Harvest Archives page, enter the relevant information in the Archive Name and
Archive Description fields.
The system saves the harvested log files in the specified archive file.
5. Click Run Profile to send a request.
The table in the Harvest Criteria View section provides you the status of the log harvesting
request. If the execution status of the request is successful, then the system creates a zip file
containing the harvested log files and saves the file in the specified location.
Viewing details of a log harvesting request
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a log harvesting profile and click Requests.
4. On the Harvest Archives page, click a request in the table in the Harvest Request Details
section.
5. If the system does not display any requests, submit a new request.
6. Click View.
The Harvest - View Harvest detail page displays the details of the selected request.
Filtering log harvesting requests
Use this feature to set filter criteria to view only those log harvesting requests that meet the set filter
criteria. The titles of the columns of the table that displays the log harvesting requests are the filter
criteria.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a log harvesting profile and click Requests.
4. On the Harvest Archives page, click Filter: Enable.
5. Enter or select the filter criteria.
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Log files
You can filter the log harvesting requests by:
• The request ID of the log harvesting request. For example, to view the requests starting
with Request ID 5, enter 5.
• The zip file name that stores the harvested files.
• The description of the log harvesting request.
• The location of the archived file that stores the harvested files.
• The status of the log harvesting request.
• The description of the log harvesting request status.
6. Click Filter: Apply.
Note:
If no records matching the filter criteria are found, the Log Harvesting page displays a
message that no records matching the search criteria are found.
The table containing log harvesting requests displays only those log harvesting requests that
match the specified filter criteria.
Viewing the contents of harvested log files
About this task
Use this feature to view the log messages stored in the harvested log files for a product. You can
view the contents of one log file at a time.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a log harvesting profile and click Requests.
4. On the Harvest Archives page, click a request in the table in the Harvest Request Details
section.
5. If the system does not display any requests, submit a new request.
6. Click Show Files.
The system lists the log files that are harvested.
7. Select the log file and click View.
The system displays the file content in the Log Browser Panel pane.
Searching for text in a log file
Use this feature to search for matching text in the log file of a product.
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Log Harvester
About this task
The search is based on Lucene Search. The search results are highlighted as per the Lucene
highlighter. The highlight package contains classes to provide keyword in context features, typically
used for highlighting search terms on the results page.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a log harvesting profile and click Requests.
4. On the Harvest Archives page, click a request in the table in the Harvest Request Details
section.
5. Click Show Files.
6. On the Search Archives page, in the Enter search text field, enter the text for which you
want to search.
7. In the Tree view, navigate to the log file by expanding the folders and select the log file.
8. Click Search.
The system displays the search results in the Search Result Panel. The Search Results
Panel field displays the line numbers as hyperlinks on which the searched text is found.
9. Click the hyperlink in the Search Results Panel field.
The system displays the page that contains the highlighted searched text in the Log
Browser Panel field.
Viewing the harvested log files in an archive
You can view the harvested log files of a product stored in an archive file.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a log harvesting profile and click Requests.
4. On the Harvest Archives page, click a request in the table in the Harvest Request Details
section.
5. Click Show files.
On the Search Archives page, navigate through the folders in the archive to view the
harvested log files.
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Log files
Downloading the harvested log files
About this task
You can download the harvested log files of one or more products that you stored in a zip file on
your local server.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Harvester.
3. On the Log Harvester page, select a log harvesting profile and click Requests.
4. On the Harvest Archives page, click a request in the table in the Harvest Request Details
section.
5. If the system does not display any requests, submit a new request.
6. Click Show Files.
7. On the Search Archives page, select a product name, host name of the server on which one
or more products are running, or a directory.
• If you select a product name, the system creates a zip file that contains the harvested log
files for the selected product instances running on the same server or on different servers.
• If you select a host name of a server under a product, the system creates a zip file that
contains the harvested log files for the products running on the server that you selected.
• If you select a directory, the system creates a zip file containing the harvested log files
under the selected directory.
8. Click Download.
The system prompts you to save the file on your local server.
9. Click Save.
Harvest Archives field descriptions
Use this page to create an archive for the log harvesting request. The archive created for a
successful harvesting request contains the requested log files in a zip file.
48
Name
Description
Archive Name
The name of the archive file that you want to create
for storing the harvested log files.
Archive Description
A brief description of the archive. This field is
optional.
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Log Harvester
Name
Description
Request Id
The unique identification number assigned to a log
harvesting request.
Archive Name
The name of the archive file that you create for
storing the harvested log files.
Request Time Stamp
The date and time when the log harvesting request is
submitted.
Request Description
A brief description of the log harvesting request.
Status
The status of the log harvesting request. The options
are:
• SUCCESS: The status is SUCCESS if System
Manager successfully harvests the log messages.
• FAILURE: The status is FAILURE if System
Manager failed to harvest the log messages for the
product.
• PARTIAL SUCCESS: The status is PARTIAL
SUCCESS if System Manager partially harvests
the log messages.
Status Time Stamp
The date and time when the execution status of the
log harvesting request is generated.
Status Description
A brief description of the log harvesting request
status. The description provides you the information
about the success or failure of the log harvesting
request.
Location
The location where the harvested log messages are
archived.
Button
Description
Run Profile
Runs the log harvesting requests for the selected
profile.
View
Opens the View Harvest detail page. You can use
this page to view the details of a selected log
harvesting request.
Show Files
Opens the Search Archives page. You can use this
page to search for text contained in the harvested
log files, download log files of one or more products
running on a same or different servers, view the
contents of a log file.
Filter: Disable
Hides the fields displayed under the column filter
fields without resetting the filter criteria. A toggle
button.
Filter: Enable
Displays fields under the column headers of the table
displaying the log harvesting requests. You can enter
Table continues…
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Log files
Button
Description
the filter criteria in these fields. Only columns that
can be filtered display the fields in which you can
enter the filter criteria. This is a toggle button.
Filter: Apply
Filters the log harvest profiles present in the system
based on the filter criteria.
Profile Criteria View field descriptions
Use this page to view the details of a selected log harvest profile.
Name
Description
Profile Name
Displays the name of the log harvesting profile.
Profile Description
A brief description of the profile.
Product
Displays the name of the product for which logs are
harvested.
Hosts
Displays the hostname of the server on which the
product resides.
Files
Displays the names of the log files for which you can
harvest log messages.
Directory
Displays the directory that contains the log files.
Filter Text
The text based on which the log files present under a
selected directory are filtered for harvesting. For
example, if you select the directory /a/b/c and
enter the text com in this field, the harvest operation
for this profile harvests the log files that contain com
in the file name. This field does not support wild
characters.
Button
Description
Done
Closes this page and takes you back to the Harvest
Profile List page.
Refresh
Refreshes the records in the table.
Search Archives field descriptions
Use this page to perform the following activities on the log files contained in an archive:
• View the contents of the harvested log files.
• Search a text in the harvested log files.
• Download the harvested log files on your local server.
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Log Harvester
Name
Description
Enter search text
The text that you want search for in the harvested
log files.
List box
Displays the hierarchy of the harvested log files in an
archive. The files are organized in a tree view.
Log Browser Panel
Displays the contents of the selected log files.
Search Results Panel
Displays the search results. This field displays the
line numbers as hyperlinks in which the searched
text is found. When you click the line number, the
system displays the line containing the searched text
at the top in the Log Browser Panel field.
Button
Description
Previous
Displays the log file contents on the previous page.
This button is available only if the contents of a log
files span across multiple pages.
Next
Displays the log file contents on the next page. This
button is available only if the contents of a log files
span across multiple pages.
Search
Searches for the occurrences of the text specified in
the Enter search text field in the selected log files.
View
Displays the contents of the selected log files in the
Log Browser Panel field.
Download
Downloads the selected log files present in the
archive to your local server.
Harvest - View Harvest detail field descriptions
Use this page to view the details of a selected log harvest request.
View Parent
Name
Description
Request Id
Displays the unique identification number assigned
to a log harvesting request.
Archive Name
Displays the name of the archive file that stores the
harvested log files containing the log messages.
Status
Displays the status of log harvesting requests. The
options are:
• SUCCESS: The status is SUCCESS if System
Manager successfully harvests the log messages.
Table continues…
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Log files
Name
Description
• FAILURE: The status is FAILURE if System
Manager fails to harvest the log messages for the
product.
Request Description
A brief description of the log harvesting request.
Child Request Details
Name
Description
Product
Displays the unique identification number assigned
to a log harvesting request.
Status
Displays the status of the log harvesting request.
The options are:
• SUCCESS: The status is SUCCESS if System
Manager successfully harvests the log messages.
• FAILURE: The status is FAILURE if System
Manager fails to harvest the log messages for the
product.
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Host Name
Displays the hostname of the server on which the
product resides.
Status Description
A brief description about the execution status of the
request.
Status Time Stamp
Displays the date and time when the system
generates the status of the log harvesting request.
Button
Description
Done
Closes this page and takes you back to the Harvest
Archives page.
Refresh
Refreshes the records in the table.
Filter: Enable
Displays fields under the column headers of the table
displaying the log harvesting requests. You can enter
the filter criteria in these fields. Only columns that
can be filtered display the fields in which you can
enter the filter criteria. A toggle button.
Filter: Apply
Filters the log harvesting requests based on the filter
criteria.
Filter: Disable
Hides the fields displayed under the columns on
which you can apply the filters without resetting the
filter criteria. A toggle button.
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Log Viewer
Log Viewer
The logging service provides an interface for viewing logs and their details generated by System
Manager or other components of the system. You can:
• view the details of a log
• search for logs based on search conditions
• set filters to view logs that match the filter conditions
Log Viewer is only used for viewing audit logs including Session Manager administration changes.
To view Session Manager logs, either use the System Manager Log Harvester or look at the logs on
the Session Manager server directly.
Viewing log details
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Viewer.
3. On the Logging page, select a log.
4. Click View.
Logging field descriptions
The Logging page has two sections: the upper section contains buttons that allow you to view the
details of the selected logs, search for logs, and set filters. The lower section displays logs in a
table. The table provides information about the logs. You can click the title of the column to sort the
data of the column in ascending or descending order.
Name
Description
Select check box
Provides the option to select a log.
Log ID
Displays the unique identification number that
identifies the log.
Time Stamp
The date and time of the log generation.
Host Name
Displays the name of the system from which the log
is generated.
Product Type
Displays the code that uniquely identifies the
component which generated the log. For example,
product, device, application, and service. An
example of the log product type is GW600, which is
a product type code identifier.
Table continues…
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Log files
Name
Description
Severity
Displays the severity level of the log. The following
are the type of severities:
• Emergency: System is unusable.
• Alert: Action must be taken immediately.
• Critical: Critical conditions.
• Error: Error conditions.
• Warning: Warning conditions.
• Notice: Normal but significant condition.
• Informational: Informational messages.
• Debug: Debug-level messages.
Note:
The colors of severities do not indicate logging
severities
Event ID
Displays the unique identification number assigned
to the event that generated the log.
Message
A brief description about the log. The message is
generated based on the severity level of the log. For
a log with severity level debug, the message
contains information about debugging an error.
Process Name
The process on the device that has generated the
message, usually the process name and process ID.
Facility
The operating system, processes, and applications
quantify messages into one of the several
categories. These categories generally consist of the
facility that generated them, along with the severity
of the message. The following are the types of
supported facilities:
• User-Level Messages
• Security/authorization
• Log Audit
Button
Description
View
Opens the Log - View Log Detail page. Use this
page to view the details of the selected log.
Auto-Refresh Mode
Switches to the Auto-Refresh mode. When the
Logging page is set in this mode, it automatically
updates the logs in the table. A toggle button.
Table continues…
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Log Viewer
Button
Description
More Actions > Export Selected
Exports the selected logs to a CSV file. You can view
the logs using the Wordpad or Excel application.
More Actions > Export All
Exports all the logs to a CSV file. You can view the
logs using the Wordpad or Excel application.
Note:
When you use Advanced Search or Filter
option to filter logs based on some criteria,
Export All exports all the filtered data.
Advanced Search
Displays fields that you can use to specify the search
criteria for searching a log.
Refresh
Refreshes the log information in the table.
Filter: Enable
Displays fields under select columns that you can
use to set filter criteria. A toggle button.
Filter: Disable
Hides the column filter fields without resetting the
filter criteria. A toggle button.
Filter: Clear
Clears the filter criteria.
Filter: Apply
Filters logs based on the filter criteria.
Select: All
Selects all the logs in the table.
Select: None
Clears the selections.
Previous
Displays logs in the previous page. This button is not
available if you are on the first page.
Next
Displays logs in the next page. This button is not
available if you are on the last page.
Criteria section
This section appears when you click Advanced Search on the top right corner.
Name
Description
Criteria
Use this section to specify search conditions. Select
the search criteria from the first drop-down field.
Select the operator from the second drop-down list.
Enter the search value in the text field.
Select following search criteria from the first dropdown list:
• Log ID: The unique identification number assigned
to the log.
• Host Name: Name of the system for which log is
generated.
• Product type: A code which uniquely identifies the
component which generated the log. For example,
product, device, application, service, and so on.
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Log files
Name
Description
• Severity: Severity level of the log.
• Message: Brief description about the log.
• Event ID: Unique identification number assigned to
the event.
• Process Name: Process on the device that has
generated the message
• Time Stamp: Date and time of the log generation.
• Facility: The operating systems, processes, and
applications quantify messages into one of several
categories. These categories generally consist of
the facility that generated them, along with the
severity of the message.
The second drop-down list displays operators. Based
on the search criterion that you select in the first
drop-down field, only those operators that are
applicable for the selected criterion are displayed in
the second drop-down list. The following are the list
of operators:
• Equals
• Not Equals
• Starts With
• Ends With
• Contains
The operators for Time Stamp are: =, >, <, >=, <=,
and !=.
When you select Time Stamp from the first dropdown list, the page provides date and time fields for
entering the date and time in the respective fields.
Enter the date in MM/DD/YYYY format . You can
select the date from the calender. You need to enter
the time in one of the following formats:
• 24Hr
• AM
• PM
Button
Description
Clear
Clears the search criterion and sets the criterion to
the default search criteria.
Search
Searches the logs based on the search conditions.
Table continues…
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Log Viewer
Button
Description
Close/Advanced Search
Hides the search fields.
+
Adds a search condition.
-
Deletes a search condition
Searching for logs
You can specify conditions for finding logs. The system displays logs that satisfy the search
conditions. You can specify multiple search conditions.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Viewer.
3. On the Logging page, click Advanced Search.
4. In the Criteria section, from the first and second drop-down fields, select the search criterion
and the operator.
5. Select or enter the search value in the third field.
6. If you want to add another search condition, click + and repeat the steps 4 through 6.
Click - to delete a search condition. You can delete a search condition only if you have more
than one search condition.
7. To add another search condition, click + and repeat the steps 4 through 6.
Click - to delete a search condition. You can delete a search condition only if you have more
than one search condition.
8. Select the AND or OR operator from the drop-down field.
This page displays this drop-down field when you specify more than one search condition.
9. Click Search to find the logs for the given search conditions.
Filtering logs
You can filter and view logs that meet the specified filter criteria. To apply the filters, you need to
specify the filter criteria in the fields provided under select columns in the table displaying the logs.
The column titles are the filter criteria. You can filter logs on multiple filter criteria.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Events.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Logs > Log Viewer.
3. On the Logging page, click Filter: Enable at the top right corner of the log table.
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Log files
4. Enter or select the filter criteria.
5. Click Filter: Apply.
The page displays the logs that match the specified filter criteria.
Note:
If no records matching the filter criteria are found, the Management Console application
displays a message that no records matching the search criteria are found.
Log Event Codes
See Alarm Event ID descriptions on page 190 for a list of Event IDs, descriptions, and
troubleshooting actions.
Session Manager Logs
SIP Tracing and Call Processing logs
The traceSM command traces SIP messages of the Session Manager and displays the Session
Manager routing decisions and internal call processing. traceSM displays a ladder diagram of all the
SIP messages, and provides a summary of each call including a call flow representation.
traceSM toggles between enabling and disabling the command.
When enabled, traceSM produces the tracer_asset.log file for SIP messages and the
call_proc.log file for call processing messages. To start or stop the capture, enter s on the
traceSM screen . The log files are located in the /var/log/Avaya/trace directory.
Warning:
Running traceSM can impact Session Manager server performance under call traffic.
SM100 (Asset) logs
You can view errors, warnings, and issues related to the SM100 (Asset). Issues include SIP TLS
problems or TCP connection disconnect or reset actions.
Note:
Errors and warnings are enabled by default. Enabling a debug level can help in some cases, but
could adversely impact performance.
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Session Manager Logs
Enter soapClientUpdateLogConfiguration debug to enable asset debug mode.
Enter soapClientUpdateLogConfiguration info to disable asset debug mode.
SM100 SIP traces
The traceSM100 command provides tracing of SIP messages directly on the SM100 process. The
SIP messages capterued on the SM100 display the message flow details in the network and in the
SIP container. Enter s on the traceSM100 screen to start or stop the capture.
The log files are located in the /var/log/Avaya/trace directory.
Session Manager Management logs
Session Manager management events are logged in the server.log file. The Session Manager
management process uses Jboss.
The log files are located in the /var/log/Avaya/jboss/SessionManager directory.
DRS replication log
The symmetric.log file contains data replication issues between Session Manager and System
Manager.
The log files are located in the /var/log/Avaya/mgmt/drs directory on System Manager.
Note:
A similar log file on Session Manager exists to view the Session Manager perspective of
replication.
PPM log
You can view the ppm.log file to debug issues related to configuration, including missing buttons,
dialplan issues, and problems relating to adding, updating, or deleting endpoint contacts.
The log files are located in the /var/log/Avaya/jboss/SessionManager directory.
Enter sm ppmlogon to enable PPM logging.
Enter sm ppmlogoff to disable PPM logging.
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Log files
Registration and Subscriptions event log
The operationalEvent.log file contains REGISTER and SUBSCRIBE events for SIP
endpoints.
The log files are located in the /var/log/Avaya/sm directory.
General System Manager log
System Manager Manager Jboss events are logged in the server.log file.
The log files are located in the /opt/Avaya/JBoss/6.1.0/jboss-as/server/avmgmt/log/ directory on
System Manager.
NPR audit logs
The nrpaudit.log file provides an audit trail for activities on the NRP pages (all pages under
Elements > Routing on the System Manager console).
The log files are located in the /var/log/Avaya/mgmt/nrp directory on System Manager.
Alarm logs
The system creates different log files for several events and alarms such as:
• Servlet and Extension event log files. These events are logged in the event.log file in
the /var/log/Avaya/sm directory.
• Session Manager management agent events log files. The eventl.log files are located in
the /var/log/Avaya/jboss/SessionManager directory.
• Logging and alarming process event log files. The spirit.log files are located in the /opt/
Avaya/SPIRIT/current/logging directory.
• Installation or upgrade process log files. These log files are created by installation or upgrade
processes and are located in the /opt/Avaya/install_logs directory.
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Chapter 7: Call Detail Recording on
Session Manager
The Call Detail Recording (CDR) feature records information on calls. When you enable CDR, the
CDR records are saved in a special directory on the local hard drive of the server.
The call record contains information regarding:
• The time of the call
• The duration of the call
• The dialed number
• The calling party
• The terminating SIP entity
• The originating SIP entity
• The bandwidth indicator
For each Session Manager, you can administer CDR as either disabled or enabled. CDR records
are created if you enable the CDR in at least one of two Session Manager entities.
Note:
Survivable Remote Session Manager (Branch Session Manager) does not support CDR.
CDR records on Session Manager are created on connected calls.
In route-through scenarios, where one Session Manager routes directly to another Session
Manager, CDR is generated only on the originating Session Manager if so administered, not on the
terminating Session Manager.
For sequenced applications (implicit or administered for a user), only one CDR record is generated
for a given call.
If the secondary Session Manager of a user receives a call, the call is routed to the primary Session
Manager of the user as per user registration. In that case, the CDR is still generated on the
secondary Session Manager and not on the primary Session Manager.
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Call Detail Recording on Session Manager
Minimum requirements for CDR
In order to support the Session Manager CDR functionality, the following minimum requirements
must be met:
• There must be IP connectivity between the CDR adjunct and the Session Manager server
periodically for remote collection of the CDR data files.
• The CDR adjunct must be compatible with Session Manager CDR formats. Contact Avaya
support for more information regarding the formats.
CDR Data file naming and structure
The CDR data files generated by the Session Manager CDR feature are stored in a directory on the
server. Whenever the CDR adjunct logs into the server, the CDR adjunct is provided direct access
to this directory.
Note:
The full path of the directory is /home/CDR_User. The CDR adjunct login is limited to
accessing the files contained in this directory only.
The CDR files stored in the special directory are the CDR data files that the server has completed
and closed. These files are now ready for the CDR adjunct to collect, process and subsequently
delete from the server. CDR_User group members are assigned the rights to read and subsequently
delete the CDR data files.
The file naming convention for the following CDR data file formats are:
1. Standard Flat File (default) format — tssssss-ssss-YYMMDD-hh_mm
2. Enhanced Flat File format — tssssss-ssss-YYMMDD-hh_mm
3. Enhanced XML File format — tssssss-ssss-YYMMDD-hh_mm_n.xml
Where:
The file name is more than 25 characters for the XML format.
For other formats, the file name is fixed at 25 alphanumeric characters, including dashes (-) and
underscores (_).
t is populated with the character S in the first Session Manager release.
ssssss-ssss is an alphanumeric string of six characters, followed by a dash (-), and followed by an
alphanumeric string of four characters, for a total of 11 characters. This hexadecimal string uniquely
identifies the Session Manager server, by using its IPv4 IP address.
YY is a two digit number that represents the year when the file was created.
MM is a two digit number that represents the month when the file was created.
DD is a two digit number that represents the day of the month when the file was created.
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CDR login and password
hh is a two digit number that represents the hour of the day when the file was created. (24 hour
clock server time)
mm is a two digit number that represents the number of minutes after the hour when the file was
created.
_n is a number that increments from 1 if more than one file with the same time stamp is created.
.xml portion just indicates that the file contains XML.
Example
For a CDR file created on January 29, 2009, at 3:24 PM from a Session Manager at IP address
142.9.147.59, the data file is named:
S008e09-933b-090129-15_24
For three XML files created with the same time stamp as mentioned earlier, the files are:
• S008e09-933b-090129-15_24_1.xml
• S008e09-933b-090129-15_24_2.xml
• S008e09-933b-090129-15_24_3.xml
Note:
CDR data files naming convention used by the Session Manager is compatible with the CDR
data files naming convention used by the Communication Manager supporting the CM
Survivable CDR functionality.
CDR login and password
The CDR adjunct uses a special login, CDR_User. This login is restricted to reach only the directory
where the CDR records are stored. The passwords are set up in the Elements > Session
Manager > Session Manager Administration section of System Manager for each Session
Manager that has CDR enabled, . The Session Manager administrator creates a password for the
designated login CDR_User. The login and password must be provided to the CDR adjunct
administrator so that the adjunct can retrieve the CDR data files. The administrator should verify that
this login and password work on each server on which CDR is administered.
CDR record transfer
CDR data is transferred in an encrypted manner from the Session Manager server to the CDR
adjunct using a secure file transfer protocol such as SFTP. CDR records are stored and transferred
in batches rather than one record at a time.
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Call Detail Recording on Session Manager
The CDR adjunct retrieves the CDR data files by logging into the server and copying the files to its
own storage device. After all the files are successfully copied, the CDR adjunct deletes the files from
the server hard drive and processes the CDR records.
Retrieving CDR data files
About this task
This section provides an example of a typical CDR data file retrieval session from a single server
named MyServer.MyDomain.com and provides suggestions and cautions concerning the setup and
operation of the Session Manager CDR functionality.
Procedure
1. Navigate to the directory where the CDR data files are to be transferred.
2. Begin the session by entering the command line:
sftp CDR_User@MySessionManager.MyDomain.com
• This command launches the SFTP program and the Session Manager server name and
user ID are passed to the server for enabling the session. In this example, the server
name is MySessionManager.MyDomain.com and the user ID is CDR_User.
• The server responds with the standard login message and prompts for the password.
3. Enter the password.
You are placed in the CDR data files directory on the Session Manager server.
4. Enter mget S* command to copy all files that exist on the server with file names that begin
with a capital S to the local directory.
5. Enter ls –al or an equivalent command to see which files were transferred.
6. Enter rm followed by the individual file name to remove each transferred file, one at a time,
from the server. Do not use rm S*. This action removes the CDR files from the Session
Manager server. See the note and caution for more information.
Note:
The files are removed individually just in case a new CDR data file has been added to
the directory between the time the files are transferred and the time they are deleted. If a
new file had been added during this time period and the rm * command is used, the
new file would be deleted without having been transferred to the CDR adjunct. Any CDR
records that are contained in the new file would be permanently lost.
Caution:
The CDR adjunct must perform file verification to provide assurance that the file has
been accurately received by the adjunct before deleting the file from the server. This
check could be as simple as comparing the relative file size of the received file with the
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CDR record deletion
size of the file on the server to make sure that they are the same size before deleting the
file on the server.
The adjunct provider may elect to design the adjunct to retrieve a group of files on one
polling pass and then process those files to assure that they are in the correct format and
contain valid data. If no errors are detected, the adjunct would then remove the previously
retrieved files on the next polling pass. If errors are detected in a file, the adjunct could reretrieve the errant file before removing it from the server.
7. Enter bye for the adjunct to sign off from the server.
CDR record deletion
There are three methods for removing CDR data files from the server, listed in order of preference:
1. After the CDR adjunct has successfully retrieved a data file from the server and verified that
it contains valid data, the adjunct deletes the data file from the server.
2. The server automatically removes any CDR data file stored on its local hard drive that is
older than five days.
3. The onsite or remote switch administrator/technician (with proper permissions) can delete
unwanted CDR data files.
CDR security provisions
Due to the potentially sensitive nature of CDR records, a secure transport mechanism is used for all
communications between the CDR adjunct and the server such as Secure File Transfer Protocol
(SFTP). Periodically, the CDR adjunct must log on to each of the administered Session Manager
servers and retrieve the CDR data files that are available.
If firewalls are implemented anywhere between the CDR adjunct and the various Session Manager
servers, it may be necessary to punch pinholes in those firewalls to allow communication between
the CDR adjunct and the servers.
CDR alarms
Alarms are generated when CDR detects problems with recording on an entity for which CDR is
enabled. These alarms indicate that call accounting for the entity is not available. During the outage,
some or all calls are not recorded in CDR.
The administrator or maintenance support personnel need to manually clear alarms after the failure
condition is resolved.
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Call Detail Recording on Session Manager
An example of alarm text is: There is a problem with the Call Detail Recording
(CDR) system. Call accounting is not operational.
An example of text when the alarm has been cleared is: Call Detail Recording (CDR)
system is now operational. Call accounting is resumed.
For more information, see CDR Not Operational on page 204.
Administering CDR on a new Session Manager instance
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, click Elements > Session Manager.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Session Manager Administration.
3. On the Session Manager Administration page, under Session Manager instances, click New.
4. In the Add Session Manager page, select the Enable CDR check box.
5. Enter a password for CDR_User login.
6. Re-enter the password to confirm it.
7. In the Data File Format field, click the format of the CDR data file.
Additionally, you can also include CDR records for other type of calls such as user to user
calls and incomplete calls.
8. Click Commit .
9. On System Manager Web Console, click Routing > SIP Entities
10. Select the appropriate SIP Entity.
11. Click Edit.
12. Select an appropriate Type from the drop-down menu in the Call Detail Recording field.
Four options are available: ingress, egress, both, and none. The default option egress for
SIP entities of type SIP Trunk. The default option for all other types is none.
13. Click Commit.
Enabling CDR for an existing Session Manager instance
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, click Elements > Session Manager.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Session Manager Administration.
3. Select a Session Manager instance from the list and click Edit.
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Enabling CDR for an existing Session Manager instance
4. In the Edit Session Manager page, select the Enable CDR check box.
5. Enter a password for the CDR_User login.
6. Re-enter the password to confirm it.
7. Click Commit.
8. On System Manager Web Console, click Routing > SIP Entities.
9. Select the appropriate SIP Entity.
10. Click Edit.
11. Select an appropriate Type from the drop-down menu in the Call Detail Recording field.
There are four choices (ingress, egress, both, and none). The default is egress for SIP
entities of type SIP Trunk. The default for all other types is none.
12. Click Commit.
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Chapter 8: SNMP support for Session
Manager
This chapter provides details on creating of SNMP User and Target profiles, and attaching the
Target profiles to Serviceability Agents.
Session Manager SNMP master agent is installed as part of factory install. This agent provides
basic IP discovery, inventory, and status capabilities through the MIB II and Host Resources MIBs
for the server and Linux operating system. The Session Manager agent requires configuration by
System Manager for assignment of SNMP V3 user to support queries. This agent:
• Provides read-only access to the SNMP agent on the Session Manager server
• Does not allow any SNMP Set capability to the Session Manager
• Does not restrict the IP addresses that are allowed to query the MIBs
• Allows access control only via SNMP V3
The System Manager server also provides a basic SNMP V3 agent.
The Serviceability Agent is an enhanced version of the SAL agent for forwarding logs, harvesting
logs, and for alarming. The Serviceability Agent sends SNMP V2, SNMP V3 traps and informs the
configured NMS destinations where two of the mandatory destinations are System Manager and the
SAL gateway.
Using the Serviceability Agent user interface on System Manager, you can:
• Remotely manage and configure SNMP V3 users.
• Remotely manage and configure SNMP trap destinations.
• Create, edit, view, and delete user and target profiles. You can also attach these profiles to
agents or detach these profiles from agents.
Manage Serviceability Agents has three sub-pages:
• SNMP User Profiles is used to establish and modify SNMP V3 user accounts. These accounts
are used for both SNMP V3 traps/informs and also SNMP V3 queries of the SNMP master
agent.
• SNMP Target Profiles is used to establish SNMP trap/inform destinations for System
Manager, SAL GW, and customer NMS along with attaching user profiles setup under SNMP
User Profiles. The profile setup supports both SNMP V2 and SNMP V3 with either trap or
inform type for notifications.
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Configuring Session Manager Serviceability Agent
• SNMP Serviceability Agents is used to manage serviceability agents registered with System
Manager agent manager. The System Manager hostname is automatically included in the list
of agents.
Configuring Session Manager Serviceability Agent
About this task
Perform the following procedure to configure the Session Manager serviceability agent to send
alarm traps:
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, select Manage Serviceability Agents to open the Manage
Serviceability Agents page.
3. In SNMPv3 User Profiles, set up a user profile to match the System Manager TrapListener
settings. The default System Manager trap listener settings for a fresh System Manager
template install or upgrade, if no modifications are done using TrapListener service page, are
user name as initial and MD5/AES password as avaya123. See the section System
Manager TrapListener service on page 80 for details. The SNMP user profile for this
System Manager is needed for the SNMP target profile for the System Manager
TrapReceiver. Optional other user profiles can be created for other NMS or SAL GW
destinations and Session Manager serviceability agents. See the section Managing SNMPv3
user profiles for details.
4. In SNMP Target Profiles, set up a target profile for the System Manager TrapReceiver. This
profile includes the System Manager IP address, port 10162, Domain type UDP, Notification
type trap or inform, and Protocol V3. Also assign the System Manager user profile created
under SNMP User Profiles before committing the profile. The System Manager
serviceability agent is already configured with a default target profile and user for the local
TrapReceiver. Other target profiles may be set up for SAL GW and NMS to also receive
alarm traps/informs. See the section Managing SNMP target profiles for details.
5. After Session Manager install or upgrade is complete and the statapp command shows
sal-agent is UP, verify that the Session Manager serviceability agent hostname and IP
address has registered with System Manager in Serviceability Agents page.
6. If status is not active, select the Session Manager serviceability agent and enable the
Activate button and verify status changes to active.
7. After the Session Manager serviceability agent becomes active, re-select the agent to make
the Manage Profiles button active. Click Manage Profiles to assign the System Manager
target profile and other desired optional target profiles. Attach a user profile for the
serviceability agent to support V3 queries from a customer or NMS, then click Commit.
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SNMP support for Session Manager
8. Verify that the Session Manager serviceability agent is properly configured for forwarding
alarms to the System Manager. Enter generateTestAlarmSM.sh on the Session
Manager CLI.
Note:
After a System Manager serviceability agent has been configured with SNMP target
profiles and a user profile on the System Manager, subsequent System Manager and
Session Manager upgrades preserve the setting and only require necessary
modifications because of changes to user passwords, trap or inform type, NMS IP
addresses, and others.
Managing SNMPv3 user profiles
Creating an SNMPv3 user profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMPv3 User Profiles.
3. Click New.
4. On the New User Profile page, complete the User Details section.
5. Click Commit.
Related Links
SNMP User profile list on page 72
SNMPv3 user profiles field descriptions on page 73
Editing an SNMPv3 user profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMPv3 User Profiles.
3. Select the user profile you want to edit from the profile list.
4. Click Edit.
5. Edit the required fields in the Edit User Profile page.
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Managing SNMPv3 user profiles
Note:
You cannot edit an SNMPv3 user profile that is assigned to the serviceability agent of an
element or that is attached to a target profile.
6. Click Commit.
Related Links
SNMP User profile list on page 72
SNMPv3 user profiles field descriptions on page 73
Viewing an SNMPv3 user profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMPv3 User Profiles.
3. Click the user profile you want to view from the profile list.
4. Click View.
You can view the details, except the password, of the SNMPv3 user profile in the View User
Profile page.
Related Links
SNMP User profile list on page 72
SNMPv3 user profiles field descriptions on page 73
Deleting an SNMPv3 user profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMPv3 User Profiles.
3. Select the user profile or profiles you want to delete from the profile list.
4. Click Delete.
5. On the User Profile Delete Confirmation page, click Delete.
Note:
You cannot delete a user profile that is attached to an element or a target profile.
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Filtering SNMPv3 user profiles
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMPv3 User Profiles.
3. Click Filter: Enable above the Profile List.
4. Apply the filter to one or multiple columns of the User Profile List.
5. Click Apply.
To hide the column filters, click Disable. This action does not clear the filter criteria that you
set in the column filters.
SNMP User profile list
Name
Description
User Name
The SNMPv3 user name.
Authentication Protocol
The authentication protocol used to authenticate the
source of traffic from SNMP V3 users.
Privacy Protocol
The encryption policy for an SNMP V3 user.
Privileges
The read-write privilege that determines the
operations you can perform on MIBs.
Button
Description
New
To go to the New User Details page where you can
add a new SNMP user profile.
View
To go to the View User Details page where you can
view an existing SNMP user profile.
Edit
To go to the Edit User Details page where you can
edit an existing SNMP user profile.
Delete
To delete the existing SNMP user profiles that you
select.
Filter: Enable
To filter the SNMP user profiles list based on one or
multiple criteria.
Related Links
Creating an SNMPv3 user profile on page 70
Editing an SNMPv3 user profile on page 70
Viewing an SNMPv3 user profile on page 71
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Managing SNMPv3 user profiles
SNMPv3 user profiles field descriptions
Name
Description
User Name
The SNMPv3 user name.
Note:
The user name can contain the following
characters: alphanumeric, period, underscore,
white space, single quote, and hyphen. The
user name cannot be blank.
Authentication Protocol
The authentication protocol used to authenticate the
source of traffic from SNMP V3 users.
The possible values are:
• MD5
• SHA
The default is MD5.
Authentication Password
The password used to authenticate the user.
Note:
The password can contain any printable and
non-whitespace characters. The password must
be at least 8 characters in length and can
contain up to 255 characters. The password
cannot be an empty string.
Confirm Authentication Password
The authentication password that you re-enter for
confirmation.
Privacy Protocol
The encryption policy for an SNMP V3 user.
The possible values are:
• DES: Use DES encryption for SNMP-based
communication.
• AES: Use AES encryption for SNMP-based
communication.
• None
The default value is AES.
Privacy Password
The pass phrase used to encrypt the SNMP data.
Confirm Privacy Password
Retype the privacy password in this field for
confirmation.
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Name
Description
Privileges
The privileges that determines the operations that
you can perform on MIBs.
• Read/Write: Use to perform GET and SET
operations.
• Read: Use to perform only GET operation.
• None
The default is None.
Button
Description
Commit
Use to create a new SNMPv3 user profile.
Saves the changes after an edit operation.
Back
Cancels the action and takes you to the previous
page.
Delete
Use to delete the user profiles you select.
Edit
Use to edit the user profile you select.
Related Links
Creating an SNMPv3 user profile on page 70
Editing an SNMPv3 user profile on page 70
Viewing an SNMPv3 user profile on page 71
Managing SNMP target profiles
Creating an SNMP target profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMP Target Profiles.
3. On the SNMP Target Profiles page, click New.
4. On the New Target Profiles page, complete the Target Details section.
5. (Optional) Click the Attach/Detach User Profile tab to attach a user profile.
Perform the step only if you select the SNMPv3 protocol.
6. Click Commit.
Related Links
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Managing SNMP target profiles
SNMP Target profile list on page 76
SNMP target profiles field descriptions on page 77
Editing an SNMP target profile
About this task
Note:
Modify the target profiles that point to System Manager to reflect the changed IP address in the
event of an IP address change on System Manager.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMP Target Profiles.
3. In the Target Profile list, click the profile that you must edit.
4. Click Edit.
5. On the Edit Target Profiles page, modify the required fields.
Note:
You cannot edit a target profile that is assigned to the serviceability agent of an element.
You must unassign the target profile before you edit the profile.
6. Click Commit.
Related Links
SNMP Target profile list on page 76
SNMP target profiles field descriptions on page 77
Viewing an SNMP target profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMP Target Profiles.
3. From the Target Profile list, click the profile you must view.
4. Click View.
The system displays the details of the target profile in the View Target Details page.
Related Links
SNMP Target profile list on page 76
SNMP target profiles field descriptions on page 77
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Deleting an SNMP target profile
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMP Target Profiles.
3. From the Target Profile list, click the profile or profiles you want to delete.
4. Click Delete.
5. On the Delete Confirmation page, click Delete.
Note:
You cannot delete a target profile that is attached to an element or an agent.
Filtering target profiles
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > SNMP Target Profiles.
3. Click Filter: Enable above the Profile List.
4. Apply the filter to one or multiple columns of the Target Profile List.
5. Click Apply.
To hide the column filters, click Disable. This action does not clear the filter criteria that you
set in the column filters.
SNMP Target profile list
76
Name
Description
Name
The name of the SNMP target profile. This name
should be a unique value.
Domain Type
The type of transport for the flow of messages. The
default value is UDP.
IP Address
The IP address of the SNMP target profile.
Port
The port of the SNMP target profile.
SNMP Version
The version of the SNMP protocol.
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Managing SNMP target profiles
Button
Description
New
To go to the New Target Details page where you can
add a new SNMP target profile.
View
To go to the View Target Details page where you
can view an existing SNMP target profile.
Edit
To go to the Edit Target Details page where you can
edit an existing SNMP target profile.
Delete
To delete the existing SNMP target profiles that you
select.
Filter: Enable
To filter the SNMP target profiles list by one or
multiple criteria.
Related Links
Creating an SNMP target profile on page 74
Editing an SNMP target profile on page 75
Viewing an SNMP target profile on page 75
SNMP target profiles field descriptions
Name
Description
Name
The name of the SNMP target profile.
Description
The description of the SNMP target profile.
IP Address
The IP address of the target.
Port
The port number of the target.
Domain Type
The type of the message flow. The default is UDP.
Notification Type
The type of notification. The options are:
• Trap
• Inform
Protocol
The type of the SNMP protocol.
Button
Description
Commit
Creates the target profile in the New Target Profile
page or saves the changes in the Edit Target Profile
page.
Back
Cancels your action and takes you to the previous
page.
Related Links
Creating an SNMP target profile on page 74
Editing an SNMP target profile on page 75
Viewing an SNMP target profile on page 75
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SNMP support for Session Manager
Managing Serviceability Agents
Activating a serviceability agent
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > Serviceability Agents.
3. In the Agent List section, select one or more agents that you must activate.
4. Click Activate.
The system activates the SNMPv3 functionality in the remote serviceability agent that you
selected. If the system does not activate the SNMPv3 functionality, refresh the Web page
and repeat Step 3 and Step 4.
Managing SNMPv3 user profiles for the selected serviceability
agents
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > Serviceability Agents.
3. In the Agent List section, select an active agent that you must manage.
4. Click Manage Profiles.
5. Click the SNMPv3 User Profile tab.
6. In the Assignable Profiles section, select the user profiles that you want to assign.
7. Click Assign.
To remove user profiles, in the Removable Profiles section, select the user profiles and
click Remove.
8. To assign the user profiles to the selected agent, click Commit.
Note:
You can also select more than one serviceability agents and assign the same user
profiles to all agents.
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Managing Serviceability Agents
Managing target profiles for the selected serviceability agents
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Inventory.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Manage Serviceability Agents > Serviceability Agents.
3. In Agent List, select the active agents that you must manage.
4. Click Manage Profiles.
5. Click the SNMP Target Profiles tab.
6. Select the target profiles you must assign from the Assignable Profiles section.
7. Click Assign.
You can unassign or remove target profiles from the Removable Profiles section by clicking
Remove.
8. Click Commit to assign the profiles to the selected agent.
Note:
You can also select more than one serviceability agents and assign the same target
profiles to all the agents.
Serviceability Agents list
Name
Description
Hostname
The host name of the server on which the
serviceability agent runs.
IP Address
The IP address of the server on which the
serviceability agent runs.
System Name
The system name of the server on which the
serviceability agent runs.
System OID
The system OID of the server on which the
serviceability agent runs.
Status
The enabled or disabled status of the serviceability
agent. The system disables SNMPv3 and displays
Inactive as the default status.
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SNMP support for Session Manager
System Manager TrapListener service
The TrapListener service receives traps and informs from different applications and displays the
traps and alarms on the System Manager Alarming UI.
• TrapListener receives V2c and V3 traps and informs that are defined in the common alarm
definition file.
• TrapListener also processes the Common Alarm Definition file for applications, where all the
trap definitions are present.
You can configure the TrapListener service through Service Profile Management on System
Manager. For information on configuring the TrapListener service, see Configuring the TrapListener
service in this chapter.
If you change the Trap Listener settings, as an administrator, you should create a new SNMP Target
Profile for the System Manager IP address, and a new SNMPv3 User Profile for the System
Manager. Optionally, you can also edit the System Manager Target Profile and User Profile to match
setting changes on System Manager trap listener. The values in these profiles should match the
values in the Trap Listener settings. You should also attach this System Manager SNMPv3 User
Profile to the System Manager Target Profile and then attach this Target Profile to all the
Serviceability Agents.
Configuring the TrapListener service
Procedure
1. On the System Manager console, click Services > Configurations.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Settings > SMGR.
3. Click TrapListener.
4. On the View Profile: TrapListener Service page, click Edit.
5. Edit the required fields in the Edit Profile: TrapListener Service page.
6. Click Commit.
TrapListener service field descriptions
Name
Description
Authentication Password
The password used to authenticate the user. The
default is avaya123.
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Session Manager SNMP MIB
Name
Description
Authentication Protocol
The authentication protocol used to authenticate the
source of traffic from SNMP V3 users. The options
are:
• md5
• SHA
The default is md5.
Community
The community for TrapListener.
Privacy Password
The password that you use to encrypt the SNMP
data. The default is avaya123.
Privacy Protocol
The encryption policy for an SNMP V3 user. The
options are:
• DES: Use the DES encryption for the SNMP-based
communication.
• AES: Use the AES encryption for the SNMP-based
communication.
The default is AES.
TrapListener Port
The port on which TrapListener listens. The default is
10162. The field is read-only.
V3 UserName
The SNMP V3 user name. The default is initial.
Although you can change the SNMP V3 user name,
use the default value.
Note:
The system configures the Privacy Password, Authentication Password, Users, and
Community fields with default values. You must change the values immediately after you
deploy System Manager.
Button
Description
Commit
Saves the changes you have made in the
TrapListener Configuration Parameters section.
Cancel
Cancels the edit and returns to the previous page.
Session Manager SNMP MIB
This section lists the SNMP MIB tables and objects that can be queried on the Session Manager
server by a network management system on the same network as the Session Manager
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SNMP support for Session Manager
management interface. The Security Module is not included in this MIB. The Security Module is a
different network interface and does not support SNMP queries.
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDeviceDescr
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDeviceErrors
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDeviceID
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDeviceIndex
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDeviceStatus
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDeviceType
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDiskStorageAccess
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDiskStorageCapacity
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDiskStorageMedia
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrDiskStorageRemoveble
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSAccess
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSBootable
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSIndex
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSLastFullBackupDate
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSLastPartialBackupDate
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSMountPoint
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSRemoteMountPoint
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSStorageIndex
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrFSType
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrMemorySize
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrNetworkIfIndex
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrPartitionFSIndex
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrPartitionID
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrPartitionIndex
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrPartitionLabel
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrPartitionSize
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrProcessorFrwID
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrProcessorLoad
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSWRunPerfCPU
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSWRunPerfMem
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrStorageAllocationUnits
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Session Manager SNMP MIB
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrStorageDescr
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrStorageIndex
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrStorageSize
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrStorageType
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrStorageUsed
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSystemDate
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSystemInitialLoadDevice
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSystemInitialLoadParameters
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSystemMaxProcesses
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSystemNumUsers
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSystemProcesses
• HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrSystemUptime
• IF-MIB::ifAdminStatus
• IF-MIB::ifDescr
• IF-MIB::ifInDiscards
• IF-MIB::ifInErrors
• IF-MIB::ifInNUcastPkts
• IF-MIB::ifInOctets
• IF-MIB::ifInUcastPkts
• IF-MIB::ifInUnknownProtos
• IF-MIB::ifIndex
• IF-MIB::ifLastChange
• IF-MIB::ifMtu
• IF-MIB::ifNumber
• IF-MIB::ifOperStatus
• IF-MIB::ifOutDiscards
• IF-MIB::ifOutErrors
• IF-MIB::ifOutNUcastPkts
• IF-MIB::ifOutOctets
• IF-MIB::ifOutQLen
• IF-MIB::ifOutUcastPkts
• IF-MIB::ifPhysAddress
• IF-MIB::ifSpecific
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• IF-MIB::ifSpeed
• IF-MIB::ifType
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpEnableAuthenTraps
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInASNParseErrs
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInBadCommunityNames
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInBadCommunityUses
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInBadValues
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInBadVersions
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInGenErrs
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInGetNexts
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInGetRequests
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInGetResponses
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInNoSuchNames
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInPkts
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInReadOnlys
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInSetRequests
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInTooBigs
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInTotalReqVars
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInTotalSetVars
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpInTraps
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutBadValues
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutGenErrs
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutGetNexts
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutGetRequests
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutGetResponses
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutNoSuchNames
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutPkts
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutSetRequests
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutTooBigs
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpOutTraps
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpProxyDrops
• SNMPv2-MIB::snmpSilentDrops
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysContact
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Session Manager SNMP MIB
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysDescr
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysLocation
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysName
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysORDescr
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysORID
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysORLastChange
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysORUpTime
• SNMPv2-MIB::sysObjectID
• TCP-MIB::tcpActiveOpens
• TCP-MIB::tcpAttemptFails
• TCP-MIB::tcpCurrEstab
• TCP-MIB::tcpEstabResets
• TCP-MIB::tcpInErrs
• TCP-MIB::tcpInSegs
• TCP-MIB::tcpMaxConn
• TCP-MIB::tcpOutRsts
• TCP-MIB::tcpOutSegs
• TCP-MIB::tcpPassiveOpens
• TCP-MIB::tcpRetransSegs
• TCP-MIB::tcpRtoAlgorithm
• TCP-MIB::tcpRtoMax
• TCP-MIB::tcpRtoMin
• UDP-MIB::udpInDatagrams
• UDP-MIB::udpInErrors
• UDP-MIB::udpNoPorts
• UDP-MIB::udpOutDatagrams
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Chapter 9: Session Manager Dashboard
The Session Manager Dashboard page displays the overall status and health summary of each
administered Session Manager.
Session Manager Dashboard field descriptions
The As of (time) message indicates the time the information on the screen was last updated.
Button
Description
Service State > Deny New Service
Block incoming calls for the selected Session
Manager or Session Managers but leave active calls
connected.
Service State > Accept New Service
Accept incoming calls for the selected Session
Managers.
Shutdown System > Shutdown
Shut down the selected Session Manager server.
Shutdown System > Reboot
Reboot the selected Session Manager server.
Name
Description
Session Manager
Displays the name of administered Session Manager
instance. Click the link to go to the Session Manager
Administration page.
Type
Displays the type of Session Manager instance. The
type can be Core or Branch Session Manager.
Tests Pass
Displays the current results for periodic maintenance
tests. Green indicates the tests passed. Red
indicates at least one test failed
Click the link to display the Maintenance Tests page.
Alarms
Displays the number of active Major/Minor/Warning
alarms.
Click the link to go to the Alarming page.
Security Module
Displays the state of the Security Module. The state
can be Up, Down, and --- (unknown).
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Session Manager Dashboard field descriptions
Name
Description
Click the link to go to the detailed summary page of
the selected security module.
Service State
Displays the current service state of Session
Manager. The service state can be:
• Accept New Service
• Deny New Service
Entity Monitoring
Displays the monitoring status of the selected
Session Manager. The page shows the number of
down links and number of total links. Click the link to
display the Session Manager Entity Link Connection
Status page.
Note:
Entity Monitoring does not apply to a Session
Manager that is administered as a BSM. The
monitoring status of a BSM is always unknown (---).
Active Call Count
Displays the current number of active calls for the
Session Manager instance.
Registrations
Displays the current registration summary and the
maximum registrations in the last 24 hours. Click the
link to display the Registration Summary page.
Data Replication
Displays the replication status for the replica node.
Green indicates synchronized and red indicates not
synchronized. Click the link to display the Replica
Groups page.
User Data Storage Status
A green check indicates the User Data Storage
Sanity Test passed. A red check indicates the test
failed. Click the check mark to display the User Data
Storage Status page for the detailed status report.
Note:
The User Data Storage Status appears as – –
for:
• Branch Session Managers.
• Session Managers running a release earlier
than 6.3.8.
Version
March 2015
Displays the installed version of the Session
Manager. The version has the following format:
<major release number>.<minor release
number>.<service pack number>.<patch
number>.<build number>. Click a version string link
to display the Session Manager Version Inventory
information for a particular software version.
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Chapter 10: Maintenance functions
Session Manager maintenance procedures
The maintenance procedures for Session Manager include the following:
• Backing up data
• Restoring backed up data
• Shutting down the server
• Rebooting the server
Backup and Restore
The backup and restore functions run on System Manager.
For Survivable Remote Session Manager (BSM) and Midsize Enterprise Session Manager, System
Platform console backup is also supported on System Manager, which includes backup and restore
of several files on the Session Manager instance.
The configuration data that is needed to run the entire system, including System Manager and all
the Session Manager instances, is kept centrally on the System Manager. One backup file contains
all the data for the entire system. Individual backups of the Session Manager instances are not
needed.
Note:
You can only restore on the load for which the backup was taken. However, when you upgrade
to a newer release of System Manager, your data should be preserved. In the event of an
upgrade failure, the current recommendation will roll back.
Backup and Restore field descriptions
Use this page to view the details of backup files or the files you require to restore.
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Backup and Restore
Name
Description
Operation
Specifies the type of operation. The values are:
• Backup
• Restore
File Name
• For the backup operation, specifies the name of
the backup file.
• For the restore operation, specifies the name of the
file you want to restore.
Path
• For the backup operation, specifies the path of the
backup file.
• For the restore operation, specifies the path of the
file you want to restore.
Status
Indicates the status of the backup or restore
operation. The values are:
• SUCCESS
• FAILED
• PLANNED
• RUNNING
Status Description
Displays the error details of the backup or restore
operation that has failed.
Operation Time
Specifies the time of the backup or restore operation.
Operation Type
Defines whether the backup or restore operation is
local or remote.
User
Displays the user who performed the operation.
Button
Description
Backup
Opens the Backup page. Use this page to back up
data on a specified local or remote location.
Restore
Opens the Restore page. Use this page to restore
data to a specified local or remote location.
Schedule Backup field descriptions
Use this page to schedule a job for backing up data by specifying the date and time.
Job Details
Name
Description
Job Name
The name of the job.
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Maintenance functions
Job Frequency
Name
Description
Task Time
The date and time of running the job.
Recurrence
The settings define whether the execution of the jobs
is a recurring activity or a one-time activity. In case of
a recurring job, the field also displays the time
interval of recurrence. The options are:
• Execute task one time only.
• Tasks are repeated.
Range
The settings define the number of recurrences or
date after which the job stops to recur. The options
are:
• No End Date
• End After occurrences
• End By Date
Button
Description
Commit
Schedules the backup job.
Cancel
Closes the Schedule Backup page and takes you
back to the Backup Restore page.
Creating a data backup on a local server
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Backup and Restore.
2. On the Backup and Restore page, click Backup.
3. On the Backup page, click Local.
4. In the File name field, enter the backup file that you want to create.
5. Click Now.
If the backup is successful, the Backup and Restore page displays the message: Backup
job submitted successfully. Please check the status detail below!!
Scheduling a data backup on a local server
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Backup and Restore.
2. On the Backup and Restore page, click Backup.
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Backup and Restore
3. On the Backup page, click Local.
4. In the File name field, enter the name of the backup file that you want to create.
5. Click Schedule.
6. On the Schedule Backup page, specify the following details in the appropriate fields:
• Job name
• Date and time when the system must run the job
• Frequency at which the system must run the job
• Range
7. Click Commit.
Viewing pending jobs
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Scheduler.
2. In the left navigation pane, click Pending Jobs.
3. To view the details of the job, on the Pending Jobs page, select a pending job and click
View.
The Job Scheduling-View Job page displays the details of the selected job.
Pending Jobs field descriptions
Name
Description
Job Type
The type of job, represented by a job type icon. The
types of job with icons are:
1.
System scheduled job.
2.
Admin scheduled job.
3.
On-demand job.
Job Name
The name of the scheduled job.
Job Status
The current status of the pending job. The types of
status are:
1. Pending Execution
2. Running
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Maintenance functions
Name
Description
State
The state of a job whether the job is active or
inactive. The types of state are:
• Enabled: An active job.
• Disabled: An inactive job.
Frequency
The time interval between two consecutive
executions of the job.
Scheduled By
The person who scheduled the job.
Button
Description
View
Displays the Job Scheduling-View Job page that
displays the details of the selected pending job.
Edit
Displays the Job Scheduling-Edit Job page that you
can use to modify the information of a selected
pending job.
Delete
Displays the Delete Confirmation page that prompts
you to confirm the deletion of the selected jobs.
More Actions > View Log
Displays the Logging page that displays the logs for
the selected pending jobs.
More Actions > Stop
Stops the selected job that is currently running.
More Actions > Enable
Changes the state of the selected pending job from
inactive to active.
More Actions > Disable
Displays the Disable Confirmation page that prompts
you to confirm the disabling of the selected pending
job.
More Actions > Schedule On Demand Job
Displays the Job Scheduling-On Demand Job page
that you can use to schedule the selected pending
job of type On Demand.
Advanced Search
Displays fields that you can use to specify the search
criteria for searching a pending job.
Filter: Enable
Displays fields under select columns that you can
use to set filter criteria.
Filter: Enable is a toggle button.
Filter: Disable
Hides the column filter fields without resetting the
filter criteria.
Filter: Disable is a toggle button.
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Filter: Apply
Filters pending jobs based on the filter criteria.
Select: All
Selects all the pending jobs in the table displayed in
the Job List section.
Select: None
Clears the selection for the pending jobs that you
have selected.
Refresh
Refreshes the pending job information.
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Backup and Restore
Criteria section
To view this section, click Advanced Search. You can find the Advanced Search link at the at the
upper-right corner of the page.
Name
Description
Criteria
The following three fields:
• Field 1– The list of criteria that you can use to
search the pending jobs.
• Field 2 – The operators for evaluating the
expression. The operators displayed depends on
the type of criterion that you selected in the first
field.
• Field 3 – The value corresponding to the search
criteria.
Button
Description
Clear
Clears the search value that you entered in the third
field.
Search
Searches the pending jobs based on the specified
search conditions and displays the search results in
the Groups section.
Close
Cancels the search operation and hides the Criteria
section.
Viewing list of backup files
Procedure
On the System Manager web console, click Services > Backup and Restore.
Result
The system displays the Backup and Restore page with the list of backup files.
Restoring data backup from a local server
About this task
Note:
• Do not restore the backup data from VMware on System Platform.
• You cannot restore the backup data on the primary System Manager server when the
Geographic Redundancy replication is enabled on System Manager.
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Maintenance functions
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Backup and Restore.
2. On the Backup and Restore page, click Restore.
3. On the Restore page, click Local.
4. In the File name field, type the file name that you must restore.
If the file name does not appear in the list, specify the complete path of the file that you must
restore.
Note:
The backup integrity check feature of System Manager verifies the signature of the
backup files and warns if you restore a corrupted or tampered backup file on System
Manager.
5. Click Restore. On the Restore Confirmation page, the system displays the following
message:
The Restore operation will terminate all sessions and no services
will be available until the operation completes. So, the System
Manager console will not be available for approximately 45 minutes
but this time may vary based on Database size. Click on Continue to
go ahead with the Restore operation or click on Cancel to abort the
operation.
6. Click Continue.
The system logs you out of the System Manager web console and then shuts down.
Result
After the restore is complete on System Manager that is configured for Geographic Redundancy, the
system automatically restarts with the Geographic Redundancy replication status as disabled.
Backup data retention
When a new backup is initiated and the maximum number of files is reached, the system removes
the oldest backup file to make room for the new backup file.
To perform the scheduled backup on the System Manager server, you must delete the older backup
files from the system as the filename is dependent on the scheduled job.
The Maximum Backup Files value controls the removal of old backup files.
Changing the Maximum Backup Files value
About this task
The new value for Maximum Backup Files is effective from the next backup is run.
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Shut down or reboot the Session Manager server
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, click Services > Configurations > Settings > SMGR
> SMGR Element Manager
2. Click Edit at the top right of the page.
3. In the Maximum Backup Files field, enter the number of backup files you want to keep.
4. Click Commit to save the change.
Shut down or reboot the Session Manager server
The Session Manager host server can be powered down safely and remotely, if needed, for
hardware servicing. The shutdown/reboot feature also provides a safer last-chance restart instead of
pressing the power button if the system becomes unresponsive. This feature is available for root,
craft, and cust users.
If the Session Manager is shut down, onsite personnel must restart the system.
You can shut down or reboot the system in two ways:
• Using the System Manager console
• Using the command line interface of the Session Manager
Note:
Place Session Manager in the Deny New Service state and wait for all active calls to end
before shutting down or rebooting the server. Active calls through the affected Session
Manager will drop if the Session Manager remains inoperational for a long time. New calls
will immediately use an alternate Session Manager, if available, once the affected Session
Manager is placed in the Deny New Service state.
Using the GUI to shut down or reboot the server
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager.
2. Select the Session Manager server that you want to shut down or reboot.
Note:
You can shut down or reboot only one Session Manager at a time.
3. Click Service State.
4. Select Deny New Service.
5. Wait for all active calls on the Session Manager to end before shutting down or rebooting the
server.
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Maintenance functions
6. Click Shutdown System .
7. Select Shutdown or Reboot from the drop-down menu.
The system displays a confirmation screen. If the Session Manager is not in the Deny New
Service state, the system displays an additional screen with the recommended action.
Using the CLI to shut down or reboot the server
About this task
If you experience problems accessing System Manager, use the CLI to shut down or reboot that
particular Session Manager using the following procedure:
Procedure
1. Log in to the Session Manager using the cust login.
2. Enter one of the following commands:
• shutdownSM (to shut down the server)
• rebootSM (to reboot the server)
3. If Session Manager is shut down, the confirmation screen warns that onsite personnel must
restart the system.
Replacing server components
About this task
This topic provides the high-level steps for replacing a server component. For exact details, see the
respective server sections.
Procedure
1. Change the state of the Session Manager instance to Deny New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Deny New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
2. Use the GUI to shut down or reboot the server.
3. Click Shutdown System, then select Shutdown from the drop-down menu for the server
that needs a component replacement. If clicking Shutdown System does not work, power
down the server by pressing in the power button, located on the front panel, for 5 seconds.
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Replacing server components
4. Unplug the power cord.
5. Replace the server part or the component.
6. Power up the server by pressing the power button on the front of the server.
7. Run maintenance test as mentioned in the chapter on Maintenance tests.
8. Change the state of the Session Manager to Accept New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Accept New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
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Chapter 11: Data Retention
Configuration data is kept on System Manager forever. However, there are other types of data that
accumulate and need to be deleted regularly to avoid filling up the disk. These types of data are:
• Log Data
• Soft-deleted Runtime Topology Service (RTS) records
• Alarm Data
• Backup Data
Data retention rules
Log, RTS, and alarm data are removed by data retention policies. The number of days that this data
is retained is specified by a value called the Retention Interval. Each day, any data that is older
than the specified retention interval is purged from the system.
The Data Retention web page displays the list of retention rules and allows you to edit, update, or
apply a rule. An example of a retention rule is LogPurgeRule. This rule sets the value for how long
logging data are retained. Each rule is applied automatically once a day to purge old data. However,
a rule can be applied immediately by selecting a rule and clicking the Apply button.
Data Retention field descriptions
Use this page to view and edit data retention rules.
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Name
Description
Option button
Provides the option to select a data retention rule.
Rule Name
Specifies the name of the rule.
Rule Description
A brief description about the data retention rule.
Retention Interval (Days)
Specifies the number of days the data is retained.
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Changing the Retention Interval Value
Button
Description
Edit
Modifies the selected rule.
Update
Updates the rule with changes made to the rule.
Cancel
Cancels the editing operation.
Apply
Applies the selected rule.
Changing the Retention Interval Value
About this task
The Retention Interval Value determines how long the log, RTS, and alarm data remain in the
system.
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Services > Configurations > Data Retention.
2. Select the rule you want to change.
3. Click Edit.
4. Enter the desired number of days to retain the data in the Retention Interval field.
5. Click Update.
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Chapter 12: Data Replication Service
The Data Replication Service (DRS) replicates data from the master database residing on the
System Manager server to the databases on the client servers (i.e., Session Manager).
DRS supports the following two modes of replication:
• Replication in Repair mode: In repair mode, DRS replicates the requested data from the master
database to the database of the replica node. Repair is only necessary if an installation failure
of DRS occurs.
• Automatic synchronization mode: After the database of the replica node is updated with the
requested data, subsequent synchronizations occur automatically. DRS replicates only the
data that has been updated since the last replication. Automatic synchronization is a scheduled
activity and occurs after a fixed interval of time as set in the configuration files.
DRS sends the data in batches from the master database to the replica node. DRS creates
replication batches when the data in the master database is added, modified, and deleted.
On the DRS Replication page, you can:
• view replica nodes in a replica group.
• replicate requested data from the System Manager master database to the database of the
replica nodes if the databases are not synchronized.
Viewing replica groups
Procedure
On the System Manager web console, click Services > Replication.
Result
The system displays the Replica Groups page with the groups in a table.
Related Links
Replica Groups field descriptions on page 104
Viewing replica nodes in a replica group
You can view the replica nodes in a group.
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Repairing a replica node
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Replication.
2. On the Replica Groups page, select a replica group and click View Replica Nodes.
Alternatively, you can click a replica group name displayed under the Replica Group column
to view the replica nodes for that replica group.
The Replica Nodes page displays the replica nodes for the select group.
Related Links
Replica Nodes field descriptions on page 105
Repairing a replica node
You can replicate data for a replica node whose database is not synchronized with the System
Manager database. Repair is necessary if there is a post-install failure of Data Replication Service.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Replication.
2. On the Replica Groups page, perform one of the following:
• Select a replica group for which you want repair the replica nodes from the table
displaying replica groups and click View Replica Nodes.
• Click the name of the replica node under the Replica Group column.
3. On the Replica Nodes page, select a replica node and click Repair.
The Synchronization Status column displays the data replication status for the repairing
replica node.
Related Links
Replica Nodes field descriptions on page 105
Repairing all replica nodes in a replica group
You can replicate data for all the replica nodes that are in a group. You can perform this operation if
replica nodes in a group are not synchronized with the System Manager database.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Replication.
2. On the Replica Groups page, select a replica group for which you want repair the replica
nodes from the table displaying replica groups.
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Data Replication Service
3. Click Repair.
The Synchronization Status column displays the data replication status for the replica
group.
Viewing replication details for a replica node
You can view the batch-related information such as total number of batches received, processed,
and skipped for a replica node. The master database sends the requested data in batches to the
replica node.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Replication.
2. On the Replica Groups page, select a replica group and click View Replica Nodes.
The Replica Nodes page displays the replica nodes for the selected replica group in a table.
3. Select a replica node and click View Details.
The Data Replication page displays the replication details for the selected replica node.
Related Links
Replication Node Details field descriptions on page 107
Removing a replica node
About this task
Warning:
Removing replica nodes or groups can cause problems with systems that use the configuration
data for active call processing. These operations should be done with care to avoid unwanted
service disruptions.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Replication.
2. On the Replica Groups page, select the replica group in which you want to remove a node.
3. Select View Replica Nodes.
4. Select the Replica Node Host Name you want to remove.
5. Select Remove.
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Removing a replica node from queue
Removing a replica node from queue
About this task
Warning:
Removing replica nodes or groups can cause problems with systems that use the configuration
data for active call processing. These operations should be done with care to avoid unwanted
service disruptions.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager web console, click Services > Replication.
2. On the Replica Groups page, select the replica group you want to remove the node from
queue.
3. Select View Replica Nodes.
4. Select the Replica Node Host Name you want to remove.
5. Select Remove from Queue.
Troubleshooting steps
About this task
Perform the following troubleshooting steps if the replica group state is not Synchronized, Queued
for Repair, or Repairing, or if the replica group is stuck in the Starting state.
Procedure
1. Log in to the System Manager Web interface.
2. In the Services column, select Replication.
3. Select the appropriate Replica Group for the Session Manager server.
4. Click View Replica Nodes.
5. Verify that the Enrollment password has not expired.
6. Enter initTM. The command should complete within 5 minutes. If it does not complete
within that time, continue with the next step.
7. Verify that the system date and time on the Session Manager server is in sync with the
system date and time on the System Manager virtual machine. Trust certificate initialization
can fail if the clocks differ by more than a few seconds.
8. Enter SMnetSetup.
a. Verify that all of the information is correct.
b. Verify the Enrollment password is correct on the System Manager Security screen.
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Data Replication Service
c. Re-enter the Enrollment password.
9. On System Manager, check to see if Session Manager is now synchronized.
Replica Groups field descriptions
The replica groups are logical groupings of the replica nodes. You can use the replica groups field
descriptions page to:
• View all the replica groups in the enterprise.
• View the replication status of the replica groups.
The page displays the following fields when you select All from the Replica Group field.
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Name
Description
Select check box
An option to select a replica group.
Replica Group
The name of the replica group. Each replica group in
the list is a hyperlink. When you click a group, the
system displays the replica nodes for that group on
the Replica Nodes page.
Synchronization Status
For each replica group, displays the combined
synchronization status of all replica nodes under the
group
Group Description
A brief description of the replica group.
Button
Description
View Replica Nodes
Displays the Replica Nodes page. Use this page to
view replica nodes for a group that you select.
Repair
Initiates full-sync for the selected groups and
effectively for all the replica nodes that belong to the
selected groups.
Filter: Enable
Displays fields under Replica Group and
Synchronization Status columns where you can set
the filter criteria. Filter: Enable is a toggle button.
Filter: Disable
Hides the column filter fields without resetting the
filter criteria. Filter: Disable is a toggle button.
Filter: Apply
Filters replica nodes based on the filter criteria.
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Replica Nodes field descriptions
Replica Nodes field descriptions
You can use this page to:
• View the replica nodes in a selected replica group when you request data replication from the
master database of System Manager.
• View the replication status of the replica nodes in a group.
Name
Description
Select check box
Provides the option to select a replica node.
Replica Node Host Name
Displays the full hostname of the replica node.
If you need to administer Session Manager, the
Replica Nodes Web page displays the fully qualified
domain name. For example, ab-ct10-defgbsm.mydata.com.
Product
Displays the name of the product.
Synchronization Status
Displays the synchronization status of the replica
node.
When you install a node, the node goes from a
Ready for Repair state to the Queued for Repair to
Repairing, and finally to the Synchronized state.
During this phase, the replica node receives a fullsync, wherein configured data is replicated to the
replica node. Once the replica node is prepared with
a full-sync, thereafter the node receives the
subsequent changes in the form of regular-sync.
A replica node can be in any one of the following
states during the lifecycle:
• Ready for Repair. The database of the replica
node is not synchronized with the master
database.
• Queued for Repair. The replication request of the
replica server is in queue with other data
replication requests. The color code of the status is
yellow.
• Repairing. The data replication process is in
progress. The color code of the status is yellow.
• Synchronized. The system has successfully
replicated the data that the replica node requested
from the master database to the database of the
replica node. The color code of the status is green.
Table continues…
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Data Replication Service
Name
Description
Note:
If you encounter the following, contact the
administrator who can manually intervene to
resolve the problem:
• Not Reachable. System Manager is unable
to connect to the replica node. This indicates
that the replica node is switched off for
maintenance, a network connectivity failure,
or any other issue that affects general
connectivity between System Manager and
the replica node.
• Synchronization Failure. Data
replication is broken between System
Manager and the replica node. This status
generally indicates a catastrophic failure.
During the automatic replication of data from the
master to the replica node, the system displays the
following status:
• Synchronizing. The data replication is in progress
for the replica node. The color code of the status is
yellow.
• Synchronized. The system successfully replicated
the data that the replica node requested from the
master database to the database of the replica
node. The color code of the status is green.
• Pending Audit. The replica node is marked for
audit. In this state, DRS dishonors any request
from the node until audit is successfully conducted
for the node. On completion of audit activity, the
node displays any of the other states as applicable.
The color code of the status is yellow.
Last Synchronization Time
Displays the last time when the system performed
the data synchronization or replication for the replica
node.
GR Enabled
Displays whether the replica node is GR-enabled or
not.
Last Pull Time
Displays the last time when the client polled DRS for
changed data.
Button
Description
View Details
Opens the Data Replication page. Use this page to
view the synchronization details for a replica node.
Table continues…
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Replication Node Details field descriptions
Button
Description
Repair
Replicates or resynchronizes data from the master
node to a selected replica node.
Remove
Removes the nodes you select from the replica
group.
Remove From Queue
Removes the replica node you select from the
queue.
Show All Replica Groups
Takes you back to the Replica Groups page.
Replication Node Details field descriptions
You can use this page to view the following details:
• The batch-related information such as total number of batches received, processed, and
skipped for a replica node.
• The last time when the replication server performed the synchronization or replication.
• Synchronization or replication error details.
General
Name
Description
Replica Node Group
Displays the name of the group that the replica node
belongs to. A node-group is a logical grouping of
similar nodes.
Replica Node Host Name
Displays the full hostname of the replica node.
If you need to administer Session Manager, the
Replica Nodes Web page displays the fully qualified
domain name. For example, ab-ct10-defgbsm.mydata.com.
Last Down Time
Displays the last time and date when the replica
node could not be reached. System Manager
periodically checks whether a replica node is
reachable.
Last Repair Start Time
Displays the last time and date when a full-sync was
started for the node.
Last Repair End Time
Displays the last time and date when a full-sync was
completed for the node.
Last Pull Time
Displays the last time when the client polled DRS for
changed data.
Build Version
Displays the version of the element configuration.
GR Enabled
Displays whether the replica node is GR-enabled or
not.
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Data Replication Service
Synchronization Statistics
Name
Description
Pending Batches
Lists the batches that are yet to be replicated to the
replica node.
During the data replication process, System
Manager records the changes for a particular replica
node in the form of events. When a replica node
requests System Manager for change events, the
change events are made into batches. These
batches are then replicated to the replica node.
Pending Unbatched Events
Lists the change events that are yet to be formed
into batches.
The recorded change events are formed into batches
and only a predefined number of batches are
replicated to a replica node in a request. The
remaining events wait for the subsequent request
from the replica and are called unbatched events
pending batching and subsequent replication.
Synchronization Status
Displays the synchronization status of the replica
node. For details, see Replica Nodes field
descriptions.
Last Synchronization Time
Displays the last time when the system performed
the data synchronization or replication for the replica
node.
Last Batch Acknowledged
Displays the last batch that an element
acknowledged as successfully processed on the
element side.
During an audit, Data Replication Service (DRS)
compares the last successfully committed batch on
the node with the data in the last batch
acknowledged batch. If the node has a more recent
batch, then DRS schedules a full-sync for the node.
Marked For Audit
Marks for audit all replica nodes that are GRenabled:
• When you activate the secondary System Manager
or when you enable GR after the primary System
Manager restores
• When the primary System Manager restores and
you choose the database of the primary System
Manager
• When the primary System Manager restores and
you choose the database of the secondary System
Manager
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Replication Node Details field descriptions
Name
Description
DRS denies any request from the replica node that is
marked for audit until the audit is complete for the
replica node.
Last Audit Time
Displays the last time and date when DRS performed
the audit of data from the node that is marked for
audit.
Last Error Details
Name
Description
Cause of Error
Describes why the system failed to replicate or
synchronize data.
Time of Error
Displays the time when the error occurred.
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Chapter 13: Security Module Status
The Security Module Status page displays the status and configuration of the security module for
each administered Session Manager and Survivable Remote Session Manager.
You can perform certain actions on the Security Module from the Security Module Status page, such
as synchronize the security module or assign a certificate authority.
Viewing Security Module status
Procedure
1. On the System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager.
The Session Manager Dashboard page displays the details and Security Module status for
all the administered Session Manager servers and Survivable Remote Session Manager
servers (BSM).
2. If the Security Module state of a particular Session Manager is not displayed as Up, see
Troubleshooting Security Module Sanity failure on page 227.
Security Module Status field descriptions
Click the Show or Hide link under Details column to display or hide the NIC bonding details in the
NIC Bonding section. The NIC bonding status column value displays the active slave interface or
None if there is no response from the security module. A warning icon in the NIC bonding column
indicates the switching of slaves interfaces in the last 24 hours. An error icon indicates that there is
no active interface and NIC bonding is enabled. The Details column of the NIC Bonding section
shows the following information:
• Slaves (eth2 and eth3) state
• Number of failures
• Time of last update on the event of switching between interfaces
The following security module statistics are displayed for each Session Manager:
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Security Module Status actions
Field
Description
Session Manager
Session Manager instance
Type
Displays the type of Session Manager instance,
either Session Manager core (SM) or Survivable
Remote Session Manager (BSM).
Status
Displays the status of the Security Module deployed
for the Session Manager (Up or Down).
Connections
Total number of connections for the Security Module.
IP Address
IP address of the security module used for SIP
traffic. This field should match the address
administered on the SIP Entity form for the Session
Manager instance.
VLAN
The VLAN ID that the security module is associated
with. This field should match the VLAN ID
administered on the Session Manager instance form.
Default Gateway
Default Gateway used by the security module. This
value should match the default gateway
administered on the Session Manager instance form.
NIC Bonding
Displays whether NIC bonding is enabled or
disabled.
Entity Links (expected/actual)
The expected value is the number of SIP Entities
configured in the Routing Policy which have Entity
Links to the Session Manager. The actual value is
the number of SIP Entities currently configured on
the security module. If these values do not match,
the Synchronize action should be performed.
Security Module Status actions
Use the Security Module Status page to perform the following actions:
• Refresh: Refreshes the statistics for all of the administered Session Manager instances.
• Reset : Resets the security module for the selected Session Manager. You may choose to
reset the security module when a connection cannot be made to the security module.
Warning:
The Session Manager cannot process calls while the security module is being reset. See
Administering Avaya Aura® Session Manager for details on how to disable the Session
Manager prior to resetting the security module.
• Synchronize: Verifies that the administered configuration matches the actual configuration
stored on the security module. This action should be performed anytime the values in the
security module statistics table do not match the administered data.
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Security Module Status
• Connection Status: Shows the view of the current status of inbound and outbound links
between the Session Manager security module and external hosts. Connection Status enables
general-purpose monitoring and debugging activities, such as:
- identifying if the Session Manager is required to be taken out of service
- determining if links are secured or not
- viewing link details and statistics
Investigating Security Module status
Possible causes for the Security Module status to be Down include:
• The security module may have recently been reset. A reset can take several minutes to
complete.
• The security module may not have received security module configuration information from
System Manager System Manager.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager Web Console, under Services, click Replication to display the
Replica Group associated with the Session Manager instance.
2. If the Synchronization Status is not Synchronized for the Session Manager instance:
a. Select the affected Replica Group.
b. Click View Replica Nodes.
c. On the Replica Nodes page, verify the Replica Node Host Name is correct.
d. If the Replica Node Host Name is incorrect, click Repair.
3. Click Refresh to see the latest status.
4. On the Security Module Status page, if the status is Down, synchronize the security module
to trigger an update:
a. Click the button in front of the appropriate Session Manager instance from the Session
Manager list.
b. Click Synchronize.
c. Click Refresh to see the latest status.
5. If the status is still Down, reset the security module:
a. Select the appropriate Session Manager instance from the Session Manager list.
b. Click Reset.
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Connection Status
Warning:
The Session Manager cannot process calls while the security module is being
reset.
6. Select Refresh to see the latest status.
Connection Status
The Connection Status page displays the current status of inbound and outbound links between the
Session Manager security module and external hosts.
You can use this information for general-purpose monitoring and debugging for:
• identifying when a Session Manager might be taken out of service
• determining if links are secured
• viewing specific connection details and statistics
The Connection Status page contains three sections:
• Summary
• Connection Filter
• Connection List
Connections Status field descriptions
Summary section
The Summary section displays the total number of Active Connections and the number of
connections that are incoming, outgoing, TCP, and TLS.
Connection Filter section
Use the Connect Filter section to define a filter and to display the connection list based on the
defined filters. A filter can be an FQDN or an IP Address and mask.
If you select the Non-compliant NIST TLS Only check box, the screen displays only the TLS
connections having an algorithm that is not compliant with the NIST SP800-131A recommendation.
Connection List section
The Connection List table displays basic information of all the active connections. The following
definitions apply to several of the fields:
• A: Acceptable. The algorithm and key length are safe to use. No security risk is currently
known.
• D: Deprecated. The use of the algorithm and key length is allowed, but the user must accept
some risk.
• X: Disallowed.
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Security Module Status
• N: Not approved.
• R: Restricted. The use of the algorithm or key length is deprecated, and there are additional
restrictions required to use the algorithm or key length for applying cryptographic protection to
data.
• U: Unknown. The system cannot determine the status.
Name
Description
Details
Show or hide the detailed information of the selected
connection link.
Dir
Link direction (inbound or outbound).
Local Port
Local Security Module port.
Remote IP
Remote IP address.
Remote Port
Remote port.
Remote FQDN/IP
Remote FQDN or IP address.
Transport
Transport protocol (UDP, TCP, TLS).
Policy
Security Policy (Trusted, Default, Instance)
Cert Sign
Certificate Signature. Digital signature algorithms (for
example, RSA or DSA) and the cryptographic hash
function (for example, SHA) of the certificate in use
by the TLS connection.
Key Exch
Key exchange algorithm (for example, RSA, DSA,
Diffie-Hellman,) and key bit length (for example,
1024, 2048) to establish symmetric keys between
the endpoints on the TLS connection.
Encryption
Cryptographic operation that provides confidentiality
of the data being carried on the TLS connection.
MAC
Message Authentication Code algorithm (for
example, SHA) that authenticates the TLS data and
provides integrity and authenticity assurance on the
message.
Connection Details section
The Connection Details section displays detailed information for the selected connection.
Name
Description
Direction
Link direction.
Creation time
Link creation time.
Last message received
Last message received time.
Last message sent
Last message sent time.
Messages/Bytes Received
Received message count and byte count.
Messages/Bytes Transmitted
Transmitted message count and byte count.
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NIC bonding
Name
Description
Messages/Bytes Dropped
Dropped message count and byte count.
Subject
The subject field identifies the entity associated with
the public key stored in the subject public key field of
the X.509 certificate.
Alt Subject
Alt subject is an extension to X.509 that allows
various values to be associated with a security
certificate.
CA
The issuer who signed the certificate.
Cipher
The negotiated TLS cipher suite. The cipher suite
includes the Key Exchange, Encryption and MAC
algorithms.
Public Key Algorithm
The encryption algorithm of the public key (e.g. RSA,
DSA or Diffie-Hellman).
Key Size (bits)
The Public Key length.
q bits size
For DSA public keys, this represents the q parameter
size.
Signature Algorithm
The identifier for the cryptographic algorithm used by
the CA to sign this certificate.
MAC Algorithm
The Message Authentication Code (MAC) algorithm
to verify data integrity.
NIC bonding
NIC bonding is method to increase available bandwidth. When bonded, 2 NICs appear to have the
same physical device and the MAC address.
NIC bonding provides backup if the primary Security Module interface fails or if the port is switched
off.
Before attempting NIC bonding, verify the integrity and functionality of each NIC individually. The
cable or either of the ports the cable plugs into can fail.
For NIC bonding, the Security Module uses Eth2 as the primary interface and Eth3 as the secondary
backup interface. A logical interface, called bond0, connects the two interfaces and has the IP
address of the Security Module.
To administer NIC bonding, make sure both the Eth 2 and Eth3 ports have network cables
connected to the network.
The system generates alarms when one of the interfaces (Eth2 or Eth3) is out of service. If both of
the interfaces are out of service, the system generates an alarm indicating that the bond0 interface
is out of service.
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Security Module Status
The system displays the NIC bonding status for a Session Manager on the Security Module Status
page.
The following is the mapping of the physical Ethernet interfaces:
• Eth0 : Management
• Eth1: Services
• Eth2: Security Module (SIP or PPM) – Physical port 3
• Eth3: Backup interface for NIC bonding – Physical port 4
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Chapter 14: Session Manager maintenance
tests
Use the Maintenance Tests page to perform tests on the System Manager server and the
configured Session Managers. The tests verify functionality such as network connectivity, data
replication, and database operation. The system runs the tests periodically to monitor the status of
system components. You can also run the tests on demand.
Note:
Tests can fail if the server under test is out of service or is not responding.
Maintenance Tests page field descriptions
Name
Description
Select System Manager or Session Manager to
test:
Select a System Manager or a Session Manager
from the drop-down menu on which to perform the
maintenance tests.
Button
Description
Execute Selected Tests
Run the selected maintenance tests on the selected
System Manager or Session Manager.
Execute All Tests
Run all the maintenance tests on the selected
System Manager or Session Manager.
Name
Description
Test Description
Description of the test.
Test Result
The outcome of executing the test (pass or fail).
Test Result Time Stamp
The last time the test was run.
Note:
The system loads Maintenance test data asynchronously in the background. The system
displays the message Loading.. when data is loading in the background. The system displays
the message Loading Complete when data loading finishes. If the wait time exceeds a certain
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Session Manager maintenance tests
limit, the system displays the message Loading failure. Please try again. and requests the
user to try again later.
Running maintenance tests
Run the maintenance tests on the current System Manager or any configured Session Manager.
Procedure
1. On the System ManagerWeb Console, under Elements, select Session Manager > System
Tools > Maintenance Tests.
2. In the System Manager or a Session Manager to test field, select System Manager or a
Session Manager instance from the drop-down menu.
3. To run all of the tests, select Execute All Tests.
4. To run only certain tests:
a. Select the test to run from the test list.
b. Click Execute Selected Tests.
5. Verify the tests pass.
Maintenance Test descriptions
Test Call Processing status
This test checks the call processing functionality for a particular Session Manager instance. If call
processing is working correctly, the test passes. If the test fails, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Test data distribution and redundancy link
This test only runs on Session Manager. This test verifies the Session Manager data share
mechanism is functioning properly by sending a test string to each configured Session Manager.
Each Session Manager saves the test string Session Manager within its respective database. After
a short wait, the system queries each Session Manager for the test string value.
The test passes if each Session Manager returns the correct value.
A test failure indicates a potential failure of link redundancy and Session Manager pass-through
capabilities that could impact call processing and Call Admission Control.
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Maintenance Test descriptions
The test does not run on a Session Manager if the state of the Session Manager is Deny New
Service.
Test host name resolution of each Session Manager
This test only runs on System Manager. The test verifies that the DNS server can resolve the host
name of each configured Session Manager.
If the DNS server can resolve the host name for each Session Manager, the test passes. Otherwise,
the test fails. Check for the following possible causes:
• The Session Manager host name is incorrect on the DNS server.
• The Session Manager host name is missing on the DNS server.
Test management link functionality
This test checks the administrative link to the Session Manager. If the test fails, administrative
changes cannot take effect on Session Manager. .
Test Postgres database sanity
This test runs on either System Manager or aSession Manager.
System Manager tests the functionality of the master database.
The Session Manager tests the functionality of the local instance database.
If the test fails, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Test sanity of Secure Access Link (SAL) agent
This test can run on either System Manager or Session Manager. It checks if the Security Access
Link agent is running or not on the server. If the link is up and running, the test passes.
If the test fails, run the statapp command and other corrective actions for associated alarms on
Session Manager before escalating to Avaya Technical Support.
Test Security Module Status
This test queries the status of the Security Module on a specified Session Manager. If the query is
successful, the test passes. Otherwise, the test fails.
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Session Manager maintenance tests
Test network connections to each Session Manager
The Network Connections test runs only on System Manager. This test verifies the connectivity to
each administered Session Manager.
If connectivity is up for each Session Manager, the test passes. If connectivity is down, the test fails.
The following are possible causes of test failure:
1. An upgrade or install is in progress.
2. The server might be out of service. Check the log for an event code, then check the Log
Event Codes in Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya Aura® Session Manager for the
appropriate troubleshooting action.
3. The network might be out of service. Run a ping test between System Manager and the
failing Session Manager to verify network connectivity.
Test User Data Storage sanity
Note:
This test is not available for:
• Branch Session Managers
• Session Managers that are running a release earlier than 6.3.8.
This test checks the status of the Cassandra application and the connectivity to the Cassandra
database. The test passes if the application and the connectivity are operating correctly. The test
fails otherwise.
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Chapter 15: SIP Entity Monitoring
Session Manager SIP Entity Monitoring
SIP Entity Monitoring provides background detection for monitored connections to improve
alternative routing and to minimize the call setup time due to SIP link failures. The SIP Monitor
periodically tests the status of the SIP proxy servers. If a proxy fails to reply, SIP messages are no
longer routed to that proxy. As a result, call delays are reduced since calls are not routed to the
failed servers. The SIP Monitor continues to monitor the failed SIP entity. When the proxy replies,
SIP messages are again routed over that link.
SIP monitoring sends OPTIONS requests to SIP entities to determine whether these are in up,
partially up, down or deny new service state. An entity is considered up if all of the addresses
associated with it are up. An entity is down if all of its addresses are down. An entity is partially up if
some, but not all, of its addresses are up. An address is considered down if the response of address
to OPTIONS is:
• 408 Request Timeout
• 500 Server Internal Error: Destination Unreachable
• 503 Service Unavailable (with no parenthetical text)
• 503 Service Unavailable (no media resources)
• 504 Server Timeout
All other responses (including "503 Service Unavailable") with other parenthetical text, such as "503
Service Unavailable (Signaling Resources Unavailable)" results in the address to be considered up.
Note:
Any 503 response is displayed as a 500 response on the SIP Monitoring GUI. SIP container
converts 503 to 500 before passing the response to Session Manager.
You can turn the monitoring on or off for a given SIP entity. If monitoring is turned off, the SIP entity
is not monitored by any instance.
You can also turn monitoring on or off for an entire instance. If monitoring is turned off, none of the
SIP entities are monitored by that instance. If monitoring for the instance is turned on, only those
SIP entities for which monitoring is turned on are monitored.
SIP Monitoring can only report problems if the Security Module is functional.
SIP Monitoring setup is administered using the SIP Entity and the Session Manager Administration
pages on System Manager. See the sections SIP Entities, Session Manager Administration and SIP
Responses to an OPTIONS Request from the book Administering Avaya Aura® Session Manager.
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SIP Entity Monitoring
Viewing the SIP Monitoring Status Summary page
About this task
The SIP Entity Link Monitoring Status Summary page displays the status of the entity links for all the
administered Session Manager instances. An entity link consists of one or more physical
connections between a Session Manager server and a SIP entity.
If all connections are up, then the entity link status is up. If one or more connections are down but
there is at least one connection up, the link status is partially down. If all of the connections are
down, the entity link status is down. If the connection denies any new service, the entity link status
is deny new service.
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, click Elements > Session Manager.
2. In the left navigation pane, click System Status > SIP Entity Monitoring
The SIP Entity Link Monitoring Status Summary page displays the SIP Entity Link
monitoring status for all Session Manager instances.
SIP Entity Link Monitoring Status Summary page field
descriptions
SIP Entities Status for ALL Monitoring Session Manager Instances
Button
Description
Run Monitor
Starts asynchronous demand monitor test for the
selected Session Manager or Branch Session
Manager instances.
Refresh
Refreshes the status of the entity links for all
administered Session Manager instances.
Field
Description
Session Manager
Name of the Session Manager instance.
Clicking any of Session Manager servers in the list
opens the Session Manager Entity Link Connection
Status page that displays detailed connection status
for all entity links from Session Manager.
Note:
An entity link consists of one or more physical
connections between a Session Manager server
and a SIP entity. If all of these connections are
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SIP Entity Link Monitoring Status Summary page field descriptions
Field
Description
up, then the entity link status is up. If one or
more connections are down, but there is at least
one connection up, then the entity link status is
partially down. If all the connections are down,
the entity link status is down.
Type
Instances of type Session Manager and Branch
Session Manager.
Monitored Entities / Down
Entity links for Session Manager that are down out of
the total number of entity links for Session Manager.
Monitored Entities / Partially Up
Entity links for Session Manager that are partially up.
Monitored Entities / Up
Entity links for Session Manager that are up out of
the total number of entity links for Session Manager.
Monitored Entities / Not Monitored
SIP entities that are not monitored, because they are
not administered to be monitored by Session
Manager.
Monitored Entities / Deny
Number of Deny New Service Entity Links.
Monitored Entities / Total
Number of total Entity Links for a SIP Entity.
All Monitored SIP Entities
Button
Description
Run Monitor
Starts asynchronous demand monitor test for the
selected SIP entities. Clicking any of the entities in
the list opens the SIP Entity, Entity Link Connection
Status page that displays detailed connection status
for all entity links from all Session Manager instances
to a single SIP entity.
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Chapter 16: SIP Tracing
Session Manager SIP Tracing
SIP Tracing allows tracing of SIP messages exchanged between the Session Manager server and
remote SIP entities. SIP Tracing consists of two components:
• SIP Tracer Configuration - defines the characteristics of messages to be traced for the
capturing engine in the Security Module
• SIP Trace Viewer - displays the captured SIP messages
You can use SIP message tracing to troubleshoot or monitor a selected Session Manager instance.
SIP tracing logs incoming and outgoing SIP messages. SIP messages that are dropped by any of
the security components such as the SIP firewall are also logged by the SIP tracer.
You can trace all of the messages belonging to a user or Call ID for a call, or for a selected Session
Manager instance.
Note:
You must add at least a User Filter or Call Filter when the Max Message Count is set in order for
the Security Module to capture packets.
SIP Tracer Configuration
The SIP Tracer Configuration page allows you to configure tracing properties for one or more
Security Modules. The output of the SIP Trace is viewable on the System Manager. Each time a
new Tracer configuration is sent to a Session Manager, the existing Tracer configuration is
overwritten.
The SIP tracing page is accessed by logging on to the System Manager console and selecting
Elements > Session Manager > System Tools > SIP Tracer Configuration. You can filter
messages by user and/or Call ID, or ignore filtering and trace all messages for a specified SIP
entity.
The Tracer Configuration page contains four sections:
• Tracer Configuration: This section contains attributes that control the basic functionality of the
SIP Message tracer. The check boxes allow you to enable or disable the attribute.
• User Filter: Filters messages based on the sending user, receiving user, or both.
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SIP Tracer Configuration
• Call Filter: Filters messages based on the sending Call ID, receiving Call ID, or both.
• Session Manager Instances: Lists the administered Session Manager instances on which to
apply the filters.
Tracer Configuration page field descriptions
Tracer Configuration
Name
Description
Tracer Enabled
SIP message tracing is enabled by default.
Trace All Messages
SIP message tracing is enabled for all SIP
messages. In this case, other fields get disabled.
From Network to Security Module
SIP message tracing is enabled for ingress calls sent
to the Session Manager instance from the network.
From Security Module to Network
SIP message tracing is enabled for egress calls
originating from the Session Manager instance and
sent to the network.
From Server to Security Module
Local SIP messages originating from Session
Manager.
From Security Module to Server
Local SIP messages originating from the security
module.
Trace Dropped Messages
SIP message tracing is enabled to trace messages
from calls dropped by the SIP firewall as well as by
the SM100 proxy.
Max Dropped Message Count
Shows the value for the maximum number of traced
dropped messages, if Dropped check box is
activated.
Send Trace to a Remote Server
Enables or disables SIP Tracing to an external host .
This enables Session Manager to send all the
(decrypted) SIP traffic out to an external host.
Session Manager uses Syslog protocol for sending
the SIP traffic (as used currently for SIP Tracing).
Remote Server FQDN or IP Address
FQDN or IP address of the remote syslog server.
Send Trace Method
Method used to transfer syslogs either using Stunnel
(encrypted TCP) or Syslog (unsecure UDP) as
mentioned below:
• Syslog (unsecured UDP) : Traffic is send without
being encrypted to remote server as specified in
the “Remote Server FQDN or IP Address” to
default syslog port.
• Stunnel (encrypted TCP) : Traffic is send as
encrypted (using stunnel) to remote server that is
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SIP Tracing
Name
Description
specified in the “Remote Server FQDN or IP
Address” to the port specified in the input
field ”Stunnel Port”.
Stunnel Port
Port number that remote server's stunnel is listening
on. Stunnel provides several modes for far end
certificate validation.
User Filter
Button
Description
New
Create a new filter for filtering SIP messages based
on the users. You can define a maximum of three
user filters.
Delete
Delete a selected user filter or filters.
Name
Description
From
Filter SIP messages based on the user from whom
the message is sent. Type the user string.
For example, a rule to trace all messages from user
“pqr”:
to=”” from=”pqr” stop-count=50
To
Filter SIP messages based on the user to whom the
message is sent. Type the user string.
For example, a rule to trace all messages to user
“xyz”:
to=”xyz” from=”” stop-count=50
Source
Filter SIP messages based on the source address.
Destination
Filter SIP messages based on the destination
address.
Max Message Count
Value for maximum number of messages matching
the filter that Session Manager should trace. Default
is 25 messages.
Call Filter
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Button
Description
New
Create a new filter for filtering all SIP messages that
start a new call. You can define a maximum of three
call filters.
Delete
Delete a selected call filter or filters.
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SIP Tracer Configuration
Name
Description
From
Filter SIP messages from a specific user. Call tracing
identifies a call by capturing the Call ID from the first
message that matches the From filter, thereafter
tracing all the messages that have the matching call
ID.
For example, a rule to trace all messages related to
a CALL from user “pqr”:
to=”” from=”pqr” request-uri=”” stop-count=50
To
Filter SIP messages based on the user to whom the
message is sent. Call tracing identifies a call by
capturing the Call ID from the first message that
matches the To filter, thereafter tracing all the
messages that have the matching call ID.
For example, a rule to trace all messages related to
a CALL to user “xyz”:
to=”xyz” from=”” request-uri=”” stop-count=50
Source
Filter SIP messages based on the source address.
Destination
Filter SIP messages based on the destination
address.
Max Call Count
Value for maximum number of messages matching
the filter that Session Manager should trace. Default
is 25 messages.
Request URI
Filter calls based on the called party (URI address).
A valid Request URI format, for example,
is .@192.111.11.111.
Session Manager Instances
Name
Description
Name
Select one or more configured Session Managers for
which the specific filters should be used.
Note:
If you select only one Session Manager from
this list, the Read button is activated. Click this
button to retrieve the current Trace
Configuration details for the selected Session
Manager and display that within the Trace
Configuration page. After displaying the
configuration, Session Manager closes the
display so that no older configuration data is
displayed.
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SIP Tracing
Button
Description
Commit
Save the configuration changes.
Read
Retrieves the current Trace Configuration details for
the selected Session Manager and display that
within the Trace Configuration page.
Configuring SIP tracing
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > SIP Tracer Configuration .
2. Enable or disable the configuration attributes in the Tracer Configuration section of the
page.
3. Set a user filter if desired (Filtering by user on page 128)
4. Set a call filter if desired (Filtering by Call ID on page 129)
5. Delete a filter if desired (Deleting a filter on page 129)
6. Under the Session Manager Network section, select one or more of the administered
Session Manager on which the filters, if any, should be used.
7. Click Commit.
If filters are selected, they will be applied to the selected Session Managers. Any previous
filter configurations will be overwritten.
Note:
You must add at least a User Filter or Call Filter when the Max Message Count is set in
order for the Security Module to capture packets.
Filtering by user
About this task
You can define up to three separate user filters.
The format for a valid sender or receiver is sip: 1234@xyz.com, where 1234 is the user and xyz
is the domain. An empty value in the From and To fields means that every message should match.
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > SIP Tracer Configuration.
2. Navigate to the User Filter section.
3. To create a new filter, click New.
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SIP Tracer Configuration
4. In the From field, enter the user from whom the message is sent (if applicable).
5. In the To field, enter the user to whom the message is sent (if applicable).
6. In the Max Message Count field, enter the maximum number of messages that should be
traced which match the filter.
Note:
You must add at least a User Filter or Call Filter when the Max Message Count is set in
order for the Security Module to capture packets.
7. Select the appropriate filters to be applied.
Filtering by Call ID
About this task
You can define up to three separate call filters.
An example of a valid Request URI format is .@123.456.789.123
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, click Elements > Session Manager > System Tools >
SIP Tracer Configuration .
2. Scroll down to the Call Filter section.
3. Click New.
4. In the From field, enter the user from whom the message is sent (if applicable).
5. In the To field, enter the user to whom the message is sent (if applicable).
6. In the Max Message Count field, enter the maximum number of messages that should be
traced which match the filter.
Note:
It is necessary to add at least a User Filter or Call Filter when the Max Message Count
is set in order for the Security Module to capture packets.
7. Select the filters to apply.
Deleting a filter
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Tracer Configuration .
2. In the User Filter and/or Call Filter sections, check the box next to the filter you wish to
delete. You can select more than one filter.
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SIP Tracing
3. Click Delete.
SIP Trace Viewer
SIP Trace Viewer displays SIP message trace logs based on the filters that were configured. You
can view these trace logs for a range of hours or days and for selected Session Manager instances.
Note:
Number of records retrieved versus displayed items: The Trace Viewer page displays the
number of listed trace messages. Due to system performance, not all trace messages which
match the filter criteria may be displayed. In this case, the value of Number of records
retrieved in the bottom right corner of the screen will be greater than the displayed Items value.
It is suggested that the filter criteria be changed to ensure that no relevant trace messages are
missing within the Trace Viewer list.
Viewing trace logs
About this task
Logs can be filtered to display only those logs within a certain time range. Due to the Trace
Configuration filter options, trace records may be shown multiple times.
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > SIP Trace Viewer.
2. To filter trace logs for a range of hours or days, click Filter and enter or select the date, time,
and time zone information under the From and To areas.
This filter criteria will cause only those logs with a time stamp between the From and To
values to be displayed.
3. Select one or more Session Manager instances for which you wish to see the trace logs.
4. Click Commit to generate the trace output.
Trace viewer output
The output on the Trace Viewer page displays the following information.
Name
Description
Details
Clicking Show displays the complete message.
Table continues…
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SIP Trace Viewer
Name
Description
Time
The time when the trace record was written.
Tracing Entity
Name of the Session Manager instance that logged the trace.
From
URI from where the traced SIP message originated.
Action
The Request/Response Action of the traced SIP message (e.g.,
INVITE, ACK). An arrow indicates the direction of the action (e.g.,
--INVITE->, <-By--).
To
URI to which the traced SIP message was sent.
Protocol
Protocol that was used by the traced SIP message such as TCP,
UDP, TLS.
Call ID
Call ID of the traced SIP message.
Trace viewer buttons
The Trace Viewer button at the bottom of the Trace Viewer page is a toggle button. When this
button is in the Show state, the following buttons appear.
Name
Description
Dialog Filter
This button is enabled if at least one table entry is selected. Trace
messages are displayed which are related to the same dialog.
Cancel
This button is enabled if a Dialog Filter is active. Selecting this
button will cancel the Dialog Filter and display the original Trace
Viewer page.
Hide/Show dropped messages
This is a toggle button. Hide dropped messages will not display
any dropped messages, thereby reducing the number of
messages displayed. Show dropped messages will display all
messages.
More Actions
This button is active only if one or more trace records are
displayed. The retrieved Trace Viewer list can be saved to a file
on the client side. The Hide/Show dropped messages and
Dialog Filter functions are operational for the exported file but the
GUI filters and sorting operations are not.
Trace viewer file options
There are two options under the More Actions drop-down menu:
• Export Trace Viewer Overview: A tab-separated plain text file is created with all of the
overview columns that appear on the Trace Viewer screen. The file can be displayed with a
text editor such as Wordpad or a spreadsheet application such as Excel.
• Export Trace Viewer Details: A plain text file is created with the details of the Trace Viewer
records.
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SIP Tracing
When you select one of the export options, you can:
• open the Trace Viewer list with an editor
• save the Trace Viewer list to a file
• perform the open or save function automatically for files from now on. This option appears only
if you are using Mozilla Firefox as your browser. If you are using Internet Explorer, this option
does not appear.
Remote logging
You can send SIP trace files to a remote server using remote logging. The SIP Tracer remote
logging feature supports both plain syslog (UDP) and encrypted tunnel (using stunnel). The
following sections describe how to configure a Linux-based server to accept traces for these two
options.
A secure shell (SSH) connection between System Manager and any Session Manager instance is
required for shell access.
Unsecure UDP syslog server
Requirements for UDP syslog server
System Requirements for the unsecure UDP syslog server are:
• CentOS-based Linux server
• Required RPM sysklogd (syslog server)
Related Links
Remote logging on page 132
Configuring a syslog server (unsecure UDP)
About this task
The high-level steps for configuring an unsecure UDP syslog server are:
• Configure the server firewall to accept logs on UDP port 514
• redirect the tracer messages to a specific file
• enable logging from a remote system to listen to syslog UDP port 514
• configure the Session Manager to send SIP traces to the file
The output of the netstat command should be similar to the following (the bold fields are the
important fields to note):
udp 0 0.0.0.0:514 0.0.0.0:* 21907/syslogd
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Remote logging
Procedure
1. Configure the firewall to accept logs on UDP port 514. If you plan to send logs from more
than one Session Manager, you need to add a rule for each IP address. The following
command is an example of how to configure the Linux firewall to allow remote logging from a
host associated with IP address 1.2.3.4:
iptables -I INPUT 1 -s 1.2.3.4 -p udp --dport 514 -j ACCEPT
2. Redirect the tracer messages to a specific file:
a. Open the syslog's configuration file /etc/syslog.config with your favorite editor.
b. Add the following line to the end of the file:
local2.info -/var/log/tracer.log
c. Write the file and close it.
3. Enable logging from a remote system to syslog UDP port 514:
a. Open the file /etc/sysconfig/syslog with your favorite editor.
b. Modify SYSLOGD_OPTIONS to include the -r flag (i.e., SYSLOGD_OPTIONS=”-r”)
c. Write and close the file.
d. Restart the syslog service by entering the command service syslog restart
e. Enter the command netstat -unpl | grep 514 to verify that syslog can listen on UDP
port 514.
The output should be similar to the netstat output described above.
4. Configure the Session Manager:
a. On the System Manager console, navigate to Elements > Session Manager >
System Tools > SIP Tracer Configuration
b. Make sure that the Tracer Enabled checkbox is checked.
c. Specify the remote syslog server FQDN or IP Address is the Remote Server FQDN or
IP Address field.
d. Select Syslog (unsecure UDP) from the Send Trace Method drop-down list.
e. Select one or more Session Managers in the Session Manager Instances table.
f. Click the Commit button. This will send the configuration to all of the selected Session
Managers, and they will redirect their output to the remote syslog server.
Related Links
Remote logging on page 132
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SIP Tracing
Secure TCP syslog server
Requirements for Secure TCP syslog server
System Requirements for the secure TCP (stunnel) syslog server are:
• Linux CentOS-based server
• Required RPMs:
- nc — Netcat, a simple utility for reading and writing data across network connections
- stunnel
- sysklogd
Related Links
Remote logging on page 132
Configuring Secure TCP syslog server
About this task
The high-level steps for configuring a Secure TCP syslog server are:
• configure the firewall to accept connections/logs on UDP port 514 and the stunnel TCP port
50614 from the Session Manager
• redirect the tracer messages to a specific file
• enable internal logging to syslog UDP port 514
• redirect the output from UDP
• create a self-signed a certificate — the stunnel server requires a certificate (X.509) in order to
work. For more information, see http://www.stunnel.org/faq/certs.html
• create a stunnel configuration file — this file contains:
- the port that listens for encrypted traffic
- the port to forward the decrypted traffic
- the certificate to send to the client on tunnel establishment
• start the stunnel server process
• start the stunnel forwarding process to forward logs to syslog UDP port 514
• configure Session Manager to send SIP traces
The output of the netstat command should be similar to the following (the bold fields are the
important fields to note):
udp 0 0.0.0.0:514 0.0.0.0:* 21907/syslogd
Procedure
1. Configure the firewall to accept connections/logs on UDP port 514. Enter the command
iptables -I INPUT 1 -i lo -p udp --dport 514 -j ACCEPT
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Remote logging
2. Configure the firewall to accept connections/logs on the stunnel TCP port from the Session
Manager. Assuming the syslog server can listen to stunnel port 50614 and the Session
Manager has an IP address of 1.2.3.4, the following is an example of the command to
configure the firewall:
iptables -I INPUT 1 -s 1.2.3.4 -p tcp --dport 50614 -j ACCEPT
3. Redirect the tracer messages to a specific file:
a. Open the syslog's configuration file /etc/syslog.config with your favorite editor.
b. Add the following line to the end of the file:
local2.info -/var/log/tracer.log
c. Write the file and close it.
4. Enable internal logging from a remote system to syslog UDP port 514:
a. Open the file /etc/sysconfig/syslog with your favorite editor.
b. Modify SYSLOGD_OPTIONS to include the -r flag (i.e., SYSLOGD_OPTIONS=”-r”)
c. Write and close the file.
d. Restart the syslog service by entering the command service syslog restart
e. Enter the command netstat -unpl | grep 514 to verify that syslog can listen on UDP
port 514.
The output should be similar to the netstat output described above.
5. Enter the command mknod /dev/udp c 30 36 to redirect the UDP output to the Linux server.
6. If a self-signed certificate does not exist, create the certificate with the command openssl
req -new -x509 -days 365 -nodes -config stunnel.cnf -out stunnel.pem -keyout
stunnel.pem
7. Using your favorite editor, create the stunnel configuration file /etc/stunnel/
stunnelSyslogServer.conf
8. Open the stunnel configuration file and do the following:
a. Enter the line cert = /etc/stunnel/stunnel.pem
b. Enter a blank line.
c. Enter the line [ssyslog]
d. Enter the line accept = IP_ADDRESS:STUNNEL_PORT, where IP_ADDRESS is the
IP address of the server. It must match the value that will be entered in the Remote
Server FQDN or IP Address field on the Tracer Configuration screen, and
STUNNEL_PORT is the port that is used to communicate with the Session Manager.
Important:
Do not omit the colon between the IP address and stunnel port (1.2.3.4:50614)
e. Enter connect = 127.0.0.1:50614
f. Enter verify = 1
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SIP Tracing
g. Write and close the file.
9. Start the stunnel server process by entering the command stunnel /etc/stunnel/
stunnelSyslogServer.conf
10. Verify that the stunnel process is running by entering the command pgrep stunnel. The
output should display the process ID number of the listening stunnel.
11. Start the stunnel forwarding process by entering the command nc -k -l 50614 | tr '\n' '\0' |
xargs -O -L 1 echo '<151>' > /dev/upd/127.0.0.1/514
12. Configure the Session Manager:
a. On the System Manager console, navigate to Elements > Session Manager >
System Tools > SIP Tracer Configuration
b. Make sure that the Tracer Enabled checkbox is checked.
c. Check the Send Trace to a Remote Server checkbox.
d. Specify the remote syslog server FQDN or IP Address is the Remote Server FQDN or
IP Address field.
e. Select Stunnel (encrypted TCP) from the Send Trace Method drop-down list.
f. Specify the remote stunnel port on the the remote stunnel server listens on.
g. Select one or more Session Managers in the Session Manager Instances table.
h. Click the Commit button. This will send the configuration to all of the selected Session
Managers, and they will redirect their output to the remote syslog server.
Related Links
Remote logging on page 132
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Chapter 17: Call Routing Test
Call Routing Test for Session Manager
The Call Routing Test provides verification of System Manager administration for routing a calling
party URI to a called party URI.
Use this test to verify that you have administered the system as intended before placing it into
service or to get feedback on why a certain type of call is not being routed as expected. No real SIP
messages are sent during this test.
This test displays the routing decision process as it uses the SIP routing algorithms. It uses
administration from the following forms:
• Routing > Adaptations, Dial Patterns, Entity Links, Locations, Policies, Domains, SIP
Entities, Time Ranges
• Elements > Session Manager > Session Manager Administration
• Elements > Session Manager > Application Configuration > Application Sequences
After the test has finished, two headings are displayed: Routing Decisions and Routing Decision
Process.
The Routing Decisions output contains one line per destination choice (there will be more than one
line if there are alternate routing choices; the output will appear in the order that destinations are
attempted). Note that each line tells you not only where the INVITE would be routed, but also what
the adapted digits and domain would be.
The Routing Decision Process information contains details about how the Routing Decisions were
made.
Call Routing Test page field descriptions
Name
Description
Calling Party URI
SIP URI of the calling party. You must specify a
handle and a domain, for example,
5552000@domain.com. You can also specify a full
URI such as sip:5555555@domain.com:
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Call Routing Test
Name
Description
5060;sometag=3;othertag=4. You can also copy a
URI recorded in a SIP trace and use it.
Calling Party Address
IP address or host name from which the INVITE is
received.
Called Party URI
SIP URI of the called party. You must specify a
handle and a domain, for example, sip:
5551000@companydomain.com. You can also
specify a full URI such as sip:
5555555@domain.com:5060;sometag=3;othertag=4.
You can also copy a URI recorded in a SIP trace and
use it.
Session Manager Listen Port
Port on which the called Session Manager Instance
receives the INVITE.
Day of Week
Day of the week. Call times can influence routing
policies.
Time (UTC)
Time. Call times can influence routing policies.
Transport Protocol
The transport protocol used by the calling party,
which may impact routing options. This is used in
testing the routing based on entity links.
Called Session Manager Instance
The Session Manager instance that receives the
initial INVITE from the calling party.
Note:
These are only core Session Manager
instances.
Button
Description
Execute Test
Carries out the routing test based on the parameters
that you provide.
The Routing Decisions box displays the result of the
routing test. This result displays one line per
destination choice. For a destination that has
alternate routing choices available, the result
displays one line per alternate routing choice and the
lines are in the same order that the test attempted
the destinations.
Each line displays not only where the INVITE would
be routed, but also what the adapted digits and
domain would be.
The Routing Decision Process box contains details
about how Session Manager made the routing
decisions. This tool allows you to test your routing
administration.
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Setting up a Call Routing Test
Setting up a Call Routing Test
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Call Routing Test.
2. Enter information for a SIP INVITE message for both Calling and Called Party URIs
3. Click Execute Test.
Call Routing Test results
The test passes if the following two conditions are met:
• Routing Decisions displays data similar to the following: < sip:
12345@MyOtherCompany.com > to SIP Entity ’CalledPartySIPentity’
port ’MyPortNumber’ using TCP/TLS/UDP
• Routing Decisions Process displays data similar to the following:
NRP Sip entities: Originating SIP Entity is “SIP Entity Name”
Using digits < 12345 > and host < MyOtherCompany.com > for routing.
NRP Dial Patterns: No matches for digits < 12345 > and domain < MyOtherCompany.com >
NRP Dial Patterns: No matches for digits < 12345 > and domain < null >
NRP Dial Patterns: No matches found for the originator’s location. Trying again
using NRP Dial Patterns that specify -ALL- locations.
NRP Dial Patterns: No matches for digits < 12345 > and domain < MyOtherCompany.com >
NRP Dial Patterns: Found a Dial Pattern match for digits < 12345 > and domain < null
>.
Ranked destination NRP Sip Entities: ’CalledPartySIPentity’
Removing disabled routes.
Ranked destination NRP Sip Entities: ’CalledPartySIPentity’
Adapting and proxying to SIP Entity ’CalledPartySIPentity’
NRP Adaptations: Doing ingress adaptation.
NRP Adaptations: Changed P-Asserted-Identity header to sip: 67890@MyCompany.com as
part of adaptation.
NRP Adaptations: Doing egress adaptation.
Routing < sip: 12345@MyCompany.com > to SIP entity ’CalledPartySIPentity’
port ’MyportNumber’ using TCP/TLS/UDP.
Note:
Calls with multiple possible destinations will display multiple rows.
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Call Routing Test
Troubleshooting a Call Route Test failure
About this task
Test failures can be due to the following reasons:
1. Failure to connect to a Session Manager to administer the test. System displays the
following message:
The following errors have occurred: Failed to retrieve output from
<Session Manager Name> — cannot connect to server.
This error means that the Session Manager could not be accessed from System Manager.
Check the Session Manager server and the administration details.
2. Failure to route the test INVITE.
Verify the administration associated with the Calling Party and Called Party URIs.
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Chapter 18: IP address and host name
changes
This section describes the procedures for changing the following Session Manager attributes:
• The Session Manager server Management Network IP address (network interface between
Session Manager and System Manager).
• The Session Manager Security Module IP address (call processing network interface).
• The Session Manager host name.
You can change these attributes after the initial installation if you need to move the server
elsewhere on a network.
To change the IP address or host name of the System Manager, see the following documents on
the Avaya Support Website:
• If System Manager is hosted on System Platform, see Avaya Aura® System Manager 6.2
Release Notes.
• If System Manager is hosted on VMware, see Deploying Avaya Aura® System Manager on
VMware in Virtualized Environment.
Changing the Security Module IP address
About this task
You must have web login access to the System Manager that is managing the Session Manager
server.
Procedure
1. Make the appropriate changes to the DHCP server if needed.
2. Make the appropriate changes to the 96xxsettings.txt file on the network file server that is
used for SIP phone registration settings using the new Security Module address.
Note:
The 96xxsettings.txt parameter ENABLE_PPM_SOURCED_SIPPROXYSRVR should
be set to 0 to prevent the phone from retaining the previous address downloaded from
the Session Manager instance.
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IP address and host name changes
3. Change the state of the Session Manager instance to Deny New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Deny New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
4. If the server is to be relocated:
a. Power down the server.
b. Relocate the server.
c. Power up the server.
5. Change the Security Module address of Session Manager:
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Routing > SIP Entities.
b. Select the appropriate Session Manager and click Edit.
c. In the FQDN or IP Address field, enter the new IP address for the Security Module.
This is not the management IP address.
d. Click Commit.
6. Update any associated Security Module information:
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements, select Session Manager >
Session Manager Administration
b. Select the appropriate Session Manager instance and click Edit.
c. Change any necessary information such as the default gateway and QoS parameters
for the Security Module.
d. Click Commit.
7. Change the provisioning for all SIP entities with links to the changed Session Manager
Security Module address using the entity’s administration.
For example, if Communication Manager communicates with the Session Manager, the
Communication Manager signaling groups need to be updated in order to connect to the
Session Manager at its new address.
8. After all provisioning has been changed, check the status of the Security Module:
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > System Status > Security
Module Status.
b. Ensure the Status for the Session Manager instance is Up and the IP address is
correct.
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Changing the Session Manager IP address or host name
9. Test the Session Manager instance:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager >
System Tools > Maintenance Tests.
b. In the Select Target field, select the Session Manager instance from the drop-down
menu.
c. Click Execute All Tests.
10. Change the state of the Session Manager to Accept New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Accept New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
11. Perform a PPM reload to tell the phones where the Session Manager instance has moved:
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Status > Registration Summary.
b. Select the appropriate Session Manager.
c. Click Reload and select Reload Complete from the drop-down menu to reload the
phone with all of its data in order to use the new Session Manager IP address.
d. Click Confirm.
e. On the status page, verify that all SIP endpoints have registered.
Changing the Session Manager IP address or host name
You must have web login access to the System Manager that is managing the Session Manager
server.
Procedure
1. Change the state of the Session Manager instance to Deny New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Deny New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
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IP address and host name changes
2. Update the Session Manager information:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager >
Session Manager Administration.
b. Select the appropriate Session Manager and click Edit.
c. Update the information in the Management Access Point Host Name/IP field.
d. Click Confirm.
3. If you are changing the IP address or FQDN of a Survivable Remote Session Manager
(Branch Session Manager):
a. Change the IP address of the host in which BSM is installed, using the Branch Session
Manager page on the System Manager console.
b. Log in to the System Platform Web Console.
c. Select Server > Network Configuration.
d. Enter the new values for the IP address and/or FQDN.
e. Submit the changes and wait for the update to complete.
Note:
You need to make the change first in System Manager,then in System Platform as
mentioned above. Otherwise, the data will not be replicated to the Branch Session
Manager. In such cases, you can fix the problem by using the command initTM.
4. If you are changing the IP address or FQDN of a core Session Manager:
a. Log in to the console of the Session Manager instance using the craft or customer login.
b. Enter SMnetSetup
c. If you are changing the IP address of the core Session Manager, enter the new IP
address when you are prompted for the IP address of the server.
d. If you are changing the host name of the Session Manager, enter the new host name
when you are prompted for the host name of the server.
e. Enter additional information as needed (netmask gateway, etc.)
f. If the System Manager IP address changed, enter the new IP address. Otherwise,
press the Enter key.
5. Test the Session Manager instance:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager >
System Tools > Maintenance Tests.
b. In the Select Target field, select the Session Manager instance from the drop-down
menu.
c. Click Execute All Tests.
6. Change the state of the Session Manager to Accept New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
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Changing the IP address or FQDN in System Manager
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Accept New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
7. If the Identity Certificates contain the IP address or the host name of the Session Manager,
make sure the certificates are re-initialized with the new IP address and/or host name:
a. Under Elements, select Inventory > Manage Elements
b. Check the box in front of the appropriate Session Manager.
c. Select More Actions > Configure Identity Certificates
d. Select the management certificate.
e. Click Replace.
f. Enter the appropriate information in the fields.
g. Ensure Replace this Certificate with Internal CA Signed Certificate is selected.
h. Click Commit.
8. If a CDR adjunct is administered, you need to change the adjunct to use the new Session
Manager IP address.
Changing the IP address or FQDN in System Manager
After you install System Manager, you can change the IP address, hostname, or the general
network settings of the machine running System Manager. For more information, see the chapter for
Changing the IP address and FQDN in System Manager in Administering Avaya Aura® System
Manager.
This section explains the changes you need to make for the Session Manager and Branch Session
Manager after you change the System Manager IP address or FQDN.
For Session Manager
Procedure
1. Log in to the CLI of the Session Manager using the craft or customer login.
2. Enter the command changeMgmtIP.
3. Enter the new IP address for the Primary System Manager when you are prompted.
4. Submit the changes and wait for the update to complete.
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IP address and host name changes
For Branch Session Manager
Procedure
1. Log in to the System Platform Web Console.
2. Select Server > Network Configuration.
3. Enter the new values for the Primary and Secondary System Manager IP addresses and/or
FQDNs.
4. Submit the changes and wait for the update to complete.
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Chapter 19: Managed Bandwidth Usage
The Managed Bandwidth Usage page displays Managed Bandwidth (Call Admission Control) realtime data. Measurement of bandwidth usage helps administrators to manage networks with
multimedia calls. It displays a read-only table containing one row for each administered location and
provides details on actual call counts and bandwidth usage for audio and video calls respectively.
You can expand each row to display a breakdown of usage and capacity by Session Manager which
can be helpful in debugging network utilization or the distribution algorithm.
Viewing Managed Bandwidth Usage
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, click Elements > Session Manager.
2. In the left navigation pane, click System Status > Managed Bandwidth Usage.
The Managed Bandwidth Usage screen displays system-wide bandwidth usage information
for locations where usage is managed.
3. Click Show under Details column to view the bandwidth usage information per Session
Manager in that location. You can click Hide to close this table.
4. On the Managed Bandwidth Usage screen, click Refresh to refresh the data.
Managed Bandwidth Usage errors
The following errors may appear on the Managed Bandwidth Usage page. They are related to a
Session Manager instance being unreachable from System Manager. The diagnosis and resolution
steps are similar:
• Network fragmentation has occurred. Bandwidth limits are not being enforced. This error
indicates that communication is being disrupted among the cluster of Session Managers in the
core (non-Branch).
• Unable to access status information for xxxx — cannot connect to server, internal error.
The Session Manager instance is unreachable from System Manager.
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Managed Bandwidth Usage
• Data displayed may be inaccurate due to connection problems to one or more Session
Managers. If one of the Session Managers is not accessible by System Manager, the values
may not be accurate.
System Manager may be able to communicate with the Session Manager instance, but the Session
Manager instance itself may be isolated from the rest of the core members. During this period, total
bandwidth management in the core is unable to be properly enforced.
Causes
Possible causes include:
• An upgrade is in progress among the Session Managers.
• A Session Manager is provisioned administratively but is not actively up and running.
• Misadministration could cause the Session Manager to appear to be administered, but the
Session Manager is unreachable.
• There is a true network error within the core where connectivity is limited or unavailable
between certain Session Managers.
• There is an error among the Session Managers that has limited their ability to maintain a full
cluster of core Session Manager nodes.
Solutions
1. The condition should be transient and ultimately resolved on its own if network connections
are being limited or disrupted, or if a Session Manager is being upgraded.
2. If the condition lasts for longer than 10 minutes, check the administration and verify it is
correct.
3. If the condition still exists, contact an Avaya service representative to help resolve the
problem.
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Chapter 20: Postgres database recovery
Postgres database corruption
After a power failure or database crash, the Postgres database may become corrupted and the
Postgres server may not restart.
The recovery action is to clear the Write-Ahead Log (WAL) and optionally reset other control
information using the pg_resetxlog command. Write-Ahead Logging is a standard method for
ensuring data integrity. Changes to data files are written only after those changes have been copied
to permanent storage. In the event of a crash, any changes that have not been applied to the data
files can be recovered from the log records.
pg_resetxlog command
pg_resetxlog resets the write-ahead log and other control information of a PostgreSQL database
cluster.
Syntax
pg_resetxlog [-n] [-f] datadir
-f
Force pg_resetxlog to proceed even if it cannot determine valid data for
pg_control
-n
Print the values that have been reconstructed from pg_control and exit.
datadir Data directory (required)
Description
pg_resetxlog resets the write-ahead log and other control information stored in the pg_control
file. It should be used only as a last resort when the server will not start due to database corruption.
pg_resetxlog can only be run by the user who installed the server because the command
requires read and write access to the data directory. For security reasons, you must specify the data
directory on the command line.
The -f option forces pg_resetxlog to proceed even if it cannot determine valid data for
pg_control.
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Postgres database recovery
The -n option prints the values reconstructed from pg_control and exits without modifying any
values. This option is mainly used for debugging, but may be useful as a sanity check before
allowing pg_resetxlog to proceed for real.
For more information regarding pg_resetxlog see http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.2/static/apppgresetxlog.html
Troubleshooting Postgres database problems
About this task
If the Postgres database is able to start up without any errors and the database is consistent, you do
not need to run the pg_resetxlog command.
Procedure
1. Log in to the server as root.
2. Enter the command service postgresql start to restart the PostgreSQL service.
3. If there are errors or the database is inconsistent:
a. Create an archival backup of the postgresql database directories with the command
tar czvf /var/avaya/backup/pgsqlbackup.tgz /var/lib/pgsql/data
b. Log in as Postgres superuser with the command su - postgres
c. Enter pg_resetxlog /var/lib/pgsql/data.
The message “Transaction log reset” should be displayed.
d. Enter exit.
e. Enter service postgresql start.
The message “Starting postgresql server:” should be displayed, followed by “[OK]”
when the server has restarted.
f. After running the above commands, check for inconsistencies.
4. Log off the server.
5. If the above steps do not fix the problem, contact Avaya Technical Support.
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Troubleshooting pg_resetxlog
Troubleshooting pg_resetxlog
pg_resetxlog won’t start
The pg_resetxlog command cannot run if the server is in use or if a server lock file exists in the
data directory. If the server failed, a lock file may not have been deleted properly.
Proposed solution
Procedure
1. Log in to the server as root.
2. Enter service postgresql status and make certain there is no server process still
alive.
3. If the status is running:
a. Enter service postgresql stop
b. Enter service postgresql status until the status is stopped.
4. Remove the lock file in the data directory to allow pg_resetxlog to run by entering the
following commands:
a. rm -f /var/lib/pgsql/data/postmaster.pid
b. su - postgres
c. pg_resetxlog /var/lib/pgsql/data
The message Transaction log reset is displayed.
d. Enter exit.
5. Enter service postgresql start
The message Starting postgresql service: is displayed, followed by [OK] when the server
has restarted.
6. Log off the server.
pg_resetxlog cannot determine valid data
If pg_resetxlog cannot determine valid data for pg_control, you can force it to proceed anyway
using the -f option. Plausible values will be substituted for the missing data, but manual assistance
may be needed for the next OID, next transaction ID and epoch, next multitransaction ID and offset,
WAL starting address, and database locale fields using the specific options.
If you are not able to determine the correct values for all of these fields, -f can still be used, but the
recovered database may still be corrupt.
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Postgres database recovery
References
For more information regarding data integrity on Postgres, see http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.1/
static/wal.html#WAL_RELIABILITY
For more information regarding pg_resetxlog see http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.2/static/apppgresetxlog.html
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Chapter 21: Testing the System Manager
and Session Manager
installation
About this task
Verify the System Manager and Session Manager are installed and configured properly, and that the
servers and applications are communicating.
Procedure
1. On the System Manager Web Console home page, under Elements, select Session
Manager > System Tools > Maintenance Tests.
2. Select System Manager from the Select Target drop-down menu.
3. Click Execute All Tests.
4. Verify all tests display Success.
5. On the System Manager Web Console home page, under Elements, select Session
Manager > System Status > Security Module Status.
6. Verify the status is Up for all Session Managers.
7. Verify the IP address is correct.
8. If the status is Down, reset the security module:
a. Select the appropriate Session Manager from the table.
b. Click Reset.
Warning:
The Session Manager cannot process calls while the security module is being
restarted.
9. On the System Manager Web Console home page, under Elements, select Session
Manager.
10. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, verify the installed software versions of all
Session Managers are the same.
11. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager >
System Tools > Maintenance Tests.
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Testing the System Manager and Session Manager installation
12. Select the appropriate Session Manager instance from the drop-down menu.
13. Click Execute All Tests.
14. Verify all tests ran successfully.
15. Check the replication status of the Session Managers:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Services, click Replication.
The Synchronization Status should be green and the status should be Synchronized.
b. If the status is not Synchronized, select the check box next to SessionManagers (type
Replica Node) and click View Replica Nodes to determine which Session Manager is
not synchronized with System Manager.
16. Verify there are no active alarms for the Session Manager. On the System Manager Web
Console home page, under Services, click Events > Alarms.
17. If the System Manager and customer NMS are configured to forward alarms, generate a test
alarm to verify forwarding of alarms. See Generating a test alarm on page 154.
18. For Geographic Redundant systems:
a. On the System Manager Web Console home page, under Services, select Inventory
> Managed Elements.
b. Verify the managed elements in the Managed by column display the correct value of
the managing System Manager.
Generating a test alarm
Generate a test alarm to the targets assigned to the serviceability agent. These targets may include:
• A SAL Gateway (the alarm is forwarded to ADC)
• System Manager Trap Listener
• Third-party NMS
• Avaya SIG server
You can either run the generateTestAlarmSM.sh script using the Session Manager CLI, or you can
use the Generate Test Alarm button on the Serviceability Agents screen.
Procedure
1. If using the Session Manager CLI:
a. Login to the Session Manager server.
b. Enter Session Manager CLI command generateTestAlarmSM.sh.
2. If using the Generate Test Alarm button on the Serviceability Agents screen:
a. On the System Manager web console, under Services, click Inventory > Manage
Serviceability Agents > Serviceability Agents.
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Generating a test alarm
b. Select a Hostname from the list and click Generate Test Alarm.
3. Verify the System Manager received the test alarm message:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Services, select Events > Alarms.
b. Verify the message Test alarm for testing only, no recovery action necessary
displays under the Description column.
4. If the serviceability agent is configured with other targets, verify the other targets also
received the test alarm.
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Chapter 22: Session Manager upgrades
To upgrade Session Manager from a previous release to the current release, see Upgrading Avaya
Aura® Session Manager on the Avaya support website at http://www.avaya.com/support.
Upgrade procedures for the Survivable Remote Session Manager or Branch Session Manager are
the same as for the core Session Manager when an upgrade template is not provided.
Upgrade procedures for Midsize Enterprise Session Manager are the same as for the core Session
Manager when the upgrade template does not include an upgrade.
For service pack installation procedures, see Installing Service Packs on Avaya Aura® Session
Manager on the Avaya support website http://www.avaya.com/support.
For patch installation procedures, see Installing Patches on Avaya Aura® Session Manager on the
Avaya support website http://www.avaya.com/support.
For information on the procedures for installing Session Manager and providing basic
administration, see Deploying Avaya Aura® Session Manager.
For information on the procedures for installing Branch Session Manager and providing basic
administration, see Deploying Avaya Aura® Branch Session Manager.
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Chapter 23: Supported servers
The information contained in this chapter applies to the following supported servers:
• Avaya S8510
• Avaya S8800
• Dell R610
• Dell R620
• HP DL360 G7
• HP DL360 G8
HP and Dell will discontinue HP DL360 G7 and Dell R610 servers in the near future. For more
information, see the respective vendor websites.
Ethernet port labels by server type
Server
Eth0 (Management Interface)
Eth2 (Security Module)
S8800
1
3
S8510
GB1
GB3
S8300D
Internal
Internal
HP DL360 G7
1
3
HP DL360p G8
1
3
Dell R610
1
3
Dell R620
1
3
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Supported servers
S8510 Servers
S8510 field replaceable hardware
This section describes the procedures for replacing the field replaceable hardware on the Avaya
S8510 server. The field replaceable units (FRUs) are:
• S8510 server
• Hard disk drives
• Memory Modules
• Power supplies
Note:
See the topic Replacing server components in the chapter Maintenance functions for server
component replacement guidelines.
Hard Disk Drive replacement
The Hard Disk Drive is monitored by the capability built into the hard disk drive unit. Some hard disk
drive problems do not occur suddenly. These problems are a result of a gradual degradation of
components over time.
The hard drives are mirrored for speed and reliability and are hot-swappable that is you do not need
to power down the server to replace either drive. However, you cannot remove both drives at the
same time.
Also, you should NOT remove the healthy, active hard drive. If you inadvertently remove the active
hard drive, you cannot plug the hard disk back in. If you removed the hard disk drive, see Replacing
an S8510 hard drive on page 159 .
Required equipment to replace a Hard Disk Drive
To replace a hard disk drive, you need the following equipment:
• S8510 replacement hard disk drive
• Electrostatic wrist ground strap and mat
• Key to server keylock on the front bezel
Hard Disk Drive LED status indicators
The following table describes the meaning of the LED colors and patterns for the Hard Disk Drives.
Drive status LED
Description of the hard disk drive
Off
Ready for insertion or removal
Flashes green, amber, off
Failing
Table continues…
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Drive status LED
Description of the hard disk drive
Flashes amber four times per second
Failed
Flashes green slowly
Rebuilding
Steady green
Online
Flashes green 3 seconds, amber 3 seconds, off 6
seconds
Rebuild aborted
Replacing an S8510 hard drive
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Services > Backup and Restore.
2. Select Backup .
3. Attach an antistatic wrist ground strap to your wrist.
4. Remove the front bezel and cover to access the hard drives.
5. Identify the defective hard drive by checking the status of the LEDs on the hard drives.
To understand the LED colors and patterns, seeHard Disk Drive LED status indicators on
page 158.
6. Remove the defective drive:
a. Pinch together the two tabs of the drive carrier release handle.
b. Open the carrier release handle.
c. Wait approximately 10 seconds to allow the internal mechanism to stop the read/write
heads so that the drive can be handled safely.
d. Pull the hard drive out of the slot.
e. Set the hard drive on an antistatic mat.
7. If the active hard drive was removed inadvertently:
a. Shut down the server at an appropriate time.
b. Reinsert the active hard drive in the original slot.
c. If the defective drive is still installed, remove the defective drive from the slot.
d. Power up the server with only the healthy drive present.
e. Make sure the server comes up and is operating normally.
8. Insert the replacement hard drive in the slot and push it in until it is seated.
9. Close the hard drive carrier handle to lock the hard drive in place.
10. Replace the front bezel and cover.
11. Check the LED of the hard disk drive which was replaced.
The LED must flash green slowly. The hard disk drive rebuilds in approximately 80 minutes.
12. Return the defective hard drive.
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Supported servers
Memory Module replacement on the Avaya S8510 Server
Required equipment for S8510 memory modules
•
•
•
•
Replacement or additional memory module
A cross-point screwdriver: #2 Phillips
Electrostatic wrist ground strap and mat
Key to front bezel
Replacing the S8510 memory modules
Procedure
1. Power down the S8510 server by pressing the power button on the front panel.
2. Wait until the server has been powered down and the power-on indicator light is off.
3. Label and disconnect the power cords from the power supplies at the back of the server.
4. Label and disconnect the LAN connection(s) from the Ethernet port(s) on the back of the
server.
5. Ensure that all cables are labeled and disconnected from the server.
Caution:
Ensure that power is completely removed from the server. Power cords must be
detached from the power supplies.
6. Loosen the captive screws on both sides of the server.
Refer to #1 in Removing the S8510 server from the rack on page 164.
7. Slide the server clear of the rails.
Refer to #2 in Removing the S8510 server from the rack on page 164.
8. Release the rail lock by pushing the lever in as you slide the server out of the rack.
Refer to #3 in Removing the S8510 server from the rack on page 164.
9. Use a #2 Phillips (cross-point) screwdriver to turn the latch release lock counter-clockwise to
the unlocked position.
Refer to #1 in Removing the cover of the S8510 server on page 165.
10. Lift the latch up to unlock.
Refer to #2 in Removing the cover of the S8510 server on page 165.
11. Slide the cover back, lift it straight up to remove, then set it aside.
Refer to #3 in Removing the cover of the S8510 server on page 165.
12. Remove the protective cover over the memory modules.
13. Remove the defective pair of memory modules.
14. Insert the new memory modules.
15. Replace the protective memory module cover.
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S8510 Servers
16. Ensure that any internal cables are clear of the cover before replacing the memory module
on the server.
17. Place the cover on top of the server, aligning it with the J hooks on the sides.
18. Slide the cover forward.
19. Push the latch down to lock.
20. Rotate the latch release lock clockwise to secure the cover.
21. Install the server onto the side rails in the rack.
22. Reconnect the Ethernet cable to the dual NIC at the back of the server.
23. Reconnect the LAN connection to the Ethernet port located at the rear of the server.
24. Reconnect the power cords to the power supply at the back of the server.
25. Push the server completely into the rack and secure into place with the two captive screws
on both sides of the server
26. Power up the server by pressing the power button on the front of the server.
27. Place the defective equipment in the protective packaging that accompanied the
replacement part(s).
28. Return the defective equipment to Avaya using the procedures established for your region.
Replacing a power supply on the S8510 Server
The power supplies are hot-swappable. You do not need to power down the server.
Before you begin
Before replacing a power supply, make sure that the power cord is connected and plugged into a
non-switched outlet. The problem may be the connection, not the power supply.
Procedure
1. Open the cable management arm, if present, to access the rear panel.
2. Identify the defective power supply by looking for middle indicator on the power supply.
3. Disconnect the power cord of the defective power supply from the power source.
4. Disconnect the power cord to the defective power supply.
5. With your thumb, press the release (orange) tab and the black handle together and pull out
the power supply.
Set the power supply aside. To reduce the risk of personal injury from hot surfaces, allow the
power supply to cool before touching it.
6. Insert the new power supply into the slot.
7. Ensure that the tab is locked into place and the power supply is securely seated in the slot.
8. Connect the power cord to the power supply.
9. (Optional) Route the power cord through the cable management arm or power cord anchor.
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Supported servers
10. (Optional) Close the cable management arm.
11. Connect the power cord to the power source.
12. Make sure that the power supply LED is green.
13. Return the defective power supply.
S8510 server upgrade
System Manager customers who purchased the S8510 server must upgrade to the following System
Manager 6.2 supported servers:
• S8800 1U server System Manager (IBM x3550m2; material code 700478589)
• R610 Server 2CPU MID2 (Dell; material code 700501083)
• DL360G7 Server 2CPU MID4 (HP; material code 700501093)
As an application, System Manager virtual machine requires maximum 10GB RAM so that existing
System Manager customers can use their S8800, HP, and Dell servers to run System Manager 6.2.
For details, see the System Manager documentation.
Required equipment for S8510 memory modules
• Replacement or additional memory module
• A cross-point screwdriver: #2 Phillips
• Electrostatic wrist ground strap and mat
• Key to front bezel
Adding S8510 Memory modules
Procedure
1. Turn off the S8510 server by pressing the power button on the front panel.
2. Wait until the server has shut down and the power-on indicator light is off.
3. Label and disconnect the power cords from the power supplies at the back of the server.
4. Label and disconnect the LAN connection from the Ethernet port at the back of the server.
5. Ensure that all cables are labeled and disconnected from the server.
Caution:
Ensure that power is completely removed from the server. Detach the power cords from
the power supplies.
6. Loosen the captive screws on both sides of the server.
See #1 in Removing the S8510 server from the rack on page 164.
7. Slide the server clear of the rails.
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See #2 in Removing the S8510 server from the rack on page 164.
8. Release the rail lock by pushing the lever in as you slide the server out of the rack.
See #3 in Removing the S8510 server from the rack on page 164.
9. Use a cross-point screwdriver to turn the latch release lock counter-clockwise to the
unlocked position.
See #1 in Removing the cover of the S8510 server on page 165.
10. Lift the latch up to unlock.
See #2 in Removing the cover of the S8510 server on page 165.
11. Slide the cover back. Lift the cover straight up to remove the cover and then set the cover
aside.
See #3 in Removing the cover of the S8510 server on page 165.
12. Remove the protective cover on the memory modules.
13. Insert the new memory modules.
14. Replace the protective memory module cover.
15. Ensure that any internal cables are clear of the cover before replacing the cover on the
server.
16. Place the cover on top of the server, aligning it with the J hooks on the sides.
17. Slide the cover forward.
18. Push the latch down to lock.
19. Rotate the latch release lock clockwise to secure the cover.
20. Install the server onto the side rails in the rack.
21. Reconnect the Ethernet cables.
22. Reconnect the power cords to the power supply at the back of the server.
23. Push the server completely into the rack and secure into place with the two captive screws
on both sides of the server.
24. Turn on the server by pressing the power button on the front of the server.
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Supported servers
Removing the S8510 server from the rack
About this task
Procedure
1. Loosen the captive screws on both sides of the server. See Figure 1.
2. Slide the server clear of the rails. See Figure 2.
3. Release the rail lock by pushing the lever in as you slide the server out of the rack. See
Figure 3.
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S8800 Servers
Removing the cover of the S8510 server
About this task
Procedure
1. Turn the latch release lock counter-clockwise to the unlock position using a Phillips
screwdriver. See Figure 1.
2. Lift the latch up to unlock. See Figure 2.
3. Slide the cover back and lift straight up to remove. See Figure 3.
S8800 Servers
S8800 Field replaceable hardware
This section describes the procedures for replacing the field replaceable hardware on the Avaya
S8800 server. The field replaceable units (FRUs) are:
• Dual in-line Memory Modules (DIMMs)
• Hard Disk Drive
• Power supply
• RAID Battery
• S8800 server
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Front of server
1
Hard disk drive activity LED (green)
2
Hard disk drive status LED (amber)
3
Drive bay 0
4
Drive bay 2
5
Drive bay 4
6
Power control button and LED
7
Operator information panel
Note:
The operator information panel is shown in the pushed in position.
166
8
Operator information panel release latch
9
Video connector
10
USB connector 1
11
Rack release latch
12
USB connector 2
13
DVD eject button
14
DVD drive activity LED
15
DVD drive
16
Drive bay 5
17
Drive bay 3
18
Drive bay 1
19
Rack release latch
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Replacing DIMMs
Sequence for populating DIMM connectors
To optimize system performance, install dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs) in the sequence that
is shown in the following table.
Installed microprocessors
DIMM connector population sequence
Microprocessor 1
3, 6, 8, 2, 5, 7, 1, 4
Microprocessor 2
11, 14, 16, 10, 13, 15, 9, 12
Note:
Dual microprocessors require equal distribution of DIMMs between the processors. For
example, a 12GB DIMM would have connectors 3,6,8 and 11,14,16 populated.
The following figure shows the numbering sequence of the DIMMs.
1
DIMMs for microprocessor 2
Table continues…
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2
DIMMs for microprocessor 1
3
Back of server
4
Front of server
Removing the DIMM air baffle
About this task
You must remove the DIMM air baffle to replace or install a memory module.
Caution:
For proper cooling and airflow, replace the air baffle before you turn on the server. Operating
the server with a missing air baffle might damage server components.
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Turn off the server and all attached devices.
2. Label and disconnect all power cords and external cables.
3. Remove the cover.
Removing a memory module
Before you begin
Remove the DIMM air baffle.
About this task
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
Carefully open the retaining clips on each end of the memory module connector and remove the
memory module. See the following figure.
Important:
Open and close the clips gently to avoid breaking the retaining clips or damaging the memory
module connectors.
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1
Memory module
2
Retaining clip
When you install or remove memory modules, the server configuration information changes. When
you restart the server, the system displays a message that indicates that the memory configuration
has changed.
Next steps
Install a memory module.
Installing a memory module
Before you begin
Remove the DIMM air baffle.
About this task
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Carefully open the retaining clips on each end of the memory module connector. See the
following figure.
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Important:
Open and close the clips gently to avoid breaking the retaining clips or damaging the
memory module connectors.
1
Memory module
2
Retaining clip
2. Touch the static-protective package that contains the memory module to any unpainted
metal surface on the server.
3. Remove the memory module from the package.
4. Turn the memory module so that the memory module keys align correctly with the connector.
5. Insert the memory module into the connector by aligning the edges of the memory module
with the slots at the ends of the memory module connector.
6. Firmly press the memory module straight down into the connector by applying pressure on
both ends of the memory module simultaneously.
The retaining clips snap into the locked position when the memory module is firmly seated in
the connector.
Important:
If there is a gap between the memory module and the retaining clips, the memory
module has not been correctly inserted. Open the retaining clips, remove the memory
module, and then reinsert it.
7. Replace the air baffle over the memory modules. Make sure all cables are out of the way.
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8. Install the cover.
9. Reconnect the external cables and power cords.
10. Turn on the attached devices and the server.
When you install or remove memory modules, the server configuration information changes.
When you restart the server, if a monitor and keyboard are connected, the system displays a
message that indicates that the memory configuration has changed.
Installing the DIMM air baffle
About this task
You must install the DIMM air baffle after you install a memory module.
Caution:
For proper cooling and airflow, replace the air baffle before you turn on the server. Operating
the server with a missing air baffle might damage server components.
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Lower the air baffle into place. Make sure that all cables are out of the way.
2. Install the cover.
3. Reconnect the external cables and power cords.
4. Turn on the attached devices and the server.
Replacing a hard disk drive
Removing a hard disk drive
About this task
Important:
To ensure adequate system cooling, do not operate the server for more than 2 minutes without
either a hard disk drive or a filler panel installed in each bay.
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
Grasp the handle and slide the drive out of the drive bay approximately 25 mm (1 inch). Wait until
the drive stops spinning before you remove the drive completely from the bay.
Next steps
Install a hard disk drive.
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Installing a hard disk drive
Before you begin
If replacing an existing hard drive, remove the hard drive that you want to replace.
About this task
Important:
To ensure adequate system cooling, do not operate the server for more than 2 minutes without
either a hard disk drive or a filler panel installed in each bay.
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Touch the static-protective package that contains the drive to any unpainted metal surface
on the server.
2. Remove the drive from the package and place it on a static-protective surface.
3. Make sure that the tray handle is in the open (unlocked) position.
4. Align the drive assembly with the guide rails in the bay. See the following figure.
5. Gently push the drive assembly into the bay until the drive stops.
6. Push the tray handle to the closed (locked) position.
7. If the drive was hot-swapped, check the hard disk drive status LED to verify that the hard
disk drive is operating correctly.
After you replace a failed hard disk drive, the green activity LED flashes as the disk is
accessed. When the new drive starts to rebuild, the amber LED flashes slowly, and the
green activity LED remains lit during the rebuild process. The rebuild process takes
approximately 30 minutes. An amber LED that remains lit indicates a faulty drive that you
must replace.
Replacing a power supply
Removing a power supply
About this task
Caution:
To remove all electrical current from the server, ensure that all power cords are disconnected
from the power source. The power control button on the server does not turn off the electrical
current supplied to the server. The server also might have more than one power cord.
Caution:
Never remove the cover on a power supply or any part that has the following label attached.
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Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels are present inside any component that has this
label attached. These components do not contain any serviceable parts. If you suspect a
problem with one of these parts, replace the power supply.
Important:
During normal operation, each power supply bay must contain either a power supply or power
supply filler for proper cooling.
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. If the server has only one power supply, turn off the server and peripheral devices and
disconnect all power cords. If the server has two power supplies, you can replace one power
supply while the server is running.
2. If the server is in a rack, at the back of the server, pull back the cable management arm to
gain access to the rear of the server and the power supply.
3. Press and hold the orange release tab to the left. See the following figure.
4. Pull the power supply part of the way out of the bay, and then release the latch and support
the power supply as you pull the power supply the rest of the way out of the bay.
Next steps
Install a power supply.
Installing a power supply
About this task
Caution:
To remove all electrical current from the server, ensure that all power cords are disconnected
from the power source. The power control button on the server does not turn off the electrical
current supplied to the server. The server also might have more than one power cord.
Caution:
Never remove the cover on a power supply or any part that has the following label attached.
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Hazardous voltage, current, and energy levels are present inside any component that has this
label attached. These components do not contain any serviceable parts. If you suspect a
problem with one of these parts, replace the power supply.
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Touch the static-protective package that contains the power supply to any unpainted metal
surface on the server.
2. Remove the power supply from the package and place the power supply on a staticprotective surface.
3. If you are installing a power supply into an empty bay, remove the power-supply filler panel
from the power-supply bay.
4. Grasp the handle on the back of the power supply and slide the power supply into the powersupply bay until it clicks. Make sure that the power supply connects firmly into the power
supply connector. See the following figure.
5. Route the power cord through the handle so that the power cord does not accidentally
become unplugged.
6. Connect the power cord for the new power supply to the power-cord connector on the power
supply.
7. Connect the other end of the power cord to a properly grounded electrical outlet.
8. Make sure that both the AC LED and the DC LED on the power supply light up.
Both LEDs light up when the power supply is operating correctly.
Replacing the RAID battery
Removing the RAID battery
Before you begin
The RAID battery is located on top of the RAID controller card.
The RAID configuration data is preserved when you replace the battery.
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About this task
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Turn off the server and all attached devices.
2. Label and disconnect all power cords and external cables.
3. Remove the cover.
4. Disconnect the cable from the connector on the battery. Leave the other end of the cable
connected to the battery carrier.
5. Squeeze the clip on the side of the battery to remove the battery from the battery carrier.
See the following figure.
1
Battery
2
Battery carrier
6. Put the old battery aside.
Next steps
Install a new RAID battery.
Installing the RAID battery
Before you begin
Remove the existing RAID battery.
About this task
The RAID battery is located on top of the RAID controller card.
The RAID configuration data is preserved when you replace the battery.
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Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Connect the battery cable to the connector on the battery.
2. Press the new battery onto the battery carrier until the clip on the side of the battery snaps
into place. See the following figure.
1
Battery
2
Battery carrier
3. Install the cover.
4. Reconnect the external cables and power cords.
5. Turn on the attached devices and the server.
S8800 Server replacement
Reuse of hardware components in replacement servers
When you replace the Avaya S8800 Server, you must reuse the following components:
• DIMMs if more than two (4 GB capacity)
• Redundant power supply if used
• Any PCIe cards
• Hard disk drives if more than two.
You must remove these components from the defective server and install them in the replacement
server.
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Required equipment and tools
• Replacement Avaya S8800 Server
• #2 cross-point (Phillips) screwdriver or 3/8 inch flathead screwdriver
• USB keyboard, USB mouse, and monitor
• Electrostatic wrist ground strap and mat
Replacing the S8800 Server
Procedure
1. Change the state of the Session Manager instance to Deny New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Deny New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
2. Click Shutdown System, then select Shutdown from the drop-down menu for the server
that is to be replaced. If for some reason this does not work, power down the server by
pressing in the power button on the front panel for 5 seconds.
3. Label all power cords and external cables.
4. Disconnect all power cords and external cables.
5. Remove the server from the rack. See Removing the server from the rack on page 178.
6. Remove the reusable components from the failed server. See Reuse of hardware
components in replacement servers on page 176.
7. Install the reusable components into the new server. See Reuse of hardware components in
replacement servers on page 176.
8. Install the new server in the rack. See Installing the server in the rack on page 179.
9. Reconnect the keyboard, monitor, mouse, and power cables. Do not connect the network
cables at this time.
10. Install the operating system and Session Manager software:
a. Insert the Session Manager Kickstart DVD (OS).
b. Turn on the server and wait for the server to boot.
c. Wait until the server ejects the DVD and reboots.
d. Insert the Session Manager software CD.
e. Log in as sroot on the console (KVM).
f. Enter the following commands to mount the CD and install the Session Manager
software using the factory configuration:
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# mount /cdrom
# cd /cdrom
# bash install.sh --factory
g. Reboot the server.
h. When the server finishes booting, log in using the craft or sroot login.
i. Reconnect the network cables to the server.
j. Enter the command SMnetSetup to configure the server for the local network.
k. Accept the EULA.
11. Change the state of the Session Manager to Accept New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Accept New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
Removing the server from the rack
Procedure
1. Turn off the server and all attached devices.
2. Label and disconnect all power cords and external cables.
3. Push the locking levers (1) forward. See the following figure.
4. Lift up the front of the server (2). See the preceding figure.
5. Pull the server out of the rack (3). See the preceding figure.
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Installing the server in the rack
Before you begin
Attach rails to the rack.
Procedure
1. Pull the slide rails forward until they click, two times, into place. See 1 in Figure 1: Attaching
server to slide rails on page 179.
2. Carefully lift the server and tilt it into position over the slide rails so that the rear nail heads
on the server line up with the rear slots on the slide rails. See 2 and 3 in Figure 1: Attaching
server to slide rails on page 179.
3. Slide the server down until the rear nail heads slip into the two rear slots.
4. Slowly lower the front of the server until the other nail heads slip into the other slots on the
slide rails. See 4 in Figure 1: Attaching server to slide rails on page 179.
5. Make sure that the front latch slides over the nail heads. See 5 in Figure 1: Attaching server
to slide rails on page 179.
Figure 1: Attaching server to slide rails
6. Lift the locking levers on the slide rails. See 6 in Figure 2: Locking server to slide rails on
page 180.
7. Push the server all the way into the rack until it clicks into place. See 7 in Figure 2: Locking
server to slide rails on page 180.
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Figure 2: Locking server to slide rails
8. Insert the optional M6 screws in the front of the server when you move the rack cabinet or if
you install the rack cabinet in a vibration-prone area. See Figure 3: Installing M6 screws on
page 180.
Figure 3: Installing M6 screws
Next steps
Install the cable management arm if desired.
Removing and installing the server cover
Removing the server cover
Before you begin
Before you disconnect the server from the power source, make a note of which LEDs light up,
including the LEDs that light up on the operation information panel, on the light path diagnostics
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panel, and LEDs inside the server on the system board. Once you disconnect the server from the
power source, you lose the ability to view the LEDs because the LEDs do not light up when the
power source is removed.
About this task
Remove the server cover to access the server's internal components.
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. If you are planning to view the error LEDs that are on the system board and components,
leave the server connected to power.
2. If you are planning to install or remove a DIMM, PCI card, battery, or other non-hot swap
device:
a. Turn off the server and all attached devices.
b. Label and disconnect all power cords and external cables.
3. If the server has been installed in a rack, slide the server out from the rack enclosure.
4. Lift the server cover off the server and set it aside.
Important:
For proper cooling and airflow, replace the cover before you turn on the server.
Operating the server for extended periods of time (over 30 minutes) with the cover
removed might damage server components.
Installing the server cover
About this task
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you work
inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on page 27.
Procedure
1. Make sure that all internal cables, PCIe cards, and other components are installed and
seated correctly and that you have not left loose tools or parts inside the server. Also, make
sure that all internal cables are correctly routed.
2. Slide the server all the way into the rack until it latches.
3. Reconnect the external cables and power cords.
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S8800 Disk upgrade
To upgrade an existing S8800 System Manager installation, you must:
• Add disk capacity.
• Add a third hard disk drive to the S8800 server running the standard RAID configuration.
• Migrate from RAID 1 to RAID 5 to extend the disk capacity of the server.
S8800 servers for R6.0 are equipped with 12 GB memory and require no additional memory.
Adding a hard disk drive to the S8800 server
About this task
The tool on the configuration CD automatically detects the number of hard disk drives physically
installed in the server. The tool createa a new RAID array based on the detected number of disks:
• Two installed hard disk drives = RAID 1
• 3, 4, or 5 installed hard disk drives = RAID 5
When the configuration tool completes the detection, the system displays one of the following four
messages:
• 2 Hard Drives Found, Applying Avaya RAID 1 Configuration & Settings
• 3 Hard Drives Found, Applying Avaya RAID 5 Configuration & Settings
• 4 Hard Drives Found, Applying Avaya RAID 5 Configuration & Settings
• 5 Hard Drives Found, Applying Avaya RAID 5 Configuration & Settings
Procedure
1. Turn off the S8800 server.
2. Insert the new hard disk drive into Drive Bay 2 located in the front panel of the S8800 server.
3. Insert the configuration CD (comcode 700500063).
4. Turn on the server.
After the server has fully booted to the CD, the scripts will run automatically.
5. Monitor the output to verify that the configuration is succeeding.
6. Verify that the number of hard drives shown matches the number of installed hard drives.
Look for the first red line of text that displays one of the above 4 messages regarding
the number of hard drives found.
7. If the system does not detect all the installed hard disk drives:
a. Verify that the hard drives are properly installed.
b. Reboot the server to re-run the configuration tool.
After the scripts finish running, the system will automatically eject the CD.
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Dell™ PowerEdge™ R610
8. When the CD has been ejected, remove the CD from the CD/DVD drive.
9. Press Enter to reboot the server, or wait two minutes for the server to reboot automatically.
Dell™ PowerEdge™ R610
The Dell™ PowerEdge™ R610 server is a replacement for the S8510 server. Unlike previous original
equipment manufactured servers, this server is not re-branded as an Avaya server (S8XXX).
For information about maintaining and troubleshooting the Dell™ PowerEdge™ R610 server, see
Maintaining and Troubleshooting the Dell™ PowerEdge™ R610 Server. This guide also provides a
list of field replaceable units (FRUs) and component replacement procedures.
Replacing the Dell R610 Server
Procedure
1. Change the state of the Session Manager instance to Deny New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Deny New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
2. Click Shutdown System, then select Shutdown from the drop-down menu for the server
that is to be replaced. If the system does not shut down, turn off the server by pressing in the
power button on the front panel for 5 seconds.
3. Unplug the power cord.
4. Label and unplug the existing cables to the server for the keyboard, monitor, mouse, and
Ethernet ports.
5. Remove the server from the rack. See Removing the Dell R610 server from the rack on
page 185.
6. Install the new server. See Installing the Dell R610 server in the rack on page 186.
7. Reconnect the keyboard, monitor, mouse, and power cables. Do not connect the network
cables at this time.
8. Install the operating system and Session Manager software:
a. Insert the Session Manager Kickstart DVD (OS).
b. Turn on the server and wait for the server to boot.
c. Wait until the server ejects the DVD and reboots.
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d. Insert the Session Manager software CD.
e. Log in as sroot on the console (KVM).
f. Enter the following commands to mount the CD and install the Session Manager
software using the factory configuration:
# mount /cdrom
# cd /cdrom
# bash install.sh --factory
g. Reboot the server.
h. When the server finishes booting, log in using the craft or sroot login.
i. Reconnect the network cables to the server.
j. Enter the command SMnetSetup to configure the server for the local network.
k. Accept the EULA.
9. Change the state of the Session Manager to Accept New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Accept New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
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Removing the Dell R610 server from the rack
About this task
Procedure
1. Locate the lock levers on the front ends of both the inner rails. See Figure 1.
2. Pull up on each lever into the release position to unlock. See Figure 2.
3. Grasp the sides of the server firmly and pull forward and up to unseat the server from the Jslots.
4. Lift the server up and away from the rack and place on a level surface. See Figure 3.
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Installing the Dell R610 server in the rack
About this task
Procedure
1. Pull the inner slide rails out of the rack until they lock into place. See Figure 1.
2. Lower the back shoulder screws of the server into the back J-slots on the slide assemblies.
See Figure 2.
3. Lower the server until all shoulder screws engage in the J-slots . See Figure 3.
4. Push the server inward until the front release latch clicks into place.
5. Press the slide-release lock buttons on both the rails and slide the server into the rack. See
Figure 4.
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Dell™ PowerEdge™ R620
Dell™ PowerEdge™ R620
The Dell™ PowerEdge™ R620 server is a replacement for the S8510 server. Unlike previous original
equipment manufactured servers, this server is not re-branded as an Avaya server (S8XXX).
For information regarding component replacement, troubleshooting, and diagnostics, see the Dell
PowerEdge R620 Owner's Manual on the Dell website.
HP ProLiant DL360 G7 Server
The HP ProLiant DL360 G7 server is a replacement for the S8800 server. Unlike previous original
equipment manufactured servers, this server is not re-branded as an Avaya server (S8XXX).
Note:
Use the command man hp-health to display server failure events and possible alarms.
For information about maintaining and troubleshooting the HP ProLiant DL360 G7, see HP ProLiant
DL360 G7 Server Maintenance and Service Guide. This guide provides component replacement
procedures and diagnostic tools.
HP ProLiant DL360p G8 Server
The HP ProLiant DL360p G8 server is a replacement for the S8800 server. Unlike previous original
equipment manufactured servers, this server is not re-branded as an Avaya server (S8XXX).
Note:
Use the command man hp-health to display server failure events and possible alarms.
For information about maintaining and troubleshooting the HP ProLiant DL360p G8 server, see HP
ProLiant DL360p Gen8 Server Maintenance and Service Guide. This guide provides component
replacement procedures and diagnostic tools.
Replacing a server with a different server type
About this task
The concept of migrating from one server to another does not exist for Session Manager. Session
Manager does not include an official backup or restore operation to support replacing a server with a
different server type or for migrating from one server to a different server type. To replace a server,
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you must install the new server and install Session Manager using the same host name and network
settings. The server vendor type is not relevant to the replacement installation.
Note:
When you change from one type of server to another, server hardware and environment failures
and alarms will occur because the servers do not use common monitoring software.
To replace a server with a different server type:
Procedure
1. Change the state of the Session Manager instance to Deny New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Deny New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
2. Click Shutdown System, then select Shutdown from the drop-down menu for the server
that is to be replaced. If the system does not shut down, turn off the server by pressing in the
power button on the front panel for 5 seconds.
3. Unplug the power cord.
4. Label and unplug the existing cables to the server for the keyboard, monitor, mouse, and
Ethernet ports.
5. Remove the server from the rack. See the installation instructions that were shipped with the
original server.
6. Install the new server in the rack. See the installation instructions that were shipped with the
original server.
7. Reconnect the keyboard, monitor, mouse, and power cables. Do not connect the network
cables at this time.
8. Install the operating system and Session Manager software:
a. Insert the Session Manager Kickstart DVD (OS).
b. Turn on the server and wait for the server to boot.
c. Wait until the server ejects the DVD and reboots.
d. Insert the Session Manager software CD.
e. Log in as sroot on the console (KVM).
f. Enter the following commands to mount the CD and install the Session Manager
software using the factory configuration:
# mount /cdrom
# cd /cdrom
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Replacing a server with a different server type
# bash install.sh --factory
g. Reboot the server.
h. When the server finishes booting, log in using the craft or sroot login.
i. Reconnect the network cables to the server.
j. Enter the command SMnetSetup to configure the server for the local network.
k. Accept the EULA.
9. Change the state of the Session Manager to Accept New Service:
a. On the System Manager Web Console, under Elements, select Session Manager.
b. On the Session Manager Dashboard page, select the appropriate Session Manager
name from the table.
c. Click Service State.
d. From the drop-down menu, select Accept New Service.
e. On the Confirmation page, click Confirm.
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Appendix A: Alarm and Log Event IDs
Alarm Event ID descriptions
The following table contains a list of alarm event IDs, the severity of the alarm, and a link to the
description and troubleshooting procedure of the alarm.
Table 1: Alarm Event ID Table
Event ID
ARBITER_10001
Alarm
severity
Alarm description
Minor
Session Manager switched to a different System Manager.
See Switched Session Manager on page 229.
ARBITER_10002
Major
Session Manager does not associate with a master System
Manager.
See No master System Manager on page 219.
DRS_DBG_0001
Major
Data Services Replication error.
See DRS Synchronization failure on page 210.
OP_AASL10900
Major
Certificate load failure.
See Certificate Status on page 205.
OP_AASL10902
Major
Failed binding a listener, the given address is in use or an invalid
interface.
See Failed binding a listener on page 212.
OP_AASL10903
Warning
Connection Limit has been exceeded for remote IP using
transport.
See Connection limit exceeded on page 205.
OP_AFWL16002
Minor
SIP firewall deep inspection configuration update failed. See SIP
Firewall Configuration on page 230.
OP_AFWL16003
Minor
SIP firewall configuration failed schema validation.
See SIP Firewall Configuration on page 230.
OP_AFWL16501
Warning
SIP firewall action matched rule.
See SIP Firewall Actions on page 229.
OP_AFWL16504
Minor
SIP firewall loop detection.
Table continues…
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Alarm Event ID descriptions
Event ID
Alarm
severity
Alarm description
See the SIP Call Loop elimination section in Administering
Avaya Aura® Session Manager.
OP_AFWL17503
Minor
SIP firewall blacklist configuration update failed.
See SIP Firewall Configuration on page 230.
OP_AFWL17504
Minor
SIP firewall whitelist configuration update failed.
See SIP Firewall Configuration on page 230.
OP_ANFW11001
Warning
Network firewall cannot be stopped. See Network firewall
stopped on page 219.
OP_ANFW11002
Warning
SM100 Network Firewall critical event.
See Network firewall critical event on page 219.
OP_APLM10300
Major
Failure pinholing Network Firewall.
See Network Firewall Pinholing on page 219.
OP_APLM10302
Major
Failure configuring network parameters.
See Network Configuration on page 218.
OP_APLM10304
Major
Ethernet interface is down.
See Network Configuration on page 218.
OP_CSRE52005
Minor
Missing ELIN link. See ELIN entity link missing on page 214.
OP_CCAC54003
Minor
Bandwidth threshold exceeded.
See Exceeding Location Bandwidth on page 211.
OP_CDAO50001
Minor
The database connection is down.
See Database Connection on page 207.
OP_CDAO50002
Minor
Database query failure (SQL Exception).
See Database Query on page 209.
OP_CDAO50003
Minor
Unexpected data.
See Unexpected data on page 232.
OP_CDAO50009
Minor
A file I/O error occurred trying to write the local DNS server
configuration or zone files.
See Zone File I/O on page 235.
OP_CDAO50011
Major
The Session Manager Instance cannot be resolved.
See Session Manager Instance Resolution on page 228.
OP_CDAO50012
Minor
Multiple Session Manager IP addresses map to the local Session
Manager Instance.
See Session Manager Instance Resolution on page 228.
OP_CDAO50013
Minor
DNS resolved to multiple IP addresses.
Table continues…
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Alarm and Log Event IDs
Event ID
Alarm
severity
Alarm description
See Security Module multiple DNS resolutions on page 226.
OP_CDAO50020
Minor
Call accounting is not available. See CDR Not Operational on
page 204.
OP_CDAO50022
Warning
OP_CDAO50024
Major
BSM Entity Links to core subtended CM not administered. See
BSM Entity links not administered on page 202.
OP_CDAO50026
Major
BSM avaya-lsp entry missing in /etc/hosts. See BSM missing
avaya-lsp entry on page 203.
OP_CDAO50031
Minor
No entity link administered between Session Manager and the far
end entity with the appropriate transport type. See No entity link
with correct transport type on page 211.
OP_CDAO50032
Minor
Entity link administration problem has been resolved.
OP_CMON55001
Warning
SIP Entity is not responding since one or more (but not all) of the
connections associated with the SIP Entity are in a down state
(equivalent to the SIP Monitoring state as Partially Up). See SIP
Monitor Alarm on page 231.
OP_CMON55002
Minor
SIP Entity is not responding since all of the connections
associated with the SIP Entity are in a down state (equivalent to
the SIP Monitoring state as Down). See SIP Monitor Alarm on
page 231.
OP_CSVH58003
Minor
Configuration file error. See Version Error in Configuration File on
page 235.
Major
Configuration file error. See Product Type Error in Configuration
File on page 222.
OP_CDAO50018
Major
JGroups Keystore has not been replicated.
OP_CURE56001
Warning
Invalid authorization data. See Registration authorization
failure on page 223.
OP_CURE56010
Warning
Data base error. See Registration service unavailable for a given
user on page 224.
OP_CURE56018
Warning
Invalid authorization data. See Subscription authorization failure
for a given user on page 232.
OP_CURE56021
Warning
Data Manager component failure. See Registration component
failure storing subscriptions on page 223.
OP_CURE56027
Minor
User failed over, manual failback mode. See User failed over,
manual failback mode on page 233.
OP_CURE56029
Minor
User failed over to Branch Survivable Server. See User failed
over to Branch Survivability Server on page 234.
OP_CSVH58005
OP_CSVH58007
OP_CSVH58009
OP_LIC20251
Warning
The direct link for Session Manager to Route Through is missing.
See Route Through on page 224.
SIP session counts exceeded the licensed number.
Table continues…
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Alarm Event ID descriptions
Event ID
Alarm
severity
Alarm description
For troubleshooting, verify number of sessions authorized in
license file.
OP_MAMA20102
Major
Security Module Management Agent failure. See Security
Module Management Agent unable to configure Security
Module on page 226.
OP_MMTC20011
Major
The Postgres database is not accessible. See Postgres database
sanity check failed on page 220.
OP_MMTC20019
Minor
Alarms are not being processed. See SAL Agent sanity check
failed on page 224.
OP_MMTC20025
Major
Security Module failed sanity check. See Security Module Sanity
Failure on page 227.
OP_MMTC20031
Minor
Data Distribution/Redundancy is down. See Data Distribution/
Redundancy is down on page 206.
OP_MMTC20033
Minor
Management Instance check failed. See Management Instance
check failed on page 215.
OP_MMTC20043
Minor
Management BSM instance check failed. See Management BSM
instance check failed on page 214.
OP_MMTC20045
Minor
Host name resolution failed on page 213.
OP_MMTC20047
Warning
Failure to install the unique authentication file during Session
Manager installation. See Failure to install the unique
authentication file on page 212
OP_MMTC20048
Warning
Certificates nearing expiration date. See Certificate Expiration on
page 204.
OP_MMTC20049
Major
Certificates nearing expiration date. See Certificate Expiration on
page 204.
OP_MMTC20050
Critical
Certificates nearing expiration date. See Certificate Expiration on
page 204.
OP_MMTC20051
Major
Call History DB out of service. Contact Avaya Professional
Services.
OP_MMTC20053
Minor
DB Compaction failure. Contact Avaya Professional Services.
OP_MMTC20055
Warning
DB Backup failure.
OP_MPER20226
Warning
Performance Monitoring disk space is at least 80% full. See
Performance data storage disk usage on page 220.
OP_MPER20227
Major
Performance Monitoring disk space is at least 95% full and data
collection has been disabled. See Performance data storage disk
usage on page 220.
OP_MPER20228
Minor
NFS server used for performance data storage is not accessible.
See Alarms for NFS Disk Space on page 201.
OP_MPER20229
Major
NFS server used for performance data storage is not accessible.
See Alarms for NFS Disk Space on page 201.
Table continues…
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Alarm and Log Event IDs
Event ID
Alarm
severity
Alarm description
OP_MWD20202
Minor
Session Manager watchdog service unable to start the requested
service. See Service <name of service> has totally failed on
page 228.
OP_MWD20204
Major
WebSphere does not respond to SIP requests.
The Session Manager monitoring of WebSphere has failed
indicating that WebSphere is no longer functioning. At this point,
watchdog restarts WebSphere in an attempt to clear the
condition. If the problem persists, report the problem to Avaya
Professional Services.
OP_PCFF40000
Major
Missing configuration file. See Missing file on page 217.
OP_PCFF40002
Minor
SMGR connection timeout. See PPM Connection problem on
page 220.
OP_TALM00100
Indeterminat
e
Test alarm event provided by generateTestAlarmSM.sh
command.
OP_TestAlarm
Indeterminat
e
Clear event for testing only.
OP_TPBR10
Minor
Postgres connection/indexing issues. See Database error on
page 208.
OP_TPBR100
Major
Event 2340. The BGI completed with uncorrectable errors. See
BGI completed with uncorrectable errors on page 202.
OP_TPBR200
Major
Power Supply sensor Power Unit — Redundancy lost. See
Power supply malfunction on page 222.
OP_TPBR201
Major
Power Supply sensor Power Supply [1 or 2] — (Power supply AC
lost | failure detected). Asserted. See Power supply
malfunction on page 222.
OP_TPBR210
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive [0 or 1] — Drive present. Deasserted.
See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR211
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive [0 or 1] — In critical | failed array.
Asserted. See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR212
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive [0 or 1] — Rebuild aborted. Asserted.
See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR213
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive [0 or 1] — Predictive failure. Asserted.
See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR214
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive [0 or 1] — Drive fault. Asserted. See Disk
drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR220
Major
Ambient temp upper critical going high. See System
overheated on page 232.
OP_TPBR230
Major
Planar (3.3,5,12)V upper critical going high. See Motherboard
voltage issues on page 218.
Table continues…
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Alarm Event ID descriptions
Event ID
Alarm
severity
Alarm description
OP_TPBR231
Major
Planar (3.3,5,12)V upper critical going low. See Motherboard
voltage issues on page 218.
OP_TPBR232
Major
Planar VBAT lower critical going low. See Motherboard voltage
issues on page 218.
OP_TPBR240
Major
Fan Tach lower critical going low. See Cooling fan failure on
page 206.
OP_TPBR30
Major
Event 2057 virtual disk degraded. See Disk drive malfunction on
page 210.
OP_TPBR300
Major
Power supply/fan/overheating alarms. See Power supply
overheating on page 222.
OP_TPBR301
Major
HP hard drive alarms. See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR302
Major
HP RAID alarms. See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR303
Major
HP Memory alarms. See Memory failing on page 217.
OP_TPBR304
Major
RAID Battery alarms. See Battery power is low on page 202.
OP_TPBR305
Major
RAID Controller alarms. See Disk drive malfunction on
page 210.
OP_TPBR31
Major
Event 2048. Device failed. See Disk drive malfunction on
page 210.
OP_TPBR32
Major
Event 2056/2076. Virtual disk failed. See Disk drive failed on
page 210.
OP_TPBR33
Major
Event 2080/2083. Physical disk failed. See Disk drive failed on
page 210.
OP_TPBR34
Major
Event 2107. Smart configuration change. See SMART
configuration change on page 231.
OP_TPBR35
Major
Event 2163. Rebuild completed with errors. See Disk drive
malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR36
Major
Event 2270/2272/2273. Disk media errors. See Disk drive
malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR37
Major
Event 2282. Hot spare SMART polling failed. See Disk drive
malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR38
Major
Event 2307 Bad block table is full. Unable to log block. See Disk
drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR39
Major
Event 2347/2348/2349. Physical disk rebuild failures. See Disk
drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR4
Minor
Postgres connection failure. See Hard disk drive data save
errors on page 213.
OP_TPBR40
Major
Event 2350. There was an unrecoverable disk media error during
the rebuild. See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
Table continues…
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Alarm and Log Event IDs
Event ID
Alarm
severity
Alarm description
OP_TPBR45
Major
Event 1354. Power supply detected a failure. Sensor location PS
[1 or 2]. See Power supply malfunction on page 222.
OP_TPBR5
Minor
Postgres integrity/protocol violation. See Hard disk drive data
save errors on page 213.
OP_TPBR50
Major
Event 2102/2103. Temperature reading errors. See Temperature
reading errors on page 232.
OP_TPBR6
Minor
Postgres invalid transaction failure. See Hard disk drive data
save errors on page 213.
OP_TPBR60
Major
Event 2169. The controller battery needs to be replaced. See
Controller battery malfunction on page 206.
OP_TPBR7
Minor
Postgres insufficient resource failure. See Hard disk drive data
save errors on page 213.
OP_TPBR70
Major
Event 2268. Storage management has lost communication with
the controller. See Disk drive malfunction on page 210.
OP_TPBR8
Minor
Postgres resource issues failure. See Hard disk drive data save
errors on page 213.
OP_TPBR80
Major
Event 2289/2299. Multi-bit ECC error / bad phy. See Memory
error on page 217.
OP_TPBR9
Minor
Postgres IO/Internal errors. See Hard disk drive data save
errors on page 213.
OP_TPBR90
Major
Event 2320/2321. DIMM single-bit ECC error. See Memory
error on page 217.
Log Event ID descriptions
The following table contains an alphabetical list of log event IDs and a description of the issue that
caused the event. These events do not generate an alarm. Most log events are not forwarded by the
Session Manager or Survivable Remote Session Manager and cannot be viewed with the log
viewer. Use the System Manager Log Harvester or search for the log on the Session Manager
instance.
The log severities are:
• EMERGENCY : system is unusable.
• ALERT : immediate action is required.
• CRITICAL: critical condition.
• ERROR: error condition.
• WARNING : warning condition.
• NOTIFICATION : normal but significant condition.
• INFO: informational message only.
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Log Event ID descriptions
You can view audit log events, such as the AU_MSEM203XX series as listed in the table, using the
log viewer for tracking administration changes.
Table 2: Log Event ID Table
Event ID
Severity
Log message
AU_MSEM20304
INFO
Database record has been updated. See Database UPDATE on
page 209.
AU_MSEM20306
INFO
Record has been inserted into the database. See Database
INSERT on page 208.
AU_MSEM20308
INFO
Database record has been deleted. See Database DELETE on
page 208.
AU_MSEM20310
INFO
Request was made that affects Session Manager. See Action on
Session Manager on page 201.
AU_MSEM20312
INFO
Request was made that affects the System Manager. See Action
on System Manager on page 201.
OP_PCFF40002
INFO
System Manager connection resolved.
OP_MWD20203
INFO
Service <service name> has totally failed again. The service fails
to restart but no alarm is raised again since failure is already
reported.
OP_CCAC54501
INFO
This alarm is related to Call admission control reduction of a call
bandwidth to prevent exceeding the bandwidth limit. As a result,
the call quality is degraded.
OP_AASL10901
INFO
Certificate load successful. See Certificate Status on page 205.
OP_AFWL15001
INFO
SIP Firewall: new configuration imposed. See SIP Firewall
Configuration on page 230.
OP_AFWL15002
INFO
Busyout mode is ON or OFF. See Camp-on busyout mode on
page 204.
OP_AFWL16001
INFO
SIP firewall deep inspection disabled or no active rules. See SIP
Firewall Configuration on page 230.
OP_AFWL16502
INFO
Too many SIP Firewall alarms. See SIP Firewall Actions on
page 229.
OP_AFWL16503
INFO
SIPFW block flow action summary log. See SIP FW Block flow
action summary log on page 231.
OP_AFWL16505
INFO
Log message: "SIP firewall loop detection action: %s "
"Remote IP: %s Local port: %d Transport: %s, "
"Req-URI: %s To: %s From: %s PAI: %s. "
"This loop resulted in %d %s in the last second."
See the SIP Call Loop elimination section in Administering
Avaya Aura® Session Manager.
OP_AFWL17501
INFO
SIP firewall blacklist disabled or no active rules. See SIP Firewall
Configuration on page 230.
Table continues…
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Alarm and Log Event IDs
Event ID
Severity
Log message
OP_AFWL17502
INFO
SIP firewall whitelist disabled or no active rules. See SIP Firewall
Configuration on page 230.
OP_ANFW11000
INFO
Network firewall started.
OP_APLM10301
INFO
Success pinholing Network Firewall. See Network Firewall
Pinholing on page 219.
OP_APLM10303
INFO
Success configuring network parameters. See Network
Configuration on page 218.
OP_APLM10305
INFO
Ethernet interface is up. See Network Configuration on
page 218.
OP_CCAC54000
WARN
OP_CCAC54001
Lack for bandwidth for a call. See Call Admission Control Call
Denial on page 203.
OP_CCAC54500
OP_CCAC54002
INFO
Bandwidth for the identified location is no longer being exceeded.
OP_CCAC54004
OP_CDAO50004
WARN
The database connection is down.
See Database Connection on page 207.
OP_CDAO50005
INFO
OP_CDAO50006
WARN
The database connection has been restored. Administration
updates should be taking effect now. See Database
Connection on page 207.
Unexpected data.
See Unexpected data on page 232.
OP_CDAO50007
INFO
There was invalid data in the database, but the error has been
corrected. See Unexpected data on page 232.
OP_CDAO50008
INFO
There was an SQL query error, but the error has been corrected.
See Database Query on page 209.
OP_CDAO50010
INFO
There was a file I/O error, but the error has been corrected. See
Zone File I/O on page 235.
OP_CDAO50014
WARN
A file I/O error occurred trying to write the local DNS server
configuration or zone files.
See Zone File I/O on page 235.
OP_CDAO50016
INFO
The Session Manager Instance resolution issue has been
corrected. See Session Manager Instance Resolution on
page 228.
OP_CDAO50017
INFO
DNS no longer resolves to multiple IP addresses for the Security
Module. See Security Module multiple DNS resolutions on
page 226.
OP_CDAO50019
INFO
Bandwidth threshold no longer exceeded for the <location name>
location. See Exceeding Location Bandwidth on page 211.
Table continues…
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Log Event ID descriptions
Event ID
Severity
Log message
OP_CDAO50021
INFO
The Call detail Recording (CDR) system is now operational. Call
accounting is resumed. See CDR Not Operational on page 204.
OP_CDAO50023
INFO
The missing Entity Link for Session Manager to Route-Through
has been inserted. See Route Through on page 224.
OP_CDAO50025
INFO
Missing BSM Entity Link has been resolved.
OP_CDAO50027
INFO
Missing BSM avaya-lsp entry has been resolved.
OP_CMON55000
INFO
SIP monitoring state for SIP Entity has changed to the Up state.
See SIP Monitor Alarm on page 231.
OP_CSRE52006
INFO
Previously missing ELIN link has been added.
OP_CSVH58002
INFO
Previous configuration file error has been resolved.
OP_CURE56000
INFO
Registration Authorizations no longer failing for user.
OP_CURE56009
INFO
Registration Service no longer failing for user, domain.
OP_CURE56017
INFO
Subscription Authorizations no longer failing for user , domain.
OP_CURE56020
INFO
No longer failing storing subscription, user, domain.
OP_CURE56024
INFO
This event is related to the Event Handler functionality of Session
Manager. This operational event means that a user attempted to
subscribe with Session Manager and failed to return a valid
acknowledge to the subscription notification function of the
Session Manager. As a result, Session Manager removed the
faulty subscription.
OP_CSVH58004
OP_CSVH58006
OP_CSVH58008
Either the subscriber or the subscriber server may be
experiencing problems.
Ensure that the subscriber and the server servicing the
subscriber are functional.
OP_CURE56025
INFO
Call denied because route back route header was changed to
{Route header URI}
OP_CURE56026
INFO
Emergency call with contact URI, originating location, to
destination SIP entity.
OP_CURE56028
INFO
No longer any failed over users or failback policy is no longer
manual.
OP_CURE56031
WARN
Receiving requests from an untrusted host where the
authentication realm does not match an authoritative domain.
OP_CURE56032
INFO
No longer receiving requests from untrusted host.
OP_CURE57000
INFO
Unregistering the user removed through administration.
OP_CURE57001
INFO
User has registered.
Table continues…
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Alarm and Log Event IDs
Event ID
200
Severity
Log message
OP_CURE57002
INFO
User has unregistered.
OP_CURE57003
INFO
User registration has expired.
OP_CURE57004
INFO
Unregistering user due to duplicate user registration. Only one
active user is allowed with the current forking policy.
OP_CURE57005
INFO
User @ domain, event package subscription has expired.
OP_CURE57006
INFO
User, domain failed authentication.
OP_CURE57007
INFO
Failed to compare registrations we found in database with
contact address in REGISTER request. Provides user handle
and domain.
OP_CURE57008
INFO
Failed to look up existing registration for user. Provides user
handle and domain.
OP_CURE57009
INFO
Failed to remove all registrations by supplying a '*' as the contact
address. Provides user handle and domain.
OP_CURE57010
INFO
Termination of registration due to reducing of the simultaneous
devices setting of the user. Provides user handle and domain.
OP_CURE57011
INFO
Detection of a registration interruption. Suggests rebooting of the
device.
OP_MAMA20103
INFO
Security Module Management Agent is able to configure the
Security Module.
OP_MMTC20012
INFO
Postgres database sanity check passed.
OP_MMTC20020
INFO
SAL-Agent sanity check passed
OP_MMTC20026
INFO
Security Module sanity check passed
OP_MMTC20030
INFO
Call Processing SAR is deployed successfully
OP_MMTC20032
INFO
Data Distribution/Redundancy is up.
OP_MMTC20034
INFO
Management Instance check passed
OP_MMTC20036
INFO
Forcing Garbage Collection of SM Management JBoss Server
due to High Memory Usage of {0}
OP_MMTC20038
INFO
Restarting SM Management JBoss Server due to High Memory
Usage of {0}
OP_MMTC20040
INFO
Restarting SM Management JBoss Server due to High CPU
Average Utilization of {0}%
OP_MMTC20042
INFO
Restarting SM Management JBoss Server due to Thread
Deadlock Condition
OP_MMTC20044
INFO
Management BSM Instance check passed
OP_MWD20200
INFO
Service <service name> has started.
OP_MWD20203
INFO
Service <service name> has totally failed again.
OP_PCFF40001
INFO
Found [ FnuFile | LabelFile | SmsConfigFile | ButtonRangesFile ]
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Action on Session Manager
Action on Session Manager
This event indicates that an administrator has initiated an administrative request from System
Manager Web Console using a Session Manager Element Manager Web page that affects Session
Manager or Survivable Remote Session Manager (Branch Session Manager ). For example, an
administrator may need to change the state of the Session Manager instance to Deny New Service
using the Session Manager Administration Web page in order to busyout this Session Manager.
The log messages for this event have the following format:
• LoginID:<The name of the user logged into System Manager Web Console>
• ClientHost :<The IP address of the computer of the Web user>
• Action on Session Manager: <The name of Session Manager or Branch Session Manager>
• Description: <The description of the requested action>
An example of the log message is: LoginID: admin ClientHost: 123.4.56.789 Action
on Session Manager:MySessionManager.dr.avaya.com Description: Initiated
Deny New Service
Action on System Manager
This event indicates that an administrator has initiated an administrative request from System
Manager Web Console using a Session Manager Element Manager Web page that affects the
System Manager server.
The log messages for this event have the following format:
• LoginID:<The name of the user logged into the System Manager Web Console>
• ClientHost :<The IP address of the computer of the Web user>
• Action on System Manager Description:<The description of the requested action>
Alarms for NFS Disk Space
Alarms are generated when Session Manager cannot read or write performance data to or from an
NFS server. This can occur when the NFS server is down or when the network connection between
the System Manager and the NFS server has failed.
• If the problem persists, the Session Manager Element Manager raises a Warning Alarm once
every 24 hours until either:
- The condition which is causing the Session Manager Element Manager to be unable to read
or write the NFS storage has been resolved and the Session Manager Element Manager
can once again successfully write and read data to and from the NFS server, or
- The system has been sending NFS Warning Alarms for one week.
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• If the NFS failure condition persists for more than one week, the Session Manager Element
Manager stops sending Warning Alarms and begins to send Minor Alarms once every 24 hours
until such time as the NFS error condition has been repaired and the Session Manager
Element Manager can once again read and write data to the NFS server.
Battery power is low
This event indicates that the RAID battery power is low. Replace the battery.
Related Links
Removing the RAID battery on page 174
Installing the RAID battery on page 175
BGI completed with uncorrectable errors
The BGI encountered errors that cannot be corrected. The virtual disk contains physical disks that
have either unusable disk space or disk errors that cannot be corrected.
For a description and the recovery procedure for hardware event ID 2340, see the list of event IDs in
S8510 DellR610 hardware and environment alarm events on page 237.
BSM Entity links not administered
This event indicates that you have not administered the mandatory entity links from the Survivable
Remote Session Manager (BSM). When the BSM initializes, it uses these entity links to set up the
connections between the BSM and LSP. Failure to find those links will raise this warning.
During BSM initialization, links between the BSM instance and the core Communication Manager
being subtended by the branch could not be found. The most likely cause is that the entity links
have not been administered through System Manager. The BSM instance was probably installed
before the links were administered on System Manager. The events will resolve after administration
is completed.
There should be one or two links administered, depending on the Communication Manager
configuration in the core. The links must use the same ports administered between the core
Communication Manager and the primary core Session Manager. This event can also indicate that
one or more branch users have a Communication Manager application to a Communication
Manager that the branch does not subtend.
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BSM missing avaya-lsp entry
Troubleshooting unadministered BSM entity links
Procedure
1. Add the correct entity links between the BSM instance and the core Communication
Manager to which the entity link subtends.
The ports and transports used should mirror those used on the entity links between the core
Communication Manager and the primary Session Manager.
2. If Step 1 does not clear the warning, verify that all users on the branch use a Communication
Manager application mapping to the subtended Communication Manager.
3. If the problem does not resolve, contact Avaya Technical Support.
BSM missing avaya-lsp entry
About this task
This event indicates the avaya-lsp entry was not found in the /etc/hosts file on the survivable
remote Session Manager server (BSM).
This entry is added during the template installation. It informs the BSM of the LSP IP address. If this
entry is not in the /etc/hosts file, the BSM cannot connect to the LSP, resulting in severely limited
service in the survivability mode.
Procedure
1. Log in to System Platform Web Console.
2. Select Server Management > Network Configuration.
3. Review the administration information and correct values, if needed.
4. Log out of System Platform Web Console.
Call Admission Control Call Denial
This alarm occurs when there are multiple call failures due to the lack of bandwidth for a call on a
particular location. While the alarm is active, the system checks the number of calls denied through
a particular location within a particular interval, with a one hour default. The alarm is cleared when
no calls were denied for the location within the last interval.
This event may be caused by one of the following:
• More simultaneous call traffic than anticipated at a specific location.
• The provisioned bandwidth for a specific location is insufficient for the actual carried traffic.
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• The provisioned bandwidth for a specific location is correctly set according to LAN
characteristics. However, traffic exceeds actual network capacity.
• Inappropriate bandwidth limitations.
• Network issues.
Troubleshooting CAC Call Denial
Procedure
1. Ensure the traffic is consistent with the bandwidth capacity.
2. Consider rerouting part of the traffic through a different, under-utilized location.
3. Increase bandwidth provisioning if allowed by the network.
4. Split the location into two or more different locations, and route traffic accordingly.
Camp-on busyout mode
This log event indicates that the Camp-on Busyout mode has changed from ON to OFF or vice
versa.
When this mode is turned on:
• New calls or registration attempts are rejected.
• Active calls are not affected.
CDR Not Operational
This event is related to the Call Detail Recording (CDR) functionality for the SIP Routing Element
(SRE), a component of Session Manager. This event means that call accounting is not available for
calls to or from certain SIP entities for which CDR is enabled. During this outage, some or all calls
will not be recorded in CDR.
Certificate Expiration
Session Manager requires certificates for securing SIP and HTTP (for Personal Profile Manager)
connections, and for communication between the Session Manager and System Manager. If a
certificate has expired, the Session Manager may be unable to establish any new connections and
security might be compromised. In many cases, TCP and UDP are not options, so certificate lifetime
must be monitored.
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Certificate status
When a certificate is approaching its expiration:
• A warning message is periodically logged, starting 60 days before expiration.
• In most cases, a major alarm is logged daily if the certificate is within 30 days of expiring.
• A critical alarm is generated when the certificate is within 15 days of expiring
It is important, therefore, that the warning expiration alarms be resolved without delay before the
major and critical alarms are raised.
Troubleshooting certificate expiration alarms
Procedure
To fix the alarm, install new certificates. For the procedure to obtain a new certificate, see
Administering Avaya Aura® Session Manager.
Certificate status
The Security Module identity certificate and CA (trusted) certificate must be present for SIP TLS. An
alarm is raised if one of the certificates cannot be loaded because it is invalid, expired, or revoked.
Troubleshooting certificate status alarms
Procedure
1. Make sure that valid identity certificates are installed on the system.
2. Make sure that valid CA certificates are installed on the system.
3. See Certificate Expiration on page 204 in this document.
4. See Trust Management in Administering Avaya Aura® Session Manager, 03-603324.
Connection limit exceeded
The Security Module limits the number of concurrent connections for a single remote IP.
When this limit is exceeded, the system displays the following information:
• The value of the limit.
• The remote IP violating the limit.
• The transport layer used.
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Controller battery malfunction
This event indicates that the controller battery has malfunctioned and must be replaced. See the list
of event IDs in S8510 DellR610 hardware and environment alarm events on page 237 for a
description and recovery procedure for the hardware event ID indicated in the alarm description.
Cooling fan failure
This event indicates that the cooling fan is failing. Check the fan and replace it if necessary.
Data Distribution/Redundancy is down
The Session Manager data distribution and redundancy system has failed a periodic maintenance
status check. This service is required for SIP call processing to distribute provisioned and status
data.
Troubleshooting data distribution or redundancy down alarm
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System Tools
> Maintenance Tests.
2. Select the affected Session Manager instance from the Select Target list.
3. Select the Test data distribution and redundancy link test.
4. Click Execute Selected Tests
5. If the test passes, clear the alarm. The problem no longer exists, and nothing further needs
to be done.
6. If the test fails, establish an SSH connection to the Session Manager instance, using either
the Avaya craft login or an established customer login.
7. Run statapp to verify the status of the WebSphere and mgmt processes.
8. If the status of WebSphere is Down, run restart WebSphere and wait for the WebSphere
SIP Container to restart.
9. If the status of WebSphere is Partially Up, wait for the status to change to completely Up.
10. Run statapp and verify that the status of WebSphere is Up.
11. Re-run the Test data distribution and redundancy link test.
12. If the test fails, run restart mgmt and wait for the Management Jboss service to restart.
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Database connection
13. If the problem persists, reboot the Session Manager instance, using the Session Manager >
Dashboard page.
14. If the reboot does not solve the problem, re-install the affected Session Manager.
Database connection
This alarm indicates a problem with the connection to the database that contains the administered
data for routing and users. The connection to the database is either timing out or has been lost.
During this outage, the running system does not recognize any new administration.
The possible causes include:
• The database might not be running.
• The connection to the database was lost or is experiencing timeouts between queries.
• The user name or password that the system uses may not match the user name or password
in the database.
• The database process might not be running on the Session Manager instance or is on a
different IP address than expected.
To resolve this issue, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Troubleshooting Database Connection Alarms
Procedure
1. Ensure the database process is running on the Session Manager instance. Log in to the
Session Manager system and run one or all of the following commands:
a. Enter ps -ef | grep postgres
There should be two process entries. One of the entries should be similar to /usr/java/
jdk1.6.0_11/bin/java -server -XX:NewSize=32m...
b. Enter statapp -s postgres -db
The output is similar to postgres-db 18/ 18 UP
c. As root, enter service postgresql status
The output is similar to postmaster (pid 32617 32570 32569 32568) is running...
d. If none of these conditions are true, enter start —s postgres—db. This command
requires the root login.
2. Ensure there is a connection to the database. Verify the connection is stable and is not
experiencing outages.
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3. Ensure that the Session Manager instance is reachable by pinging it from another machine
that is capable of reaching the Session Manager instance:
a. Enter ping w.x.y.z , where w.x.y.z is the management IP address of the Session
Manager instance.
b. If there is no answer, the system is either in an unresponsive state, is currently powered
down, or is in the process of restarting.
4. If the problem continues after performing the above steps, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Database DELETE
This event indicates that an administrator has deleted an existing record in the System Manager
database. For example, an administrator may have deleted a Session Manager instance using the
Session Manager Administration Web page.
The log messages for this event have the following format:
• LoginID:<The name of user logged into System Manager Web Console>
• ClientHost :<The IP address of the web user computer>
• Action: Database DELETE from table <database table name> with key <database record
primary key value>
An example of the DELETE log message is: LoginID: admin ClientHost: 123.4.56.789
Action: Database DELETE from table asminstance with key 1
Database error
This event indicates a connection or indexing error with the postgres database. For Session
Manager servers, a reinstall may be required. For System Manager servers, a restore from back up
may be required. Contact Avaya Technical Support.
Database INSERT
This event indicates that an administrator has added a new record into the System Manager
database. For example, an administrator may have added a new Session Manager instance using
the Session Manager Administration web page.
The log messages for this event have the following format:
• LoginID:<Name of user logged into System Manager Web Console>
• ClientHost :<IP address of the web user's computer>
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Database Query
• Action: Database INSERT into table <database table name> with key <database record
primary key value> and properties: <database table column name>:<column value>, ...
An example of the INSERT log message is: LoginID: admin ClientHost: 123.4.56.789
Action: Database INSERT into table asminstance with key 1 and properties:
assetDNSIPAddress:<NULL>, assetDNSSearch:<NULL>, assetDefaultGateway:
255.255.255.0, assetIPAdress:<NULL>, assetInterfaceName:<NULL>,
assetNetMask:255.255.255.0...
Database Query
This event occurs when a database query cannot complete or fails, usually after an upgrade
indicating that the upgrade had problems. As a result, Session Manager might not operate correctly.
This event can occur if the database schemas do not match, indicating that variable types are
different or fields are nonexistent.
Call Avaya Technical Support to check the database versions and ensure the version are correct
and compatible. In particular, the table schemaversion in the System Manager and Session
Manager databases must have appropriate and matching version entries for major, minor, revision
and schemaname.
Database UPDATE
This event indicates that an administrator has updated an existing record in the System Manager
database. For example, an administrator might have edited a Session Manager instance using the
Session Manager Administration Web page.
The log messages for this event have the following format:
• LoginID:<The name of user logged into System Manager Web Console>
• ClientHost :<The IP address of the web user computer>
• Action: Database UPDATE into table <The name of the database table> with key <database
record primary key value> and properties: <database table column name>:[<previous
value>]=> <new value>, ...
An example of the UPDATE log message is: LoginID: admin ClientHost: 123.4.56.789
Action: Database UPDATE into table asminstance with key 1 and properties:
description: [<NULL>]=>This is my sm
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Disk drive failed
This event indicates that one of the disk drives failed. See the list of event IDs in S8510 DellR610
hardware and environment alarm events on page 237 for a description and recovery procedure for
the hardware event ID indicated in the alarm description.
If a hardware event ID is not included in the alarm description, have the disk drive serviced to
determine if the disk drive needs to be replaced.
Disk drive malfunction
This event indicates a malfunction in one of the disk drives. See the list of event IDs in S8510
DellR610 hardware and environment alarm events on page 237 for a description and recovery
procedure for the hardware event ID indicated in the alarm description.
If a hardware event ID is not included in the alarm description, have the disk drive serviced to
determine if the disk drive needs to be replaced.
DRS failure due to reinstallation of System Manager
After reinstalling System Manager, run the initTM -f command on the Session Manager and
Branch Session Manager instances that System Manager manages. This command reestablishes
the trust relationship with the reinstalled System Manager database.
Follow this procedure to resolve any DRS and trust relationship issues.
Warning:
This command removes any administered third party certificates. Hence, you need to readminister any third party certificate.
DRS Synchronization failure
About this task
Data Replication Service (DRS) replication error: The Session Manager instance is out of sync with
the System Manager database.
A sync failure indicates a critical failure in the functioning of the node. The failure is not a
configuration issue. Based on the error description, the administrator or support technician should
analyze the problem on the element node before initiating a repair.
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No entity link with correct transport type
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Services > Replication.
2. Select the affected Replica Group.
3. Select the affected Session Manager.
4. Click Repair.
5. Manually resolve any inconsistencies.
No entity link with correct transport type
This event indicates there is no entity link administered between the Session Manager and the far
end entity with the appropriate transport type. An entity link might be present, but the link does not
match the transport required for the call to complete.
Create an entity link between the Session Manager and the far end entity with the appropriate
transport type as described in the alarm.
Exceeding Location Bandwidth
This event is related to the Call Admission Control functionality for Session Manager.
The used bandwidth for a specific location has exceeded an allotment threshold. Additionally, the
alarm indicates which multimedia pools are being exceeded.
You can configure the thresholds to be configured for each location and for each pool as well as the
duration for which the threshold must be exceeded before the alarm is generated on System
Manager. The default threshold for each pool is set to 80%.
The alarm is centralized and is only seen from one Session Manager instance. If the alarming
Session Manager goes down, another Session Manager takes over the alarming role.
When the bandwidth is at 100% capacity for a particular location, new calls are not allowed on that
location and are denied.
This alarm may be caused by one of the following:
• There is more simultaneous call traffic than anticipated at a specific location.
• The provisioned bandwidth for a specific location is insufficient for the actual carried traffic.
• The provisioned bandwidth for a specific location is correctly set according to LAN
characteristics. However, traffic exceeds actual network capacity.
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Troubleshooting Exceeding Location Bandwidth Alarms
Procedure
1. If this is an undesired location from which to alarm, the location can be disabled from
alarming in one of two ways:
a. Set the thresholds to Disabled - this only applies to a single location.
b. On the Session Manager Administration screen, check the Disable Call Admission
Control Threshold Alarms box - this applies to all locations.
2. Check the bandwidth threshold values for the pools to ensure they are appropriate. Also
ensure the Latency before Alarm Trigger time is appropriate.
3. Ensure the traffic is consistent with the bandwidth capacity.
4. Consider rerouting part of the traffic through a different, under-utilized location.
5. Increase bandwidth provisioning if allowed by the network.
6. Consider splitting the location into two or more different locations and route traffic
accordingly.
Failed binding a listener
This event indicates that the specified address is in use or is an invalid interface.
A port conflict possibly exists with another Session Manager application on the server.
Troubleshooting failed binding listener
Procedure
1. Check the administration of the specified port to make sure that it is not already in use and
that it is available for the Security Module.
2. If you cannot resolve the conflict and cannot establish a listener, contact Avaya Technical
Support.
Failure to install the unique authentication file
Services can login to Session Manager in the field using Access Security Gateway (ASG)
challenged authentication method. During Session Manager installation process, the default
authentication file must be replaced by the unique authentication file. This alarm is related to the
failure to install the unique authentication file during the Session Manager installation.
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Hard disk drive data save errors
The alarm is raised when the system fails to validate the unique authentication file.
Troubleshooting unique authentication file failure
About this task
The unique authentication file can be created using Authentication File System (AFS) and loaded as
shown below.
Procedure
1. Generation of unique authentication file using AFS. You can either:
• Download the authentication file directly from AFS.
• Receive the authentication file in an email.
2. Load the authentication file using the command "loadpwd" which validates the authenticity of
authentication file.
For further details, see the book Implementing Avaya Aura® Session Manager Release 6.2,
03-603473.
Hard disk drive data save errors
This event indicates that the database software is having problems persisting data to the hard disk
drive. Check that there is space left on the disk drive. If not, contact Avaya Technical Support. If
there is sufficient disk space, try rebooting the system. If the problem persists, contact Avaya
Technical Support.
Host name resolution failed
The on-demand or periodic maintenance test run on System Manager has detected connection
problems while resolving the host name of a Session Manager or Branch Session Manager
instance.
Troubleshooting Host name resolution failed
Procedure
1. If the DNS server is administered on System Manager, make sure it is reachable from
System Manager.
2. Ensure the host name of the Session Manager instance and the survivable remote Session
Manager (BSM) is administered properly on the DNS servers.
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3. If the DNS server is not administered, ensure the host name-to-IP address map of the
Session Manager and/or survivable remote Session Manager (BSM) instance is included in
the /etc/hosts file on System Manager. If the map is not included:
a. Log in to System Platform Web Console.
b. Select Server Management > Network Configuration.
c. Make sure the administration is correct. If not, enter the correct information.
d. Log out of System Platform Web Console.
ELIN entity link missing
This event indicates that an Emergency Location Identification Number (ELIN) server is
administered as a SIP Entity of type ELIN Server, user registrations are occurring, but there is no
entity link between some Session Managers and the ELIN server. This can occur on many Session
Managers at the same time and hence, the alarm can be on a per Session Manager basis.
To fix this problem, add the correct Entity Link between the Session Manager and ELIN Server.
Management BSM instance check failed
The periodic maintenance test which runs on the System Manager has detected connection
problems with the listed Branch Session Managers (BSM).
Troubleshooting Management BSM instance check failure
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > Dashboard .
2. Check the latest status for each administered Branch Session Manager.
3. Note the Branch Session Managers which are currently failing tests, if any. The failing tests
may indicate connectivity problems from the System Manager.
4. For each failing Branch Session Manager:
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Maintenance Tests.
b. Select the Branch Session Manager from the Select Target list.
c. Run the associated demand Maintenance Tests to verify the current connection status
to the administered Branch Session Manager.
5. If the previously failing Branch Session Managers pass the demand tests, clear this alarm to
indicate that the problem no longer exists and no further action is required.
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Management Instance check failed
6. Resolve all network problems including possible incorrect DNS and network firewall settings.
7. If a network problem is resolved:
a. Verify the status on the Dashboard.
b. Run the demand Maintenance Tests on the previously failing Branch Session
Managers.
8. If the tests fail, bring up the web console for the System Platform hosting the Branch Session
Manager.
9. Select Virtual Machine Management > Manage
10. Check the Application State for the Branch Session Manager.
a. If the application state is Running, the Branch Session Manager is running normally.
b. If the application state is Starting, the Branch Session Manager is starting up. Wait for
the application state to change to Running.
c. If the application state is Stopped, the Branch Session Manager is inactive.
d. If the application state is Unknown, installation has just completed and progress
information has not been received. Wait for the application state to change.
e. If the application state is Partially, not all of the services are up and running. Wait for
the application state to change.
f. If the application state is Error:
g. Select the link under the Version column to see a log of what happened during the
Branch Session Manager startup.
h. Log on to the Branch Session Manager.
i. Check for trouble deploying with SFS.
j. Check for trust management initialization failures and resolve, if any.
k. Check for DRS replication initialization failures and resolve, if any.
11. Re-run the demand Maintenance Tests for the failing Branch Session Manager.
12. If the tests are still failing, run initTM on the Branch Session Manager to clear possible trust
relationship problems.
13. Re-run the demand Maintenance Tests.
Management Instance check failed
The periodic maintenance test which runs on the System Manager has detected connection
problems with the listed Session Managers.
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Troubleshooting Management instance check failure
About this task
If multiple Session Managers fail the ping test, a network problem may be the cause of the alarms.
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > Dashboard.
2. Check the latest status for each administered core Session Manager.
3. Note which Session Managers are currently failing tests, if any. The failing tests may indicate
connectivity problems from the System Manager.
4. Select Elements > Session Manager > System Tools > Maintenance Tests.
5. Select System Manager from the Select Target list.
6. Select the Test network connections to each Session Manager test.
7. Click Execute Selected Tests.
8. If the test passes, clear the alarm. The problem no longer exists, and nothing further needs
to be done.
9. If the tests fails, do the following for each of the failing administered core Session Managers:
a. Run a ping test for the failing Session Manager instance, using either ping <IP address
of the Session Manager > or ping < hostname of the Session Manager> from the
System Manager shell.
b. If the ping test fails:
a. Establish an SSH connection to the Session Manager instance, using either the
Avaya craft login or an established customer login.
b. Enter statapp to verify the status of mgmt.
c. If the status of mgmt is Down, enter restart mgmt and wait for the Management
JBoss server to restart.
d. If the status of mgmt is Partially Up, wait for the status to change to completely
Up.
e. Enter statapp to verify that the status of mgmt is Up.
f. Re-run the Test network connections to each Session Manager test.
g. If the test fails, enter initTM on the Session Manager to clear possible trust
relationship problems.
h. Re-run the Test network connections to each Session Manager test.
i. Note if the test passes or fails for this Session Manager.
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Memory error
10. If multiple Session Managers are failing the ping test:
a. Resolve all network problems including possible incorrect DNS and network firewall
settings.
b. If a network problem is resolved, verify the latest status on the Session Manager
Dashboard.
c. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Maintenance Tests.
d. Select System Manager from the Select Target list.
e. Select the Test network connections to each Session Manager test.
f. Click Execute Selected Tests.
11. If the problem persists and no known network problems exist, reboot the Session Manager
instance. If you cannot reboot using theSession Manager > Dashboard page or cannot
establish an SSH connection, gain physical access to the server to reboot Session Manager.
Memory error
This event indicates that a memory error occurred. Take the system out of service and perform
memory diagnostics. See the list of event IDs in S8510 DellR610 hardware and environment alarm
events on page 237 for a description and recovery procedure for the hardware event ID indicated in
the alarm description.
Memory failing
This event indicates an HP memory alarm that the memory is failing. Contact Avaya Technical
Support.
Missing file
One of the following files is missing:
• ButtonDataType
• LabelFile
The system displays the name of the missing file.
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Clearing a missing file alarm
Procedure
Reinstall the server.
Motherboard voltage issues
This event indicates that the motherboard is experiencing voltage issues. This is most likely due to a
malfunction in one of the power supplies. Have the power supplies serviced and checked for
possible replacement. If the power supplies are fine, the motherboard may fail in the near future.
Network Configuration
The Security Module network parameters are configured during the installation and administration of
Session Manager. Both successful and unsuccessful configurations are reported. If the Security
Module network is not configured, an alarm is raised.
When the Security Module stops or restarts, the system displays the change in state of the Security
Module interface (Eth2) between up and down, unless NIC bonding is being used as noted below.
During normal operation, the interface should only display as up. Failure to properly configure the
Security Module network may be due to incorrect settings.
The primary Security Module interface is Eth2. When NIC bonding is activated:
• The Security Module uses Eth3 as its secondary interface.
• A logical interface called bond0 is defined.
When NIC bonding is not activated, the following alarms/log events occur:
• OP_APLM10304 eth2 Interface is down
• OP_APLM10305 eth2 Interface is up
When first activating NIC bonding, the following four alarms/logs occur:
• OP_APLM10304 bond0 Interface is down
• OP_APLM10304 eth3 Interface is down
• OP_APLM10305 eth2 Interface is up
• OP_APLM10305 bond0 Interface is up
When NIC bonding is active, alarms/logs indicate the status of the interface that changes state. The
status of bond0 is always alarmed or logged. For example: The primary interface goes down and the
secondary interface takes over. The following alarm/log sequence occurs:
• OP_APLM10304 eth2 Interface is down
• OP_APLM10305 bond0 Interface is up
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Network firewall critical event
If the secondary interface then fails, the following alarm/log sequence occurs:
• OP_APLM10304 eth3 Interface is down
• OP_APLM10305 bond0 Interface is down
When the secondary interface returns to service, the following alarm/log sequence occurs:
• OP_APLM10304 eth3 Interface is up
• OP_APLM10305 bond0 Interface is up
Network firewall critical event
This alarm indicates there is a problem with the Linux network firewall iptables.
Contact Avaya Global Services.
Network Firewall Pinholing
By default, the Security Module network firewall restricts access to all but those interfaces and ports
defined in the Avaya Aura® Session Manager: Port Matrix documentation that is available when you
log in to the support website and use the InSite Knowledge Management Database at http://
support.avaya.com.
However, the pinhole mechanism permits applications to make on-demand requests to open or
close temporary “pinholes” through the network firewall.
Failure of an application to open a pinhole indicates an internal Session Manager problem. If the
problem persists, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Network firewall stopped
This alarm indicates that the network firewall has been manually turned off.
Contact Avaya Global Services.
No master System Manager
About this task
Session Manager could not locate any System Manager as its Management System.
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Alarm and Log Event IDs
Procedure
1. Check the Geographic Redundancy mode of the System Managers. If none of the System
Managers are active, check System Manager Web Console for trouble shooting.
2. Verify whether or not the Session Manager instance has network connectivity to the System
Managers. Check the network connectivity or SSL settings between Session Managers and
System Managers.
PPM Connection problem
The connection between the Session Manager and the System Manager is down.
This alarm is raised when a PPM command fails due to a connection problem.
This can happen when:
• PPM is trying to update the System Manager database due to an endpoint request to add,
update, or delete a contact from the phone.
• PPM is trying to update the System Manager database due to an endpoint request to add or
update Device Data from the phone.
The alarm is resolved when the PPM successfully contacts the System Manager to update the
database.
Performance data storage disk usage
Performance data storage disk usage is low or critically low.
Contact Avaya Technical Support to resize the data setup for the collection storage space.
Postgres database sanity check failed
The periodic maintenance operation check of the Postgres database has failed and possibly
Postgres service is not running.
This failure requires actions on both Session Manager and System Manager. System Manager
requires root privileges.
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Postgres database sanity check failed
Troubleshooting Postgres database sanity check failed
Procedure
1. For Session Manager:
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Maintenance Tests.
b. Select the affected Session Manager from the Select Target list.
c. Select the Test Postgres database sanity test.
d. Click Execute Selected Tests
e. If the test passes, clear the alarm. The problem no longer exists, and nothing further
needs to be done.
f. If the test fails, establish an SSH connection to the Session Manager instance using
either the craft login (Avaya) or an established customer login.
g. Run statapp to verify the status of postgres-db.
h. If the status of postgres-db is Down, run restart postgres-db and wait for the
Postgres service to restart.
i. If the status of postgres-db is Partially Up, wait for the status to change to completely
Up.
j. Run statapp to verify the status of postgres-db.
k. Re-run the Test Postgres database sanity test.
l. If the test still fails, reboot the Session Manager server using the reboot option on the
Session Manager > Dashboard page.
2. For System Manager: (requires root privilege)
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Maintenance Tests.
b. Select System Manager from the Select Target list.
c. Select the Test Postgres database sanity test.
d. Click Execute Selected Tests
e. If the test passes, clear the alarm. The problem no longer exists, and nothing further
needs to be done.
f. Run service postgresql status to verify if the Postgres service is running.
g. If the Postgres service is up, nothing further needs to be done.
h. If the service is down, run service postgresql restart to start service.
i. Wait for the Postgres service to restart.
j. Run service postgresql status to verify that the Postgres service is running.
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k. If the Postgres service is still down, check the available disk space under the /var
partition.
l. If there is enough disk space, reboot the server.
m. If the problem persists, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Power supply malfunction
This event indicates that one of the power supplies is malfunctioning. Contact Avaya Technical
Support to have the power supply serviced.
Power supply overheating
This event indicates that the power supply is overheating.
Troubleshooting power supply overheating
Procedure
1. Shut down the system.
2. Check the cooling fan for any malfunction. Replace it if necessary.
3. Check the power supply for any malfunction that could cause overheating. Replace it if
necessary.
4. Check for environmental factors that could contribute to overheating.
5. If the previous steps do not resolve the problem, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Product Type Error in Configuration File
The installation configuration file is either missing product type information, or it contains an
unrecognized product type.
The possible causes are:
• The installation process failed to install the proper configuration file.
• The configuration file has become corrupted.
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Registration authorization failure
Troubleshooting product type error in configuration file
Procedure
1. View or edit the contents of /opt/Avaya/install.properties. The file should contain
an entry similar as shown below:
InstallType=SM
2. If this entry is not present, add the entry with the correct product type for the software load
on the system.
Note:
The occurrence of this condition is unusual and may indicate a more significant problem
with the installation of the system. Therefore, you must also check for other problems.
3. Restart the system services.
Registration authorization failure
This event is related to the Registrar functionality for the Registration component in Session
Manager. This event indicates that a user has attempted to register with Session Manager and
failed to provide valid authorization credentials. The system logs a warning after five registration
attempts fail in one minute. The system clears the event automatically if no more registration
authorization failures occur.
The credentials provided by the user for the attempted registration are invalid.
Ensure the provided credentials being provided by the user are correct.
Registration component failure storing subscriptions
This event is related to the Eventing Handler functionality for the Registration component in Session
Manager. Due to this event, subscription based functionality stops working for the affected users.
For example, affected users fail to receive the Message Waiting Indicator (MWI) event for the
Voicemails. A warning event is logged after three such failures occur in one minute. The event is
automatically cleared when such events stop.
This event can occur if the Data Manager component experiences a failure for one or more users.
The failure could be due to an database inconsistency or error condition.
If the problem persists or recurs, call Avaya Technical Support.
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Registration service unavailable for a given user
This event is related to the endpoint processing function in the Registration component in Session
Manager. This event means that the system experienced a problem or failure while processing the
resolution of a SIP domain for an endpoint. A warning event is logged after four failures occur within
five minutes. The event is automatically cleared when such events stop.
This event can occur if a user is attempting to register to a Session Manager which does not have
the user marked as a local user. A local user in this context refers to one having the Session
Manager as either the Primary and Secondary Session Manager on the Communication Profile
section of the Manage Users administration screen.
The problem may be related to a Replication failure on one of the Session Managers, or to the
Personal Profile Management download to the endpoint itself. If the problem persists or reoccurs,
contact Avaya Technical Support.
If the problem persists or reoccurs, call Avaya Technical Support.
Route Through
This event indicates that Route Through is being attempted on calls, but it cannot route through to
another Session Manager Instance. The system may deny the calls may as a result of not being
able to Route Through. This may or may not be a real problem, depending on the customer
configuration.
The most likely cause is that the Entity Link between the Session Managers is missing on the NRP
Entity Link page.
To fix this problem, add the correct Entity Link between the two Session Managers. The alarm
message should identify which Session Managers experienced the “Can't Route Through” problem
SAL Agent sanity check failed
The periodic maintenance sanity check of the SAL Agent has failed and possibly Session Manager
alarming service is not running.
The troubleshooting actions are performed on both Session Manager and System Manager. Root
privilege is required only for the System Manager corrective action.
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SAL Agent sanity check failed
Troubleshooting SAL Agent sanity check failure
Procedure
1. For Session Manager:
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Maintenance Tests.
b. Select the affected Session Manager instance from the Select Target list.
c. Select the Test sanity of Secure Access Link (SAL) agent test.
d. Click Execute Selected Tests
e. If the test passes, clear the alarm. The problem no longer exists, and nothing further
needs to be done.
f. If the test fails, establish an SSH connection to the Session Manager using either the
craft login (Avaya) or an established customer login.
g. Run statapp to verify the status of sal-agent.
h. If the status of sal-agent is Down, run restart sal-agent and wait for the sal-agent
service to restart.
i. If the status of sal-agent is Partially Up, wait for the status to change to completely Up.
j. Run statapp to verify the status of sal-agent.
k. Rerun the Test sanity of Secure Access Link (SAL) agent test.
l. If the test still fails, reboot the Session Manager server using the reboot option on the
Session Manager > Dashboard page.
2. For System Manager: (requires root privilege)
a. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Tools > Maintenance Tests.
b. Select System Manager from the Select Target list.
c. Select the Test sanity of Secure Access Link (SAL) agent test.
d. Click Execute Selected Tests
e. If the test passes, clear the alarm. The problem no longer exists, and nothing further
needs to be done.
f. Run service spiritAgent status to verify if the SAL agent service is running.
g. If the Postgres service is up, nothing further needs to be done.
h. If the service is down, run service spiritAgent restart to restart service.
i. Wait for the SAL Agent service to restart.
j. Run service spiritAgent status to verify that the SAL agent service is running.
k. Rerun the Test sanity of Secure Access Link (SAL) agent test.
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l. If the test still fails, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Security Module Management Agent unable to configure
Security Module
The management configuration of the Security Module is failing. Without the configuration, the
Security Module will not setup the network configuration for accepting SIP connections.
Troubleshooting unable to configure Security Module
Procedure
1. On System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System Tools
> Maintenance Tests.
2. Run the Test Security Module Status maintenance test for the failing Session Manager to
verify the sanity of the Security Module.
3. Select Elements > Session Manager > System Status > Security Module Status.
4. If the test passes and the Status for the Session Manager instance is Up, clear the alarm.
The problem no longer exists.
5. If the test fails or if the Status is Down:
a. Select the appropriate Session Manager instance from the System Name list.
b. Select the Security Module Reset button.
Warning:
The Session Manager instance cannot process calls while the security module is
being restarted.
c. Click Refresh to display the current status.
d. Rerun the Test Security Module Status maintenance test in Step 2 for this Session
Manager instance.
Security Module multiple DNS resolutions
The Security Module is provisioned as a DNS name in the Session Manager, but the name resolves
to more than one IP address.
The default behavior is to use the first IP address to which the DNS name maps whether the
address is 26 correct or not. While the system may work just fine, the situation is highly dangerous
in terms of not having a reliable system.
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Security Module Sanity Failure
Troubleshooting Security Module multiple DNS resolution alarms
Procedure
1. Check the IP address in the Session Manager Security Module administration and make
sure it is correct.
2. Check what the name resolves to by entering one of the following commands:
a. Enter host someDNSname where someDNSname is the server name.
b. Use some other equivalent DNS reverse look-up tool such as dig
3. Check /etc/hosts to ensure that the name resolves to the proper single IP address.
The file should have entries in the form of <IP Address> <FQDN> <domain>
4. Fix real DNS to resolve to one IP address.
Security Module Sanity Failure
The Security Module failed a sanity check.
Troubleshooting Security Module Sanity failure
Procedure
1. On the System Manager Web Console, select Elements > Session Manager > System
Status > Security Module Status.
2. Select Refresh to display the current status.
3. Verify that the Status for the indicated Session Manager is Up.
4. Verify that the IP address is correct.
5. If the status is selected as Down, reset the security module:
a. Select the appropriate Session Manager instance from the table.
b. Click Reset.
Warning:
Session Manager cannot process calls while the system resets the security module.
6. Select Refresh to display the current status.
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Service <name of service> has totally failed
The Session Manager watchdog service is unable to start the service specified in the alarm
message.
Troubleshooting Session Manager service failure
Procedure
1. Make sure the Session Manager is properly configured for the failing service.
2. Run statapp to see which services are running. Not all monitored services are displayed
with this command.
3. Run /sbin/service <failing-service-name> status to see if the service is running. This
command requires root privilege.
4. If the service is not running, reboot the Session Manager server using the Session Manager
> Dashboard web page.
Warning:
Rebooting the Session Manager server will affect calls.
5. If the problem persists, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Session Manager Instance Resolution
This event occurs when the administration for the Session Manager instance does not match the IP
address of the configured management interface. During this failure, the Session Manager instance
remains unresolved and hence does not service any calls.
Possible causes are:
• The IP address specified in the Session Manager Administration configuration does not match
the IP Address of the Session Manager in the Management Access Point field.
• The IP address of the Security Module was entered in place of the IP address of Session
Manager Management interface.
• The DNS name resolves to multiple IP addresses or no IP addresses.
Troubleshooting Session Manager Resolution Alarms
Procedure
1. Check the IP address in the Session Manager Administration’s Management Access Point
Host Name/IP field:
a. Enter /sbin/ifconfig
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Switched Session Manager
b. The IP address should match the eth0 IP address of the Session Manager instance.
2. If the Management Access Point Host Name/IP is a DNS name, check what it resolves to
using one of the following commands:
a. Enter host someDNSname where someDNSname is the server name.
b. Use some other DNS reverse lookup tool such as dig.
3. Check the /etc/hosts file on the Session Manager to ensure that the name resolves to the
proper, single IP address. The file should have entries in the form of <IP Address> <FQDN>
<hostname>.
4. If the information in the /etc/hosts file is incorrect or missing:
a. Log in to System Platform Web Console.
b. Select Server Management > Network Configuration
c. Verify the administration information or correct as needed.
d. Log out of System Platform Web Console.
Switched Session Manager
About this task
Session Manager has switched to a different System Manager.
Procedure
1. Find out the System Manager Geographic Redundancy mode.
2. Verify whether the switch over was due to a manual process using the System Manager web
console.
3. Verify that the failed over System Manager is in Active mode.
4. Verify that the failed from System manager is not in Active mode. Then this might have
caused the alarm.
5. Verify whether or not the Session Manager has network connectivity with the switching from
System Manager.
SIP Firewall actions
If administration has configured SIP firewall rules with logs or alarms, all received SIP messages
matching that rule will cause an alarm notification trap to be sent if the alarm option is set.
The log or alarm message includes the following information:
• The action taken on the SIP message.
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• The matched rule name.
• An administration-customized message.
• The transport protocol over which the message was received.
• Originating host address or port.
• Destination host address or port.
For rules with track operation, the system displays the concrete track value. You can use these
logging details to further analyze and mitigate threats to the system.
Troubleshooting SIP Firewall actions alarms
About this task
Complete the following steps if the system displays too many matched-rule log or alarm messages.
Procedure
1. Review the log/alarm messages.
2. Consider additional changes to the SIP Firewall configuration to reduce messages.
See SIP Firewall Configuration section of Administering Avaya Aura® Session Manager,
03-603324.
SIP firewall configuration
Configuration failures are serious and cause alarms. When the system generates alarms, the
system displays information about the failure: effected list, list rule number, and some rule details.
Configuration failure is not an expected occurrence.
Troubleshooting SIP Firewall Configuration Alarms
Procedure
1. Refer to the Configuring SIP Firewall section of Administering Avaya Aura® Session
Manager at http://support.avaya.com/css/P8/documents/100068081 to ensure that the rule is
correctly configured.
2. If the problem persists, report the problem to Avaya Technical Support.
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SIP FW Block flow action summary log
SIP FW Block flow action summary log
The system generates a summary log whenever the SIPFW is stopping a block attack. For example,
when the system detects an attack that must be stopped or goes below the predefined threshold.
This log contains information on the packet dropped during the blocking period.
SIP Monitor Alarm
The alarmed SIP entity is not successfully responding to SIP OPTIONS requests.
A SIP entity can be reachable through several addresses, depending on Local Host Name
Resolution administration and DNS address resolution.
If the state of the entity is down, none of the entity addresses respond to OPTIONS requests
successfully.
If the state of the entity is partially up, at least one of the entity addresses is responding
successfully and at least one address is not responding successfully.
The SIP Monitoring Status page on the System Manager provides more detail, including the status
of the entity’s various addresses and the response codes returned by the various addresses. The
response codes are the standard SIP responses according to RFC 3261, section 21.
Troubleshooting SIP Monitoring alarms
Procedure
1. Check the SIP Monitoring Status page for more details.
2. Verify network connectivity exists between Session Manager and the alarmed SIP entity
using the ping command.
3. Using the SIP Tracer tool or a network protocol analyzer such as Wireshark, verify that an
OPTIONS request is sent from the Session Manager to the alarmed entity, and that the
entity responds successfully. A typical response is 200 OK.
SMART configuration change
This event indicates that a disk received a SMART alarm (predictive failure) after a configuration
change. The disk is likely to fail in the near future. See the list of event IDs in S8510 DellR610
hardware and environment alarm events on page 237 for a description and recovery procedure for
hardware event ID 2107.
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Subscription authorization failure for a given user
This event is related to the Eventing Handler functionality of the Subscription processing
component. This alarm means that a user has attempted to subscribe with Session Manager and
failed to provide a valid authorization credential. The system logs a warning after five subscription
attempts fail in one minute.
The credentials provided by the user for the attempted subscription are invalid.
Ensure the provided credentials being provided by the user are correct.
System overheated
This event indicates that the system has overheated.
Troubleshooting system overheated
Procedure
1. Shut down the system.
2. Check the cooling fan for any malfunction. Replace it if necessary.
3. Check for environmental factors that could contribute to overheating.
4. If the previous steps do not resolve the problem, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Temperature reading errors
This event indicates that the physical disk enclosure temperature has either exceeded the maximum
failure threshold, or has dropped below the minimum failure threshold. It is either too hot, or too
cold. See the list of event IDs in S8510 DellR610 hardware and environment alarm events on
page 237 for a description and recovery procedure for the hardware event ID indicated in the alarm
description, either 2102 or 2103.
Unexpected data
The system detects unexpected data the database. During this period, the invalid data will not be
actualized in the running Session Manager.
Possible causes are:
• Administration data that was not properly checked for errors by the system.
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User failed over, manual failback mode
• Incorrect data that was written directly into the database. For example, if you enter a digit
pattern that is 5555 and set the minimum and maximum limits to 3. The limit must be set to at
least 4.
To correct the problem:
1. Check any recent administration relating to the suggested configuration pages of the alarm.
2. If the problem persists, contact Avaya Global Services.
User failed over, manual failback mode
This event occurs when one or more users fail over to their nonprimary, redundant Session
Manager and the Global failback policy is set to manual.
Manual failback policy means that without manual intervention, the failed over users stays on this
nonprimary Session Manager forever. This event reflects a notification of a potential problem and
not loss in service.
You can find the primary Session Manager defined on the User administration page in
Communication Profile and Session Manager Profile section as the first drop-down menu.
The possible causes for this event are:
• The primary Session Manager is not running.
• The user lost connectivity with the primary Session Manager due to network issues or any
other reason.
• The primary Session Manager is currently in the Deny New Service state.
• The primary Session Manager is currently overloaded.
• The primary Session Manager is in an error state which is preventing the user from receiving
service from it.
Troubleshooting User failed over, manual failback mode
Procedure
1. Make sure the Session Manager is up and running.
2. Verify the Session Manager is in the Accept New Service state.
3. Check the SIP Entity Monitoring page to see if there are any network connectivity problems
to the primary Session Manager.
4. Using the User Registration page:
a. Find the affected users.
b. Select the affected users.
c. Click the Failback button.
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5. Change the Global Failback Policy on the Session Manager Administration screen from
Manual to Auto.
6. If none of these steps work, contact your Avaya support representative.
User failed over to Branch Survivability Server
This event occurs when one or more users fail over to their branch survivability server due to a loss
of connectivity with their core Session Managers. Users active on the Survivable Remote Session
Manager (BSM) do not receive the full service of the core. The only sequenced application available
in survivability mode is the Communication Manager application for the Communication Manager
subtended by the branch. To place calls from a branch SIP user to a user outside the branch, dial
the call using the public number of the user. To place calls to a branch SIP user from outside the
branch, dial the public number.
The possible causes are:
• Lost connectivity between the branch and core.
• Had partial network outages.
• The core Session Managers are overloaded.
• The core Session Managers are in the Deny New Service state.
• The core Session Managers are in an error state which is preventing consistent survivability
state service.
Troubleshooting User failed over to Branch Survivability Server
Procedure
1. Make sure the core Session Managers are operational.
2. Restore network connectivity between the branch and core.
3. Verify the Session Managers are in the Accept New Service state.
4. Check the SIP Entity Monitoring page to see if there are any network connectivity problems
with the primary and secondary Session Managers.
5. Once the core Session Managers are available to the users to provide service, initiate a
failback to move the users active on Session Manager from the Branch Session Manager to
the Primary Session Manager. The failback of the users is based on the failback policy of the
LSP in the branch. When the LSP fails back, the users will follow. For ways to administer
failback and activate failback on a system, see Communication Manager documentation.
6. If none of these steps work, call Avaya Technical Support.
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Version Error in Configuration File
Version Error in Configuration File
The installation configuration file is either missing version information, or it contains a version string
with an unrecognized format.
The possible causes are:
• The installation process failed to install the proper configuration file.
• The configuration file has become corrupted.
Troubleshooting version error in configuration file
Procedure
1. View or edit the contents of /opt/Avaya/install.properties. There should be a
similar entry as shown below:
Release=2.0.0.0.13001
2. If this entry is not present, add the entry with the correct version number for the software
load on the system.
Note:
The occurrence of this condition is unusual and may indicate a more significant problem
with the installation of the system. Check for other installation problems.
Zone File I/O
Zone files are written to the local file system to reflect the host name resolution data administered on
the Local Host Name Resolution page. The Security Module uses this data when performing DNS
resolution.
A Zone File I/O alarm indicates that an error occurred while trying to access the file system to read
or write data for zone files. Possible causes include:
• Missing directories.
• Permission errors.
• No space on the disk.
• Other errors that cause failure in the attempt to read or write to the zone files.
Troubleshooting Zone File I/O Alarms
About this task
To troubleshoot the error, you must log on using the root user.
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Procedure
1. Verify that the master directory exists:
a. Enter ls -ltr /var/named/ | grep master
b. If the directory does not exist, enter mkdir /var/named/master
2. Check the /var/named/master directory for problems such as missing, permission errors:
a. Enter ls -ltr /var/named/ | grep master
The output should be similar to drwxr-x--x 2 root root 4096 Apr 16 11:52 master
b. If the permissions are not drwxr-x--x, enter chmod 751 /var/named/master
c. If the file ownership is not root, enter chown root /var/named/master
d. If the group is not root, enter chgrp root /var/named/master
3. Ensure there is enough space on the disk:
a. Enter df
b. If the Use% value is greater than 95%, remove any unnecessary large and old log files
on the system.
First check the log files in /var/log/Avaya/sm and ensure their size is not too large
more than 100 MB.
4. Ensure that the file /etc/named.nre.zones exists:
a. Enter ls -l /etc/named.nre.zones
The output should be similar to -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 219 Apr 16 11:52 /etc/
named.nre.zones
b. If the file does not exist, create the file with the command > /etc/named.nre.zones
c. If the permissions are not -rw-r--r--, enter chmod 644 /etc/named.nre.zones
d. If the file ownership is not root, enter chown root /etc/named.nre.zones
e. If the group is not root, enter chgrp root /etc/named.nre.zones
5. If the above steps do not solve the problem, contact Avaya Technical Support.
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Appendix B: S8510 and Dell R610 Server
alarms
S8510/DellR610 hardware and environment alarm events
The hardware and environment alarms are the same for the S8510 and Dell R610 servers. The Dell
R610 is a replacement for the S8510 server.
The following table contains a list of the server hardware and environment monitoring alarms. All of
the failure events are major alarms. The table contains information regarding the Event ID, the
severity of the event, and a link to the description and recovery action.
The alarm message for hard disk drives contains the disk number of the failing or failed drive. An
example of an alarm message for Event ID 2048:
Storage Service EventID: 2048 Device failed: Physical disk 0:0:1 Controller 0, Connector 0
The LED display on the server indicates which disk failed or is failing.
Table 3: List of Event ID, severity of the event, and link to the description and recovery action
Event ID
Severity
Description or action
1354
Major
Instrumentation Service EventID: 1354 Power supply detected a failure.
See Power supply detected a failure on page 239.
2048
Major
Storage Service EventID: 2048 Device failed. See Device failed on
page 239.
2056
Major
Storage Service EventID: 2056 Virtual disk failed. See Virtual disk failed on
page 239.
2057
Major
Storage Service EventID: 2057 Virtual disk degraded. See Virtual disk
degraded on page 239.
2076
Major
Storage Service EventID: 2076 Virtual disk check consistency failed. See
Virtual disk check consistency failed on page 240.
2080
Major
Storage Service EventID: 2080 Array disk initialize failed. See Physical disk
initialize failed on page 240.
2083
Major
Storage Service EventID: 2083 Array disk rebuild failed. See Physical disk
rebuild failed on page 240.
2102
Major
Service EventID: 2102 Temperature exceeded the maximum failure
threshold. See Temperature exceeded maximum threshold on page 241.
Table continues…
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Event ID
Severity
Description or action
2103
Major
Service EventID: 2103 Temperature dropped below the minimum failure
threshold. See Temperature dropped below minimum threshold on
page 241.
2107
Major
Service EventID: 2107 Smart configuration change. See SMART
configuration change on page 241.
2163
Major
Service EventID: 2163 Rebuild completed with errors. See Rebuild
completed with errors on page 241.
2169
Major
Storage Service EventID 2169: The controller battery needs to be replaced.
See Controller battery needs to be replaced on page 242.
2268
Major
Service EventID: 2268 Storage Management has lost communication. See
Storage Management has lost communication on page 242.
2270
Major
Service EventID: 2270 Clear operation failed. See Physical disk Clear
operation failed on page 242.
2272
Major
Service EventID: 2272 Uncorrectable media error detected. See
Uncorrectable media error detected on page 243.
2273
Major
Service EventID: 2273 Physical disk puncture. See Physical disk
puncture on page 243.
2282
Major
Service EventID: 2283 Hot spare SMART polling failed. See Hot spare
SMART polling failed on page 244.
2289
Major
Service EventID: 2289 Multi-bit ECC error. See Multi-bit ECC error on
page 244.
2299
Major
Service EventID: 2299 Bad physical connection
Bad physical connection on page 244.
238
2307
Major
Service EventID: 2307 Bad block table is full. See Bad block table is full on
page 245.
2320
Major
Service EventID: 2320 Single-bit ECC error. See Single-bit ECC error on
page 245.
2321
Major
Service EventID: 2321 Single-bit ECC error, no further alerts. See Singlebit ECC error, no further alerts on page 245.
2340
Major
Service EventID: BGI completed with uncorrectable errors. See BGI
completed with uncorrectable errors on page 202.
2347
Major
Service EventID: 2347 Rebuild failed on source physical disk. See Rebuild
failed on source physical disk on page 246.
2348
Major
Service EventID: 2348 Rebuild failed on target physical disk. See Rebuild
failed on target physical disk on page 246.
2349
Major
Service EventID: 2349 Bad disk block could not be reassigned. See Bad
disk block could not be reassigned on page 247.
2350
Major
Service EventID: 2350 Unrecoverable disk media error during rebuild. See
Unrecoverable disk media error during rebuild on page 247.
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Power supply detected a failure
Power supply detected a failure
A power supply is disconnected or failed. The system displays the following information:
• Sensor location: the location in chassis
• Chassis location: the name of chassis
• Previous state was: the state
• Power Supply type: the type of power supply
• <Additional power supply status info>
• Configuration error type: (if in configuration error state, the type of configuration error)
Troubleshooting a power supply failure
Procedure
1. Check if the power supply is disconnected.
2. If the power supply is connected but nonfunctional, replace the power supply.
Device failed
A storage component such as a physical disk failed.
1. Replace the failed component.
2. Perform a rescan after replacing a disk.
Virtual disk failed
One or more physical disks included in the virtual disk failed.
1. Replace the failed disk.
2. Create a new virtual disk and restore from a backup.
Virtual disk degraded
The possible causes of a virtual disk degradation:
• A physical disk in the disk group has been removed.
• A physical disk included in a redundant virtual disk has failed.
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Troubleshooting a virtual disk degradation
Procedure
1. If a physical disk was removed from the disk group:
a. Replace the disk or restore the original disk.
b. Perform a rescan after replacing the disk.
2. If a physical disk included in a redundant virtual disk has failed:
a. Configure a hot spare for the virtual disk if one is not already configured.
b. Rebuild the virtual disk.
When using an Expandable RAID Controller (PERC) PERC 3/SC, 3/DCL, 3/DC, 3/QC,
4/SC, 4DC, 4eDC, 4/Di, CERC ATA100/4ch, PERC5/E, PERC5/i or a Serial Attache
SCSI (SAS) 5/iR controller, rebuild the virtual disk by first configuring a hot spare for the
disk, then initiating a write operation to the disk. The write operation will initiate a rebuild
of the disk.
Virtual disk check consistency failed
A physical disk in the virtual disk failed or there is an error in the parity information.
1. Replace the failed physical disk.
2. Rebuild the physical disk.
3. When the rebuild is finished, restart the check consistency operation.
Physical disk initialize failed
The physical disk failed or is corrupt.
1. Replace the failed or corrupt disk.
2. Restart the initialization.
Physical disk rebuild failed
A physical disk in the virtual disk has failed or is corrupt, or a user may have cancelled the rebuild.
1. Replace the failed or corrupt disk.
2. Rebuild the virtual disk.
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Temperature exceeded maximum threshold
Temperature exceeded maximum threshold
The temperature has exceeded the maximum failure threshold. The physical disk enclosure is too
hot. The possible causes are: a fan may have failed, the thermostat may be set too high, or the
room temperature may be too hot.
Check for the following factors which may cause overheating:
• Verify the fan is working.
• Check the thermostat settings.
• Check if the enclosure is near a heat source.
• Make sure the enclosure has enough ventilation.
• Make sure the room is not too hot.
• See the physical disk enclosure documentation for more diagnostic information.
Temperature dropped below minimum threshold
The temperature has dropped below the minimum failure threshold. The physical disk enclosure is
too cool.
• Check if the thermostat setting is too low.
• Check if the room temperature is too cool.
SMART configuration change
A disk has received a SMART alert (predictive failure) after a configuration change. The disk is likely
to fail in the near future.
• If the physical disk is a member of a non-redundant virtual disk, back up the data on the disk
that received the SMART alert.
• Replace the disk that has received the SMART alert.
Rebuild completed with errors
In some situations, a rebuild may complete successfully while also reporting errors. This may occur
when a portion of the disk containing redundant (parity) information is damaged.
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Restoring data from a rebuild which completed with errors
About this task
The rebuild process can restore data from the healthy portions of the disk but not from the damaged
portion. If the backup on the virtual disk is successful, the user data on the virtual disk has not been
damaged.
If the backup encounters errors, the user data has been damaged and cannot be recovered from the
virtual disk. In this case, the only possibility for recovery is to restore from a previous backup of the
virtual disk.
Procedure
1. Backup the degraded virtual disk.
a. If the backup is successful, continue with Step 2.
b. If the backup encounters errors, restore from a previous backup of the virtual disk.
2. Perform a consistency check on the virtual disk that you have backed up.
3. Restore the virtual disk onto the healthy array disks.
Controller battery needs to be replaced
The controller battery cannot recharge. The battery may be old or the charger may not be working.
Replace the battery pack.
Storage Management has lost communication
%1 Storage Management has lost communication with the controller. The controller driver or
firmware may be experiencing a problem. The %1 in the message is a substitution variable which
displays text and varies depending on the situation.
• Reboot the system.
• If the problem is not resolved, contact Avaya Technical Support.
Physical disk Clear operation failed
A Clear task was being performed on a physical disk but the task did not complete successfully. The
controller may have lost communication with the disk, the disk may have been removed, or the
cables may be loose or defective.
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Uncorrectable media error detected
Troubleshooting a disk clear failure
Procedure
1. Verify that the disk is present and not in a failed state.
2. Make sure the cables are attached securely.
3. Restart the clear task.
Uncorrectable media error detected
The Patrol Read task encountered an error that cannot be corrected. The reason might be a bad
disk block that cannot be remapped.
Troubleshooting an uncorrectable media error
Procedure
1. Backup the data.
2. If you are able to back up the data successfully:
a. Fully initialize the disk.
b. Restore from backup.
Physical disk puncture
A block on the physical disk has been punctured by the controller.
The controller encountered an unrecoverable medium error when attempting to read a block on the
physical disk and marked that block as invalid. If the controller encountered an unrecoverable
medium error on a source physical disk during a rebuild or reconfigure operation, the controller also
punctures the corresponding block on the target physical disk. The invalid block is cleared on a write
operation.
The only action that can be taken is to backup the data.
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Hot spare SMART polling failed
The controller firmware attempted a SMART polling on the hot spare but was unable to complete it.
The controller has lost communication with the hot spare.
Restoring communication with hot spare
Procedure
1. Check the health of the disk assigned as a hot spare.
2. If the disk assigned as a hot spare is not in a functional state:
a. Replace the faulty disk.
b. Reassign the hot spare.
3. Make sure the cables are securely attached.
Multi-bit ECC error
The system encountered an error involving multiple bits during a read or write operation, indicating
data loss.
Resolving a Multi-bit ECC error
Procedure
1. See the hardware documentation for information on replacing the dual in-line memory
module (DIMM).
The DIMM is a part of the controller battery pack.
2. Replace the DIMM.
3. You may need to restore data from backup.
Bad physical connection
The message Bad PHY %1 indicates a problem with a physical connection or PHY. The %1 is a
text string which varies depending on the situation.
Contact Avaya Technical Support.
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Bad block table is full
Bad block table is full
The bad block table is used for remapping bad disk blocks. When the table is full, bad disk blocks
can no longer be remapped, disk errors can no longer be corrected, and data loss occurs. The %1
in the message indicates which block is bad - Unable to log block %1.
Resolving a bad block table error
Procedure
1. Replace the disk which is generating this alert.
2. If necessary, restore your data from backup.
Single-bit ECC error
The DIMM is malfunctioning. Data loss or data corruption may be imminent.
Resolving a single-bit ECC error
Procedure
1. See your hardware documentation for information on replacing the DIMM.
The DIMM is a part of the controller battery pack.
2. Replace the DIMM immediately to avoid data loss or data corruption.
Single-bit ECC error, no further alerts
The DIMM is malfunctioning. Data loss or data corruption is imminent. No further alerts will be
generated.
Resolving a single-bit ECC error
Procedure
1. See your hardware documentation for information on replacing the DIMM.
The DIMM is a part of the controller battery pack.
2. Replace the DIMM immediately to avoid data loss or data corruption.
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BGI completed with uncorrectable errors
The BGI encountered errors that cannot be corrected. The virtual disk contains physical disks that
have either unusable disk space or disk errors that cannot be corrected.
For a description and the recovery procedure for hardware event ID 2340, see the list of event IDs in
S8510 DellR610 hardware and environment alarm events on page 237.
Troubleshooting BGI uncorrectable errors
Procedure
1. Review other alert messages to identify the physical disk that has errors.
2. Replace the physical disk that contains the disk errors.
3. If the virtual disk is redundant, you can replace the physical disk and continue using the
virtual disk.
4. If the virtual disk is non-redundant, recreate the virtual disk after replacing the physical disk.
5. Run Check Consistency to check the data after replacing the disk.
Rebuild failed on source physical disk
The rebuild failed due to errors on the source physical disk. You are attempting to rebuild data on a
disk that is defective.
1. Replace the source disk.
2. Restore from backup.
Rebuild failed on target physical disk
The rebuild failed due to errors on the target physical disk. You are attempting to rebuild data on a
disk that is defective.
Resolving a target rebuild failure
Procedure
1. Replace the target disk.
2. If a rebuild does not automatically start after replacing the disk, initiate the rebuild task.
3. If the rebuild still does not start, assign the new disk as a hot spare to initiate the rebuild.
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Bad disk block could not be reassigned
Bad disk block could not be reassigned
A bad disk block could not be reassigned during a write operation.
A write operation remains incomplete because the disk contains bad disk blocks which could not be
reassigned. Data loss may have occurred and data redundancy may also be lost.
The only corrective action for this error is to replace the disk.
Unrecoverable disk media error during rebuild
The rebuild encountered an unrecoverable disk media error.
Replace the disk. There is no other corrective action for this error.
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Appendix C: S8800 Alarm Messages
The following table contains alarm messages for the S8800 server:
Table 4: Alarm messages for the S8800 server
Severity
Description
Major
Temperature sensor Ambient Temp Upper Critical going high (Reading 45
> Threshold 41 degrees C)
Major
Voltage sensor Planar 3.3V Upper Critical going high (Reading 3.59 >
Threshold 3.56 Volts)
Major
Voltage sensor Planar 3.3V Lower Critical going low (Reading 3.01 <
Threshold 3.04 Volts)
Major
Voltage sensor Planar 5V Upper Critical going high (Reading 5.63 >
Threshold 5.58 Volts)
Major
Voltage sensor Planar 5V Lower Critical going low (Reading 4.43 <
Threshold 4.47 Volts)
Major
Voltage sensor Planar 12V Upper Critical going high (Reading 13.55 >
Threshold 13.45 Volts)
Major
Voltage sensor Planar 12V Lower Critical going low (Reading 10.58 <
Threshold 10.69 Volts)
Major
Voltage sensor Planar VBAT Lower Critical going low (Reading 2.07 <
Threshold 2.10 Volts)
Major
Fan sensor Fan 1A Tach Lower Critical going low (Reading 424 <
Threshold 530 RPM)
Major
Power Supply sensor Power Supply 1 - Failure detected Asserted
Major
Power Supply sensor Power Supply 2 - Failure detected Asserted
Major
Power Supply sensor Power Supply 1 - Power Supply AC lost Asserted
Major
Power Supply sensor Power Supply 2 - Power Supply AC lost Asserted
Major
Power Supply sensor Power Unit - Redundancy Lost
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 0 - Drive Present Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 1 - Drive Present Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 0 - Drive Fault Asserted
Table continues…
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Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 1 - Drive Fault Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 0 - Predictive Failure Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 1 - Predictive Failure Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 0 - In Critical Array Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 1 - In Critical Array Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 0 - In Failed Array Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 1 - In Failed Array Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 0 - Rebuild Aborted Asserted
Major
Drive Slot sensor Drive 1 - Rebuild Aborted Asserted
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Appendix D: S8800 Server Light path
diagnostics
About light path diagnostics
Light path diagnostics is a system of LEDs on various external and internal components of the
server. When an error occurs, LEDs light up throughout the server. By viewing the LEDs in a
particular order, you can often identify the source of the error.
When LEDs light up to indicate an error, they remain lit when the server is turned off, provided that
the server is still connected to a power source and the power supply is operating correctly.
Using light path diagnostics to identify system errors
About this task
If an error occurs, view the light path diagnostics LEDs in the following order:
Procedure
1. Look at the operator information panel on the front of the server. Check if the information
LED or system error LED lights up.
2. View the light path diagnostics panel. Lit LEDs on this panel indicate the type of error that
has occurred.
Important:
The checkpoint code display does not provide error codes or suggest components to be
replaced. The checkpoint code is an internal code used for IBM development only and is
subject to change over time. Ignore this code unless you have a specific request from
Avaya to note it.
3. Remove the server cover while the server is connected to power and look inside the server
for lit LEDs.
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Operator information panel
Important:
Always use an electrostatic-discharge wrist strap or other grounding system when you
work inside the server. For more information, see Protecting against ESD damage on
page 27.
Certain components inside the server have LEDs that light up to indicate the location of a
problem. For some components, such as dual inline memory modules (DIMMs) and fans,
these LEDs can help you identify the problem. For other components, these LEDs are not
useful.
Orange on a component or an orange label on or near a component indicates that the
component can be hot-swapped, which means that you can remove or install the component
while the server is running. Orange can also indicate touch points on hot-swap components.
See the instructions for removing or installing a specific hot-swap component for any
additional procedures that you might have to perform before you remove or install the
component.
Related Links
Accessing the light path diagnostics panel on page 253
Removing the server cover on page 180
Operator information panel on page 251
System board LEDs on page 260
Operator information panel
The operator information panel is located on the front of the server.
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
1
Power control button cover
2
Ethernet icon LED
3
Ethernet activity LEDs
These LEDs indicate that the server is transmitting or receiving signals on the Ethernet
port that corresponds to the lit LED.
4
Information LED
This LED indicates that a noncritical event has occurred. An LED on the light path
diagnostics panel also lights up to help isolate the error.
5
System error LED
This LED indicates that a system error has occurred. An LED on the light path
diagnostics panel also lights up to help isolate the error.
6
Release latch
Slide this latch to the left to access the light path diagnostics panel, which is behind the
operator information panel.
7
Locator button and LED
Use this LED to visually locate the server among other servers. It is also used as the
physical presence for Trusted Platform Module (TPM). Press this button to turn on or
turn off this LED locally. You can use IBM Systems Director to light this LED remotely.
A system locator LED on the back of the server also lights up when this LED lights up.
8
Ethernet activity LEDs
These LEDs indicate that the server is transmitting or receiving signals on the Ethernet
port that corresponds to the lit LED.
9
Power control button and power-on LED
Press this button to turn the server on and off. The states of the power-on LED are:
• Off: AC power is not present, or the power supply or the LED itself has failed.
• Flashing rapidly (4 times per second): the server is turned off and is not ready to be
turned on. The power-control button is disabled. The power-control button becomes
active approximately three minutes after the server is connected to AC power.
• Flashing slowly (once per second): the server is turned off and is ready to be turned
on. You can press the power-control button to turn on the server.
• Lit: The server is turned on.
Note:
If this LED is off, do not assume that electrical power is absent in the server. The
LED might be burned out. To remove all electrical power from the server, you must
disconnect the power cord from the electrical outlet.
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Accessing the light path diagnostics panel
Accessing the light path diagnostics panel
The light path diagnostics panel is on the top of the operator information panel.
Procedure
1. Slide the blue release button on the operator information panel to the left. Pull forward on the
unit until the hinge of the operator panel is free of the server chassis.
2. Pull down on the unit, so that you can view the light path diagnostics panel information.
1
Operator information panel
2
Light path diagnostics LEDs
3
Release latch
3. Note any LEDs that light up, and then reinstall the light path diagnostics panel in the server.
Important:
When you slide the light path diagnostics panel out of the server to check the LEDs, do
not run the server continuously with light path diagnostics panel outside of the server.
The panel should be outside of the server for only a short time. The light path
diagnostics panel must remain in the server when the server is running to ensure proper
cooling.
Related Links
Light path diagnostics panel on page 253
Light path diagnostics panel
1
Remind button
Table continues…
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
Pressing this button places the system-error LED on the front panel into Remind mode.
In Remind mode, the system-error LED flashes once every 2 seconds until the problem
is corrected, the server is restarted, or a new problem occurs.
By placing the system-error LED indicator in Remind mode, you acknowledge that you
are aware of the last failure but will not take immediate action to correct the problem.
The Integrated Management Module (IMM) controls the remind function.
2
NMI button
Pressing this button forces a nonmaskable interruption to the microprocessor. You might
have to use a pen or the end of a straightened paper clip to press the button. Use this
button only when directed by your service provider.
3
Checkpoint code display
The checkpoint code is an internal code used for IBM development only and is subject
to change over time. The checkpoint code does not provide error codes or suggest
components to be replaced. Ignore this code unless you have a specific request from
Avaya to note it .
4
Reset button
Pressing this button resets the server and runs the power-on self-test (POST). You
might have to use a pen or the end of a straightened paper clip to press the button. The
Reset button is in the lower-right corner of the light path diagnostics panel.
Troubleshooting light path diagnostic LEDs
OVERSPEC LED lights up
The OVERSPEC LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when the power supplies are
using more power than their maximum rating.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check the power-supply LEDs for an error indication. For example, AC LED and DC LED do
not both light up, or the information LED lights up. Replace a failed power supply.
2. Replace the server.
Related Links
Removing a power supply on page 172
Installing a power supply on page 173
Power supply LEDs on page 263
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Troubleshooting light path diagnostic LEDs
LOG LED lights up
The LOG LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when an error occurs.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. If any replaceable components need to be replaced, replace them.
2. If a faulty component is not replaceable, replace the server.
LINK LED lights up
The LINK LED on the light path diagnostics panel is not used.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Ignore unless directed otherwise by Avaya.
PS LED lights up
The PS LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when power supply 1 or power supply 2
fails.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check the power supply LEDs for an error indication. For example, AC LED and DC LED do
not both light up.
2. Make sure that the power supplies are seated correctly.
3. Remove one of the power supplies to isolate the failed power supply.
4. Replace the failed power supply.
Related Links
Removing a power supply on page 172
Installing a power supply on page 173
Power supply LEDs on page 263
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
PCI LED lights up
The PCI LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when an error occurs on a PCI bus or on
the system board. An additional LED lights up next to a failing PCI slot.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check the LEDs on the PCI slots to identify the component that caused the error.
2. If you have a monitor, check the system error log for information about the error.
3. If you cannot isolate the failing PCIe card by using the LEDs and the information in the
system error log, remove one card at a time from the failing PCI bus. Restart the server after
each card is removed.
4. Reseat the failing PCIe card.
5. Replace the server.
SP LED lights up
The SP LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when an error occurs on the service
processor.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Disconnect the server from the power source, and then reconnect the server to the power
source and restart the server.
2. Report this error to your service provider for possible server replacement.
FAN LED lights up
The FAN LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when a fan fails, is operating too slowly,
or has been removed. The TEMP LED might also light up.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Reseat the failing fan, which is indicated by a lit LED near the fan connector on the system
board.
2. Replace the server.
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Troubleshooting light path diagnostic LEDs
TEMP LED lights up
The TEMP LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when the system temperature exceeds
a threshold level. A failing fan can cause the TEMP LED to light up.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Make sure that the room temperature is not too high.
2. Make sure that the air vents are not blocked.
3. Determine whether a fan has failed. If it has, replace the server.
MEM LED lights up
The MEM LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when a memory configuration is invalid
or a memory error occurs (both the MEM LED and CNFG LED might light up).
Troubleshooting steps when both MEM LED and CNFG LED light up
Procedure
1. Make sure that the DIMM configuration is supported.
2. Replace the DIMMs with a supported configuration.
Related Links
Removing a memory module on page 168
Installing a memory module on page 169
Sequence for populating DIMM connectors on page 167
Troubleshooting steps when only MEM LED lights up
Procedure
• If the server did not boot and a failing DIMM LED lights up:
1. If you have a monitor, check for a PFA log event in the system event log .
2. Reseat the DIMM.
3. If the problem still exists, move the DIMM to a different slot.
4. Look at the DIMM LEDs on the system board:
- If the DIMM LED that corresponds to the new DIMM socket lights up, replace the
DIMM.
- If the DIMM LED that corresponds to the original DIMM socket lights up, replace the
server.
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
• If the server booted, the failing DIMM is disabled, and the DIMM LED lights up:
1. If the LEDs light up by two DIMMs and you have a monitor, check the system event log for
a PFA event for one of the DIMMs, and then replace that DIMM. Otherwise, replace both
DIMMs
2. If the LED lights up by only one DIMM, replace that DIMM.
Related Links
Removing a memory module on page 168
Installing a memory module on page 169
Sequence for populating DIMM connectors on page 167
System board LEDs on page 260
NMI LED lights up
The NMI LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when a nonmaskable interruption occurs,
or you press the NMI button.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. If you have a monitor, check the system event log for information about the error.
2. Shut down the server and remove the power cord.
3. Check that all plug-in cards and devices are firmly installed.
4. Turn on the server.
5. If the server does not boot, replace the server.
CNFG LED lights up
The CNFG LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when a hardware configuration error
occurs. This LED is used with the MEM and CPU LEDs.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check that the memory modules are installed in the correct sequence.
2. Check that the memory modules are properly seated.
3. Replace the server.
Related Links
Removing a memory module on page 168
Installing a memory module on page 169
Sequence for populating DIMM connectors on page 167
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Troubleshooting light path diagnostic LEDs
CPU LED lights up
When only the CPU LED lights up, a microprocessor has failed.
When the CPU and CNFG LEDs light up, an invalid microprocessor configuration has occurred.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Determine whether the CNFG LED also lights up.
• If the CNFG LED does not light up, a microprocessor has failed.
• If the CNFG LED lights up, then an invalid microprocessor configuration has occurred.
2. Replace the server if the microprocessor has failed.
3. Make sure that the microprocessors are compatible with each other if the microprocessor
configuration is invalid.
The microprocessors must match in speed and cache size. To compare the microprocessor
information, run the Setup utility and select System Information > System Summary >
Processor Details.
VRM LED lights up
The VRM LED on the light path diagnostics panel is not used.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Ignore unless directed otherwise by Avaya.
DASD LED lights up
The DASD LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when a hard disk drive fails or is
missing.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check the LEDs on the hard disk drives for the drive with a lit up status LED and reseat the
hard disk drive.
2. If the error remains, replace the hard disk drive and then restart the server.
Related Links
Removing a hard disk drive on page 171
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
Installing a hard disk drive on page 172
Hard disk drive LEDs on page 260
RAID LED lights up
The RAID LED on the light path diagnostics panel is not used.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Ignore unless directed otherwise by Avaya.
BRD LED lights up
The BRD LED on the light path diagnostics panel lights up when an error occurs on the system
board.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Replace the server.
System board LEDs
The following figure shows the LEDs on the system board. A lit LED on or beside a component
identifies the component as the cause of an error.
Hard disk drive LEDs
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Troubleshooting hard disk drives
Troubleshooting hard disk drives
Failed hard disk drive
A hard disk drive has failed, and the associated amber hard disk drive status LED lights up.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Replace the hard disk drive.
Important:
Before replacing the hard disk drive, check the documentation for the application that is running
on the server. You may need to execute specific commands before replacing a hard disk drive.
After you replace a hard disk drive, the rebuild process takes a minimum of 30 minutes.
Related Links
Removing a hard disk drive on page 171
Installing a hard disk drive on page 172
Hard disk drive LEDs on page 260
A newly installed hard disk drive is not recognized
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check the amber status LED for the hard disk drive.
2. If the LED lights up, remove the drive from the bay, wait 45 seconds, and reinsert the drive.
Make sure that the drive assembly connects to the hard disk drive backplane.
3. Check the green activity LED and the amber status LED for the hard disk drive:
• If the green activity LED flashes and the amber status LED does not light up, the drive is
recognized by the RAID controller and is working correctly.
• If the green activity LED flashes and the amber status LED flashes slowly, the drive is
recognized by the RAID controller and is rebuilding.
• If neither LED lights up or flashes, check the hard disk drive backplane (go to next step).
• If the green activity LED flashes and the amber status LED lights up, replace the drive. If
the activity of the LEDs remains the same, go to the next step. If the activity of the LEDs
changes, return to step 1.
4. If the application provides information about the RAID status, access that information.
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
5. Connect a customer-provided keyboard, mouse, and monitor to the server and check the
application syslog for errors.
Related Links
Removing a hard disk drive on page 171
Installing a hard disk drive on page 172
Hard disk drive LEDs on page 260
Multiple hard disk drives fail
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Replace the server.
Multiple hard disk drives are offline
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Replace the server.
A replacement hard disk drive does not rebuild
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Make sure that the hard disk drive is recognized by the RAID controller card (the green hard
disk drive activity LED is flashing).
2. Check the amber status LED for the hard disk drive.
3. If the LED lights up, remove the drive from the bay, wait 45 seconds, and reinsert the drive.
Make sure that the drive assembly connects to the hard disk drive backplane.
4. Check the green activity LED and the amber status LED for the hard disk drive:
• If the green activity LED flashes and the amber status LED does not light up, the drive is
recognized by the RAID controller and is working correctly.
• If the green activity LED flashes and the amber status LED flashes slowly, the drive is
recognized by the RAID controller and is rebuilding.
• If neither LED lights up or flashes, check the hard disk drive backplane (go to next step).
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Power supply LEDs
• If the green activity LED flashes and the amber status LED lights up, replace the drive. If
the activity of the LEDs remains the same, go to the next step. If the activity of the LEDs
changes, return to step 1.
5. Connect a customer-provided keyboard, mouse, and monitor to the server and check the
application syslog for errors.
Related Links
Removing a hard disk drive on page 171
Installing a hard disk drive on page 172
Hard disk drive LEDs on page 260
Power supply LEDs
Power supply LEDs
1
AC LED (green)
2
DC LED (green)
3
Power supply error LED (amber)
Identifying power supply problems
Power supply LEDs
Description
AC
DC
Error
Off
Off
Off
No AC power to the server or a problem with the AC
power source.
This is a normal condition when no AC power is present.
See Server has no AC power on page 264
Off
Off
On
No AC power to the power supply, a problem with the AC
power source, or a failed power supply.
This condition occurs only when a second power supply
is providing power to the server.
See Error LED lights up for one power supply on
page 264
Off
On
Off
Faulty power supply.
See Faulty power supply on page 265
Table continues…
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
Power supply LEDs
Description
AC
DC
Error
Off
On
On
Faulty power supply.
See Faulty power supply on page 265
On
Off
Off
Power supply not fully seated (most typical), faulty power
supply, or faulty system board.
See Power supply AC LED lights up on page 265
On
Off or flashing
On
Faulty power supply.
See Faulty power supply on page 265
On
On
Off
Normal operation
On
On
On
Power supply is faulty but still operational
See Faulty power supply on page 265
Troubleshooting power supply problems
Server has no AC power
All power supply LEDs are off when the server has no AC power.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check the AC power to the server.
2. Make sure that the power cord is connected to a functioning power source.
3. Turn the server off and then turn the server back on.
4. Replace the power supply.
Related Links
Removing a power supply on page 172
Installing a power supply on page 173
Error LED lights up for one power supply
If the power supply Error LED lights up and all other power supply LEDs are off, either the power
supply has no AC power, a problem exists with the AC power source, or the power supply failed.
This condition occurs only when a second power supply is providing power to the server.
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Troubleshooting power supply problems
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Check the AC power to the server.
2. Make sure that the power cord is connected to a functioning power source.
3. Replace the power supply.
Related Links
Removing a power supply on page 172
Installing a power supply on page 173
Power supply LEDs on page 263
Power supply AC LED lights up
If the power supply AC LED lights up and all other power supply LEDs are off, one of three possible
problems exists:
• The power supply is not fully seated (most typical).
• The power supply is faulty.
• The system board is faulty.
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
1. Reseat the power supply.
2. If the 240 V failure LED on the system board does not light up, replace the power supply.
3. If the 240 V failure LED on the system board lights up, replace the server.
Related Links
Removing a power supply on page 172
Installing a power supply on page 173
Power supply LEDs on page 263
System board LEDs on page 260
Faulty power supply
Several LEDs and combinations of LEDs can indicate that a power supply is faulty. The following
table describes these LEDs and LED combinations.
AC
DC
Error
Off
On
Off
Table continues…
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S8800 Server Light path diagnostics
AC
DC
Error
Off
On
On
On
Off or flashing
On
On
On
On
Troubleshooting steps
Procedure
Replace the power supply.
Related Links
Removing a power supply on page 172
Installing a power supply on page 173
Power supply LEDs on page 263
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Appendix E: Product notifications
Avaya issues a product change notice (PCN) for a software update. A PCN accompanies a service
pack or patch that must be applied universally.
Avaya issues a product support notice (PSN) when there is a change in a product. A PSN provides
information such as a workaround for a known problem and steps to recover software.
Both of these types of notices alert you to important issues that directly impact Avaya products.
Viewing PCNs and PSNs
Procedure
1. Go to the Avaya Support website at http://support.avaya.com.
2. Enter your login credentials, if applicable.
3. On the top of the page, click DOCUMENTS.
4. In the Enter your Product Here field, enter the name of the product, then select the product
from the drop-down menu.
5. In the Choose Release field, select the specific release from the drop-down menu.
6. In the list of filters, select the Product Correction Notices and/or Product Support Notices
check box.
Note:
You can select multiple filters to search for different types of documents at one time.
7. Click Enter.
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Product notifications
Registering for product notifications
Note:
This procedure applies only to registered Avaya customers and business partners with an SSO
login.
Procedure
1. Go to the Avaya Support website at http://support.avaya.com.
2. Log in using your SSO credentials.
3. Click on the MY PROFILE link.
4. Click the highlighted HI, <username> tab.
5. Select E Notifications from the menu.
6. In the Product Notifications section:
a. Click Add More Products.
b. Select the appropriate product.
7. In the Product box that appears on your screen:
a. Select the appropriate release or releases for which you want to receive notifications.
b. Select which types of notifications you want to receive. For example, Product Support
Notices and Product Correction Notices (PCN).
c. Click Submit.
8. If you want notifications for other products, select another product from the list and repeat
the above step.
9. Log out.
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Index
Special Characters
, System Manager FQDN .................................................. 145
A
access, remote .................................................................... 28
accessing log harvest .......................................................... 41
access log harvesting .......................................................... 41
access to Session Manager .................................................28
activating agent ....................................................................78
activating serviceability agent .............................................. 78
adding
memory modules on the S8510 ..................................162
adding an SNMP target profile .............................................74
adding disks to S8800 server ............................................ 182
additional disk capacity ......................................................182
administering
CDR on a new Session Manager instance ...................66
Alarm Event Codes ..............................................................40
alarm event ID descriptions ............................................... 190
alarming ............................................................................... 32
Alarm List page ....................................................................36
alarm logs ............................................................................ 60
alarm messages, S8800 .................................................... 248
alarms
CDR ..............................................................................65
events ........................................................................... 32
NFS Disk Space ......................................................... 201
troubleshooting ............................................................. 40
alarms; export ...................................................................... 34
alarms; search ..................................................................... 35
alarm severity descriptions .................................................. 33
alarm test ........................................................................... 154
alarm throttling; configure .................................................... 35
asset.log .............................................................................. 58
authentication file failure ............................................ 212, 213
authorization failure ........................................................... 223
Avaya Learning ....................................................................16
avaya-lsp entry missing ..................................................... 203
B
Backup and Restore page ................................................... 88
backup data ......................................................................... 88
backup data retention .......................................................... 94
backup files; view .................................................................93
bad block table
resolving ..................................................................... 245
bad block table is full ......................................................... 245
bad disk block
could not be reassigned ............................................. 247
bad physical connection .................................................... 244
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battery power low ...............................................................202
BGI completed with uncorrectable errors .................. 202, 246
BGI uncorrectable errors
troubleshooting ........................................................... 246
Branch Survivability server failover failed .......................... 234
BRD LED ........................................................................... 260
BSM entity links administration alarms .............................. 202
ButtonRangesFile .............................................................. 217
C
CAC call denial .................................................................. 203
call_proc.log .........................................................................58
Call Route Test
troubleshootoing a test failure .................................... 140
Call Routing Test ............................................................... 137
results ......................................................................... 139
setting up .................................................................... 139
Call Routing Test page field descriptions .......................... 137
camp-on busyout mode ..................................................... 204
CDR ..................................................................................... 61
administering on a new Session Manager instance ..... 66
alarms ...........................................................................65
data file name ............................................................... 62
enabling for existing Session Manager instance .......... 66
login and password .......................................................63
minimum requirements ................................................. 62
record deletion ..............................................................65
record transfer .............................................................. 63
retrieving data files ....................................................... 64
security provisions ........................................................ 65
CDR Not Operational .........................................................204
Certificate Expiration ..........................................................204
troubleshooting alarms ............................................... 205
Certificate Status ............................................................... 205
troubleshooting alarms ............................................... 205
changing ............................................................................ 145
Maximum Backup Files value .......................................94
Security Module IP address ........................................141
Session Manager IP address or host name ............... 143
System Manager IP address ...................................... 145
changing alarm status ..........................................................34
changing attributes
post-installation ...........................................................141
changing retention interval value ......................................... 99
changing server types ........................................................187
clearing missing file alarm
missing file alarm, clear .............................................. 218
CNFG LED .........................................................................258
commands
restricted .......................................................................21
commands, customer account .............................................19
configuration file .........................................................222, 235
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Index
configuration file product type error ................................... 223
configuration file version error ........................................... 235
configure alarm throttling ..................................................... 35
configuring
Session Manager Serviceability Agent ......................... 69
SIP tracing .................................................................. 128
configuring trap listener ....................................................... 80
connecting
a laptop to the server ....................................................30
connection limit exceeded ................................................. 205
Connections Status
field descriptions .........................................................113
connection status ...............................................................113
controller battery malfunction .............................................206
controller battery needs to be replaced ............................. 242
cooling fan failure ...............................................................206
courses ................................................................................ 16
cover
installing ......................................................................181
removing .....................................................................180
CPU LED ........................................................................... 259
create
log harvesting profile .................................................... 42
create log harvesting profile .................................................42
Create New Profile page ......................................................43
creating an SNMP target profile ...........................................74
creating an SNMPv3 user profile ......................................... 70
creating system data backup on a local server ....................90
customer account commands ..............................................19
D
DASD LED .........................................................................259
dashboard ............................................................................86
data backup
create ............................................................................90
data backup; schedule .........................................................90
data backup from local server ..............................................93
Database Connection
troubleshooting ........................................................... 207
Database Connection error ................................................207
Database DELETE ............................................................ 208
Database INSERT ............................................................. 208
Database Query .................................................................209
Database UPDATE ............................................................209
data distribution and redundancy link test ......................... 118
data distribution down ........................................................206
data distribution down alarm ..............................................206
data replication service ...................................................... 100
data retention .................................................................94, 98
rules ..............................................................................98
Data Retention page ............................................................98
data storage alarm .............................................................220
delete SNMPv3 user profiles ............................................... 71
deleting
filter .............................................................................129
deleting an SNMP target profile ...........................................76
270
deleting an SNMPv3 user profile ......................................... 71
deleting SNMP target profiles .............................................. 76
Dell R610 Server ............................................................... 183
Dell R620 Server ............................................................... 187
device failed .......................................................................239
DIMM air baffle
installing ......................................................................171
removing .....................................................................168
DIMMs
installing ......................................................................169
removing .....................................................................168
sequence for populating ............................................. 167
disk drive data save errors .................................................213
disk drive failed .................................................................. 210
disk drive malfunction ........................................................ 210
disk usage alarm ................................................................220
documentation
related ...........................................................................14
download
harvested log files .........................................................48
downloading harvested log files ...........................................48
DRS ................................................................................... 210
DRS failure due to reinstallation of System Manager ........ 210
DRS synchronization failure .............................................. 210
E
editing an SNMP target profile .............................................75
editing an SNMPve user profile ........................................... 70
editing SNMPv3 user profiles .............................................. 70
ELIN Entity Link Missing .................................................... 214
enabling CDR for existing Session Manager instance .........66
environment
events ......................................................................... 237
equipment
required to replace memory modules ................. 160, 162
equipment required to replace a Hard Disk Drive ..............158
Ethernet port labels ............................................................157
events .................................................................................. 32
server hardware and environment ..............................237
Exceeding Location Bandwidth ..........................................211
troubleshooting ........................................................... 212
export alarms ....................................................................... 34
F
failed binding listener ......................................................... 212
troubleshooting ........................................................... 212
FAN LED ............................................................................256
field descriptions
maintenance tests ...................................................... 117
TrapListener ................................................................. 80
Field replaceable units, S8510 .......................................... 158
filtering
by CALL ID ................................................................. 129
by user ........................................................................128
deleting a filter ............................................................ 129
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Index
filtering alarms ..................................................................... 33
filtering log harvesting profiles ............................................. 44
Filtering log harvesting requests ..........................................45
filtering logs ..........................................................................57
filtering SNMPv3 user profiles ............................................. 72
filtering target profiles .......................................................... 76
Firefox
disabling proxy servers .................................................30
FnuFile ...............................................................................217
G
generate an alarm ..............................................................154
H
hard disk drive
installing ......................................................................172
LEDs ...........................................................................260
removing .....................................................................171
replacing defective drive .............................................159
troubleshooting ................................................... 261, 262
Hard Disk Drive
equipment required for replacement ...........................158
LED status indicators ..................................................158
hard disk drive replacement ...............................................158
hardware_info ...................................................................... 21
Harvest Archives page ...................................................48, 51
harvested log files; download .............................................. 48
host name resolution failed ................................................213
host name resolution test ...................................................119
hot spare
restoring communication ............................................ 244
hot spare SMART polling failed ......................................... 244
HP DL360 G7 Server .........................................................187
HP DL360 G8 Server .........................................................187
I
installation
testing for System Manager or Session Manager ...... 153
installing R610 server ........................................................ 186
Internet Explorer
disabling proxy servers .................................................29
investigating
Security Module status ............................................... 112
IP address
changing for the Security Module ............................... 141
IP settings
configuring on laptop .................................................... 28
L
LabelFile ............................................................................ 217
laptop
configuring to connect to server ................................... 28
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LEDs
hard disk drive ............................................................ 260
power supply .............................................................. 263
system board .............................................................. 260
LED status indicators .........................................................158
legal notices .............................................................................
light path diagnostics
about ...........................................................................250
using to identify system errors ....................................250
light path diagnostics panel
accessing ....................................................................253
buttons ........................................................................253
checkpoint code ..........................................................253
LEDs ...................................................................254–260
LINK LED ...........................................................................255
log details; view ................................................................... 53
Log Event ID descriptions ..................................................196
log file; search for text ..........................................................46
logging menu options ...........................................................41
Logging page ....................................................................... 53
log harvest; access .............................................................. 41
log harvester ........................................................................ 41
log harvesting profile
create ............................................................................42
log harvesting profile; view details ....................................... 44
log harvesting profiles; filter ................................................. 44
log harvest requests; filter ....................................................45
login and password, CDR .................................................... 63
LOG LED ........................................................................... 255
logs; search ......................................................................... 57
log viewer .............................................................................53
M
maintenance procedures ..................................................... 88
maintenance tests ......................................................117, 118
Test Call Processing status ........................................ 118
Test sanity of Secure Access Link (SAL) agent ......... 119
maintenance tests page
field descriptions .........................................................117
managed bandwidth
viewing usage .............................................................147
Managed Bandwidth Usage ...............................................147
Managed Bandwidth Usage errors .................................... 147
management BSM instance check failure ......................... 214
Management BSM instance failure ....................................214
management instance check failure .................................. 216
Management Instance failure ............................................ 215
management link functionality test .....................................119
managing SNMPv3 user profiles ......................................... 78
managing target profiles ...................................................... 79
managing user profiles ........................................................ 78
manual failback mode ........................................................233
Maximum Backup Files value, changing ............................. 94
MEM LED .......................................................................... 257
memory error ..................................................................... 217
memory failing ................................................................... 217
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Index
memory module air baffle
installing ......................................................................171
removing .....................................................................168
memory modules
equipment required to replace ............................160, 162
installing ......................................................................169
removing .....................................................................168
sequence for populating ............................................. 167
memory modules, adding on the S8510 ............................ 162
memory modules, replacing on the S8510 ........................ 160
MIB ...................................................................................... 81
modifying SNMPv3 user profiles ..........................................70
motherboard voltage issues ...............................................218
multi-bit ECC error ............................................................. 244
Multi-bit ECC error
resolving ..................................................................... 244
N
Network Configuration ....................................................... 218
network connections test ................................................... 120
network firewall critical event ............................................. 219
Network Firewall Pinholing ................................................ 219
network firewall stopped .................................................... 219
New log harvesting profile ................................................... 43
new release upgrades ....................................................... 156
NFS Disk Space
alarms .........................................................................201
NIC bonding .......................................................................115
NMI LED ............................................................................ 258
nodes; remove ................................................................... 102
notices, legal ............................................................................
notifications ........................................................................267
NPR audit logs .....................................................................60
O
operator information panel .................................................251
OVERSPEC LED ...............................................................254
P
PCI LED .............................................................................256
PCNs
viewing ........................................................................267
PCN updates ..................................................................... 267
pending jobs; view ............................................................... 91
Pending Jobs page .............................................................. 91
pg_resetxlog cannot determine valid data ......................... 151
pg_resetxlog command ..................................................... 149
pg_resetxlog won’t start .....................................................151
physical disk Clear operation failed ................................... 242
troubleshooting ........................................................... 243
physical disk initialize failed ............................................... 240
physical disk puncture ....................................................... 243
physical disk rebuild failed ................................................. 240
272
Postgres database corruption ............................................149
postgres database error .....................................................208
Postgres database sanity check failure ............................. 221
Postgres database sanity failure ........................................220
Postgres database sanity test ............................................119
post-installation
changing attributes ..................................................... 141
power supply
installing ......................................................................173
LEDs ...........................................................................263
removing .....................................................................172
troubleshooting ................................................... 263–265
power supply, replacing on the S8510 ...............................161
power supply detected a failure ......................................... 239
troubleshooting ........................................................... 239
power supply malfunction .................................................. 222
power supply overheating ..................................................222
PPM connection problem ...................................................220
ppm log ................................................................................ 59
product notification enrollment ...........................................268
product notifications
e-notifications ............................................................. 268
Profile Criteria View page .................................................... 50
proxy servers
disabling in Firefox ........................................................30
disabling in Internet Explorer ........................................ 29
PS LED .............................................................................. 255
PSNs
viewing ........................................................................267
PSN updates ......................................................................267
R
R610 server installation ..................................................... 186
R610 server removal ......................................................... 185
rack
installing server ...........................................................179
removing server ..........................................................178
RAID battery
installing ......................................................................175
removing .....................................................................174
RAID LED .......................................................................... 260
rebuild completed with errors .............................................241
rebuild failed on source physical disk ................................ 246
rebuild failed on target physical disk ..................................246
record deletion, CDR ........................................................... 65
record transfer, CDR ............................................................63
redundancy down .............................................................. 206
redundancy down alarm .................................................... 206
references ..........................................................................152
registration and subscriptions log file ...................................60
registration component failure storing registration .............223
registration service unavailable ......................................... 224
related documentation ......................................................... 14
remote access ..................................................................... 28
remote SIP logging ............................................................ 132
removing a node ................................................................ 102
Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya Aura® Session Manager
Comments? infodev@avaya.com
March 2015
Index
removing R610 server ....................................................... 185
removing replica node from queue .................................... 103
removing S8510 server ......................................................164
removing S8510 server cover ............................................165
repairing a replica node ..................................................... 101
replacing
defective hard drive .................................................... 159
Dell R610 server .........................................................183
hard disk drive ............................................................ 158
memory modules on the S8510 ..................................160
power supply on the S8510 ........................................ 161
server components ....................................................... 96
replacing S8800 server ......................................................177
replacing server
required equipment and tools ..................................... 177
reusing components ................................................... 176
replacing server with different server .................................187
replica group; remove nodes ............................................. 102
replica group; removing replica node from queue ............. 103
replica groups; view ........................................................... 100
Replica Groups page ......................................................... 104
Replica Nodes page .......................................................... 105
Replication Node Details page .......................................... 107
required
equipment to replace memory modules ............. 160, 162
required equipment ..............................................................19
required equipment to replace a Hard Disk Drive ..............158
requirements
minimum for CDR ......................................................... 62
resolving
bad block table error ...................................................245
multi-bit ECC error ......................................................244
single-bit ECC error .................................................... 245
target rebuild failure ....................................................246
restore data ..........................................................................88
restoring
communication with hot spare .................................... 244
data from a rebuild which completed with errors ........ 242
restoring a system backup from a local server .................... 93
restoring data backup .......................................................... 93
restricted commands ........................................................... 21
Route Through ...................................................................224
running
maintenance tests ...................................................... 118
S
S8000 alarm messages ..................................................... 248
S8510 FRUs ...................................................................... 158
S8510 server cover removal ..............................................165
S8510 server removal ........................................................164
S8510 server upgrade ....................................................... 162
S8800 additional disk .........................................................182
S8800 disk upgrade ...........................................................182
S8800 hardware replacement
S8800 field replaceable hardware .............................. 165
S8800 server, replacing .....................................................177
March 2015
safety ....................................................................... 24, 25, 27
electrical ....................................................................... 25
ESD .............................................................................. 27
inspection ..................................................................... 25
SAL Agent sanity check failure .................................. 224, 225
Schedule Backup page ........................................................89
scheduling a data backup on a local server .........................90
Search Archives page ..........................................................50
searching for alarms ............................................................ 35
searching for a text in a log file ............................................ 46
searching for logs ................................................................ 57
searching logs ......................................................................57
security module, unable to configure ................................. 226
Security Module Multiple DNS Resolutions ....................... 226
troubleshooting ........................................................... 227
Security Module sanity failure
troubleshooting ........................................................... 227
Security Module Sanity Failure .......................................... 227
Security Module status
investigate .................................................................. 112
Security Module Status ......................................................110
security module status page actions ..................................111
Security Module Status page field descriptions ................. 110
security module status test ................................................ 119
security provisions, CDR ..................................................... 65
server
front view .................................................................... 166
installing in rack .......................................................... 179
removing from the rack ...............................................178
replacing ............................................................. 176, 177
server.log ............................................................................. 59
server cover
installing ......................................................................181
removing .....................................................................180
server hardware
events ......................................................................... 237
serviceability agent
activate ......................................................................... 78
serviceability agents list ....................................................... 79
service failure .....................................................................228
Service Pack upgrade ........................................................156
services ports for local access .............................................28
Session Manager
dashboard .....................................................................86
managed bandwidth viewing usage ........................... 147
Session Manager action .................................................... 201
Session Manager Dashboard
field descriptions ...........................................................86
Session Manager Instance Resolution .............................. 228
troubleshooting ........................................................... 228
Session Manager service failure ........................................228
setting up a Call Routing Test ............................................139
severities
alarms ...........................................................................33
shut down/reboot the Session Manager server ................... 95
shutdown or reboot the server
using the CLI ................................................................ 96
Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya Aura® Session Manager
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273
Index
single-bit ECC error ........................................................... 245
no further alerts .......................................................... 245
resolving ..................................................................... 245
SIP
tracing .........................................................................124
SIP Entity Link Monitoring Status ...................................... 122
SIP Firewall Actions ...........................................................229
troubleshooting ........................................................... 230
SIP Firewall Configuration ................................................. 230
troubleshooting ........................................................... 230
SIP FW block flow action summary log ............................. 231
SIP Monitor Alarm ..............................................................231
troubleshooting ........................................................... 231
SIP monitoring
viewing the SIP Monitoring Status Summary page .... 122
SIP Monitoring ................................................................... 121
SIP Tracer Configuration ................................................... 124
SMART configuration change ....................................231, 241
SmsConfigFile ................................................................... 217
SNMP MIB ........................................................................... 81
SNMP support ..................................................................... 68
SNMP target profile
add ................................................................................74
edit ................................................................................75
SNMP target profile; view .................................................... 75
SNMP target profile list ........................................................ 76
SNMP target profiles; delete ................................................76
SNMP target profiles field descriptions ................................77
SNMP traps ......................................................................... 80
SNMP user profile list .......................................................... 72
SNMPv3 user profile; add ....................................................70
SNMPv3 user profile; create ................................................70
SNMPv3 user profile; delete ................................................ 71
SNMPv3 user profile; edit .................................................... 70
SNMPv3 user profile; filter ................................................... 72
SNMPv3 user profile; view ...................................................71
SNMPv3 user profiles
assign ........................................................................... 78
manage .........................................................................78
SNMPv3 user profiles field description ................................ 73
software version string .........................................................19
SP LED .............................................................................. 256
Storage Management
has lost communication .............................................. 242
submitting a request for harvesting log files ........................ 44
subscription authorization failure ....................................... 232
support .................................................................................17
supported servers .............................................................. 157
symmetric.log .......................................................................59
synchronization failure ....................................................... 210
synchronizing System Manager master database and replica
computer database ............................................................ 101
syslog server, secure TCP configuration ........................... 134
syslog server, unsecure UDP ............................................ 132
syslog server requirements (Secure TCP) .........................134
syslog server requirements (UDP) .....................................132
system board
274
LEDs ...........................................................................260
System Manager action ..................................................... 201
system overheated ............................................................ 232
T
target profile; manage ..........................................................79
target profiles
edit ................................................................................75
target profiles; delete ........................................................... 76
target profiles; filter .............................................................. 76
target profiles field descriptions ........................................... 77
target rebuild failure
rebuild failed ............................................................... 246
resolving ..................................................................... 246
temperature dropped below minimum threshold ............... 241
temperature errors ............................................................. 232
temperature exceeded maximum threshold ...................... 241
TEMP LED .........................................................................257
testing
System/Session Managers .........................................153
throttling period .................................................................... 35
trace logs, viewing ............................................................. 130
tracer_asset.log ............................................................. 58, 59
Tracer Configuration page field descriptions ..................... 125
Trace viewer
buttons ........................................................................131
output ..........................................................................130
Trace Viewer ......................................................................130
file options .................................................................. 131
tracing ................................................................................ 124
configuring .................................................................. 128
training ................................................................................. 16
TrapListener .........................................................................80
field descriptions ...........................................................80
Trap listener field description ...............................................80
TrapListener service ............................................................ 80
Traplistener service; alarming UI ......................................... 80
TrapListener service; configure ........................................... 80
troubleshooting .................................................. 212, 213, 240
alarms ...........................................................................40
an uncorrectable media error ..................................... 243
BGI uncorrectable errors ............................................ 246
BSM entity links not administered .............................. 203
CAC Call Denial ..........................................................204
Call Route Test failure ................................................ 140
Certificate Expiration Alarms ...................................... 205
Certificate Status Alarms ............................................ 205
Database Connection Alarms .....................................207
disk Clear failure .........................................................243
Exceeding Location Bandwidth Alarms ...................... 212
failed binding a listener ...............................................212
manual failback mode .................................................233
Postgres database problems ......................................150
power supply failure ....................................................239
Security Module Multiple DNS Resolution Alarms ......227
Security Module sanity failure Alarms ........................ 227
Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya Aura® Session Manager
Comments? infodev@avaya.com
March 2015
Index
troubleshooting (continued)
Session Manager Resolution Alarms ......................... 228
SIP Firewall Actions Alarms ....................................... 230
SIP Firewall Configuration Alarms ..............................230
SIP Monitoring Alarms ................................................231
user failed over ........................................................... 233
user failed over to Branch Survivability Server ...........234
Zone File I/O Alarms ...................................................235
view log details .................................................................... 53
view log harvested files; archive .......................................... 47
view replica groups ............................................................ 100
virtual disk check consistency failed .................................. 240
virtual disk degraded ..........................................................239
troubleshooting ........................................................... 240
virtual disk failed ................................................................ 239
VRM LED ...........................................................................259
U
W
unable to configure security module .................................. 226
uncorrectable media error detected ...................................243
troubleshooting ........................................................... 243
unexpected data ................................................................ 232
unrecoverable disk media error
during rebuild ..............................................................247
upgrading releases ............................................................ 156
upgrading S8510 server .................................................... 162
upgrading service packs .................................................... 156
user data storage sanity test ..............................................120
user failed over .......................................................... 233, 234
user failed over, branch survivability server .......................234
using
CLI to shut down or reboot the server .......................... 96
using, shutdown using GUI
GUI to shut down or reboot the server ......................... 95
reboot using GUI .......................................................... 95
warranty ............................................................................... 18
wrong transport type .......................................................... 211
Z
Zone File I/O ...................................................................... 235
troubleshooting ........................................................... 235
V
verify alarm configuration ...................................................154
version string, software ........................................................19
videos .................................................................................. 17
view backup files ..................................................................93
view contents; log harvested files ........................................ 46
view details; log harvesting request .....................................45
viewing
PCNs .......................................................................... 267
PSNs .......................................................................... 267
SIP Monitoring Status Summary page ....................... 122
trace logs .................................................................... 130
viewing alarms ..................................................................... 33
viewing an SNMP target profile ........................................... 75
viewing an SNMPv3 user profile ..........................................71
viewing details of a log harvesting profile ............................ 44
viewing details of a log harvesting request .......................... 45
viewing harvested log files in an archive ............................. 47
viewing list of backup files ................................................... 93
viewing log details ................................................................53
viewing pending jobs ........................................................... 91
viewing replica groups ....................................................... 100
viewing replica node details ...............................................102
viewing replica nodes in a replica group ............................100
viewing replication details for a replica node ..................... 102
viewing security module status .......................................... 110
viewing the contents of harvested log files .......................... 46
March 2015
Maintaining and Troubleshooting Avaya Aura® Session Manager
Comments? infodev@avaya.com
275
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